WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth field nmr

  1. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  2. NMR at earth's magnetic field using para-hydrogen induced polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamans, Bob C; Andreychenko, Anna; Heerschap, Arend; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Tessari, Marco

    2011-09-01

    A method to achieve NMR of dilute samples in the earth's magnetic field by applying para-hydrogen induced polarization is presented. Maximum achievable polarization enhancements were calculated by numerically simulating the experiment and compared to the experimental results and to the thermal equilibrium in the earth's magnetic field. Simultaneous 19F and 1H NMR detection on a sub-milliliter sample of a fluorinated alkyne at millimolar concentration (∼10(18) nuclear spins) was realized with just one single scan. A highly resolved spectrum with a signal/noise ratio higher than 50:1 was obtained without using an auxiliary magnet or any form of radio frequency shielding.

  3. NMR at earth's magnetic field using para-hydrogen induced polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamans, B.C.; Andreychenko, A.; Heerschap, A.; Wijmenga, S.S.; Tessari, M.

    2011-01-01

    A method to achieve NMR of dilute samples in the earth's magnetic field by applying para-hydrogen induced polarization is presented. Maximum achievable polarization enhancements were calculated by numerically simulating the experiment and compared to the experimental results and to the thermal equil

  4. Use of earth field spin echo NMR to search for liquid minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the spatial, qualitative and quantitative parameters of an underground nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active liquid mineral deposit, including oil and water. A phased array of excitation and receiver antennas on the surface and/or in a borehole excites the NMR active nuclei in the deposit, and using known techniques from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the spatial and quantitative distribution of the deposit can be measured. A surface array may utilize, for example, four large (50-500 diameter) diameter wire loops laid on the ground surface, and a weak (1.5-2.5 kHz) alternating current (AC) field applied, matching the NMR frequency of hydrogen in the rather flat and uniform earth magnetic field. For a short duration (a few seconds) an additional gradient field can be generated, superimposed to the earth field, by applying direct current (DC) to the grid (wire loops), enhancing the position sensitivity of the spin-echo and also suppressing large surface water signals by shifting them to a different frequency. The surface coil excitation can be combined with downhole receivers, which are much more radio-quiet compared to surface receivers, and this combination also enhances the position resolution of the MRI significantly. A downhole receiver module, for example, may have a 5.5 inch diameter and fit in a standard six inch borehole having a one-quarter inch thick stainless steel casing. The receiver module may include more than one receiver units for improved penetration and better position resolution.

  5. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  6. Early non-destructive biofouling detection in spiral wound RO Membranes using a mobile earth's field NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, E.O.

    2015-04-20

    We demonstrate the use of Earth\\'s field (EF) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to provide early non-destructive detection of active biofouling of a commercial spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module. The RO membrane module was actively biofouled to different extents, by the addition of biodegradable nutrients to the feed stream, as revealed by a subtle feed-channel pressure drop increase. Easily accessible EF NMR parameters (signal relaxation parameters T1, T2 and the total NMR signal modified to be sensitive to stagnant fluid only) were measured and analysed in terms of their ability to detect the onset of biofouling. The EF NMR showed that fouling near the membrane module entrance significantly distorted the flow field through the whole membrane module. The total NMR signal is shown to be suitable for non-destructive early biofouling detection of spiral wound membrane modules, it was readily deployed at high (operational) flow rates, was particularly sensitive to flow field changes due to biofouling and could be deployed at any position along the membrane module axis. In addition to providing early fouling detection, the mobile EF NMR apparatus could also be used to (i) evaluate the production process of spiral wound membrane modules, and (ii) provide an in-situ determination of module cleaning process efficiency.

  7. Temperature and field independence of the fluorine and lithium NMR shift tensors in lithium rare-earth tetrafluorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevald, Rolf; Hansen, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    The fluorine and lithium NMR line shifts have been followed in temperature from 300 to 1.3 K and in fields up to 40 kG for LiTbF4 and LiHoF4. The Tb3+ and Ho3+ ionic moments cause these shifts. The Li shifts are dominated by dipole interactions, whereas the F shifts also have transferred hyperfine...... contributions of comparable sizes. The transferred hyperfine interactions turn out to be almost isotropic and exhibiting no temperature or field dependence. In LiHoF4 the line shifts are detectable within the entire temperature range. In LiTbF4 the fluorine and lithium lines broaden to such an extent...

  8. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  10. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  11. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-10-18

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current.

  12. Dynamic pulsed-field-gradient NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Sørland, Geir Humborstad

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with the basics, theory and applications of dynamic pulsed-field-gradient NMR NMR (PFG NMR), this book describes the essential theory behind diffusion in heterogeneous media that can be combined with NMR measurements to extract important information of the system being investigated. This information could be the surface to volume ratio, droplet size distribution in emulsions, brine profiles, fat content in food stuff, permeability/connectivity in porous materials and medical applications currently being developed. Besides theory and applications it will provide the readers with background knowledge on the experimental set-ups, and most important, deal with the pitfalls that are numerously present in work with PFG-NMR. How to analyze the NMR data and some important basic knowledge on the hardware will be explained, too.

  13. Zero-field NMR and NQR spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, A.; Zax, D. B.; Zilm, K. W.; Pines, A.

    1986-03-01

    In comparison to high-field NMR, zero-field techniques offer advantages in terms of spectral interpretability in studies of polycrystalline or amorphous solids. This article describes a technique and apparatus for time-domain measurements of nuclear magnetism in the absence of applied fields (Fourier transform zero-field NMR and NQR). Magnetic field cycling and high field detection are employed to enhance sensitivity. The field cycling is accomplished with an air-driven shuttle system which moves the sample between regions of high and low magnetic field, in combination with switchable electromagnets in the low-field region. Sudden field steps or pulses are used to initiate coherent nuclear spin evolution in zero field and to monitor such evolution as a function of time. Experimental results are shown and analyzed. Possible variations on the basic method are described and their relative advantages are discussed.

  14. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  15. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  16. The earth's gravitational field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    of the tides) have a very small effect on the apparent strength of Earth's gravity, depending on their relative positions; typical variations are 2 µm/s² (0.2 mGal) over the course of a day. Gravity measurements at sea The gravity measurements at sea... quoted as an acceleration, which in SI units is measured in m/s 2 (metres per second per second, equivalently written as m·s −2 ). It has an approximate value of 9.8 m/s 2 , which means that, ignoring air resistance, the speed of an object falling...

  17. Development and applications of NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in low fields and zero field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields.

  19. A mobile one-sided NMR sensor with a homogeneous magnetic field: the NMR-MOLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, B; Coy, A; Dykstra, R; Eccles, C D; Hunter, M W; Parkinson, B J; Callaghan, P T

    2006-11-01

    A new portable NMR sensor with a novel one-sided access magnet design, termed NMR-MOLE (MObile Lateral Explorer), has been characterised in terms of sensitivity and depth penetration. The magnet has been designed to be portable and create a volume with a relatively homogeneous magnetic field, 15,000 ppm over a region from 4 to 16 mm away from the probe, with maximum sensitivity at a depth of 10 mm. The proton NMR frequency is 3.3 MHz. We have demonstrated that with this approach a highly sensitive, portable, unilateral NMR sensor can be built. Such a design is especially suited for the characterisation of liquids in situations where unilateral or portable access is required.

  20. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  1. Charge Penetration Effects in Rare-Earth Crystal Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Interactions, 3. Three-Parameter Theory of Crystal Fields, Harry Diamond Laboratories HDL-TR-1673 (June 1975). 2R. M. Sternheimer , Phys. Rev., 84 (1951...R. M. Sternheimer , Phys. Rev., 84 (1951), 244. (3) R. E. Watson and A. J. Freeman, Phys. Rev., 135 (1964), A1209. (4) D. Sengupta and J. 0. Artman...A RARE-EARTH ION INTO THE CHARGE DI! THE RESULTS ARE CAST INTO A FORM REMINISCENT OF THE STERNHEIMER SHIELDING FA( A PRIME NM(R TO THE NTH POWER) TO

  2. sup 29 Si magic angle spinning NMR spectra of alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, and rare earth metal ion exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Kueijung; Chern, Jeryoung (Tsinghua Univ., Taiwan (China))

    1989-02-23

    The variation of the extraframework cation location in groups IA and IIA metals and rare earth metal (RE) Y zeolites as a function of the dehydration and the rehydration is monitored by {sup 29}Si MAS NMR. Unheated hydrated zeolites give similar {sup 29}Si spectra as they present the similar cation distributions. Upon dehydration a high-field shift is observed which correlates with the distortion of bond angles in silicon-oxygen tetrahedra. The line shapes of {sup 29}Si spectra depend on the nature and the location of the exchangeable cations and the occupancy of the different sites in dehydrated and rehydrated states. The correlation between the line shape of {sup 29}Si spectra and the migration of cations from the supercages to the sodalite cages after heating treatment was studied. The results of {sup 29}Si NMR agree with the known structure data.

  3. Factors Influencing the Earth's Magnetic Field Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kurazhkovskii, A Yu; Klain, B I

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the behavior of an ancient geomagnetic field characteristics (paleointensity and frequency of inversions) and cyclic recurrence of endogenic and cosmogeneous processes which are conceivably connected with radial mantle heat transmission and the Earth rotation speed has been studied. It is shown that endogenic processes affect the behavior of the paleointensity and frequency of inversions. Large basalt effusions identified with plumes are accompanied by the changes in paleointensity (by 30-40)% and the frequency of inversions. Characteristic time intervals of paleointensity variations caused by the formation of plumes makes up 10-20 Ma. The paleointensity varies (by 15-30)% according to phases of the riftogenesis activization and tension - compression cycles. The dependence of geomagnetic field behavior on changes of the Earth rotation speed which occurred as a result of the Earth - Moon - Sun system evolution has been analyzed. Thus, in accordance with phases of the Earth - Moon dista...

  4. NMR Probe as a Field Marker in a Quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1999-01-01

    A study has started to improve the reproducibility of the focusing elements of the SPS for its operation as LHC injector. This note is a copy of the oral presentation to the IMMW11 seminar, which took place at Brookhaven National Laboratory in September 1999. It indicates the feasibility of the creation of a "G-Train" via a NMR probe used as a field marker in a reference quadrupole.

  5. Reversals of the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duene E.

    J.A. Jacobs of Cambridge University has written a concise, authoritative, and up-todate text on reversals of the earth's magnetic field. Chapter 1 is a concise summary of the basic attributes of the geomagnetic field and its behavior in different time frames. It explains spherical harmonic analysis of the field and presents the history of acquisition of the data that best represent the recent field. Lastly, it includes a short summary of the origin and electrodynamics of the magnetic field, outlining the current theoretical basis for its generation.

  6. The Magnetic Field of Planet Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, G.; Finlay, Chris; Constable, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks h...... yr) to the longest (virtually the age of the Earth) time scales are finally reviewed, underlining the respective roles of the magnetohydodynamics at work in the core, and of the slow dynamic evolution of the planet as a whole.......The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks...... observations have been made possible from space, leading to the possibility of observing the Earth’s magnetic field in much more details than was previously possible. The progressive increase in computer power was also crucial, leading to advanced ways of handling and analyzing this considerable corpus of data...

  7. Pulsed field magnetization in rare-earth kagome systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, M. J. R.; Zhou, H. D.; Mun, E.; Harrison, N.

    2016-02-01

    The rare-earth kagome systems R 3Ga5SiO14 (R  =  Nd or Pr) exhibit cooperative paramagnetism at low temperatures. Evidence for correlated spin clusters in these weakly frustrated systems has previously been obtained from neutron scattering and from ESR and NMR results. The present pulsed field (0-60 T, 25 ms) magnetization measurements made on single crystals of Nd3Ga5SiO14 (NGS) and Pr3Ga5SiO14 (PGS) at temperatures down to 450 mK have revealed striking differences in the magnetic responses of the two materials. For NGS the magnetization shows a low field plateau, saturation in high transient fields, and significant hysteresis while the PGS magnetization does not saturate in transient fields up to 60 T and shows no hysteresis or plateaus. Nd3+ is a Kramers ion while Pr3+ is a non-Kramers ion and the crystal field effects are quite different in the two systems. For the conditions used in the experiments the magnetization behavior is not in agreement with Heisenberg model predictions for kagome systems in which easy-axis anisotropy is much larger than the exchange coupling. The extremely slow spin dynamics found below 4 K in NGS is, however, consistent with the model for Kramers ions and provides a basis for explaining the pulsed field magnetization features.

  8. Pulsed field magnetization in rare-earth kagome systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, M J R; Zhou, H D; Mun, E; Harrison, N

    2016-02-03

    The rare-earth kagome systems R 3Ga5SiO14 (R  =  Nd or Pr) exhibit cooperative paramagnetism at low temperatures. Evidence for correlated spin clusters in these weakly frustrated systems has previously been obtained from neutron scattering and from ESR and NMR results. The present pulsed field (0-60 T, 25 ms) magnetization measurements made on single crystals of Nd3Ga5SiO14 (NGS) and Pr3Ga5SiO14 (PGS) at temperatures down to 450 mK have revealed striking differences in the magnetic responses of the two materials. For NGS the magnetization shows a low field plateau, saturation in high transient fields, and significant hysteresis while the PGS magnetization does not saturate in transient fields up to 60 T and shows no hysteresis or plateaus. Nd(3+) is a Kramers ion while Pr(3+) is a non-Kramers ion and the crystal field effects are quite different in the two systems. For the conditions used in the experiments the magnetization behavior is not in agreement with Heisenberg model predictions for kagome systems in which easy-axis anisotropy is much larger than the exchange coupling. The extremely slow spin dynamics found below 4 K in NGS is, however, consistent with the model for Kramers ions and provides a basis for explaining the pulsed field magnetization features.

  9. Factors Influencing the Earth's Magnetic Field Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Kurazhkovskii, A. Yu.; Kurazhkovskaya, N. A.; Klain, B. I.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the behavior of an ancient geomagnetic field characteristics (paleointensity and frequency of inversions) and cyclic recurrence of endogenic and cosmogeneous processes which are conceivably connected with radial mantle heat transmission and the Earth rotation speed has been studied. It is shown that endogenic processes affect the behavior of the paleointensity and frequency of inversions. Large basalt effusions identified with plumes are accompanied by the changes in ...

  10. Dartmouth College Earth Sciences Mobile Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E. E.; Osterberg, E. C.; Dade, W. B.; Sonder, L. J.; Renshaw, C. E.; Kelly, M. A.; Hawley, R. L.; Chipman, J. W.; Mikucki, J.; Posmentier, E. S.; Moore, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    For the last 50 years the Department of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College has offered a term-long, undergraduate field program, informally called "the Stretch". A student typically enrolls during fall quarter of his or her junior year soon after choosing a major or minor. The program thus provides valuable field context for courses that a student will take during the remainder of his or her undergraduate career. Unlike many traditional field camps that focus on one particular region, the Stretch is a mobile program that currently travels through Western North America, from the Canadian Rockies to the Grand Canyon. The program spans two and a half months, during which time undergraduates, graduate TAs, and faculty live, work, and learn collaboratively. Dartmouth College faculty members sequentially teach individual 1- to 2-week segments that focus on their interests and expertise; currently, there are a total of eight segments led by eleven faculty members. Consequently, topics are diverse and include economic geology, geobiology, geomorphology, glaciology, glacial geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, paleontology, stratigraphy, structure and tectonics, and volcanology. The field localities are equally varied, including the alpine glaciers of western Alberta, the national parks of Montana, Wyoming and Utah, the eastern Sierra Nevada, the southern Great Basin, and highlight such classic geological field locales as Sheep Mountain in Wyoming's Bighorn Basin, Death Valley, and the Grand Canyon. Overall, the program aims to: 1) give students a broad perspective on the timing and nature of the processes that resulted in the landscape and underlying geology of western North America; and 2) introduce students to a wide variety of geological environments, field techniques, and research equipment. Students emerge from the program with wide-ranging exposure to active research questions as well as a working knowledge of core field skills in the earth sciences. Stretch students

  11. Determination of herb authenticity by low-field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preto, M S M; Tavares, M I B; Sebastião, P J O; Azeredo, R B V

    2013-02-15

    The safe use of herbal medicines requires prior authentication of the raw materials used to make them. This is an important step, since the ingestion of herbal preparations or extracts can cause serious health problems. Among the different analytical techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and therefore suitable for the characterization of natural products such as medicinal plants. This work presents a characterisation study of the samples of the popular plant Maytenus ilicifolia, obtained from different commercial producers. This plant is used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, as it possesses antitumorigenic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The differences in the chemical structure and molecular organisation detected by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) were also investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry, in particular by fast field cycling (FFC) relaxometry, and relaxometry in the rotating frame. All results confirmed the similarity between the control sample and only one of the plant investigated. The differences detected between the samples could be related to their non-authenticity, due to the non recognise the plant due to the leaves similarity among plants from the same family and/or contamination, due to addition of similar other plants parts to the commercial ones, as they are mixed together this difficulties the acceptation of the plant.

  12. NMR in High Fields and Field Gradients up to 42 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Eric E.

    2002-03-01

    We describe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed in fields as high as 42 T. This work was done at Northwestern University and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) with superconducting magnets, resistive Bitter-style electromagnets, and a superconducting-resistive hybrid magnet. After reviewing crucial probe and spectrometer design features, we describe the scientific and technical advantages that high field provides for two experiments. First, we studied the mixed state of the high-temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x through ^17O NMR.[1] The NMR spectrum gives the field distribution associated with vortices which we use to selectively inspect regions inside and outside the vortex core. We use the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T_1-1) to probe the electronic density-of-states in this spatially resolved fashion. Second, we have studied ultraslow diffusion in glass-forming liquids such as glycerol. These studies use the high magnetic field gradient at the edge of the solenoid, which can exceed 200 T/m for the resistive magnets at the NHMFL. We employed a 4 K inductive shield to stabilize the fluctuations in the resistive magnets' applied field over the necessarily long timescales of a slow diffusion NMR experiment. We have also made use of fast frequency jumping to enhance signal-to-noise by circumventing the finite spatial excitation bandwidth imposed by the large gradient. We show NMR experiments of slow diffusion in glass-formers up to high field (H0 = 21 T, G = 220 T/m) that have resolved diffusivities as low as 10-10 cm^2/s. [1] V. F. Mitrovic et.al., Nature 413, 501-504 (2001).

  13. NMR system and method having a permanent magnet providing a rotating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, Ross D [Berkeley, CA; Budinger, Thomas F [Berkeley, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a rotating magnetic field. The rotating magnetic field can be used to obtain rotating-field NMR spectra, such as magic angle spinning spectra, without having to physically rotate the sample. This result allows magic angle spinning NMR to be conducted on biological samples such as live animals, including humans.

  14. Navigation: bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J; Cochran, William W; Wikelski, Martin

    2006-12-07

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation, but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances. Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark.

  15. Navigation: Bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Richard A.; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation 1 , but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances 2 . Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting...... the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark....

  16. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Smith, Pieter E. S. [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  17. Permanent Magnet with Very Low Field Gradient (0.1G/mm) for NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Ognjen; Issadore, David; Hunt, Tom; Westervelt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for obtaining chemical, physical and structural information. To produce the uniform fields required, NMR experiments typically employ large, expensive electromagnets and shimming coils. We have developed a small permanent magnet with an iron yoke that produces a field of ˜10 kG with gradient CCNE.

  18. NMR, MRI, and spectroscopic MRI in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, Vasiliki; Pines, Alexander; Martin, Rachel W; Franck, John; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-24

    A method for locally creating effectively homogeneous or "clean" magnetic field gradients (of high uniformity) for imaging (with NMR, MRI, or spectroscopic MRI) both in in-situ and ex-situ systems with high degrees of inhomogeneous field strength. THe method of imaging comprises: a) providing a functional approximation of an inhomogeneous static magnetic field strength B.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}) at a spatial position {right arrow over (r)}; b) providing a temporal functional approximation of {right arrow over (G)}.sub.shim(t) with i basis functions and j variables for each basis function, resulting in v.sub.ij variables; c) providing a measured value .OMEGA., which is an temporally accumulated dephasing due to the inhomogeneities of B.sub.0({right arrow over(r)}); and d) minimizing a difference in the local dephasing angle .phi.({right arrow over (r)},t)=.gamma..intg..sub.0.sup.t{square root over (|{right arrow over (B)}.sub.1({right arrow over (r)},t')|.sup.2+({right arrow over (r)}{right arrow over (G)}.sub.shimG.sub.shim(t')+.parallel.{right arrow over (B)}.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}).parallel..DELTA..omega.({right arrow over (r)},t'/.gamma/).sup.2)}dt'-.OMEGA. by varying the v.sub.ij variables to form a set of minimized v.sub.ij variables. The method requires calibration of the static fields prior to minimization, but may thereafter be implemented without such calibration, may be used in open or closed systems, and potentially portable systems.

  19. Direct imaging of rf waveguide modes via ultra-high field NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Tonyushkin, A; Van de Moortele, P -F; Adriany, G; Kiruluta, A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimental method for direct 2D and 3D imaging of magnetic rf field distribution in metal waveguides based on traveling wave (TW) nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging at ultra-high field (>7T). The typical apparatus would include an ultra-high field whole body or small bore NMR scanner, waveguide elements filled with NMR active dielectrics with predefined electric and magnetic properties, and TW rf transmit-receive probes. We validated the technique by obtaining TW magnetic-resonance (MR) images of the magnetic field distribution of the rf modes of circular waveguide filled with deionized water in a 16.4 T small-bore NMR scanner and compared the MR images with numerical simulations. Our NMR technique opens up a practical way of imaging of previously inaccessible rf field distribution of modes inside of various shapes metal waveguides with inserted dielectric objects, including waveguide mode converters and transformers.

  20. Sensitization of a stray-field NMR to vibrations: a potential for MR elastometry with a portable NMR sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Barnhill, Marie

    2014-11-01

    An NMR signal from a sample in a constant stray field of a portable NMR sensor is sensitized to vibrations. The CPMG sequence is synchronized to vibrations so that the constant gradient becomes an "effective" square-wave gradient, leading to the vibration-induced phase accumulation. The integrating nature of the spot measurement, combined with the phase distribution due to a non-uniform gradient and/or a wave field, leads to a destructive interference, the drop in the signal intensity and changes in the echo train shape. Vibrations with amplitudes as small as 140 nm were reliably detected with the permanent gradient of 12.4 T/m. The signal intensity depends on the phase offset between the vibrations and the pulse sequence. This approach opens the way for performing elastometry and micro-rheology measurements with portable NMR devices beyond the walls of a laboratory. Even without synchronization, if a vibration frequency is comparable to 1/2TE of the CPMG sequence, the signal can be severely affected, making it important for potential industrial applications of stray-field NMR.

  1. Ab Initio Calculation of 19F NMR Chemical Shielding for Alkaline-earth-metal Fluorides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI,Shu-Hui(蔡淑惠); CHEN,Zhong,(陈忠); LU,Xin(吕鑫); CHEN,Zhi-Wei(陈志伟); WAN,Hui-Lin(万惠霖)

    2001-01-01

    Gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method atHartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFr) lev-els,respectively,was employed to calculate 19F NMR chemi-cal shieldings of solid state alkaline-earth-metal fluorides MF2 (M = Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba).The results show that,although thecalculated19F chemical shieldings tend to be larger than the experinental values,they have a fairly good linear relation-ship with the observed ones.The calculated results based on different combinations of basis sets show that the B3LYP (ahybrid of DFT with HF) predictions are greatly superior tothe I-IF predictions.When a basis set of metal atom with ef- fecfive core potential (ECP) has well representation of valencewavefunction,especially wavefuncfion of d component,andproper definition of core electron nmnher,it can be applied toobtain 19F chemical shielding which is dose to that of all-elec-tron calculation.Tne variation of 19F chemical shielding of al-kaline-earth-metal fluorides correlates well with the latticefactor A/R2.``

  2. Monitoring the Earth's Dynamic Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Applegate, David; Townshend, John B.

    2008-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey's Geomagnetism Program is to monitor the Earth's magnetic field. Using ground-based observatories, the Program provides continuous records of magnetic field variations covering long timescales; disseminates magnetic data to various governmental, academic, and private institutions; and conducts research into the nature of geomagnetic variations for purposes of scientific understanding and hazard mitigation. The program is an integral part of the U.S. Government's National Space Weather Program (NSWP), which also includes programs in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSWP works to provide timely, accurate, and reliable space weather warnings, observations, specifications, and forecasts, and its work is important for the U.S. economy and national security. Please visit the National Geomagnetism Program?s website, http://geomag.usgs.gov, where you can learn more about the Program and the science of geomagnetism. You can find additional related information at the Intermagnet website, http://www.intermagnet.org.

  3. Derivation and evaluation of the fourth moment of NMR lineshape in zero-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Kahol, Pawan K

    2008-10-01

    An expression for the fourth moment in zero-field NMR has been analytically derived and numerically evaluated for a rigid cubic lattice. Model simulations have been performed to calculate the second moment, the fourth moment, the ratio of the fourth moment to the square of the second moment, and the width of the resonance line for a crystal and a polycrystalline material in high-field as well as in zero-field NMR. The simulation results allow us to draw two conclusions: (1) zero-field NMR gives sharper and better defined spectra than the high-field NMR and (2) the ratio of the high- to zero-field resonance line-widths is 4 for a crystal, whereas it is 11 for a polycrystalline material.

  4. Measuring the Earth's Magnetic Field in a Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartacci, A.; Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the Earth's magnetic field are described. In the former, according to Gauss, the Earth's magnetic field is compared with that of a permanent magnet; in the latter, a well-known method, the comparison is made with the magnetic field generated by a current. As all the used instruments are available off the shelf, both…

  5. NMR Field regulation with the PT2026 Teslameter and the RCS Magnet in Building 287

    CERN Document Server

    Patz, Evan; King, Quentin; CERN. Geneva. TE Department

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2016, the TE-EPC group collaborated with Metrolab Technology SA on a project to regulate magnetic field using a new PT2026 NMR teslameter. Tests using a PT2026 NMR teslameter and the results are presented in this paper.

  6. Ultrahigh Field NMR and MRI: Science at a Crossroads Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polenova, Tatyana [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Budinger, Thomas F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The workshop “Ultrahigh Field NMR and MRI: Science at Crossroads”, initiated by the scientific community and supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the National Institutes of Health, took place on November 12-13, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, on the NIH campus. The meeting was held to assess the science drivers, technological challenges, prospects for achieving field strengths for NMR and MRI nearly double their current value, and strategies on how to provide ultrahigh field NMR/MRI capabilities to a national user community.

  7. Field-cycling-NMR: A new magnet design for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plendl, Dirk; Privalov, Alexei F.; Fujara, Franz [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Field-cycling-NMR is an established method for the investigation of field dependent spin phenomena, like relaxation dispersion, polarization transfer, enhanced NQR etc. In contrast to normal NMR, the magnetic field in a field-cycling experiment is switched between several distinct levels within milliseconds. This can only be achieved with specially designed, low inductive magnets. Today, nearly all FC-spectrometers utilize air core coils made of copper or silver. Producing strong magnetic fields with normal-conducting magnets results in a large energy dissipation (tens of kW) so that the maximum field strength is limited by the amount of heat that can be extracted by the cooling system. We present a new magnet design for fast field-cycling-NMR which uses a magnet with an iron core for field amplification, thus generating the same field with significantly reduced energy consumption and system complexity.

  8. Swarm: A constellation to study the Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Luhr, H.; Hulot, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Swarm mission was selected as the 5th mission in ESA's Earth Explorer Programme in 2004. The mission will provide the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution that will lead to new insights into the Earth system by improving our understanding of the Earth's interior...... and its effect on Geospace, the vast region around the Earth where electrodynamic processes are influenced by the Earth's magnetic field. Scheduled for launch in 2010, the mission will comprise a constellation of three satellites, with two spacecraft flying side-by-side at lower attitude (450 km initial...... field measurements, will provide the necessary observations that are required to separate and model the various Sources of the geomagnetic field. This results in it unique "view" inside the Earth from space to study the composition and processes of its interior. It also allows analysing the Sun...

  9. Aristoteles - An ESA mission to study the earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeck, K.

    In preparing for its first Solid-Earth Program, ESA has studied a satellite concept for a mission dedicated to the precise determination of the earth's geopotential (gravitational and magnetic) fields. Data from such a mission are expected to make substantial contributions to a number of research and applications fields in solid-earth geophysics, oceanography and global-change monitoring. The impact of a high-resolution gravity-field mission on studies of the various earth-science problems is assessed. The current state of our knowledge in this area is discussed and the ability of low-orbit satellite gradiometry to contribute to their solution is demonstrated.

  10. Ultralow field NMR spectrometer with an atomic magnetometer near room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guobin; Li, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xianping; Feng, Jiwen; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2013-12-01

    We present a Cs atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of 150fT/Hz(1/2) operating near room temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of 125μL tap water was detected at an ultralow magnetic field down to 47nT, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the NMR signal approaching 50 after eight averages. Relaxivity experiments with a Gd(DTPA) contrast agent in zero field were performed, in order to show the magnetometer's ability to measure spin-lattice relaxation time with high accuracy. This demonstrates the feasibility of an ultralow field NMR spectrometer based on a Cs atomic magnetometer, which has a low working temperature, short data acquisition time and high sensitivity. This kind of NMR spectrometer has great potential in applications such as chemical analysis and magnetic relaxometry detection in ultralow or zero fields.

  11. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  12. Guar gum/borax hydrogel: Rheological, low field NMR and release characterizations

    OpenAIRE

    Grassi, M; T. Coviello; Matricardi, P; Alhaique, F.; Farra, R; G. Tesei; S. Fiorentino; F. Asaro; Milcovich, G.

    2013-01-01

    Guar gum (GG) and Guar gum/borax (GGb) hydrogels are studied by means of rheology, Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF NMR) and model drug release tests. These three approaches are used to estimate the mesh size (ζ) of the polymeric network. A comparison with similar Scleroglucan systems is carried out. In the case of GGb, the rheological and Low Field NMR estimations of ζ lead to comparable results, while the drug release approach seems to underestimate ζ. Such discrepanc...

  13. Self-diffusion imaging by spin echo in Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohoric, A; Stepisnik, J; Kos, M; Planinsi

    1999-01-01

    The NMR of the Earth's magnetic field is used for diffusion-weighted imaging of phantoms. Due to a weak Larmor field, care needs to be taken regarding the use of the usual high field assumption in calculating the effect of the applied inhomogeneous magnetic field. The usual definition of the magnetic field gradient must be replaced by a generalized formula valid when the strength of a nonuniform magnetic field and a Larmor field are comparable (J. Stepisnik, Z. Phys. Chem. 190, 51-62 (1995)). It turns out that the expression for spin echo attenuation is identical to the well-known Torrey formula only when the applied nonuniform field has a proper symmetry. This kind of problem may occur in a strong Larmor field as well as when the slow diffusion rate of particles needs an extremely strong gradient to be applied. The measurements of the geomagnetic field NMR demonstrate the usefulness of the method for diffusion and flow-weighted imaging.

  14. Dry-cured ham tissue characterization by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry and quantitative magnetization transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajd, Franci; Gradišek, Anton; Apih, Tomaž; Serša, Igor

    2016-05-31

    Fast field cycling (FFC) and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) NMR methods are two powerful tools in NMR analysis of biological tissues. The qMT method is well established in biomedical NMR applications, while the FFC method is often used in investigations of molecular dynamics on which longitudinal NMR relaxation times of the investigated material critically depend. Despite their proven analytical potential, these two methods were rarely used in NMR studies of food, especially when combined together. In our study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a combined FFC/qMT-NMR approach for the fast and nondestructive characterization of dry-curing ham tissues differing by protein content. The characterization is based on quantifying the pure quadrupolar peak area (area under the quadrupolar contribution of dispersion curve obtained by FFC-NMR) and the restricted magnetization pool size (obtained by qMT-NMR). Both quantities correlate well with concentration of partially immobilized, nitrogen-containing and proton magnetization exchanging muscle proteins. Therefore, these two quantities could serve as potential markers for dry-curing process monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  16. NMR studies of field induced magnetism in CeCoIn5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Matthias [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Curro, Nicholas J [UC/DAVIS; Young, Ben - Li [NATIONAL CHIAO TUNG UNIV; Urbano, Ricardo R [FLORIDA STATE UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Recent Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and elastic neutron scattering experiments have revealed conclusively the presence of static incommensurate magnetism in the field-induced B phase of CeCoIns, We analyze the NMR data assuming the hyperfine coupling to the 1n(2) nuclei is anisotropic and simulate the spectra for several different magnetic structures, The NMR data are consistent with ordered Ce moments along the [001] direction, but are relatively insensitive to the direction of the incommensurate wavevector.

  17. Solar wind induced magnetic field around the unmagnetized Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Birk, G T; Konz, C

    2004-01-01

    The Earth is a planet with a dipolar magnetic field which is agitated by a magnetized plasma wind streaming from the Sun. The magnetic field shields the Earth's surface from penetrating high energy solar wind particles, as well as interstellar cosmic rays. The magnetic dipole has reversed sign some hundreds of times over the last 400 million years. These polarity reversals correspond to drastic breakdowns of the dynamo action. The question arises what the consequences for the Earth's atmosphere, climate, and, in particular, biosphere are. It is shown by kinematic estimates and three-dimensional plasma-neutral gas simulations that the solar wind can induce very fast a magnetic field in the previously completely unmagnetized Earth's ionosphere that is strong enough to protect Earth from cosmic radiations comparable to the case of an intact magnetic dynamo.

  18. 27 Al MAS NMR Studies of HBEA Zeolite at Low to High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wan, Chuan; Vjunov, Aleksei; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Zhenchao; Hu, Mary Y.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-06-01

    27Al single pulse (SP) MAS NMR spectra of HBEA zeolites with high Si/Al ratios of 71 and 75 were obtained at three magnetic field strengths of 7.05, 11.75 and 19.97 T. High field 27Al MAS NMR spectra acquired at 19.97 T show significantly improved spectral resolution, resulting in at least two well-resolved tetrahedral-Al NMR peaks. Based on the results obtained from 27Al MAS and MQMAS NMR acquired at 19.97 T, four different quadrupole peaks are used to deconvolute the 27Al SP MAS spectra acquired at vari-ous fields by using the same set of quadrupole coupling constants, asymmetric parameters and relative integrated peak intensities for the tetrahedral Al peaks. The line shapes of individual peaks change from typical quadrupole line shape at low field to essentially symmetrical line shapes at high field. We demonstrate that for fully hydrated HBEA zeolites the effect of second order quadrupole interaction can be ignored and quantitative spectral analysis can be performed by directly fitting the high field spectra using mixed Gaussian/Lorentzian line shapes. Also, the analytical steps described in our work allow direct assignment of spectral intensity to individual Al tetrahedral sites (T-sites) of zeolite HBEA. Finally, the proposed concept is suggested generally applicable to other zeo-lite framework types, thus, allowing a direct probing of Al distributions by NMR spectroscopic methods in zeolites with high confi-dence.

  19. Spacecraft attitude determination using the earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, David G.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented by which the attitude of a low-Earth orbiting spacecraft may be determined using a vector magnetometer, a digital Sun sensor, and a mathematical model of the Earth's magnetic field. The method is currently being implemented for the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (as a backup for the failing star trackers) as a way to determine roll gyro drift.

  20. Multiplets at zero magnetic field: the geometry of zero-field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Mark C; Ledbetter, Micah P; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John W; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2013-05-14

    For liquid samples at Earth's field or below, nuclear-spin motion within scalar-coupled networks yields multiplets as a spectroscopic signature. In weak fields, the structure of the multiplets depends on the magnitude of the Zeeman interaction relative to the scalar couplings; in Earth's field, for example, heteronuclear couplings are truncated by fast precession at distinct Larmor frequencies. At zero field, weak scalar couplings are truncated by the relatively fast evolution associated with strong scalar couplings, and the truncated interactions can be described geometrically. When the spin system contains a strongly coupled subsystem A, an average over the fast evolution occurring within the subsystem projects each strongly coupled spin onto FA, the summed angular momentum of the spins in A. Weakly coupled spins effectively interact with FA, and the coupling constants for the truncated interactions are found by evaluating projections. We provide a formal description of zero-field spin systems with truncated scalar couplings while also emphasizing visualization based on a geometric model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental spectra that exhibit second-order shifts and splittings.

  1. Multiplets at zero magnetic field: The geometry of zero-field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Mark C.; Ledbetter, Micah P.; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John W.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    For liquid samples at Earth's field or below, nuclear-spin motion within scalar-coupled networks yields multiplets as a spectroscopic signature. In weak fields, the structure of the multiplets depends on the magnitude of the Zeeman interaction relative to the scalar couplings; in Earth's field, for example, heteronuclear couplings are truncated by fast precession at distinct Larmor frequencies. At zero field, weak scalar couplings are truncated by the relatively fast evolution associated with strong scalar couplings, and the truncated interactions can be described geometrically. When the spin system contains a strongly coupled subsystem A, an average over the fast evolution occurring within the subsystem projects each strongly coupled spin onto FA, the summed angular momentum of the spins in A. Weakly coupled spins effectively interact with FA, and the coupling constants for the truncated interactions are found by evaluating projections. We provide a formal description of zero-field spin systems with truncated scalar couplings while also emphasizing visualization based on a geometric model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental spectra that exhibit second-order shifts and splittings.

  2. Magnetic Fields Induced in the Solid Earth and Oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, Alexei; Olsen, Nils

    Electromagnetic induction in the Earth's interior is an important contributor to the near-Earth magnetic field. Oceans play a special role in the induction, due to their relatively high conductance of large lateral variability. Electric currents that generate secondary magnetic fields are induced...... ocean circulation. Finally, we will discuss how the results of 3-D predictions can be utilized in geomagnetic field modeling and in a recovery of deep conductivity structures.......Electromagnetic induction in the Earth's interior is an important contributor to the near-Earth magnetic field. Oceans play a special role in the induction, due to their relatively high conductance of large lateral variability. Electric currents that generate secondary magnetic fields are induced...... in the oceans by two different sources: by time varying external magnetic fields, and by motion of the conducting ocean water through the Earth's main magnetic field. Significant progress in the accurate and detailed prediction of magnetic fields induced by these sources has been achieved during the last years...

  3. Magnetic Fields Induced in the Solid Earth and Oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, Alexei; Olsen, Nils

    Electromagnetic induction in the Earth's interior is an important contributor to the near-Earth magnetic field. Oceans play a special role in the induction, due to their relatively high conductance of large lateral variability. Electric currents that generate secondary magnetic fields are induced...... in the oceans by two different sources: by time varying external magnetic fields, and by motion of the conducting ocean water through the Earth's main magnetic field. Significant progress in the accurate and detailed prediction of magnetic fields induced by these sources has been achieved during the last years......, utilizing realistic 3-D conductivity models of the oceans, crust and mantle. In addition to these improvements in the prediction of 3-D induction effects, much attention has been paid to identifying magnetic signals of oceanic origin in observatory and satellite data. During the talk we will present...

  4. Core Processes: Earth's eccentric magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause.......Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause....

  5. Interaction of ferulic acid derivatives with human erythrocytes monitored by pulse field gradient NMR diffusion and NMR relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Bernardi, Francesca; Centini, Marisanna; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2005-04-01

    Ferulic acid (Fer), a natural anti-oxidant and chemo-protector, is able to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in the forestomach, lungs, skin, tongue and colon. Several Fer derivatives have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention, being the biological activity related also to the capacity of partitioning between aqueous and lipid phases. In the present work, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurement and NMR relaxation rates have been adopted for investigating the interaction of three Fer derivatives (Fer-C11, Fer-C12 and Fer-C13) with human erythrocytes. Binding to the erythrocyte membrane has been shown for all derivatives, which displayed a similar interaction mode such that the aromatic moiety and the terminal part of the alkyl chain were the most affected. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion coefficients was used to show that Fer-C12 and Fer-C13 display higher affinity for the cell membrane when compared with Fer-C11. These findings agree with the higher anti-oxidant activity of the two derivatives.

  6. A Field Study of NMR Logging to Quantify Petroleum Contamination in Subsurface Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are directly sensitive to hydrogen-bearing fluids including water and petroleum products. NMR logging tools can be used to detect and quantify petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the sediments surrounding a well or borehole. An advantage of the NMR method is that data can be collected in both cased and uncased holes. In order to estimate the volume of in-situ hydrocarbon, there must be sufficient contrast between either the relaxation times (T2) or the diffusion coefficients (D) of water and the contaminant. In a field study conducted in Pine Ridge, South Dakota, NMR logging measurements were used to investigate an area of hydrocarbon contamination from leaking underground storage tanks. A contaminant sample recovered from a monitoring well at the site was found to be consistent with a mixture of gasoline and diesel fuel. NMR measurements were collected in two PVC-cased monitoring wells; D and T2 measurements were used together to detect and quantify contaminant in the sediments above and below the water table at both of the wells. While the contrast in D between the fluids was found to be inadequate for fluid typing, the T2 contrast between the contaminant and water in silt enabled the estimation of the water and contaminant volumes. This study shows that NMR logging can be used to detect and quantify in-situ contamination, but also highlights the importance of sediment and contaminant properties that lead to a sufficiently large contrast in T2 or D.

  7. Molecular MRI in the Earth's Magnetic Field Using Continuous Hyperpolarization of a Biomolecule in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovedo, Philipp; Knecht, Stephan; Bäumlisberger, Tim; Cremer, Anna Lena; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Gary G R; Burns, Michael; Rayner, Peter J; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; Pütz, Gerhard; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-06-30

    In this work, we illustrate a method to continuously hyperpolarize a biomolecule, nicotinamide, in water using parahydrogen and signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE). Building on the preparation procedure described recently by Truong et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. B , 2014 , 118 , 13882 - 13889 ], aqueous solutions of nicotinamide and an Ir-IMes catalyst were prepared for low-field NMR and MRI. The (1)H-polarization was continuously renewed and monitored by NMR experiments at 5.9 mT for more than 1000 s. The polarization achieved corresponds to that induced by a 46 T magnet (P = 1.6 × 10(-4)) or an enhancement of 10(4). The polarization persisted, although reduced, if cell culture medium (DPBS with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) or human cells (HL-60) were added, but was no longer observable after the addition of human blood. Using a portable MRI unit, fast (1)H-MRI was enabled by cycling the magnetic field between 5 mT and the Earth's field for hyperpolarization and imaging, respectively. A model describing the underlying spin physics was developed that revealed a polarization pattern depending on both contact time and magnetic field. Furthermore, the model predicts an opposite phase of the dihydrogen and substrate signal after one exchange, which is likely to result in the cancelation of some signal at low field.

  8. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  9. The B-dot Earth Average Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capo-Lugo, Pedro A.; Rakoczy, John; Sanders, Devon

    2013-01-01

    The average Earth's magnetic field is solved with complex mathematical models based on mean square integral. Depending on the selection of the Earth magnetic model, the average Earth's magnetic field can have different solutions. This paper presents a simple technique that takes advantage of the damping effects of the b-dot controller and is not dependent of the Earth magnetic model; but it is dependent on the magnetic torquers of the satellite which is not taken into consideration in the known mathematical models. Also the solution of this new technique can be implemented so easily that the flight software can be updated during flight, and the control system can have current gains for the magnetic torquers. Finally, this technique is verified and validated using flight data from a satellite that it has been in orbit for three years.

  10. Emission Properties, Solubility, Thermodynamic Analysis and NMR Studies of Rare-Earth Complexes with Two Different Phosphine Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Iwanaga

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes novel molecular designs for rare-earth complexes involving the introduction of two different phosphine oxide structures into one rare-earth ion. These designs are effective for improving solubility and emission intensity. Additionally, the complexes are indispensable for realizing high performances in LEDs and security media. The thermodynamic properties of Eu(III complexes are correlated with the solubility. Correlations between coordination structures and emission intensity were explained by NMR analysis. The luminous flux of red LED devices with Eu(III complexes is very high (20 mA, 870 m lumen. A new white LED has its largest spectra intensity in the red region and a human look much more vividly under this light.

  11. Characteristics of the magnetic field distribution on compact NMR magnets using cryocooled HTS bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takano, R.; Nakano, T.; Imai, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hahn, S.Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, MIT, NW14-3117, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the performance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved rapidly. So, various applications using HTS bulks such as motors, bearings and flywheels have been investigated by many research groups. A compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of the HTS bulk more than 11.7 T (500 MHz {sup 1}H NMR frequency) has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is cost-effective compared with conventional NMR magnets and then expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of the compact NMR magnets, spatial field homogeneity of the large trapped magnetic field in HTS bulk annuli is a crucial issue because the behavior of a trapped field is highly non-linear and, as a result, a technique to improve the field homogeneity such as active/passive shimming now becomes more challenging compared with that of the conventional counterparts. This paper presents the magnetic field distributions in single and three assembled HTS bulk annuli measured by a 3-axis and multi-arrayed Hall sensor under two different cryogenic environments: (1) in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) and (2) dry cooling by a cryocooler. The spatial homogeneity changes with various operating temperatures were investigated and the effect of critical current density enhancement by lowering the operating temperature on the field homogeneity improvement was discussed in detail.

  12. 23Na and 1H NMR Relaxometry of Shale at High Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Donghan

    2016-01-01

    Formation evaluation of unconventional reservoirs is challenging due to the coexistence of different phases such as kerogen, bitumen, movable and bound light hydrocarbon and water. Current low-frequency (0.05 T) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) laboratory and logging methods are incapable of quantitatively separating the different phases. We demonstrate the utility of high-field (9 T) NMR 2D T1-T2 measurements for separating hydrocarbon and the clay-interacting aqueous phases in shale based on the difference in the frequency dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time. Furthermore, we demonstrate 23Na NMR as a promising complementary technique to conventional 1H NMR for shale fluid typing, taking advantage of the fact that sodium ions are only present in the aqueous phase. We validate high-field (9 T) 23Na-1H NMR relaxometry for assessing brine-filled porosity and brine salinity in various porous materials, including porous glass, conventional rocks, clays, and shale, and apply it for differentiating hydro...

  13. Modeling of Earth's Gravity Fields Visualization Based on Quad Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhicai; LI Zhenhai; ZHONG Bo

    2010-01-01

    The problems of the earth's gravity fields' visualization are both focus and puzzle currently. Aiming at multiresolution rendering, modeling of the Earth's gravity fields' data is discussed in the paper by using LOD algorithm based on Quad Tree. First,this paper employed the method of LOD based on Quad Tree to divide up the regional gravity anomaly data, introduced the combined node evaluation system that was composed of viewpoint related and roughness related systems, and then eliminated the T-cracks that appeared among the gravity anomaly data grids with different resolutions. The test results demonstrated that the gravity anomaly data grids' rendering effects were living, and the computational power was low. Therefore, the proposed algorithm was a suitable method for modeling the gravity anomaly data and has potential applications in visualization of the earth's gravity fields.

  14. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  15. Detection of Virgin Olive Oil Adulteration Using Low Field Unilateral NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of adulteration in edible oils is a concern in the food industry, especially for the higher priced virgin olive oils. This article presents a low field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR method for the detection of the adulteration of virgin olive oil that can be performed through sealed bottles providing a non-destructive screening technique. Adulterations of an extra virgin olive oil with different percentages of sunflower oil and red palm oil were measured with a commercial unilateral instrument, the profile NMR-Mouse. The NMR signal was processed using a 2-dimensional Inverse Laplace transformation to analyze the transverse relaxation and self-diffusion behaviors of different oils. The obtained results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting adulterations of olive oil with percentages of at least 10% of sunflower and red palm oils.

  16. Application of chemometrics to low-field H-1 NMR relaxation data of intact fish flesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Pedersen, H.T.; Engelsen, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    and subsequently analysed for oil or water content by standard chemical methods. In a second experiment, 58 differently thawed cod (Gadus morhua) samples were measured by NMR and subsequently analysed for water-holding capacity. Correlations between chemical data and NMR data were evaluated using partial least...... squares (PLS) regression on complete relaxation curves and compared with conventional regression models on exponential fitting parameters. Predictions on an independent test set were superior for the PLS regression models, with optimal prediction errors of 12 g kg(-1), 6 g kg(-1) and 3.9% for oil...... and water content in fresh salmon flesh and water-holding capacity in thawed cod flesh respectively. Thus rapid, non-invasive low- field NMR can be used to simultaneously determine both oil and water content of fish flesh. Furthermore, it can predict water- holding capacity of cod flesh, with an R-2 of 0...

  17. Analytical estimation of the Earth's magnetic field scale

    CERN Document Server

    Bologna, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analytically estimate the magnetic field scale of planets with physical core conditions similar to that of Earth from a statistical point of view. We evaluate the magnetic field on the basis of the physical parameters of the center of the planet, such as density, temperature, and core size. We look at the contribution of the Peltier-Seebeck effect on the magnetic field, showing that an electrical thermal current can exist in a rotating fluid sphere. Finally, we apply our calculations to Earth and Jupiter. In each case we show that the thermal generation of currents leads to a magnetic field scale comparable to the observed fields of the two planets.

