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Sample records for earth compounds pnictides

  1. Quantum Magnetism Applied to the Iron-Pnictides and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Ryan

    This dissertation presents computational studies of two families of magnetic materials of significant current interest. The iron pnictides are new high temperature superconductors with interesting parent compound antiferromagnetism. The rare earth pyrochlore material Yb2Ti2O7 is a candidate quantum spin ice. The magnetic and structural phases of individual iron pnictides have both many common features and material specific differences. In an attempt to unify these behaviors as instances of a larger theoretical picture, we use Monte Carlo simulations of a two-dimensional Hamiltonian with coupled Heisenberg-spin and Ising-orbital degrees of freedom. We introduce spin-space and single-ion anisotropies and study the finite temperature transitions in our model. We develop a phase diagram and propose that the interplay of spin and orbital physics in the presence of anisotropy could explain how material details affect the transitions of the pnictide materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can study magnetic materials via the hyperfine interaction and the coupling between the nuclear moment and the field produced by the samples local moment environment. Recent measurements suggest that Zn doped BaFe2As2 may have quantum fluctuations about the striped phase that produce a distribution of fields at As nuclear sites. The non-magnetic ion Zn replaces Fe and can be treated as an impurity which can be studied by a zero-temperature Ising Series expansion method. We propose a Heisenberg-like J1a-J 1b-J2 model which has small ferromagnetic exchanges along the b axis and strong antiferromagnetic exchanges along the a axis. In our impurity model we find that the magnetic moments are everywhere reduced by quantum fluctuations, except on the nearest neighbor site in the AFM direction. We suggest that the presented impurity model may provide an explanation for the experimental measurements. Based on a recently proposed quantum spin ice model, we use numerical linked cluster (NLC

  2. Effect of antimony substitution in iron pnictide compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, D.; Braun, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have examined the effect of negative chemical pressure in iron pnictides. We have synthesized substitution series replacing arsenic by antimony in a number of 1111- and 122-iron arsenides and present their crystallographic and physical properties. The SDW transition temperature in LaFeAs$_{\\mathrm{1-x}}$Sb$_{\\mathrm{x}}$O decreases with increasing antimony content, while the superconducting transition temperature in LaFeAs$_{\\mathrm{1-x}}$Sb$_{\\mathrm{x}}$O$_{\\mathrm{0...

  3. Transport measurements on superconducting iron pnictides and Heusler compounds; Transportmessungen an Supraleitenden Eisenpniktiden und Heusler-Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombor, Dirk

    2014-09-05

    In this work, results of electronic transport measurements are discussed for superconducting iron pnictides as well as for ferromagnetic Heusler compounds. The iron pnictides are a recently discovered class of high temperature superconductors where magnetism might play a crucial role. While the 122-pnictides show antiferromagnetism and migrate to the superconducting state upon doping, ferromagnetism has been observed in doped LiFeAs. On the other hand, in the undoped state this material shows interesting superconducting properties. Among other properties, Heusler compounds are well known due to their ferromagnetism. Co{sub 2}FeSi, which was investigated in this work, is one of the strongest ferromagnets. Beside this, one predicts this compound to be a half-metallic ferromagnet with completely spin polarized electronic transport where all conducting electrons have the same spin. The here addressed properties can well be investigated with the method of electronic transport measurements, whose results on single crystals are discussed in this work.

  4. Crystal growth iron based pnictide compounds; Kristallzuechtung eisenbasierter Pniktidverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacke, Claudia

    2012-11-15

    The present work is concerned with selected crystal growth method for producing iron-based superconductors. The first part of this work introduces significant results of the crystal growth of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and the cobalt-substituted compound Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x{sub Nom} = 0.025, 0.05, 0.07, 0.10 and 0.20. For this purpose a test procedure for the vertical Bridgman method was developed. The second part of this work contains substantial results for growing a crystal of LiFeAs and the nickel-substituted compound Li{sub 1-δ}Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}As with x{sub Nom} = 0.015, 0.025, 0.05, 0.06, 0.075 and 0.10. For this purpose a test procedure for the melt flow process has been developed successfully. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit ausgewaehlten Kristallzuechtungsverfahren zur Herstellung eisenbasierter Supraleiter. Der erste Teil dieser Arbeit fuehrt wesentliche Ergebnisse der Kristallzuechtung von BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} sowie der Cobalt-substituierten Verbindung Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} mit x{sub Nom} =0.025, 0.05, 0.07, 0.10 und 0.20 auf. Hierzu wurde eine Versuchsdurchfuehrung fuer das vertikale Bridgman-Verfahren konzipiert, mit welcher erfolgreich Kristalle dieser Zusammensetzungen gezuechtet wurden. Der zweite Teil dieser Arbeit enthaelt wesentliche Ergebnisse zur Kristallzuechtung von LiFeAs sowie der Nickel-substituierten Verbindung Li{sub 1-δ}Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}As mit x{sub Nom} = 0.015, 0.025, 0.05, 0.06, 0.075 und 0.10. Hierfuer wurde erfolgreich eine Versuchsdurchfuehrung fuer das Schmelzfluss-Verfahren entwickelt.

  5. Effect of pressure on the crystal field splitting in rare earth pnictides and chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirber, J.E.; Weaver, H.T.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental situation for the pressure dependence of the crystal field of praseodymium pnictides and chalcogenides is reviewed and compared with the predictions of the point charge model. The problem of separating exchange and crystal field contributions from the measured NMR frequency shift or susceptibility measurements is discussed as well as problems explaining these effects with conduction electron related models

  6. Electronic structure studies of ferro-pnictide superconductors and their parent compounds using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setti, Thirupathaiah

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictide compound LaO 1-x F x FeAs with T c = 26 K as created enormous interest in the high-T c superconductor community. So far, four prototypes of crystal structures have been found in the Fe-pnictide family. All four show a structural deformation followed or accompanied by a magnetic transition from a high temperature paramagnetic conductor to a low temperature antiferromagnetic metal whose transition temperature T N varies between the compounds. Charge carrier doping, isovalent substitution of the As atoms or the application of pressure suppresses the antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) order and leads to a superconducting phase. More recently high Tc superconductivity has been also detected in iron chalchogenides with similar normal state properties. Since superconductivity is instability of the normal state, the study of normal state electronic structure in comparison with superconducting state could reveal important information on the pairing mechanism. Therefore, it is most important to study the electronic structure of these new superconductors, i.e., to determine Fermi surfaces and band dispersions near the Fermi level at the high symmetry points in order to obtain a microscopic understanding of the superconducting properties. Using the technique angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) one measures the electrons ejected from a sample when photons impinge on it. In this way one can map the Fermi surface which provides useful information regarding the physics behind the Fermi surface topology of high T c superconductors. Furthermore, this technique provides information on the band dispersion, the orbital character of the bands, the effective mass, the coupling to bosonic excitations, and the superconducting gap. This emphasizes the importance of studying the electronic structure of the newly discovered Fe-pnictides using ARPES. In this work we have studied the electronic

  7. Electronic structure studies of ferro-pnictide superconductors and their parent compounds using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setti, Thirupathaiah

    2011-07-14

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictide compound LaO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs with T{sub c} = 26 K as created enormous interest in the high-T{sub c} superconductor community. So far, four prototypes of crystal structures have been found in the Fe-pnictide family. All four show a structural deformation followed or accompanied by a magnetic transition from a high temperature paramagnetic conductor to a low temperature antiferromagnetic metal whose transition temperature T{sub N} varies between the compounds. Charge carrier doping, isovalent substitution of the As atoms or the application of pressure suppresses the antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) order and leads to a superconducting phase. More recently high Tc superconductivity has been also detected in iron chalchogenides with similar normal state properties. Since superconductivity is instability of the normal state, the study of normal state electronic structure in comparison with superconducting state could reveal important information on the pairing mechanism. Therefore, it is most important to study the electronic structure of these new superconductors, i.e., to determine Fermi surfaces and band dispersions near the Fermi level at the high symmetry points in order to obtain a microscopic understanding of the superconducting properties. Using the technique angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) one measures the electrons ejected from a sample when photons impinge on it. In this way one can map the Fermi surface which provides useful information regarding the physics behind the Fermi surface topology of high T{sub c} superconductors. Furthermore, this technique provides information on the band dispersion, the orbital character of the bands, the effective mass, the coupling to bosonic excitations, and the superconducting gap. This emphasizes the importance of studying the electronic structure of the newly discovered Fe-pnictides using ARPES. In this work we have

  8. Structural chemistry of superconducting pnictides and pnictide oxides with layered structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johrendt, Dirk [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. Chemie und Biochemie; Hosono, Hideo [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan). Frontier Research Center; Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2011-07-01

    The basic structural chemistry of superconducting pnictides and pnictide oxides is reviewed. Crystal chemical details of selected compounds and group subgroup schemes are discussed with respect to phase transitions upon charge-density formation, the ordering of vacancies, or the ordered displacements of oxygen atoms. Furthermore, the influences of doping and solid solutions on the valence electron concentration are discussed in order to highlight the structural and electronic flexibility of these materials. (orig.)

  9. Iron pnictide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co x Fe 1-x )PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 , is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba 1-x K x )Fe 2 As 2 is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe 2 As 2 and EuFe 2 As 2 are characterised and the superconductors Sr 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 and Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se 1-x Te x ) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr 3 Sc 2 O 5 Fe 2 As 2 are presented and Ba 2 ScO 3 FeAs and Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is given. Finally, the superconductor Sr 2 VO 3 FeAs is scrutinised and necessary prerequisites for superconductivity in this compound are suggested. (orig.)

  10. The lattice dynamical studies of rare earth compounds: electron-phonon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Prafulla K.; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Singh, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    During the last two decades chalcogenides and pnictides of rare earth (RE) atoms have drawn considerable attention of the solid state physicists because of their peculiar electronic, magnetic, optical and phonon properties. Some of these compounds e.g. sulphides and selenides of cerium (Ce), samarium (Sm), yttrium (Y), ytterbium (Yb), europium (Eu) and thulium (Tm) and their alloys show nonintegral valence (between 2 and 3), arising due to f-d electron hybridization at ambient temperature and pressure. The rare earth mixed valence compounds (MVC) reviewed in this article crystallize in simple cubic structure. Most of these compounds show the existence of strong electron-phonon coupling at half way to the zone boundary. This fact manifests itself through softening of the longitudinal acoustic mode, negative value of elastic constant C 12 etc. The purpose of this contribution is to review some of the recent activities in the fields of lattice dynamics and allied properties of rare earth compounds. The present article is primarily devoted to review the effect of electron-phonon interactions on the dynamical properties of rare earth compounds by using the lattice dynamical model theories based on charged density deformations and long-range many body forces. While the long range charge transfer effect arises due to f-d hybridization of nearly degenerate 4f-5d bands of rare earth ions, the density deformation comes into the picture of breathing motion of electron shells. These effects of charge transfer and charge density deformation when considered in the lattice dynamical models namely the three body force rigid ion model (TRM) and breathing shell model (BSM) are quite successful in explaining the phonon anomalies in these compounds and undoubtedly unraveled many important physical process governing the phonon anomalies in rare earth compounds

  11. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance study in Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2: a 'parent' compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangzhuo; Xu, Chunqiang; Li, Zhanfeng; Feng, Jiajia; Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yufeng; Sun, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Zhixiang

    2017-12-07

    We report a study of angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) with the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current on a Ca 0.73 La 0.27 FeAs 2 single crystal, which is regarded as a 'parent' compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors. A pronounced AMR with twofold symmetry is observed, signifying the highly anisotropic Fermi surface. By further analyzing the AMR data, we find that the Fermi surface above the structural/antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition (T s /T N ) is quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D), as revealed by the 2D scaling behavior of the AMR, Δρ/ρ(0) (H, θ)  =  Δρ/ρ(0) (µ 0 Hcosθ), θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis. While such 2D scaling becomes invalid at temperatures below T s /T N , the three-dimensional (3D) scaling approach by inclusion of the anisotropy of the Fermi surface is efficient, indicating that the appearance of the 3D Fermi surface contributes to anisotropic electronic transport. Compared with other experimental observations, we suspect that the additional 3D hole pocket (generated by the Ca d orbital and As1 p z orbital) around the Γ point in CaFeAs 2 will disappear in the heavily electron doped regime, and moreover, the Fermi surface should be reconstructed across the structural/AFM transition. Besides, a quasi-linear in-plane magnetoresistance with H//ab is observed at low temperatures and its possible origins are also discussed. Our results provide more information to further understand the electronic structure of 112-type IBSs.