  18. Magnetomigration of rare-earth ions in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franczak, Agnieszka; Binnemans, Koen; Jan Fransaer

    2016-10-05

    The effects of external inhomogenous (gradient) magnetic fields on the movement of the rare-earth ions: Dy(3+), Gd(3+) and Y(3+), in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions have been investigated. Differences in the migration of rare-earth ions in gradient magnetic fields were observed, depending on the magnetic character of the ions: paramagnetic ions of Dy(3+) and Gd(3+) move towards regions of the sample where the magnetic field gradient is the strongest, while diamagnetic ions of Y(3+) move in the opposite direction. It has been showed that the low magnetic field gradients, such the ones generated by permanent magnets, are sufficient to observe the magnetomigration effects of the ions in solution. The present work clearly establishes the behavior of magnetically different ions in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions exposed to magnetic field gradients. To this avail, a methodology for measuring the local concentration differences of metal ions in liquid samples was developed.

  19. High radio-frequency field strength nutation NMR of quadrupolar nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, W. M. J.; Rezus, Y. L. A.; Kentgens, A. P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Owing to the introduction of microcoils, high RF field strength nutation NMR is a viable candidate for the study of quadrupolar nuclei with strong quadrupolar couplings, not accessible using contemporary NMR techniques. We show powder 23 Na nutation spectra on sodium nitrite for RF field strengths of up to 1170 kHz, that conform to theoretical predictions. For lanthanum fluoride powder, 139 La nutation spectra taken at elevated RF field amplitudes show clear discrepancies when compared to the theory. These errors are shown to be mainly caused by pulse transients at the end of the pulse, which proved to be detrimental to the shape of the nutation spectra. Using a nutation pulse which ends in a sudden frequency jump, we show that these errors can be reduced, and nutation spectra that conform to theory can be readily acquired. This enables nutation NMR for the study of quadrupolar nuclei with a strong quadrupolar coupling, bridging the gap between NMR, which can only analyse nuclei with a weak to medium quadrupolar coupling, and NQR, were extensive searching for the right quadrupolar frequency is the limiting factor.

  20. Field Measurements and Pullout Tests of Reinforced Earth Retaining Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈群; 何昌荣; 朱分清

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, field measurements and pullout tests of a new type of reinforced earth retaining wall, which is reinforced by trapezoid concrete blocks connected by steel bar, are described. Field measurements included settlements of the earth fill, tensile forces in the ties and earth pressures on the facing panels during the construction and at completion. Based on the measurements, the following statements can be made: ( 1 ) the tensile forces in the ties increased with the height of backfill above the tie and there is a tensile force crest in most ties; (2) at completion, the measured earth pressures along the wall face were between the values of the active earth pressures and the pressures at rest; (3) larger settlements occurred near the face of the wall where a zone of drainage sand and gravel was not compacted properly and smaller settlements occurred in the well-compacted backfill. The results of field pullout tests indicated that the magnitudes of pullout resistances as well as tensile forces induced in the ties were strongly influenced by the relative displacements between the ties and the backfill, and pullout resistances increased with the height of backfill above the ties and the length of ties.

  1. The Earth's Magnetic Field Fuels Inter-Disciplinary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Biller, R. Dale; Wilson, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt that integrated concepts inspire students and take learning to a new level. As we fly, we fly through the magnetic field of the Earth. We used the concepts involved in flying to develop an exercise that bonds geology, physics and life sciences.

  2. Simple System to Measure the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, R.; Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib

    2010-01-01

    Our aim in this proposal is to use Faraday's law of induction as a simple lecture demonstration to measure the Earths magnetic field (B). This will also enable the students to learn about how electric power is generated from rotational motion. Obviously the idea is not original, yet it may be attractive in the sense that no sophisticated devices…

  3. The Earth's Magnetic Field Fuels Inter-Disciplinary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Biller, R. Dale; Wilson, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt that integrated concepts inspire students and take learning to a new level. As we fly, we fly through the magnetic field of the Earth. We used the concepts involved in flying to develop an exercise that bonds geology, physics and life sciences.

  4. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Jinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper. Two topics are discussed: Firstly, the concept, development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced; Secondly, some problems of theory and method, which must be considered in the study of the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data, are expounded.

  5. Snow as Field-Teaching Medium for Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Stephan Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Snow is a widely available earth-science teaching medium which can be used to explore scientific concepts in the field, either directly or by analogy. Snow can be considered a mineral, sediment, sedimentary rock, or metamorphic rock. Natural processes such as crystal growth, melting, sedimentation, and metamorphism can be studied in practical time…

  6. Improving the accuracy of pulsed field gradient NMR diffusion experiments: Correction for gradient non-uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Mark A.; Bowyer, Paul J.; Adam Bone, P.; Davis, Adrian L.; Swanson, Alistair G.; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsed field gradient NMR is a well-established technique for the determination of self-diffusion coefficients. However, a significant source of systematic error exists in the spatial variation of the applied pulsed field gradient. Non-uniform pulsed field gradients cause the decay of peak amplitudes to deviate from the expected exponential dependence on gradient squared. This has two undesirable effects: the apparent diffusion coefficient will deviate from the true value to an extent determined by the choice of experimental parameters, and the error estimated by the nonlinear least squares fitting will contain a significant systematic contribution. In particular, the apparent diffusion coefficient determined by exponential fitting of the diffusional attenuation of NMR signals will depend both on the exact pulse widths used and on the range of gradient amplitudes chosen. These problems can be partially compensated for if experimental attenuation data are fitted to a function corrected for the measured spatial dependence of the gradient and signal strength. This study describes a general alternative to existing methods for the calibration of NMR diffusion measurements. The dominant longitudinal variation of the pulsed field gradient amplitude and the signal strength are mapped by measuring pulsed field gradient echoes in the presence of a weak read gradient. These data are then used to construct a predicted signal decay function for the whole sample, which is parameterised as the exponential of a power series. Results are presented which compare diffusion coefficients obtained using the new calibration method with previous literature values.

  7. NMR in pulsed high-field magnets and application to high-T(C) superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, H; Bontemps, P; Rikken, G L J A

    2013-09-01

    This article deals with the implementation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields at the pulsed-field facility of the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses and its application to the high-T(C) superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.51. The experimental setup is described in detail, including a low-temperature probe head adapted for pulsed fields. An entire paragraph is dedicated to the discussion of NMR in pulsed field and the introduction of an advanced deconvolution technique making use of the induction voltage in an additional pick-up coil. The (63)Cu/(65)Cu NMR experiments on an YBa2Cu3O6.51 single crystal were performed at 2.5K during a field pulse of 46.8-T-amplitude. In the recorded spectrum the (63)Cu center line and high-frequency satellites as well as the (65)Cu center line are identified and are compared with results in literature.

  8. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed.

  9. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines between the Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Cairns, Iver; Gosling, J. T.; Lobzin, Vasili; Steward, Graham; Neudegg, Dave; Owens, Mathew

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic field topologies between the Sun and Earth are important for the connectivity to Earth of solar suprathermal particles, e.g., solar energetic particles and the electrons in type III solar radio bursts. An approach is developed for mapping large-scale magnetic field lines in the solar equatorial plane, using near-Earth observations and a solar wind model with nonzero azimuthal magnetic field at the source surface. The predicted field line maps show that near both minimal and maximal solar activity the field lines are typically open and that loops with both ends either connected to or disconnected from the Sun occur sometimes. The open field lines, nonetheless, often do not closely follow the Parker spiral, being less or more tightly wound, or strongly azimuthally or radially oriented, or inverted. Assessments of the mapped field line configurations using time-varying suprathermal electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) observed by Wind show that the mapping predictions agree quantitatively (˜90%) with the PAD observations and outperform (by ˜20%) the predictions using the standard Parker spiral model. Application to a type III radio burst observed by Ulysses and Wind shows that the mapping prediction agrees well with the local magnetic field line traced by the type III source path, which covers heliocentric distances of ˜0.1--0.4 AU. Furthermore, applications to local field structures inferred from ACE observations demonstrate that the mapping can predict the majority (65-75%) of the local field line inversions for the multiple phases of the solar cycle.

  10. Interference of spin-, charge- and orbital degrees of freedom in low-carrier rare earth compounds, investigated by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, S.

    2006-05-01

    In rare earth compounds, the concentration of charge carriers is known to strongly influence the nature, and the charge carriers caused by valence fluctuations result in a complete suppression of the magnetic state, as typically observed for YbInCu4. The notable exception has been reported for the cubic (NaCl structure) TmX and YbX families with low carrier, that exhibits antiferro-magnetic (AFM) order at low temperatures. Among these families, TmTe and YbSb with degenerate low-lying multiplets have an additional transition of antiferro-quadrupolar (AFQ) orderings. To elucidate the interplay between the electronic transport and magnetic and/or orbital phenomena close to a semiconductor-to-metal transition, we have carried NMR measurements of 63Cu in YbInCu4, 125Te in TmTe, and 121Sb in YbSb down to 1.2 K and the implication of NMR findings is discussed in terms of the CEF splitting.

  11. Guar gum/borax hydrogel: Rheological, low field NMR and release characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grassi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum (GG and Guar gum/borax (GGb hydrogels are studied by means of rheology, Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF NMR and model drug release tests. These three approaches are used to estimate the mesh size (ζ of the polymeric network. A comparison with similar Scleroglucan systems is carried out. In the case of GGb, the rheological and Low Field NMR estimations of ζ lead to comparable results, while the drug release approach seems to underestimate ζ. Such discrepancy is attributed to the viscous effect of some polymeric chains that, although bound to the network to one end, can freely fluctuate among meshes. The viscous drag exerted by these chains slows down drug diffusion through the polymeric network. A proof for this hypothesis is given by the case of Scleroglucan gel, where the viscous contribution is not so significant and a good agreement between the rheological and release test approaches was found.

  12. Dynamic processes and chemical composition of Lepidium sativum seeds determined by means of field-cycling NMR relaxometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachocki, A; Latanowicz, L; Tritt-Goc, J

    2012-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as field-cycling relaxometry, wide-line NMR spectroscopy, and magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, were applied to study the seeds of cress, Lepidium sativum. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used for the first time to investigate the properties of the whole molecular system of dry cress seeds. This method not only allowed the dynamics to be studied, but was also successful in the differentiation among the solid (i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, or fats forming a solid form of lipids) and liquid-like (oil compounds) components of the seeds. The (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion of oils was interpreted as a superposition of intramolecular and intermolecular contributions. The intramolecular part was described in terms of a Lorentzian spectral density function, whereas a log-Gaussian distribution of correlation times was applied for the intermolecular dipole-dipole contribution. The models applied led to very good agreement with the experimental data and demonstrate that the contribution of the intermolecular relaxation to the overall relaxation should not be disregarded, especially at low frequencies. A power-law frequency dependence of the proton relaxation dispersion was used for the interpretation of the solid components. From the analysis of the (1)H wide-line NMR spectra of the liquid-like component of hydrated cress seeds, we can conclude that the contribution of oil protons should always be taken into account when evaluating the spin-lattice relaxation times values or measuring the moisture and oil content. The application of (1)H magic angle spinning NMR significantly improves resolution in the liquid-like spectrum of seeds and allows the determination of the chemical composition of cress seeds.

  13. Production and detection of atomic hexadecapole at Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, V M; Auzinsh, M; Gawlik, W; Grisins, P; Higbie, J M; Jackson Kimball, D F; Krzemien, L; Ledbetter, M P; Pustelny, S; Rochester, S M; Yashchuk, V V; Budker, D

    2008-07-21

    Optical magnetometers measure magnetic fields with extremely high precision and without cryogenics. However, at geomagnetic fields, important for applications from landmine removal to archaeology, they suffer from nonlinear Zeeman splitting, leading to systematic dependence on sensor orientation. We present experimental results on a method of eliminating this systematic error, using the hexadecapole atomic polarization moment. In particular, we demonstrate selective production of the atomic hexadecapole moment at Earth's magnetic field and verify its immunity to nonlinear Zeeman splitting. This technique promises to eliminate directional errors in all-optical atomic magnetometers, potentially improving their measurement accuracy by several orders of magnitude.

  14. Hearing loss and potential hazards of metallic middle-ear implants in NMR-magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huettenbrink, K.B.

    1987-08-01

    Concurrent with the expanding clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, patients with metallic middle-ear implants will certainly be exposed to this strong magnetic field in the future. To determine potential hazards, associated with movements of steel- or Platinium stapes-prostheses, several tests were performed in a 0.5 tesla NMR unit and the induced forces were calculated. Although the commonly used paramagnetic steel-wire or platinium-alloys will not dislodge in vivo, ferromagnetic prostheses may present a hazardous risk. Prior to exposure to the magnetic field, information about the implanted material should therefore be obtained. A side-effect of the induced current flow is the attenuation of the sound-vibrations of the stapes prosthesis. This, 5-10 dB impairment of transmission develops only at a certain position of the patient's head, when the prosthesis vibrates perpendicularly to the magnetic field's Z-axis. Patients with a metallic prosthesis should be informed about this purely physical, harmless phenomenon prior to entering the NMR-cylinder.

  15. A HTS dc SQUID-NMR: fabrication of the SQUID and application to low-field NMR for fruit quality detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Linus U.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have made the detection of low-field (LF) and ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) a reality. The latter has been proven to be a potential tool for non-destructive quality testing of horticultural products, amongst many other applications. High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) dc SQUIDS are likely to allow for the development of not only low-cost NMR systems but also prototypes that are mobile and easily maintainable. A HTS dc SQUID was manufactured on an YBCO thin film, using a novel laser based lithography method. The lithography was implemented by a new laser system developed in-house, as a model of low-cost lithography systems. The junctions of the dc SQUID were tested and displayed normal I-V characteristics in the acceptable range for the application. In order to determine the viability of low-field NMR for non-destructive quality measurement of horticultural products, a commercial HTS dc SQUID-NMR system was used to measure quality parameters of banana during ripening. The trend of color change and sugar increase of the banana during ripening were the most highly correlated attributes to the SQUID-NMR measured parameter, average T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time). Further studies were done, that involved processing of the NMR signal into relaxation time resolved spectra. A spectral signature of banana was obtained, where each peak is a T1 value corresponding to a proton pool, and is reported here. These results will potentially lead to deeper understanding of the quality of the samples under study.

  16. Attitude and Trajectory Estimation Using Earth Magnetic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetometer has long been a reliable, inexpensive sensor used in spacecraft momentum management and attitude estimation. Recent studies show an increased accuracy potential for magnetometer-only attitude estimation systems. Since the Earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computer and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both the spacecraft trajectory and attitude errors. Therefore, these errors can be used to estimate both trajectory and attitude. Traditionally, satellite attitude and trajectory have been estimated with completely separate system, using different measurement data. Recently, trajectory estimation for low earth orbit satellites was successfully demonstrated in ground software using only magnetometer data. This work proposes a single augmented extended Kalman Filter to simultaneously and autonomously estimate both spacecraft trajectory and attitude with data from a magnetometer and either dynamically determined rates or gyro-measured body rates.

  17. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. In Situ and Ex Situ Low-Field NMR Spectroscopy and MRI Endowed by SABRE Hyperpolarization**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barskiy, Danila A.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A.; Best, Quinn A.; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    By using 5.75 and 47.5 mT nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, up to 105-fold sensitivity enhancement through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was enabled, and subsecond temporal resolution was used to monitor an exchange reaction that resulted in the buildup and decay of hyperpolarized species after parahydrogen bubbling. We demonstrated the high-resolution low-field proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pyridine in a 47.5 mT magnetic field endowed by SABRE. Molecular imaging (i.e. imaging of dilute hyperpolarized substances rather than the bulk medium) was conducted in two regimes: in situ real-time MRI of the reaction mixture (in which pyridine was hyperpolarized), and ex situ MRI (in which hyperpolarization decays) of the liquid hyperpolarized product. Low-field (milli-Tesla range, e.g. 5.75 and 47.5 mT used in this study) parahydrogen-enhanced NMR and MRI, which are free from the limitations of high-field magnetic resonance (including susceptibility-induced gradients of the static magnetic field at phase interfaces), potentially enables new imaging applications as well as differentiation of hyperpolarized chemical species on demand by exploiting spin manipulations with static and alternating magnetic fields. PMID:25367202

  19. Field Performance of an Optimized Stack of YBCO Square "Annuli" for a Compact NMR Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Voccio, John; Bermond, Stéphane; Park, Dong-Keun; Bascuñán, Juan; Kim, Seok-Beom; Masaru, Tomita; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-06-01

    The spatial field homogeneity and time stability of a trapped field generated by a stack of YBCO square plates with a center hole (square "annuli") was investigated. By optimizing stacking of magnetized square annuli, we aim to construct a compact NMR magnet. The stacked magnet consists of 750 thin YBCO plates, each 40-mm square and 80- μm thick with a 25-mm bore, and has a Ø10 mm room-temperature access for NMR measurement. To improve spatial field homogeneity of the 750-plate stack (YP750) a three-step optimization was performed: 1) statistical selection of best plates from supply plates; 2) field homogeneity measurement of multi-plate modules; and 3) optimal assembly of the modules to maximize field homogeneity. In this paper, we present analytical and experimental results of field homogeneity and temporal stability at 77 K, performed on YP750 and those of a hybrid stack, YPB750, in which two YBCO bulk annuli, each Ø46 mm and 16-mm thick with a 25-mm bore, are added to YP750, one at the top and the other at the bottom.

  20. New Views of Earth's Gravity Field from GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Map 1Map 2Gravity and the Earth's Shape Gravity is the force that is responsible for the weight of an object and is determined by how the material that makes up the Earth is distributed throughout the Earth. Because gravity changes over the surface of the Earth, the weight of an object changes along with it. One can define standard gravity as the value of gravity for an perfectly smooth 'idealized' Earth, and the gravity 'anomaly' is a measure of how actual gravity deviates from this standard. Gravity reflects the Earth's surface topography to a high degree and is associated with features that most people are familiar with such as large mountains and deep ocean trenches.Progress in Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field Through GRACE Prior to GRACE, the Earth's gravity field was determined using measurements of varying quality from different satellites and of incomplete coverage. Consequently the accuracy and resolution of the gravity field were limited. As is shown in Figure 1, the long wavelength components of the gravity field determined from satellite tracking were limited to a resolution of approximately 700 km. At shorter wavelengths, the errors were too large to be useful. Only broad geophysical features of the Earth's structure could be detected (see map 1).In contrast, GRACE, by itself, has provided accurate gravity information with a resolution of 200 km. Now, much more detail is clearly evident in the Earth's geophysical features (see map 2). High resolution features detected by GRACE that are representative of geophysical phenomena include the Tonga/Kermadec region (a zone where one tectonic plate slides under another), the Himalayan/Tibetan Plateau region (an area of uplift due to colliding plates), and the mid-Atlantic ridge (an active spreading center in the middle of the Atlantic ocean where new crust is being created). Future GRACE gravity models are

  1. Can the earth's magnetic field be simulated in the laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, U; Stieglitz, R

    2000-09-01

    Today it is generally accepted that the Earth's magnetic field, as well as that of many other planets, is generated by buoyancy driven convection in the electrically conducting liquid cores of these rotating celestial bodies. The conversion of mechanical energy into electromagnetic energy is known as the dynamo effect. In contrast to technical dynamos, which utilize the rotational motion of a complex arrangement of wire coils and other materials of different electrical and magnetic properties, the geodynamo is based on a freely developing spiral flow in a practically homogeneous, electrically conducting liquid core domain, and is therefore termed a homogeneous dynamo. This report outlines some fundamental properties of the Earth's magnetic field. The structure of the spiral flow in the liquid interior of planets is explained with the help of some model experiments in rapidly rotating spherical shells, which were carried out by Busse and Carrigan (1974). Based on the main ideas of electromagnetism it is shown that spiral motion in well-conducting fluids, like liquid metals, can amplify seed magnetic fields to generate dynamo action. Starting from the conjectured flow structure in the Earth's interior, a conceptional and engineering design is described for a laboratory dynamo experiment. Some details of the construction of the test facility and first experimental results are presented and discussed.

  2. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2 MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future.

  3. Real-time oil-saturation monitoring in rock cores with low-field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J; Howe, A M; Clarke, A

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful suite of tools for studying oil in reservoir core plugs at the laboratory scale. Low-field magnets are preferred for well-log calibration and to minimize magnetic-susceptibility-induced internal gradients in the porous medium. We demonstrate that careful data processing, combined with prior knowledge of the sample properties, enables real-time acquisition and interpretation of saturation state (relative amount of oil and water in the pores of a rock). Robust discrimination of oil and brine is achieved with diffusion weighting. We use this real-time analysis to monitor the forced displacement of oil from porous materials (sintered glass beads and sandstones) and to generate capillary desaturation curves. The real-time output enables in situ modification of the flood protocol and accurate control of the saturation state prior to the acquisition of standard NMR core analysis data, such as diffusion-relaxation correlations. Although applications to oil recovery and core analysis are demonstrated, the implementation highlights the general practicality of low-field NMR as an inline sensor for real-time industrial process control.

  4. Characterization of Oat (Avena nuda L.) β-Glucan Cryogelation Process by Low-Field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Li, Linlin; Wu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Qiaoling; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-13

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) is a useful method in studying the water distribution and mobility in heterogeneous systems. This technique was used to characterize water in an oat β-glucan aqueous system during cryogelation by repeated freeze-thaw treatments. The results indicated that microphase separation occurred during cryogelation, and three water components were determined in the cryostructure. The spin-spin relaxation time was analyzed on the basis of chemical exchange and diffusion exchange theory. The location of each water component was identified in the porous microstructure of the cryogel. The pore size measured from the SEM image is in accordance with that estimated from relaxation time. The formation of cryogel is confirmed by rheological method. The results suggested that the cryogelation process of the polysaccharide could be monitored by LF-NMR through the evolution of spin-spin relaxation characteristics.

  5. Wettability testing of unconsolidated oil sands using low field NMR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, X.; Kantzas, A.; Bryan, J. [University of Calgary/TIPM Laboratory (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In an oil field it is important to understand wettability within the reservoir as it has an important impact on several parameters. However it is difficult to measure wettability in oil sands since conventional Amott/USBM testing cannot be applied. The aim of this paper is to develop protocols to assess wettability from NMR spectra in heavy oil reservoirs. Research was conducted on water wet and oil wet conditions; 3 sets of experiments were carried out with oil phases of different viscosity. Results showed that the signal from oil is insensitive to the location of the oil when viscosity increases but that water relaxation times are linked to the presence of water so water peak shifts can be used to determine different wettability states. This study determined that using water phase NMR relaxation presents several advantages to extract wettability information in unconsolidated sand systems and a technique was developed to interpret wettability.

  6. Fluxgate magnetometry for precise mapping of the Earth's field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The requirements for precise global mapping of the Earth's vector magnetic field from a high inclination LEO satellite needs a stable and precise vector magnetometer. Equally important are the measurement of the stellar attitude of the vector sensor and establishment of the calibration by onboard...... comparison to an absolute scalar magnetometer. In addition, the position in orbit and the precise timing relative to the UTC is needed. Finally, the end-to-end system precision also depends on a known and controlled local satellite magnetic field....

  7. Low-field NMR logging sensor for measuring hydraulic parameters of model soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucre, Oscar; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Minière, Adrien; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    SummaryKnowing the exact hydraulic parameters of soils is very important for improving water management in agriculture and for the refinement of climate models. Up to now, however, the investigation of such parameters has required applying two techniques simultaneously which is time-consuming and invasive. Thus, the objective of this current study is to present only one technique, i.e., a new non-invasive method to measure hydraulic parameters of model soils by using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hereby, two model clay or sandy soils were respectively filled in a 2 m-long acetate column having an integrated PVC tube. After the soils were completely saturated with water, a low-field NMR sensor was moved up and down in the PVC tube to quantitatively measure along the whole column the initial water content of each soil sample. Thereafter, both columns were allowed to drain. Meanwhile, the NMR sensor was set at a certain depth to measure the water content of that soil slice. Once the hydraulic equilibrium was reached in each of the two columns, a final moisture profile was taken along the whole column. Three curves were subsequently generated accordingly: (1) the initial moisture profile, (2) the evolution curve of the moisture depletion at that particular depth, and (3) the final moisture profile. All three curves were then inverse analyzed using a MATLAB code over numerical data produced with the van Genuchten-Mualem model. Hereby, a set of values ( α, n, θr and θs) was found for the hydraulic parameters for the soils under research. Additionally, the complete decaying NMR signal could be analyzed through Inverse Laplace Transformation and averaged on the 1/ T2 space. Through measurement of the decay in pure water, the effect on the relaxation caused by the sample could be estimated from the obtained spectra. The migration of the sample-related average with decreasing saturation speaks for a enhancement of the surface relaxation as the soil dries, in

  8. Effects of Rare Earth Ions on NMR Spectrum of Anticoagulation Factor from Snake Venom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐小龙; 吴双顶; 刘清亮; 王守业

    2001-01-01

    The effects of Pr3+, Gd3+ ions on the 1H NMR spectrum of anticoagulation factor (ACF) from snake venom were investigated. It was observed that the quartet peaks at δ 4.16 and the triplet peaks at δ 1.37 are gradually broadened with the increase of Pr3+ ion content, but the broadening effects of Pr3+ ion on the two single peaks at δ 1.99 and δ 2.29 were not observed obviously, and the obvious chemical shifts of all peaks induced by Pr3+ were not found. Two peaks contributed to αH and βH of the Ala side chain in ACF are broadened by Gd3+ ion, while two single peaks at δ 1.99 and δ 2.29 are not affected basically by Gd3+ ion. This result proves that the distance between the Ca2+-binding site in ACF and αH or βH of the Ala side chain in ACF is shorter than that between the Ca2+-binding site in ACF and proton in Met residue.

  9. A study by computer simulation of the generation and evolution of the Earth`s magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Hollerbach, R.; Roberts, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    Until recently very little has been known about the maintenance of the Earth`s magnetic field. The general consensus was that some type of convective motion edits in the Earth`s liquid iron alloy core that is affected by rotational forces in a way that continually generates new magnetic field to replace that which diffuses away. Magnetic-field reversals and secular variation have long been measured but no theory existed to explain these phenomena. To gain an understanding of the basic physical mechanisms of the ``geodynamo,`` we produced the first self-consistent computer simulation of convection and magnetic field generation in a rotating three-dimensional spherical fluid shell as an anologue to the Earth`s convective dynamo. This is a final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  10. Correlation between the Earth's Magnetic Field and the Gravitational Mass of the Outer Core

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2013-01-01

    The theory accepted today for the origin of the Earth's magnetic field is based on convection currents created in the Earth's outer core due to the rotational motion of the planet Earth around its own axis. In this work, we show that the origin of the Earth's magnetic field is related to the gravitational mass of the outer core.

  11. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  12. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  13. Temperature dependency of magnetic field drifts of HTS pancake coils for NMR/MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyeong Dal; Lee, Se Yeon; Kim, Woo Seok [Dept. of Energy and Electrical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We had proposed a winding method so called “Wind-and-Flip”, which enables a persistent current operation of an HTS pancake coil without any electrical joint. In order to improve the magnetic field drift characteristics, a prototype HTS coil with the technique was fabricated, and tested under various temperatures. Because the coil does not have any electric terminals for current leads, an HTS background magnet was used to induce the persistent current in the coil by field cooling process. A conduction cooling system with a GM cryocooler was prepared to keep the operating temperatures of the prototype coil much below the 77 K. We investigated the magnetic field drift characteristics under the various operating temperatures by measuring the center magnetic field with a cryogenic Hall sensor. The persistent current mode operation at 20 ∽ 50K showed a strong possibility of the winding technique for the application such as MRI or NMR.

  14. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse-relaxation-optimized pulsed field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2011-10-19

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy for the characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse-relaxation-optimized (TRO) (15)N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE with conventional (15)N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects involving molecular particles with different size ranges. An initial application of the (15)N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25-60 °C.

  15. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical Field (ELF) measurement project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for an inexpensive, extensive, long-lasting global electric field measurement system (ELF). The primary performance driver of this mission is the need to measure the attitude of each spacecraft in the Earth's electric field very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to know the electric charge generated by the satellite as it crosses the magnetic field lines (E equals V times B). In order to achieve the desired global coverage, a constellation of about 50 satellites in at least 18 different orbits will be used. To reduce the cost of each satellite, off-the-shelf, proven technology will be used whenever possible. Researchers have set a limit of $500,000 per satellite. Researchers expect the program cost, including the deployment of the entire constellation, to be less than $100 million. The minimum projected mission life is five years.

  16. Bats use magnetite to detect the earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Doak, Thomas G; Wikelski, Martin

    2008-02-27

    While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a "compass organelle" containing the iron oxide particles magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic "Kalmijn-Blakemore" pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular magnetite is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of magnetite as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use magnetite to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating magnetite particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the magnetite containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals.

  17. Bats use magnetite to detect the earth's magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Holland

    Full Text Available While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a "compass organelle" containing the iron oxide particles magnetite (Fe(3O(4. Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic "Kalmijn-Blakemore" pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular magnetite is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of magnetite as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use magnetite to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating magnetite particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the magnetite containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals.

  18. Paramagnetic NMR chemical shift in a spin state subject to zero-field splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Soncini, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We derive a general formula for the paramagnetic NMR nuclear shielding tensor of an open-shell molecule in a pure spin state, subject to a zero-field splitting (ZFS). Our findings are in contradiction with a previous proposal. We present a simple application of the newly derived formula to the case of a triplet ground state split by an easy-plane ZFS spin Hamiltonian. When $kT$ is much smaller than the ZFS gap, thus a single non-degenerate level is thermally populated, our approach correctly predicts a temperature-independent paramagnetic shift, while the previous theory leads to a Curie temperature dependence.

  19. Zero-field NMR and NQR measurements of the antiferromagnet URhIn5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, H.; Kambe, S.; Tokunaga, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tateiwa, N.; Haga, Y.; Fisk, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The antiferromagnet URhIn5 with the Néel temperature TN=98 K has been investigated by nuclear magnetic/quadrupole resonance (NMR/NQR). 115In-NQR spectra in the paramagnetic state give the respective electrical field gradient parameters for the locally tetragonal and orthorhombic In(1) and In(2) sites. In the antiferromagnetic state at 4.5 K, 115In-NMR spectra in the zero external field indicate a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure. The internal field at In(1) sites is found to be zero and that at In(2) sites is 21.1 kOe at 4.5 K. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear relaxation rates 1/T1 in the paramagnetic state shows a distinct site dependence: Korringa-type constant (T1T)-1 behavior below ˜150 K for In(1) sites and a divergent behavior of 1/T1 toward TN for In(2). The plausible antiferromagnetic structure is discussed based on these observations.

  20. A general framework to quantify the effect of restricted diffusion on the NMR signal with applications to double pulsed field gradient NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarslan, Evren; Shemesh, Noam; Basser, Peter J

    2009-03-14

    Based on a description introduced by Robertson, Grebenkov recently introduced a powerful formalism to represent the diffusion-attenuated NMR signal for simple pore geometries such as slabs, cylinders, and spheres analytically. In this work, we extend this multiple correlation function formalism by allowing for possible variations in the direction of the magnetic field gradient waveform. This extension is necessary, for example, to incorporate the effects of imaging gradients in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging scans and in characterizing anisotropy at different length scales via double pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments. In cylindrical and spherical pores, respectively, two- and three-dimensional vector operators are employed whose form is deduced from Grebenkov's results via elementary operator algebra for the case of cylinders and the Wigner-Eckart theorem for the case of spheres. The theory was validated by comparison with known findings and with experimental double-PFG data obtained from water-filled microcapillaries.

  1. Pulsed-Field NMR Measurements in Porous Media and Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Lawrence Lance

    During the early stages of cerebral ischemia, the diffusion of water in the brain is decreased. The physical change in the tissue that is responsible for the decrease is unknown. Previous investigations have shown that pulsed-field-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG -NMR) measurements of diffusion in porous media contain information about microstructures. To advance the understanding of the PFG-NMR measurement of water diffusing in heterogeneous media, such as the brain, the studies presented in this dissertation were undertaken. Three groups of experiments are presented. The first set of experiments deals with the type of structural information that is available from PFG-NMR measurements of water diffusing in the pore-space of porous solids. In the second group of experiments, the diffusion of water in packed red blood cells, a model for diffusion in systems with permeable membranes, is studied. The third set of experiments deals with the diffusion of water in the rat brain during focal ischemia and cortical spreading depression. Measurements of time dependant diffusion in porous media indicate that the surface-to-pore-volume ratio and the free diffusion coefficient of the saturating fluid can be extracted from the short-time behavior and that the tortuosity of the pore space can be extracted from the long-time limit. Furthermore, the dynamic probability -of-return-to-the-origin can be obtained directly from the PFG-NMR amplitude. Experiments on packed red blood cells demonstrate that the measured diffusion coefficient is a sensitive function of both membrane permeability and extracellular volume fraction. Results on water diffusion measurements in the ischemic rat brain show the correlation between the region of the brain with decreased diffusion and the subsequently infarcted tissue and demonstrate the ability to predict the tissue salvaged by reperfusion. Also demonstrated is a decrease in diffusion following the transient depolarization of excitable

  2. Diffusion of light gases in 6FDA/BPDA-DAM Carbon Molecular Sieve membranes by Pulsed Field Gradient NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Robert; Kanungo, Rohit; Kiyono-Shimobe, Mayumi; Koros, William J.; Vasenkov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy to reveal detailed knowledge of self-diffusion of light gases and light gas mixtures in carbon molecular sieve membranes on small length scales. PFG NMR is used to investigate intra-membrane diffusion of carbon dioxide and methane for a broad range of temperatures and mean square displacements in a carbon molecular sieve membrane derived from a 6FDA/BPDA-DAM polyimide film. Diffusion is investigated...

  3. Coordination field analysis of rare earth complexes with triangular symmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范英芳; 潘大丰; 杨频

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of the complex matrixes in odd triangular symmetry was accomplished.The configurations of the coordination unit with various triangular symmetries and different ligand numbers were discussed.On the basis of the double-sphere coordination point-charge (DSCPCF) model,the detailed forms of the DSCPCF parameters Bmk and the expressions of the perturbation matrix elements in triangular field (D3,D3h,D3d) were derived.Thereby,the calculation scheme of coordination field perturbation energy of the rare earth complexes with triangular symmetry was constructed After the calculation scheme was programmed,the Stark energies of the crystalline TbAl3(BO3)4 were calculated The results were considerably close to the experimental values

  4. Microbially assisted recording of the Earth's magnetic field in sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Egli, Ramon; Gilder, Stuart A; Müller, Sebastian

    2016-02-11

    Sediments continuously record variations of the Earth's magnetic field and thus provide an important archive for studying the geodynamo. The recording process occurs as magnetic grains partially align with the geomagnetic field during and after sediment deposition, generating a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) or post-DRM (PDRM). (P)DRM acquisition mechanisms have been investigated for over 50 years, yet many aspects remain unclear. A key issue concerns the controversial role of bioturbation, that is, the mechanical disturbance of sediment by benthic organisms, during PDRM acquisition. A recent theory on bioturbation-driven PDRM appears to solve many inconsistencies between laboratory experiments and palaeomagnetic records, yet it lacks experimental proof. Here we fill this gap by documenting the important role of bioturbation-induced rotational diffusion for (P)DRM acquisition, including the control exerted on the recorded inclination and intensity, as determined by the equilibrium between aligning and perturbing torques acting on magnetic particles.

  5. New approaches to explore the Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Moretto, T.; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2002-01-01

    New strategies are presented for the analysis of the high-precision geomagnetic data that are currently obtained by the low-orbiting satellites Orsted, CHAMP and Orsted-2/SAC-C. The measured magnetic field is the sum of contributions from various sources in the core, crust, ionosphere...... and magnetosphere, and the accuracy of core and crustal field models is affected by ionospheric and magnetospheric source contributions. A proper parameterization of these external sources, together with a careful data pre-selection, is necessary to avoid spurious effects. In addition, the advantage of having...... multiple satellite missions measuring simultaneously over different regions of the Earth is discussed, and swarm, a proposed constellation consisting of 6 satellites in two different orbit planes, is presented....

  6. Modelling the core magnetic field of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that radial off-center dipoles located within the core of the earth be used instead of spherical harmonics of the magnetic potential in modeling the core magnetic field. The off-center dipoles, in addition to more realistically modeling the physical current systems within the core, are if located deep within the core more effective at removing long wavelength signals of either potential or field. Their disadvantage is that their positions and strengths are more difficult to compute, and such effects as upward and downward continuation are more difficult to manipulate. It is nevertheless agreed with Cox (1975) and Alldredge and Hurwitz (1964) that physical realism in models is more important than mathematical convenience. A radial dipole model is presented which agrees with observations of secular variation and excursions.

  7. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  8. Earth's external magnetic fields at low orbital altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpar, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    Under our Jun. 1987 proposal, Magnetic Signatures of Near-Earth Distributed Currents, we proposed to render operational a modeling procedure that had been previously developed to compute the magnetic effects of distributed currents flowing in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. After adaptation of the software to our computing environment we would apply the model to low altitude satellite orbits and would utilize the MAGSAT data suite to guide the analysis. During the first year, basic computer codes to run model systems of Birkeland and ionospheric currents and several graphical output routines were made operational on a VAX 780 in our research facility. Software performance was evaluated using an input matchstick ionospheric current array, field aligned currents were calculated and magnetic perturbations along hypothetical satellite orbits were calculated. The basic operation of the model was verified. Software routines to analyze and display MAGSAT satellite data in terms of deviations with respect to the earth's internal field were also made operational during the first year effort. The complete set of MAGSAT data to be used for evaluation of the models was received at the end of the first year. A detailed annual report in May 1989 described these first year activities completely. That first annual report is included by reference in this final report. This document summarizes our additional activities during the second year of effort and describes the modeling software, its operation, and includes as an attachment the deliverable computer software specified under the contract.

  9. NOC model of the earth's main magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Wenyao(徐文耀)

    2003-01-01

    The method of natural orthogonal components (NOC) is used to analyze the earth's main magnetic field IGRF 1900-2000, and the NOC model of the field is established. The first step of the analysis is to calculate eigen modes of the field from the Gauss coefficients of IGRF 1900-2000. Then the magnetic field for each epoch is expanded in a series at the basic function set constructed by the eigen modes, and the intensity coefficients of the eigen modes are calculated. Test of the convergency and stability of the NOC model shows that the model has very short series and much rapid convergency in comparison with the conventional spherical harmonic models of IGRF. Comparison of the eigen modes obtained from different IGRF model groups indicates that the low-degree eigen modes are rather stable, while the high-degree modes show a relatively large variability. The physical meaning of the eigen modes in the NOC model is discussed, and an interesting relationship is found between the spatial structure of the main field and its secular variation.

  10. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuke, K., E-mail: fuke@kobe-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science (Japan); Ohshima, Y. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Tona, M. [Ayabo Co. Fukukama (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  11. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuke, K.; Ohshima, Y.; Tona, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  12. Methane storage in nanoporous media as observed via high field NMR relaxometry

    CERN Document Server

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    The storage properties of methane gas in Vycor porous glass (5.7 nm) are characterized in a wide pressure range from 0.7 MPa-89.7 MPa using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We demonstrate the capability of high field NMR relaxometry for the determination of the methane gas storage capacity and the measurement of the Hydrogen Index, to a high degree of accuracy. This helps determine the excess gas in the pore space which can be identified to exhibit Langmuir properties in the low pressure regime of 0.7 MPa to 39.6 Mpa. The Langmuir model enables us to determine the equilibrium density of the monolayer of adsorbed gas to be 8.5% lower than that of liquid methane. We also identify the signatures of multilayer adsorption at the high pressure regime from 39.6 Mpa to 89.7 Mpa and use the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) theory to determine the number of adsorbed layers of methane gas. We show how these measurements help us differentiate the gas stored in the Vycor pore space into free and adsorbed fractions for the ent...

  13. Intermediate length scale organisation in tin borophosphate glasses: new insights from high field correlation NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, G; Saitoh, A; Takebe, H

    2015-11-28

    The structure of tin borophosphate glasses, considered for the development of low temperature sealing glasses or anode materials for Li-batteries, has been analysed at the intermediate length scale by a combination of high field standard and advanced 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The nature and extent of B/P mixing were analysed using the (11)B((31)P) dipolar heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence NMR sequence and the data interpretation allowed (i) detecting the presence and analysing the nature of the B-O-P linkages, (ii) re-interpreting the 1D (31)P spectra and (iii) extracting the proportion of P connected to borate species. Interaction between the different borate species was analysed using the (11)B double quantum-simple quantum experiment to (i) investigate the presence and nature of the B-O-B linkage, (ii) assign the different borate species observed all along the composition line and (iii) monitor the borate network formation. In addition, (119)Sn static NMR was used to investigate the evolution of the chemical environment of the tin polyhedra. Altogether, the set of data allowed determining the structural units constituting the glass network and quantifying the extent of B/P mixing. The structural data were then used to explain the non-linear and unusual evolution of the glass transition temperature.

  14. High-field QCPMG NMR of strontium nuclei in natural minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Geoffrey M; Lipton, Andrew S; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-02-01

    The only stable NMR-active isotope of strontium, (87)Sr, is a spin-9/2 quadrupolar nucleus that has a low gyromagnetic ratio, a low natural abundance, and a large nuclear electric quadrupole moment. In this work, we utilize the quadrupolar Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) pulse sequence and a 21.14 T NMR spectrometer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to characterize the strontium sites in the natural minerals strontianite (SrCO(3)) and celestine (SrSO(4)). QCPMG at 21.14 T was found to provide sensitivity enhancements of roughly two orders of magnitude over Hahn-echo experiments at an 11.74 T magnetic field. We extracted the quadrupolar parameters for the strontium nuclei through iterative simulations of the experimental spectra with the SIMPSON program by Bak, Rasmussen, and Nielsen. The data show that the quadrupolar parameters of (87)Sr appear to be highly sensitive to the symmetry of the strontium coordination environment and can thus provide information about the strontium binding environment in complex systems.

  15. Investigation of material properties by NMR in low and high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rata, D.G.

    2006-07-10

    In this work the experiments have been performed at both low and high field. The experiments cover various domains from simple relaxation experiments in low field to diffusion and spin-diffusion in high field. The applications of low-field investigations are: - quality control of chemical products. - water content determination inside of the walls of buildings. - determination of multilayer polymer coatings on a concrete. In high-field NMR several alkane molecules swollen at equilibrium in cross-linked natural rubber samples have been investigated and analyzed based on the assumptions of the Vrentras theory. A small diffusion anisotropy of the order of 10% has been discovered because of a deformation of free volume under compression. The anisotropy increases with the cross-link density and the compression ratio. The results presented in this study show that the solvent size influences the anisotropy of the diffusion process through the size parameter. The spin-diffusion measurements have been performed on Stanyl samples with different aged samples, at controlled temperature conditions. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  17. Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for NMR/MRI instruments at low-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Aktham; Raoof, Kosai; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2013-11-27

    A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF) electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems at low-field (0.1 T) is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer). The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…). The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to "enjoy" from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay) signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed.

  18. Software Defined Radio (SDR and Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS for NMR/MRI Instruments at Low-Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktham Asfour

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A proof-of-concept of the use of a fully digital radiofrequency (RF electronics for the design of dedicated Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR systems at low-field (0.1 T is presented. This digital electronics is based on the use of three key elements: a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS for pulse generation, a Software Defined Radio (SDR for a digital receiving of NMR signals and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP for system control and for the generation of the gradient signals (pulse programmer. The SDR includes a direct analog-to-digital conversion and a Digital Down Conversion (digital quadrature demodulation, decimation filtering, processing gain…. The various aspects of the concept and of the realization are addressed with some details. These include both hardware design and software considerations. One of the underlying ideas is to enable such NMR systems to “enjoy” from existing advanced technology that have been realized in other research areas, especially in telecommunication domain. Another goal is to make these systems easy to build and replicate so as to help research groups in realizing dedicated NMR desktops for a large palette of new applications. We also would like to give readers an idea of the current trends in this field. The performances of the developed electronics are discussed throughout the paper. First FID (Free Induction Decay signals are also presented. Some development perspectives of our work in the area of low-field NMR/MRI will be finally addressed.

  19. Characteristics of trapped magnetic fields in HTS bulk annuli with various axial spaces for compact NMR magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Imai, M.; Takano, R.; Kashima, K.; Hahn, S. [Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as a critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved. In consequence, various applications with HTS bulks such as motors, bearings, and flywheels are being investigated by many research groups; Compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of an HTS bulk more than 11.7 T, 500 MHz {sup 1}H NMR frequency, has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is far less expensive than those conventional NMR magnets and expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of those compact NMR magnets, the issues of spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of trapped magnetic fields in HTS bulk annuli are very important. In this paper, the characteristics of the trapped magnetic fields in a stack of assembled HTS bulk annuli were investigated with various axial spaces between HTS bulks, experimentally and analytically.

  20. Low-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy for distinguishing between arabica and robusta ground roast coffees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defernez, Marianne; Wren, Ella; Watson, Andrew D; Gunning, Yvonne; Colquhoun, Ian J; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Williamson, David; Kemsley, E Kate

    2017-02-01

    This work reports a new screening protocol for addressing issues of coffee authenticity using low-field (60MHz) bench-top (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, useful spectra were obtained from the lipophilic fraction of ground roast coffees. It was found that 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC, a recognized marker compound for robusta beans) gives rise to an isolated peak in the 60MHz spectrum, which can be used as an indicator of the presence of robusta beans in the sample. A total of 81 extracts from authenticated coffees and mixtures were analysed, from which the detection limit of robusta in arabica was estimated to be between 10% and 20% w/w. Using the established protocol, a surveillance exercise was conducted of 27 retail samples of ground roast coffees which were labelled as "100% arabica". None were found to contain undeclared robusta content above the estimated detection limit.

  1. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  2. Air core notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruber, S; Farrher, G D; Anoardo, E

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript we present details on the optimization, construction and performance of a wide-bore (71 mm) α-helical-cut notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR. In addition to the usual requirements for this kind of magnets (high field-to-power ratio, good magnetic field homogeneity, low inductance and resistance values) a tunable homogeneity and a more uniform heat dissipation along the magnet body are considered. The presented magnet consists of only one machined metallic cylinder combined with two external movable pieces. The optimal configuration is calculated through an evaluation of the magnetic flux density within the entire volume of interest. The magnet has a field-to-current constant of 0.728 mT/A, allowing to switch from zero to 0.125 T in less than 3 ms without energy storage assistance. For a cylindrical sample volume of 35 cm(3) the effective magnet homogeneity is lower than 130 ppm.

  3. Coordination field calculation for rare earth complexes in dihedral symmetry field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范英芳; 杨频; 潘大丰; 王越奎

    1995-01-01

    The coordination field perturbation matrix element expressions about D2-field of the terms 2S+1Lf (J=0 - 8 and 7=1/2 - 15/2) with fN (N=1 -13) configuration have been derived The concrete forms of the DSCPCF parameters Akm in the dihedral field (D2, C2v) for various ligand numbers (5 -12) and their reducing behavior in the higher symmetry fields (D4, C4v, D2d, D4d, D2k, D4h and Oh) are discussed with the double sphere coordination point charge field (DSCPCF) model and the irreducible operator tensor method. Besides, the corresponding computational schemes have been developed and the computer program DSF.D has been compiled, which is applicable for the spectral analysis of the rare earth ion complexes with arbitrary ligand numbers in the dihedral, tetragonal and cubical symmetry fields.

  4. Illustrating the quantum approach with an Earth magnetic field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pars Benli, Kami; Dillmann, Baudouin; Louelh, Ryma; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Teaching imaging of magnetic resonance (MR) today is still as challenging as it has always been, because it requires admitting that we cannot express fundamental questions of quantum mechanics with straightforward language or without using extensive theory. Here we allow students to face a real MR setup based on the Earth's magnetic field. We address the applied side of teaching MR using a device that is affordable and that proves to be sufficiently robust, at universities in Orsay, France, and San Sebastian, Spain, in experimental practicals at undergraduate and graduate levels. We specifically present some of the advantages of low field for measuring R2 relaxation rates, reaching a power of separation of 1.5 μmol on Mn(II) ions between two water bottles each of half a liter. Finally we propose key approaches for the lecturers to adopt when they are asked to pass from theoretical knowledge to teachable knowhow. The outcomes are fast calibration and the MR acquisition protocols, demonstrating the reproducibility of energy transfer during the saturation pulses, and the quantitative nature of MR, with water protons and a helium-3 sample.

  5. Zero-field NMR and NQR studies of magnetically ordered state in charge-ordered EuPtP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, T.; Maruyama, T.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Mitsuda, A.; Umeda, M.; Sugishima, M.; Wada, H.

    2015-03-01

    EuPtP undergoes two valence transitions and has two kinds of valence states of Eu ions at low temperatures. In the charge-ordered state, this compound shows an antiferromagnetic order ascribed to magnetic divalent Eu ions. We investigated the antiferromagnetically ordered state of EuPtP by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement in a zero external magnetic field. The observed 153Eu NMR signals of a magnetic divalent state and Eu,153151 NQR signals of a nonmagnetic trivalent state clearly demonstrate that the spins order in the hexagonal basal plane and the internal magnetic field is not canceled out, even at the Eu3 + layers which are in the middle of magnetic Eu2 + layers. In addition, the observation of 31P and 195Pt NMR spectra allowed us to discuss a possible magnetic structure. We also evaluated the nuclear quadrupole frequencies for both Eu2 + and Eu3 + ion states.

  6. Crystal Fields in Dilute Rare-Earth Metals Obtained from Magnetization Measurements on Dilute Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal field parameters of Tb, Dy, and Er in Sc, Y, and Lu are summarized. These parameters are obtained from magnetization measurements on dilute single crystals, and successfully checked by a number of different methods. The crystal field parameters vary unpredictably with the rare-earth solute....... B40, B60, and B66 are similar in Y and Lu. Crystal field parameters for the pure metals Tb, Dy, and Er are estimated from the crystal fields in Y and Lu....

  7. A comprehensive model of the quiet-time, near-Earth magnetic field: phase 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, T.J.; Olsen, Nils; Langel, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The near-Earth magnetic field is caused by sources in the Earth's core, ionosphere, magnetosphere, lithosphere and from coupling currents between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, and between hemispheres. Traditionally, the main field (low degree internal field) and magnetospheric field have......, and includes an accounting for main field influences on the magnetosphere, main field and solar activity influences on the ionosphere, seasonal influences on the coupling currents, a priori characterization of the influence of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere on Earth-induced fields, and an explicit...

  8. Precise NMR measurement and stabilization system of magnetic field of a superconducting 7 T wave length shifter

    CERN Document Server

    Borovikov, V M; Karpov, G V; Korshunov, D A; Kuper, E A; Kuzin, M V; Mamkin, V R; Medvedko, A S; Mezentsev, N A; Repkov, V V; Shkaruba, V A; Shubin, E I; Veremeenko, V F

    2001-01-01

    The system of measurement and stabilization of the magnetic field in the superconducting 7 T wave length shifter (WLS), designed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics are described. The measurements are performed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnetometer at two points of the WLS magnetic field. Stabilization of the field is provided by the current pumping system. The stabilization system is based on precise NMR measurement of magnetic field as a feedback signal for computer code which control currents inside the superconducting coils. The problem of the magnetic field measurements with NMR method consists in wide spread of field in the measured area (up to 50 Gs/mm), wide temperature range of WLS operating, small space for probe and influence of iron hysteresis. Special solid-state probes were designed to satisfy this requirements. The accuracy of magnetic field measurements at probe locations is not worse than 20 ppm. For the WLS field of 7 T the reproducibility of the magnetic field of 30 ppm has be...

  9. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field...

  10. Resolution Improvements in in Vivo1H NMR Spectra with Increased Magnetic Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruetter, Rolf; Weisdorf, Sally A.; Rajanayagan, Vasantham; Terpstra, Melissa; Merkle, Hellmut; Truwit, Charles L.; Garwood, Michael; Nyberg, Scott L.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-11-01

    The measurement of cerebral metabolites using highly homologous localization techniques and similar shimming methods was performed in the human brain at 1.5 and 4 T as well as in the dog and rat brain at 9.4 T. In rat brain, improved resolution was achieved by shimming all first- and second-order shim coils using a fully adiabatic FASTMAP sequence. The spectra showed a clear improvement in spectral resolution for all metabolite resonances with increased field strength. Changes in cerebral glutamine content were clearly observed at 4 T compared to 1.5 T in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. At 9.4 T, glutamine H4 at 2.46 ppm was fully resolved from glutamate H4 at 2.37 ppm, as was the potential resonance from γ-amino-butyric acid at 2.30 ppm and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 2.05 ppm. Singlet linewidths were found to be as low as 6 Hz (0.015 ppm) at 9.4 T, indicating a substantial decrease in ppm linewidth with field strength. Furthermore, the methylene peak of creatine was partially resolved from phosphocreatine, indicating a close to 1:1 relationship in gray matter. We conclude that increasing the magnetic field strength increases spectral resolution also for1H NMR, which can lead to more than linear sensitivity gains.

  11. Scaling and multifractal fields in the solid earth and topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lovejoy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Starting about thirty years ago, new ideas in nonlinear dynamics, particularly fractals and scaling, provoked an explosive growth of research both in modeling and in experimentally characterizing geosystems over wide ranges of scale. In this review we focus on scaling advances in solid earth geophysics including the topography. To reduce the review to manageable proportions, we restrict our attention to scaling fields, i.e. to the discussion of intensive quantities such as ore concentrations, rock densities, susceptibilities, and magnetic and gravitational fields.

    We discuss the growing body of evidence showing that geofields are scaling (have power law dependencies on spatial scale, resolution, over wide ranges of both horizontal and vertical scale. Focusing on the cases where both horizontal and vertical statistics have both been estimated from proximate data, we argue that the exponents are systematically different, reflecting lithospheric stratification which – while very strong at small scales – becomes less and less pronounced at larger and larger scales, but in a scaling manner. We then discuss the necessity for treating the fields as multifractals rather than monofractals, the latter being too restrictive a framework. We discuss the consequences of multifractality for geostatistics, we then discuss cascade processes in which the same dynamical mechanism repeats scale after scale over a range. Using the binomial model first proposed by de Wijs (1951 as an example, we discuss the issues of microcanonical versus canonical conservation, algebraic ("Pareto" versus long tailed (e.g. lognormal distributions, multifractal universality, conservative and nonconservative multifractal processes, codimension versus dimension formalisms. We compare and contrast different scaling models (fractional Brownian motion, fractional Levy motion, continuous (in scale cascades, showing that they are all based on fractional integrations of noises

  12. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy - a 30 year adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    The first information on the Earth's gravitational field from artificial satellite observations was published in 1958. The next years have seen a dramatic improvement in the resolution and accuracy of the series representation of the Earth's gravity field. The improvements have taken place slowly taking advantage of improved measurement accuracy and the increasing number of satellites. The proposed ARISTOTELES mission would provide the opportunity to take a significant leap in improving our knowledge of the Earth's gravity field.

  13. Direct observation of the active center for methane dehydroaromatization using an ultrahigh field 95Mo NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heng; Ma, Ding; Bao, Xinhe; Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2008-03-26

    The use of an ultrahigh magnetic field spectrometer and 95Mo isotope enrichment facilitate the direct observation of the local structure of Mo species on Mo/zeolite catalysts by 95Mo NMR. Top trace: The experimental 95Mo NMR spectrum of 6Mo/HZSM-5. Bottom traces: The simulated overall spectrum (orange), the spectral component corresponding to MoO3 (purple), and the component corresponding to the exchanged Mo species (green). The exchanged Mo species proved to be the active center for the methane dehydroaromatization (MDA) reaction.

  14. Solid state field-cycling NMR relaxometry: instrumental improvements and new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujara, Franz; Kruk, Danuta; Privalov, Alexei F

    2014-10-01

    The paper reviews recent progress in field cycling (FC) NMR instrumentation and its application to solid state physics. Special emphasis is put on our own work during the last 15years on instrumentation, theory and applications. As far as instrumentation is concerned we report on our development of two types of electronical FC relaxometers, a mechanical FC relaxometer and a combination of FC and one-dimensional microimaging. Progress has been achieved with respect to several parameters such as the accessible field and temperature range as well as the incorporation of sample spinning. Since an appropriate analysis of FC data requires a careful consideration of relaxation theory, we include a theory section discussing the most relevant aspects of relaxation in solids which are related to residual dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. The most important limitations of relaxation theory are also discussed. With improved instrumentation and with the help of relaxation theory we get access to interesting new applications such as ionic motion in solid electrolytes, structure determination in molecular crystals, ultraslow polymer dynamics and rotational resonance phenomena.

  15. NMR investigation of field-induced magnetic order in barium manganese oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Steve

    As early as 1956, Matsubara and Matsuda found an exact correspondence between a lattice gas model and a quantum antiferromagnet model[1]. They paved the way for the language of integer spin boson particles to be used interchangeably with quantum magnetic insulator systems in a general manner. For example, an analogy of density of bosons is found in magnetization, and analogy of chemical potential is found in external field. Just as there exist corresponding parameters between these two seemingly unrelated systems, quantum magnets can also exhibit consequences of Boson particle systems. In particular, spin-ordering transition in quantum magnets can be interpreted as Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) transition in Boson particle framework. Direct observation of BEC in Boson particles has been realized in 4He's superfluid transition and in dilute atomic gas clouds cooled to very low temperatures[2]. In this thesis, we try to realize and analyze BEC transition through field-induced spin-ordering transition in the S = 1 antiferromagnetic dimer system, Ba3Mn2O8. We perform NMR measurements with 135,137Ba nucleus as a local probe. Although S = 1 spin properties of Ba 3Mn2O8 come from electronic spins on Mn atoms, hyperfine coupling between Mn electronic spins and Ba nuclear spins allow us to infer Mn electrons' spin information. Since there are 2 inequivalent Ba sites, Ba(1) and Ba(2), in Ba3Mn2O8, we essentially have two probes that provide a detailed picture of structure and nature of magnetism in this material. There are many antiferromagnetic BEC candidates, but there is a significant advantage of studying Ba3Mn 2O8. Unlike the other popular antiferromagnetic BEC candidates such as TlCuCl3[3] or BaCuSi2O6[4], we find no evidence of lattice deformation in Ba3Mn2O8 . This allows us an unprecedented clean look at magnetic properties. Aside from the aforementioned simple technical advantage, there are new physics that we can learn from Ba3Mn2O 8. The geometric frustration of

  16. High quality NMR structures: a new force field with implicit water and membrane solvation for Xplor-NIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Schwieters, Charles D; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2017-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by NMR is unique in its ability to measure restraints, very accurately, in environments and under conditions that closely mimic those encountered in vivo. For example, advances in solid-state NMR methods enable structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent-free lipid bilayers, and of large soluble proteins prepared by sedimentation, while parallel advances in solution NMR methods and optimization of detergent-free lipid nanodiscs are rapidly pushing the envelope of the size limit for both soluble and membrane proteins. These experimental advantages, however, are partially squandered during structure calculation, because the commonly used force fields are purely repulsive and neglect solvation, Van der Waals forces and electrostatic energy. Here we describe a new force field, and updated energy functions, for protein structure calculations with EEFx implicit solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals Lennard-Jones forces, in the widely used program Xplor-NIH. The new force field is based primarily on CHARMM22, facilitating calculations with a wider range of biomolecules. The new EEFx energy function has been rewritten to enable OpenMP parallelism, and optimized to enhance computation efficiency. It implements solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals energy terms together, thus ensuring more consistent and efficient computation of the complete nonbonded energy lists. Updates in the related python module allow detailed analysis of the interaction energies and associated parameters. The new force field and energy function work with both soluble proteins and membrane proteins, including those with cofactors or engineered tags, and are very effective in situations where there are sparse experimental restraints. Results obtained for NMR-restrained calculations with a set of five soluble proteins and five membrane proteins show that structures calculated with EEFx have significant improvements in accuracy, precision

  17. Using GIS in an Earth Sciences Field Course for Quantitative Exploration, Data Management and Digital Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Wouter A.; van de Grint, Liesbeth; Alberti, Koko; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Field courses are essential for subjects like Earth Sciences, Geography and Ecology. In these topics, GIS is used to manage and analyse spatial data, and offers quantitative methods that are beneficial for fieldwork. This paper presents changes made to a first-year Earth Sciences field course in the French Alps, where new GIS methods were…

  18. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  19. An advanced phantom study assessing the feasibility of neuronal current imaging by ultra-low-field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Rainer; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Höfner, Nora; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Kim, Kiwoong; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/MRI, a common scheme is to magnetize the sample by a polarizing field of up to hundreds of mT, after which the NMR signal, precessing in a field on the order of several μT, is detected with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In our ULF-NMR system, we polarize with up to 50 mT and deploy a single-stage DC-SQUID current sensor with an integrated input coil which is connected to a wire-wound Nb gradiometer. We developed this system (white noise 0.50 fT/√{Hz}) for assessing the feasibility of imaging neuronal currents by detecting their effect on the ULF-NMR signal. Magnetoencephalography investigations of evoked brain activity showed neuronal dipole moments below 50 nAm. With our instrumentation, we have studied two different approaches for neuronal current imaging. In the so-called DC effect, long-lived neuronal activity shifts the Larmor frequency of the surrounding protons. An alternative strategy is to exploit fast neuronal activity as a tipping pulse. This so-called AC effect requires the proton Larmor frequency to match the frequency of the neuronal activity, which ranges from near-DC to ∼kHz. We emulated neuronal activity by means of a single dipolar source in a physical phantom, consisting of a hollow sphere filled with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 and NaCl. In these phantom studies, with physiologically relevant dipole depths, we determined resolution limits for our set-up for the AC and the DC effect of ∼10 μAm and ∼50 nAm, respectively. Hence, the DC effect appears to be detectable in vivo by current ULF-NMR technology.

  20. Improved determination of FID signal parameters in low-field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabek, Juhani; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Vesanen, Panu T; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2010-07-01

    In this work, novel methods are suggested for assessing signal parameters of the free induction decay (FID) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The FID signal was recorded in a microtesla field and analysed to determine its relaxation time, amplitude, Larmor frequency and phase. The challenge was posed by the narrow line width, whose related effects were investigated through simulations, also. The developed methods give a new view on FID signal estimation in microtesla as well as lower and higher fields. It is shown that the transverse relaxation time of a sample can be accurately determined in the frequency domain by other means than the Lorentz peak half width. Also, with some realistic approximations, a simple functional form for the power spectrum Lorentz peak shape is proposed. As shown in this work, the inspection of the power spectrum instead of the absorption and dispersion Lorentzians is advantageous in the sense that the waveform is independent of the FID phase. The automatic and efficient methods presented in this work incorporate an integral exponential fit, the fit of the power spectrum Lorentz peak and two ways to determine the FID phase. When there are sufficiently many data points in the Lorentz peak, the power spectrum Lorentz peak shape fit provides a quick, simple and accurate way of determining the amplitude, relaxation time and Larmor frequency of the FID. In the measurements of this work, however, the narrow line width led to establishing a more applicable method which is based on the exponential decay of the Lorentz peak with a temporally moving power spectrum window.

  1. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide us with a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth....... In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...

  2. Can the earth be dated from decay of its magnetic field?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Thomas G. Barnes, Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Texas, El Paso, and a creationist, argues that the geomagnetic field was created by unknown processes at the time of creation of the earth and has been decaying irreversibly and exponentially, with a half-life of about 1400 years, since then. He calculates that the field would have been impossibly large in 8000 BC and concludes that the earth, therefore, is less than 10,000 years old. He denies that the earth's field has reversed polarity in the past, and attempts to refute the dynamo theory of the origin of the field. Barnes' arguments and conclusions are commonly cited in creationist literature as definitive proof that the earth is very young. Barnes is wrong, and has ignored or misrepresented much of the data on the earth's magnetic field. Paleomagnetic evidence shows that the earth's field has existed for more than three billion years, and that the dipole field both fluctuates in strength and irregularly reverses polarity. There are no properties of the magnetic field that can be used to place an upper limit on the earth's age. - Author

  3. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  4. Effect of magnetic field strength on NMR-based metabonomic human urine data. Comparative study of 250, 400, 500, and 800 MHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Malmendal, Anders; Petersen, Bent O.;

    2007-01-01

    Metabonomic analysis of urine utilizing high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and chemometric techniques has proven valuable in characterizing the biochemical response to an intervention. To assess the effect of magnetic field strength on information contained in NMR-based metabonomic data sets, 1H NM...

  5. Lateral diffusion of PEG-Lipid in magnetically aligned bicelles measured using stimulated echo pulsed field gradient 1H NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion measurements of PEG-lipid incorporated into magnetically aligned bicelles are demonstrated using stimulated echo (STE) pulsed field gradient (PFG) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bicelles were composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) plus dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) (q = DMPC/DHPC molar ratio = 4.5) plus 1 mol % (relative to DMPC) dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DMPE-PEG 2000) at 25 wt % lipid. 1H NMR STE spectra of perpendicular aligned bicelles contained only resonances assigned to residual HDO and to overlapping contributions from a DMPE-PEG 2000 ethoxy headgroup plus DHPC choline methyl protons. Decay of the latter's STE intensity in the STE PFG 1H NMR experiment (g(z) = 244 G cm(-1)) yielded a DMPE-PEG 2000 (1 mol %, 35 degrees C) lateral diffusion coefficient D = 1.35 x 10(-11) m2 s(-1). Hence, below the "mushroom-to-brush" transition, DMPE-PEG 2000 lateral diffusion is dictated by its DMPE hydrophobic anchor. D was independent of the diffusion time, indicating unrestricted lateral diffusion over root mean-square diffusion distances of microns, supporting the "perforated lamellae" model of bicelle structure under these conditions. Overall, the results demonstrate the feasibility of lateral diffusion measurements in magnetically aligned bicelles using the STE PFG NMR technique.

  6. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Detection of {sup 15}N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei (TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H}) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. The {sup 15}N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H} component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a {sup 15}N-detected 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N TROSY-HSQC ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ{sub c} ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for {sup 1}H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit {sup 15}N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording {sup 15}N TROSY of proteins expressed in H{sub 2}O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D{sub 2}O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of {sup 15}N{sub H}-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  7. Diffusion of methane and carbon dioxide in carbon molecular sieve membranes by multinuclear pulsed field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert; Kanungo, Rohit; Kiyono-Shimobe, Mayumi; Koros, William J; Vasenkov, Sergey

    2012-07-10

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are promising materials for energy efficient separations of light gases. In this work, we report a detailed microscopic study of carbon dioxide and methane self-diffusion in three CMS membrane derived from 6FDA/BPDA(1:1)-DAM and Matrimid polymers. In addition to diffusion of one-component sorbates, diffusion of a carbon dioxide/methane mixture was investigated. Self-diffusion studies were performed by the multinuclear (i.e., (1)H and (13)C) pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR technique which combines the advantages of high field (17.6 T) NMR and high magnetic field gradients (up to 30 T/m). Diffusion measurements were carried out at different temperatures and for a broad range of the root-mean-square displacements of gas molecules inside the membranes. The diffusion data obtained from PFG NMR are compared with the corresponding results of membrane permeation measurements reported previously for the same membrane types. The observed differences between the transport diffusivities and self-diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide and methane are discussed.

  8. Tidal dissipation and the strength of the Earth's internal magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, Bruce A

    2010-12-16

    Magnetic fields at the Earth's surface represent only a fraction of the field inside the core. The strength and structure of the internal field are poorly known, yet the details are important for our understanding of the geodynamo. Here I obtain an indirect estimate for the field strength from measurements of tidal dissipation. Tidally driven flow in the Earth's liquid core develops internal shear layers, which distort the internal magnetic field and generate electric currents. Ohmic losses damp the tidal motions and produce detectable signatures in the Earth's nutations. Previously reported evidence of anomalous dissipation in nutations can be explained with a core-averaged field of 2.5 mT, eliminating the need for high fluid viscosity or a stronger magnetic field at the inner-core boundary. Estimates for the internal field constrain the power required for the geodynamo.

  9. High-field {sup 1}H NMR microscopy for fundamental biophysical research; Hochfeld {sup 1}H-NMR-Mikroskopie zur biophysikalischen Grundlagenforschung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, D.

    2003-08-08

    This work has a biophysical background and uses different examples to demonstrate the practical applicability of NMR-Microscopy in the medical and biological sector. Therefore, the different projects are feasibility studies which are used to compare the possibilities and advantages of NMR-Microscopy with other, established examination techniques. In detail, using MR-Microscopy, different living and fixed biological samples have been visualized non-invasively with high spatial resolution. The specific purpose of the studies ranged from the visualization of the invasion of tumor-spheroids into cell aggregates using T2 parameter maps (time constant of the spin-spin relaxation) to the three-dimensional display of the honey bee brain in the intact head capsule and the non-invasive visualization of the anatomy of prenatal dolphins. For all these projects, the non-invasive character of MR-experiments was of utmost importance. The tumor invasion was not to be disturbed by the measurements, the bee brain should be visualized as close to its true natural shape as possible and the examined dolphins represent rare museum specimens which should not be destroyed. The different samples were all imaged with the best possible spatial resolution which was either limited by the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or the available scan time. In order to resolve single details and fine structures in the images, it was necessary to optimize the SNR as well as the contrast-to-noise ratio. To guarantee the necessary SNR, the measurements were performed on high field MR-spectrometers with resonance frequencies of 500 and 750 MHz.

  10. An NMR Experiment Based on Off-the-Shelf Digital Data-Acquisition Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Christian; Bowen, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) poses significant challenges for teaching in the context of an undergraduate laboratory, foremost because of high equipment cost. Current off-the-shelf data-acquisition hardware, however, is sufficiently powerful to constitute the core of a fully digital NMR spectrometer operating at the earth's field. We present…

  11. High-field magnetization of dilute rare earths in yttrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.; Cock, G. J.;

    1974-01-01

    Magnetization measurements have been performed on single crystals of Y containing small amounts of Tb, Dy, or Er at 4.2 K in fields up to 295 × 105 A/m (370 kOe). Crystal-field and molecular-field parameters obtained from measurements of the initial susceptibility versus temperature give...... a satisfactory quantitative account of the high-field magnetization. This includes characteristic features due to the crossing and mixing of crystal-field levels....

  12. Correction of environmental magnetic fields for the acquisition of Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles below Earth's field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetoulas, Vasileios; Lurie, David J.; Broche, Lionel M.

    2017-09-01

    T1 relaxation times can be measured at a range of magnetic field strengths by Fast Field-Cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry to provide T1-dispersion curves. These are valuable tools for the investigation of material properties as they provide information about molecular dynamics non-invasively. However, accessing information at fields below 230 μT (10 kHz proton Larmor frequency) requires careful correction of unwanted environmental magnetic fields. In this work a novel method is proposed that compensates for the environmental fields on a FFC-NMR relaxometer and extends the acquisition of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion profiles to 2.3 μT (extremely low field region), with direct application in the study of slow molecular motions. Our method is an improvement of an existing technique, reported by Anoardo and Ferrante in 2003, which exploits the non-adiabatic behaviour of the magnetisation in rapidly-varying magnetic fields and makes use of the oscillation of the signal amplitude to estimate the field strength. This increases the accuracy in measuring the environmental fields and allows predicting the optimal correction values by applying simple equations to fit the data acquired. Validation of the method is performed by comparisons with well-known dispersion curves obtained from polymers and benzene.

  13. Gravitomagnetic Field of the Universe and Coriolis Force on the Rotating Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe--deduced from a simple…

  14. Can the Earth be Dated from Decay of Its Magnetic Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1983-01-01

    Thomas G. Barnes, geologist/creationist, argues that the geomagnetic field was created by unknown processes when earth was created and has been decaying (irreversibly/exponentially) with a half-life of about 1,400 years since then. Shows that Barnes' proposition is wrong and explains why the earth's age cannot be determined from magnetic-field…

  15. Gravitomagnetic Field of the Universe and Coriolis Force on the Rotating Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe--deduced from a simple…

  16. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's…

  17. Dynamics of water solutions of natural polysaccharides by fast field cycling nmr relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusova, Alena; Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri; de Pasquale, Claudio; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Cryobiology studies the effect of low temperatures on living systems such as microorganisms and plants. In particular, plants growing in cold or frozen environments can survive such extreme conditions due to the cold hardening process. Hardening is a three step process during which, first, translocation of polysaccharides to the plant roots affects water structure in the cell-soil surface. For this reason, increase of cell-membrane permeability and resistance to temperatures from -5°C to -10°C is achieved. In a second step, chemical alteration of cell membrane arises and resistance to temperatures up to -20°C is obtained. The last hardening step consists in the vitrification of the plant tissues which allow plants to survive at temperatures as low as -50°C. Since polysaccharides play a very important role in the initial part of the cold hardening process, it is of paramount importance to study the effect of such natural biopolymers on water structure. Here, we present preliminary data obtained by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry on the effect of hyaluronan (an anionic, non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan) on water structure at different concentrations of the polysaccharide. Although hyaluronan is a polysaccharide found exceptionally in animal, human or bacterial bodies, in the present work it was used as a model "pilot" compound. In fact, it has an unique ability to hold water and it contains both polysaccharide and protein-like acetamido functionalities. For this reason, hyaluronan promotes the future research on other plant biopolymers such as, for instance, starch and other very specific proteins. Results revealed that different water-structure systems surround the molecule of hyaluronan in diluted and semidiluted systems. Namely, at the lowest hyaluronan concentration, three hydration shells can be recognized. The first hydration shell is made by bound water (BW) which is strongly fixed to the hyaluronan surface mainly through electrostatic interactions. A

  18. Field Performance of an Optimized Stack of YBCO Square “Annuli” for a Compact NMR Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Voccio, John; Bermond, Stéphane; Park, Dong-Keun; Bascuñán, Juan; Kim, Seok-Beom; Masaru, Tomita; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-01-01

    The spatial field homogeneity and time stability of a trapped field generated by a stack of YBCO square plates with a center hole (square “annuli”) was investigated. By optimizing stacking of magnetized square annuli, we aim to construct a compact NMR magnet. The stacked magnet consists of 750 thin YBCO plates, each 40-mm square and 80- μm thick with a 25-mm bore, and has a Ø10 mm room-temperature access for NMR measurement. To improve spatial field homogeneity of the 750-plate stack (YP750) a three-step optimization was performed: 1) statistical selection of best plates from supply plates; 2) field homogeneity measurement of multi-plate modules; and 3) optimal assembly of the modules to maximize field homogeneity. In this paper, we present analytical and experimental results of field homogeneity and temporal stability at 77 K, performed on YP750 and those of a hybrid stack, YPB750, in which two YBCO bulk annuli, each Ø46 mm and 16-mm thick with a 25-mm bore, are added to YP750, one at the top and the other at the bottom. PMID:22081753

  19. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-04

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data.

  20. Data on the Earth's Magnetic Field and its Secular Change since 1800

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information on the past and present orientation of the Earth's magnetic field is available from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) which serves as the...

  1. Kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of 5-fluorouracil by pulsed-field-gradient 19F NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okamura, Emiko

    2009-06-01

    The kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) is quantified by high resolution NMR with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. The 19F NMR signal of 5FU is analyzed at 293-313 K by the solution of Bloch equation with exchange terms. The rate constants of 5FU binding and dissociation are 0.2 and 4.1 s -1 at 303 K. The 5FU motion in the vertical direction to the membrane surface is restricted as compared with the lateral diffusion, judging from the activation energy (57 kJ/mol) larger than the lateral diffusion in membrane (26 kJ/mol [E. Okamura, N. Yoshii, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 215102]).

  2. STUDIES ON THE SELF-DIFFUSION OF WATER ETHANOL MIXTURE IN CHITOSAN PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE WITH PULSED FIELD GRADIENT NMR DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Fang; Ji-cai Huang; Qun-hui Guo; Vitalij I. Volkov

    2002-01-01

    The self-diffusion of water, ethanol and water-ethanol mixtures in chitosan (CS) membranes crosslinked byaqueous H2SO4 solution and uncrosslinked membrane was measured using pulsed-field gradient (PFG) nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) spectroscopy to obtain the partial solubilities and self-diffusion coefficients. An attempt was made toexplain the transport properties of water and ethanol through the CS membrane. It was concluded that there are two types ofchannel water and ethanol diffusate transfer. The water was localized in the hydrophilic ionic region formed by the ionizedgroups, and the ethanol was localized in the hydrophobic amorphous network of the polymer. There was a good agreementbetween the separation factors estimated from PFG-NMR data and those obtained by pervaporation testing.

  3. 13C-NMR STUDY ON THE CHAIN TERMINAL STRUCTURE OF POLY-1,3-PENTADIENE POLYMERIZED WITH RARE EARTH CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Demin; GONG Zhi; WANG Fosong

    1987-01-01

    The sequence distribution and the terminal structures of poly-1,3-pentadiene chains obtained by rare earth catalyst and effect of polymerization temperature on microstructure of the polymer have been investigated by 13C-NMR method. According to experimental results it was supposed that terminal active growing chain of the polymer would be four types of anti- and syn-η3-allyl structures. When polymerization temperature was reduced, the content of cis-1,4-poly-1,3-pentadiene increases. It can be explained by isomerization between anti- and syn-η3-allyl. The process forming trans-1,2 unit instead of 3,4-unit were also described.

  4. Global changes in intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during the past 800kyr

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guyodo, Yohan; Valet, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in palaeomagnetic and dating techniques have led to increasingly precise records of the relative intensity of the Earth’s past magnetic field at numerous field sites. The compilation and analysis of these records can provide important constraints on changes in global magnetic field i

  5. The Electromagnetic Fields Under, On and Up Earth Surface As Precursor of Local Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chterev Mavrodiev, Strachimir

    The analysis of accurasy measured Earth magnetic field gives a signal for near future near enîugh and strong enough eartquake. The correlation wit the tide gravitational potential derivatives permits to predict the day of the earthquake. It is formulated a Programm for electromagnetic field monitoring under on and up Earth surface and data analysis for investigation of possibilities for predicting the time, place, Magnitude and destractive power of future earthquake in Balkan and Black Sea region.

  6. Ultra-High Field NMR and MRI—The Role of Magnet Technology to Increase Sensitivity and Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewald Moser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available “History, of course, is difficult to write, if for no other reason, than that it has so many players and so many authors.” – P. J. Keating (former Australian Prime MinisterStarting with post-war developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR a race for stronger and stronger magnetic fields has begun in the 1950s to overcome the inherently low sensitivity of this promising method. Further challenges were larger magnet bores to accommodate small animals and eventually humans. Initially, resistive electromagnets with small pole distances, or sample volumes, and field strengths up to 2.35 T (or 100 MHz 1H frequency were used in applications in physics, chemistry, and material science. This was followed by stronger and more stable (Nb-Ti based superconducting magnet technology typically implemented first for small-bore systems in analytical chemistry, biochemistry and structural biology, and eventually allowing larger horizontal-bore magnets with diameters large enough to fit small laboratory animals. By the end of the 1970s, first low-field resistive magnets big enough to accommodate humans were developed and superconducting whole-body systems followed. Currently, cutting-edge analytical NMR systems are available at proton frequencies up to 1 GHz (23.5 T based on Nb3Sn at 1.9 K. A new 1.2 GHz system (28 T at 1.9 K, operating in persistent mode but using a combination of low and high temperature multi-filament superconductors is to be released. Preclinical instruments range from small-bore animal systems with typically 600–800 MHz (14.1–18.8 T up to 900 MHz (21 T at 1.9 K. Human whole-body MRI systems currently operate up to 10.5 T. Hybrid combined superconducting and resistive electromagnets with even higher field strength of 45 T dc and 100 T pulsed, are available for material research, of course with smaller free bore diameters. This rather costly development toward higher and higher field strength is a consequence of the inherently low

  7. A New Approach to Isolating External Magnetic Field Components in Spacecraft Measurements of the Earth's Magnetic Field Using Global Positioning System observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, C.; Hajj, G.

    1994-01-01

    We review the problem of separating components of the magnetic field arising from sources in the Earth's core and lithosphere, from those contributions arising external to the Earth, namely ionospheric and magnetospheric fields, in spacecraft measurements of the Earth's magnetic field.

  8. Temporal variations of the gravity field and Earth precession-nutation

    CERN Document Server

    Bourda, G

    2007-01-01

    Due to the accuracy now reached by space geodetic techniques, and also considering some modelisations, the temporal variations of some Earth Gravity Field coefficients can be determined. They are due to Earth oceanic and solid tides, as well as geophysical reservoirs masses displacements. They can be related to the variations in the Earth's orientation parameters (through the inertia tensor). Then, we can try to improve our knowledge of the Earth Rotation with those space measurements of the Gravity variations. We have undertaken such a study, using data obtained with the combination of space geodetic techniques. In particular, we use CHAMP data that are more sensitive to such variations and that complete the ones already accumulated (for example with Starlette and LAGEOS I). In this first approach, we focus on the Earth precession nutation, trying to refine it by taking into account the temporal variations of the Earth dynamical flattening. The goal is mainly to understand how Geodesy can influence this fiel...

  9. Introducing High School Students to NMR Spectroscopy through Percent Composition Determination Using Low-Field Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Pitzer, Joy M.; Frost, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mole to gram conversions, density, and percent composition are fundamental concepts in first year chemistry at the high school or undergraduate level; however, students often find it difficult to engage with these concepts. We present a simple laboratory experiment utilizing portable nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to determine the…

  10. International school on high field NMR spectroscopy for solids and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, D.; Meier, B.; Keeler, J.; Berthault, P.; Vedrine, P.; Grandinetti, P.; Delsuc, M.A.; Spiess, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the school is to offer high-level pedagogical courses on a wide range of liquid- and solid-state NMR concepts and techniques: theory, instrumentation (magnets and probes), data acquisition, processing and analysis, measurement of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings, spin relaxation and hyper-polarization. This document gathers only the slides of most presentations.

  11. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide us with a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth....... In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...... of the source region, the core-mantle boundary, we present maps of the detailed structure of the geodynamo, and how this is presently evolving. Both the trend (secular variation) and accelerations in the field changes since the launch of the Swarm mission will be presented. Assuming that field changes...

  12. The role of rotation on the evolution of dynamo generated magnetic fields in Super Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Zuluaga, Jorge I

    2011-01-01

    Planetary magnetic fields could have a role on the evolution of planetary atmospheres and the required conditions for the emergence and evolution of life (habitability). After briefly review the current efforts to study the evolution of dynamo generated magnetic fields in massive earth-like rocky planets (Super Earths), we take the results from thermal evolution models and updated scaling laws for convection driven magnetodynamos to predict the evolution of the local Rossby number, the basic indicator of core magnetic field geometry and regime. We study the dependence of this property on planetary mass and rotation rate. Previous works have paid Attention only to the evolution of dipolar dominant core magnetic fields assuming rapid rotating planets. Here we extend these results including consistently the effects of rotation on the evolution of planetary magnetic field properties and obtain global constraints to the existence of intense protective magnetic fields in rapidly and slowly rotating Super Earths. We...

  13. Resonances in field-cycling NMR on molecular crystals. (reversible) Spin dynamics or (irreversible) relaxation?; Resonanzen in Field-Cycling-NMR an Molekuelkristallen. (reversible) Spindynamik oder (irreversible) Relaxation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Multi spin systems with spin 1/2 nuclei and dipolar coupled quadrupolar nuclei can show so called ''quadrupolar dips''. There are two main reasons for this behavior: polarization transfer and relaxation. They look quite alike and without additional research cannot be differentiated easily in most cases. These two phenomena have quite different physical and theoretical backgrounds. For no or very slow dynamics, polarization transfer will take place, which is energy conserving inside the spin system. This effect can entirely be described using quantum mechanics on the spin system. Detailed knowledge about the crystallography is needed, because this affects the relevant hamiltonians directly. For systems with fast enough dynamics, relaxation takes over, and the energy flows from the spin system to the lattice; thus a more complex theoretical description is needed. This description has to include a dynamic model, usually in the form of a spectral density function. Both models should include detailed modelling of the complete spin system. A software library was developed to be able to model complex spin systems. It allows to simulate polarization transfer or relaxation effects. NMR measurements were performed on the protonic conductor K{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. A single crystal shows sharp quadrupolar dips at room temperature. Dynamics could be excluded using relaxation measurements and literature values. Thus, a polarization transfer analysis was used to describe those dips with good agreement. As a second system, imidazolium based molecular crystals were analyzed. The quadrupolar dips were expected to be caused by polarization transfer; this was carefully analyzed and found not to be true. A relaxation based analysis shows good agreement with the measured data in the high temperature area. It leverages a two step spectral density function, which indicates two distinct dynamic processes happening in this system.

  14. Geomagnetic Field Reversals and Life on the Earth in Phanerozoic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    Global paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic data are generalized. As a result it is found out that the direct connection between geomagnetic reversals, biozones and maxima of mass extinction of a biota is absent. At the same time it is noted close to a synchronous total picture of consistent changes of biozones and geomagnetic polarity. It is explained by the general source - the Earth's diurnal rotation. The reversal polarity of a geomagnetic field prevailed during the Phanerozoic that is agreed with the Earth's counterclockwise rotation. Change of polarity of a field, most likely, is connected with acceleration or deceleration of rotation speed of the internal core relative to the Earth's mantle. Lack of direct interrelation between changes in the biosphere and geomagnetic field indicate a lack of influence of a field on life evolution on Earth. It follows also from the fact that life on Earth developed from primitive unicellular forms to mammals and the man and diversity of biota was grew against a close condition of a geomagnetic field during ~2,5 billion years and irrespective of numerous geomagnetic reversals. Main conclusion: evolutionary development of life on Earth doesn't depend both on large changes of a geomagnetic field, and on the extreme catastrophic events conducting to mass extinction of a biota.

  15. Calculating the electromagnetic field on the earth due to an electrodynamic tethered system in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the electromagnetic wave field on the earth's surface associated with the operation of an electrodynamic tethered satellite system of constant or slowly varying current in the upper ionosphere. The wave field at the ionospheric boundary and on the earth's surface is obtained by numerical integration. The results suggest that the ionospheric waves do not propagate into the atmosphere and that the image of the Alfven wings from a steady-current tether should be greatly broadened on the earth's surface.

  16. Comparison of Chemical Compositions in Pseudostellariae Radix from Different Cultivated Fields and Germplasms by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiao Hua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudostellariae Radix (PR is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, which is consumed commonly for its positive health effects. However, the chemical differences of PR from different cultivated fields and germplasms are still unknown. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of PR from different cultivated fields, in this study, 1H-NMR-based metabolomics coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC were used to investigate the different metabolites in PR from five germplasms (jr, zs1, zs2, sb, and xc cultivated in traditional fields (Jurong, Jiangsu, JSJR and cultivated fields (Zherong, Fujian, FJZR. A total of 34 metabolites were identified based on 1H-NMR data, and fourteen of them were found to be different in PR from JSJR and FJZR. The relative contents of alanine, lactate, lysine, taurine, sucrose, tyrosine, linolenic acid, γ-aminobutyrate, and hyperoside in PR from JSJR were higher than that in PR from FJZR, while PR from FJZR contained higher levels of glutamine, raffinose, xylose, unsaturated fatty acid, and formic acid. The contents of Heterophyllin A and Heterophyllin B were higher in PR from FJZR. This study will provide the basic information for exploring the influence law of ecological environment and germplasm genetic variation on metabolite biosynthesis of PR and its quality formation mechanism.

  17. Design for Vibrator Field Experiment Based- on Vibrator- earth System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zubin; Lin Jun; Liang Tiecheng; Zhang Linhang

    2000-01-01

    Source- generated energy in seismic vibrator records high frequency harmonic behavior. Conventional vibratorearth coupling model was set up on the linear system. Some assumptions in the application of linear theory to the vibrator problem play an insignificant role in the overall coupling structure. Obviously, non- linear behaviors can be modeled using a "hard - spring" form of the Duffing equation. Model dedicates that a qualitatively similar harmonic component is present for a broad range of possible mathematical descriptions. After some qualitative analysis about the non- linear system, some conclusion can be drawn. Firstly, The design of the vibrator weight should be abided by two points as followed: In order to avoid decoupling for the vibrator to the earth, the weight should be greater than the peak of the driving force amplitude as to keep the resultant force pointing to the earth's core. On the other hand, for the limited energy output, the vibrator overweight may damage the system high - frequency ability. Secondly, as the driving force frequency approaching to the ground hard- spring inherent frequency, the energy transmission was found to climb its peak from the system energy absorbed curve. At last, due to the non- linear coupling model system, its load curve would come into unstable frequency range,which might limit the application of the Vibroseis conventional sweeping pattern - linear sweep. A new sweeping pattern was listed: the driving signal was the pseudo- random sequence modulated by a fixed frequency cosine signal satisfying with the exploration precision and absorbing efficiency. The synthesized signal was ready to be realized by the electromagnetic driven system. Even the side- lobes noise of its auto- correlation function was restrained well. The theory coming from the Vibrator- earth coupling model was applied to the design of the Portable High- frequency Vibrator System (PHVS), and the good result was obtained. By the analysis of the

  18. An inversion method of 2D NMR relaxation spectra in low fields based on LSQR and L-curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanqun; Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijia; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2016-04-01

    The low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) inversion method based on traditional least-squares QR decomposition (LSQR) always produces some oscillating spectra. Moreover, the solution obtained by traditional LSQR algorithm often cannot reflect the true distribution of all the components. Hence, a good solution requires some manual intervention, for especially low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. An approach based on the LSQR algorithm and L-curve is presented to solve this problem. The L-curve method is applied to obtain an improved initial optimal solution by balancing the residual and the complexity of the solutions instead of manually adjusting the smoothing parameters. First, the traditional LSQR algorithm is used on 2D NMR T1-T2 data to obtain its resultant spectra and corresponding residuals, whose norms are utilized to plot the L-curve. Second, the corner of the L-curve as the initial optimal solution for the non-negative constraint is located. Finally, a 2D map is corrected and calculated iteratively based on the initial optimal solution. The proposed approach is tested on both simulated and measured data. The results show that this algorithm is robust, accurate and promising for the NMR analysis.

  19. Area per lipid and cholesterol interactions in membranes from separated local-field (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F

    2014-11-18

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved (13)C-(1)H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the (13)C-(1)H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive.

  20. High-Field Magnetization of Light Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEwen, K.A.; Cock, G.J.; Roeland, L.W.;

    1973-01-01

    The magnetization of single crystals of Eu, Sm, Nd, Pr, and Pr-Nd alloys has been measured in fields up to 37 T (370 kG). The results give new information on the magnetic properties of these metals. Of particular interest is a first-order transition from a nonmagnetic to a metamagnetic phase...... in double-hexagonal close-packed Pr, due to the crossing of crystal-field levels, when a field of about 32 T is applied in the hard direction at low temperatures....

  1. Modeling and analysis of solar wind generated contributions to the near-Earth magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Rastatter, L.

    2006-01-01

    Solar wind generated magnetic disturbances are currently one of the major obstacles for improving the accuracy in the determination of the magnetic field due to sources internal to the Earth. In the present study a global MHD model of solar wind magnetosphere interaction is used to obtain...... a physically consistent, divergence-free model of ionospheric, field-aligned and magnetospheric currents in a realistic magnetospheric geometry. The magnetic field near the Earth due to these currents is analyzed by estimating and comparing the contributions from the various parts of the system, with the aim....... At high latitudes the field-aligned component is of partidular interest in connection with internal field-modelling. In the attitude regime of 400-800 km (typical for low Earth orbit satellites) the ionospheric currents are found to contribute significantly to the disturbancance, and account for more than...

  2. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  3. Changes in Porcine Muscle Water Characteristics during Growth—An in Vitro Low-Field NMR Relaxation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Rasmussen, Marianne; Busk, Hans; Oksbjerg, Niels; Karlsson, Anders Hans; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of developmental stage and muscle type on the mobility and distribution of water within skeletal muscles, using low-field 1H-NMR transverse relaxation measurements in vitro on four different porcine muscles ( M. longissimus dorsi, M. semitendinosus, M. biceps femoris, M. vastus intermedius) from a total of 48 pigs slaughtered at various weight classes between 25 kg and 150 kg. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed effects of both slaughter weight and muscle type on the transverse relaxation decay. Independent of developmental stage and muscle type, distributed exponential analysis of the NMR T 2 relaxation data imparted the existence of three distinct water populations, T 2b, T 21, and T 22, with relaxation times of approximately 1-10, 45-120, and 200-500 ms, respectively. The most profound change during muscle growth was a shift toward faster relaxation in the intermediate time constant, T 21. It decreased by approx. 24% in all four muscle types during the period from 25 to 150 kg live weight. Determination of dry matter, fat, and protein content in the muscles showed that the changes in relaxation time of the intermediate time constant, T 21, during growth should be ascribed mainly to a change in protein content, as the protein content explained 77% of the variation in the T 21 time constant. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed validated correlations in the region of 0.58 to 0.77 between NMR transverse relaxation data and muscle development for all the four muscle types, which indicates that NMR relaxation measurements may be used in the prediction of muscle developmental stage.

  4. Steady state magnetic field configurations for the earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, L.-N.; Wolf, R. A.; Voigt, G.-H.; Wu, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional, force-balance magnetic field model is presented. The theoretical existence of a steady state magnetic field configuration that is force-balanced and consistent with slow, lossless, adiabatic, earthward convection within the limit of the ideal MHD is demonstrated. A numerical solution is obtained for a two-dimensional magnetosphere with a rectangular magnetopause and nonflaring tail. The results are consistent with the convection time sequences reported by Erickson (1985).

  5. Length of day and polar motion, with respect to temporal variations of the Earth gravity field

    CERN Document Server

    Bourda, G

    2007-01-01

    The masses distribution inside the Earth governs the behaviour of the rotation axis in the Earth (polar motion), as well as the Earth rotation rate (or equivalently, length of day). This masses distribution can be measured from space owing to artificial satellites, the orbitography of which provides the Earth gravity field determination. Then, the temporal variations of the Earth gravity field can be related to the variations of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (with the Inertia Tensor). Nowadays, owing to the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique and to the new gravimetric satellite missions (such as CHAMP or GRACE), the temporal variations of the low degree coefficients of the Earth gravity field (i.e. Stokes coefficients) can be determined. This paper is one of the first study using gravity variations data in the equations already established (e.g. Lambeck 1988) and linking the variations of the length of day and of the C20 Stokes coefficient (or, linking the polar motion and the C21 and S21 coeffi...

  6. Characteristic of the radiation field in low Earth orbit and in deep space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Guenther

    2008-01-01

    The radiation exposure in space by cosmic radiation can be reduced through careful mission planning and constructive measures as example the provision of a radiation shelter, but it cannot be completely avoided. The reason for that are the extreme high energies of particles in this field and the herewith connected high penetration depth in matter. For missions outside the magnetosphere ionizing radiation is recognized as the key factor through its impact on crew health and performance. In absence of sporadic solar particle events the radiation exposure in Low Earth orbit (LEO) inside Spacecraft is determined by the galactic cosmic radiation (protons and heavier ions) and by the protons inside the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), an area where the radiation belt comes closer to the earth surface due to a displacement of the magnetic dipole axes from the Earth's center. In addition there is an albedo source of neutrons produced as interaction products of the primary galactic particles with the atoms of the earth atmosphere. Outside the spacecraft the dose is dominated by the electrons of the horns of the radiation belt located at about 60" latitude in Polar Regions. The radiation field has spatial and temporal variations in dependence of the Earth magnetic field and the solar cycle. The complexity of the radiation field inside a spacecraft is further increased through the interaction of the high energy components with the spacecraft shielding material and with the body of the astronauts. In interplanetary missions the radiation belt will be crossed in a couple of minutes and therefore its contribution to their radiation exposure is quite small, but subsequently the protection by the Earth magnetic field is lost, leaving only shielding measures as exposure reduction means. The report intends to describe the radiation field in space, the interaction of the particles with the magnetic field and shielding material and give some numbers on the radiation exposure in low earth

  7. Magnetic Fields of the Earth and Mars a Comparison and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    In several aspects the magnetic fields of the Earth and Mars are similar but also different. In the past both bodies had planetary magnetic fields but while they Earth's field remains today the Martian ceased to operate, at some unknown time in the past, leaving this planet without a main or core field. This fact resulted in the interaction between the solar and interplanetary magnetic fields with the surfaces of these planets being very different. In addition, Mars has large crustal magnetic anomalies, nearly ten times larger than those on the Earth. Since crustal magnetic anomalies are the product of the thickness of the layer of magnetization, both the magnetizing material and the thickness of the layer of this material must be very different on Mars than Earth. Furthermore, the martian anomalies can only be produced by remanent or fossil magnetization, in contrast with the Earth where both induced and remanent magnetization are producing these anomalies. Crustal magnetic anomalies on the Earth are mainly produced by single-domain, irontitanium oxides, in the form of magnetite being the most common on Mars the main magnetic mineral(s) are unknown. The thickness of the martian magnetized layer in comparison with the Earth remains a major area for research. Determining the paleopole position for the Earth has been done by some of the earliest paleomagnetic researchers. Since we do not have oriented martian rock samples determining the paleopoles for Mars has been done by fitting a magnetization vector to individual magnetic anomalies. Several groups have worked on this problem with somewhat differing results.

  8. Measuring the Earth's gravity field with cold atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Carraz, Olivier; Massotti, Luca; Haagmans, Roger; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  9. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, B Z; Lummen, T T A; van Loosdrecht, P H M; Dhalenne, G; Zakirov, A R

    2010-07-14

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R(2)Ti(2)O(7) (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the site and bulk susceptibilities of the pyrochlore lattice are derived taking into account long range dipole-dipole interactions and anisotropic exchange interactions between the nearest neighbor rare earth ions. The sets of crystal field parameters and anisotropic exchange coupling constants have been determined and their variations along the lanthanide series are discussed.