  12. Three series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal pnictides with CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structures: RECuZnAs{sub 2}, REAgZnP{sub 2}, and REAgZnAs{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Ramachandran, Krishna K.; Blanchard, Peter E.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Rosmus, Kimberly A.; Aitken, Jennifer A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Three series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal pnictides REMM′Pn{sub 2} (M=Cu, Ag; M′=Zn; Pn=P, As) have been prepared by reaction of the elements at 800 °C, with crystal growth promoted through the addition of iodine. The extent of RE substitution is broad in these series: RECuZnAs{sub 2} (RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd–Lu), REAgZnP{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, Gd–Dy), and REAgZnAs{sub 2} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy). Powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that they adopt the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure (space group P3{sup ¯}m1, Z=1), in which Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms over the unique tetrahedrally coordinated transition-metal site. Magnetic measurements indicated Curie–Weiss behavior for several members of the RECuZnAs{sub 2} and REAgZnP{sub 2} series. Core-line X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) collected on some RECuZnAs{sub 2} members corroborate the charge assignment deduced by the Zintl concept for these compounds, (RE{sup 3+})(M{sup 1+})(Zn{sup 2+})(Pn{sup 3−}){sub 2}. Optical diffuse reflectance spectra and valence band XPS spectra established that these compounds are small band-gap semiconductors (up to ∼0.8 eV in REAgZnP{sub 2}) or semimetals (RECuZnAs{sub 2}). Band structure calculations also support this electronic structure and indicate that the band gap can be narrowed through appropriate chemical substitution (RE=smaller atoms, M=Cu, and Pn=As). - Graphical abstract: Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms over the tetrahedral site within relatively rigid [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}] slabs in three series of quaternary pnictides adopting the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. - Highlights: • Three series (comprising 25 compounds) of pnictides REMM'Pn{sub 2} were prepared. • Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms within relatively rigid [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}] slabs. • They are semimetals or small band-gap semiconductors. • RECuZnAs{sub 2} and REAgZnP{sub 2} are generally

  13. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is

  14. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  15. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance study in Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2: a "parent" compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangzhuo; Xu, Chunqiang; Li, Zhanfeng; Feng, Jiajia; Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yufeng; Sun, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Zhixiang

    2017-11-21

    We report a study of angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) with the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current on a Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2 single crystal, which is regarded as a "parent" compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors. A pronounced AMR with twofold symmetry is observed, signifying the highly anisotropic Fermi surface. By further analyzing the AMR data, we find that the Fermi surface above the structural/antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition (Ts/TN) is quasi-two-dimensional (2D), as revealed by the 2D scaling behavior of the AMR, Δρ/ρ(0) (H, θ)=Δρ/ρ(0) (μ0Hcosθ), θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis. While such a 2D scaling becomes invalid at temperatures below Ts/TN, the three-dimensional (3D) scaling approach by inclusion of the anisotropy of Fermi surface is efficient, indicating that the appearance of 3D Fermi surface contributed to the anisotropic electronic transport. Compared with other experimental observations, we suspect that the additional 3D hole pocket (generated by the Ca d orbital and As1 pz orbital) around the Γ point in CaFeAs2 will disappear in the heavily electron doped regime, and moreover, the Fermi surface should be reconstructed across the structural/AFM transition. Besides, a quasi-linear in-plane magnetoresistance is observed at low temperatures and its possible origins are also discussed. Our results provide more information to further understand the electronic structure of 112-type IBSs. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Correlation effects in the iron pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Qimiao; Abrahams, Elihu; Dai Jianhui; Zhu Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here, we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, the single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared with the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V 2 O 3 or Se-doped NiS 2 , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analysis, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part of the excitation spectrum. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multiband matrix t-J 1 -J 2 model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

  17. High pressure and microwave based synthesis of transition metal pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobel, Roman Rupert

    2016-04-11

    The goal of this thesis was to explore the possibilities of synthetic methods that are not very common in current transition metal pnictide research. The substitution of the Ca-site in CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} with rare earth elements such as Pr the has been reported to induce superconductivity. However, some inconsistencies in the data suggested a non-intrinsic origin of the observed diamagnetic signal. Furthermore a solubility limit of 13% was found when prepared in an electrical furnace thus leaving a huge part of the physical phase diagram inaccessible. A high pressure/high temperature synthesis was developed to allow access to the whole doping range and an in-depth characterization of this compound was carried out. During the experiments concerning the high pressure synthesis of Ca{sub 1-x}Pr{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} the new ternary iron arsenide CaFe{sub 5}As{sub 3} was identified and classified as a member of the Ca{sub n(n+1)/2}(Fe{sub 1-x}M{sub x}){sub (2+3n)}M'{sub n(n-1)/2}As{sub (n+1)(n+2)/2} (n = 1-3; M =Nb, Pd, Pt; M' = □, Pd, Pt) family. The complete solid solution Ca{sub 1-x}Pr{sub x}Fe{sub 5}As{sub 3} (O ≤ x ≤ 1) was prepared and physically characterized. Furthermore, several useful techniques were developed to aid in future high pressure based investigations of transition metal pnictides. The second part of this thesis concerns a completely different, but equally promising synthetic approach. Microwave based synthesis is a well-established technique in many solution based fields, such as organic, medicinal or nano chemistry. For solid state and materials research several parameters and particularities have to be considered. But when successful, it allows for the reduction of reaction time by several orders of magnitude. It has very rarely been applied in the preparation of pnictides and on1y once in the context of pnictide superconductor research. The possibilities of this method were explored and employed in the preparation of several

  18. Magnetism and superconductivity in Eu-based iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapf, Sina [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is an extraordinary parent compound of the iron pnictides, as it exhibits at low temperatures - additional to the Fe spin density wave - long-range magnetic order of the Eu{sup 2+} local moments. Nevertheless, bulk superconductivity around 30 K can be induced by mechanical pressure or chemical substitution. In this talk we review the remarkable interplay of unconventional superconductivity, itinerant and local magnetism in Eu based iron pnictides. We focus on the appearance of a re-entrant spin glass phase that coexists with superconductivity and an indirect magneto-elastic coupling, enabling the persistent magnetic detwinning by small magnetic fields.

  19. Spin-Lattice Coupling and Superconductivity in Fe Pnictides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Egami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider strong spin-lattice and spin-phonon coupling in iron pnictides and discuss its implications on superconductivity. Strong magneto-volume effect in iron compounds has long been known as the Invar effect. Fe pnictides also exhibit this effect, reflected in particular on the dependence of the magnetic moment on the atomic volume of Fe defined by the positions of the nearest neighbor atoms. Through the phenomenological Landau theory, developed on the basis of the calculations by the density functional theory (DFT and the experimental results, we quantify the strength of the spin-lattice interaction as it relates to the Stoner criterion for the onset of magnetism. We suggest that the coupling between electrons and phonons through the spin channel may be sufficiently strong to be an important part of the superconductivity mechanism in Fe pnictides.

  20. Thermoelectric transport in rare-earth compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Ulrike

    2007-07-01

    This work focuses on the thermoelectric transport in rare-earth compounds. The measurements of the thermal conductivity, thermopower, and Nernst coefficient are supplemented by investigations of other quantities as magnetic susceptibility and specific heat. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the relevant physical concepts. Section 1 of that chapter summarizes the characteristic properties of rare-earth systems; section 2 gives an overview on thermoelectric transport processes in magnetic fields. The applied experimental techniques as well as the new experimental setup are described in detail in Chapter 3. The experimental results are presented in Chapter 4-6, of which each concentrates on a different subject. In Chapter 4, various Eu clathrates and the skutterudite-like Ce{sub 3}Rh{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} are presented, which have been investigated as potential thermoelectric materials for applications. Chapter 5 focusses on the study of the energy scales in the heavy-fermion series Lu{sub 1-x}Yb{sub x}Rh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}Ni{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} by means of thermopower investigations. Chapter 6 is dedicated to the thermoelectric transport properties of the correlated semimetal CeNiSn with special emphasis on the Nernst coefficient of this compound. (orig.)

  1. Thermoelectric transport in rare-earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Ulrike

    2007-01-01

    This work focuses on the thermoelectric transport in rare-earth compounds. The measurements of the thermal conductivity, thermopower, and Nernst coefficient are supplemented by investigations of other quantities as magnetic susceptibility and specific heat. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the relevant physical concepts. Section 1 of that chapter summarizes the characteristic properties of rare-earth systems; section 2 gives an overview on thermoelectric transport processes in magnetic fields. The applied experimental techniques as well as the new experimental setup are described in detail in Chapter 3. The experimental results are presented in Chapter 4-6, of which each concentrates on a different subject. In Chapter 4, various Eu clathrates and the skutterudite-like Ce 3 Rh 4 Sn 13 are presented, which have been investigated as potential thermoelectric materials for applications. Chapter 5 focusses on the study of the energy scales in the heavy-fermion series Lu 1-x Yb x Rh 2 Si 2 and Ce x La 1-x Ni 2 Ge 2 by means of thermopower investigations. Chapter 6 is dedicated to the thermoelectric transport properties of the correlated semimetal CeNiSn with special emphasis on the Nernst coefficient of this compound. (orig.)

  2. Optical measurements on iron pnictides containing Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, David; Baumgartner, Andreas; Merz, Johannes; Zapf, Sina; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Aswartham, Saicharan [University of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Wurmehl, Sabine [IFW, Dresden (Germany); Jiao, Wen-He; Cao, Guang-Han [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-07-01

    The interplay of magnetism with superconductivity is a fascinating, highly debated field of research and many questions still remain unsolved. Members of the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family are a perfectly suited playground for investigations concerning this topic, due to the peculiarity of strong local magnetism of the europium (T{sub N}∼ 20K), which is a unique feature among the 122 iron pnictides. Optical studies of the parent compound have already revealed that the spin density wave formation deviates from the other 122 pnictides. To get more insight into the superconducting properties of the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family we carried out an optical study on differently doped samples. We compare Eu(Fe{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} where electron doping takes place directly in the conducting iron layer, with EuFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} which corresponds to isovalent substitution at atomic positions out of the Fe-plane. The influence of the Eu is furthermore investigated by placing data we obtained on Ba{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4}(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} in juxtaposition to the already highly investigated pure Ba analogue.

  3. High pressure behaviour of uranium mono pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagare, Gitanjali; Ojha, Poonam; Sanyal, S.P.; Aynyas, Mahendra

    2006-01-01

    The pressure induced structural phase transition of three actinide mono pnictides AX (A=U and X=As, Sb, Bi), have been studied theoretically using two body interionic potential with necessary modifications to include the effect of Coulomb screening by the delocalized 5f electrons of the actinide (uranium) ion. The peculiar properties of these compounds have been interpreted in terms of the hybridization of f electrons with the conduction band. The calculated compression curves are compared with the experimental results. These compounds exhibits first order crystallographic phase transition from their NaCl (B 1 ) phase to CsCl (B 2 ) phase at 17GPa, 9.5GPa and 5.3 GPa respectively. The NaCl phase possesses lower energy than CsCl phase and stable at ambient pressure. (author)

  4. Magnetostriction of rare earth-Fe2 Laves phase compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.E.; Abbundi, R.; Savage, H.T.

    1977-01-01

    Single crystal magnetostriction measurements were made as a function of temperature on TbFe 2 and DyFe 2 . From these, the intrinsic magnetoelastic coupling coefficients were determined for the rare earth-Fe 2 compounds. Employing X-ray techniques, certain multicomponent rare earth-Fe 2 compounds were identified to maximize the magnetostriction to anisotropy ratio. (Auth.)

  5. Angular-dependent magnetoresistance study in Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2: a ‘parent’ compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangzhuo; Xu, Chunqiang; Li, Zhanfeng; Feng, Jiajia; Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Yufeng; Sun, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Zhixiang

    2018-01-01

    We report a study of angular-dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) with the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current on a Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2 single crystal, which is regarded as a ‘parent’ compound of 112-type iron pnictide superconductors. A pronounced AMR with twofold symmetry is observed, signifying the highly anisotropic Fermi surface. By further analyzing the AMR data, we find that the Fermi surface above the structural/antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition (T s/T N) is quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D), as revealed by the 2D scaling behavior of the AMR, Δρ/ρ(0) (H, θ)  =  Δρ/ρ(0) (µ 0 Hcosθ), θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis. While such 2D scaling becomes invalid at temperatures below T s/T N, the three-dimensional (3D) scaling approach by inclusion of the anisotropy of the Fermi surface is efficient, indicating that the appearance of the 3D Fermi surface contributes to anisotropic electronic transport. Compared with other experimental observations, we suspect that the additional 3D hole pocket (generated by the Ca d orbital and As1 p z orbital) around the Γ point in CaFeAs2 will disappear in the heavily electron doped regime, and moreover, the Fermi surface should be reconstructed across the structural/AFM transition. Besides, a quasi-linear in-plane magnetoresistance with H//ab is observed at low temperatures and its possible origins are also discussed. Our results provide more information to further understand the electronic structure of 112-type IBSs.

  6. Optical and magnetization studies on europium based iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapf, Sina Maria Ute

    2015-07-01

    The investigations carried out in the framework of this thesis mainly concentrate on europium based iron pnictides. These are a peculiar member of the 122 family as they develop at low temperatures (∝20K) an additional magnetic order of the local rare earth moments. Therefore, europium based iron pnictides provide a unique platform to study the interplay of structural, magnetic and electronic effects in high-temperature superconductors. For this challenging purpose, we have employed SQUID magnetometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy on EuFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} single crystals. By systematic studies of the in- and out-of-plane magnetic properties of a series of single crystals, we derived the complex magnetic phase diagram of europium based iron pnictides, which contains an A-type antiferromagnetic and a re-entrant spin glass phase. Furthermore, we have investigated the magneto-optical properties of EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, revealing a much more complex magnetic detwinning process than expected. These studies demonstrate a remarkable interdependence between magnetic, electronic and structural effects that might be very important to understand the unconventional superconductivity in these fascinating materials.

  7. Optical and magnetization studies on europium based iron pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapf, Sina Maria Ute

    2015-01-01

    The investigations carried out in the framework of this thesis mainly concentrate on europium based iron pnictides. These are a peculiar member of the 122 family as they develop at low temperatures (∝20K) an additional magnetic order of the local rare earth moments. Therefore, europium based iron pnictides provide a unique platform to study the interplay of structural, magnetic and electronic effects in high-temperature superconductors. For this challenging purpose, we have employed SQUID magnetometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy on EuFe 2 (As 1-x P x ) 2 single crystals. By systematic studies of the in- and out-of-plane magnetic properties of a series of single crystals, we derived the complex magnetic phase diagram of europium based iron pnictides, which contains an A-type antiferromagnetic and a re-entrant spin glass phase. Furthermore, we have investigated the magneto-optical properties of EuFe 2 As 2 , revealing a much more complex magnetic detwinning process than expected. These studies demonstrate a remarkable interdependence between magnetic, electronic and structural effects that might be very important to understand the unconventional superconductivity in these fascinating materials.

  8. Spin polarization in rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenwijk, F.J. van

    1976-01-01

    In this thesis the results of Moessbauer experiments performed on a series of intermetallic compounds of europium and gadolinium are reported. For each of these compounds the magnetic hyperfine field, the electric field gradient at the nuclear site and the isomer shift were determined. For most of the compounds the magnetic ordering temperature was also measured. For some of the europium compounds (e.g. EuAu 5 , EuAg 5 , and EuCu 5 ) it could be derived from the measurements that the easy direction of magnetization falls along the crystallographic c-axis. In a number of compounds (e.g. EuCu 5 , EuZn 5 , EuAu 2 and GdCu 5 ), the various contributions to the magnetic hyperfine field were disentangled by the investigation of suitable pseudobinary compounds that are dilute in Eu. The neighbour contribution Hsub(N) and the paramagnetic Curie temperature thetasub(p) were compared with each other in terms of the RKKY model for EuCu 5 and GdCu 5 . Since the correspondence was found to be poor it was concluded that the magnetic behaviour in these compounds cannot be described by a simple free electron picture as is the basis for the RKKY model

  9. Oxygen stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.P.; Malekzadeh, M.; Pickus, M.R.

    1975-10-01

    A new, oxygen-stabilized intermetallic compound was identified in sintered, pre-alloyed rare-earth iron powder samples. Its composition corresponds to formula R 12 Fe 32 O 2 and its crystal structure belongs to space group Im3m. The presence of these compounds was observed, so far, in several R--Fe--O systems, with R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Y

  10. A Compound Model for the Origin of Earth's Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izidoro, A.; de Souza Torres, K.; Winter, O. C.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  11. A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C.; De Souza Torres, K.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  12. Rare earth intermetallic compounds produced by a reduction-diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A reduction-diffusion process is given for producing novel rare earth intermetallic compounds, such as cobalt--rare earth intermetallic compounds, especially compounds useful in preparing permanent magnets. A particulate mixture of rare earth metal halide, cobalt and calcium hydride is heated to effect reduction of the rare earth metal halide and to diffuse the resulting rare earth metal into the cobalt to form the intermetallic compound

  13. Crystal field in rare-earth metals and intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    Reasons for the success of the crystal-field model for the rare-earth metals and intermetallic compounds are discussed. A review of some of the available experimental results is made with emphasis on cubic intermetallic compounds. Various sources of the origin of the crystal field in these metals are discussed in the background of the recent APW picture of the conduction electrons. The importance of the non-spherical part of the muffin-tin potential on the single-ion anisotropy is stressed. (author)

  14. Crystalline and amorphous rare-earth metallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burzo, E.

    1975-01-01

    During the last years the study of magnetic behaviour of rare-earth (or yttrium) compounds with cobalt and iron has growth of interest. This interest of justified by a large area of experimental and theoretical problems coming into being in the study of some rare-earth materials as well as in their technical applications. In the last three years a great number of new rare earth materials were studied and also new models explaining the magnetic behaviour of these systems have been used. In this paper we refer especially to some typical systems in order to analyse the magnetic behaviour of iron and cobalt and also the part played by the magnetic interactions in the values of the cobalt or iron moments. The model used will be generally the molecular field model. In the second chapter we present comparatively the structure of crystalline and amorphous compounds for further correlation with the magnetic properties. In chapter III we analyse the magnetic interactions in some crystalline and amorphous rare-earth alloys. Finally, we exemplify the ways in which we ensure better requried characteristics by the technical utilizations of these materials. These have in view the modifications of the magnetic interactions and are closely related with the analysis made in chapter III

  15. Spectrographic determination of some rare earths in thorium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, J. de.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spectrographic determination of Gd, Sm, Dy, Eu, Y, Yb, Tm and Lu in thorium compounds has been developed. Sensibilities of 0.01 μg rare earths/g Th02 were achieved. The rare earth elements were chromatographycally separated in a nitric acid-ether-cellulose system. The solvent mixture was prepared by dissolving 11% of concentrated nitric acid in ether. The method is based upon the sorption of the rare earths on activated cellulose, the elements being eluted together with 0.01 M HNO 3 . The retention of the 152 , 154 Eu used as tracer was 99,4%. The other elements showed recoveries varying from 95 to 99%. A direct carrier destillation procedure for the spectrochemical determination of the mentioned elements was used. Several concentrations of silver chloride were used to study the volatility behavior of the rare earths. 2%AgCl was added to the matrix as definite carrier, being lantanum selected as internal standard. The average coefficient of variation for this method was +- -+ 7%. The method has been appleid to the analysis of rare earths in thorium coumpounds prepared by Thorium Purification Pilot Plant at Atomic Energy Institute, Sao Paulo [pt

  16. Biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Earth system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laothawornkitkul, Jullada; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds produced by plants are involved in plant growth, development, reproduction and defence. They also function as communication media within plant communities, between plants and between plants and insects. Because of the high chemical reactivity of many of these compounds, coupled with their large mass emission rates from vegetation into the atmosphere, they have significant effects on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere. Hence, biogenic volatile organic compounds mediate the relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Alteration of this relationship by anthropogenically driven changes to the environment, including global climate change, may perturb these interactions and may lead to adverse and hard-to-predict consequences for the Earth system.

  17. Structure and physical properties for a new layered pnictide-oxide: BaTi2As2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X F; Yan, Y J; Ying, J J; Li, Q J; Zhang, M; Xu, N; Chen, X H

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully synthesized a new layered pnictide-oxide: BaTi 2 As 2 O. It shares similar characteristics with Na 2 Ti 2 Sb 2 O. The crystal has a layered structure with a tetragonal P4/nmm group (a = 4.047(3) A, c = 7.275(4) A). The resistivity shows an anomaly at 200 K, which should be ascribed to an SDW or structural transition. The SDW or structural transition is confirmed by magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. These behaviors are very similar to those observed in parent compounds of high-T c iron-based pnictide superconductors, in which the superconductivity shows up when the anomaly due to the SDW or structural transition is suppressed. Therefore, the new layered pnictide-oxide, BaTi 2 As 2 O, could be a potential parent compound for superconductivity. It is found that Li + doping significantly suppresses the anomaly, but no superconductivity emerges so far.

  18. Structure and properties of intermetallic ternary rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    The so called material science is an always growing field in modern research. For the development of new materials not only the experimental characterization but also theoretical calculation of the electronic structure plays an important role. A class of compounds that has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years is known as REME compounds. These compounds are often referred to with RE designating rare earth, actinide or an element from group 1-4, M representing a late transition metal from groups 8-12, and E belonging to groups 13-15. There are more than 2000 compounds with 1:1:1 stoichiometry belonging to this class of compounds and they offer a broad variety of different structure types. Although many REME compounds are know to exist, mainly only structure and magnetism has been determined for these compounds. In particular, in the field of electronic and transport properties relatively few efforts have been made. The main focus in this study is on compounds crystallizing in MgAgAs and LiGaGe structure. Both structures can only be found among 18 valence electron compounds. The f electrons are localized and therefor not count as valence electrons. A special focus here was also on the magnetoresistance effects and spintronic properties found among the REME compounds. An examination of the following compounds was made: GdAuE (E=In,Cd,Mg), GdPdSb, GdNiSb, REAuSn (RE=Gd,Er,Tm) and RENiBi (RE=Pr,Sm,Gd-Tm,Lu). The experimental results were compared with theoretic band structure calculations. The first half metallic ferromagnet with LiGaGe structure (GdPdSb) was found. All semiconducting REME compounds with MgAgAs structure show giant magnetoresistance (GMR) at low temperatures. The GMR is related to a metal-insulator transition, and the value of the GMR depends on the value of the spin-orbit coupling. Inhomogeneous DyNiBi samples show a small positive MR at low temperature that depends on the amount of metallic impurities. At higher fields the samples show a

  19. Structure and properties of intermetallic ternary rare earth compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, Frederick

    2008-12-17

    The so called material science is an always growing field in modern research. For the development of new materials not only the experimental characterization but also theoretical calculation of the electronic structure plays an important role. A class of compounds that has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years is known as REME compounds. These compounds are often referred to with RE designating rare earth, actinide or an element from group 1-4, M representing a late transition metal from groups 8-12, and E belonging to groups 13-15. There are more than 2000 compounds with 1:1:1 stoichiometry belonging to this class of compounds and they offer a broad variety of different structure types. Although many REME compounds are know to exist, mainly only structure and magnetism has been determined for these compounds. In particular, in the field of electronic and transport properties relatively few efforts have been made. The main focus in this study is on compounds crystallizing in MgAgAs and LiGaGe structure. Both structures can only be found among 18 valence electron compounds. The f electrons are localized and therefor not count as valence electrons. A special focus here was also on the magnetoresistance effects and spintronic properties found among the REME compounds. An examination of the following compounds was made: GdAuE (E=In,Cd,Mg), GdPdSb, GdNiSb, REAuSn (RE=Gd,Er,Tm) and RENiBi (RE=Pr,Sm,Gd-Tm,Lu). The experimental results were compared with theoretic band structure calculations. The first half metallic ferromagnet with LiGaGe structure (GdPdSb) was found. All semiconducting REME compounds with MgAgAs structure show giant magnetoresistance (GMR) at low temperatures. The GMR is related to a metal-insulator transition, and the value of the GMR depends on the value of the spin-orbit coupling. Inhomogeneous DyNiBi samples show a small positive MR at low temperature that depends on the amount of metallic impurities. At higher fields the samples show a

  20. Superconducting thin films of As-free pnictide LaPd{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retzlaff, Reiner; Buckow, Alexander; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We use reactive molecular beam epitaxy as synthesis technique for the search of arsenic free pnictide superconductors. Epitaxial thin films of LaPd{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} were grown on (100) MgO substrates from elemental sources by simultaneous evaporation of high purity La, Pd and Sb metals by e-gun. LaPd{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} belongs to a novel class of pnictide superconductors with a peculiar pnictide square net layer. Previously, we have reported epitaxial growth of isostructural Bi based compounds. The substitution of Bi by Sb leads to thin films with metallic behavior and room temperature resistivity of about 85 μΩ cm. The highest observed transition temperature T{sub c} inLaPd{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} is 3.1 K and does not depend on x. We discuss strategies to increase T{sub c} in this pnictide subfamily.