  10. Magnetometer suitable for Earth field measurement based on transient atomic response

    CERN Document Server

    Lenci, L; Valente, P; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a simple atomic magnetometer using $^{87}$Rb vapor suitable for Earth magnetic field monitoring. The magnetometer is based on time-domain determination of the transient precession frequency of the atomic alignment around the measured field. A sensitivity of 1.5 nT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$ is demonstrated on the measurement of the Earth magnetic field in the laboratory. We discuss the different parameters determining the magnetometer precision and accuracy and predict a sensitivity of 30 pT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$

  11. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, W C; Obruchkov, S; Galvosas, P; Hunter, M W

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  12. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, W. C.; Obruchkov, S.; Galvosas, P.; Hunter, M. W.

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  13. Peculiarities in the director reorientation and evolution of NMR spectra under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical description is proposed for new modes of reorientation of the director field widehat n and the evolution of the NMR spectrum I(ν) of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) formed by molecules of deuterated 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl encapsulated in a rectangular LC cell under the action of crossed electric, E, and magnetic, B, fields directed at an angle of α to one another. Numerical calculations in the framework of the nonlinear generalization of the classical Ericksen-Leslie theory show that, under certain relations between the forces and moments acting upon a unit volume of the LC phase upon the reorientation of widehat n, transient periodic structures can arise if the corresponding distortion mode is characterized by the fastest response and thus suppresses all other modes, including uniform ones. It is shown that the rise of these periodic structures leads to a reduction in the time for the reorientation of the director field.

  14. Levitation of Superconductive Cable in Earth Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohus Ulrych

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an introductory study about a superconductive cable levitating in Earth’s magnetic field. Built are two mathematical models of the problem providing both the shape of the arc of the cable and forces acting along it. The theoretical analysis is supplemented with an illustrative example.

  15. Shock Magnetic Field and Origin of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyi, I.; Timko, M.; Roth, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    To the effects of impulse magnetic field in protoplanetary nebula (fast melting, cooling and magnetization of chondrules), there is added another possible effect - mechanism associated with the forces of attraction between magnetized planetesimals. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Mapping the earth's magnetic and gravity fields from space Current status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, M.; Taranik, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    The principal magnetic fields encountered by earth orbiting spacecraft include the main (core) field, external fields produced by electrical currents within the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and the crustal (anomaly) field generated by variations in the magnetization of the outermost portions of the earth. The first orbital field measurements which proved to be of use for global studies of crustal magnetization were obtained by a series of three satellites launched and operated from 1965 to 1971. Each of the satellites, known as a Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO), carried a rubidium vapor magnetometer. Attention is also given to Magsat launched in 1979, the scalar anomaly field derived from the Magsat measurements, satellite tracking studies in connection with gravity field surveys, radar altimetry, the belt of positive free air gravity anomalies situated along the edge of the Pacific Ocean basin, future technological capabilities, and information concerning data availability.

  17. Spherical harmonic series solution of fields excited by vertical electric dipole in earth-ionosphere cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanxin WANG; Wensheng FAN; Weiyan PAN; Hongqi ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The spherical harmonic series expression of electromagnetic fields excited by ELF/SLF vertical electric dipole in the spherical earth-ionosphere cavity is derived when the earth and ionosphere are regarded as non-ideal conductors. A method of speeding numerical convergence has been presented. The electromagnetic fields in the cavity are calculated by this algorithm, and the results show that the electromagnetic fields between the earth and the ionosphere are the sum of two traveling waves in the SLF band. Moreover, the results are in complete agreement with that of the well-known spherical second-order approximation in the SLF band. The electromagnetic fields in the cavity are a type of standing wave in the ELF band and the variation of the amplitude versus frequency coincides with Schumann's resonance.

  18. NMR at 900 MHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ An important factor in the development of solutionstate NMR has always been th e ability to produce stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. As higher and higher field strengths are reached the pressure is growing on manufacturers to produce NMR systems with greatly improved spectral resolution and signal to noise ratio. The introduction of the Varian 900 MHz INOVA system in August 2000 featuring Oxford Instruments 21.1 T magnet represents the latest pioneering development in NMR technology.

  19. Solar axions as an energy source and modulator of the Earth magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Kudela, K; Mavrodiev, S Cht; Zelentsova, T N; Smolyar, V P; Merkotan, K K

    2010-01-01

    We show existence of strong negative correlation between the temporal variations of magnetic field toroidal component of the solar tachocline (the bottom of convective zone) and the Earth magnetic field (Y-component). The possibility that hypothetical solar axions, which can transform into photons in external electric or magnetic fields (the inverse Primakoff effect), can be the instrument by which the magnetic field of convective zone of the Sun modulates the magnetic field of the Earth is considered. We propose the axion mechanism of "solar dynamo-geodynamo" connection, where an energy of axions, which form in the Sun core, is modulated at first by the magnetic field of the solar tachocline zone (due to the inverse coherent Primakoff effect) and after that is absorbed in the liquid core of the Earth under influence of the terrestrial magnetic field, thereby playing the role of an energy source and a modulator of the Earth magnetic field. Within the framework of this mechanism new estimations of the strength...

  20. The intensity of the Earth's magnetic field over the past 160 million years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juárez, M.T.; Tauxe, Lisa; Gee, J.S.; Pick, T.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to our detailed knowledge of the directional behaviour of the Earth's magnetic field during geological and historical times, data constraining the past intensity of the field remain relatively scarce. This is mainly due to the difficulty in obtaining reliable palaeointensity measurements

  1. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Lummen, T. T. A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Dhalenne, G.; Zakirov, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R2Ti2O7 (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the s

  2. Crystal fields at light rare-earth ions in Y and Lu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Nevald, Rolf; Johansson, Torben

    1978-01-01

    Crystal-field parameters have been deduced for the light rare-earth solutes Ce, Pr, and Nd in Y or Lu hosts from measurements of the paramagnetic susceptibilities. In the analysis all multiplets in the lowest LS term were included. For a given host, crystal-field parameters divided by Stevens fac...

  3. NMR magnet technology at MIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.; Bobrov, E.S.; Iwasa, Y.; Punchard, W.F.B.; Wrenn, J.; Zhukovsky, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    The design and construction of high field superconducting NMR magnets has much in common with other types of adiabatic superconducting magnets. However, two issues have a particular relevance to NMR magnets. They are field drift and homogeneity. In this paper the control of these factors in the particular context of high field NMR spectrometer magnets is examined.

  4. A Comprehensive Model of the Near-Earth Magnetic Field. Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Olsen, Nils; Langel, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    The near-Earth magnetic field is due to sources in Earth's core, ionosphere, magnetosphere, lithosphere, and from coupling currents between ionosphere and magnetosphere and between hemispheres. Traditionally, the main field (low degree internal field) and magnetospheric field have been modeled simultaneously, and fields from other sources modeled separately. Such a scheme, however, can introduce spurious features. A new model, designated CMP3 (Comprehensive Model: Phase 3), has been derived from quiet-time Magsat and POGO satellite measurements and observatory hourly and annual means measurements as part of an effort to coestimate fields from all of these sources. This model represents a significant advancement in the treatment of the aforementioned field sources over previous attempts, and includes an accounting for main field influences on the magnetosphere, main field and solar activity influences on the ionosphere, seasonal influences on the coupling currents, a priori characterization of ionospheric and magnetospheric influence on Earth-induced fields, and an explicit parameterization and estimation of the lithospheric field. The result of this effort is a model whose fits to the data are generally superior to previous models and whose parameter states for the various constituent sources are very reasonable.

  5. The role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in Super Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Cuartas, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary magnetic fields could impact the evolution of planetary atmospheres and have a role in the determination of the required conditions for the emergence and evolution of life (planetary habitability). We study here the role of rotation in the evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in massive Earth-like planets, Super Earths (1-10 M⊕). Using the most recent thermal evolution models of Super Earths (Gaidos, E., Conrad, C.P., Manga, M., Hernlund, J. [2010]. Astrophys. J. 718, 596-609; Tachinami, C., Senshu, H., Ida, S. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 726, 70) and updated scaling laws for convection-driven dynamos, we predict the evolution of the local Rossby number. This quantity is one of the proxies for core magnetic field regime, i.e. non-reversing dipolar, reversing dipolar and multipolar. We study the dependence of the local Rossby number and hence the core magnetic field regime on planetary mass and rotation rate. Previous works have focused only on the evolution of core magnetic fields assuming rapidly rotating planets, i.e. planets in the dipolar regime. In this work we go further, including the effects of rotation in the evolution of planetary magnetic field regime and obtaining global constraints to the existence of intense protective magnetic fields in rapidly and slowly rotating Super Earths. We find that the emergence and continued existence of a protective planetary magnetic field is not only a function of planetary mass but also depend on rotation rate. Low-mass Super Earths ( M ≲ 2 M⊕) develop intense surface magnetic fields but their lifetimes will be limited to 2-4 Gyrs for rotational periods larger than 1-4 days. On the other hand and also in the case of slowly rotating planets, more massive Super Earths ( M ≳ 2 M⊕) have weak magnetic fields but their dipoles will last longer. Finally we analyze tidally locked Super Earths inside and outside the habitable zone of GKM stars. Using the results obtained here we develop a classification of

  6. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail from 10 to 40 earth radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetotail magnetic field measurements near the equatorial plane reveals new information about various aspects of magnetospheric structure. More magnetic flux crosses the equatorial plane on the dawn and dusk flanks of the tail than near midnight, but no evidence is found for a dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field sector polarity. Field magnitudes within 3 earth radii of the equatorial plane near dawn are more than twice as large as those near dusk for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii. The frequency of occurrence of southward fields is greatest near midnight, and such fields are seen almost twice as often for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii as for Xsm beyond -20 earth radii. This latter result supports the idea that the midnight region of the tail between 10 and 20 is a special location where neutral lines are particularly apt to form. Such a neutral line will approach nearest the earth in the midnight and premidnight region, where substorms are thought to have their onset.

  7. Predicting the Magnetic Field of Earth-impacting CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, C.; Gopalswamy, N.; Reinard, A.; Opher, M.

    2017-02-01

    Predicting the impact of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the southward component of their magnetic field is one of the key goals of space weather forecasting. We present a new model, the ForeCAT In situ Data Observer (FIDO), for predicting the in situ magnetic field of CMEs. We first simulate a CME using ForeCAT, a model for CME deflection and rotation resulting from the background solar magnetic forces. Using the CME position and orientation from ForeCAT, we then determine the passage of the CME over a simulated spacecraft. We model the CME’s magnetic field using a force-free flux rope and we determine the in situ magnetic profile at the synthetic spacecraft. We show that FIDO can reproduce the general behavior of four observed CMEs. FIDO results are very sensitive to the CME’s position and orientation, and we show that the uncertainty in a CME’s position and orientation from coronagraph images corresponds to a wide range of in situ magnitudes and even polarities. This small range of positions and orientations also includes CMEs that entirely miss the satellite. We show that two derived parameters (the normalized angular distance between the CME nose and satellite position and the angular difference between the CME tilt and the position angle of the satellite with respect to the CME nose) can be used to reliably determine whether an impact or miss occurs. We find that the same criteria separate the impacts and misses for cases representing all four observed CMEs.

  8. North-South Asymmetries in Earth's Magnetic Field: Effects on High-Latitude Geospace

    CERN Document Server

    Laundal, K M; Milan, S E; Haaland, S E; Coxon, J; Pedatella, N M; Förster, M; Reistad, J P

    2016-01-01

    The solar-wind magnetosphere interaction primarily occurs at altitudes where the dipole component of Earth's magnetic field is dominating. The disturbances that are created in this interaction propagate along magnetic field lines and interact with the ionosphere-thermosphere system. At ionospheric altitudes, the Earth's field deviates significantly from a dipole. North-South asymmetries in the magnetic field imply that the magnetosphere ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) coupling is different in the two hemispheres. In this paper we review the primary differences in the magnetic field at polar latitudes, and the consequences that these have for the M-I-T coupling. We focus on two interhemispheric differences which are thought to have the strongest effects: 1) A difference in the offset between magnetic and geographic poles in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and 2) differences in the magnetic field strength at magnetically conjugate regions. These asymmetries lead to differences in plasma convection, neutr...

  9. The earth’'s electric field sources from sun to mud

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Electric Field provides you with an integrated and comprehensive picture of the generation of the terrestrial electric fields, their dynamics and how they couple/propagate through the medium. The Earth's Electric Field provides basic principles of terrestrial electric field related topics, but also a critical summary of electric field related observations and their significance to the various related phenomena in the atmosphere. For the first time, Kelley brings together information on this topic in a coherent way, making it easy to gain a broad overview of the critical processes in an efficient way. If you conduct research in atmospheric science, physics, atmospheric chemistry, space plasma physics, and solar terrestrial physics, you will find this book to be essential reading. The only book on the physics of terrestrial electric fields and their generation mechanisms, propagation and dynamics-making it essential reading for scientists conducting research in upper atmospheric, ionospheric, magnet...

  10. Effect of clay aggregation on water diffusivity using low field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichet, Xavier; Fleury, Marc; Kohler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    Water diffusivity D measured by using NMR techniques in Na-smectite suspensions decreases with increasing smectite fraction (up to 50 wt%), but increases with increasing salinity (NaCl or CaCl(2) aqueous solutions) at a fixed clay fraction. The increase, larger for CaCl(2) solutions, is explained by aggregation of clay particles when high salinities are reached. Macroscopic organisation of dense mixtures of clay and aqueous solutions can be inferred by T(2) transverse NMR relaxation times which are sensitive to the volume to surface ratio. Dispersed suspensions exhibit mono-modal T(2) distributions, whereas bimodal T(2) distributions are observed for flocculated systems. The bimodal T(2) distributions are interpreted as a measurement of the spacing between clay particles within aggregates and between aggregates. Finally, the diffusion data can be gathered in an unique curve using the Debye length and the measured spacing between particles. When the thickness of the electro-diffuse layer (Debye length) is of the same order as the spacing between clay particles, the water diffusivity decreases. Otherwise it is constant at about 2.22+/-0.25x10(-9) m(2)/s. This last result illustrates clearly the effect of electro-chemical properties of smectite on water diffusivity.

  11. Rapid determination of fluid viscosity using low-field two-dimensional NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feng; Xiao, Lizhi; Chen, Weiliang; Liu, Huabing; Liao, Guangzhi; Wang, Mengying; Xie, Qingming

    2014-10-01

    The rapid prediction of fluid viscosity, especially the fluid in heavy-oil petroleum reservoirs, is of great importance for oil exploration and transportation. We suggest a new method for rapid prediction of fluid viscosity using two-dimensional (2D) NMR relaxation time distributions. DEFIR, Driven-Equilibrium Fast-Inversion Recovery, a new pulse sequence for rapid measurement of 2D relaxation times, is proposed. The 2D relation between the ratio of transverse relaxation time to longitudinal relaxation time (T1/T2) and T1 distribution of fluid are obtained by means of DEFIR with only two one-dimensional measurements. The measurement speed of DEFIR pulse sequence over 2 times as fast as that of the traditional 2D method. Using Bloembergen theory, the relation between the distributions and fluid viscosity is found. Precise method for viscosity prediction is then established. Finally, we apply this method to a down-hole NMR fluid analysis system and realized on-site and on-line prediction of viscosity for formation fluids. The results demonstrated that the new method for viscosity prediction is efficient and accurate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy: A 30 year adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    The history of research in the Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy is described and limitations of existing geopotential models are indicated. Although current solutions have made outstanding achievements, their limited accuracy restricts their use for some oceanographic applications. An example is discussed where there appears to be an incompatibility of the long wavelength geoid undulation obtained through satellite analysis with independent estimates that have become available. The future Aristoteles mission is seen as providing a significant leap in Earth gravity field knowledge improvement.

  13. A robust approach to correct for pronounced errors in temperature measurements by controlling radiation damping feedback fields in solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolahan, Stephanie M; Li, Zhao; Hsu, Chao-Hsiung; Huang, Shing-Jong; Clubb, Robert; Hwang, Lian-Pin; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2014-11-01

    Accurate temperature measurement is a requisite for obtaining reliable thermodynamic and kinetic information in all NMR experiments. A widely used method to calibrate sample temperature depends on a secondary standard with temperature-dependent chemical shifts to report the true sample temperature, such as the hydroxyl proton in neat methanol or neat ethylene glycol. The temperature-dependent chemical shift of the hydroxyl protons arises from the sensitivity of the hydrogen-bond network to small changes in temperature. The frequency separation between the alkyl and the hydroxyl protons are then converted to sample temperature. Temperature measurements by this method, however, have been reported to be inconsistent and incorrect in modern NMR, particularly for spectrometers equipped with cryogenically-cooled probes. Such errors make it difficult or even impossible to study chemical exchange and molecular dynamics or to compare data acquired on different instruments, as is frequently done in biomolecular NMR. In this work, we identify the physical origins for such errors to be unequal amount of dynamical frequency shifts on the alkyl and the hydroxyl protons induced by strong radiation damping (RD) feedback fields. Common methods used to circumvent RD may not suppress such errors. A simple, easy-to-implement solution was demonstrated that neutralizes the RD effect on the frequency separation by a "selective crushing recovery" pulse sequence to equalize the transverse magnetization of both spin species. Experiments using cryoprobes at 500 MHz and 800 MHz demonstrated that this approach can effectively reduce the errors in temperature measurements from about ±4.0 K to within ±0.4 K in general.

  14. Electric Power Generation from Earth's Rotation through its Own Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Christopher F.; Hand, Kevin P.

    2016-07-01

    We examine electric power generation from Earth's rotation through its own nonrotating magnetic field (that component of the field symmetric about Earth's rotation axis). There is a simple general proof that this is impossible. However, we identify a loophole in that proof and show that voltage can be continuously generated in a low-magnetic-Reynolds-number conductor rotating with Earth, provided magnetically permeable material is used to ensure curl(v ×B0)≠0 within the conductor, where B0 derives from the axially symmetric component of Earth's magnetic flux density, and v is Earth's rotation velocity at the conductor's location. We solve the relevant equations for one laboratory realization, and from this solution, we predict the voltage magnitude and sign dependence on system dimensions and orientation relative to Earth's rotation. The effect, which would be available nearly globally with no intermittency, requires testing and further examination to see if it can be scaled to practical emission-free power generation.

  15. Field-stepped broadband NMR in pulsed magnets and application to SrCu2(BO3)2 at 54 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlrautz, J.; Haase, J.; Green, E. L.; Zhang, Z. T.; Wosnitza, J.; Herrmannsdörfer, T.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, B. D.; Stern, R.; Kühne, H.

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed magnets generate the highest magnetic fields as brief transients during which the observation of NMR is difficult, however, this is the only route to unique insight into material properties up to the regime of 100 T. Here, it is shown how rather broad NMR spectra can be assembled in a pulsed magnet during a single field pulse by using the inherent time dependence of the field for the recording of field-stepped free induction decays that cover a broad frequency range. The technique is then applied to 11B NMR of the spin-dimer system SrCu2(BO3)2, a magnetic insulator known to undergo a series of field-driven changes of the magnetic ground state. At peak fields of about 54T at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 11B NMR spectra spanning a total of about 9MHz width are reconstructed. The results are in good accordance with a change from a high-temperature paramagnetic state to a low-temperature commensurate superstructure of field-induced spin-dimer triplets.

  16. Fast field cycling NMR relaxometry characterization of biochars obtained from an industrial thermochemical process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pasquale, Claudio; Marsala, Valentina; Alonzo, Giuseppe; Conte, Pellegrino [Universita degli Studi di Palermo (Italy). Dipt. dei Sistemi Agro-Ambientali; Berns, Anne E. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Bio- and Geosciences (IBG-3); Valagussa, Massimo [M.A.C. Minoprio Analisi e Certificazioni S.r.l., Vertemate con Minoprio, CO (Italy); Pozzi, Alessandro [A.G.T. Advanced Gasification Technology S.r.l., Arosio, CO (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Biochar has unique properties which make it a powerful tool to increase soil fertility and to contribute to the decrease of the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide through the mechanisms of C sequestration in soils. Chemical and physical biochar characteristics depend upon the technique used for its production and the biomass nature. For this reason, biochar characterization is very important in order to address its use either for agricultural or environmental purposes. Materials and methods: Three different biochars obtained from an industrial gasification process were selected in order to establish their chemical and physical peculiarities for a possible use in agronomical practices. They were obtained by charring residues from the wine-making industry (marc) and from poplar and conifer forests. Routine analyses such as pH measurements, elemental composition, and ash and metal contents were performed together with the evaluation of the cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) {sup 13}C NMR spectra of all the biochar samples. Finally, relaxometry properties of water-saturated biochars were retrieved in order to obtain information on pore size distribution. Results and discussion: All the biochars revealed basic pH values due to their large content of alkaline metals. The quality of CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra, which showed the typical signal pattern for charred systems, was not affected by the presence of paramagnetic centers. Although paramagnetism was negligible for the acquisition of solid state spectra, it was effective in some of the relaxometry experiments. For this reason, no useful information could be retrieved about water dynamics in marc char. Conversely, both relaxograms and nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles of poplar and conifer chars indicated that poplar char is richer in small-sized pores, while larger pores appear to be characteristic for the conifer char. Conclusions: This study showed the potential of relaxometry in

  17. Application of instrumental techniques like NMR and GPC in the field of polymer modified bitumens; Determinazione mediante NMR e GPC di polimeri incorporati in bitumi modificati

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, M.; Di Gennaro, E.; Mascherpa, A.; Vecchi, C. [Stazione Sperimentale per i Combustibili, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)

    1996-05-01

    In the present work a simple method is proposed to determine, at the same time, the nature of the polymer, the composition of polymer/bitumen blends and the origin of the bitumen. The procedure is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In a few minutes and without any sample manipulation, a simple NMR proton spectrum reveals the presence and the nature of the polymer in road bitumens modified with different contents of SBS, SIS, EVA. EMA. The detection limits are function of the instrument used and the nature of the polymer. NMR data have been compared with those obtained by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) which is a less expensive technique than NMR, but does not allow can easy identification of the polymer. When the polymer concentration in the mixture is very low (1-2%), the difference between know and calculated values increases: better results can be obtained analysing the n-pentane insolubles, where the whole amount of the modifier is observed.

  18. Sensitivity of near field GIA response with respect to rheological features of the Earth structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, Jan M.; Klemann, Volker; Sasgen, Ingo; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    One task of the German National Climate Modeling Initiative PalMod will be to couple earth system models representing the atmospere, ocean and ice dynamics during the last glacial cycle with the dynamic loading response of a viscoelastic earth model. In preparation, we discuss in this study the influence of viscosity stratification and of lateral heterogeneities in the Earth structure on the solid-earth response to glacial loading. As discussed in literature, there is a controversy about the impact of lateral heterogeneity on the prediction of present and past GIA signals. The influence of the Earth structure on the far-field response is governed by the flexural behaviour of the regional lithosphere and upper-mantle structure in response to the varying ocean load. The influence at and around the glacial ice sheets is substantial with respect to the amplitudes and also with respect to the temporal evolution of the earth's response. Depending on the region of interest, lithospheric variations are present over the extent of the glacial ice sheets varying between 40 and 200 km, and lateral variations in viscosity can vary by one or two orders of magnitude. The focus will be to what extent the behaviour of a laterally heterogeneous viscosity structure can be parameterised by an adjusted spherical earth model representation. Accordingly, we apply predefined ice-sheet histories (like ICE5G and ICE6G) and analyse ensemble runs representing the variability of relative sea-level and palaeo-topography predictions. Spatial pattern of deformation fields will be discussed as the behaviour at specific sea-level curves. Furthermore, we compare the sensitivity on earth structure during the evolution of sea level and palaeo topography during the termination phase of the last glaciation to present-day rates of relative sea-level height and radial displacement.

  19. Evaluation of PHB nanocomposite by low field NMR;Avaliacao de nanocompositos de PHB por RMN de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mariana Bruno Rocha e; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno, E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) based on nanocomposites containing different amounts of a commercial organically modified clay (viscogel B8) were prepared employing solution intercalation method. The relationship among the processing conditions; molecular structure and intermolecular interaction, between both nanocomposite components, were investigated using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as a part of characterization methodology, which has been used by Tavares et al. It involves the proton spin-lattice relaxation time, T1 H, by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, employing low field NMR. X-ray diffraction was also employed because it is a conventional technique, generally used to obtain the first information on nanocomposite formation. Changes in PHB crystallinity were observed after the organophilic nanoclay had been incorporated in the polymer matrix. These changes, in the microstructure, were detected by the variation of proton nuclear relaxation time values and by X-ray, which showed an increase in the clay interlamellar space due to the intercalation of the polymer in the clay between lamellae. (author)

  20. NMR logging apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  1. NMR logging apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  2. The microscopic NMR probe in chiral magnets. Zero field-, field-modulated- and Skyrmion- states in FeGe and MnSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baenitz, Michael; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Majumder, Mayukh; Khuntia, Panchanan; Schmidt, Marcus [MPI for the Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius [Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Cubic FeGe is a prototype B20 chiral magnet (T{sub c} = 280 K) which allows to study chiral correlations directly ''on-site'' via the{sup 57}Fe nucleus because of its S=1/2 nuclear spin interacting only with the electron spin moment. NMR provides the static and dynamic staggered local magnetization M{sub Q} through the hyperfine field (H{sub hf}) and the spin lattice relaxation rate (SLRR = 1/T{sub 1}). Measurements were performed on randomly oriented {sup 57}Fe enriched FeGe single crystals between 2-300 K. Helical-, conical- and field-polarized-states could be clearly identified and spin dynamics of each phase was investigated. MnSi single crystals and {sup 29}Si enriched MnSi polycrystals were studied by {sup 29}Si-NMR (S=1/2) in the ordered state (T{sub c} = 29 K) and above. The T- and H- dependence of H{sub hf} and SLRR was investigated in great detail for both FeGe and MnSi.The {sup 29}Si-NMR lines in MnSi are narrow and H{sub hf}-values obtained are smaller than in FeGe. Our results are in general accordance with the extended SCR theory for itinerant helical magnets, although the theory does not include the symmetry breaking in the B20 structure and the multi-band nature. For FeGe correlations are complex due to its more localized magnetism.

  3. Responses of atmospheric electric field and air-earth current to variations of conductivity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, M.; Ogawa, T.

    1984-05-01

    A global circuit model is constructed to study responses of air-earth current and electric field to a variation of atmospheric electrical conductivity profile. The model includes the orography and the global distribution of thunderstorm generators. The conductivity varies with latitude and exponentially with altitude. The thunderstorm cloud is assumed to be a current generator with a positive source at the top and a negative one at the bottom. The UT diurnal variations of the global current and the ionospheric potential are evaluated considering the local-time dependence of thunderstorm activity. The global distribution of the electric field and the air-earth current are affected by the orography and latitudinal effects. Assuming a variation of conductivity profile, responses of atmospheric electrical parameters are investigated. The nonuniform decrement of the conductivity with altitude increases both the electric field and the air-earth current. The result suggests a possibility that the increment of the electric field and the air-earth current after a solar flare may be caused by this scheme, due to Forbush decrease.

  4. A New Look On the Nature of the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikholaevich Dmitriev, Arkadiy

    2016-10-01

    There was examined the model of the Earth's dipole magnetic field based on the existing geothermocurrents in the Earth's core, that occurred because of the geothermal gradient and the related Seebeck effect. The calculations showed, that the energy of geothermocurrents is enough to keep Earth's Magnetic Field (EMF) at the present level, that is about (3 - 5)10-5 T. EMF model is quite innovative in comparison to the known electrical models, because it contains two branches of the planetary thermoelectrical element: “inner core - outer core - lower mantel”. These branches are connected through the more warmed and melted outer core. If the thermocurrents are simultaneously directed to the Earth's surface, a thaw period comes. If they are directed oppositely an ice age comes. As the directions of thermocurrents in the inner core change, EMF poles get inverted. At the moment of their inversion dipole magnetic field decreases up to its transitional disappearance. At the same time the pole caused by the lower mantel stays as 4.6 10-6 T. Thermoelectrical EMF model is universal. It enables us to calculate magnetic fields of any planet within the Solar System.

  5. Possibility for a fourth test of general relativity in earth's gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong

    1982-10-01

    In this work, the effect of Earth's gravitational field on a interferometer is calculated in general relativity. The result is that an expected fringe shift, about 10/sup -10/, will occur when the interferometer is rotated through 90/sup 0/ if the length of arms are 1 meter and wavelength of light is 1 ..mu..m.

  6. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots.

  7. Modelling the Earth's Main Magnetic Field by the spinning Astrid-2 satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Risbo, T.

    1999-01-01

    and therefore the mapping of the Earth's magnetic field may be possible. The spinning of the spacecraft about a certain axis makes the stabilisation in space possible. This fact and the well distributed data over the globe makes the magnetic data well suited for the estimation of the magnetic field model...... at the spacecraft altitude (circa 1000km). Several methods for field modelling are presented in this paper with the assumption that the direction of the spin axis is nearly constant. In any case the orientation of the magnetometer is to bedetermined simultaneously with the instrument calibration and main field...

  8. The application of tailor-made force fields and molecular dynamics for NMR crystallography: a case study of free base cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Neumann, Marcus A.; van de Streek, Jacco

    2017-01-01

    Motional averaging has been proven to be significant in predicting the chemical shifts in ab initio solid-state NMR calculations, and the applicability of motional averaging with molecular dynamics has been shown to depend on the accuracy of the molecular mechanical force field. The performance...... cocaine is used as an example. The results reveal that, even though the TMFF outperforms the COMPASS force field for representing the energies and conformations of predicted structures, it does not give significant improvement in the accuracy of NMR calculations. Further studies should direct more...

  9. Low-field NMR determinations of the properties of heavy oils and water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaTorraca, G A; Dunn, K J; Webber, P R; Carlson, R M

    1998-01-01

    Low-field (magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging measurements are beginning to be used to obtain estimates of oil viscosity in situ. To build an interpretive capability, we made laboratory T1 and T2 relaxation measurements on a suite of high-density, high-viscosity crude oils. These measurements were also used to estimate oil viscosity and water fraction from T1 and T2 measurements on stable, water-in-oil emulsions. High-density, high-viscosity oils have components that relax faster than can be measured by nuclear magnetic resonance logging tools. This requires corrections to T2 logging measurements for accurate estimates of oil saturation and porosity.

  10. EVALUATION OF ERRORS IN PARAMETERS DETERMINATION FOR THE EARTH HIGHLY ANOMALOUS GRAVITY FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Staroseltsev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper presents research results and the simulation of errors caused by determining the Earth gravity field parameters for regions with high segmentation of gravity field. The Kalman filtering estimation of determining errors is shown. Method. Simulation model for the realization of inertial geodetic method for determining the Earth gravity field parameters is proposed. The model is based on high-precision inertial navigation system (INS at the free gyro and high-accuracy satellite system. The possibility of finding the conformity between the determined and stochastic approaches in gravity potential modeling is shown with the example of a point-mass model. Main Results. Computer simulation shows that for determining the Earth gravity field parameters gyro error model can be reduced to two significant indexes, one for each gyro. It is also shown that for regions with high segmentation of gravity field point-mass model can be used. This model is a superposition of attractive and repulsive masses - the so-called gravitational dipole. Practical Relevance. The reduction of gyro error model can reduce the dimension of the Kalman filter used in the integrated system, which decreases the computation time and increases the visibility of the state vector. Finding the conformity between the determined and stochastic approaches allows the application of determined and statistical terminology. Also it helps to create a simulation model for regions with high segmentation of gravity field.

  11. Simulations of a quasi-Taylor state geomagnetic field including polarity reversals on the Earth Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    2005-07-15

    High-resolution, low-viscosity geodynamo simulations have been carried out on the Earth Simulator, one of the fastest supercomputers, in a dynamic regime similar to that of Earth's core, that is, in a quasi-Taylor state. Our dynamo models exhibit features of the geodynamo not only in spatial and temporal characteristics but also in dynamics. Polarity reversals occurred when magnetic flux patches at high latitudes moved poleward and disappeared; patches with reversed field at low and mid-latitudes then moved poleward.

  12. Fourier power spectra of the geomagnetic field for circular paths on the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, L.R.; Benton, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Fourier power spectra of geomagnetic component values, synthesized from spherical harmonic models, have been computed for circular paths on the Earth's surface. They are not found to be more useful than is the spectrum of magnetic energy outside the Earth for the purpose of separating core and crustal sources of the geomagnetic field. The Fourier power spectra of N and E geomagnetic components along nearly polar great circle paths exhibit some unusual characteristics that are explained by the geometric perspective of Fourier series on spheres developed by Yee. -Authors

  13. Rates of change of the earth's magnetic field measured by recent analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Huang, Qilin

    1990-01-01

    Typical rates of change of the earth's magnetic field are presented as a function of the earth's spherical harmonics. Harmonics up to the eight degree are analyzed. With the increase in the degree of the harmonics an increase in the relative rate of change can be observed. For higher degrees, the rate of change can be predicted. This enables a differentiation between harmonics originating in the core and harmonics caused by crustal magnetization. The westward drift of the magnetic field depends on the longitudinal gradient of the field. In order to determine the longitudinal motions, harmonics up to degree 20 can be utilized. The average rate of secular acceleration increases with the degree of harmonics from 0.001 deg/sq yr for a dipole term to an average of 0.05 deg/sq yr for degree eight harmonics.

  14. Free oscillations of the earth-like planets in the presence of magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available   we study the free oscillations of a non-rotating earth-like planet in the presence of a force free magnetic field. The model consists of a solid inner core, a liquid outer core and a solid mantle which is spherically symmetric. The lagrangian displacements are decomposed into scaloidal, poloidal and toroidal components using a gauged version of Helmholtz theorem. These components are identified, with P- , g and t- modes, respectively. The normal modes of the model are determined using a Rayleigh-Ritz variational technique. The consequence of the presence of the solid parts and the magnetic field is the emergence of pure t- oscillations. The magnetic field, in addition to exciting t- modes, couples the everpresent p- and g -modes together. As an application of the model, the real seismic data of the earth is used to calculate eigenvalues and eigenvectors for different modes.

  15. Effect of upward ion on field-aligned currents in the near-earth magnetotail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; LingQian; LIU; ZhenXing; MA; ZhiWei; SHEN; Chao; ZHOU; XuZhi; ZHANG; XianGuo

    2007-01-01

    A 3-dimensional resistive MHD simulation was carried out to study the effect of the upward ions on the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the near-earth magnetotail. The simulation results show that the up-flow ions originating from the nightside auroral oval would drift into the center plasma sheet along the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet boundary, and have an important effect on the field-aligned currents. The main conclusions include that: 1) the upward-ions mainly affect the field- aligned currents in the near-earth magnetotail (inside 15 Re); 2) the generated FACs in the near-earth region have two types, i.e., Region 1 FAC in the high-latitude and Region 2 FAC in the low-latitude; 3) FACs increase with the enhancement of the upward ion flux; 4) with the same flux of the upward ions, FACs enhance with the increase of the velocity of the up-flow ions; 5) the intensification of FACs is also closely related with the latitude of the upward ions, and the ions from the closed field line region generate larger FACs; 6) the generation of FACs is closely related with By created by the upward ions.

  16. Future missions for observing Earth's changing gravity field: a closed-loop simulation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    The GRACE mission has successfully demonstrated the observation from space of the changing Earth's gravity field at length and time scales of typically 1000 km and 10-30 days, respectively. Many scientific communities strongly advertise the need for continuity of observing Earth's gravity field from space. Moreover, a strong interest is being expressed to have gravity missions that allow a more detailed sampling of the Earth's gravity field both in time and in space. Designing a gravity field mission for the future is a complicated process that involves making many trade-offs, such as trade-offs between spatial, temporal resolution and financial budget. Moreover, it involves the optimization of many parameters, such as orbital parameters (height, inclination), distinction between which gravity sources to observe or correct for (for example are gravity changes due to ocean currents a nuisance or a signal to be retrieved?), observation techniques (low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, satellite gravity gradiometry, accelerometers), and satellite control systems (drag-free?). A comprehensive tool has been developed and implemented that allows the closed-loop simulation of gravity field retrievals for different satellite mission scenarios. This paper provides a description of this tool. Moreover, its capabilities are demonstrated by a few case studies. Acknowledgments. The research that is being done with the closed-loop simulation tool is partially funded by the European Space Agency (ESA). An important component of the tool is the GEODYN software, kindly provided by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  17. On the usefulness of relativistic space-times for the description of the Earth's gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffel, Michael; Frutos, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    The usefulness of relativistic space-times for the description of the Earth's gravitational field is investigated. A variety of exact vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations (Schwarzschild, Erez and Rosen, Gutsunayev and Manko, Hernández-Pastora and Martín, Kerr, Quevedo, and Mashhoon) are investigated in that respect. It is argued that because of their multipole structure and influences from external bodies, all these exact solutions are not really useful for the central problem. Then, approximate space-times resulting from an MPM or post-Newtonian approximation are considered. Only in the DSX formalism that is of the first post-Newtonian order, all aspects of the problem can be tackled: a relativistic description (a) of the Earth's gravity field in a well-defined geocentric reference system (GCRS), (b) of the motion of solar system bodies in a barycentric reference system (BCRS), and (c) of inertial and tidal terms in the geocentric metric describing the external gravitational field. A relativistic SLR theory is also discussed with respect to our central problem. Orders of magnitude of many effects related to the Earth's gravitational field and SLR are given. It is argued that a formalism with accuracies better than of the first post-Newtonian order is not yet available.

  18. Zero quantum NMR imaging and spectroscopy in a low homogeneity magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, L.D.; Norwood, T.J.

    1987-10-27

    This patent describes a method of obtaining zero-quantum coherence resolved images and spectra from a spin system substance in an inhomogeneous or low homogeneity magnetic field which comprises applying to the substance a pulse and spatial encoding sequence.

  19. The NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Wide Field-of-View Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kathryn A.; Smith, G. Louis; Young, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consisted of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers and scanning radiometers for measuring outgoing longwave radiation and solar radiation reflected from the Earth. These instruments were carried by the dedicated Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and by the NOAA-9 and -10 operational spacecraft. The WFOV radiometers provided data from which instantaneous fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are computed by use of a numerical filter algorithm. Monthly mean fluxes over a 5-degree equal angle grid are computed from the instantaneous TOA fluxes. The WFOV radiometers aboard the NOAA-9 spacecraft operated from February 1985 through December 1992, at which time a failure of the shortwave radiometer ended the usable data after nearly 8 years. This paper examines the monthly mean products from that data set.

  20. Existence of a component corotating with the earth in high-latitude disturbance magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A.; Kim, J. S.; Sugiura, M.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the data from the high-latitude North American IMS network of magnetic stations suggests that there is a component in substorm perturbations that corotates with the earth. It is as yet not certain whether the existence of this component stems from the corotation of a part of the magnetospheric plasma involved in the substorm mechanism or if it is a 'phase change' resulting from the control of the substorm manifestations by the earth's main magnetic field which is not axially symmetric. There are other geophysical phenomena showing a persistence of longitudinal variations corotating with the earth. These phenomena are of significance for a better understanding of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  1. Elementary Theoretical Forms for the Spatial Power Spectrum of Earth's Crustal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic field produced by magnetization in Earth's crust and lithosphere can be distinguished from the field produced by electric currents in Earth's core because the spatial magnetic power spectrum of the crustal field differs from that of the core field. Theoretical forms for the spectrum of the crustal field are derived by treating each magnetic domain in the crust as the point source of a dipole field. The geologic null-hypothesis that such moments are uncorrelated is used to obtain the magnetic spectrum expected from a randomly magnetized, or unstructured, spherical crust of negligible thickness. This simplest spectral form is modified to allow for uniform crustal thickness, ellipsoidality, and the polarization of domains by an periodically reversing, geocentric axial dipole field from Earth's core. Such spectra are intended to describe the background crustal field. Magnetic anomalies due to correlated magnetization within coherent geologic structures may well be superimposed upon this background; yet representing each such anomaly with a single point dipole may lead to similar spectral forms. Results from attempts to fit these forms to observational spectra, determined via spherical harmonic analysis of MAGSAT data, are summarized in terms of amplitude, source depth, and misfit. Each theoretical spectrum reduces to a source factor multiplied by the usual exponential function of spherical harmonic degree n due to geometric attenuation with attitude above the source layer. The source factors always vary with n and are approximately proportional to n(exp 3) for degrees 12 through 120. The theoretical spectra are therefore not directly proportional to an exponential function of spherical harmonic degree n. There is no radius at which these spectra are flat, level, or otherwise independent of n.

  2. The mechanism of paramagnetic NMR relaxation produced by Mn(II): role of orthorhombic and fourth-order zero field splitting terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Robert

    2008-10-14

    Mn(II) is a spin-5/2 paramagnetic ion that mediates a characteristically large NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (NMR-PRE) of nuclear spins in solution. In the range of high magnetic field strengths (above about 0.3 T), where the electronic Zeeman interaction provides the largest term of the electron spin Hamiltonian, NMR relaxation mechanism is well understood. In the lower field range, the physical picture is more complex because of the presence in the spin Hamiltonian of zero field splitting (ZFS) terms that are comparable to or greater than the Zeeman term. This work describes a systematic study of the relaxation mechanism in the low field range, particularly aspects involving the dependence of NMR-PRE on the orthorhombic (E) and fourth-order (a(q)(4), q=0,2,4) ZFS tensor components. It is shown that the fourfold (a(4)(4)) and twofold (a(2)(4)) fourth-order components exert large orientation-dependent influences on the NMR-PRE. Thus, fourth-order terms with magnitudes equal to only a few percent of the quadratic ZFS terms (D,E) produce large changes in the shape of the magnetic field profile of the PRE. Effects arising from the orthorhombic quadratic ZFS term (E) are much smaller than those of the fourth-order terms and can in most cases be neglected. However, effects due to a(4)(4) and a(2)(4) need to be included in simulations of low field data.

  3. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  4. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near- Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterizing the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  5. Swarm - The European Space Agency's Constellation Mission: Mapping Earth's Magnetic and Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floberghagen, Rune

    2016-07-01

    Launched on 22 November 2013, the three-satellite Swarm constellation is about halfway into its four-year nominal mission. Embarking identical, high accuracy and high spatial as well as temporal resolution instrumentation on all satellites, the mission has ambitious goals reaching from the deep Earth interior (the liquid outer core) all the way out to the solar-terrestrial interaction in the magnetosphere. One may safely state that the mission addresses a diverse range of science issues, and therefore acts as a true discoverer in many fields. Measurements of the magnetic field (magnitude and vector components), the electric field (through ion drift velocity, ion density, ion temperature, electron density, electron temperature and spacecraft potential), the gas density and horizontal winds as well as precise positioning are supported by a range of derived products for the magnetic field, geophysics, aeronomy and space physics communities. Indeed, Swarm is at the forefront of cross-cutting science issues that involve significant parts of the space and earth physics community. In recent data exploitation and science projects we have also seen a high number of coupling studies emerging. This contribution details the status and achievements of the mission in the field of magnetic field, electric field and geospace research. It furthermore discusses the the Agency's further plans, beyond the currently foreseen nominal end of mission in spring 2018. The role of Swarm for space weather research will also be discussed.

  6. Herding Cats: Geocuration Practices Employed for Field Research Data Collection Activities and Visualization by Blueprint Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, R.; Harrison, M.; Sonnenthal, N.; Hernandez, A.; Pelaez, J.

    2015-12-01

    Researchers investigating interdisciplinary topics must work to understand the barriers created by information siloes in order to productively collaborate on complex Earth science questions. These barriers create acute challenges when research is driven by observations rather than hypotheses, as communication between collaborators hinges on data synthesis techniques that often vary greatly between disciplines. Field data collection across disciplines creates even more challenges, and employing student researchers of varying abilities demands an approach that is structured, and yet still flexible enough to accommodate inherent differences in the subjective portions of student data collection. Blueprint Earth is performing system-level environmental observations in the broad areas of geology, biology, hydrology, and atmospheric science. Traditional field data collection methodologies are employed for ease of reproducibility, but must translate across disciplinary information siloes. Information collected must be readily useable in the formulation of hypotheses based on field observations, which necessitates an understanding of key metrics by all investigators involved in data analysis. Blueprint Earth demonstrates the ability to create clear data standards across several disciplines while incorporating a quality control process and this allows for conversion of data into functional visualizations. Additionally, geocuration is organized such that data will be ready for public dissemination upon completion of field research.

  7. Solid-state (79/81)Br NMR and gauge-including projector-augmented wave study of structure, symmetry, and hydration state in alkaline earth metal bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Cory M; Bryce, David L

    2010-02-11

    Bromine-79/81 solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is established as a tool to characterize the local structure and symmetry about bromide ions in inorganic systems. Benchmark experimental (79/81)Br SSNMR data are acquired for CaBr(2), SrBr(2), BaBr(2), MgBr(2).6H(2)O, SrBr(2).6H(2)O, BaBr(2).2H(2)O, and CaBr(2).xH(2)O using the Solomon echo and/or QCPMG pulse sequences in magnetic fields of 11.75 and 21.1 T. Analytical line-shape analysis provides (79/81)Br electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters (including (79)Br quadrupolar coupling constants, C(Q)((79)Br), of up to 75.1(5) MHz in CaBr(2)), chemical shift tensor parameters (including the largest reported anisotropy), and the relative orientation of the tensor principal axis systems. These data are interpreted in terms of structure and symmetry. Our results indicate that ionic bromide systems should be generally accessible to characterization by (79/81)Br SSNMR despite sizable quadrupolar interactions. The resolving capabilities of (79/81)Br SSNMR spectroscopy are illustrated, using samples which possess up to four magnetically inequivalent sites, and through a rare example of (79)Br magic-angle spinning NMR for a Br in a noncubic lattice. Bromine-79/81 SSNMR spectroscopy is demonstrated to be sensitive to the presence of hydrates (i.e., pseudopolymorphism), via drastic changes in C(Q) and delta(iso). The changes are diagnostic to an extent that the composition of the mixture CaBr(2).xH(2)O is determined for the first time. This technique should therefore be applicable to characterize other unknown mixtures or polymorphs. Important instances where (79)Br nuclear quadrupole resonance data were found to be deficient are noted and corrected. GIPAW DFT computations are shown to be generally in very good agreement with the experimental (79/81)Br SSNMR observations. Finally, it is demonstrated that the origin of the EFG at the Br nuclei cannot be described quantitatively using a point charge model, even after

  8. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico); Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J., E-mail: arturoj.hernandez@upr.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  9. NMR measurement of the magnetic field correlation function in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2008-01-18

    The structure factor provides a fundamental characterization of porous and granular materials as it is the key for solid crystals via measurements of x-ray and neutron scattering. Here, we demonstrate that the structure factor of the granular and porous media can be approximated by the pair correlation function of the inhomogeneous internal magnetic field, which arises from the susceptibility difference between the pore filling liquid and the solid matrix. In-depth understanding of the internal field is likely to contribute to further development of techniques to study porous and granular media.

  10. NMR for chemists and biologists

    CERN Document Server

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to the field of nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR. It presents the basic foundations of NMR in a non-mathematical way and provides an overview of both recent and important biological applications of NMR.

  11. Zero-field NMR of nematic liquid crystals with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies. [Propyl-, pentyl-, and heptylbicyclo-hexylcarbonitriles, p-ethoxybenzylidene-p-butylaniline (EBBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, A.M.; Luzar, M.; Pines, A.

    1987-04-09

    Nematic liquid crystal systems with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies are studied by NMR in high and zero magnetic fields. The behavior of the system in zero field is dictated by the form of the zero-field Hamiltonian, the symmetry of the liquid crystal phase, and the initial state of the magnetization. Zero-field evolution is initiated both with and without the use of dc pulsed fields in the field cycle. Pulsed dc fields are also used to remove the effects of residual field inhomogeneities by zero-field spin echoes. The order parameters measured in an applied field and in the absence of a field are found to be the same within experimental error for both types of liquid crystal.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  13. The characteristics of spatial homogeneity and strength of magnetic field for compact NMR magnets using stacked HTS bulks with various gap lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kimoto, T.; Imai, M.; Yano, Y.; Joo, J.H. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hahn, S.; Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tomita, M. [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    A compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of an high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk. In design of a compact NMR magnet which consists of the stacked HTS bulk annuli, the issues of strength, spatial homogeneity and temporal stability by trapped magnetic fields are very important. This paper presents a study on the effects of magnetization field strength and gap length between stacked bulks for the compact HTS bulk NMR applications. Four-stacked HTS bulk magnet with ID 20 mm and OD 60 mm was prepared to investigate the optimized configuration. The thickness of each HTS bulk is 5 mm, and the gap lengths from 0 mm to 10 mm were used as parameters in analysis and experiment, respectively. Four-stacked HTS bulk magnets with various gap lengths were tested at two different background magnetic fields of 0.5 T and 2 T at 77 K. The optimized axial gap length was found out by analytical results, and the better magnetic field homogeneity and temporal decay property of trapped magnetic field were obtained by lower magnetization field in this experiments.