  1. Short range order in liquid pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, M; Makov, G; Yahel, E; Greenberg, Y

    2013-01-01

    Liquid pnictides have anomalous physical properties and complex radial distribution functions. The quasi-crystalline model of liquid structure is applied to interpret the three-dimensional structure of liquid pnictides. It is shown that all the column V elements can be characterized by a short range order lattice symmetry similar to that of the underlying solid, the A7 structure, which originates from a Peierls distorted simple cubic lattice. The evolution of the liquid structure down the column as well as its temperature and pressure dependence is interpreted by means of the effect of thermodynamic parameters on the Peierls distortion. Surprisingly, it is found that the Peierls effect increases with temperature and the nearest neighbour distances exhibit negative thermal expansion. (paper)

  2. A general theory for radioactive processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo, R.; Meruane, T.

    1998-01-01

    The formal theory of radiative processes in centrosymmetric coordination compounds of the Ln X 3+ is a trivalent lanthanide ion and X -1 =Cl -1 , Br -1 ) is put forward based on a symmetry vibronic crystal field-ligand polarisation model. This research considers a truncated basis set for the intermediate states of the central metal ion and have derived general master equations to account for both the overall observed spectral intensities and the measured relative vibronic intensity distributions for parity forbidden but vibronically allowed electronic transitions. In addition, a procedure which includes the closure approximation over the intermediate electronic states is included in order to estimate quantitative crystal field contribution to the total transition dipole moments of various and selected electronic transitions. This formalism is both general and flexible and it may be employed in any electronic excitations involving f N type configurations for the rare earths in centrosymmetric co-ordination compounds in cubic environments and also in doped host crystals belonging to the space group Fm 3m. (author)

  3. Pressure dependence of crystal field splitting in Pr pnictides and chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirber, J.E.; Weaver, H.T.; Ginley, D.S.

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the pressure dependence of the Pr nuclear magnetic resonance shift in PrN, PrP, PrSb, PrAs, PrS and PrSe. The shifts in all the pnictides increase while in the chalcogenides the shifts decrease with pressure. The rare earth frequency shift is inversely proportional to the crystal field splitting in the context of the point charge model (PCM) so a decrease would be expected for all of these materials at a rate of 5/3 the volume compressibility. Our values for the pnictides tend to be considerably larger than the PCM value as well as the wrong sign. The chalcogenide values are much nearer in magnitude and are of the right sign for the PCM. Contrary to the report of Guertin et al. we see no anomaly in the pressure dependence of the susceptibility of PrS. The fact that PrN which is reported to be non-metallic also shows the wrong sign for the PCM presents difficulties for various conduction electron explanations for this unexpected behavior of the pnictides

  4. Dimensional crossover in manganese based analogues of iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zingl, Manuel; Assmann, Elias; Aichhorn, Markus [University of Technology, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Computational Physics, Graz (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    The manganese pnicitides BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2} and LaOMnAs crystallize in the same structure as the extensively studied iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and LaOFeAs. In contrast to the d{sup 6} configuration of the iron systems, the manganese d-shell is only half-filled (d{sup 5}). As a consequence, electronic correlations are much stronger, placing these compounds at the verge of the Mott metal-insulator transition. In this region of the phase diagram materials are prone to enhanced magnetism, apparent in the remarkably high Neel temperature of 625 K for BaMn{sub 2}As{sub 2}. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed differences in the Neel temperatures, the band gap, and the optical properties of the manganese compounds under consideration can be traced back to their effective dimensionality. Our fully charge self-consistent DFT+DMFT calculations show excellent agreement with experiments, especially measured optical spectra.

  5. Magnetism in rare-earth metals and rare-earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, B.; Nordstroem, L.; Eriksson, O.; Brooks, M.S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Some of out recent local spin density electronic structure calculations for a number of ferromagnetic rare-earth systems are reviewed. A simplified model of the level densities for rare-earth (R) transition metal (M) intermetallic compounds, R m M n , is used to describe in a simple way the main features of their basic electronic structure. Explicit calculations for LuFe 2 and RFe 2 (R=Gd-Yb) systems are presented, where a method to treat simultaneously the localized 4f and the conduction electron spin magnetism is introduced. Thereby it becomes possible to calculate the K RM exchange coupling constant. This method is also used to study theoretically the permanent magnet material Nd 2 Fe 14 B. The electronic structure of the anomalous ferromagnets CeFe 2 and CeCo 5 is discussed and an induced 4f itinerant magnetism is predicted. The γ-α transition in cerium metal is considered, and results from calculations including orbital polarization are presented, where a volume collapse of 10% is obtained. On one side of the transition the 4f electrons are calculated to be essentially non-bonding (localized) and on the other side they are found to contribute to the metallic bonding and this difference in behaviour gives rise to the volume collapse. Recent calculations by Wills, Eriksson and Boring for the crystal structure changes in cerium metal under high pressure are discussed. Their successful results imply an itinerant picture for the 4f electrons in α-cerium. Consequently this strongly supports the view that the γ-α phase transformation is caused by a Mott transition of the 4f electrons. (orig.)

  6. Homoleptic Trivalent Tris(alkyl) Rare Earth Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindwal, Aradhana; Yan, KaKing; Patnaik, Smita; Schmidt, Bradley M; Ellern, Arkady; Slowing, Igor I; Bae, Cheolbeom; Sadow, Aaron D

    2017-11-22

    Homoleptic tris(alkyl) rare earth complexes Ln{C(SiHMe 2 ) 3 } 3 (Ln = La, 1a; Ce, 1b; Pr, 1c; Nd, 1d) are synthesized in high yield from LnI 3 THF n and 3 equiv of KC(SiHMe 2 ) 3 . X-ray diffraction studies reveal 1a-d are isostructural, pseudo-C 3 -symmetric molecules that contain two secondary Ln↼HSi interactions per alkyl ligand (six total). Spectroscopic assignments are supported by comparison with Ln{C(SiDMe 2 ) 3 } 3 and DFT calculations. The Ln↼HSi and terminal SiH exchange rapidly on the NMR time scale at room temperature, but the two motifs are resolved at low temperature. Variable-temperature NMR studies provide activation parameters for the exchange process in 1a (ΔH ⧧ = 8.2(4) kcal·mol -1 ; ΔS ⧧ = -1(2) cal·mol -1 K -1 ) and 1a-d 9 (ΔH ⧧ = 7.7(3) kcal·mol -1 ; ΔS ⧧ = -4(2) cal·mol -1 K -1 ). Comparisons of lineshapes, rate constants (k H /k D ), and slopes of ln(k/T) vs 1/T plots for 1a and 1a-d 9 reveal that an inverse isotope effect dominates at low temperature. DFT calculations identify four low-energy intermediates containing five β-Si-H⇀Ln and one γ-C-H⇀Ln. The calculations also suggest the pathway for Ln↼HSi/SiH exchange involves rotation of a single C(SiHMe 2 ) 3 ligand that is coordinated to the Ln center through the Ln-C bond and one secondary interaction. These robust organometallic compounds persist in solution and in the solid state up to 80 °C, providing potential for their use in a range of synthetic applications. For example, reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe 2 ) 3 } 3 and ancillary proligands, such as bis-1,1-(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)ethane (HMeC(Ox Me2 ) 2 ) give {MeC(Ox Me2 ) 2 }Ln{C(SiHMe 2 ) 3 } 2 , and reactions with disilazanes provide solvent-free lanthanoid tris(disilazides).

  7. Thiocarbomide coordination compounds of yttrium subgroup rare earth chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharova, Yu.G.; Perov, V.N.; Loginov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    Thiocarbamide coordination compounds of chlorides of elements of the yttrium subgroup 4MeCl 3 x5Cs(NH 2 ) 2 x2OH 2 O (where Me stands for Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Y) were produced for the first time. The compounds obtained are stable in air, have definite melting points, are highly soluble in methyl and ethyl alcohols, and are unstable in water. They recrystallize from ethyl alcohol without changing their chemical composition. The identity of these compounds was confirmed by X-ray analysis

  8. Spectral determination of individual rare earths in different classes of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, L.I.; Fadeeva, L.A.; Shevchenko, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions are found allowing to analyze various inorganic compounds for rare-earth elements without separation from non-rare-earth components. The influence of the plasma composition on the intensity of spectral lines of rare-earth elements is studied. The relative intensity of homologous spectral lines of various rare-earth elements remains constant regardless of the plasma composition. The conditions are found for the determination of individual rare-earth elements acting as both alloying additives (Csub(n) -- n x 10 -1 -n x 10 -3 %), and basic components (up to tens of per cent) in different classes of inorganic compounds of 1-7 elements. The general method is developed for the determination of individual rare-earth elements in mixtures of oxides of rare-earth elements, complex fluorides of rare-earth elements and elements of group 2, gallates, borates, germanates, vanadates of rare-earth elements and aluminium; zirconates-titanates of lead and barium, containing modifying additives of rare-earth elements, complex chalcogenides of rare-earth elements and elements of group 5

  9. Sythesis of rare earth metal - GIC graphite intercalation compound in molten chloride system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masafumi; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1994-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds of ytterbium and neodymium have been prepared by interacting graphite and metals in molten chlorides. These rare earth metals can be suspended in molten chlorides in the presence of trichlorides via disproportionation reaction RE(0) + RE(III) = 2RE(II) at lower than 300 degC. Carbides-free compounds are obtained in these systems. (author)

  10. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  11. Advantageous grain boundaries in iron pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katase, Takayoshi; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Tsukamoto, Akira; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Tanabe, Keiichi; Hosono, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    High critical temperature superconductors have zero power consumption and could be used to produce ideal electric power lines. The principal obstacle in fabricating superconducting wires and tapes is grain boundaries—the misalignment of crystalline orientations at grain boundaries, which is unavoidable for polycrystals, largely deteriorates critical current density. Here we report that high critical temperature iron pnictide superconductors have advantages over cuprates with respect to these grain boundary issues. The transport properties through well-defined bicrystal grain boundary junctions with various misorientation angles (θGB) were systematically investigated for cobalt-doped BaFe2As2 (BaFe2As2:Co) epitaxial films fabricated on bicrystal substrates. The critical current density through bicrystal grain boundary (JcBGB) remained high (>1 MA cm−2) and nearly constant up to a critical angle θc of ∼9°, which is substantially larger than the θc of ∼5° for YBa2Cu3O7–δ. Even at θGB>θc, the decay of JcBGB was much slower than that of YBa2Cu3O7–δ. PMID:21811238

  12. Distribution of rare earths in liver of mice administered with chloride compounds of 12 rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, A.; Chiba, M.; Inaba, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Rare earths are used in high technology field, however, the information on their biological effects are not sufficient. The behaviour of rare earths in biology is of interest in connection with their toxicity. In the present study, the distribution of rare earths in liver of mice administered with these elements was investigated. The effects on Ca and other biological essential elements were also determined. Male mice (5 weeks old) were injected with one of 12 kinds of rare earths (chlorides of Y, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Yb) at the dose of 25 mg/KXg body weight. After 20 hours of administration, mice were sacrificed, then liver and other organs were taken out. Liver was homogenized and separated by centrifugation. The concentrations of rare earths administered were measured by microwave-induced plasma-mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) after acid digestion. The concentrations of administered elements in whole liver were about 100μg/g (wet weight), where the difference between elements was few. Distribution amounts of elements administered in four fractions were following order; 700μg precipitate > mitocondrial fraction > microsomal fraction > cytosol. The relative contents in these fractions, however, was different depending on the element administered. Calcium concentrations in liver of administered mice were higher than those of control mice. Increase of Ca concentrations were observed in all four fractions and the increase ratio was also dependent on the elements administered

  13. Vortex core properties in iron pnictides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharchuk I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in recently discovered Fe-based superconductors has been intensively discussed. A plausible candidate is the superconducting (SC pairing mediated by antiferromagnetic (AFM interactions. There are two different approaches predicting the s± pairing state, in which the SC gap shows an s-wave symmetry that changes sign between different Fermi-surface (FS sheets. The first one is based on the itinerant spin fluctuations promoted by FS nesting, and the second is based on the local AFM exchange couplings. We apply quasiclassical Eilenberger approach to the vortex state to calculate the cutoff parameter, ξh, at different levels of impurity scattering rates and to compare results with experimental data for iron pnictides. The s±-wave pairing symmetry is considered as a presumable state for these materials. Magnetic field dependence of ξh/ξc2 is found to be nonuniversal for s± pairing: depending on the chosen parameter set it can reside both below and above analytical Ginzburg-Landau curve. It is also found that normalized ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 dependence is increasing with pair-breaking (interband impurity scattering, and the intraband scattering results in decreasing of the ξ2/ξc2 value. Here, ξ2 is the vortex core size and ξc2 is the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length determined from the upper critical field. The ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 curve has a minimum at low temperatures and small scattering evolving into monotonously decreasing function at strong scattering and high temperatures.

  14. Novel laser nanomaterials based on rare-earth compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Darayas N., E-mail: dpatel@oakwood.edu [Oakwood University, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, 7000 Adventist Blvd. Huntsville, AL 35896 (United States); Hardy, Lauren A.; Smith, Tabatha J.; Smith, Eva S.; Wright, Donald M. [Oakwood University, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, 7000 Adventist Blvd. Huntsville, AL 35896 (United States); Sarkisov, Sergey [SSS Optical Technologies, LLC, 515 Sparkman Drive, Suite 122, Huntsville, AL 35816 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    We report on the infrared-to-visible upconversion luminescence in microcrystalline powders and photonic crystal fibers filled with nanocolloids of trivalent rare-earth ion co-doped NaYF{sub 4} phosphor. The phosphor was prepared using a simple co-precipitation synthetic method. Nanocolloids of the phosphor were prepared by selective precipitation in methanol and laser ablation in water. Optical dynamic scatterometry determined average particle sizes of the nanocolloids of 1.5-1.9 nm in methanol and 83.8-86.4 nm in water. Nanocolloids of these phosphors were utilized as laser filling medium in photonic crystal fibers. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesize highly efficient hexagonal-phase NaYF{sub 4}:Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} powder and nanocolloid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser/amplifier containing the NaYF{sub 4} nanocolloid were pumped with 980 nm diode laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emission peaks were observed at 540 nm, 654 nm and 840.4 nm from the fiber arrangement.

  15. Luminescence and energy transfer processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, J.P.M. van.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis some studies are presented of the luminescence and energy transfer in compounds containing Eu 3+ , Pr 3+ and Gd 3+ ions. Ch. 2 deals with the energy migration in the system Gd 1 - xEu x(IO 3) 3. In ch 3 the luminescence properties of the Pr 3+ ion in the system La 1 - xPr xMgAl 1 10 1 9 are reported. Ch. 4 discusses the luminescence properties of alkali europium double tungstates and molybdates AEuW 20 8 and AEuMo 20 * (A + = alkali metal atom). The luminiscence and energy migration characteristics of the isostructural system LiGd 1 - xEu xF 4 and Gd 1 - xEu xNbO 4 are reported in ch. 5. In ch. 6 the mechanism of energy migration in (La,Gd)AlO 3 and (Gd,Eu)AlO 3 is discussed. Ch. 7 deals with the system Na 5(Gd,Eu) (WO 4) 4. In ch. 8 the luminescence and energy transfer properties of two europium tellurite anti-glass phases are reported. The two phases are Eu 1 . 7 9TeO x, which has a pseudotetragonal structure, and Eu 1 . 0 6TeO x, which has a monoclinic, ordered structure. (author). 201 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  16. 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Contrasting Superconductivity of Pnictides and Cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Schmalian, J. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Canfield, P. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Chakravarty, S. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States)

    2011-05-02

    Our quest for materials with better properties is closely integral to the fabric of our society. Currently the development of materials that will allow for improved generation, transport, and storage of energy is at the forefront of our research in condensed matter physics and materials science. Among these materials, compounds that exhibit correlated electron states and emergent phenomena such as superconductivity have great promise, but also difficulties that need to be overcome: problems associated with our need to reliably find, understand, improve and control these promising materials. At the same time, the field of correlated electrons represents the frontier of our understanding of the electronic properties of solids. It contains deep open scientific issues within the broad area of quantum phenomena in matter. The aim of this workshop is to explore and understand the physics of recently discovered Fe-based high-temperature superconductors and contrast and compare them with the cuprates. The superconductivity in iron pnictides, with transition temperatures in excess of 55 K, was discovered in early 2008. The impact of this discovery is comparable to cuprates discovered in 1986. At the same time a number of recent experimental developments in cuprates may lead to a shift in our thinking with regards to these materials. There is therefore much to be learned by devoting a conference in which both classes of superconductors are discussed, especially at this nascent stage of the pnictides.

  17. Phase diagram and gap anisotropy in iron-pnictide superconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ikeda, H.; Arita, R.; Kuneš, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 5 (2010), 054502//1-054502//15 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : iron pnictides * superconductivity * fluctuation-exchange approximation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010 http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v81/i5/e054502

  18. Rare earths in uranium compounds and important evidences for nuclear forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Daniele S.; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear forensics mainly focuses on the nuclear or radioactive material and aims to providing indication on the intended use, the history and even the origin of the material. Uranium compounds have isotopic or chemical characteristics that provide unambiguous information concerning their origin and production process. Rare earths elements (REE) are a set of sixteen chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the fourteen Lanthanides in addition scandium and yttrium. These elements are often found together but in widely variable concentrations in uncommon varieties of igneous rocks. A large amount of uranium is in rare earths deposits, and may be extracted as a by-product. Accordingly, REE in uranium compounds can be used as an evidence of uranium origin. In this study, REE was determined in uranium compounds from different origin. Measurements were carried out using a High resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS) Element 2, in low resolution mode (R-300). (author)

  19. Elastic, thermal and high pressure structural properties of heavy rare earth antimonides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.; Pagare, G.; Sanyal, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Pressure induced structural phase transition of two heavy rare earth antimonides (RESb; RE=Ho, Er) have been studied theoretically by using an inter-ionic potential theory. This method has been found quite satisfactory in the case of pnictides of rare earth and describes the crystal properties in the framework of rigid-ion modal. The long-range Coulomb interaction, short-range repulsive interaction and van der Waals (vdW) interactions are properly incorporated in this theory. These compounds exhibit first order crystallographic phase transition from their NaCl-type structure to CsCl-type structure at 27 GPa and 33.2 GPa, respectively. The bulk moduli of RESb compounds are compared with the experimental values of elastic constants. We have also calculated the Debye temperature by incorporating the elastic constants for both the rare earth antimonides. (author)

  20. As-free pnictide LaNi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} thin films grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retzlaff, Reiner; Buckow, Alexander; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We use reactive molecular beam epitaxy (RMBE) as synthesis technique for the search of arsenic free pnictide superconductors. Epitaxial thin films of LaNi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} were grown on (100)MgO substrates from elemental sources by simultaneous evaporation of high purity La, Ni and Sb metals by e-gun. The LaNi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} thin films grow epitaxially and are (00l) oriented with high crystalline quality, as evident from RHEED and X-Ray diffraction studies. The Ni deficient LaNi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub 2} thin films show metallic behavior with a room temperature resistivity of 110 {mu}{Omega} cm, while the stoichiometric compound is a semiconductor/insulator. The isostructural compound with Bi as pnictide shows a superconducting transition with a T{sub C}(0) of 3.1 K.

  1. Powder metallurgical processing of magnetostrictive materials based on rare earth-iron intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekzadeh, M.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for fabrication of high density rare earth-iron magnetostrictive compounds by powder metallurgical techniques. The fabrication involves a sequence of steps which includes preparing the pre-alloyed compounds, pulverizing them into a fine powder, compacting in suitable sizes and shapes, and sintering. Samples prepared by these procedures are carefully characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, dilatometry, and magnetic measurements. Process steps are found to exert important influences upon densities, microstructure and magnetic properties attained after densification. Investigations on a number of these process steps, including milling time and medium, sintering, and magnetic powder alignment are described

  2. Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud& #x27; ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

    2013-05-28

    Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

  3. μSR-studies of magnetic properties of metallic rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asch, L.; Kalvius, G.M.; Chappert, J.; Yaouanc, A.; Hartmann, O.; Karlsson, E.; Wappling, R.

    1984-01-01

    Positive muons can probe the magnitude and the time dependence of the magnetic field at interstitial sites in condensed matter. Thus the relatively new techniques of muons spin rotation and muon spin relaxation have become unique tools for studying magnetism. After a brief introduction into the experimental method we then discuss measurements on the elemental rare earth metals and on intermetallic compounds, in particular on the cubic Laves phases REAl 2

  4. Robust flat bands in RCo5 (R=rare earth) compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ochi, Masayuki; Arita, Ryotaro; Matsumoto, Munehisa; Kino, Hiori; Miyake, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism to realize the peculiar flat bands generally existing in RCo5 (R=rare earth) compounds is clarified by analyzing the first-principles band structures and the tight-binding model. These flat bands are constructed from the localized eigenstates, the existence of which is guaranteed by the partial cancelation between the intersite hopping amplitudes among the Co-3d states at the Kagome sites and those between the Kagome and honeycomb sites. Their relative positions to other bands c...

  5. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  6. Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Compound for Immobilization of Radioactive Waste Containing Actinide and Rare Earth Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E. Vinokurov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective immobilization of liquid radioactive waste (LRW is key to the successful development of nuclear energy. The possibility of using the magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP compound for LRW immobilization on the example of nitric acid solutions containing actinides and rare earth elements (REE, including high level waste (HLW surrogate solution, is considered in the research work. Under the study of phase composition and structure of the MKP compounds that is obtained by the XRD and SEM methods, it was established that the compounds are composed of crystalline phases—analogues of natural phosphate minerals (struvite, metaankoleite. The hydrolytic stability of the compounds was determined according to the semi-dynamic test GOST R 52126-2003. Low leaching rates of radionuclides from the compound are established, including a differential leaching rate of 239Pu and 241Am—3.5 × 10−7 and 5.3 × 10−7 g/(cm2∙day. As a result of the research work, it was concluded that the MKP compound is promising for LRW immobilization and can become an alternative material combining the advantages of easy implementation of the technology, like cementation and the high physical and chemical stability corresponding to a glass-like compound.

  7. Charge and spin density in s-stable rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, H. de.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with a study of the electronic structure of rare earth intermetallic compounds, in particular the electronic charge and spin density distribution. These are closely related to the properties of the rare earth ions, which carry the partly filled 4f shell. In chapter 1 a survey of the theory of hyperfine interaction as far as it has a bearing on the Moessbauer effect of 155 Gd and 151 Eu is given. Also some details of the Moessbauer spectra, which have practical importance are discussed. In chapter 2 the experimental set-up is described. Special attention is paid to the gamma radiation source and gamma detection requirements. In chapter 3 the author introduces the theoretical framework which will be used to interpret the measurements. In chapter 4 the results of the 155 Gd Moessbauer measurements are presented. Also it is discussed how the result can be understood in terms of the charge and spin density in rare earth intermetallic compounds. In order to lend support to the picture emerging from the previous chapter, in chapter 5 the conduction electron band structure of some representative Gd intermetallics is computed with an approximate semi-empirical LCAO method. The results are compared with those from chapter 4. Finally, in chapter 6, the 151 Eu resonance is used to investigate the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field and line width in the Eu intermetallic compounds Eu 2 Mg 17 and EuMg 5 . (Auth.)

  8. Magnetostriction of some cubic rare earth-Co2 compounds in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moral, A. del; Melville, D.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetostriction measurements have been carried out in the cubic Laves phase compounds DyCo 2 , HoCo 2 and ErCo 2 from 10 K to well above their respective Neel temperatures Tsub(N). Pulsed magnetic fields up to 15 T (150kOe) were applied. The observed magnetostrictions are very large (approximately 10 -3 ) being similar to those found in the RFe 2 compounds. The measurements confirm the extremely high anisotropy of these materials. At the highest fields the polycrystalline samples are still undergoing rotational magnetization processes. The expected values of the saturation magnetostriction at O K are similar in sign and magnitude to those found in the corresponding rare earth metals. This fact and the scaling of magnetostriction with rare earth sublattice magnetization indicates that the rare earth ion is the main source of the magnetostriction. The metamagnetic transition above Tsub(N) has been studied, the relation between critical field and temperature being nonlinear for HoCo 2 and ErCo 2 . The compounds are highly anisotropic above Tsub(N) and all the features indicate that the field-induced phases are likely to be ferrimagnetic. (author)

  9. Pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperatures of rare earth-Sn/sub 3/ compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foner, S [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.