  14. A statistical study of magnetic field magnitude changes during substorms in the near earth tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Using AMPTE/CCE data taken in 1985 and 1986 when the CCE apogee (8.8 earth radii) was within 4.5 hours of midnight, 167 injection events in the near-earth magnetotail have been cataloged. These events are exactly or nearly dispersionless on a 72-sec time scale from 25 keV to 285 keV. The changes in the field magnitude are found to be consistent with the expected effects of the diversion/disruption of the cross-tail current during a substorm, and the latitudinal position of the current sheet is highly variable within the orbit of CCE. The local time variation of the magnetic-field changes implies that the substorm current wedge is composed of longitudinally broad Birkeland currents.

  15. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Years of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.; Kotsiaros, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two years of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years of Swarm satellite data by comparison with other recent models that also include non-Swarm magnetic observations.

  16. Crystal-field investigations of rare-earth-doped wide band gap semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Muller, S; Wahl, U

    Crystal field investigations play a central role in the studies of rare earth doped semiconductors. Optical stark level spectroscopy and lattice location studies of radioactive rare earth isotopes implanted at ISOLDE have provided important insight into these systems during the last years. It has been shown that despite a major site preference of the probe atoms in the lattice, several defect configurations do exist. These sites are visible in the optical spectra but their origin and nature aren't deducible from these spectra alone. Hyperfine measurements on the other hand should reveal these defect configurations and yield the parameters necessary for a description of the optical properties at the atomic scale. In order to study the crystal field with this alternative approach, we propose a new concept for perturbed $\\gamma\\gamma$-angular correlation (PAC) experiments at ISOLDE based on digital signal processing in contrast to earlier analog setups. The general functionality of the spectrometer is explained ...

  17. Modelling the Earth's Main Magnetic Field by the spinning Astrid-2 satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Risbo, T.;

    1999-01-01

    and therefore the mapping of the Earth's magnetic field may be possible. The spinning of the spacecraft about a certain axis makes the stabilisation in space possible. This fact and the well distributed data over the globe makes the magnetic data well suited for the estimation of the magnetic field model......The Swedish micro-satellite Astrid-2 was successfully launched into a near polar orbit last December 98. Despite the fact that its primary mission was the research of Auroral phenomena, the magnetic instrumentation has been designed to accomplish high resolution vector field magnetic measurements...... at the spacecraft altitude (circa 1000km). Several methods for field modelling are presented in this paper with the assumption that the direction of the spin axis is nearly constant. In any case the orientation of the magnetometer is to bedetermined simultaneously with the instrument calibration and main field...

  18. Space Technology 5 Multi-point Measurements of Near-Earth Magnetic Fields: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R. L.; Wang, Y.; Boardsen, S.A.; Moldwin, M. B.; Spence, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission successfully placed three micro-satellites in a 300 x 4500 km dawn-dusk orbit on 22 March 2006. Each spacecraft carried a boom-mounted vector fluxgate magnetometer that returned highly sensitive and accurate measurements of the geomagnetic field. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of approximately 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness and current density. In doing so, we demonstrate two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit; 1) the "standard method," based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion, and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data set and expand to include geomagnetic field gradient analyses as well as field-aligned and ionospheric currents.

  19. On the flow magnitude and field-flow alignment at Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Amit, H.

    We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models. An expr......We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models....... An expression linking the core surface flow magnitude tospherical harmonic spectra of the MF and SV is derived from the magneticinduction equation. This involves the angle gamma between the flowand the horizontal gradient of the radial field. We study gamma in asuite of numerical dynamo models and discuss...... that the amount of field-flow alignment depends primarily on amagnetic modified Rayleigh number Raeta = alpha g0 Delta T D / eta Omega , which measures the vigorof convective driving relative to the strength of magnetic dissipation.Synthetic tests of the flow magnitude estimation scheme are encouraging...

  20. On the flow magnitude and field-flow alignment at Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Amit, H.

    We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models. An expr......We present a method to estimate the typical magnitude of flow close toEarth's core surface based on observational knowledge of the maingeomagnetic field (MF) and its secular variation (SV), together withprior information concerning field-flow alignment gleaned from numericaldynamo models....... An expression linking the core surface flow magnitude tospherical harmonic spectra of the MF and SV is derived from the magneticinduction equation. This involves the angle gamma between the flowand the horizontal gradient of the radial field. We study gamma in asuite of numerical dynamo models and discuss...... that the amount of field-flow alignment depends primarily on amagnetic modified Rayleigh number Raeta = alpha g0 Delta T D / eta Omega , which measures the vigorof convective driving relative to the strength of magnetic dissipation.Synthetic tests of the flow magnitude estimation scheme are encouraging...

  1. TELEPENSOUTH project Measurement of the Earth gravitomagnetic field in a terrestrial laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Sánchez, J F

    2003-01-01

    We will expose a preliminary study on the feasibility of an experiment leading to a direct measurement of the gravitomagnetic field generated by the rotational motion of the Earth. This measurement would be achieved by means of an appropriate coupling of a TELEscope and a Foucault PENdulum in a laboratory on ground, preferably at the SOUTH pole. An experiment of this kind was firstly proposed by Braginski, Polnarev and Thorne, 18 years ago, but it was never re-analyzed.

  2. MFE/Magnolia - A joint CNES/NASA mission for the earth magnetic field investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runavot, Josette; Ousley, Gilbert W.

    1988-01-01

    The joint phase B study in the CNES/NASA MFE/Magnolia mission to study the earth's magnetic field are reported. The scientific objectives are summarized and the respective responsibilities of NASA and CNES are outlined. The MFE/Magnolia structure and power systems, mass and power budgets, attitude control system, instrument platform and boom, tape recorders, rf system, propellant system, and scientific instruments are described.

  3. Fast torsional waves and strong magnetic field within the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Jault, Dominique; Canet, Elisabeth; Fournier, Alexandre

    2010-05-06

    The magnetic field inside the Earth's fluid and electrically conducting outer core cannot be directly probed. The root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) intensity for the resolved part of the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary is 0.3 mT, but further assumptions are needed to infer the strength of the field inside the core. Recent diagnostics obtained from numerical geodynamo models indicate that the magnitude of the dipole field at the surface of a fluid dynamo is about ten times weaker than the r.m.s. field strength in its interior, which would yield an intensity of the order of several millitesla within the Earth's core. However, a 60-year signal found in the variation in the length of day has long been associated with magneto-hydrodynamic torsional waves carried by a much weaker internal field. According to these studies, the r.m.s. strength of the field in the cylindrical radial direction (calculated for all length scales) is only 0.2 mT, a figure even smaller than the r.m.s. strength of the large-scale (spherical harmonic degree n geodynamo models with studies of geostrophic motions in the Earth's core that rely on geomagnetic data. From an ensemble inversion of core flow models, we find a torsional wave recurring every six years, the angular momentum of which accounts well for both the phase and the amplitude of the six-year signal for change in length of day detected over the second half of the twentieth century. It takes about four years for the wave to propagate throughout the fluid outer core, and this travel time translates into a slowness for Alfvén waves that corresponds to a r.m.s. field strength in the cylindrical radial direction of approximately 2 mT. Assuming isotropy, this yields a r.m.s. field strength of 4 mT inside the Earth's core.

  4. The hardening of Portland cement studied by ? NMR stray-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Teresa; Randall, E. W.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Bodart, P.; Feio, G.

    1996-03-01

    Hydration and hardening processes of Portland cement (type I) were studied by analysis of the one-dimensional projections (profiles) obtained periodically with the 0022-3727/29/3/044/img8 stray-field imaging technique over two days. The influence of additives, such as gypsum, in Portland cement (type IA) was also investigated. The decay of the signal intensity as a function of time was found to be bi-exponential for type I and mono-exponential for type IA.

  5. On the influence of Aerosols in measurement of electric field from Earth surface using a Field-Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Sundar De, Syam; Paul, Suman; Hazra, Pranab; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol particles influence the electrical conductivity of air. The value is reduced through the removal of small ions responsible for the conductivity. The metropolitan city, Kolkata (latitude 22.56° N, longitude 88.5° E) is densely populated surrounded by various types of Industries. Air is highly invaded by pollutant particles here for which the city falls under small-scale fair-weather condition where electric field and air-earth current get perturbed by ionization and different aerosols produced locally. Fine particles having diameter measurement of potential gradient and air-earth current will be presented. Different parameters like air-conductivity, relative abundance of smoke, visibility would offer new signatures of aerosol-influence on electric potential gradient. Some of those will be reported here.

  6. Determination of Molecular Self-Diffusion Coefficients Using Pulsed-Field-Gradient NMR: An Experiment for Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Jennifer; Coffman, Cierra; Villarrial, Spring; Chabolla, Steven; Heisel, Kurt A.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become one of the primary tools that chemists utilize to characterize a range of chemical species in the solution phase, from small organic molecules to medium-sized proteins. A discussion of NMR spectroscopy is an essential component of physical and biophysical chemistry lecture courses, and a number of instructional…

  7. Determination of Molecular Self-Diffusion Coefficients Using Pulsed-Field-Gradient NMR: An Experiment for Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Jennifer; Coffman, Cierra; Villarrial, Spring; Chabolla, Steven; Heisel, Kurt A.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become one of the primary tools that chemists utilize to characterize a range of chemical species in the solution phase, from small organic molecules to medium-sized proteins. A discussion of NMR spectroscopy is an essential component of physical and biophysical chemistry lecture courses, and a number of instructional…

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of attitude and orbit estimation using real earth magnetic field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    1997-01-01

    A single, augmented extended Kalman filter (EKF) which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit was developed and tested with simulated and real magnetometer and rate data. Since the earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is accurately known, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft's orbit, are a function of orbit and attitude errors. These differences can be used to estimate the orbit and attitude. The test results of the EKF with magnetometer and gyro data from three NASA satellites are presented and evaluated.

  9. Magnetism of Rare-Earth Compounds with Non-Magnetic Crystal-Field Ground Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Among rare-earth compounds, there are many materials having non-magnetic crystal-field (CF) ground levels.To understand their magnetic behaviour at low temperatures, we study the effects of the CF levels and the Heisenberg-like coupling on the magnetic process of such a crystalline with mean-field and CF theory. It is found that the material can be magnetically ordered if the Heisenberg exchange is sufficiently strong. Additionally we obtain a condition for initial magnetic ordering, and derive a formula for estimating the Curie temperature if the ordering occurs.

  10. Crystal field and magnetism with Wannier functions:rare-earth doped aluminum garnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Mihóková; Pavel Novák; Valentin V. Laguta

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed method we calculated the crystal field parameters in yttrium and lutetium aluminum garnets doped with seven trivalent Kramers rare-earth ions. We then inserted calculated parameters into the atomic-like Hamiltonian taking into account the electron-electron, spin-orbit and Zeeman interactions and determined the multiplet splitting by the crystal field as well as magneticĝ tensors. We compared calculated results with available experimental data. Very good agreement with the spectro-scopic data and qualitative agreement with experimentalĝ tensors was found.

  11. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Year of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    More than two year of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth’s magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its...... Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm...

  12. Can Core Flows inferred from Geomagnetic Field Models explain the Earth's Dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Pais, Maria Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    We test the ability of velocity fields inferred from geomagnetic secular variation data to produce the global magnetic field of the Earth. Our kinematic dynamo calculations use quasi-geostrophic (QG) flows inverted from geomagnetic field models which, as such, incorporate flow structures that are Earth-like and may be important for the geodynamo. Furthermore, the QG hypothesis allows straightforward prolongation of the flow from the core surface to the bulk. As expected from previous studies, we check that a simple quasi-geostrophic flow is not able to sustain the magnetic field against ohmic decay. Additional complexity is then introduced in the flow, inspired by the action of the Lorentz force. Indeed, on centenial timescales, the Lorentz force can balance the Coriolis force and strict quasi-geostrophy may not be the best ansatz. When the columnar flow is modified to account for the action of the Lorentz force, magnetic field is generated for Elsasser numbers larger than 0.25 and magnetic Reynolds numbers l...

  13. Studies of the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using Ultrahigh-Field Solid-State Mo95 NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF; Zheng, Heng; Ma, Ding; Bao, Xinhe

    2009-01-26

    Abstract It is found that the spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, corresponding to the surface exchanged molybdenum species in Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts is short, i.e., less than about 100ms at 21.1 T while the value of T1 for the crystallite MoO3 molecules is longer, i.e., about 30 s. Such a difference, more than two orders in magnitude, is utilized to differentiate the exchanged Mo species from the agglomerate MoO3 in Mo/HZSM-5 catalyst. An approximately linear correlation between the amount of exchanged species and the aromatics formation rate is obtained. This result significantly strengthens our prior conclusion that the exchanged Mo species are the active centers for the methane dehydroaromatization reaction on Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 3722-3723). Our results also suggest that one exchanged Mo atom anchors on two ion exchange sites and the exchanged Mo species on catalysts are possibly monomeric. Analyzing the linshapes obtained from both the 95Mo MAS and the static spectra indicates that the exchanged sites are heterogeneous, resulting in a significantly broadened MAS spectrum and essentially a featureless but nearly symmetric static lineshape for the exchanged Mo species. Furthermore, for crystallite MoO3 powder sample, the parameters related to the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor, the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and the three Euler angles required to align the CSA principal axis system with the quadrupolar principal axis system are determined by analyzing both the 95Mo MAS and the static spectra obtained at ultra-high field of 21.1 T. The new results obtained from this study on crystallite MoO3 powders should help to clarify some of the contradictions in prior literature reports from other groups. Key words: 95Mo NMR, MAS, relaxation, surface exchanged species, HZSM-5, electric-field-gradient (EFG), chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), active centers.

  14. Magnetic field gradients and their uses in the study of the earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Southam, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients are discussed from the standpoint of their usefulness in modeling crustal magnetizations. The fact that gradients enhance shorter wavelength features helps reduce both the core signal and the signal from external fields in comparison with the crustal signal. If the gradient device can be oriented, then directions of lineation can be determined from single profiles, and anomalies caused by unlineated sources can be identified.

  15. The spinning Astrid-2 satellite used for modeling the Earth's main magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Jørgensen, P.S.; Risbo, T.;

    2002-01-01

    , and therefore mapping of the Earth's magnetic field was possible. The spacecraft spins about a highly stable axis in space. This fact and the globally distributed data make the magnetic measurements well suited for the estimate of a magnetic field model at the spacecraft altitude (about 1000 km). This paper......The Swedish micro-satellite Astrid-2 was successfully launched into a near polar orbit in December 1998. Despite the fact that the primary science mission was auroral research, the magnetic instrument was designed to accomplish high-resolution and high-precision vector field magnetic measurements...... describes the initial analysis of the Astrid-2 magnetic data. As a result of the study of a single day (February 7, 1999), magnetically fairly quiet, it was possible to in-flight adjust the calibration of the magnetometer and find a magnetic field model fitting the scalar component of the measurements...

  16. Spin-orbit qubits of rare-earth-metal ions in axially symmetric crystal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaina, S; Shim, J H; Gambarelli, S; Malkin, B Z; Barbara, B

    2009-11-27

    Contrary to the well-known spin qubits, rare-earth-metal qubits are characterized by a strong influence of crystal field due to large spin-orbit coupling. At low temperature and in the presence of resonance microwaves, it is the magnetic moment of the crystal-field ground state which nutates (for several micros) and the Rabi frequency Omega(R) is anisotropic. Here, we present a study of the variations of Omega(R)(H(0)) with the magnitude and direction of the static magnetic field H(0) for the odd 167Er isotope in a single crystal CaWO(4):Er(3+). The hyperfine interactions split the Omega(R)(H(0)) curve into eight different curves which are fitted numerically and described analytically. These "spin-orbit qubits" should allow detailed studies of decoherence mechanisms which become relevant at high temperature and open new ways for qubit addressing using properly oriented magnetic fields.

  17. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, D., E-mail: dkaqua@kyudai.jp; Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil); Mozer, F. S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cardoso, F. R. [School of Engineering - EEL, University of São Paulo, Lorena, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  18. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P

    2016-07-26

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism.

  19. Control of Earth-like magnetic fields on the transformation of ferrihydrite to hematite and goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2016-07-01

    Hematite and goethite are the two most abundant iron oxides in natural environments. Their formation is controlled by multiple environmental factors; therefore, their relative concentration has been used widely to indicate climatic variations. In this study, we aimed to test whether hematite and goethite growth is influenced by ambient magnetic fields of Earth-like values. Ferrihydrite was aged at 95 °C in magnetic fields ranging from ~0 to ~100 μT. Our results indicate a large influence of the applied magnetic field on hematite and goethite growth from ferrihydrite. The synthesized products are a mixture of hematite and goethite for field intensities <~60 μT. Higher fields favour hematite formation by accelerating ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite aggregation. Additionally, hematite particles growing in a controlled magnetic field of ~100 μT appear to be arranged in chains, which may be reduced to magnetite keeping its original configuration, therefore, the presence of magnetic particles in chains in natural sediments cannot be used as an exclusive indicator of biogenic magnetite. Hematite vs. goethite formation in our experiments is influenced by field intensity values within the range of geomagnetic field variability. Thus, geomagnetic field intensity could be a source of variation when using iron (oxyhydr-)oxide concentrations in environmental magnetism.

  20. Optical detection of NMR J-spectra at zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Crawford, C W; Pines, A; Wemmer, D E; Knappe, S; Kitching, J; Budker, D

    2009-07-01

    Scalar couplings of the form JI(1) x I(2) between nuclei impart valuable information about molecular structure to nuclear magnetic-resonance spectra. Here we demonstrate direct detection of J-spectra due to both heteronuclear and homonuclear J-coupling in a zero-field environment where the Zeeman interaction is completely absent. We show that characteristic functional groups exhibit distinct spectra with straightforward interpretation for chemical identification. Detection is performed with a microfabricated optical atomic magnetometer, providing high sensitivity to samples of microliter volumes. We obtain 0.1 Hz linewidths and measure scalar-coupling parameters with 4-mHz statistical uncertainty. We anticipate that the technique described here will provide a new modality for high-precision "J spectroscopy" using small samples on microchip devices for multiplexed screening, assaying, and sample identification in chemistry and biomedicine.

  1. Optical detection of NMR J-spectra at zero magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, M P; Pines, A; Wemmer, D E; Knappe, S; Kitching, J; Budker, D

    2009-01-01

    Scalar couplings of the form J I_1 \\cdot I_2 between nuclei impart valuable information about molecular structure to nuclear magnetic-resonance spectra. Here we demonstrate direct detection of J-spectra due to both heteronuclear and homonuclear J-coupling in a zero-field environment where the Zeeman interaction is completely absent. We show that characteristic functional groups exhibit distinct spectra with straightforward interpretation for chemical identification. Detection is performed with a microfabricated optical atomic magnetometer, providing high sensitivity to samples of microliter volumes. We obtain 0.1 Hz linewidths and measure scalar-coupling parameters with 4-mHz statistical uncertainty. We anticipate that the technique described here will provide a new modality for high-precision "J spectroscopy" using small samples on microchip devices for multiplexed screening, assaying, and sample identification in chemistry and biomedicine.

  2. Properties of the static NMR response of a confined thin nematic film of 5CB-d2 under crossed electric and magnetic fields: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véron, A; Sugimura, A; Luckhurst, G R; Martins, A F

    2012-11-01

    This work describes an investigation of the static (or quasistatic) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response in a nematic liquid crystal confined between two planar conducting plates and subject to a magnetic field and an electric field produced by a difference of voltage applied on the plates. Deuterium NMR spectroscopy of 4-pentyl-d(2)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB-d(2)) under these conditions has revealed a voltage dependent inhomogeneous director distribution for a particular narrow range of voltages and for a fixed magnetic field (that of the spectrometer). In the ideal setup the two plates are assumed to be rigorously parallel, so that a difference of voltage applied on the plates leads to a constant electric field normal to them. When the magnetic field is parallel to the plates (orthogonal geometry) there exists a threshold value of the electric field for which the effect of both fields exactly compensate; moreover, for stronger electric field the director aligns with the electric field while for weaker electric field the director aligns with the magnetic field. If there is a lack of parallelism between the two plates, the electric field becomes inhomogeneous so that it may be larger than the threshold value in some region of the sample and smaller in the remaining part of the sample. In that case the director will adopt essentially two orientations within the sample, namely, parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the position of the frontier between the two domains depends on the voltage. This feature is clearly shown by deuterium NMR spectra that exhibit a transfer of intensity between two quadrupolar doublets with increase in the applied voltage. The coexistence of two director populations occurs for a range of voltages that depends on the degree of nonparallelism; accordingly, an estimation of this range by NMR yields an experimental estimation of the lack of parallelism. A tiny tilt of the magnetic field (nonorthogonal geometry) entrains a

  3. Magnetic Modes in Rare Earth Perovskites: A Magnetic-Field-Dependent Inelastic Light Scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Cao, Bing-Chen; Motapothula, M.; Cong, Chun-Xiao; Sarkar, Tarapada; Srivastava, Amar; Sarkar, Soumya; Patra, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ariando; Coey, J. M. D.; Yu, Ting; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we report the presence of defect-related states with magnetic degrees of freedom in crystals of LaAlO3 and several other rare-earth based perovskite oxides using inelastic light scattering (Raman spectroscopy) at low temperatures in applied magnetic fields of up to 9 T. Some of these states are at about 140 meV above the valence band maximum while others are mid-gap states at about 2.3 eV. No magnetic impurity could be detected in LaAlO3 by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy. We, therefore, attribute the angular momentum-like states in LaAlO3 to cationic/anionic vacancies or anti-site defects. Comparison with the other rare earth perovskites leads to the empirical rule that the magnetic-field-sensitive transitions require planes of heavy elements (e.g. lanthanum) and oxygen without any other light cations in the same plane. These magnetic degrees of freedom in rare earth perovskites with useful dielectric properties may be tunable by appropriate defect engineering for magneto-optic applications.

  4. Magnetic Modes in Rare Earth Perovskites: A Magnetic-Field-Dependent Inelastic Light Scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Cao, Bing-Chen; Motapothula, M.; Cong, Chun-Xiao; Sarkar, Tarapada; Srivastava, Amar; Sarkar, Soumya; Patra, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ariando; Coey, J. M. D.; Yu, Ting; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the presence of defect-related states with magnetic degrees of freedom in crystals of LaAlO3 and several other rare-earth based perovskite oxides using inelastic light scattering (Raman spectroscopy) at low temperatures in applied magnetic fields of up to 9 T. Some of these states are at about 140 meV above the valence band maximum while others are mid-gap states at about 2.3 eV. No magnetic impurity could be detected in LaAlO3 by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy. We, therefore, attribute the angular momentum-like states in LaAlO3 to cationic/anionic vacancies or anti-site defects. Comparison with the other rare earth perovskites leads to the empirical rule that the magnetic-field-sensitive transitions require planes of heavy elements (e.g. lanthanum) and oxygen without any other light cations in the same plane. These magnetic degrees of freedom in rare earth perovskites with useful dielectric properties may be tunable by appropriate defect engineering for magneto-optic applications. PMID:27845368

  5. Magnetic Modes in Rare Earth Perovskites: A Magnetic-Field-Dependent Inelastic Light Scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Cao, Bing-Chen; Motapothula, M; Cong, Chun-Xiao; Sarkar, Tarapada; Srivastava, Amar; Sarkar, Soumya; Patra, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ariando; Coey, J M D; Yu, Ting; Venkatesan, T

    2016-11-15

    Here, we report the presence of defect-related states with magnetic degrees of freedom in crystals of LaAlO3 and several other rare-earth based perovskite oxides using inelastic light scattering (Raman spectroscopy) at low temperatures in applied magnetic fields of up to 9 T. Some of these states are at about 140 meV above the valence band maximum while others are mid-gap states at about 2.3 eV. No magnetic impurity could be detected in LaAlO3 by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy. We, therefore, attribute the angular momentum-like states in LaAlO3 to cationic/anionic vacancies or anti-site defects. Comparison with the other rare earth perovskites leads to the empirical rule that the magnetic-field-sensitive transitions require planes of heavy elements (e.g. lanthanum) and oxygen without any other light cations in the same plane. These magnetic degrees of freedom in rare earth perovskites with useful dielectric properties may be tunable by appropriate defect engineering for magneto-optic applications.

  6. On the occurrence of Earth's magnetic field changes during the last century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; De Santis, Angelo; Campuzano, Saioa A.; Qamili, Enkelejda

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is characterized by different temporal chaotic fluctuations such as reversals, excursions, archeomagnetic and geomagnetic jerks. During the last decades the number of geomagnetic jerks has increased up to recent rates of one jerk every 3 years. In addition, the dipolar field is continuously decreasing since the time we had geomagnetic instrumental or historical measurements and the non-dipolar harmonic contributions are taking an important role in the present geomagnetic field behaviour, as reflected by the rapid growth of the region covered by the South Atlantic Anomaly. These mentioned facts seem to indicate that something is changing in the Earth's outer core where the main part of the geomagnetic field has its origin, pointing out a possible imminent reversal or excursion. In this work we analyse with different techniques the occurrence of this geomagnetic changes during the last decades, paying attention to the most recent years, thanks to the most accurate geomagnetic data provided by the ESA's Swarm satellite mission

  7. Steady state toroidal magnetic field at earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Eugene H.; Pearce, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the dc electrical potential near the top of earth's mantle have been extrapolated into the deep mantle in order to estimate the strength of the toroidal magnetic field component at the core-mantle interface. Recent measurements have been interpreted as indicating that at the core-mantle interface, the magnetic toroidal and poloidal field components are approximately equal in magnitude. A motivation for such measurements is to obtain an estimate of the strength of the toroidal magnetic field in the core, a quantity important to our understanding of the geomagnetic field's dynamo generation. Through the use of several simple and idealized calculation, this paper discusses the theoretical relationship between the amplitude of the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and the actual amplitude within the core. Even with a very low inferred value of the toroidal field amplitude at the core-mantle boundary, (a few gauss), the toroidal field amplitude within the core could be consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo dominated by nonuniform rotation and having a strong toroidal magnetic field.

  8. A model of Earth's magnetic field derived from 2 years of Swarm satellite constellation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    More than 2 years of magnetic field data taken by the three-satellite constellation mission Swarm are used to derive a model of Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. This model is called SIFMplus. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of Swarm by including East-West magnetic intensity and vector field gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences of the magnetic intensity as well as of the vector components provide further information concerning the North-South gradient. The SIFMplus model provides a description of the static lithospheric field that is very similar to models determined from CHAMP data, up to at least spherical harmonic degree n=75. Also the core field part of SIFMplus, with a quadratic time dependence for n ≤ 6 and a linear time dependence for n=7-15, demonstrates the possibility to determine high-quality field models from only 2 years of Swarm data, thanks to the unique constellation aspect of Swarm. To account for the magnetic signature caused by ionospheric electric currents at polar latitudes we co-estimate, together with the model of the core, lithospheric and large-scale magnetospheric fields, a magnetic potential that depends on quasi-dipole latitude and magnetic local time.

  9. Steady state toroidal magnetic field at earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Eugene H.; Pearce, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the dc electrical potential near the top of earth's mantle have been extrapolated into the deep mantle in order to estimate the strength of the toroidal magnetic field component at the core-mantle interface. Recent measurements have been interpreted as indicating that at the core-mantle interface, the magnetic toroidal and poloidal field components are approximately equal in magnitude. A motivation for such measurements is to obtain an estimate of the strength of the toroidal magnetic field in the core, a quantity important to our understanding of the geomagnetic field's dynamo generation. Through the use of several simple and idealized calculation, this paper discusses the theoretical relationship between the amplitude of the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and the actual amplitude within the core. Even with a very low inferred value of the toroidal field amplitude at the core-mantle boundary, (a few gauss), the toroidal field amplitude within the core could be consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo dominated by nonuniform rotation and having a strong toroidal magnetic field.

  10. Optimal approach to the investigation of the Earth's gravitational field by means of satellite gradiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, M. S.

    The conventional approach to the recovery of the Earth's gravitational field from satellite gradiometry observations is based on constructing, from the start, several boundary value (BV) relations, each of them corresponding to a separate observable component of the gravity gradient (GG) tensor or a certain combination of them. In particular, one of such projects, the ARISTOTELES mission, assumes that only the radial and across-track components are accessible (by technical reasons). The purpose of the present paper is mainly to discuss the principle aspects of the problem of the Earth's potential recovering from satellite gradiometry, to give an optimal formulation of the problem and derive the basic boundary value equation in different forms.

  11. A space-time multiscale modelling of Earth's gravity field variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    The mass distribution within the Earth varies over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, generating variations in the Earth's gravity field in space and time. These variations are monitored by satellites as the GRACE mission, with a 400 km spatial resolution and 10 days to 1 month temporal resolution. They are expressed in the form of gravity field models, often with a fixed spatial or temporal resolution. The analysis of these models allows us to study the mass transfers within the Earth system. Here, we have developed space-time multi-scale models of the gravity field, in order to optimize the estimation of gravity signals resulting from local processes at different spatial and temporal scales, and to adapt the time resolution of the model to its spatial resolution according to the satellites sampling. For that, we first build a 4D wavelet family combining spatial Poisson wavelets with temporal Haar wavelets. Then, we set-up a regularized inversion of inter-satellites gravity potential differences in a bayesian framework, to estimate the model parameters. To build the prior, we develop a spectral analysis, localized in time and space, of geophysical models of mass transport and associated gravity variations. Finally, we test our approach to the reconstruction of space-time variations of the gravity field due to hydrology. We first consider a global distribution of observations along the orbit, from a simplified synthetic hydrology signal comprising only annual variations at large spatial scales. Then, we consider a regional distribution of observations in Africa, and a larger number of spatial and temporal scales. We test the influence of an imperfect prior and discuss our results.

  12. Foucault pendulum at the South Pole: Proposal for an experiment to detect the Earth's general relativistic gravitomagnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.; Polnarev, Aleksander G.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment is proposed for measuring the earth's gravitomagnetic field by monitoring its effect on the plane of swing of a Foucault pendulum at the south pole ("dragging of inertial frames by earth's rotation"). With great effort a 10% experiment in a measurement time of several months might be achieved.

  13. Effect of magnetic field strength on NMR-based metabonomic human urine data. Comparative study of 250, 400, 500, and 800 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Malmendal, Anders; Petersen, Bent O; Madsen, Jens Chr; Pedersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Hoppe, Camilla; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Duus, Jens Ø

    2007-09-15

    Metabonomic analysis of urine utilizing high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and chemometric techniques has proven valuable in characterizing the biochemical response to an intervention. To assess the effect of magnetic field strength on information contained in NMR-based metabonomic data sets, 1H NMR spectra were acquired on 250-, 400-, 500-, and 800-MHz instruments, respectively, on the same set of human urine samples collected before and after dietary interventions with milk and with meat proteins. Partial least-squares regression discriminant analyses (PLS-DA) were performed in order to elucidate the ability of the 1H spectra acquired at various field strengths to identify possible spectral differences and discriminate between pre- and postintervention samples. The loadings from PLS-DA contained the same spectral regions, implying that the same metabolites were involved in the discrimination independent of magnetic field strength. The investigation revealed a strong increase in prediction performance and thereby spectral information content when increasing the magnetic field strength from 250 to 500 MHz, while from 500 to 800 MHz the increase was less pronounced.

  14. Nonthermal ions and associated magnetic field behavior at a quasi-parallel earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, W. P.; Pardaens, A. K.; Schwartz, S. J.; Burgess, D.; Luehr, H.; Kessel, R. L.; Dunlop, M.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to ion and magnetic field measurements at the earth's bow shock from the AMPTE-UKS and -IRM spacecraft, which were examined in high time resolution during a 45-min interval when the field remained closely aligned with the model bow shock normal. Dense ion beams were detected almost exclusively in the midst of short-duration periods of turbulent magnetic field wave activity. Many examples of propagation at large elevation angles relative to the ecliptic plane, which is inconsistent with reflection in the standard model shock configuration, were discovered. The associated waves are elliptically polarized and are preferentially left-handed in the observer's frame of reference, but are less confined to the maximum variance plane than other previously studied foreshock waves. The association of the wave activity with the ion beams suggests that the former may be triggered by an ion-driven instability, and possible candidates are discussed.

  15. Extending comprehensive models of the Earth's magnetic field with Orsted and CHAMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, T.J.; Olsen, Nils; Purucker, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    A new model of the quiet-time, near-Earth magnetic field has been derived using a comprehensive approach, which includes not only POGO and Magsat satellite data, but also data from the Orsted and CHAMP satellites. The resulting model shows great improvement over its predecessors in terms...... of completeness of sources, time span and noise reduction in parameters. With its well separated fields and extended time domain of 1960 to mid-2002, the model is able to detect the known sequence of geomagnetic jerks within this frame and gives evidence for an event of interest around 1997. Because all sources...... are coestimated in a comprehensive approach, intriguing north-south features typically filtered out with other methods are being discovered in the lithospheric representation of the model, such as the S Atlantic spreading ridge and Andean subduction zone lineations. In addition, this lithospheric field exhibits...

  16. ARISTOTELES: A European approach for an Earth gravity field recovery mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, R.; Faulks, H.; Langemann, M.

    1989-06-01

    Under contract of the European Space Agency a system study for a spaceborne gravity field recovery mission was performed, covering as a secondary mission objective geodetic point positioning in the cm range as well. It was demonstrated that under the given programmatic constraints including dual launch and a very tight development schedule, a six months gravity field mission in a 200 km near polar, dawn-dusk orbit is adequate to determine gravity anomalies to better than 5 mgal with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 km half wavelength. This will enable scientists to determine improved spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field equation to the order and degree of 180 or better.

  17. Field quality control of an earth dam: random versus purposive sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzias, P.C.; Stamatopoulos, A.C.

    1996-08-01

    Two sampling operations, the random and purposive techniques, for field quality control of an earth dam were presented. Each technique was analyzed and their similarities and differences were compared. Each took into consideration the attributes or variables such as strength, temperature, slump, air content, density, and water content. The purposive operation needed much less field sampling and testing than the random operation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique were described. It was concluded that both techniques could be used individually or jointly on the same project as long as the extent of the application, with all rules and underlying assumptions, were recognized for each case and were strictly adhered to in the field. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, Thomas; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared to conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated via parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP), enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H J-couplings in compounds with 13C in natural abundance in a single transient. The resulting spectra display distinct features that have straightforward interpretation and can be...

  19. Phonon and crystal field excitations in geometrically frustrated rare earth titanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lummen, T. T. A.; Handayani, I. P.; Donker, M. C.; Fausti, D.; Dhalenne, G.; Berthet, P.; Revcolevschi, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    2008-06-01

    The phonon and crystal field excitations in several rare earth titanate pyrochlores are investigated. Magnetic measurements on single crystals of Gd2Ti2O7 , Tb2Ti2O7 , Dy2Ti2O7 , and Ho2Ti2O7 are used for characterization, while Raman spectroscopy and terahertz time domain spectroscopy are employed to probe the excitations in the materials. The lattice excitations are found to be analogous across the compounds over the whole temperature range investigated (295-4 K). The resulting full phononic characterization of the R2Ti2O7 pyrochlore structure is then used to identify crystal field excitations observed in the materials. Several crystal field excitations have been observed in Tb2Ti2O7 in Raman spectroscopy, among which all of the previously reported excitations. The presence of additional crystal field excitations, however, suggests the presence of two inequivalent Tb3+ sites in the low-temperature structure. Furthermore, the crystal field level at approximately 13cm-1 is found to be both Raman and dipole active, indicating broken inversion symmetry in the system and thus undermining its current symmetry interpretation. In addition, evidence is found for a significant crystal field-phonon coupling in Tb2Ti2O7 . The additional crystal field information on Tb2Ti2O7 adds to the recent discussion on the low temperature symmetry of this system and may serve to improve its theoretical understanding.

  20. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail - AMPTE/CCE observations at R less than 8.8 earth radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    The MPTE/CCE magnetic field experiment has been used to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the frequency and extent of magnetic field distortion in the near-tail region at less than 8.8 earth radii. The variation of this distortion with Kp, radial distance, longitude, and near-equatorial latitude is reported. It has been found that taillike distortions from the dipole field direction may reach 80 deg near the MPTE/CE apogee of 8.8 earth radii. The Bz field component in dipole coordinates was always positive within 0.5 earth radii of the equatorial current sheet, indicating the neutral lines were never seen inside of 8.8 earth radii. Fields were most taillike near midnight and during times of high Kp. At 8.5 earth radii the equatorial field magnitude depressions were roughly half the dipole field strength of 51 nT. These depressions are larger at lesser distances, reaching -40 nT at 3.4 earth radii for Kp of 2- or less and -80 nT and Kp of 3+ and greater.

  1. Roald Amundsen's contributions to our knowledge of the magnetic fields of the Earth and the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Egeland

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Roald Amundsen (1872–1928 was known as one of the premier polar explorers in the golden age of polar exploration. His accomplishments clearly document that he has contributed to knowledge in fields as diverse as ethnography, meteorology and geophysics. In this paper we will concentrate on his studies of the Earth's magnetic field. With his unique observations at the polar station Gjøahavn (geographic coordinates 68°37'10'' N; 95°53'25'' W, Amundsen was first to demonstrate, without doubt, that the north magnetic dip-pole does not have a permanent location, but steadily moves its position in a regular manner. In addition, his carefully calibrated measurements at high latitudes were the first and only observations of the Earth's magnetic field in the polar regions for decades until modern polar observatories were established. After a short review of earlier measurements of the geomagnetic field, we tabulate the facts regarding his measurements at the observatories and the eight field stations associated with the Gjøa expedition. The quality of his magnetic observations may be seen to be equal to that of the late 20th century observations by subjecting them to analytical techniques showing the newly discovered relationship between the diurnal variation of high latitude magnetic observations and the direction of the horizontal component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF By. Indeed, the observations at Gjøahavn offer a glimpse of the character of the solar wind 50 yr before it was known to exist. Our motivation for this paper is to illuminate the contributions of Amundsen as a scientist and to celebrate his attainment of the South Pole as an explorer 100 yr ago.

  2. Secular variation of the Earth magnetic field recorded in Holocene lava flows from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, Pierrick; Chauvin, Annick; Lara, Luis; Moreno, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    The recent secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field is mainly characterized by the large growth of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly during the last three centuries, first documented in the geomagnetic field model GUFM (Jackson et al., 2000). This present-day magnetic anomaly is characterized in Chile by low magnetic inclinations and low intensities of the geomagnetic field (-40° and 25.7µT at 40°S). In order to better describe the secular variation during the Holocene, we sampled 21 dated lava flows or pyroclastic flows from several Chilean volcanoes (Lonquimay, Llaima, Solipulli, Villarrica, Mocho-Choshuenco, Osorno, Calbuco). Juvenile clasts from basaltic-andesitic pyroclastic flow deposits provide reliable paleomagnetic results (Roperch et al, 2014). We also sampled 56 sites in Holocene lava flows with only relative ages with respect of the dated units. Paleomagnetic results were obtained from several sites in two well-dated historic lava flows; 9 sites and 11 paleointensity results (PI) from the 1835AD eruption of the Osorno volcano and 8 sites and 23 PIs from the 1751AD eruption of the Llaima volcano. In addition, 14 PIs were obtained in bricks from shelters built along the main path across the Andes from Santiago (Chile) to Mendoza (Argentina) in 1768AD. These results confirm the high reliability of the global geomagnetic model GUFM for the last three centuries. At Villarrica, results from 10 sites in lava flows (calibrated age 1440AD±30) provide paleomagnetic directions that are different from the CALS3k.4 model (Korte et al., 2011) indicating that more paleomagnetic results in well dated lava flows are necessary to improve the robustness of global geomagnetic models prior to 1700AD. The steepest inclination of the geomagnetic field (-71.6°) and the highest intensity (70µT±5) are found in the time range 850-900AD. This observation is made from paleomagnetic results from a pyroclastic flow from the Osorno volcano (calibrated age range of 782

  3. Use of Earth's magnetic field for mitigating gyroscope errors regardless of magnetic perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad Haris; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Most portable systems like smart-phones are equipped with low cost consumer grade sensors, making them useful as Pedestrian Navigation Systems (PNS). Measurements of these sensors are severely contaminated by errors caused due to instrumentation and environmental issues rendering the unaided navigation solution with these sensors of limited use. The overall navigation error budget associated with pedestrian navigation can be categorized into position/displacement errors and attitude/orientation errors. Most of the research is conducted for tackling and reducing the displacement errors, which either utilize Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) or special constraints like Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPT) and Zero Angular Rate Updates (ZARU). This article targets the orientation/attitude errors encountered in pedestrian navigation and develops a novel sensor fusion technique to utilize the Earth's magnetic field, even perturbed, for attitude and rate gyroscope error estimation in pedestrian navigation environments where it is assumed that Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) navigation is denied. As the Earth's magnetic field undergoes severe degradations in pedestrian navigation environments, a novel Quasi-Static magnetic Field (QSF) based attitude and angular rate error estimation technique is developed to effectively use magnetic measurements in highly perturbed environments. The QSF scheme is then used for generating the desired measurements for the proposed Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based attitude estimator. Results indicate that the QSF measurements are capable of effectively estimating attitude and gyroscope errors, reducing the overall navigation error budget by over 80% in urban canyon environment.

  4. The source of the intermediate wavelength component of the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.

    1985-01-01

    The intermediate wavelength component of the Earth's magnetic field has been well documented by observations made by MAGSAT. It has been shown that some significant fraction of this component is likely to be caused within the core of the Earth. Evidence for this comes from analysis of the intermediate wavelength component revealed by spherical harmonics between degrees 14 and 23, in which it is shown that it is unlikely that all of this signal is crustal. Firstly, there is no difference between average continental source strength and average oceanic source strength, which is unlikely to be the case if the anomalies reside within the crust, taking into account the very different nature and thickness of continental and oceanic crust. Secondly, there is almost no latitudinal variation in the source strength, which is puzzling if the sources are within the crust and have been formed by present or past magnetic fields with a factor of two difference in intensity between the equator and the poles. If however most of the sources for this field reside within the core, then these observations are not very surprising.

  5. The effect of divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of chalk evaluated from compressional wave velocity and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2015-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions on the elasticity and the pore collapse of chalk were studied through rock-mechanical testing and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. Chalk samples saturated with deionized water and brines containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and sulfate ions were...... subjected to petrophysical experiments, rock mechanical testing and low-field NMR spectroscopy. Petrophysical characterization involving ultrasonic elastic wave velocities in unconfined conditions, porosity and permeability measurements, specific surface and carbonate content determination and backscatter...... electron microscopy of the materials were conducted prior to the experiments. The iso-frame model was used to predict the bulk moduli in dry and saturated conditions from the compressional modulus of water-saturated rocks. The effective stress coefficient, as introduced by Biot, was also determined from...

  6. Application of precise altimetry to the study of precise leveling of the sea surface, the Earth's gravity field, and the rotation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, J.; Ganeko, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Mori, T.; Ooe, M.; Nakagawa, I.; Ishii, H.; Hagiwara, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Our program includes five research items: (1) determination of a precision geoid and gravity anomaly field; (2) precise leveling and detection of tidal changes of the sea surface and study of the role of the tide in the global energy exchange; (3) oceanic effect on the Earth's rotation and polar motion; (4) geological and geophysical interpretation of the altimetry gravity field; and (5) evaluation of the effectiveness of local tracking of TOPEX/POSEIDON by use of a laser tracker.

  7. 31P MAS-NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: Evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palke, A. C. [Stanford University; Stebbins, J. F. [Stanford University; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We present 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ( x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, and Nd3+ in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensity of these peaks is related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La3+ or Y3+ with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce3+ and Nd3+. The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the 31P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  8. Calculation of crystal-field parameters for rare-earth noble metal alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, L. [MPG Research Group `Electron Systems`, Department of Physics, University of Technology, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062, Dresden (Germany); Richter, M. [MPG Research Group `Electron Systems`, Department of Physics, University of Technology, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062, Dresden (Germany); Eschrig, H. [MPG Research Group `Electron Systems`, Department of Physics, University of Technology, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062, Dresden (Germany); Nitzsche, U. [MPG Research Group `Electron Systems`, Department of Physics, University of Technology, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062, Dresden (Germany)

    1995-02-09

    The crystal-field (CF) parameters for 4f electrons of a series of rare-earth impurities in Ag and Au have been evaluated from first-principles density functional calculations of the charge distribution which are based on an optimized LCAO scheme. The localized 4f states are treated as `open core shell`. By including the self-interaction correction for the 4f states, artificial constraints on the 4f charge density employed in earlier density functional CF calculations are avoided. The calculated parameters are compared with recent neutron scattering data. ((orig.)).

  9. Calculation of crystal-field parameters for rare-earth noble metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, L.; Richter, M.; Eschrig, H.; Nitzsche, U.

    1995-02-01

    The crystal-field (CF) parameters for 4f electrons of a series of rare earth impurities in Ag and Au have been evaluated from first-principles density functional calculations of the charge distribution which are based on an optimized LCAO scheme. The localized 4f states are treated as 'open core shell'. By including the self-interaction correction for the 4f states, artificial constraints on the 4f charge density employed in earlier density functional CF calculations are avoided. The calculated parameters are compared with recent neutron scattering data.

  10. Simulation of the Earth's gravitational field recovery from GRACE using the energy balance approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wei; LU Xiaolei; HSU Houtse; SHAO Chenggang; LUO Jun; WANG Nengchao

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurement principles of GRACE satellites, the observation equations are set up using the energy balance approach. The Earth's gravitational field complete up to degree and order 120 is recovered applying the preconditioning conjugate gradient iterative approach by numerical simulation. Assuming an accuracy of 1?m/s in range-rate measurements of the K-band microwave ranging system, the matching relationships of accuracies of K-band microwave ranging system, SuperSTAR Accelerometer, position vector and velocity vector measurements are investigated.

  11. Comparison and validation of combined GRACE/GOCE models of the Earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate global models of the Earth's gravity field are needed in various applications: in geodesy - to facilitate the production of a unified global height system; in oceanography - as a source of information about the reference equipotential surface (geoid); in geophysics - to draw conclusions about the structure and composition of the Earth's interiors, etc. A global and (nearly) homogeneous set of gravimetric measurements is being provided by the dedicated satellite mission Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In particular, Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) data acquired by this mission are characterized by an unprecedented accuracy/resolution: according to the mission objectives, they must ensure global geoid modeling with an accuracy of 1 - 2 cm at the spatial scale of 100 km (spherical harmonic degree 200). A number of new models of the Earth's gravity field have been compiled on the basis of GOCE data in the course of the last 1 - 2 years. The best of them take into account also the data from the satellite gravimetry mission Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE), which offers an unbeatable accuracy in the range of relatively low degrees. Such combined models contain state-of-the-art information about the Earth's gravity field up to degree 200 - 250. In the present study, we compare and validate such models, including GOCO02, EIGEN-6S, and a model compiled in-house. In addition, the EGM2008 model produced in the pre-GOCE era is considered as a reference. The validation is based on the ability of the models to: (i) predict GRACE K-Band Ranging (KBR) and GOCE SGG data (not used in the production of the models under consideration), and (ii) synthesize a mean dynamic topography model, which is compared with the CNES-CLS09 model derived from in situ oceanographic data. The results of the analysis demonstrate that the GOCE SGG data lead not only to significant improvements over continental areas with a poor coverage with

  12. The gel-forming behaviour of dextran in the presence of KCl: a quantitative 13C and pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, L; Schiller, J; Kaufmann, J; Stallmach, F; Kärger, J; Arnold, K

    2003-05-01

    Although the gel forming ability of certain polysaccharides in the presence of ions is a well-known phenomenon, detailed physicochemical mechanisms of such processes are still unknown. In this investigation high resolution 13C NMR as well as 1H pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR were used to investigate the mobility of dextran in the sol and in the gel state. Gel-formation of dextran can be easily induced by the addition of large amounts of potassium chloride. No major differences in the T(1) relaxation times of dextran in the sol and in the gel state could be observed. Accordingly, the analysis of the 13C NMR spectroscopic data did not provide any indication of an observable line-broadening upon gel-formation. However, a KCl concentration dependent decrease of signal intensity in comparison to an internal standard was detected. On the other hand, the PFG NMR studies clearly indicated a gradual diminution of the self-diffusion coefficient of the dextran with increasing molecular weight as well as in the presence of potassium chloride. These measurements revealed in agreement with spectroscopic data that at least one potassium ion per monomer subunit (i.e. one glycopyranose residue) is necessary for gel formation.

  13. Gd[sup 3+] chelates of interest in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): studies using [sup 17]O NMR and EPR at several magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh Powell, D. (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Gonzalez, Gabriel (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Tissieres, Veronique (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Micskei, Karoly (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland) Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Kossuth University, 4010, Debrecen (Hungary)); Bruecher, Ernoe (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Kossuth University, 4010, Debrecen (Hungary)); Helm, Lothar (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Merbach, Andre E. (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry,

    1994-06-01

    The combination of [sup 17]O NMR relaxation rate and chemical shift measurements and EPR linewidth measurements at several magnetic fields provides a powerful probe of water exchange, rotational dynamics and electronic relaxation in aqueous solutions of Gd[sup 3+] complexes. This information is important for the understanding of the proton relaxivity of the complexes. Variable pressure measurements show a change of water exchange mechanism from associatively activated on [Gd(H[sub 2]O)[sub 8

  14. Pulsed-Field Gradient NMR Self Diffusion and Ionic Conductivity Measurements for Liquid Electrolytes Containing LiBF₄ and Propylene Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, PM; Voice, AM; Ward, IM

    2014-01-01

    Liquid electrolytes have been prepared using lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF₄) and propylene carbonate (PC). Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) measurements were taken for the cation, anion and solvent molecules using lithium (⁷Li), fluorine (¹⁹F) and hydrogen (¹H) nuclei, respectively. It was found that lithium diffusion was slow compared to the much larger fluorinated BF₄ anion likely resulting from a large solvation shell of the lithium. Ionic conductivity and visco...

  15. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  16. Comparison of surface NMR with non-invasive and in-situ measurements of soil water content at a floodplain field site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werban, Ulrike; Schrön, Martin; Dietrich, Peter; Walsh, David; Grunewald, Elliot; Pohle, Marco; Kathage, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil water content is a very relevant issue in soil and environmental studies. There is a broad spectrum of methods applied for measuring soil water content in the field either deployed in situ or non-invasively from the surface. For many reasons the latter is preferred in field studies. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the rare methods that measure the water content directly. Whereas others, e.g. geophysical methods, make use of proximal relationships for determination of soil water content. We applied a new single-sided NMR sensor to non-invasively measure in-situ soil moisture profiles at several points along two transects in a floodplain. The field site exhibits variations in soil water content due to morphology, e.g. flood channels and alluvial fan structures. Furthermore we applied at the same transects (1) in situ methods: soil sampling for gravimetrical analysis and TDR and (2) non-invasive methods: electromagnetical induction, mobile cosmic-ray neutron sensing with a rover and gamma-ray spectrometry. We will present results that confirm agreement of NMR and gravimetrical analysis from soil sampling and discuss issues that arise when using non-unique proxy methods and relationships for determination of soil water content.

  17. Earthward electric field and its reversal in the near-Earth current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations (radial distance r from 9 to 35 Earth radii, RE), we investigate ion and electron contributions to the cross-tail current density in the magnetotail current sheet. We analyze plasma pressure measurements (including the contribution from high-energy particles) and estimate the magnitudes of ion and electron diamagnetic drifts. In the downtail, r > 15RE, region, ion (electron) diamagnetic drifts are shown to provide more than 50% (less than 25%) of the cross-tail current density at the neutral plane, Bx=0. Conversely, in the near-Earth region, r≤15RE, the ion (electron) diamagnetic drift contribution to the cross-tail current density is 20% (50%). The directly measured duskward (dawnward) component of the ion (electron) velocity, vyi (-vye), where y is the GSM direction, is very small (quite large) in the downtail region but large (small) in the near-Earth region. This systematic discrepancy between the expected values of vyi, -vye (based on estimates of diamagnetic drifts) and the direct measurements of the velocity, vyi, -vye, is consistent with a contribution to the total velocity by an E × B drift caused by an electric field oriented parallel to the x axis, Ex. To decrease the ion (increase the electron) total drift to agree with the measured flows in the downtail region and increase (decrease) this total drift to match the measurements in the near-Earth region, this Ex would need to be directed earthward at r > 15RE and tailward at r≤15RE. Such an Ex distribution is consistent with the equatorial projection of the Harang discontinuity.

  18. Science at the ends of the Earth: astrobiology field expeditions as outreach tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Linda

    INTRODUCTION This paper will report on and evaluate communication, education, and outreach initiatives conducted in conjunction with NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets (ASTEP) field campaigns, addressing the costs and benefits of linking students, teachers, and other interested citizens with researchers in the field. This paper will highlight success stories, lessons learned, and promising practices regarding educational programs in scientific research environments. The Astrobiology Program in the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Science Mission Directorate studies the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe. Public interest in astrobiology is great, and advances in the field are rapid. Hence, the Astrobiology Program supports the widest possible dissemination of timely and useful information about scientific discoveries, technology development, new knowledge, and greater understanding produced by its investigators, employing an approach described as strategic communication planning. That is, the Astrobiology Program aims to integrate communication, education, and outreach into all aspects of program planning and execution. The Program encourages all of its investigators to contribute to the ongoing endeavor of informing public audiences about Astrobiology. The ASTEP element of the Astrobiology Program sponsors terrestrial field campaigns to further scientific research and technology development relevant to future solar system exploration missions. ASTEP science investigations are designed to further biological research in terrestrial environments analogous to those found on other planets, past or present. ASTEP sponsors the development of technologies to enable remote searches for, and identification of, life in extreme environments. ASTEP supports systems-level field campaigns designed to demonstrate and validate the science and technology in extreme environments on Earth. This

  19. From field data collection to earth sciences dissemination: mobile examples in the digital era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Ghiraldi, Luca; Palomba, Mauro; Perotti, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the technological and cultural revolution related to the massive diffusion of mobile devices, as smartphones and tablets, the information management and accessibility is changing, and many software houses and developer communities realized applications that can meet various people's needs. Modern collection, storing and sharing of data have radically changed, and advances in ICT increasingly involve field-based activities. Progresses in these researches and applications depend on three main components: hardware, software and web system. Since 2008 the geoSITLab multidisciplinary group (Earth Sciences Department and NatRisk Centre of the University of Torino and the Natural Sciences Museum of the Piemonte Region) is active in defining and testing methods for collecting, managing and sharing field information using mobile devices. Key issues include: Geomorphological Digital Mapping, Natural Hazards monitoring, Geoheritage assessment and applications for the teaching of Earth Sciences. An overview of the application studies is offered here, including the use of Mobile tools for data collection, the construction of relational databases for inventory activities and the test of Web-Mapping tools and mobile apps for data dissemination. The fil rouge of connection is a standardized digital approach allowing the use of mobile devices in each step of the process, which will be analysed within different projects set up by the research group (Geonathaz, EgeoFieldwork, Progeo Piemonte, GeomediaWeb). The hardware component mainly consists of the availability of handheld mobile devices (e.g. smartphones, PDAs and Tablets). The software component corresponds to applications for spatial data visualization on mobile devices, such as composite mobile GIS or simple location-based apps. The web component allows the integration of collected data into geodatabase based on client-server architecture, where the information can be easily loaded, uploaded and shared

  20. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Year of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars;

    More than two year of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth’s magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its...... Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm...... satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years...

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of Attitude and Orbit Estimation Using Actual Earth Magnetic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie K.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2000-01-01

    A single, augmented Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit has been developed and successfully tested with real magnetometer and gyro data only. Because the earth magnetic field is a function of time and position, and because time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both orbit and attitude errors. Thus, conceivably these differences could be used to estimate both orbit and attitude; an observability study validated this assumption. The results of testing the EKF with actual magnetometer and gyro data, from four satellites supported by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center, are presented and evaluated. They confirm the assumption that a single EKF can estimate both attitude and orbit when using gyros and magnetometers only.

  2. Improving the accuracy of GRACE Earth's gravitational field using the combination of different inclinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zheng; Chenggang Shao; Jun Luo; Houze Xu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the GRACE Earth's gravitational field complete up to degree and order 120 is recovered based on the combination of different inclinations using the energy conservation principle.The results show that because different inclinations of satellite are sensitive to the geopotential coefficients with different degrees/and orders m.the design of GRACE exploiting 89° inclination can effectively improve the accuracy of geopotential zonal harmonic coefficients.However,it is less sensitive to the geopotential tesseral harmonic coefficients.Accordingly.the second group of GRACE exploiting lower inclination is required to determine high-accurately the geopotential tesseral harmonic coefficients and cover the shortage of the single group of GRACE exploiting 89° inclination.Two groups of GRACE individually exploiting 89°+(82°-84°)inclinations are the optimal combination of the Earth'S gravitational field recovery complete up to degree and order 120.In the degree 120,the joint accuracy of cumulative geoid height based on two groups of GRACE individually exploiting 89° and 83° inclinations is averagely two times higher than the accuracy of a group of GRACE exploiting 89° inclination.

  3. The magnetic field of the earth - Performance considerations for space-based observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.; Taylor, P. T.; Schnetzler, C. C.; Langel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Basic problems inherent in carrying out observations of the earth magnetic field from space are reviewed. It is shown that while useful observations of the core and crustal fields are possible at the peak of the solar cycle, the greatest useful data volume is obtained during solar minimum. During the last three solar cycles, the proportion of data with a planetary disturbance index of less than 2 at solar maximum was in the range 0.4-0.8 in comparison with solar minimum. It is found that current state of the art orbit determination techniques should eliminate orbit error as a problem in gravitational field measurements from space. The spatial resolution obtained for crustal field anomalies during the major satellite observation programs of the last 30 years are compared in a table. The relationship between observing altitude and the spatial resolution of magnetic field structures is discussed. Reference is made to data obtained using the Magsat, the Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO), and instruments on board the Space Shuttle.

  4. Earth-strength magnetic field affects the rheotactic threshold of zebrafish swimming in shoals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, Alessandro; De Rosa, Rosario; Putman, Nathan F; Agnisola, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Rheotaxis, the unconditioned orienting response to water currents, is a main component of fish behavior. Rheotaxis is achieved using multiple sensory systems, including visual and tactile cues. Rheotactic orientation in open or low-visibility waters might also benefit from the stable frame of reference provided by the geomagnetic field, but this possibility has not been explored before. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) form shoals living in freshwater systems with low visibility, show a robust positive rheotaxis, and respond to geomagnetic fields. Here, we investigated whether a static magnetic field in the Earth-strength range influenced the rheotactic threshold of zebrafish in a swimming tunnel. The direction of the horizontal component of the magnetic field relative to water flow influenced the rheotactic threshold of fish as part of a shoal, but not of fish tested alone. Results obtained after disabling the lateral line of shoaling individuals with Co(2+) suggest that this organ system is involved in the observed magneto-rheotactic response. These findings constitute preliminary evidence that magnetic fields influence rheotaxis and suggest new avenues for further research.

  5. A Wide Field Auroral Imager (WFAI for low Earth orbit missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Bannister

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of the solar wind interaction with Earth's coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system requires an ability to observe the charged particle environment and auroral activity from the same platform, generating particle and photon image data which are matched in time and location. While unambiguous identification of the particles giving rise to the aurora requires a Low Earth Orbit satellite, obtaining adequate spatial coverage of aurorae with the relatively limited field of view of current space bourne auroral imaging systems requires much higher orbits. A goal for future satellite missions, therefore, is the development of compact, wide field-of-view optics permitting high spatial and temporal resolution ultraviolet imaging of the aurora from small spacecraft in low polar orbit. Microchannel plate optics offer a method of achieving the required performance. We describe a new, compact instrument design which can observe a wide field-of-view with the required spatial resolution. We report the focusing of 121.6 nm radiation using a spherically-slumped, square-pore microchannel plate with a focal length of 32 mm and an F number of 0.7. Measurements are compared with detailed ray-trace simulations of imaging performance. The angular resolution is 2.7±0.2° for the prototype, corresponding to a footprint ~33 km in diameter for an aurora altitude of 110 km and a spacecraft altitude of 800 km. In preliminary analysis, a more recent optic has demonstrated a full width at half maximum of 5.0±0.3 arcminutes, corresponding to a footprint of ~1 km from the same spacecraft altitude. We further report the imaging properties of a convex microchannel plate detector with planar resistive anode readout; this detector, whose active surface has a radius of curvature of only 100 mm, is shown to meet the spatial resolution and sensitivity requirements of the new wide field auroral imager (WFAI.

  6. Characterization of natural porous media by NMR and MRI techniques. High and low magnetic field studies for estimation of hydraulic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this thesis is to apply different NMR techniques for: i) understanding the relaxometric properties of unsaturated natural porous media and ii) for a reliable quantification of water content and its spatial and temporal change in model porous media and soil cores. For that purpose, porous media with increasing complexity and heterogeneity were used (coarse and fine sand and different mixture of sand/clay) to determine the relaxation parameters in order to adapt optimal sequence and parameters for water imaging. Conventional imaging is mostly performed with superconducting high field scanners but low field scanners promise longer relaxation times and therefore smaller loss of signal from water in small and partially filled pores. By this reason high and low field NMR experiments were conducted on these porous media to characterize the dependence on the magnetic field strength. Correlations of the NMR experiments with classical soil physics method like mercury intrusion porosimetry; water retention curves (pF) and multi-step-outflow (MSO) were performed for the characterization of the hydraulic properties of the materials. Due to the extensive research the experiments have been structured in three major parts as follows. In the first part a comparison study between relaxation experiments in high and low magnetic field was performed in order to observe the influence of the magnetic field on the relaxation properties. Due to these results, in the second part of the study only low field relaxation experiments were used in the attempt of correlations with classical soil physics methods (mercury intrusion porosimetry and water retention curves) for characterizing the hydraulic behavior of the samples. Further, the aim was to combine also MRI experiments (2D and 3D NMR) with classical soil physics methods (multi-step-outflow, MSO) for the same purpose of investigating the hydraulic properties. Because low field MRI systems are still under developing for the

  7. 31P magic angle spinning NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palke, Aaron C; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-11-04

    We present (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La(1-x)Ce(x)PO4 (x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y(1-x)M(x)PO4 (M = V(n+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic V(n+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+) in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensities of these peaks are related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La(3+) or Y(3+) with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce(3+) and Nd(3+). The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the (31)P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  8. Earth rotation and variations of the gravity field, in the framework of the "Descartes-nutation" project

    CERN Document Server

    Bourda, G

    2007-01-01

    The "Descartes-Nutation" Project is devoted to the "understanding of the next decimal of precession-nutation, from the theoretical point of view as well as from the observational point of view". In this framework, we made a proposal in order to contribute to the study of (i) the dynamical flattening of the Earth, (ii) the coupling effects of the lunisolar forcing, (iii) the effect of the geophysical fluids on the EOP and (iv) the Nutation observations. We investigate further the links between Earth Orientation and Gravity Field Variations. Indeed, the masses distributions inside the Earth govern the behaviour of the rotation axis in space (precession-nutation) and in the Earth (polar motion), as well as the Earth rotation rate (or equivalently, length of the day). These distributions of masses can be measured by space owing to artificial satellites, the orbitography of which provides the Earth gravity field determination. Then, the temporal variations of the Earth gravity field can be related to the variation...

  9. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Grill, P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2012-01-01

    satisfactorily explain the observed disparity in NMR transverse relaxation of the four marine DOM samples. Likewise, the presence of metal ions in isolated marine DOM remained near constant or declined from surface to depth for important paramagnetic ions like Mn, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu. Iron in particular, a strong complexing paramagnetic ion, was found most abundant by a considerable margin in surface (FISH) marine DOM for which well resolved COSY cross peaks were observed. Hence, facile relationships between metal content of isolated DOM (which does not reflect authentic marine DOM metal content) and transverse NMR relaxation were not observed. High field (12 T) negative electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectra showed at first view rather conforming mass spectra for all four DOM samples with abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers of mass peaks from surface to bottom DOM and similar fractions (~50%) of assigned molecular compositions throughout all DOM samples. The average mass increased from surface to bottom DOM by about 10 Dalton. The limited variance of FTICR mass spectra probably resulted from a rather inherent conformity of marine DOM at the mandatory level of intrinsic averaging provided by FTICR mass spectrometry, when many isomers unavoidably project on single nominal mass peaks. In addition, averaging from ion suppression added to the accordance observed. The proportion of CHO and CHNO molecular series increased from surface to depth whereas CHOS and especially CHNOS molecular series markedly declined. The abundance of certain aromatic CHOS compounds declined with water depth. For future studies, COSY NMR spectra appear best suited to assess organic molecular complexity of marine DOM and to define individual DOM molecules of yet unknown structure and function. Non-target organic structural spectroscopy at the level demonstrated here covered nearly all carbon present in marine DOM. The exhaustive characterization of

  10. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  11. Water metabolism in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae of races Y-3137 and Y-3327, according to pulsed-field gradient NMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilova, I. A.; Vasil'ev, S. G.; Rimareva, L. V.; Serba, E. M.; Volkova, L. D.; Volkov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    The self-diffusion of water in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae of races Y-3137 and Y-3327 is studied by means of pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR. Three types of water are detected that differ by their self-diffusion coefficients (SDCs): free, intercellular, and intracellular. It is found that the self-diffusion of intercellular and intracellular water is restricted. The size and permeability of the cells of yeasts with different cultivation times (24 and 48 h) is determined by analyzing the dependences of the self-diffusion coefficients of intracellular water on the interval between pulses of the magnetic field gradient.

  12. Earth's magnetic field, preservation of the hydrosphere and planetary habitability (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarduno, John

    2017-04-01

    reduced standoff of the solar wind to 5 Earth radii, implying the potential for some atmospheric loss. Our efforts to test the presence/absence of a terrestrial dynamo and magnetic shielding during Eoarchean to Hadean times based on the study of single zircons provide evidence of the field to ages as old as 4.2 Ga. For intervals >100,000 years long, magnetopause standoff distances may have reached 3 to 4 Earth radii or less. These reduced standoff distances again imply some atmospheric erosion and water loss. Water can be added by a "late veneer", but the strong solar forcing extended into the Paleoarchean. This suggests the presence of an initial water reservoir much greater than that of today to account for Earth's present-day large water inventory. Thus, this terrestrial history suggests that should a very young Earth 2.0 be discovered, considerations for its habitability on billion-year time scales would be not only an operating dynamo, but also the presence of a superocean.

  13. Self-Guided Field Explorations: Integrating Earth Science into Students' Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Kirkby, S.

    2013-12-01

    Self-guided field explorations are a simple way to transform an earth science class into a more pedagogically effective experience. Previous experience demonstrated that self-guided student explorations of museum and aquarium exhibits were both extremely popular and remarkably effective. That success led our program to test an expansion of the concept to include self-guided student explorations in outdoor field settings. Preliminary assessment indicates these self-guided field explorations are nearly as popular with students as the museum and aquarium explorations and are as pedagogically effective. Student gains on post-instruction assessment match or exceed those seen in instructor-assisted, hands-on, small group laboratory activities and completely eclipse gains achieved by traditional lecture instruction. As importantly, self-guided field explorations provide a way to integrate field experiences into large enrollment courses where the sheer scale of class trips makes them logistically impossible. This expands course breadth, integrating new topics that could not be as effectively covered by the original class structure. Our introductory program assessed two models of self-guided field explorations. A walking/cycling exploration of the Saint Anthony Falls area, a mile from campus, focuses on the intersections of geological processes with human history. Students explore the geology behind the waterfalls' evolution as well as its subsequent social and economic impacts on human history. A second exploration focuses on the campus area geology, including its building stones as well as its landscape evolution. In both explorations, the goal was to integrate geology with the students' broader understanding of the world they live in. Although the explorations' creation requires a significant commitment, once developed, self-guided explorations are surprisingly low maintenance. These explorations provide a model of a simple, highly effective pedagogical tool that is

  14. The steady part of the secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field results from the effects of magnetic induction in the fluid outer core and from the effects of magnetic diffusion in the core and the mantle. Adequate observations to map the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary extend back over three centuries, providing a model of the secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Here we consider how best to analyze this time-dependent part of the field. To calculate steady core flow over long time periods, we introduce an adaptation of our earlier method of calculating the flow in order to achieve greater numerical stability. We perform this procedure for the periods 1840-1990 and 1690-1840 and find that well over 90 percent of the variance of the time-dependent field can be explained by simple steady core flow. The core flows obtained for the two intervals are broadly similar to each other and to flows determined over much shorter recent intervals.

  15. Field reversing magnetotail current sheets: earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.

    1986-09-01

    This dissertation examines the field reversing magnetotail current sheets at the earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner. In the near earth study a new analysis technique is developed to calculate the detailed current density distributions within the cross tail current sheet for the first time. This technique removes the effects of a variable sheet velocity by inverting intersatellite timings between the co-orbiting satellites ISEE-1 and -2. Case studies of three relatively geomagnetically quiet crossings are made; sheet thicknesses and peak current densities are approx.1-5 x 10/sup 4/ km and approx.5-50 nA/m/sup 2/. Current density distributions reveal a high density central region, lower density shoulders, and considerable fine structure throughout. In the Venus study another new analysis technique is developed to reconstruct the average tail configuration from a correlation between field magnitude and draping angle in a large statistical data set. In the comet study, high resolution magnetic field and plasma electron data from the ICE traversal of Giacobini-Zinner are combined for the first time to determine the tail/current sheet geometry and calculate certain important but unmeasured local ion and upstream properties. Pressure balance across the tail gives ion temperatures and betas of approx.1.2 x 10/sup 5/ K and approx.40 in the center of the current sheet to approx.1 x 10/sup 6/ K and approx.3 in the outer lobes. Axial stress balance shows that the velocity shear upstream near the nucleus is >6 (approx.1 at ICE), and that a region of strongly enhanced mass loading (ion source rate approx.24 times that upstream from lobes) exists upstream from the current sheet. The integrated downtail mass flux is approx.2.6 x 10/sup 26/ H/sub 2/O+/sec, which is only approx.1% of the independently determined total cometary efflux. 79 refs., 37 figs.

  16. Behaviour of the low degree terms of the Earth gravity field over the last 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancale, R.; Lemoine, J.-M.; Reinquin, F.; Deleflie, F.; Ramillien, G.; Gégout, P.

    2012-04-01

    The GRACE mission has revealed since 2002 the recent evolution of the Earth's gravity field with a resolution down to 400 km, equivalent to degree and order 50 in spherical harmonics. Precise orbit computation for altimetric satellites can obviously gain by applying these variations, which are classically given, as in recent EIGEN models, as drifts and periodic terms (yearly and semi-yearly). However extrapolating these variations to pre-GRACE periods, mainly the drifts, can be problematic for orbit computation performances on former altimetric satellites. One option is to analyse older satellite data, in particular SLR data on geodetic satellites, in order to assess the very low degree variations of the gravity field and compare it to the GRACE determination. This can be done over the last 30 years, using for instance the Lageos and Lageos-2, Starlette and Stella satellites. The spherical harmonic degrees that can be accessed in this way are degrees 2 to 4. Additional information on degree 2 can be derived from the analysis of the Earth orientation parameters, pole coordinates and length of day (LOD), which have been observed over a long period with great accuracy by astrometric, satellite geodetic and extra-galactic means. Once corrected for atmospheric and oceanic load and velocity variations, the pole coordinates will principally bring information on the C(2,1) and S(2,1) coefficients, while the LOD will principally be connected with the C(2,0). Combining these two approaches allows a better observation of the temporal evolution of the gravity field over a long time span and a more realistic modelling of it for the precise orbit computation of past altimeter missions.

  17. CHAOS-a model of the Earth's magnetic field derived from CHAMP, Orsted, and SAC-C magnetic satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Luhr, H.; Sabaka, T.J.;

    2006-01-01

    We have derived a model of the near-Earth magnetic field (up to spherical harmonic degree n= 50 for the static field, and up to n = 18 for the first time derivative) using more than 6.5 yr of high-precision geomagnetic measurements from the three satellites Orsted, CHAMP and SAC-C taken between...

  18. Modelling the Earth's static and time-varying gravity field using a combination of GRACE and GOCE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is modelling the static and time-varying parts of the Earth's gravity field at the global scale based on data acquired by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In addition, a new

  19. Modelling the Earth's static and time-varying gravity field using a combination of GRACE and GOCE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is modelling the static and time-varying parts of the Earth's gravity field at the global scale based on data acquired by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In addition, a new methodol

  20. Reduction of Marine Magnetic Data for Modeling the Main Field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, R. T.; Ridgway, J. R.; Davis, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The marine data set archived at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) consists of shipborne surveys conducted by various institutes worldwide. This data set spans four decades (1953, 1958, 1960-1987), and contains almost 13 million total intensity observations. These are often less than 1 km apart. These typically measure seafloor spreading anomalies with amplitudes of several hundred nanotesla (nT) which, since they originate in the crust, interfere with main field modeling. The source for these short wavelength features are confined within the magnetic crust (i.e., sources above the Curie isotherm). The main field, on the other hand, is of much longer wavelengths and originates within the earth's core. It is desirable to extract the long wavelength information from the marine data set for use in modeling the main field. This can be accomplished by averaging the data along the track. In addition, those data which are measured during periods of magnetic disturbance can be identified and eliminated. Thus, it should be possible to create a data set which has worldwide data distribution, spans several decades, is not contaminated with short wavelengths of the crustal field or with magnetic storm noise, and which is limited enough in size to be manageable for the main field modeling. The along track filtering described above has proved to be an effective means of condensing large numbers of shipborne magnetic data into a manageable and meaningful data set for main field modeling. Its simplicity and ability to adequately handle varying spatial and sampling constraints has outweighed consideration of more sophisticated approaches. This filtering technique also provides the benefits of smoothing out short wavelength crustal anomalies, discarding data recorded during magnetically noisy periods, and assigning reasonable error estimates to be used in the least square modeling. A useful data set now exists which spans 1953-1987.

  1. Magnetic fields in Earth-like exoplanets and implications for habitability around M-dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Morales, Mercedes; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Ruedas, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    We present estimations of dipolar magnetic moments for terrestrial exoplanets using the Olson & Christiansen (EPS Lett 250:561-571, 2006) scaling law and assuming their interior structure is similar to Earth. We find that the dipolar moment of fast rotating planets (where the Coriolis force dominates convection in the core), may amount up to ~80 times the magnetic moment of Earth, M ⊕, for at least part of the planets' lifetime. For slow rotating planets (where the force of inertia dominates), the dipolar magnetic moment only reaches up to ~1.5 M [symbol in text]. Applying our calculations to confirmed rocky exoplanets, we find that CoRoT-7b, Kepler-10b and 55 Cnc e can sustain dynamos up to ~18, 15 and 13 M [symbol in text], respectively. Our results also indicate that the magnetic moment of rocky exoplanets not only depends on rotation rate, but also on their formation history, thermal state, age, composition, and the geometry of the field. These results apply to all rocky planets, but have important implications for the particular case of planets in the Habitable Zone of M-dwarfs.

  2. Transformer-coupled NMR probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsuzawa, Shin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we propose an NMR probe circuit that uses a transformer with a ferromagnetic core for impedance matching. The ferromagnetic core provides a strong but confined coupling that result in efficient energy transfer between the sample coil and NMR spectrometer, while not disturbing the B1 field generated by the sample coil. We built a transformer-coupled NMR probe and found that it offers comparable performance (loss NQR.

  3. Calculated crystal-field parameters for rare-earth impurities in noble metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Lutz; Richter, Manuel; Eschrig, Helmut; Nitzsche, Ulrike

    1994-06-01

    From first-principles density-functional calculations of the charge distribution the crystal-field (CF) parameters for 4f states of Er and Dy impurities in Ag and Au have been evaluated. The calculations are based on an optimized linear combination of atomic orbitals scheme, where the local-density approximation (LDA) is used for the conduction-electron states, while the localized rare-earth 4f states are treated as ``open core shell.'' As the 4f localization cannot be properly described within LDA, a self-interaction correction for the 4f states is included. In this way, any artificial constraints on the 4f charge density employed in earlier first-principles CF calculations are avoided. The calculated CF parameters agree well with recent neutron scattering data.

  4. Earth Gravity Field Recovered from CHAMP Science Orbit and Accelerometer Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xuhua; WU Bin; PENG Bibo; XU Houze

    2006-01-01

    The earth gravity field model CDS01S of degree and order 36 has been recovered from the post processed Science Orbits and on-board accelerometer data of GFZ's CHAMP satellite. The model resolves the geoid with an accuracy of better than 4 cm at a resolution of 700 km half-wavelength. By using the degree difference variances of geopotential coefficients to compare the model CDS01S with EIGEN3P, EIGEN1S and EGM96, the result indicates that the coefficients of CDS01S are most close to those of EIGEN3P. The result of the comparison between the accuracies of geopotential coefficients in the above models, indicates that the accuracy of coefficients in CDS01S is higher than that in EGM96.The geoid undulations of CDS01S and GGM01C up to 30 degrees are calculated and the standard deviation is 4.7 cm between them.

  5. Radiation Field Forming for Industrial Electron Accelerators Using Rare-Earth Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Khankin, V. V.; Shvedunov, N. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Yurov, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the radiation field forming system for industrial electron accelerators, which would have uniform distribution of linear charge density at the surface of an item being irradiated perpendicular to the direction of its motion. Its main element is non-linear quadrupole lens made with the use of rare-earth magnetic materials. The proposed system has a number of advantages over traditional beam scanning systems that use electromagnets, including easier product irradiation planning, lower instantaneous local dose rate, smaller size, lower cost. Provided are the calculation results for a 10 MeV industrial electron accelerator, as well as measurement results for current distribution in the prototype build based on calculations.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic field variations and slow mode transitions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Daniel

    2001-04-01

    The event observed on September 17, 1978 on ISEE 1-2, which led to the concept of a stationary slow mode transition region (SMT) in the magnetosheath in front of the magnetopause, is revisited. We establish that the two edges of this SMT have an exogenous origin induced by two discontinuities of the interplanetary magnetic field. The key of our analysis is that the outer edge of the SMT is built up by a tangential interplanetary discontinuity which is observed on ISEE-3 at a large distance from the Sun-Earth line and which has an unusual direction. In this SMT the subsolar magnetosheath is entirely downstream of a quasi-parallel bow shock, while upstream this SMT the subsolar magnetosheath is downstream of a quasi-perpendicular shock. We identify three effects at the origin of the density enhancement in this SMT. We extend this approach to the original statistical study and we find that any SMT is connected to interplanetary magnetic field variations. This corroborates our hypothesis that SMTs have an exogeneous origin driven by interplanetary magnetic field variations.

  7. Visual field information in Nap-of-the-Earth flight by teleoperated Helmet-Mounted displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Kohn, S.; Merhav, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    The human ability to derive Control-Oriented Visual Field Information from teleoperated Helmet-Mounted displays in Nap-of-the-Earth flight, is investigated. The visual field with these types of displays originates from a Forward Looking Infrared Radiation Camera, gimbal-mounted at the front of the aircraft and slaved to the pilot's line-of-sight, to obtain wide-angle visual coverage. Although these displays are proved to be effective in Apache and Cobra helicopter night operations, they demand very high pilot proficiency and work load. Experimental work presented in the paper has shown that part of the difficulties encountered in vehicular control by means of these displays can be attributed to the narrow viewing aperture and head/camera slaving system phase lags. Both these shortcomings will impair visuo-vestibular coordination, when voluntary head rotation is present. This might result in errors in estimating the Control-Oriented Visual Field Information vital in vehicular control, such as the vehicle yaw rate or the anticipated flight path, or might even lead to visuo-vestibular conflicts (motion sickness). Since, under these conditions, the pilot will tend to minimize head rotation, the full wide-angle coverage of the Helmet-Mounted Display, provided by the line-of-sight slaving system, is not always fully utilized.

  8. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  9. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  10. Characterization of polyurethane/organophilic montmorillonite nanocomposites by low field NMR; Caracterizacao de nanocompositos de poliuretano/montmorilonita organofilica por RMN de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcos Anacleto da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Nanocompositos Polimericos; Tavares, Maria I.B.; Nascimento, Suelen A.M.; Rodrigues, Elton J. da R [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NUCAT/PEQ/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Nanocompositos Polimericos

    2012-07-01

    Polyurethanes are important and versatile materials, mainly due to some of their properties, such as high resistance to abrasion and tearing, excellent absorption of mechanical shocks and good flexibility and elasticity. However, they have some drawbacks as well, such as low thermal stability and barrier properties. To overcome these disadvantages, various studies have been conducted involving organophilic polyurethane/montmorillonite nanocomposites. The investigation of the structure of polyurethane/clay nanocomposites has mainly been done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this work, PU/clay nanocomposite films obtained by solution intercalation were studied. The nanocomposites were characterized by XRD and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR). The LF-NMR measurements, with determination of the spin-lattice relaxation time of the hydrogen nucleus, supplied important information about the molecular dynamics of these nanocomposites. The X-ray diffraction measurements validated the results found by NMR. The thermal stability of the material was also determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under an inert atmosphere. A slight improvement in this stability was observed in the nanocomposite in comparison with polyurethane (author)

  11. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of 1H and 13C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) 1H-13C correlations with 1H detection and (ii) 1H-1H double-quantum ↔ single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of L-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to 13C detection, we show that 1H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for 1H-13C 2D correlation experiments. By combining 1H-13C and 1H-1H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of 13C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the 1H and 13C signals of each L-alanine ligand.

  12. Effects of organic amendments on natural organic matter in bulk soils from an italian agricultural area as assessed by Fast Field Cycling NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Riccardo; Conte, Pellegrino; Alonzo, Giuseppe; Rao, Maria A.

    2010-05-01

    Losses of soil organic carbon often occur in soil because of intensive agricultural practices. This is due both to removal of organic carbon following harvest production and to insufficient inputs of organic amendments. Natural organic matter (NOM) can be a very appropriate material for enhancing organic carbon content in very stressed agricultural soils. In general, NOM plays an important role in environmental matrices due, for example, to its capacity in retaining water, in interacting with organic and inorganic pollutants, and in enhancing nutrient availability to plants. For this reason, the understanding of the mechanisms with which NOM interacts with other chemicals in the environment is of paramount importance. Structural and conformational NOM characteristics can be analysed by high field (HF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy either in the solid or in the liquid state. In both cases, information on the chemical nature of NOM can be achieved. Moreover, relaxometry studies can be also conducted to provide information on the molecular dynamics of natural organic matter. However, HF-NMR relaxometry limitations are related to the strength of the magnetic fields which limits the range of relaxation rates that can be investigated. In fact, high magnetic fields (e.g. ≥108 Hz) reduce the possibilities to observe molecular dynamics at very low frequencies such as those between 106 and 103 Hz. To this aim, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry at low fields and in the fast field cycling (FFC) setup is the most powerful way to retrieve information on the dynamics at low frequencies. Here, FFC-NMR relaxometry studies on soils subjected to different organic amendements are presented. Two farms, in an important agricultural area of Campania Region, Italy, were selected in order to study the effect of different organic amendments on bulk soils. Namely, a compost from municipal solid wastes and wood-wastes (scraps of poplars pruning) were applied in

  13. Evaluation of a benchtop cryogen-free low-field ¹H NMR spectrometer for the analysis of sexual enhancement and weight loss dietary supplements adulterated with pharmaceutical substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Guilhem; Gerdova, Anna; Williamson, David; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2014-12-02

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a unique tool for detection, structural characterization, and quantification of compounds in complex mixtures. However, due to cost constraints, NMR is rarely used in routine quality control (QC) analysis. The recent release of benchtop cryogen-free low-field NMR spectrometers represents a technological break in the NMR field. In this paper, we evaluated the potential of a benchtop cryogen-free 60 MHz spectrometer for uncovering adulteration of "100% natural" sexual enhancement and weight loss dietary supplements. We demonstrated that the adulterant(s) can readily be detected in ≈20 min of recording after a very simple and rapid sample preparation. We also showed that the quantification by the internal standard method can be done on the low-field NMR spectrometer and leads to results similar to those obtained with high-field NMR. Considering the cost and space efficiency of these spectrometers, we anticipate their introduction in QC laboratories as well as in governmental agencies, especially in the field of fraud detection.

  14. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-, sigma- and theta-Al2O3 are well known metastable “transitional” alumina structural polymorphs. Upon heating, Al2O3 transitions to the so-called and Al2O3 polymorphs and finally forms the thermally stable Al2O3. The poorly developed crystallinity and co-existence of the , , and Al2O3 prior to forming all Al2O3, making it difficult to characterize the structures as well as to quantify the various phases of the transition alumina. As a result, there are significant controversies in the literatures. In this work, a detailed NMR analysis was carried out at high magnetic field on three special aluminum oxide samples where the, , , Al2O3 phases are made dominant, respectively, by controlling the synthesis conditions. The goal is to simplify, including making unambiguous, spectral assignments in 27Al MAS NMR spectra of transition alumina that have not yet been commonly agreed previously. Specifically, quantitative 1D 27Al MAS NMR was used to quantify the ratios of the different alumina structural units, 2D MQMAS 27Al MAS was used for obtaining the highest spectral resolution to guide the analysis of the 1D spectrum, and a saturation pulse sequence was integrated into the 1D NMR to select the amorphous structures, including obtain spectra where the penta-coordinate sites are observed with enhanced relative intensity. Collectively, this study uniquely assigns Al-peaks (both octahedral and tetrahedral) to the Al2O3 and the Al2O3 phases and offers a new way of understanding, including quantifying, the different structural units and sites in transition alumina samples.

  15. Magnetic field and wind of Kappa Ceti: towards the planetary habitability of the young Sun when life arose on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, J -D do; Folsom, P Petit C; Castro, M; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; de Mello, G F Porto; Meibom, S; Jeffers, S V; Guinan, E; Ribas, I

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetic field measurements for Kappa1~Cet, a proxy of the young Sun when life arose on Earth. We carry out an analysis of the magnetic properties determined from spectropolarimetric observations and reconstruct its large-scale surface magnetic field to derive the magnetic environment, stellar winds and particle flux permeating the interplanetary medium around Kappa1~Cet. Our results show a closer magnetosphere and mass-loss rate of Mdot = 9.7 x 10^{-13} Msol/yr, i.e., a factor 50 times larger than the current solar wind mass-loss rate, resulting in a larger interaction via space weather disturbances between the stellar wind and a hypothetical young-Earth analogue, potentially affecting the planet's habitability. Interaction of the wind from the young Sun with the planetary ancient magnetic field may have affected the young Earth and its life conditions

  16. Functional group analysis by H NMR/chemical derivatization for the characterization of organic aerosol from the SMOCC field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tagliavini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble organic compounds (WSOC in aerosol samples collected in the Amazon Basin in a period encompassing the middle/late dry season and the beginning of the wet season, were investigated by H NMR spectroscopy. HiVol filter samples (PM2.5 and PM>2.5 and size-segregated samples from multistage impactor were subjected to H NMR characterization. The H NMR methodology, recently developed for the analysis of organic aerosol samples, has been improved by exploiting chemical methylation of carboxylic groups with diazomethane, which allows the direct determination of the carboxylic acid content of WSOC. The content of carboxylic carbons for the different periods and sizes ranged from 12% to 20% of total measured carbon depending on the season and aerosol size, with higher contents for the fine particles in the transition and wet periods with respect to the dry period. A comprehensive picture is presented of WSOC functional groups in aerosol samples representative of the biomass burning period, as well as of transition and semi-clean atmospheric conditions. A difference in composition between fine (PM2.5 and coarse (PM>2.5 size fractions emerged from the NMR data, the former showing higher alkylic content, the latter being largely dominated by R-O-H (or R-O-R' functional groups. Very small particles (<0.14 μm, however, present higher alkyl-chain content and less oxygenated carbons than larger fine particles (0.42–1.2 μm. More limited variations were found between the average compositions in the different periods of the campaign.

  17. Pulsation Solution to the Equation of Earth's Gravitational Field (Main Outcome)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using d'Alembert equation as the approximation of Einstein's equation, a solution is given in this paper to the time-dependent gravitational equation of the Earth in consideration of the Earth's features, which describes the characteristics of pulsation of the Earth and the structures of spherical layers of its interior, thus providing a theoretical basis for establishing the idea of mantle pulsation.

  18. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas; Ganssle, Paul; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnet...

  19. The near-earth magnetic field at 1980 determined from Magsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the Magsat spacecraft for November 1979 through April 1980 and from 91 magnetic observatories for 1978 through 1982 are used to derive a spherical harmonic model of the earth's main magnetic field and its secular variation. Constant coefficients are determined through degree and order 13 and secular variation coefficients through degree and order 10. The first degree external terms and corresponding induced internal terms are given as a function of Dst. Preliminary modeling using separate data sets at dawn and dusk local time showed that the dusk data contains a substantial field contribution from the equatorial electrojet current. The final data set is selected first from dawn data and then augmented by dusk data to achieve a good geographic data distribution for each of three time periods: (1) November/December, 1979; (2) January/February, 1980; (3) March/April, 1980. A correction for the effects of the equatorial electrojet is applied to the dusk data utilized. The solution included calculation of fixed biases, or anomalies, for the observation data.

  20. Flexible field goniometer system: the Goniometer for Outdoor Portable Hyperspectral Earth Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Charles M.; Abelev, Andrei; Montes, Marcos J.; Philpot, William; Gray, Deric; Doctor, Katarina Z.; Fusina, Robert A.; Mattis, Gordon; Chen, Wei; Noble, Scott D.; Coburn, Craig; Corl, Tom; Slomer, Lawrence; Nichols, C. Reid; van Roggen, Elena; Hughes, Roy J.; Carr, Stephen; Kharabash, Sergey; Brady, Andrew; Vermillion, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a portable hyperspectral goniometer system for measurement of hemispherical conical reflectance factor (HCRF) data for terrestrial applications, especially in the coastal zone. This system, the Goniometer for Portable Hyperspectral Earth Reflectance (GOPHER), consists of a computer-controlled Spectra Vista Corporation HR-1024 full-range spectrometer mounted on a rotating arc and track assembly, allowing complete coverage in zenith and azimuth of a full hemisphere for recording HCRF. The control software allows customized scan patterns to be quickly modified in the field, providing for flexibility in recording HCRF and the opposition effect with varying grid sizes and scan ranges in both azimuth and zenith directions. The spectrometer track can be raised and lowered on a mast to accommodate variations in terrain and land cover. To minimize the effect of variations in illumination during GOPHER scan cycles, a dual-spectrometer approach has been adapted to link records of irradiance recorded by a second spectrometer during the GOPHER HCRF scan cycle. Examples of field data illustrate the utility of the instrument for coastal studies.

  1. GRACE Data-based High Accuracy Global Static Earth's Gravity Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qiujie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To recover the highly accurate static earth's gravity field by using GRACE satellite data is one of the hot topics in geodesy. Since linearization errors of dynamic approach quickly increase when extending satellite arc length, we established a modified dynamic approach for processing GRACE orbit and range-rate measurements in this paper, which treated orbit observations of the twin GRACE satellites as approximate values for linearization. Using the GRACE data spanning the period Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2010, containing satellite attitudes, orbits, range-rate, and non-conservative forces, we developed two global static gravity field models. One is the unconstrained solution called Tongji-Dyn01s complete to degree and order 180; the other one is the Tongji-Dyn01k model computed by using Kaula constraint. The comparisons between our models and those latest GRACE-only models (including the AIUB-GRACE03, the GGM05S, the ITSG-Grace2014k and the Tongji-GRACE01 published by different international groups, and the external validations with marine gravity anomalies from DTU13 product and height anomalies from GPS/levelling data, were performed in this study. The results demonstrate that the Tongji-Dyn01s has the same accuracy level with those of the latest GRACE-only models, while the Tongji-Dyn01k model is closer to the EIGEN6C2 than the other GRACE-only models as a whole.

  2. Earth Systems Field Work: Service Learning at Local and Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A.; Derry, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth & Environmental Systems (EES) Field Program engages students in hands-on exploration along the boundaries of the living earth, solid earth, ocean, and atmosphere. Based on Hawaíi Island, the semester-length program integrates scientific study with environmental stewardship and service learning. Each year EES students contribute 3000 hours of service to their host community. Throughout the semester students engage in different service activities. Most courses includes a service component - for example - study of the role of invasive species in native ecosystems includes an invasive species removal project. Each student completes a 4-week service internship with a local school, NGO, state or federal agency. Finally, the student group works to offset the carbon footprint of the program in collaboration with local conservation projects. This effort sequesters CO2 emissions while at the same time contributing to reforestation of degraded native ecosystems. Students learn that expertise is not confined to "the academy," and that wisdom and inspiration can be found in unexpected venues. Much of the service learning in the EES Program occurs in collaboration with local partners. Service internships require students to identify a partner and to design a tractable project. Students work daily with their sponsor and make a formal presentation of their project at the end of the internship period. This includes speaking to a non-technical community gathering as well as to a scientific audience. For many students the opportunity to work on a real problem, of interest in the real world, is a highlight of the semester. Beyond working in support of local community groups, the EES Prograḿs C-neutral project engages students with work in service to the global commons. Here the outcome is not measurable within the time frame of a semester, yet the intangible result makes the experience even more powerful. Students take responsibility for an important issue that is not

  3. Study of diffusion in cartilage by the ''PFG'' (pulsed-field-gradient) NMR technique; Studium der Diffusion im Knorpel mit der ''PFG'' (pulsed-field-gradient)-NMR-Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, L.; Trampel, R.; Ngwa, W.; Knauss, R.; Schiller, J.; Arnold, K. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Biophysik

    2001-07-01

    Since cartilage does not contain any blood vessels, diffusion is the most important mechanism for its supply. Although several methods are available for the measurement of diffusion, this study focuses exclusively on NMR methods. Besides the ''classic'' water diffusion, the diffusion behaviour of ions and polymers in cartilage is also described. In all cases, and at short observation times, diffusion is mostly determined by the water content of the sample. However, the variation of the observation time allows to obtain information also on the internal structure of cartilage. In addition, it is discussed to which extent the individual techniques allow conclusions with respect to degenerative joint diseases, and under which in vivo conditions they can be applied. (orig.) [German] Das Fehlen von Blutgefaessen im Knorpel macht die Diffusion zum wichtigsten Transportmechanismus fuer die Versorgung des Knorpels. Obwohl unterschiedliche Methoden zur Messung von Diffusionsprozessen eingesetzt werden koennen, beschraenken wir uns hie ausschliesslich auf NMR-Methoden. Neben der ''klassischen'' Wasserdiffusion werden auch die Diffusion von Ionen und die Polymerdiffusion in Knorpel beschrieben. In allen Faellen gilt, dass ueber kurze Beobachtungszeiten das Diffusionsverhalten im wesentlichen durch den Wassergehalt bestimmt wird. Jedoch werden durch Variation der Beobachtungszeit auch Informationen ueber die innere Struktur des Knorpels erhalten. Es wird ausserdem dargelegt, inwieweit Techniken Rueckschluesse auf degenerative Gelenkveraenderungen zugelassen und wie sie unter In-vivo-Bedingungen genutzt werden koennten. (orig.)

  4. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hertkorn

    2012-01-01

    were not observed.

    High field (12 T negative electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectra showed at first view rather conforming mass spectra for all four DOM samples with abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers of mass peaks from surface to bottom DOM and similar fractions (~50% of assigned molecular compositions throughout all DOM samples. The average mass increased from surface to bottom DOM by about 10 Dalton. The limited variance of FTICR mass spectra probably resulted from a rather inherent conformity of marine DOM at the mandatory level of intrinsic averaging provided by FTICR mass spectrometry, when many isomers unavoidably project on single nominal mass peaks. In addition, averaging from ion suppression added to the accordance observed. The proportion of CHO and CHNO molecular series increased from surface to depth whereas CHOS and especially CHNOS molecular series markedly declined. The abundance of certain aromatic CHOS compounds declined with water depth. For future studies, COSY NMR spectra appear best suited to assess organic molecular complexity of marine DOM and to define individual DOM molecules of yet unknown structure and function. Non-target organic structural spectroscopy at the level demonstrated here covered nearly all carbon present in marine DOM. The exhaustive characterization of complex unknowns in mbox{marine} DOM will reveal a meaningful assessment of individual marine biogeosignatures which carry the holistic memory of the oceanic water masses (Koch et al., 2011.

  5. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region: Highlights from the 2012 Summer Field Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, M.; Bierma, R. M.; Boyce, E. S.; Willoughby, H.; Fend, M.; Feaux, K.

    2012-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its fourth year of operation and maintenance of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 data communications relays that comprise the Alaska region of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The successful operation of the autonomous GPS and tiltmeter network in Alaska continues to be a challenge, because of logistics, weather, and other difficulties related to working in Alaska. PBO engineers continue to work on network enhancements to make the stations more robust, while improving overall data quality and station uptime to better serve the EarthScope science community. In the summer of 2012, PBO engineers completed maintenance activities in Alaska, which resulted in a 95% operational status for the Alaska network within PBO. PBO engineers completed a total of 87 maintenance visits in the summer of FY2012, including 62 routine maintenance and 25 unscheduled maintenance visits to GPS and data communications stations. We present a number of highlights and accomplishments from the PBO 2012 summer field season in Alaska, for example the deployment of a newly designed methanol fuel cell at AV35, a critical station that serves as the main repeater for the real time network on Unimak Island. In addition, PBO engineers also completed the installation of three Inmarsat BGAN terminals for data telemetry following successful testing at AC60 Shemya. Lastly, PBO engineers completed scheduled battery replacements at most of the PBO stations on Unimak Island, in collaboration with the USGS/Alaska Volcano Observatory. In addition to routine maintenance and planned station improvements to sites in Alaska, numerous critical repairs were made at stations on Unimak Island and elsewhere to ensure that the PBO network continues to function well and continues to meet the requirements stipulated by the NSF. We also present some of the station failures unique to Alaska, which we encountered during the course of the 2012 field season, as well

  6. Hyperfine coupling constant for {sup 59}Co estimated from a high-field susceptibility and high-field NMR shift in ferromagnetic Co{sub 2}TiGa and Co{sub 2}VGa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishihara, H; Furutani, Y; Wada, T [Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, Otsu 520-2194 (Japan); Kanomata, T [Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajo 985-8537 (Japan); Kobayashi, K; Ishida, K [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kainuma, R [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Koyama, K; Watanabe, K, E-mail: nishihara@rins.ryukoku.ac.j [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The hyperfine coupling constant for {sup 59}Co in the ferromagnetic state of a Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}TiGa in the high-field range has been estimated to be 170 kOe per 1 {mu}{sub B} of the moment of cobalt atom from the high-field magnetic susceptibility of 2.3 x 10{sup -6} emu/gOe measured at 5 K in a field range from 20 to 70 kOe and a reported positive high-field NMR shift of +0.83 percent. The value of the hyperfine coupling constant has been found to be even larger in the case of Co{sub 2}VGa. These features suggest that the positive hyperfine field at Co nucleus in the Co-based Heusler alloys is due to conduction electron polarization rather than a transferred hyperfine field.