    1979-12-01

    Measurements of the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the Neel temperatures, Tsub(N), are reported for PrSn/sub 3/, NdSn/sub 3/, GdSn/sub 3/ and CeIn/sub 3/. Tsub(N) is found to increase with applied pressure for PrSn/sub 3/ and NdSn/sub 3/, whereas Tsub(N) is pressure independent within experimental error for GdSn/sub 3/ and CeIn/sub 3/. Slightly Sn-deficient RESn/sub 3/ (RE = rare earth) compounds are found consistently to be weakly ferromagnetic. The physical properties of the RESn/sub 3/ compounds exhibit analogies with the corresponding properties of dilute superconducting (LaRE)Sn/sub 3/ alloys. The high pressure data for PrSn/sub 3/ and CeIn/sub 3/ are qualitatively consistent with a 'Kondo necklace' model for magnetically ordered RE compounds with unstable 4f shells.

  10. Pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperatures of rare earth - Sn/sub 3/ compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, L E [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Dept. of Physics; Guertin, R P; Foner, S

    1979-12-01

    Measurements of the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the Neel temperatures, Tsub(N), are reported for PrSn/sub 3/, NdSn/sub 3/, GdSn/sub 3/ and CeIn/sub 3/. Tsub(N) is found to increase with applied pressure for PrSn/sub 3/ and NdSn/sub 3/, whereas Tsub(N) is pressure independent within experimental error for GdSn/sub 3/ and CeIn/sub 3/. Slightly Sn-deficient RESn/sub 3/ (RE=rare earth) compounds are found consistently to be weakly ferromagnetic. The physical properties of the RESn/sub 3/ compounds exhibit analogies with the corresponding properties of dilute superconducting (LaRE)Sn/sub 3/ alloys. The high pressure data for PrSn/sub 3/ and CeIn/sub 3/ are qualitatively consistent with a 'Kondo necklace' model for magnetically ordered RE compounds with unstable 4f shells.

  11. Synchrotron Diffraction Studies of Spontaneous Magnetostriction in Rare Earth Transition Metal Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Yang

    2004-01-01

    Thermal expansion anomalies of R 2 Fe 14 B and R 2 Fe 17 C x (x = 0,2) (R Y, Nd, Gd, Tb, Er) stoichiometric compounds are studied with high-energy synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction using Debye-Schemer geometry in temperature range 10K to 1000K. Large spontaneous magnetostriction up to their Curie temperatures (T c ) is observed. The a-axes show relatively larger invar effects than c-axes in the R 2 Fe 14 B compounds whereas the R 2 Fe 17 C x show the contrary anisotropies. The iron sub-lattice is shown to dominate the spontaneous magnetostriction of the compounds. The contribution of the rare earth sublattice is roughly proportional to the spin magnetic moment of the rare earth in the R 2 Fe 14 B compounds but in R 2 Fe 17 C x , the rare earth sub-lattice contribution appears more likely to be dominated by the local bonding. The calculation of spontaneous magnetostrain of bonds shows that the bonds associated with Fe(j2) sites in R 2 Fe 14 B and the dumbbell sites in R 2 Fe 17 C x have larger values, which is strongly related to their largest magnetic moment and Wigner-Seitz atomic cell volume. The roles of the carbon atoms in increasing the Curie temperatures of the R 2 Fe 17 compounds are attributed to the increased separation of Fe hexagons. The R 2 Fe 17 and R 2 Fe 14 B phases with magnetic rare earth ions also show anisotropies of thermal expansion above T c . For R 2 Fe 17 and R 2 Fe 14 B the a a /a c > 1 whereas the anisotropy is reversed with the interstitial carbon in R 2 Fe 17 . The average bond magnetostrain is shown to be a possible predictor of the magnetic moment of Fe sites in the compounds. Both of the theoretical and phenomenological models on spontaneous magnetostriction are discussed and a Landau model on the spontaneous magnetostriction is proposed

  12. Results from the nuclear microprobe PIXE analysis of selected rare earth fluor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollerman, William A.; Gates, Earl; Boudreaux, Philip; Glass, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    Most previous research measures fluorescence properties over the macroscopic regime. Properties of individual microscopic grains could be significantly different than those measured over the macroscopic scale. Until recently, it was difficult to measure properties of individual fluor grains. Existing characterization techniques like scanning electron microscopy are not practical, since the resulting fluorescence masks the electron surface profile. Starting in September 2000, a research program was initiated at the Acadiana Research Laboratory to determine microscopic fluorescence properties for selected inorganic rare earth compounds. The initial phase of this program utilized microscopic proton induced X-ray emission (μPIXE) to characterize the elemental composition of individual fluor grains. Results show that both individual grains and small clusters of grains could be seen using μPIXE. Maps of this type can be used to estimate grain dimensions for the selected rare earth fluor. This technique is a new and innovative method to characterize a fluor material

  13. Atomic absorption determination of iron and copper impurities in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelyukova, Yu.V.; Kravchenko, J.B.; Kucher, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    An extraction atomic absorption method for the determination of copper and iron impurities in rare earth compounds has been developed. The extraction separation of determined elements as hydroxy quinolinates with isobuthyl alcohol was used. It increased the sensitivity of these element determination and excluded the effect of the analysed sample. Cu, Te, Zn, Bi, Sn, In, Ga, Tl and the some other elements can be determined at pH 2.0-3.0 but rare earths are remained in an aqueous phase. The condition of the flame combustion does not change during the introduction of isobutyl extract but the sensitivity of the determination of the elements increased 2-3 times. The limit of Fe determination is 0.01 mg/ml and the limit of Cu determination is 0.014 mg/ml

  14. Contribution to the study of magnetic properties of rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morariu, M.

    1976-01-01

    The intermetallic binary compounds Ysub(x)Fesub(y)(YFe 2 ,YFe 3 ,Y 6 Fe 23 ,Y 2 Fe 17 ), RFe 2 (R=Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er and Tm) and the intermetallic pseudobinary compounds (Gdsub(x)Ysub(1-x))Fe 2 and Dy(Fesub(x)Nisub(1-x)) 3 were studied, using magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy, in order to obtain information on their magnetic behaviour. The different models which describe magnetic interactions in rare-earths with 3d transition element compounds are reviewed. The magnetic hyperfine field Hsub(n) at the Fe 57 nucleus, measured by Moessbauer spectroscopy, depends on the atom position in the lattice, being sensitive to magnetic interactions with neighbouring atoms. The mean value of the magnetic hyperfine field, average Hsub(n) is proportional to the mean magnetic moment of the iron atom: average Hsub(n)/average μsub(Fe) approximately 150 kOe. The comparative study of the temperature dependence of average Hsub(n) and average μsub(Fe) values shows that this relation is valid for the whole range of magnetic ordering (T>Tsub(c)). The mean magnetic hyperfine fields at the Fe 57 nucleus in RFe 2 compounds depend on the rare-earth partner and vary approximative linearly with the Gennes factor. The spin reorientation diagram for the (Gdsub(x)Ysub(1-x))Fe 2 system is obtained. All results on Moessbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with the magnetic measurements. The magnetic behaviour of iron atoms is justified using a model in which the most electrons are in a narrow band, so they could be considered localized, and the magnetic interactions between these atoms take place through a fraction (<5%) of 3d itinerant electrons. (author)

  15. Compounds of addition between yttrium and rare-earths (III) nitrates and the N,N,N'N'-tetramethyladipamide (TMAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, W.N. de.

    1974-01-01

    The synthesis of addition compounds between hydrated rare-earths and yttrium nitrates with the diamine N,N,N',N'-tetramethyladipamide (TMAA) in ethanol, is described. The compounds were characterized by elemental analisys, infrared, Raman, visible and near infrared spectra, molar conductance and molecular weight measurements, conductometric titrations and X-ray powder patterns. (Author) [pt

  16. Mapping the Superconducting Anti-ferromagnetic C4 Phase in Iron-Pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadel, Ryan; Taddei, Keith; Bugaris, Dan; Lapidus, Saul; Claus, Helmut; Phelan, Daniel; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri; Osborn, Raymond; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Chmaissem, Omar

    Following the discovery of the microscopic coexistence of antifermagnetic spin density waves and superconductivity in Ba1-xKxFe2As2 and the low temperature re-entrance to the novel magnetic C4 tetragonal phase in Ba1-xNaxFe2As2, there has been significant interest in developing an understanding of the properties and formation of these phases and analyzing their dependence on temperature and composition in hole-doped 122 alkaline earth metal/iron-pnictides. We describe the mapping of various Ba, Sr, and Ca 122 phase diagrams with systematically controlled levels of hole-doping of alkaline metal onto the alkaline earth metal site, which was investigated via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Our elaborate synthesis, diffraction work, and analysis maps and firmly establishes the C4 phase space in these ternary diagrams as well as the boundary lines that separate the individual phases, and provides natural clues as well as a framework to investigate the stability and formation of the C4 domes that shift location with doping contents in the phase diagrams. Work at Argonne was supported by US DOE, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  17. Analysis of “Favorable Growth Element” Based on Rare Earth-aluminum Composite Mechanism of Compound Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Baohong; Zeng, Qihui; Zhao, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Under the background that failure resulted in by high temperature once only aluminum oxide is used as the gasoline additive. This paper, with the purpose to solve this problem, is to synthesize AcAl oxide for gasoline additive. In order to get the rare-earth-aluminum oxide, first, a complex model of rare earth oxide based on theories about ion coordination is established. Then, by the complex model, the type of “compound growth unit” when rare earth elements join the hydrothermal conditions and the inclination that “diversification” might probably happen are deduced. Depending on the results got by complex model, this paper introduces the type of compound and its existence conditions of “Compound growth unit” owned by stable rare-earth-aluminum oxide. By adjusting the compositions of modifier, compound materials of rare earth-aluminum oxide used for gasoline additive is made. By XRD test, aperture test, adsorption test and desorption test, the theoretical deduction is proved to be right. From the experiment, it is concluded that: a dense environment is the pre-condition to form rare-earth-aluminum polymer, which is also an essential condition for the polymer to update to a favorable growth unit and produce mesoporous rare-earth-aluminum oxide with high activity.

  18. Synchrotron Diffraction Studies of Spontaneous Magnetostriction in Rare Earth Transition Metal Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ning [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    Thermal expansion anomalies of R2Fe14B and R2Fe17Cx (x = 0,2) (R = Y, Nd, Gd, Tb, Er) stoichiometric compounds are studied with high-energy synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction using Debye-Schemer geometry in temperature range 10K to 1000K. Large spontaneous magnetostriction up to their Curie temperatures (Tc) is observed. The a-axes show relatively larger invar effects than c-axes in the R2Fe14B compounds whereas the R2Fe17Cx show the contrary anisotropies. The iron sub-lattice is shown to dominate the spontaneous magnetostriction of the compounds. The contribution of the rare earth sublattice is roughly proportional to the spin magnetic moment of the rare earth in the R2Fe14B compounds but in R2Fe17Cx, the rare earth sub-lattice contribution appears more likely to be dominated by the local bonding. The calculation of spontaneous magnetostrain of bonds shows that the bonds associated with Fe(j2) sites in R2Fe14B and the dumbbell sites in R2Fe17Cx have larger values, which is strongly related to their largest magnetic moment and Wigner-Seitz atomic cell volume. The roles of the carbon atoms in increasing the Curie temperatures of the R2Fe17 compounds are attributed to the increased separation of Fe hexagons. The R2Fe17 and R2Fe14B phases with magnetic rare earth ions also show anisotropies of thermal expansion above c. For R2Fe17 and R2Fe14B the a a/a c > 1 whereas the anisotropy is reversed with the interstitial carbon in R2Fe17. The average bond magnetostrain is shown to be a possible predictor of the magnetic moment of Fe sites in the compounds. Both of the theoretical and

  19. Half-metallic zinc-blende pnictides in real environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lijie; Liu Banggui

    2005-01-01

    The structural stability of half-metallic zinc-blende pnictides and the robustness of their half-metallic ferromagnetism in the presence of tetragonal and orthorhombic crystalline deformations are studied using a full-potential linear augmented plane wave method within the density-functional theory. The total energies of zinc-blende MnAs, CrAs, and CrSb are proved to increase with deformation increase, in contrast to those of other zinc-blende half-metallic pnictides, and therefore these three are stable against the deformations but the others are not. This is consistent with the experimental fact that only these three have been fabricated. On the other hand, the half-metallic ferromagnetism of the latter two is proved to be robust enough to survive large crystal deformations. This implies that half-metallic ferromagnetism may be achieved experimentally even in substantially deformed zinc-blende ultrathin films or layers of CrAs and CrSb in real environments

  20. Cubic rare-earth compounds: variants of the three-state Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.; Levy, P.M.; Uffer, L.F.