  7. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a

  8. An Approach to Model Earth Conductivity Structures with Lateral Changes for Calculating Induced Currents and Geoelectric Fields during Geomagnetic Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic disturbances, the telluric currents which are driven by the induced electric fields will flow in conductive Earth. An approach to model the Earth conductivity structures with lateral conductivity changes for calculating geoelectric fields is presented in this paper. Numerical results, which are obtained by the Finite Element Method (FEM with a planar grid in two-dimensional modelling and a solid grid in three-dimensional modelling, are compared, and the flow of induced telluric currents in different conductivity regions is demonstrated. Then a three-dimensional conductivity structure is modelled and the induced currents in different depths and the geoelectric field at the Earth’s surface are shown. The geovoltages by integrating the geoelectric field along specific paths can be obtained, which are very important regarding calculations of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in ground-based technical networks, such as power systems.

  9. nmr spectroscopic study and dft calculations of giao nmr shieldings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    various fields of science and industry such as microelectronic and aerospace ... GIAO/DFT (Gauge Including Atomic Orbitals/Density Functional Theory) approach is .... successfully by using NMR and quantum chemical calculations.

  10. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  11. Feasibility of a Constellation of Miniature Satellites for Performing Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the requirements for a small constellation of satellites to perform measurements of the magnetic field of the Earth and a payload and boom design for such a mission is discussed. After studying communication, power and mass requirements it is found that it is feasible to develop...

  12. Gravitational Wave Track in the Electromagnetic Field of the Earth in the Infra-Low Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunskaya, L. V.; Isakevich, V. V.; Isakevich, D. V.; Luk'ianov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    Signals in the infra-low frequency range in the electric and geomagnetic fields of the Earth have been detected, corresponding to frequencies of gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by a series of binary star systems (BSS). The coherence of the detected signals has been investigated. The amplitude characteristics of signals in the electric and geomagnetic fields at GW frequencies of BSS are estimated. The estimates of the amplitudes of the detected signals are in line with model estimates.

  13. Magnetic Fields in Earth-like Exoplanets and Implications for Habitability around M-dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Gomez-Perez, Natalia; Ruedas, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We present estimations of dipolar magnetic moments for terrestrial exoplanets using the Olson & Christiansen (2006) scaling law and assuming their interior structure is similar to Earth. We find that the dipolar moment of fast rotating planets (where the Coriolis force dominates convection in the core), may amount up to ~80 times the magnetic moment of Earth, M_Earth, for at least part of the planets' lifetime. For very slow rotating planets (where the force of inertia dominates), the dipolar...

  14. To theory of tornado formation: mass condensation into droplets, their polarization by the Earth electric fields and rotation by magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Perel'man, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Vapor condensation with removing of latent heat by emission of characteristic frequencies allows fast droplets formation in big volumes, which becomes possible with spatial redistribution and spreading of condensation nuclei and ions formed in long lightning traces. Droplets in the vertical Earth electric fields will be polarized and dipoles will be oriented; at movements in the Earth magnetic field they will be torqued into horizontal plane. The estimations show that the teamwork of these phenomena leads to formation of tropic cyclones, which can decay in regions with reduced fields and non supersaturated vapor. The suggested theory can be verified by examination of fields' intensity and radiations: the characteristic, mainly IR radiating of latent heat and emission of the 150 kHz range at approaching of water dipoles to drops.

  15. Thermal coupling of conjugate ionospheres and the tilt of the earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of thermal coupling and the tilt of the earth's magnetic field on interhemispheric coupling is investigated, and, due to a longitudinal displacement in the conjugate points, it is found that the tilt significantly effects the upward flow of H(+) flux such that the maximum upward flux can occur several hours before local sunrise. Heating from the conjugate atmosphere, which accompanies solar illumination in one hemisphere, produces electron temperatures 1000 K higher in the dark than in the sunlit hemisphere, and the morning upward H(+) fluxes in the dark ionosphere are as large as the daytime fluxes. A strong symmetry is also noted in the overall behavior of the H(+) fluxes due to the differing day lengths at the conjugate points, which are separated by 15 deg in latitude. Electron temperatures in the conjugate hemispheres are found to be strongly coupled above the F region peaks, though in the vicinity of the peaks near 250 km, the coupling is weak during the day and strong during the night.

  16. Crystal electric field effects and thermal expansion of rare-earth hexaborides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. V.; Pilipenko, E. S.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Anomalies in the magnetic contribution to the thermal expansion coefficients ∆β(T)of the CeB6, PrB6, and NdB6 hexaborides in the range of 5-300 K were found by comparison with diamagnetic LaB6. The characteristic of the anomalies was the same in all the studied borides: a distinct peak at low temperatures, followed by a broad maximum at higher temperatures (50-100 K), then a decrease and transition to the region of negative values as the temperature increases further. The features of ∆β(T) are explained by the effects of the magnetic order (sharp low temperature peaks) and the crystal electric field (CEF). The βCEF(T) dependencies were calculated using Raman and neutron scattering data on the splitting of the rare-earth (RE) ions R3+ f-level by the CEF. A satisfactory consistency between the values of βCEF(T) and ∆β(T)was obtained for the studied hexaborides. Additionally, we determined the values of the Grüneisen parameter γi that correspond to the transition between the ground and excited multiplets of R3+ ions f-level splitting.

  17. GREMLIT: an airborne gradiometer to explore the Earth's gravitational field in coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.

    2010-12-01

    With its family of ultra sensitive space accelerometers dedicated to the in-orbit measurement of the Earth gravity field (CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions), the Onera team has accumulated these last years, the necessary experience and technical know-how to propose a new concept of airborne gravity gradiometer. This planar gradiometer is composed of four thin test masses levitated between two ULE electrodes plates similarly to the space sensors. The instrument is optimized to comply with the specific on ground gravity and aircraft vibration environment when it is mounted on its dedicated filtering platform. Thanks to the combination of super-spring active isolation with hexapod actuation, the platform is finely stabilised and servo-controlled horizontally exploiting the gradiometer acceleration and attitude outputs themselves. Operating as the GOCE space drag free system with respect to the aircraft perturbations and taking advantage of precise GPS positioning and accurate built-in thermal regulation, such a gradiometer has a resolution objective of better than 0.1Eötvös for the two horizontal gravity gradient components. The overall volume of the instrument including its platform and its electronics units is less than 1 m3. The stripping airborne measurements provided by this gradiometer is a fine complement to the global geoids derived from the space missions, GRACE and GOCE to obtain increased accuracy on the subsurface geology in particular in the costal areas.

  18. MICROCLIMATE CARTOGRAPHY USING DATA FROM THE EARTH REMOTE SENSING AND SIMULATION OF THERMAL FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shcherbakov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper proposes geoinformation technology that provides automated compiling of informative microclimatic map by co-processing of digital terrain models, historical dataof meteorological observations and satellite registration of plant vegetation index for a number of years. We present a new solution for urgent task of microclimate cartography according to satellite imagery and modeling of thermal fields. Method. Insolation and vegetation index NDVI were selected as indicators of microclimatic environment areas, showing the main microclimate forming factors that affect the condition of plants and the dynamics of their life cycle phases change. Main Results. We have done the comparison of the seasonal rhythm variability of microclimatic indicators for synchronicity and their being timed to each other. We have defined indicative properties of microclimate parameters, generalization degree of cartographic image, borders for microclimatic cartography. We have presented a fragment of microclimate map obtained with the use of the proposed GIS technology implemented in “ArcGIS” environment. Practical Relevance. Proposed technology allows the creation of formalized microclimate maps showing the distribution of insolation and photosynthetic activity of plants foliage on the Earth surface, taking into account the features of the terrain, and the search for locations favorable for growing the required crops and forecasting solution of problems in the sphere of nature.

  19. Searching for high energy cosmic ray electrons using the Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, S.; Bower, C.; Coutu, S.; Duvernois, M.; Martell, A.; Muller, D.; Musser, J.; Schubnell, M.; Tarle, G.; Yagi, A.

    2006-04-01

    The Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) instrument is a balloon payload designed to measure the flux of primary cosmic ray electrons at energies greater than 2 TeV. Because electrons at these energies lose energy rapidly during propagation through the interstellar medium, their detection would indicate the existence of sources which are within a few kiloparsecs. In order to obtain the needed large exposure time and aperture of the detector, we use an approach that depends on the detection of synchrotron photons emitted when the electrons travel through the earth's magnetic field. Such photons have energies in the x-ray and gamma-ray region, hence CREST incorporates an array of inorganic scintillators. Since the primary electrons do not need to pass through the detector, the effective detection area is much larger than the actual detector array size. To verify the technique and to determine background count rates, a prototype array of BGO and BaF2 crystals was flown on high altitude balloon from Ft. Sumner, N.M. in autumn 2005. The full detector system is currently under construction. It will consist of a 1600 crystal array, and will be carried on Long-Duration Balloons on circumpolar trajectory.

  20. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)).

  1. Role of finite ionospheric conductivity on toroidal field line oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere -- Analytic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Jayashree; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, Geeta

    2016-06-01

    An analytic solution has been formulated to study the role of ionospheric conductivity on toroidal field line oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere. The effect of ionospheric conductivity is addressed in two limits, viz, (a) when conductance of Alfvén wave is much different from ionospheric Pedersen conductance and (b) when conductance of Alfvén wave is close to the ionospheric Pedersen conductance. In the former case, the damping is not significant and standing wave structures are formed. However, in the latter case, the damping is significant leading to mode translation. Conventionally, "rigid-end" and "free-end" cases refer to eigenstructures for infinitely large and vanishingly small limit of ionospheric conductivity, respectively. The present work shows that when the Pedersen conductance overshoots (undershoots) the Alfvén wave conductance, a free-end (rigid-end) mode gets transformed to rigid-end (free-end) mode with an increase (decrease) in harmonic number. This transformation takes place within a small interval of ionospheric Pedersen conductance around Alfvén wave conductance, beyond which the effect of conductivity on eigenstructures of field line oscillations is small. This regime of conductivity limit (the difference between upper and lower limits of the interval) decreases with increase in harmonic number. Present paper evaluates the damping effect for density index other than the standard density index m = 6, using perturbation technique. It is found that for a small departure from m = 6, both mode frequency and damping rate become a function of Pedersen conductivity.

  2. The expanding Earth at present: evidence from temporal gravity field and space-geodetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Han

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The Earth expansion problem has attracted great interest, and the present study demonstrates that the Earth has been expanding, at least over the recent several decades. Space-geodetic data recorded at stations distributed globally were used (including global positioning system data, very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging stations, and stations for Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite, which covered a period of more than 10 years in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2008. A triangular network covering the surface of the Earth was thus constructed based on the spherical Delaunay approach, and average-weighted vertical variations in the Earth surface were estimated. Calculations show that the Earth is expanding at present at a rate of 0.24 ± 0.04 mm/yr. Furthermore, based on the Earth Gravitational Model 2008 and the secular variation rates of the second-degree coefficients estimated by satellite laser ranging and Earth mean-pole data, the principal inertia moments of the Earth (A, B, C and in particular their temporal variations, were determined: the simple mean value of the three principal inertia moments (i.e., [A+B+C]/3 is gradually increasing. This clearly demonstrates that the Earth has been expanding, at least over the recent decades, and the data show that the Earth is expanding at a rate ranging from 0.17 ± 0.02 mm/yr to 0.21 ± 0.02 mm/yr, which coincides with the space geodetic evidence. Hence, based on both space geodetic observations and gravimetric data, we conclude that the Earth has been expanding at a rate of about 0.2 mm/yr over recent decades.

  3. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling of Field-Grown Leaves from Sugar Beet Plants Harbouring Different Levels of Resistance to Cercospora Leaf Spot Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Sekiyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cercospora leaf spot (CLS is one of the most serious leaf diseases for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. worldwide. The breeding of sugar beet cultivars with both high CLS resistance and high yield is a major challenge for breeders. In this study, we report the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolic profiling of field-grown leaves for a subset of sugar beet genotypes harbouring different levels of CLS resistance. Leaves were collected from 12 sugar beet genotypes at four time points: seedling, early growth, root enlargement, and disease development stages. 1H-NMR spectra of foliar metabolites soluble in a deuterium-oxide (D2O-based buffer were acquired and subjected to multivariate analyses. A principal component analysis (PCA of the NMR data from the sugar beet leaves shows clear differences among the growth stages. At the later time points, the sugar and glycine betaine contents were increased, whereas the choline content was decreased. The relationship between the foliar metabolite profiles and resistance level to CLS was examined by combining partial least squares projection to latent structure (PLS or orthogonal PLS (OPLS analysis and univariate analyses. It was difficult to build a robust model for predicting precisely the disease severity indices (DSIs of each genotype; however, GABA and Gln differentiated susceptible genotypes (genotypes with weak resistance from resistant genotypes (genotypes with resistance greater than a moderate level before inoculation tests. The results suggested that breeders might exclude susceptible genotypes from breeding programs based on foliar metabolites profiled without inoculation tests, which require an enormous amount of time and effort.

  4. Sulfide Composition and Melt Stability Field in the Earth's Upper Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's upper mantle, sulfur occurs chiefly as (Fe, Ni)xS minerals and melts with near-monosulfide stoichiometries. These could have substantial influence on geochemical and geophysical properties of the Earth's interior. For example, sulfide mineral and melts are the major carriers of chalcophile and platinum group elements (PGEs) and sulfide melts are potentially responsible for mantle geophysical anomalies, as their physical properties (higher density, surface tension, electrical conductivity and lower melting points) differ greatly from those of silicates. Sulfide melts are a potential sink for reduced mantle carbon and perhaps be associated with carbon transport, including diamond precipitation. Sulfides may be molten in large parts of the mantle, but this is determined in part by sulfide composition, which is in turn a product of Fe-Ni exchange with olivine and of the effect of sulfur, oxygen, and carbon fugacities on metal/anion ratios of melts. Melting experiments define the monosulfide (Fe0.35Ni0.12Cu0.01S0.52) solidus from 1-8 GPa at carbon-free and graphite saturated conditions. The resulting carbon-free solidus is below the mantle adiabat to depths of at least 300 km, but does not indicate sulfide melting in continental lithosphere. In contrast, the graphite saturated solidus indicates melting in the lithosphere at 6-7 GPa (~200 km), close to the source conditions typical of diamond formation. To determine the composition of sulfide equilibrated with olivine, we performed experiments on monosulfide-olivine (crushed powders from San Carlos single crystal) under 2 GPa, 1400 ◦C. Our preliminary results suggests that Fe-Ni distribution coefficients KD, defined by (Ni/Fe)sulfide/(Ni/Fe)olivine, have significantly lower values than those determined previously at one atmosphere (Doyle and Naldrett 1987; Fleet and MacRae 1987; Gaetani and Grove 1997). This indicates that sulfide equilibrated with olivine in the mantle is richer in Fe than former

  5. Variations of the earth's magnetic field and rapid climatic cooling: A possible link through changes in global ice volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    A possible relationship between large scale changes in global ice volume, variations in the earth's magnetic field, and short term climatic cooling is investigated through a study of the geomagnetic and climatic records of the past 300,000 years. The calculations suggest that redistribution of the Earth's water mass can cause rotational instabilities which lead to geomagnetic excursions; these magnetic variations in turn may lead to short-term coolings through upper atmosphere effects. Such double coincidences of magnetic excursions and sudden coolings at times of ice volume changes have occurred at 13,500, 30,000, 110,000, and 135,000 YBP.

  6. iVFTs - immersive virtual field trips for interactive learning about Earth's environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, G.; Anbar, A. D.; Semken, S. C.; Summons, R. E.; Oliver, C.; Buxner, S.

    2014-12-01

    Innovations in immersive interactive technologies are changing the way students explore Earth and its environment. State-of-the-art hardware has given developers the tools needed to capture high-resolution spherical content, 360° panoramic video, giga-pixel imagery, and unique viewpoints via unmanned aerial vehicles as they explore remote and physically challenging regions of our planet. Advanced software enables integration of these data into seamless, dynamic, immersive, interactive, content-rich, and learner-driven virtual field explorations, experienced online via HTML5. These surpass conventional online exercises that use 2-D static imagery and enable the student to engage in these virtual environments that are more like games than like lectures. Grounded in the active learning of exploration, inquiry, and application of knowledge as it is acquired, users interact non-linearly in conjunction with an intelligent tutoring system (ITS). The integration of this system allows the educational experience to be adapted to each individual student as they interact within the program. Such explorations, which we term "immersive virtual field trips" (iVFTs), are being integrated into cyber-learning allowing science teachers to take students to scientifically significant but inaccessible environments. Our team and collaborators are producing a diverse suite of freely accessible, iVFTs to teach key concepts in geology, astrobiology, ecology, and anthropology. Topics include Early Life, Biodiversity, Impact craters, Photosynthesis, Geologic Time, Stratigraphy, Tectonics, Volcanism, Surface Processes, The Rise of Oxygen, Origin of Water, Early Civilizations, Early Multicellular Organisms, and Bioarcheology. These diverse topics allow students to experience field sites all over the world, including, Grand Canyon (USA), Flinders Ranges (Australia), Shark Bay (Australia), Rainforests (Panama), Teotihuacan (Mexico), Upheaval Dome (USA), Pilbara (Australia), Mid-Atlantic Ridge

  7. Paleosecular variation of the earth magnetic field at the Canary Islands over the last 15 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Laj, C.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J. C.; Wandres, C.; Guillou, H.

    2015-02-01

    We report on new paleomagnetic directions obtained from 38 lava flows located at Tenerife and Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). One flow is a historical one (1706 AD) and 28 other flows are dated by radiocarbon between 1550 AD and about 13 200 BC. Nine other flows are not dated but they have stratigraphic links with the other flows. Thermomagnetic curves, unblocking temperatures and coercivities suggest that the main carrier of the remanent magnetization is titanomagnetite with various titanium contents in the pseudo-single domain range. Paleodirections were obtained by thermal and alternating field demagnetization on more than 400 specimens. The two youngest flows yield directions well consistent with the data previously published from the Canary Islands but only covering the last 500 yr. Comparison with model predictions indicates that the models account on the long-term for most of the data. However, on short-term scale, a better agreement is observed with the archeomagnetic-based model predictions (ARCH3K and SHA.DIF.14k). Two time intervals (between 25 BC and 85 AD and around 600-700 BC), however, are characterized by more variable paleomagnetic directions, suggesting that the variability of the earth magnetic field was faster than predicted by the models. On a wider geographical scale, a rather good consistency is observed between the Canarian dataset and those from Northern Africa, Spain and Azores. Field information is well consistent with paleomagnetic information for the undated sites and they both confirm that the eruption rate of the Gran Canaria volcanic system was high around 600 BC, 1000 BC and 4650 BC. Refined ages could be obtained for two of the undated sites using archeomagnetic dating. Combined with the data previously published for the last 500 yr, this new dataset is the first long PSV record available for the Canary Islands, significantly contributing to the archeomagnetic/paleomagnetic database at latitudes lower than 30°N. Improvement

  8. Influence of lipid type on water and fat mobility in fermented sausages studied by low-field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklos, R; Mora-Gallego, H; Larsen, F H; Serra, X; Cheong, L-Z; Xu, X; Arnau, J; Lametsch, R

    2014-01-01

    The effects of diacylglycerols (DAG), pork back fat and sunflower oil on water and fat mobility in fermented sausages were studied with (1)H NMR relaxometry. The added fat affected the physicochemical parameters weight loss, water activity, moisture content and moisture content on a defatted-dry-matter basis of reduced-fat non-acid fermented sausages. The weight losses were the lowest in sausages prepared with DAG and sunflower oil, which resulted in higher water activity compared to sausages prepared with back fat. The relaxation times related to fat mobility differed between fat types and increased in the order: control

  9. Penetration of ELF Currents and Electromagnetic Fields into the Off-Equatorial E-Region of the Earth's Ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj; Sharma, A S; Papadopoulos, K

    2012-01-01

    The generation of ELF (of the order of 10 Hz) currents and electromagnetic fields in the off-equatorial E-region (90-120 km) of the Earth's ionosphere and their subsequent penetration into the deeper ionospheric layers is studied theoretically and numerically. These ELF currents and fields are generated by the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse with the E-region at its lower boundary located at 90 km above the Earth's surface. The wave penetration (with a typical wavelength of the order of 10 km) of the generated ELF currents and fields into the deeper ionospheric layers up to 120 km takes place due to the dominance of the Hall conductivity over the Pederson conductivity in the region between 90-120 km and penetration becomes diffusive above 120 km. During night time, the increase in the wave speed due to the reduced conductivities leads to the deeper penetration. As the angle between Earth's magnetic field and horizontal is increased (going away from the equator), the currents and fields penetrate deepe...

  10. Detection of olive oil adulteration by low-field NMR relaxometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy upon mixing olive oil with various edible oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ok

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adulteration of olive oil using unhealthy substitutes is considered a threat for public health. Low-field (LF proton (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxometry and ultra-violet (UV visible spectroscopy are used to detect adulteration of olive oil. Three different olive oil with different oleoyl acyl contents were mixed with almond, castor, corn, and sesame oils with three volumetric ratios, respectively. In addition, Arbequina olive oil was mixed with canola, flax, grape seed, peanut, soybean, and sunflower seed oils with three volumetric ratios. Transverse magnetization relaxation time (T2 curves were fitted with bi-exponential decaying functions. T2 times of each mixture of olive oils and castor oils, and olive oils and corn oils changed systematically as a function of volumetric ratio. To detect the adulteration in the mixtures with almond and sesame oils, both LF 1H NMR relaxometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy were needed, where UV-Vis-spectroscopy detected the adulteration qualitatively. In the mixtures of Arbequina olive oil and flax, peanut, soybean, and sunflower seed oils, both T21 and T22 values became longer systematically as the content of the olive oil was decreased. The unique UV-Vis maximum absorbance of flax oil at 320.0 nm shows the adulteration of olive oil qualitatively.

  11. Isolation and structure elucidation of a highly haemolytic saponin from the Merck saponin extract using high-field gradient-enhanced NMR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, C; Gavin, J A; Aumelas, A; Bonnet, P A; Roumestand, C

    1997-07-11

    Saponins SAPO50 and SAPO30, of which SAPO50 is highly haemolytic, have been isolated from the commercial Merck Saponin. Their structures have been determined exclusively by high-field gradient-enhanced NMR methods. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of these saponins in pyridine-deuterium oxide have been assigned by homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation experiments. Anomeric configurations were obtained by combined use of 1JCH, 3JH-1.H-2, and 1D-NOESY data. Sugar residues were identified by use of 3JHH values obtained from their subspectra recorded using an optimized 1D-zeta-TOCSY sequence. Linkage assignments were made using the ge-HMBC and 1D-NOESY spectra. This study shows that SAPO50 represents a hitherto undescribed saponin with the following structure: 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->3)-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl- (1-->2)]-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl gypsogenin 28-O-(6-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1--> 3)- beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D- fucopyranoside. SAPO30, however, corresponds to a saponin previously described [D. Frechet, B. Christ, B. Monegier du Sorbier, H. Fischer, and M. Vuilhorgne, Phytochemistry, 30 (1991) 927-931].

  12. Inorganic-organic hybrids based on poly (ε-Caprolactone and silica oxide and characterization by relaxometry applying low-field NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Sato de Souza de Bustamante Monteiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly (ε-caprolactone (PCL based hybrids containing different amounts of modified (Aerosil® R972 and unmodified (Aerosil® A200 silica oxide were prepared employing the solution method, using chloroform. The relationships of the amount of nanofillers, organic coating, molecular structure and intermolecular interaction of the hybrid materials were investigated mainly using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. The NMR analyses involved the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation time (T1H and hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T1ρH. The spin-lattice relaxation time measurements revealed that the PCL/silica oxide hybrids were heterogeneous, meaning their components were well dispersed. X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA were also employed. The DSC data showed that all the materials had lower crystallization temperature (Tc and melting temperature (Tm, so the crystallinity degree of the PCL decreased in the hybrids. The TGA analysis demonstrated that the addition of modified and unmodified silica oxide does not cause considerable changes to PCL's thermal stability, since no significant variations in the maximum temperature (Tmax were observed in relation to the neat polymer.

  13. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    High field quantitative 27Al MAS NMR and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol are used to study the surface and phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 during calcination in the temperature range of 500 to 1300 degrees C. Following ethanol adsorption, ethylene is generated during TPD with a desorption temperature > 200 degrees C. With increasing calcination temperature prior to TPD, the amount of ethylene produced decreases monotonically. Significantly, 27Al MAS NMR reveals that the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions (Lewis acid sites) also decreases with increasing calcination temperature. In fact, a strong correlation between the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions and the amount of strongly adsorbed ethanol molecules (i.e., the ones that convert to ethylene during TPD) is obtained. This result indicates that the penta-coordinate aluminum sites are the catalytic active sites on alumina surfaces during ethanol dehydration reaction across the entire course of gamma- to alpha-Al2O3 phase transformations.

  14. NMR studies of the internal electric field in a single crystal of the quasi-one-dimensional conductor Li0.9Mo6O17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoqing; Wu, Bing

    2015-03-01

    The quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) conductor Li0.9Mo6O17 is of considerable interest because it has a highly conducting phase with properties likely associated with a Luttinger liquid, a poorly understood ``metal-insulator'' crossover at temperature TMI = 24 K, and a 3D superconducting phase that may involve triplet Cooper pairs at Tc = 2.2 K, while the mechanism for many of its properties has been a long mystery and it presents tremendous experimental challenges. We report the 7Li-NMR measurements of the internal electric field with an externally applied magnetic field B0 = 9 - 12 T, and we also show our theoretically calculated result of the electric field based on the structure of the crystal lattice. We find that the 7Li-NQR frequency (νQ) has a value of ~ 45 kHz and the electric field gradient (EFG) at the Li site due to the charges of the surrounding Mo conduction electrons has an axial symmetry with the principle axis (pz) to be along the lattice a-axis. There is no temperature or field dependence for the value of νQ or EFG, indicating that the ``metal-insulator'' crossover has a magnetic origin, rather than the charge density wave (CDW) as one of the possible mechanisms previously thought in literature.

  15. Theory of crystal field states for heavy rare-earth impurities in MgB sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Welsch, F; Faehnle, M

    2002-01-01

    For isolated rare-earth impurities substituting for Mg atoms in the superconductor MgB sub 2 the crystal field parameters are calculated by the ab initio density functional electron theory with constraints for the 4f charge and spin density. The crystal field parameter A sub 6 sup 6 is extremely small due to the structure and bonding properties of MgB sub 2 , and therefore the crystal field levels are nearly exclusively determined by one magnetic quantum number M. Implications for the pair-breaking mechanism of the superconductivity in MgB sub 2 are discussed.

  16. Reduced Magneto-Resistivity of a Rare-Earth Crystalline and the Degeneracy Removals of Its Crystal-Field Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-Sen

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical approach is generalized and employed to calculate the magneto-resistivity of a rare-earth crystalline (CeAl2) with degenerate ground crystal-field (CF) level in the presence of external fields. The calculated results show that when a magnetic field is applied in the c-direction, the magneto-resistivity may be reduced by more than 90% in certain cases in comparison with the pure CF contribution at the same temperature, demonstrating the strong effects of the degeneracy removals of the CF levels on the magnetic resistivity.

  17. Construction of Earth's gravitational field model from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic principle of spectral combination method is discussed, and the general expressions of the spectral weight and spectral combination of the united-processing of various types of gravimetric data are shown. What's more, based on degree error RMS of potential coefficients, the detailed expressions of spectral combination formulae and the corresponding spectral weights in the Earth's gravitational field model(EGM determination using GOCE + GRACE and CHAMP + GRACE + GOCE are derived. The fundamental situation that ulux-champ2013s, tongji-GRACE01, go-cons-gcf-2-tim-r5 constructed respectively by CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE data and go-cons-gcf-2-dir-r5 constructed by syncretic processing of GRACE, GOCE and LAGEOS data are explained briefly, the degree error RMS, cumulative geoid height error and cumulative gravity anomaly error of these models are calculated. A syncretic model constructed from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE data, which is expressed by champ + grace + goce, is obtained based on spectral combination method. Experimentation results show that the precision of CHAMP data model is the lowest in satellite-only models, so it is not needed in the determination of syncretic models. The GRACE data model can improve the GOCE data model in medium-long wavelength, so the overall precision of syncretic model can be improved. Consequently, as many types of gravimetric data as possible should be combined together in the data processing in order to strengthen the quality and reliability with widening scope and improve the precision and spatial resolution of the computational results.

  18. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  19. New insight into Earth's weather through studies of Sun's magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  20. What does Earth's electromagnetic field from ground and space measurements tell us about conductivity of the mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayver, Alexander; Morschhauser, Achim; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents an overview of new models of Earth's mantle conductivity that have been derived using new methodologies and data from magnetic observatories and satellite missions such as CHAMP and Swarm. The electrical conductivity of the mantle provides a wealth of information on composition and temperature of the mantle material at depths. Lateral and vertical variations of this physical property allow us to constrain rheological and dynamic states of the tectonic processes in the subsurface. Electromagnetic (EM) induction methods is the only tool that can be used to study electrical conductivity at depth. They exploit natural electromagnetic field variations to derive frequency-dependent responses that are used to conduct Earth sounding. These variations originate from electric current systems in magnetosphere, ionosphere and even oceans. Over the last 17 years, almost continuous operation of low-orbit satellites measuring Earth's magnetic field, installation of new magnetic observatories in remote locations as well as substantial improvements in processing and modeling have enabled us to study mantle electrical conductivity using a variety of EM methods either globally or/and at different locations on Earth.

  1. Magnetic field-cycling NMR and (14)N, (17)O quadrupole resonance in the explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John A S; Rayner, Timothy J; Rowe, Michael D; Barras, Jamie; Peirson, Neil F; Stevens, Andrew D; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2010-05-01

    The explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) C(CH(2)-O-NO(2))(4) has been studied by (1)H NMR and (14)N NQR. The (14)N NQR frequency and spin-lattice relaxation time T(1Q) for the nu(+) line have been measured at temperatures from 255 to 325K. The (1)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) has been measured at frequencies from 1.8kHz to 40MHz and at temperatures from 250 to 390K. The observed variations are interpreted as due to hindered rotation of the NO(2) group about the bond to the oxygen atom of the CH(2)-O group, which produces a transient change in the dipolar coupling of the CH(2) protons, generating a step in the (1)H T(1) at frequencies between 2 and 100kHz. The same mechanism could also explain the two minima observed in the temperature variation of the (14)N NQR T(1Q) near 284 and 316K, due in this case to the transient change in the (14)N...(1)H dipolar interaction, the first attributed to hindered rotation of the NO(2) group and the second to an increase in torsional amplitude of the NO(2) group due to molecular distortion of the flexible CH(2)-O-NO(2) chain which produces a 15% increase in the oscillational amplitude of the CH(2) group. The correlation times governing the (1)H T(1) values are approximately 25 times longer than those governing the (14)N NQR T(1Q), explained by the slow spin-lattice cross-coupling between the two spin systems. At higher frequencies, the (1)H T(1) dispersion results show well-resolved dips between 200 and 904kHz assigned to level crossing with (14)N and weaker features between 3 and 5MHz tentatively assigned to level crossing with (17)O. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NMR GHZ

    CERN Document Server

    Laflamme, R; Zurek, W H; Catasti, P; Mariappan, S V S

    1998-01-01

    We describe the creation of a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state of the form |000>+|111> (three maximally entangled quantum bits) using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We have successfully carried out the experiment using the proton and carbon spins of trichloroethylene, and confirmed the result using state tomography. We have thus extended the space of entangled quantum states explored systematically to three quantum bits, an essential step for quantum computation.

  3. A Solid-State 11B NMR and Computational Study of Boron Electric Field Gradient and Chemical Shift Tensors in Boronic Acids and Boronic Esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The results of a solid-state 11B NMR study of a series of 10 boronic acids and boronic esters with aromatic substituents are reported. Boron-11 electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors obtained from analyses of spectra acquired in magnetic fields of 9.4 and 21.1 T are demonstrated to be useful for gaining insight into the molecular and electronic structure about the boron nucleus. Data collected at 21.1 T clearly show the effects of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), with tensor spans (Ω) on the order of 10−40 ppm. Signal enhancements of up to 2.95 were achieved with a DFS-modified QCPMG pulse sequence. To understand the relationship between the measured tensors and the local structure better, calculations of the 11B EFG and magnetic shielding tensors for these compounds were conducted. The best agreement was found between experimental results and those obtained from GGA revPBE DFT calculations. A positive correlation was found between Ω and the dihedral angle (ϕCCBO), which describes the orientation of the boronic acid/ester functional group relative to an aromatic system bound to boron. The small boron CSA is discussed in terms of paramagnetic shielding contributions as well as diamagnetic shielding contributions. Although there is a region of overlap, both Ω and the 11B quadrupolar coupling constants tend to be larger for boronic acids than for the esters. We conclude that the span is generally the most characteristic boron NMR parameter of the molecular and electronic environment for boronic acids and esters, and show that the values result from a delicate interplay of several competing factors, including hydrogen bonding, the value of ϕCCBO, and the electron-donating or withdrawing substituents bound to the aromatic ring. PMID:20337440

  4. Earth Expeditions: Telling the stories of eight NASA field campaigns by focusing on the human side of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Earth Right Now communication team kicked off an ambitious multimedia campaign in March 2016 to tell the stories of eight major field campaigns studying regions of critical change from the land, sea and air. Earth Expeditions focused on the human side of science, with live reporting from the field, behind-the-scenes images and videos, and extended storytelling over a six-month period. We reported from Greenland to Namibia, from the eastern United States to the South Pacific. Expedition scientists explored ice sheets, air quality, coral reefs, boreal forests, marine ecosystems and greenhouse gases. All the while the campaign communications team was generating everything from blog posts and social media shareables, to Facebook Live events and a NASA TV series. We also participated in community outreach events and pursued traditional media opportunities. A massive undertaking, we will share lessons learned, best practices for social media and some of our favorite moments when science communication touched our audience's lives.

  5. Global coupling at 660 km is proposed to explain plate tectonics and the generation of the earth's magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Jozsef

    2007-01-01

    The presence of low viscosity layers in the mantle is supported by line of geological and geophysical observations. Recent high pressure and temperature investigations indicated that partial carbonate melt should exist at the bottom of the lithosphere and at 660 km. The presence of few percent carbonate melt reduces the viscosity by several order of magnitude. The globally existing 660 km very low viscosity layer allows the development of differential rotation between the upper and lower mantle. This differential rotation between the 660 km outer shell and the rest of the earth offers a plausible explanation for plate tectonics and for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. Simple dynamo model is proposed, which able to reproduce all of the features of the contemporary and, within reasonable uncertainty, the paleomagnetic field. The model is also consistent with geological and geophysical observations.

  6. Next Generation Gravity Mission: a Step Forward in the Earth's Gravity Field Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrin, P.; Aguirre, M.; Massotti, L.; Cesare, S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper concerns with the "System Support to Laser Interferometry Tracking Technology Development for Gravity Field Monitoring" study of the European Space Agency, a mission study for monitoring the variations of Earth's gravity field at high resolution (up to harmonic degree 200) over a long time period (>5 years). The mission exploits the use of a heterodyne laser interferometer for the high-resolution measurement of the displacement between two satellites flying at low altitude (around 325 km). More in details, employing a formation of two co-orbiting satellites at 10 km relative distance, a resolution of about 1 nm rms is needed in the inter-satellite distance measurement, and the non gravitational accelerations must be measured with a resolution of about 10-10 m/s2 rms to achieve geoid height variation rate error equal to 0.1 mm/year at degree 200. Starting from the geophysical phenomena to be investigated, a detailed derivation of the mission requirements on the orbit, satellite formation and control, measurement instruments (laser interferometer and accelerometer) was performed using analytical models and numerical simulations, and the satellite GNC (Guidance, Navigation & Control) was approached through different techniques. A possible solution for the optical metrology suitable for the realization of a Next-Generation Gravimetric Mission has been identified, designed, breadboarded and tested to a level of detail sufficient to assess its feasibility. The main elements of this optical metrology are: 1) a Michelson-type heterodyne laser interferometer for measuring the distance variation between the retro-reflectors installed on two satellites. The innovative feature of the interferometer consists in chopping the laser beam with a frequency related to the satellite distance. This enables its proper functioning with a retro-reflector placed at large distances (around 10 km) from the source; 2) an optical device consisting of three small telescopes endowed

  7. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  8. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  9. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which…

  10. On the differential properties of internal magnetic field models at the Earth's surface and at satellite altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webers, Wigor A.

    2007-03-01

    The inverse theory of potential fields shows that the correspondence between the internal magnetic field of the Earth and its field sources is unique when the potential field is known in all points of the three-dimensional space including all points of the source region (cp., e.g. Diesselhorst, H., 1939. Magnetische Felder und Kräfte. Johann Ambrosius Barth Verlag, Leipzig). Thus, to determine the sources of the field it is not sufficient to know the potential field in the space external to the sources. Moreover, field models derived from finite sets of potential field observations emphasize different source properties because of measurement errors. In this study, I argue that improved internal field models can be developed from multi-altitude magnetic observations by imposing more effective constraints on the poorly conditioned downward continuation problem. In particular, the convergence behaviour of spherical harmonic field models can be used to improve the downward continuation of the higher truncation index terms. A high quality approximation of the field continuation is essential when the field models are interpreted for relatively small field contributions such as from the lithospheric sources. The relations between the potential field and its sources including the problems of potential field continuations - upward and downward - are governed by the theory of ill-posed inverse problems (cp., e.g. Anger, G., 1990. Inverse Problems in Differential Equations. Akademie/Plenum Press, Berlin/London; Anger, G., Gorenflo, R., Jochmann, H., Moritz, H., Webers, W. (Eds.), 1993. Inverse Problems: Principles and Applications in Geophysics, Technology, and Medicine. Akademie, Berlin; Huestis, S.P., Parker, R.L., 1979. Upward and downward continuations as inverse problems. Geophys. J. R. Astr. Soc. 57, 171-188; Rösler, R., 1981. Über die Fehlerfortpflanzung bei Potentialfeldtransformationen. Gerlands Beitr. Gephys. 90, 47-57).

  11. A model for the human's use of visual field cues in nap-of-the-Earth flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.; Chan, K.

    1986-01-01

    A simple model is developed which describes the manner in which the human pilot may use visual field cues in controlling a vehicle in nap-of-the earth flight. The model is based upon the feedforward of information obtained from streamer patterns in the visual field to the inner-most loop of a multi-loop pilot/vehicle model. In this framework, the model is a logical extension of pursuit and preview models of the human operator which have appeared in the literature. Simulation and flight test data involving low-level helicopter flight tasks are applied to model development and validation.

  12. High-field ELDOR-detected NMR study of a nitroxide radical in disordered solids: Towards characterization of heterogeneity of microenvironments in spin-labeled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, Anna; Möbius, Klaus; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Savitsky, Anton

    2014-05-01

    The combination of high-field EPR with site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL) techniques employing nitroxide radicals has turned out to be particularly powerful in probing the polarity and proticity characteristics of protein/matrix systems. This information is concluded from the principal components of the nitroxide Zeeman (g), nitrogen hyperfine (A) and quadrupole (P) tensors of the spin labels attached to specific sites. Recent multi-frequency high-field EPR studies underlined the complexity of the problem to treat the nitroxide microenvironment in proteins adequately due to inherent heterogeneities which result in several principal x-components of the nitroxide g-tensor. Concomitant, but distinctly different nitrogen hyperfine components could, however, not be determined from high-field cw EPR experiments owing to the large intrinsic EPR linewidth in fully protonated guest/host systems. It is shown in this work that, using the W-band (95 GHz) ELDOR- (electron-electron double resonance) detected NMR (EDNMR) method, different principal nitrogen hyperfine, Azz, and quadrupole, Pzz, tensor values of a nitroxide radical in glassy 2-propanol matrix can be measured with high accuracy. They belong to nitroxides with different hydrogen-bond situations. The satisfactory resolution and superior sensitivity of EDNMR as compared to the standard ENDOR (electron-nuclear double resonance) method are demonstrated.

  13. Localized NMR Mediated by Electrical-Field-Induced Domain Wall Oscillation in Quantum-Hall-Ferromagnet Nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, S; Miura, T; Watanabe, S; Nagase, K; Hirayama, Y

    2016-03-09

    We present fractional quantum Hall domain walls confined in a gate-defined wire structure. Our experiments utilize spatial oscillation of domain walls driven by radio frequency electric fields to cause nuclear magnetic resonance. The resulting spectra are discussed in terms of both large quadrupole fields created around the wire and hyperfine fields associated with the oscillating domain walls. This provides the experimental fact that the domain walls survive near the confined geometry despite of potential deformation, by which a localized magnetic resonance is allowed in electrical means.

  14. Ensemble fits of restrained peptides' conformational equilibria to NMR data. Dependence on force fields: AMBER/8 ff03 versus ECEPP/3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarkowski, Jerzy; Łuczak, Sylwia; Jagieła, Dawid; Sikorska, Emilia; Wójcik, Jacek; Oleszczuk, Marta; Izdebski, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Two variants of NMR-based conformational analyses of flexible peptides are compared using two examples meeting the formula Tyr-D-Daa-Phe-Daa-NH₂ (Daa=diamino acid): 1 combining D-Dab² (α,γ-diaminobutyryl) with Lys⁴, and 2 -D-Dap² (α,β-diaminopropionyl) with Orn⁴. The ω-amino groups of D-Daa² and Daa⁴ are coupled with C=O into the urea, restraining 1 and 2 with 16- and 14-membered rings and leading to potent and impotent μ/δ opioid peptides, respectively. To the current task, we took from an earlier work (Filip et al, J. Pept. Sci. 11 (2005) 347-352) the NMR NOE- and J-data in H₂O/D₂O; and the selection of the ensembles of 1 and 2, 822 and 788 conformational families, respectively, obtained by using the EDMC/ECEPP3 method. Here, we generated ensembles of 1 and 2 using AMBER molecular dynamics in explicit water to eventually selected 686 and 761 conformers for 1 and 2, respectively. We did numbers of fits for both types of the conformational ensembles of 1 and 2 to their NOE- and J-data using a common method i.e. maximum entropy approach (Groth et al, J. Biomol. NMR 15 (1999) 315-330). Both types of the well structurally diversified ensembles fit to quite different equilibria in regressions to common experimental NOE- and J-restraints using maximum entropy principle, which is a disappointing message. Intriguing is startlingly small standard deviation in J-couplings: σ(JNHαH) ≈ 0.01 Hz for LES-MD/AMBER ensemble, contrary to σ(JNHαH) = 0.8 - 1.1 Hz for the EDMC/ECEPP ensemble, over the wide range of entropy, i.e. relatively insensitive to it. A similar feature is not the case when comparing σ(NOE) in both methods. Hence, at minute entropy contributions, it follows that J does or does not transpose "overfitted" into the final σ(J) in the AMBER or ECEPP ensemble, respectively. Could this be an effect of softness of the AMBER flexible-valence force field compared to ECEPP rigid-geometry, and its effect on ensemble sampling? We do not know an

  15. A novel low-E field coil to minimize heating of biological samples in solid-state multinuclear NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Baudouin; Elbayed, Karim; Zeiger, Heinz; Weingertner, Marie-Catherine; Piotto, Martial; Engelke, Frank

    2007-07-01

    A novel coil, called Z coil, is presented. Its function is to reduce the strong thermal effects produced by rf heating at high frequencies. The results obtained at 500 MHz in a 50 μl sample prove that the Z coil can cope with salt concentrations that are one order of magnitude higher than in traditional solenoidal coils. The evaluation of the rf field is performed by numerical analysis based on first principles and by carrying out rf field measurements. Reduction of rf heating is probed with a DMPC/DHPC membrane prepared in buffers of increasing salt concentrations. The intricate correlation that exists between the magnetic and electric field is presented. It is demonstrated that, in a multiply tuned traditional MAS coil, the rf electric field E1 cannot be reduced without altering the rf magnetic field. Since the detailed distribution differs when changing the coil geometry, a comparison involving the following three distinct designs is discussed: (1) a regular coil of 5.5 turns, (2) a variable pitch coil with the same number of turns, (3) the new Z coil structure. For each of these coils loaded with samples of different salt concentrations, the nutation fields obtained at a certain power level provide a basis to discuss the impact of the dielectric and conductive losses on the rf efficiency.

  16. A novel low-E field coil to minimize heating of biological samples in solid-state multinuclear NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Baudouin; Elbayed, Karim; Zeiger, Heinz; Weingertner, Marie-Catherine; Piotto, Martial; Engelke, Frank

    2007-07-01

    A novel coil, called Z coil, is presented. Its function is to reduce the strong thermal effects produced by rf heating at high frequencies. The results obtained at 500MHz in a 50 microl sample prove that the Z coil can cope with salt concentrations that are one order of magnitude higher than in traditional solenoidal coils. The evaluation of the rf field is performed by numerical analysis based on first principles and by carrying out rf field measurements. Reduction of rf heating is probed with a DMPC/DHPC membrane prepared in buffers of increasing salt concentrations. The intricate correlation that exists between the magnetic and electric field is presented. It is demonstrated that, in a multiply tuned traditional MAS coil, the rf electric field E(1) cannot be reduced without altering the rf magnetic field. Since the detailed distribution differs when changing the coil geometry, a comparison involving the following three distinct designs is discussed: (1) a regular coil of 5.5 turns, (2) a variable pitch coil with the same number of turns, (3) the new Z coil structure. For each of these coils loaded with samples of different salt concentrations, the nutation fields obtained at a certain power level provide a basis to discuss the impact of the dielectric and conductive losses on the rf efficiency.

  17. The electrical conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle as estimated from satellite measured magnetic field variations. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didwall, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Low latitude magnetic field variations (magnetic storms) caused by large fluctuations in the equatorial ring current were derived from magnetic field magnitude data obtained by OGO 2, 4, and 6 satellites over an almost 5 year period. Analysis procedures consisted of (1) separating the disturbance field into internal and external parts relative to the surface of the Earth; (2) estimating the response function which related to the internally generated magnetic field variations to the external variations due to the ring current; and (3) interpreting the estimated response function using theoretical response functions for known conductivity profiles. Special consideration is given to possible ocean effects. A temperature profile is proposed using conductivity temperature data for single crystal olivine. The resulting temperature profile is reasonable for depths below 150-200 km, but is too high for shallower depths. Apparently, conductivity is not controlled solely by olivine at shallow depths.

  18. Assessing Guest-Molecule Diffusion in Heterogeneous Powder Samples of Metal-Organic Frameworks through Pulsed-Field-Gradient (PFG) NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Roland; Kärger, Jörg; de Sousa Amadeu, Nader; Nießing, Sandra; Janiak, Christoph

    2017-07-19

    Investigation of guest diffusion in porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is of major importance, because many porosity-related properties of MOFs are influenced by diffusion effects. The diffusion of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the MOF MIL-53-NH2 (Al) was investigated through pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy. The microporous material was synthesized in small crystallites (under 500 nm), which agglomerated in a large range of particle sizes (from hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers), giving a morphologically very heterogeneous sample. No special agglomeration pattern could be observed, which makes a PFG NMR investigation very challenging, yet it represents a realistic situation for the diffusion of guest molecules in porous materials. We were able to distinguish between two diffusion regimes existing in parallel with each other over the total range from 15 to 200 ms of observation times as accessible in the experiments: In the large crystal agglomerates (diameters above 20 μm), guest movement was found to be subdiffusive, with a time exponent κ =0.8 (rather than one as for normal diffusion). Guest diffusion in the remaining, smaller host particles followed the pattern of normal diffusion within a bed of spheres of impenetrable external surfaces, with a size distribution in good agreement with that of the material under study. Diffusion in a rather complex system could thus be referred to a two-region model with new potentials for application to systems of intricate topology. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Mathematical modeling and measurement of electric fields of electrode-based through-the-earth (TTE) communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lincan; Zhou, Chenming; Reyes, Miguel; Whisner, Bruce; Damiano, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    There are two types of through-the-earth (TTE) wireless communication in the mining industry: magnetic loop TTE and electrode-based (or linear) TTE. While the magnetic loop systems send signal through magnetic fields, the transmitter of an electrode-based TTE system sends signal directly through the mine overburden by driving an extremely low frequency (ELF) or ultralow frequency (ULF) AC current into the earth. The receiver at the other end (underground or surface) detects the resultant current and receives it as a voltage. A wireless communication link between surface and underground is then established. For electrode-based TTE communications, the signal is transmitted through the established electric field and is received as a voltage detected at the receiver. It is important to understand the electric field distribution within the mine overburden for the purpose of designing and improving the performance of the electrode-based TTE systems. In this paper, a complete explicit solution for all three electric field components for the electrode-based TTE communication was developed. An experiment was conducted using a prototype electrode-based TTE system developed by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The mathematical model was then compared and validated with test data. A reasonable agreement was found between them.