    1975-01-01

    In appropriate cubic fields, rare-earth ions have sixfold degenerate ground states. When the angular momentum of the rare earth is large, the six levels are characterized by states that are directed along the cube edges. Within these states the angular momentum operators J/sub x/, J/sub y/, and J/sub z/ have particularly simple matrix representations. The projection of an isotropic pair coupling between the rare earths onto these sixfold degenerate states leads to an interaction Hamiltonian H = -I Σ/sub (ij)/ sigma/sub i/sigma/sub j/delta/sub l/sub i/sub l/sub j//, where sigma takes on the values +-1 and l the values x, y, and z. This interaction is a variant of the three-state Potts model. Magnetic and quadrupolar anisotropy field terms are added to the Hamiltonian and the symmetry properties of the phase diagram associated with this model are determined. For nonzero quadrupolar anisotropy fields, the model is shown to have the thermodynamic behavior of an Ising model. However, for zero fields a new symmetry appears and in the mean-field approximation the model has tricritical-like exponents. This simple model is able to account for the large specific-heat critical exponent α' = 1 / 2 which has been observed for holmium antimonide in zero external fields. To the extent that the mean-field approximation is an accurate guide, we predict there are many cubic rare-earth compounds which exhibit tricritical-like behavior in zero field. In addition, for pure quadrupole coupling between rare earths in the sixfold degenerate states, the interaction Hamiltonian is exactly the three-state Potts model. In the mean-field approximation this system has a first-order phase transition. However, a small quadrupolar anisotropy field is sufficient to drive the system to a wing critical point. The specific heat has a critical exponent of α = 2 / 3 or 1 depending on the path taken to approach this critical point. (auth)

  1. Crystal-fields at rare-earth sites in R2Fe14B compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, S.; Adam, G.; Burzo, E.

    1985-12-01

    Crystal-field effects are expected to be important in R 2 Fe 14 B compounds. Within a model-independent approach, it is proved that four distinct rare-earth sites exist with respect to the crystalline electric fields, namely, R(4f; z=0), R(4f; z=0.5 c), R(4g; z=0), and R(4g; z=0.5 c), and relationships are established between the corresponding crystal-fields coefficients. Further, generalized Stevens parametrizations of the crystal field coefficients are derived at three levels of approximation for the interatomic forces inside the crystal. A crystal lattice dressing effect upon the radial electronic integrals is found to occur, the magnitude of which depends on the deviation of the interatomic forces from Coulombian. Finally, computation of crystal-field coefficients in Nd 2 Fe 14 B leads to results which raise questions about the validity of the simple Coulomb point-charge model. (author)

  2. Synthesis and ferroelectric properties of rare earth compounds with tungsten bronze-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouziane, M., E-mail: bouzianemeryem@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue Ibn Batouta, BP 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Taibi, M. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, LAF 502, Ecole Normale Superieure, BP 5118, Rabat (Morocco); Boukhari, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue Ibn Batouta, BP 1014, Rabat (Morocco)

    2011-10-03

    Highlights: {center_dot} Polycrystalline materials with the tungsten bronze-type structure have been synthesized and characterized. {center_dot} Effect of the incorporation of rare earth ions and paramagnetic cations (Fe{sup 3+}) into a matrix ferroelectrically active was studied. {center_dot} Ferroelectric transition is pronounced by a large thermal hysteresis during the heating and cooling cycles. {center_dot} Phase transitions around T{sub c} were confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. - Abstract: Polycrystalline materials with a general formula Pb{sub 2}Na{sub 0.8}R{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 4.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 15} (R = Dy, Eu, Sm, Nd, La) have been synthesized, in air by a high temperature solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction study, at room temperature, revealed that they crystallize in the tungsten bronze-type structure. Dielectric properties were performed, in the temperature range 25-500 deg. C, at three different frequencies 10, 100 and 1000 kHz. The ferroelectric transition is pronounced by a large thermal hysteresis during the heating and cooling cycles. The determined Curie temperature values T{sub c} were discussed as a function of rare earth size. Phase transitions around T{sub c} for the investigated compounds were confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements.

  3. Phase transitions of rare earth compounds during immobilization by foamed corundum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potemkina, T.I.; Zakharov, M.A.; Plotnikova, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Expansion of work on the environmentally safe handling of radioactive materials has become very important in recent years. The proposed method for immobilizing radionuclides by injection into a porous matrix and subsequent fixation has a definite advantage over other techniques, because of its simplicity and low cost. This raises a number of problems that require careful study. The authors can distinguish the following: choice of porous matrix materials; thermal decomposition of nitrates directly in the matrix itself, which determines the minimum firing temperature; behavior and properties of oxides produced in nitrate decomposition; conditions for compound formation between injected solutions and matrix material; processes occurring during immobilizer storage. The rare earth nitrate series can be divided into two groups on the basis of behavior during thermal decomposition: the elements preceding and following Gd. The first group includes La, Pr, And Eu, for which decomposition begins simultaneously with conclusion of dehydration; the second includes Dy, Tb, and Yb, for which nitrate group decomposition begins before dehydration is complete. The authors utilized DTA, XPA, and IR analysis to study the physicochemical properties of the immobilizer produced by a single impregnation of the foamed corundum with rare earth (La, Eu, Dy, Tb, and Yb) nitrate solutions and subsequent firing at 900 degrees C for 30 min. The choice of these rare earths was dictated by the fact that the Ln 2 O 3 -AlO 3 system can be divided into three groups on the basis of phase ratios: La-Nd, Sm-Eu, and Gd-Lu. Lanthanide monoaluminates are formed in all these groups, and the difference lies in the other reaction products generated: LnAl 11 O 18 for La-Nd, LnAl 11 O 18 and Ln 4 Al 2 O 9 for Sm-Eu, and Ln 4 Al 2 O 9 and Ln 3 Al 5 O 12 for Gd-Lu

  4. A Study on the Design of Novel Neutron Absorber Using Artificial Rare Earth Compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Song Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Jeia; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon Young [RADCORE Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwan Seo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The artificial rare earth compounds (RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generated by the result of the pyro-processing are radioactive wastes which have many long-live radionuclides. Due to the high and long-lived radioactivity of the article RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}, specific radiation shielding and disposal techniques are required. In this study, a simultaneous disposal method of the RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the spent fuels is proposed by reusing them for the neutron absorber. In this study, the neutron absorber based on artificial RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} compound was designed for the use in the spent fuel storage. The design of the storage racks for the WH 17Χ17 and PLUS7 spent fuel assemblies were designed and the criticalities were evaluated with the various RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions. Also, the radioactivity and irradiation calculations were performed for the applicability and stability analyses of the neutron absorber into the spent fuel storage. The results show that the neutron absorber can sufficiently reduce the criticality under the regulation guideline. It is expected that the neutron absorber can contribute minimizing the disposal area of the radioactive wastes as well as the reducing the costs and resources for the using the other types of the neutron absorbers.

  5. SQCRAMscope imaging of transport in an iron-pnictide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollar, Alicia; Taylor, Stephen; Palmstrom, Johanna; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Fisher, Ian; Lev, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We have recently introduced a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. We will report on the first use of the SQCRAMscope for imaging a strongly correlated material. Specifically, we will present measurements of electron transport in iron-pnictide superconductors across the electron nematic phase transition at T = 135 K.

  6. Effect of crystalline electric fields and long-range magnetic order on superconductivity in rare earth alloys and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallum, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of rare earth ions in a superconducting matrix has been studied in two distinct regimes. First, the effects of crystal field splitting of the 4f levels of a magnetic rare earth ion in the alloy system (LaPr)Sn 3 were investigated in the limit of low Pr 3+ concentration. In this system the rare earth impurity ions occupy random La sites in the crystal lattice. Second, the interaction of long-range magnetic order and superconductivity was explored in the ternary rare earth molybdenum chalcogenide systems. In these compounds the rare earth ions occupy periodic lattice sites in contrast to the random distribution of magnetic ions in dilute impurity alloy systems such as (LaPr)Sn 3

  7. NMR study of electron spin density distribution in rare-earth intermetallic compounds with iron and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'kovskij, V.A.; Gorlenko, A.A.; Kupriyanov, A.K.; Ostrovskij, V.F.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that in intermettalic compounds local fields in rare earth (RE) element nuclei directed by 3d-sublattice atoms depend on 3d-atom type but they practically do not depend on the value of its magnetic moment and the compound stoichiometry. The results are explained in the assumption concerning the presence of a system of collectivized electrons, their spin polarization determining the field in RE nuclei and contributing to 3d-atom magnetic moment

  8. Theoretical study of orbital ordering induced structural phase transition in iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Sushree Sangita, E-mail: sushree@iopb.res.in; Rout, G. C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in [Physics Enclave, Plot No-664/4825, Lane-4A, Shree Vihar, Bhubaneswar-24, Odisha (India); Panda, S. K., E-mail: skp@iopb.res.in

    2016-05-06

    We attribute the structural phase transition (SPT) in the parent compounds of the iron pnictides to orbital ordering. Due to anisotropy of the d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} orbitals in the xy plane, orbital ordering makes the orthorhombic structure more favorable and thus inducing the SPT. We consider a one band model Hamiltonian consisting of first and second-nearest-neighbor hopping of the electrons. We introduce Jahn-Tellar (JT) distortion in the system arising due to the orbital ordering present in this system. We calculate the electron Green’s function by using Zuvareb’s Green’s function technique and hence calculate an expression for the temperature dependent lattice strain which is computed numerically and self-consistently. The temperature dependent electron specific heat is calculated by minimizing the free energy of the system. The lattice strain is studied by varying the JT coupling and elastic constant of the system. The structural anomaly is studied through the electron occupation number and the specific heat by varying the physical parameters like JT coupling, lattice constant, chemical potential and hopping integrals of the system.

  9. Strong correlations and the search for high-Tc superconductivity in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, J. M.; Calderón, M. J.; Liu, J.; Muñoz, M. C.; Bascones, E.

    2017-02-01

    Undoped iron superconductors accommodate n =6 electrons in five d orbitals. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that the strength of correlations increases with hole doping, as the electronic filling approaches half filling with n =5 electrons. This evidence delineates a scenario in which the parent compound of iron superconductors is the half-filled system, in analogy to cuprate superconductors. In cuprates the superconductivity can be induced upon electron or hole doping. In this work we propose to search for high-Tc superconductivity and strong correlations in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides with n slave-spin and multiorbital random-phase-approximation calculations we analyze the strength of the correlations and the superconducting and magnetic instabilities in these systems with the main focus on LaCrAsO. We find that electron-doped LaCrAsO is a strongly correlated system with competing magnetic interactions, with (π ,π ) antiferromagnetism and nodal d -wave pairing being the most plausible magnetic and superconducting instabilities, respectively.

  10. Calculations of magnetic x-ray dichroism in the 3d absorption spectra of rare-earth compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GOEDKOOP, JB; THOLE, BT; VANDERLAAN, G; SAWATZKY, GA; DEGROOT, FMF; FUGGLE, JC; de Groot, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X

    1988-01-01

    We present atomic calculations for the recently discovered magnetic x-ray dichroism (MXD) displayed by the 3d x-ray-absorption spectra of rare-earth compounds. The spectral shapes expected at T=0 K for linear polarization parallel and normal to the local magnetic field is given, together with the

  11. Simulation of the effects of rare earth elements presence in the growth of III-V compound layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrobár, Fedor; Procházková, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 10 (2007), s. 528-530 ISSN 1842-6573 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/06/0153 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : semiconductor technology * rare earth compounds * getters Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. Stability of the 1144 phase in iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B. Q.; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    A series of iron arsenides (e.g., CaRbFe4As4 , SrCsFe4As4 ) have been discovered recently, and have provoked a rise in superconductor searches in a different phase, known as the 1144 phase. For the presence of various chemical substitutions, it is believed that more 1144 compounds remain to be discovered. In this work, we perform general model analysis as well as scenario calculation on a basis of density functional theory to investigate phase stability in a variety of compounds. We predict that the 1144-type phase could be stabilized in EuKFe4As4 , EuRbFe4As4 , EuCsFe4As4 , CaCsFe4P4 , SrCsFe4P4 , BaCsFe4P4 , InCaFe4As4 , InSrFe4As4 , etc. Remarkably, it involves rare earths, trivalence elements (e.g., indium) and iron phosphides, which greatly expands the range of its existence and suggests a promising prospect for experimental synthesis. In addition, we find that the formation of many random doping compounds (e.g., Ba0.5Cs0.5Fe2As2 , Ba0.5Rb0.5Fe2As2 ) is driven by entropy and could be annealed to a 1144-type phase. Eventually, we plot a phase diagram about two structural factors Δ a and Δ c , giving a bird's-eye view of stability of various 1144 compounds.