  20. 地球主磁场电磁转矩导致的地球差异旋转%The earth's differential rotation caused by the electromagnetic torque of the earth's main magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹润莉

    2012-01-01

    As the earth's main magnetic field is stationary relative to the earth's axis, the earth autorotation drives the electrostatic charges to move along the vertical direction of the earth's main magnetic field,and causes charged particles subject to Lorentz force. According to the right-hand screw rule, the Lorentz force lies in meridian plane, perpendicular to the earth's rotation speed,with the directions of positively charged particles pointing to the earth's axis and the negatively charged to the opposite in normal phase of geomagnetic field while in abnormal phase, they point to the opposite. This force is proportional to the earth' s rotation speed and is referred to as normal Lorentz force. The normal Lorentz force forces the charges to drift along the normal and causes the normal drift velocity. Similarly.it is deduced that the Lorentz force, corresponding to the normal drift velocity of the charged particles, is always to the west along the tangent whether normal or abnormal phase of geomagnetic field. This force is proportional to the normal drift velocity and is referred to as tangent Lorentz force. The tangential Lorentz force causes charged particles to produce tangent acceleration,and thus forms westward drift which drives the solid medium containing charged particles drift westward. It hinders the earth's rotation that the torque of the tangential Lorentz force relative to the earth's axis,which is the electromagnetic torquen M of the earth's main magnetic field. This leads to the earth's rotation rate long-term slowdown in single-valued,as well as differential rotation of the earth. To explore the law of the earth's differential rotation, the whole earth was studied as the object and the earth's axis was as the central axis for the cylindrical coordinate system. With application of the classical physics theory and analyzing method, the formulas were deduced to calculate the rotary inertia J of thin cylinder in the earth's sphere, the electromagnetic

  1. Effect of near-earth thunderstorms electric field on the intensity of ground cosmic ray positrons/electrons in Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. X.; Wang, X. J.; Huang, D. H.; Jia, H. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the correlation between the ground cosmic ray intensity and near-earth thunderstorms electric field at YBJ (located at YangBaJing, Tibet, China, 4300 m a. s. l.). The variations of the secondary cosmic ray intensity are found to be highly dependent on the strength and polarity of the electric field. In negative fields and in positive fields greater than 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons increases with increasing electric field strength. And these values increase more obviously when involving a shower with lower primary energy or a higher zenith angle. While in positive fields ranging from 0 to 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons declines and the amplitude is up to 3.1% for vertical showers. A decrease of intensity occurs in inclined showers within the range of 0-500 V/cm, which is accompanied by smaller amplitudes. In this paper, the intensity changes are analyzed, especially concerning those decreasing phenomena in positive electric fields. Our simulation results could be helpful in understanding the decreases observed in some ground-based experiments (such as the Carpet air shower array and ARGO-YBJ), and also be useful in understanding the acceleration mechanisms of secondary charged particles caused by an atmospheric electric field.

  2. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, M. Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  3. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  4. The effect of earth's atmosphere on contrast reduction for a nonuniform surface albedo and 'two-halves' field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a model for contrast reduction by atmospheric haze developed for the 'two-halves' field of the earth's surface and other geometries of the earth's surface albedo. The model is based on a simplified solution of the equation of radiative transfer in two dimensions, resulting in a method for calculation of the upward zenith intensity in the atmosphere as a function of the distance from the border between the two half planes, for an unabsorbing atmosphere. The adjacency effect between two infinitesimal areas of different albedos is calculated; the resultant simplified solution is used to develop expressions for the line-spread function of the atmosphere and the modulation transfer function. The line-spread function is used to calculate the point spread function, which can be used to compute the intensity above any surface with given spatial dependence of the reflectivity.

  5. Key Ground-Based and Space-Based Assets to Disentangle Magnetic Field Sources in the Earth's Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.; Matzka, J.; Masson, A.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic field measured on the ground or in space is the addition of several sources: from flows within the Earth's core to electric currents in distant regions of the magnetosphere. Properly separating and characterizing these sources requires appropriate observations, both ground-based and space-based. In the present paper, we review the existing observational infrastructure, from magnetic observatories and magnetometer arrays on the ground to satellites in low-Earth (Swarm) and highly elliptical (Cluster) orbits. We also review the capability of SuperDARN to provide polar ionospheric convection patterns supporting magnetic observations. The past two decades have been marked by exciting new developments in all observation types. We review these developments, focusing on how they complement each other and how they have led or could lead in the near future to improved separation and modeling of the geomagnetic sources.

  6. Structure of Long-Term Variations of the Plasma Parameters and Magnetic Field in the Near-Earth Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskii, I. S.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Suvorova, A. V.; Minaeva, Yu. S.

    The methods of the fast Fourier transform, spectrumtime analysis, and wavelet analysis are used to study the structure and dynamics of rhythmic and arrythmic variations of the main param- eters of solar wind, as well as the interplanetary and solar magnetic field at time scales from days to tens of years. A large variety of the observed regular and irregular variations in the near-Earth helio- sphere is explained by a number of reasons: (1) the variability of unstable processes and in the region of solar wind formation, (2) the solar rotation of the Sun and the associated inhomogeneities in its corona, (3) and the Earth's orbital motion. Irregular, aperiodic variations are present for all parame- ters and at all time scales. The most prominent regular variations are related to cyclic processes on the Sun and its rotation.

  7. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redfield, Alfred G., E-mail: redfield@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753-768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  8. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Alfred G

    2012-02-01

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753-768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  9. Earth's lithospheric magnetic field determined to spherical harmonic degree 90 from CHAMP satellite measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maus, S.; Rother, M.; Hemant, K.;

    2006-01-01

    The CHAMP magnetic field mission is providing highly reliable measurements from which the global lithospheric magnetic field can be determined in unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Using almost 5 yr of data, we derive our fourth generation lithospheric field model termed MF4, which is expanded...... to spherical harmonic degree and order 90. After subtracting from the full magnetic field observations predicted fields from an internal field model up to degree 15, an external field model up to degree two, and the predicted magnetic field signatures for the eight dominant ocean tidal constituents, we fit...... of the lithospheric field down to an altitude of about 50 km at lower latitudes, with reduced accuracy in the polar regions. Crustal features come out significantly sharper than in previous models. In particular, bands of magnetic anomalies along subduction zones become visible by satellite for the first time....

  10. Influence of the Earth s Corotation Field on the Atmospheric Electricity: Latitudinal Variation and Response to the Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumin, Y.

    Influence of the magnetospheric convection field on the atmospheric electricity is widely studied, both theoretically and experimentally, from the early 1970s. On the other hand, a considerably less attention was paid to the effects of plasmaspheric corotation field, since it was usually believed that the electric field of corotation of the solid Earth is fitted smoothly to the corotation field of plasmasphere, so that no potential difference is formed between them in the lower atmosphere. A conjecture on the important role of corotation field in the global atmospheric-electric circuit was done a few years ago in [P.A. Bespalov, Yu.V. Chugunov, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 1996, v.58, p.601] and several subsequent works. Unfortunately, because of using an oversimplified model of plasmasphere (in the form of a spherically-symmetric envelope with isotropic conductivity and rigid-body rotation), no reliable numerical estimates were derived, and no comparison with experimental distributions of the atmospheric electric field could be conducted. The main aim of the present report is to study the corotation effects in the framework of a considerably more realistic analytical model, where conductivity of the plasmasphere is strongly anisotropic, and the magnetic field lines are substantially distorted (stretched to "infinity") in the polar regions. Escape of polarization electric charges along the distorted field lines results in appreciable decrease (by 10-15 V/m) in the average atmospheric electric field at high latitudes. Such phenomenon was experimentally discovered as early as the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958) but was not quantitatively explained by now. Yet another interesting effect following from our model is changing the high-latitude electric field due to variations in the degree of distortion of the magnetic field lines at different levels of the solar activity. These transient changes in the atmospheric electricity should be symmetric about the noon

  11. 27.3-day and Average 13.6-day Periodic Oscillations in the Earth's Rotation Rate and Atmospheric Pressure Fields Due to Celestial Gravitation Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guoqing; ZONG Haifeng; ZHANG Qingyun

    2011-01-01

    Variation in length of day of the Earth (LOD equivalent to the Earth's rotation rate) versus change in atmospheric geopotential height fields and astronomical parameters were analyzed for the years 1962-2006.This revealed that there is a 27.3-day and an average 13.6-day periodic oscillation in LOD and atmospheric pressure fields following lunar revolution around the Earth. Accompanying the alternating change in celestial gravitation forcing on the Earth and its atmosphere, the Earth's LOD changes from minimum to maximum,then to minimum. and the atmospheric geopotential height fields in the tropics oscillate from low to high,then to low. The 27.3-day and average 13.6-day periodic atmospheric oscillation in the tropics is proposed to be a type of strong atmospheric tide, excited by celestial gravitation forcing. A formula for a Tidal Index was derived to estimate the strength of the celestial gravitation forcing, and a high degree of correlation was found between the Tidal Index determined by astronomical parameters, LOD, and atmospheric geopotential height. The reason for the atmospheric tide is periodic departure of the lunar orbit from the celestial equator during lunar revolution around the Earth. The alternating asymmetric change in celestial gravitation forcing on the Earth and its atmosphere produces a "modulation" to the change in the Earth's LOD and atmospheric pressure fields.

  12. Design, Development and Preliminary Student Evaluation of Virtual Field Guides as aids to teaching and learning in the Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Tim

    2010-05-01

    In Universities the benefits of teaching and learning through fieldwork has been brought under closer examination in recent years (e.g. Andrews et al., 2003) and the notion of supporting fieldwork in the Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) disciplines has been gathering momentum over the past decade as evidenced by conferences on ‘Supporting fieldwork using information technology' (Maskall et al., 2007) and a Higher Education Academy GEES Virtual Fieldwork Conference at University of Worcester (May 2007). Virtual environments and e-learning resources have been shown to help students become active rather than passive learners by appealing to their multi-sensory learning ability with interactive media (Fletcher et al., 2002; 2007). Research on glacial and fluvial processes has been conducted since 2003 by Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) staff, sometimes in collaboration with other Universities, at field sites in the French Alps, Swiss Alps and Cariboo Mountains in British Columbia. A virtual field guide (VFG) (www.virtualalps.co.uk) has been developed which uses maps, site photos, panorama movies, video clips, a google earth tour, student exercises using hydrological and glacial datasets collected in the field and revision exercises. A preliminary evaluation of this learning resource has been carried out with two groups of LJMU students and an article written (Stott et al. 2009a). The Ingleton Waterfalls VFG (http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/BIE/ingleton/) was developed by LJMU staff to meet the needs of Foundation degree and undergraduate students. A workshop was presented at the Earth Science Teachers Association 2008 Annual Conference at LJMU, and a subsequent article written (Stott et al. 2009b). The final section of this presentation will summarise some staff perspectives and raises some questions and issues concerned with development and accessibility of VFGs in the light of new developments of a ‘semantic web' at LJMU (Carmichael, 2009). Andrews

  13. Results of long-term field tests of protective earthing device for vessel electric systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaginin V.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of prolonged natural tests of protective neutral earthing device for controlling the fire and electrical safety of vessel electric systems have been shown. The use of such devices provides safe single-phase fault currents and reducing arc overvoltage during the long-term operation of a ship. The results of long-term monitoring of the device operation as part of the existing vessel electric power system have confirmed its effectiveness

  14. Results of long-term field tests of protective earthing device for vessel electric systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blaginin V.A.; Kazhekin I.E.; Yusyp V.M.; Moskalyuk A.M.; Syrenko D.P.

    2015-01-01

    The results of prolonged natural tests of protective neutral earthing device for controlling the fire and electrical safety of vessel electric systems have been shown. The use of such devices provides safe single-phase fault currents and reducing arc overvoltage during the long-term operation of a ship. The results of long-term monitoring of the device operation as part of the existing vessel electric power system have confirmed its effectiveness

  15. Astrobiology in the Field: Studying Mars by Analogue Expeditions on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Pamela G.

    2011-01-01

    We will present a strategy for how one prepares to engage in fieldwork on another planets by practicing in analogous environments on the Earth, including at Mono Lake. As an example, we will address the problem of how to study the habitability of an environment when you have no idea what kind of life might be there to exploit it. This will all be related to the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory to Mars in late November this year.

  16. Ultrahigh field NMR and MRI: Science at a crossroads. Report on a jointly-funded NSF, NIH and DOE workshop, held on November 12-13, 2015 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polenova, Tatyana; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance plays a central role in academic, industrial and medical research. NMR is widely used for characterizing the structure, chemistry and dynamic properties of new materials, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, in both the liquid and solid phases. NMR also provides detailed functional information on biological macromolecules and their assemblies, in vitro, in membranes and even in whole cells. In vivo, MRI/S are used for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of disease, for non-invasive studies of human physiology and metabolism in general, and for evaluating brain function, in particular. MRI/S is also a key technology for imaging small organisms at the cellular level, monitoring catalysis in chemical reactors and other scientific areas where non-destructive characterizations of structure and dynamics in complex systems are needed. At the heart of all the MR methods are strong, stable and homogeneous magnets built from low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which are essential to these experiments. Further developments in NMR/MRI are hampered because the ultimate limit of the attainable field strengths of persistent LTS magnets has now been reached. Fortunately, recent breakthroughs in new high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and hybrid LTS/HTS magnet technologies promise to greatly increase the achievable field strength of NMR magnets and to decrease the operational complexity of high field human MRI infrastructures, thereby enabling new applications at the forefront of modern multidisciplinary research.

  17. NMR paramagnetic relaxation due to the S=5/2 complex, Fe(III)-(tetra-p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin: central role of the tetragonal fourth-order zero-field splitting interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2005-05-08

    The metalloporphyrins, Me-TSPP [Me=Cr(III), Mn(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), and TSPP=meso-(tetra-p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin], which possess electron spins S=3/2, 2, 5/2, and 5/2, respectively, comprise an important series of model systems for mechanistic studies of NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (NMR-PRE). For these S>1/2 spin systems, the NMR-PRE depends critically on the detailed form of the zero-field splitting (zfs) tensor. We report the results of experimental and theoretical studies of the NMR relaxation mechanism associated with Fe(III)-TSPP, a spin 5/2 complex for which the overall zfs is relatively large (D approximately = 10 cm(-1)). A comparison of experimental data with spin dynamics simulations shows that the primary determinant of the shape of the magnetic relaxation dispersion profile of the water proton R1 is the tetragonal fourth-order component of the zfs tensor. The relaxation mechanism, which has not previously been described, is a consequence of zfs-induced mixing of the spin eigenfunctions of adjacent Kramers doublets. We have also investigated the magnetic-field dependence of electron-spin relaxation for S=5/2 in the presence of a large zfs, such as occurs in Fe(III)-TSPP. Calculations show that field dependence of this kind is suppressed in the vicinity of the zfs limit, in agreement with observation.

  18. Effect of near-earth thunderstorms electric field on the intensity of ground cosmic ray positrons/electrons in Tibet

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, X X; Huang, D H; Jia, H Y

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the correlation between the ground cosmic ray intensity and near-earth thunderstorms electric field at YBJ (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China). The variations of the secondary cosmic ray intensity are found to be highly dependent on the strength and polarity of the electric field. In negative fields and in positive fields greater than 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons increases with increasing electric field strength. And these values increase more obviously when involving a shower with lower primary energy or a higher zenith angle. While in positive fields ranging from 0 to 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons declines and the amplitude is up to 3.1% for vertical showers. A decrease of intensity occurs for inclined showers in positive fields less than 500 V/cm, which is accompanied by smaller amplitudes. In this paper, the intensity changes are discussed, especially concerning the decreases in posi...

  19. Activation changes in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain areas evoked by alterations of the earth magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keary, Nina; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Many animals are able to perceive the earth magnetic field and to use it for orientation and navigation within the environment. The mechanisms underlying the perception and processing of magnetic field information within the brain have been thoroughly studied, especially in birds, but are still obscure. Three hypotheses are currently discussed, dealing with ferromagnetic particles in the beak of birds, with the same sort of particles within the lagena organs, or describing magnetically influenced radical-pair processes within retinal photopigments. Each hypothesis is related to a well-known sensory organ and claims parallel processing of magnetic field information with somatosensory, vestibular and visual input, respectively. Changes in activation within nuclei of the respective sensory systems have been shown previously. Most of these previous experiments employed intensity enhanced magnetic stimuli or lesions. We here exposed unrestrained zebra finches to either a stationary or a rotating magnetic field of the local intensity and inclination. C-Fos was used as an activity marker to examine whether the two treatments led to differences in fourteen brain areas including nuclei of the somatosensory, vestibular and visual system. An ANOVA revealed an overall effect of treatment, indicating that the magnetic field change was perceived by the birds. While the differences were too small to be significant in most areas, a significant enhancement of activation by the rotating stimulus was found in a hippocampal subdivision. Part of the hyperpallium showed a strong, nearly significant, increase. Our results are compatible with previous studies demonstrating an involvement of at least three different sensory systems in earth magnetic field perception and suggest that these systems, probably less elaborated, may also be found in nonmigrating birds.

  20. Activation changes in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata brain areas evoked by alterations of the earth magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Keary

    Full Text Available Many animals are able to perceive the earth magnetic field and to use it for orientation and navigation within the environment. The mechanisms underlying the perception and processing of magnetic field information within the brain have been thoroughly studied, especially in birds, but are still obscure. Three hypotheses are currently discussed, dealing with ferromagnetic particles in the beak of birds, with the same sort of particles within the lagena organs, or describing magnetically influenced radical-pair processes within retinal photopigments. Each hypothesis is related to a well-known sensory organ and claims parallel processing of magnetic field information with somatosensory, vestibular and visual input, respectively. Changes in activation within nuclei of the respective sensory systems have been shown previously. Most of these previous experiments employed intensity enhanced magnetic stimuli or lesions. We here exposed unrestrained zebra finches to either a stationary or a rotating magnetic field of the local intensity and inclination. C-Fos was used as an activity marker to examine whether the two treatments led to differences in fourteen brain areas including nuclei of the somatosensory, vestibular and visual system. An ANOVA revealed an overall effect of treatment, indicating that the magnetic field change was perceived by the birds. While the differences were too small to be significant in most areas, a significant enhancement of activation by the rotating stimulus was found in a hippocampal subdivision. Part of the hyperpallium showed a strong, nearly significant, increase. Our results are compatible with previous studies demonstrating an involvement of at least three different sensory systems in earth magnetic field perception and suggest that these systems, probably less elaborated, may also be found in nonmigrating birds.

  1. High-field magnetization of rare-earth ions in scandium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeland, L. W.; Touborg, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic moments of Tb, Dy, or Er ions in dilute Sc single-crystal alloys have been measured in fields up to 280 × 105 A/m (350 kOe). The Zeeman energies in this high field are comparable to the total crystal-field splittings. This gives rise to characteristic features in the magnetization...... curves. The crystal-field parameters obtained previously from experiments in low fields and the Zeeman interaction give a satisfactory quantitative acount of the experimental results....

  2. Amplitude modulated, by M1, Earth's oscillating (T = 1 day) electric field triggered by K1 tidal waves. Its relation to the occurrence time of large EQs

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the observation that quite often the Earth's oscillating electric field varies in amplitude, a mechanism is postulated that accounts for these observations. That mechanism is the piezoelectric one driven by the M1 and K1 tidal components. It is demonstrated how the system: piezoelectricity triggered in the lithosphere - M1 and K1 tidal components is activated and produces the amplitude modulated Earth's oscillating electric field. This procedure is linked to the strain load conditions met in the seismogenic area before the occurrence of a large EQ. Peaks of the oscillating Earth's electric field are tightly connected to the M1 peak tidal component and to the timing of the occurrence of large EQs. Typical examples from real recordings of the Earth's oscillating electric field, recorded by the ATH (Greece) monitoring site, are given in order to verify the postulated detailed piezoelectric mechanism.

  3. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a membrane protein in biphenyl phospholipid bicelles with the bilayer normal parallel to the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Ho; Loudet, Cécile; Marassi, Francesca M.; Dufourc, Erick J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2008-07-01

    Bicelles composed of the long-chain biphenyl phospholipid TBBPC (1-tetradecanoyl-2-(4-(4-biphenyl)butanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-PC) and the short-chain phospholipid DHPC align with their bilayer normals parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. In contrast, in typical bicelles the long-chain phospholipid is DMPC or DPPC, and the bilayers align with their normals perpendicular to the field. Samples of the membrane-bound form of the major coat protein of Pf1 bacteriophage in TBBPC bicelles are stable for several months, align magnetically over a wide range of temperatures, and yield well-resolved solid-state NMR spectra similar to those obtained from samples aligned mechanically on glass plates or in DMPC bicelle samples "flipped" with lanthanide ions so that their bilayer normals are parallel to the field. The order parameter of the TBBPC bicelle sample decreases from approximately 0.9 to 0.8 upon increasing the temperature from 20 °C to 60 °C. Since the frequency spans of the chemical shift and dipolar coupling interactions are twice as large as those obtained from proteins in DMPC bicelles without lanthanide ions, TBBPC bicelles provide an opportunity for structural studies with higher spectral resolution of the metal-binding membrane proteins without the risk of chemical or spectroscopic interference from the added lanthanide ions. In addition, the large temperature range of these samples is advantageous for the studies of membrane proteins that are unstable at elevated temperatures and for experiments requiring measurements as a function of temperature.

  4. Analytically derived limits on short-range fifth forces from quantum states of neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Westphal, Alexander; Abele, Hartmut; Baessler, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Recently, quantum states of ultra-cold neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field have been observed for the first time. From the fact that they are consistent with Newtonian gravity on the 10 %-level, analytical limits on alpha and lambda of short-range Yukawa-like additional interactions are derived between lambda = 1 micrometer and 1 mm. We arrive for lambda > 10 micrometer at alpha < 2 \\cdot 10^11 at 90 % confidence level. This translates into a limit g_s g_p / (\\hbar c) < 2 \\cdot 10^{-1...

  5. Analytically derived limits on short-range fifth forces from quantum states of neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field

    CERN Document Server

    Westphal, A; Baessler, S; Abele, Hartmut; Baessler, Stefan; Westphal, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Recently, quantum states of ultra-cold neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field have been observed for the first time. From the fact that they are consistent with Newtonian gravity on the 10 %-level, analytical limits on alpha and lambda of short-range Yukawa-like additional interactions are derived between lambda = 1 micrometer and 1 mm. We arrive for lambda > 10 micrometer at alpha < 2 \\cdot 10^11 at 90 % confidence level. This translates into a limit g_s g_p / (\\hbar c) < 2 \\cdot 10^{-15} on the pseudo-scalar coupling of axions in the previously experimentally unaccessible astrophysical axion window.

  6. Feasibility of a Constellation of Miniature Satellites for Performing Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the requirements for a small constellation of satellites to perform measurements of the magnetic field of the Earth and a payload and boom design for such a mission is discussed. After studying communication, power and mass requirements it is found that it is feasible to develop...... a 10 x 10 x 30 cm(3) satellite with a mass of about 2.5 kg, which can fulfill such a mission. We also study the feasibility of controlling a constellation of such small satellites by means of air drag by extracting one or more flaps. It is found that it is indeed possible, but for best performance...

  7. The Earth-Moon Lagrangian points as a testbed for general relativity and effective field theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2015-01-01

    In the restricted four-body problem consisting of the Earth, the Moon and the Sun as the primaries and a spacecraft as the planetoid, we take into account the solar perturbation in the description of the motion of a spacecraft in the vicinity of the stable Earth-Moon libration points L4 and L5 both in the classical regime and in the context of effective field theories of gravity. We then evaluate the location of all Lagrangian points in the Earth-Moon system within the framework of general relativity. For the points L4 and L5, the corrections of coordinates are of order a few millimeters. After that, we set up a scheme where the theory which is quantum corrected has as its classical counterpart the Einstein theory, instead of the Newtonian one. By virtue of the effective-gravity correction to the longdistance form of the potential among two point masses, all terms involving the ratio between the gravitational radius of the primary and its separation from the planetoid get modified. Within this framework, for ...

  8. The effects of amylose and starch phosphate on starch gel retrogradation studied by low-field 1H NMR relaxometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Blennow, A.; Engelsen, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    ) relaxation curves from the two measurements (day 1 and day 7) could be used as a simple, illustrative way of describing the retrogradation. Three different behaviours were identified: One group of samples (mostly potato starches) slowly changed from a soft to a more rigid gel from day 1 to 7. A second group...... (mostly cereal starches) formed a rigid gel already before the first measurement and changed little after that. A third group comprised a few samples containing little or no amylose aged similarly to the first group of samples, but at a much slower rate. For the potato starches, a weak negative......Low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (23 MHz) was used to study the effects of the degree of phosphorylation, the amylose content and the amylopectin chain length distribution on gel retrogradation for a set of 26 starches, six of which were of crystal polymorph type A, 18 of type B and two of type...

  9. Apparent diffusion behaviour of intermolecular double-quantum coherence modulated by a distant dipolar field in solution NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Gui-Ping; Cai Cong-Bo; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A modified correlated spectroscopy (COSY) revamped with asymmetric Z-gradient echo detection sequence was designed to investigate the influence of diffusion behaviour on intermolecular double-quantum coherence signal attenuation during the pre-acquisition period. Theoretical formulas were deduced and experimental measurements and simulations were performed. It is found that the diffusion behaviour of intermolecular double-quantum coherence in the pre-acquisition period may be different from that of conventional single-quantum coherence, depending on the relative orientation of diffusion weighting gradients to coherence selection gradients. When the orientation of the diffusion weighting gradients is parallel or anti-parallel to the orientation of the coherence selection gradients, the diffusion is modulated by the distant dipolar field. This study is helpful for understanding the signal properties in intermolecular double-quantum coherence magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  11. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation. PMID:28223697

  12. Ediacaran paleomagnetic field records from Laurentia: Insights into the evolution of the diversity of life and Earth's deep interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, R. K.; Tarduno, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Ediacaran to early Cambrian interval (~635-530 Ma) marks a tremendous increase in biotic diversity known as the Cambrian explosion. The magnitude of the biotic evolution has motivated hypotheses evoking a role for abiotic/environmental causal factors. For example, a rotation of the entire solid Earth by 90°, in what has been called an inertial interchange true polar wander (IITPW) event, has been linked to these events. One of the primary data sets motivating IITPW has been the report of nearly orthogonal directions from the Sept-Îles (ca. 565 Ma) intrusion (Quebec, Canada) on the basis of whole rock paleomagnetic analyses. We have found that only one direction (shallow) from our sampling of the Sept-Îles intrusion is carried by single domain magnetic grains and thus can be considered primary (Bono and Tarduno, Geology, 2015). Moreover, we find that the geomagnetic field was reversing during cooling of the intrusion; the small spatial scales on which we see antipodal directions suggest a very rapid reversal rate. Preliminary total-TRM paleointensity results from the Sept-Îles intrusion suggest a low field strength. The high geomagnetic reversal rate and low geomagnetic field intensity that characterize a portion of the Jurassic (ca. 165 Ma) may be an analog for field behavior during the Ediacaran to early Cambrian. This model may provide insight into the development of Earth's interior; if high thermal core conductivity values are correct, the onset of inner core growth is predicted to have an age similar to that of our directional and paleointensity data. To test these linkages, we investigate dated localities of the Grenville dikes (ca. 590 Ma) from which classic paleomagnetic results on whole rocks (Murthy, 1971) have long figured into debates over the paleolatitude history of Laurentia. New rock- and paleo-magnetic experiments testing single crystal feldspars from Laurentian Ediacaran intrusive units will be discussed, along with new estimates of

  13. Indirect perturbation influence of planets on the variation of the instantaneous angular velocity of the rigid Earth in the lunar-solar gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Sen

    2017-08-01

    The differential equation and its solution for indirect influence of the planetary perturbation on the variation of the rotational angular velocity of the rigid Earth in the lunar-solar gravitational field are obtained by using Euler's dynamic equations. The theoretical results show that the angular velocity of the Earth varies with the periodic and mixed periodic variation under the lunar and solar gravitational field due to the planetary perturbation on the Earth orbit. The numerical results for the amplitudes of the periodic terms and the coefficient of the mixed periodic terms are presented.

  14. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  15. Field Guide to Rock Weathering. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Robert E.

    Highlighted are the effects of weathering through field investigations of the environment, both natural rocks, and the urban environment's pavements, buildings, and cemeteries. Both physical weathering and chemical weathering are discussed. Questions are presented for post-field trip discussion. References and a glossary are provided. (Author/RE)

  16. High-performance liquid chromatography on-line coupled to high-field NMR and mass spectrometry for structure elucidation of constituents of Hypericum perforatum L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S. H.; Jensen, A. G.; Cornett, Claus

    1999-01-01

    The on-line separation and structure elucidation of naphthodianthrones, flavonoids, and other constituents of an extract from Hypericum perforatum L, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled on-line with ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectrometry...... (MS) is described. A conventional reversed-phase HPLC system using ammonium acetate as the buffer substance in the eluent tvas used, and proton NMR spectra were obtained on a 500 MHz NMR instrument. The MS and MS/MS analyses were performed using negative electrospray ionization, In the present study...

  17. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies.

  18. Theory of a metrology for the earths magnetic field based on the resonance of polarised atomic nuclei (1962); Theorie d'une metrologie du champ magnetique terrestre basee sur la resonance de noyaux atomiques polarises (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-06-15

    The problems presented by the metrology of the earths field are studied from two points of view. a. The first, purely physical, concerns the study of NMR transducers in their role for the transformation of the magnetic field into a frequency. The possibilities and limitations are outlined. The use of an equivalent model is introduced systematically in the considerations of NMR phenomena, this makes it possible to treat all problems of interaction between a spin system and an electric detection system in a unified form. b. The other point of view concerns the restitution of the nuclear signal frequency in the form of a directly perceptible observable. The treatment of information is considered from a statistical angle, which leads to the study of an optimisation process concerning the linearization of the measurement as well as the minimisation of noise effects. (author) [French] Les problemes que pose la metrologie du champ terrestre sont etudies sous un double aspect: a. L'un, purement physique, concerne l'etude des traducteurs a RMN dans leur role de transformation du champ magnetique en une frequence. On en degage les possibilites et les limitations. L'emploi d'un modele equivalent est introduit de maniere systematique pour rendre compte des phenomenes de RMN, ce qui permet de traiter sous forme unifiee tous les problemes d'interaction entre un systeme de spins et un systeme electrique de detection. b. L'autre aspect concerne la restitution de la frequence du signal nucleaire sous la forme d'une observable directement perceptible. On considere le traitement de l'information sous l'aspect statistique, ce qui amene a etudier un processus d'optimisation concernant la linearisation de la mesure aussi bien que la minimisation des effets des bruits. (auteur)

  19. The Swarm End-to-End mission simulator study: A demonstration of separating the various contributions to Earth's magnetic field using synthetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Haagmans, R.; Sabaka, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    Swarm, a satellite constellation to measure Earth's magnetic field with unpreceded accuracy, has been selected by ESA for launch in 2009. The mission will provide the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution, in order to gain new insights into the Earth system...... by improving our understanding of the Earth's interior and climate. An End-to-End mission performance simulation was carried out during Phase A of the mission, with the aim of analyzing the key system requirements, particularly with respect to the number of Swarm satellites and their orbits related...... to the science objectives of Swarm. In order to be able to use realistic parameters of the Earth's environment, the mission simulation starts at January 1, 1997 and lasts until re-entry of the lower satellites five years later. Synthetic magnetic field values were generated for all relevant contributions...

  20. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling {sup 1}H NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A. [Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-01-21

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R{sub 1}(ω)=T{sub 1}{sup −1}(ω), is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R{sub 1}(ω,x) (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τ{sub rot}(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  1. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons.

  2. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Monitor Land Management Practices and the Development of Marshlands to Rice Fields in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusabimana, M. R.; Blach, D.; Mwiza, F.; Muzungu, E.; Swaminathan, R.; Tate, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Rwanda, a small country with the highest population density in Sub-Saharan Africa, is one of the world's poorest countries. Although agriculture is the backbone of Rwandan economy, agricultural productivity is extremely low. Over 90 % of the population is engaged in subsistence farming and only 52 % of the total land surface area is arable. Of this land, approximately 165,000 hectares are marshlands, of which only 57 % has been cultivated. Rwandan government has invested in the advancement of agriculture with activities such as irrigation, marshland reclamation, and crop regionalization. In 2001, Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources (MINAGRI) released the Rural Sector Support Program (RSSP), which aimed at converting marshlands into rice fields at various development sites across the country. The focus of this project was to monitor rice fields in Rwanda utilizing NASA Earth observations such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager. Modified Normalized Difference Water Index (MNDWI) was used to depict the progress of marshland to rice field conversion as it highlights the presence of irrigated rice fields from the surrounding area. Additionally, Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) was used to estimate rice yield at RSSP sites. Various simulations were run to find perfect conditions for cultivating the highest yield for a given farm. Furthermore, soil erosion susceptibility masks were created by combining factors derived from ASTER, MERRA, and ground truth data using Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). The end results, maps, and tutorials were delivered to the partners and policy makers in Rwanda to help make informed decisions. It can be clearly seen that Earth observations can be successfully used to monitor agricultural and land management practices as a cost effective method that will enable farmers to improve crop yield production and food security.

  3. Comparative High Field Magneto-transport Of Rare Earth Oxypnictides With Maximum Transition Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakirev, Fedor F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, A [MPA-NHMFL; Riggs, S [NHMFL-FSU; Hunte, F [NHMFL-FSU; Gurevich, A [NHMFL-FSU; Larbalestier, D [NHMFL-FSU; Boebinger, G [NHMFL-FSU; Jaroszynski, J [NHMFL-FSU; Ren, Z [CHINA; Lu, W [CHINA; Yang, J [CHINA; Shen, X [CHINA; Dong, X [CHINA; Zhao, Z [CHINA; Jin, R [ORNL; Sefat, A [ORNL; Mcguire, M [ORNL; Sales, B [ORNL; Christen, D [ORNL; Mandrus, D [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    We compare magnetotransport of the three iron-arsenide-based compounds ReFeAsO (Re=La, Sm, Nd) in very high DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 and 54 T, respectively. Each sample studied exhibits a superconducting transition temperature near the maximum reported to date for that particular compound. While high magnetic fields do not suppress the superconducting state appreciably, the resistivity, Hall coefficient, and critical magnetic fields, taken together, suggest that the phenomenology and superconducting parameters of the oxypnictide superconductors bridges the gap between MgB{sub 2} and YBCO.

  4. Overcoming apparent susceptibility-induced anisotropy (aSIA) by bipolar double-pulsed-field-gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Noam; Cohen, Yoram

    2011-10-01

    Double-Pulsed-Field-Gradient (d-PFG) MR is emerging as a powerful new means for obtaining unique microstructural information in opaque porous systems that cannot be obtained by conventional single-PFG (s-PFG) methods. The angular d-PFG MR methodology is particularly important since it can utilize the effects of microscopic anisotropy (μA) and compartment shape anisotropy (csA) in the E(ψ) profile at the different t(m) regimes to provide detailed information on compartment size and eccentricity. An underlying assumption is that the PFGs that are imparted to weigh diffusion are the only gradients present; however, in realistic systems and especially where there are randomly oriented anisotropic pores, susceptibility effects may induce strong internal gradients. In this study, the effects of such internal gradients on E(ψ) plots obtained from angular d-PFG MR and on microstructural information that can be obtained from s-PFG and d-PFG MR were investigated. First, it was found that internal gradients induce a bias in the s-PFG MR results, thus creating an anisotropy that is not related to microstructure, termed apparent-Susceptibility-Induced-Anisotropy (aSIA). We then show that aSIA effects are also manifest in different ways in the angular d-PFG MR experiment in controlled phantoms and in realistic systems such as quartz sand, emulsions, and biological systems. The effects of aSIA in some cases completely masked the effects of μA and csA; however, we subsequently show that by introducing bipolar gradients to the d-PFG MR (bp-d-PFG), the effects of aSIA can be largely suppressed, restoring the E(ψ) plots that are expected from the theory along with the microstructural information that it conveys. We conclude that when specimens are characterized by strong internal gradients, the novel information on μA and csA that is manifest in the E(ψ) plots can indeed be inferred when bp-d-PFG MR is used, i.e. when bipolar gradients are applied.

  5. Migratory birds use head scans to detect the direction of the earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Kropp, Wiebke

    2004-11-09

    Night-migratory songbirds are known to use a magnetic compass , but how do they detect the reference direction provided by the geomagnetic field, and where is the sensory organ located? The most prominent characteristic of geomagnetic sensory input, whether based on visual patterns or magnetite-mediated forces , is the predicted symmetry around the north-south or east-west magnetic axis. Here, we show that caged migratory garden warblers perform head-scanning behavior well suited to detect this magnetic symmetry plane. In the natural geomagnetic field, birds move toward their migratory direction after head scanning. In a zero-magnetic field , where no symmetry plane exists, the birds almost triple their head-scanning frequency, and the movement direction after a head scan becomes random. Thus, the magnetic sensory organ is located in the bird's head, and head scans are used to locate the reference direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  6. Earth-based rover field testing for exploration mission on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstel, Edward; Huntsberger, Terry; Baumgartner, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a high-level overview of the last major field operations test conducted in 2002 leading up to the MER mision. Objectives, approach, general results, and lessons learned are discussed.

  7. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. New methods and applications in solid-state NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Sneddon, Scott

    2014-11-05

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has long been established as offering unique atomic-scale and element-specific insight into the structure, disorder, and dynamics of materials. NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei (I > (1)/2) are often perceived as being challenging to acquire and to interpret because of the presence of anisotropic broadening arising from the interaction of the electric field gradient and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment, which broadens the spectral lines, often over several megahertz. Despite the vast amount of information contained in the spectral line shapes, the problems with sensitivity and resolution have, until very recently, limited the application of NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state. In this Perspective, we provide a brief overview of the quadrupolar interaction, describe some of the basic experimental approaches used for acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra, and discuss the information that these spectra can provide. We then describe some interesting recent examples to showcase some of the more exciting and challenging new applications of NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei in the fields of energy materials, microporous materials, Earth sciences, and biomaterials. Finally, we consider the possible directions that this highly informative technique may take in the future.

  9. Graduate student involvement with designing inquiry-based Earth science field projects for the secondary-level classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, J. M.; Scherf, L.; Ward, S.; Cady, P.; Bromley, J.; Varner, R. K.; Froburg, E.

    2008-12-01

    In a secondary-level Earth System Science (ESS) curriculum, the most authentic learning is achieved through the inquiry-based application of real-world research methods in the context of modern understanding of the interconnected components of the Earth System (e.g. lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Following the intensive ESST-1 summer institute at UNH, during which teachers enhance their ESS content knowledge via interactions with UNH faculty, staff, and graduate students, each participating teacher is paired with one graduate student fellow for the duration of the school year. This graduate fellow provides a continuing link between the secondary-level school teaching environment and university resources, facilitating the implementation of new content knowledge and current scientific research methodology into the classroom setting. According to the National Science Education Standards (1), scientific inquiry is the central strategy for teaching science. "In successful science classrooms, teachers and students collaborate in the pursuit of ideas... Students formulate questions and devise ways to answer them, they collect data and decide how to represent it, they organize data to generate knowledge, and they test the reliability of the knowledge they have generated. As they proceed, students explain and justify their work to themselves and to one another, learn to cope with problems such as the limitations of equipment, and react to challenges posed by the teacher and by classmates." To speak to these goals, an ongoing local wetland field study has been conceptualized and implemented in three example classrooms (seventh grade general science, ninth grade physical science and tenth grade biology) in two school systems (Oyster River Middle School in Durham, NH and Berlin High School in Berlin, NH). These field studies were conducted using authentic scientific equipment to collect data, including a Li-Cor 840 infrared CO2 analyzer and handmade

  10. Challenges and perspectives in quantitative NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This perspective article summarizes, from the author's point of view at the beginning of 2016, the major challenges and perspectives in the field of quantitative NMR. The key concepts in quantitative NMR are first summarized; then, the most recent evolutions in terms of resolution and sensitivity are discussed, as well as some potential future research directions in this field. A particular focus is made on methodologies capable of boosting the resolution and sensitivity of quantitative NMR, which could open application perspectives in fields where the sample complexity and the analyte concentrations are particularly challenging. These include multi-dimensional quantitative NMR and hyperpolarization techniques such as para-hydrogen-induced polarization or dynamic nuclear polarization. Because quantitative NMR cannot be dissociated from the key concepts of analytical chemistry, i.e. trueness and precision, the methodological developments are systematically described together with their level of analytical performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. 3D Visualization of near real-time remote-sensing observation for hurricanes field campaign using Google Earth API

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Turk, J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Licata, S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is planning a new field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) will be deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. During the field campaign, both the spaceborne and the airborne observations will be collected in real-time and integrated with the hurricane forecast models. This observation-model integration will help the campaign achieve its science goals by allowing team members to effectively plan the mission with current forecasts. To support the GRIP experiment, JPL developed a website for interactive visualization of all related remote-sensing observations in the GRIP’s geographical domain using the new Google Earth API. All the observations are collected in near real-time (NRT) with 2 to 5 hour latency. The observations include a 1KM blended Sea Surface Temperature (SST) map from GHRSST L2P products; 6-hour composite images of GOES IR; stability indices, temperature and vapor profiles from AIRS and AMSU-B; microwave brightness temperature and rain index maps from AMSR-E, SSMI and TRMM-TMI; ocean surface wind vectors, vorticity and divergence of the wind from QuikSCAT; the 3D precipitation structure from TRMM-PR and vertical profiles of cloud and precipitation from CloudSAT. All the NRT observations are collected from the data centers and science facilities at NASA and NOAA, subsetted, re-projected, and composited into hourly or daily data products depending on the frequency of the observation. The data products are then displayed on the 3D Google Earth plug-in at the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) website. The data products offered by the TCIS in the Google Earth display include image overlays, wind vectors, clickable

  12. Spin-Exchange Pumped NMR Gyros

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Thad G

    2016-01-01

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  13. Status of the fifth generation GOCE time-wise Earth gravity field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Guerr, Torsten; Brockmann, Jan Martin; Krasbutter, Ina; Höck, Eduard; Zehentner, Norbert; Pail, Roland; Schuh, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Since the launch of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite in 2009, four releases of the so called time-wise gravity field models were computed within the ESA funded High-level Processing Facility (HPF). The observations are the gravity gradients measured by the gradiometer and the satellite orbit determined via GPS. These gravity field models were released as a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and a corresponding full variance covariance matrix. As a lot of effort is put into the modeling of the original observation errors, these covariance matrix realistically presents the errors of the gravity field models. The fifth generation called TIM5 is in preparation. The new solution will consider the GOCE data from the complete lifetime. This includes also data from lower orbit phases, which provides higher sensitivity, especially for the detailed structures of the gravity field. To account for the higher sensitivity the complete data set has been reprocessed. The preprocessing was needed as the spatial resolution is increased from maximum degree/order 250 to degree/order 280 in terms of spherical harmonic coefficients. This means additional 16,000 parameters were estimated. Within this presentation first results of the new model TIM5 are presented.

  14. Analysis of oil content and oil quality in oilseeds by low-field NMR; Analise do teor e da qualidade dos lipideos presentes em sementes de oleaginosas por RMN de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantino, Andre F.; Lacerda Junior, Valdemar; Santos, Reginaldo B. dos; Greco, Sandro J.; Silva, Renzo C.; Neto, Alvaro C.; Barbosa, Lucio L.; Castro, Eustaquio V.R. de [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Freitas, Jair C.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    To choose among the variety of oleaginous plants for biodiesel production, the oil content of several matrices was determined through different low-field {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with varied pulse sequences, namely single-pulse, spin-echo, CPMG, and CWFP. The experiments that involved the first three sequences showed high correlation with each other and with the solvent extraction method. The quality of the vegetable oils was also evaluated on the basis of the existing correlation between the T{sub 2} values of the oils and their properties, such as viscosity, iodine index, and cetane index. These analyses were performed using HCA and PCA chemometric tools. The results were sufficiently significant to allow separation of the oleaginous matrices according to their quality. Thus, the low-field {sup 1}H NMR technique was confirmed as an important tool to aid in the selection of oleaginous matrices for biodiesel production. (author)

  15. Weak and Strong Field Dynamos: from the Earth to the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, J; Schrinner, M; Donati, J -F

    2011-01-01

    Observations of magnetism in very low mass stars recently made important progress, revealing characteristics that are now to be understood in the framework of dynamo theory. In parallel, there is growing evidence that dynamo processes in these stars share many similarities with planetary dynamos. We investigate the extent to which the weak \\emph{vs} strong field bistability predicted for the geodynamo can apply to recent observations of two groups of very low mass fully-convective stars sharing similar stellar parameters but generating radically different types of magnetic fields. Our analysis is based on previously published spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic data. We argue that these can be interpreted in the framework of weak and strong field dynamos.

  16. Reduction of the Earth's magnetic field inhibits growth rates of model cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Carlos F; Portelli, Lucas; McCabe, Kevin; Hernandez, Mark; Barnes, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Small alterations in static magnetic fields have been shown to affect certain chemical reaction rates ex vivo. In this manuscript, we present data demonstrating that similar small changes in static magnetic fields between individual cell culture incubators results in significantly altered cell cycle rates for multiple cancer-derived cell lines. This change as assessed by cell number is not a result of apoptosis, necrosis, or cell cycle alterations. While the underlying mechanism is unclear, the implications for all cell culture experiments are clear; static magnetic field conditions within incubators must be considered and/or controlled just as one does for temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide concentration. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    . Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling...... in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity...

  18. Magnetization, Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy and the Crystalline Electric Field in Rare-Earth Al2 Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purwins, H. -G.; Walker, E.; Barbara, B.;

    1974-01-01

    Magnetization measurements are reported for single crystals of PrAl2 in the range from 4.2K to 30K for magnetic fields up to 150 kOe applied in the (100), (110) and (111) directions. For these measurements, together with the magnetization results obtained earlier for TbAl2 the authors give...... a quantitative quantum mechanical description of the magnetization and the related magnetocrystalline anisotropy in terms of a cubic crystalline electric field and an isotropic exchange interaction. The parameters used in this description can be unified to good approximation to all REAl2 intermetallic compounds...

  19. Some feature of interpretation of tension single pulsed electromagnetic field of the Earth to create the model parameter fields physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokritskaya T.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic analysis of the results of different methods of obtaining and processing of information allows us to solve problems on a qualitatively different level. This is important when creating complex earth models and fields of its parameters, particularly the physical properties. Application of remote sensing methods (geophysical investigations with the registration of a single pulse intensity of the electromagnetic field of the Earth (EIEMPZ seismic profiling, is expanding. Interesting results of the joint interpretation of the results of geophysical and laboratory studies of physical soil. Interesting results of the joint interpretation of the results of geophysical and laboratory studies of physical soil. For the first time a methodology for assessing the state of the soil [3] applied for a joint interpretation of materials determine the field strength EMPZ, seismic profiling, and laboratory techniques. This has allowed to characterize the state of the geological environment and to build a model of inhomogeneous density distribution of fractured rocks at depth. In this paper we made a mathematical analysis of the results of research and talus deposits eluvial clay Taurian series, studied at one of the construction sites southern coast at a depth of 12.0 -25.0 m. Methods of statistical analysis, assessment of homogeneity and symmetrically distributed, rank correlation and multiple regression analysis described in [3]. The analysis of the spatial distribution of areas extrem value of EMPZ, heterogeneity of seismic rigidity. Statistical characteristics of indicators of physical properties reflect the genetic characteristics of the formation and the current state of silty-clay sediments of different genesis.It is proved that the regression model can be applied to interpret the state of the array in the construction of geodynamic model. It is established that the creation of forward-looking (dynamic models for the distribution of the physical

  20. Field Guide to Soils. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Henry; Jacobs, Hyde S.

    Discussed are the importance of soil to plant and animal life, the evolution of a soil profile, and the major kinds of soil in the United States. On a suggested field trip, students examine different kinds of soil profiles; they also measure soil acidity and water-holding capacity. Suggestions for further study are provided along with references…