  13. Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba, as thermoelectric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Parker and David J Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2Sn, Sr2Sn and Ba2Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli—roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

  14. Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba, as thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David; Singh, David J

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2Sn, Sr2Sn and Ba2Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli—roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature. PMID:27877610

  15. Microbial cycling of isoprene, the most abundantly produced biological volatile organic compound on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGenity, Terry J; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin

    2018-04-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly produced biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) on Earth, is highly reactive and can have diverse and often detrimental atmospheric effects, which impact on climate and health. Most isoprene is produced by terrestrial plants, but (micro)algal production is important in aquatic environments, and the relative bacterial contribution remains unknown. Soils are a sink for isoprene, and bacteria that can use isoprene as a carbon and energy source have been cultivated and also identified using cultivation-independent methods from soils, leaves and coastal/marine environments. Bacteria belonging to the Actinobacteria are most frequently isolated and identified, and Proteobacteria have also been shown to degrade isoprene. In the freshwater-sediment isolate, Rhodococcus strain AD45, initial oxidation of isoprene to 1,2-epoxy-isoprene is catalyzed by a multicomponent isoprene monooxygenase encoded by the genes isoABCDEF. The resultant epoxide is converted to a glutathione conjugate by a glutathione S-transferase encoded by isoI, and further degraded by enzymes encoded by isoGHJ. Genome sequence analysis of actinobacterial isolates belonging to the genera Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium and Gordonia has revealed that isoABCDEF and isoGHIJ are linked in an operon, either on a plasmid or the chromosome. In Rhodococcus strain AD45 both isoprene and epoxy-isoprene induce a high level of transcription of 22 contiguous genes, including isoABCDEF and isoGHIJ. Sequence analysis of the isoA gene, encoding the large subunit of the oxygenase component of isoprene monooxygenase, from isolates has facilitated the development of PCR primers that are proving valuable in investigating the ecology of uncultivated isoprene-degrading bacteria.

  16. Synthesis, crystallographic and magnetic properties of protactinium pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hery, Yves.

    1979-03-01

    From a theoretical point of view, protactinium lies in a very important place in the periodic system for it seems to be the first element of the actinide series where the 5f state is occupied. We have studied protactinium pnictides, particularly arsenides and antimonides. PaAs 2 , Pa 3 As 4 , PaSb 2 and Pa 3 Sb 4 were synthetized and their crystallographic properties were determined and discussed. We have measured the magnetic susceptibilities of PaC, PaAs 2 and PaSb 2 . Protactinium exhibits a dual character. In its monocarbide, which is a weakly diamagnet, it behaves as a transition element while in the temperature independent paramagnets PaAs 2 and PaSb 2 , it behaves like a 'f' element. This 'f' element character increases with increasing metal-metal distances. Furthermore the radial expansion of the protactinium 5f orbital seems to be more important than the Uranium one, and consequently the corresponding protactinium 5f electrons are less localized. In addition, some protactinium chalcogenides (βPaS 2 , γPaSe 2 and PaOSe) have been identified [fr

  17. Unconventional superconductivity in iron pnictides: Magnon mediated pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    kar, Raskesh; Paul, Bikash Chandra; Misra, Anirban

    2018-02-01

    We study the phenomenon of unconventional superconductivity in iron pnictides on the basis of localized-itinerant model. In this proposed model, superconductivity arises from the itinerant part of electrons, whereas antiferromagnetism arises from the localized part. The itinerant electrons move over the sea of localized electrons in antiferromagnetic alignment and interact with them resulting in excitation of magnons. We find that triplet pairing of itinerant electrons via magnons is possible in checkerboard antiferromagnetic spin configuration of the substances CaFe2As2 and BaFe2As2 in pure form for umklapp scattering with scattering wave vector Q =(1 , 1) , in the unit of π/a where a being one orthorhombic crystal parameter, which is the nesting vector between two Fermi surfaces. The interaction potential figured out in this way, increases with the decrease in nearest neighbour (NN) exchange couplings. Under ambient pressure, with stripe antiferromagnetic spin configuration, a very small value of coupling constant is obtained which does not give rise to superconductivity. The critical temperature of superconductivity of the substances CaFe2As2 and BaFe2As2 in higher pressure checkerboard antiferromagnetic spin configuration are found to be 12.12 K and 29.95 K respectively which are in agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Hidden phase in parent Fe-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khadiza; Adhikary, Ganesh; Thakur, Sangeeta; Patil, Swapnil; Mahatha, Sanjoy K.; Thamizhavel, A.; De Ninno, Giovanni; Moras, Paolo; Sheverdyaeva, Polina M.; Carbone, Carlo; Petaccia, Luca; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the origin of exoticity in Fe-based systems via studying the fermiology of CaFe2As2 employing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. While the Fermi surfaces (FSs) at 200 K and 31 K are observed to exhibit two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) topology, respectively, the FSs at intermediate temperatures reveal the emergence of the 3D topology at a temperature much lower than the structural and magnetic phase transition temperature (170 K, for the sample under scrutiny). This leads to the conclusion that the evolution of FS topology is not directly driven by the structural transition. In addition, we discover the existence in ambient conditions of energy bands related to the cT phase. These bands are distinctly resolved in the high-photon energy spectra exhibiting strong Fe 3 d character. They gradually move to higher binding energies due to thermal compression with cooling, leading to the emergence of 3D topology in the Fermi surface. These results reveal the so-far hidden existence of a cT phase under ambient conditions, which is argued to lead to quantum fluctuations responsible for the exotic electronic properties in Fe-pnictide superconductors.

  19. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF COMPOUNDS AND ALLOYS OF RARE-EARTH METALS WITH ELEMENTS OF GROUPS V AND VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, F. J.; Matson, L. K.; Miller, J. F.; Himes, R. C.

    1963-04-15

    The electric properties of rare earth compounds and alloys with As, Sb, Se, and Te are reported. Without exception, samples of Se and Te compounds with normally trivalent Nd, Gd, and Ce having synthetic compositions, MX and M/sub 3/X/ sub 4/, are n-type wrth free electron concentrations in the range 10/sup 20/ to 10 /sup 22//cm/sup 3/, and have very low electric resistivities. Room temperature electric properties and thermoelectric data are tabulated. (P.C H.)

  20. Separation of rare earths by means of acid organophosphorous compounds. Structure-activity study by molecular simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourcot, Fabrice

    1991-01-01

    The increasing number of industrial applications of rare earths has resulted in an increased demand in purified rare earths whereas their separation is difficult due to their high chemical similarity. The search for a better separation leads to the search for more selective extraction agents. Organophosphorous compounds appear to be the most selective. As the search for new extraction agents resulting in high lanthanide extraction efficiency or in a better selectivity between rare earths has been mainly empiric, this research thesis aims at developing a molecular simulation method which allows the number of molecules to be synthesized and tested to be reduced. After having briefly recalled general knowledge on liquid-liquid extraction and on rare earths, and described calculation methods (quantum methods, methods based on molecular mechanics, conformational analysis, methods of charge calculation), the author proposes a critical review of literature related to rare earth liquid-liquid extraction by organophosphorous acids with respect to the used extraction agent. The molecular modelling issue is then addressed by describing ways to apply it to extraction problems, faced problems, brought solutions and obtained results

  1. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  2. The influence of the magnetic state on the thermal expansion in 1:2 rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, E.; Lindbaum, A.

    1994-01-01

    The attempt is made to demonstrate on some selected rare earth intermetallics the influence of the magnetic state on the thermal expansion. Using the X-ray powder diffraction method we investigated the thermal expansion of some selected nonmagnetic compounds (YAl 2 , YNi 2 and YCo 2 ) and some magnetic RE (rare earth) - cobalt compounds (RCo 2 ) in the temperature range from 4 up to 450 K. All these compounds crystallize in the C15-type structure (cubic Laves phase structure). By comparing the nonmagnetic Y-based compounds we could show that there is an enhanced contribution of the 3d electrons to the thermal expansion in YCo 2 . In the magnetic RCo 2 compounds the induced 3d magnetism gives rise to large volume anomalies at the magnetic ordering temperature T c . Below T c there is in addition a distortion of the cubic unit cell due to the interaction of the magnetically ordered RE ions with the anisotropic crystal field.The thermal expansion of the orthorhombic TmCu 2 , GdCu 2 and YCu 2 compounds has also been investigated for comparison. The influence of the crystal field on the thermal expansion in TmCu 2 in the paramagnetic range (TmCu 2 orders magnetically at T N =6.3 K) has been determined by comparing the thermal expansion of the nonmagnetic YCu 2 with that of TmCu 2 . The data thus obtained are compared with a theoretical model. GdCu 2 , for which the influence of the crystal field can be neglected, has been investigated in order to study the influence of the exchange interaction in the magnetically ordered state (below 42 K). ((orig.))

  3. Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics using complex compounds of chromotropic acid bisazoderivatives with rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alykov, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of complex formation of bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid with rare earth ions and aminoglycoside antibiotics have made it possible to choose carboxyarsenazo, orthanyl R and carboxynitrazo as highly sensitive reagents for determining aminoglycoside antibiotics. Conditions have been found for the formation of precipitates of different-ligand complexes containing rare earth ions, bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid and aminogylcoside antibiotics. A procedure has been worked out of determining the antibiotics in biological samples with carboxyarsenazo [ru

  4. Coordination compounds of rare-earth metals with organic ligands for electroluminescent diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katkova, M A; Bochkarev, Mikhail N; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G

    2005-01-01

    Data on lanthanide coordination compounds with organic ligands used in the design of electroluminescent diodes are summarised and systematically represented. The molecular and electronic structures and spectroscopic characteristics of these compounds are considered. A comparative analysis of the properties of organic electroluminescent diodes with different compositions of emitting and conductive layers is presented.

  5. A new series of rhenium VII compounds: sodium-rare earth perrhenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slimane, Z.A.A.; Silvestre, J.-P.; Freundlich, William

    1978-01-01

    Synthesis by solid state reaction or in aqueous solution and radiocrystallographical study of the hexagonal sodium-rare earth perrhenates NaLn(ReO 4 ) 4 (Ln=La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Er) and of the tetragonal tetrahydrates NaLn(ReO 4 ) 4 , 4H 2 O (Ln=Eu, Gd, Er, Lu) [fr

  6. Interaction of intermetallic compounds formed by rare earths, scandium, yttrium and 3d-transition metals, with gaseous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilkin, S.P.; Volkova, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of the RT n intermetallic compounds, where R Sc, Y, rare earths, T = Fe, Co, Ni; n = 2,3,5, with gaseous ammonia under pressure of 1MPa and at temperatures of 293, 723 and 798 K is studied. It is established on the basis of roentgenographic studied, chemical analysis data, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and specific surface measurements that metallic matrixes of intermetallides decompose into nitrides and transition metal phases at temperatures of 723 and 798 K under effect of ammonia and independent of structural types of the source materials; partial or complete decomposition of intermetallides through ammonia with formation of transition metal mixture, binary hydrides and nitrides of the most electropositive metal the above systems occurs at the temperature of 293 K depending on the heat of the source compounds and their tendency to decomposition under ammonia effect

  7. Recent results of examination of the applicability of polyoxonium compounds to the extraction separation of rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalova, M.

    1992-01-01

    Macrocyclic polyethers possess an extraordinary ability to bond with high selectivity to metal ions. The salt-polyether complex is formed by ion-dipole interaction between the cation and the negatively charged oxygen atoms symmetrically positioned in the polyether ring. Compounds of cyclic polyethers can be employed as extractants in solvent extraction systems, which not only can be applied to the separation of ions but also can provide information on the mechanism of the complexation. The process of extraction of lanthanides in the presence of hydrophobic counter-ions is described, and the calculated equilibrium constants are given. A survey is presented of the application of polyoxonium compounds to the extraction separation of rare earths. (M.D.). 12 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs

  8. Magnetostriction anisotropy in the rare earth RCo5 compounds on spontaneous spin-orientation phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahdreev, A.V.; Deryagin, A.V.; Zadvorkin, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature dependences of parameters a and c in the crystal lattice of RCo 5 compounds (R=Pr, Tb, Dy, Ho) are studied in an X-ray diffractometer the spin reorientation region. On the basis of these data the magnetostriction constants lambdasub(1)sup(α, 2) and lambdasub(2)sup(α, 2) are determined for temperatures corresponding to the middle of reorientation regions of the compounds mentioned above (excluding PrCo 5 ). The values of lambdasub(1)sup(α, 2) and lambdasub(2)sup(α, 2) at T=0 K are calculated on the basis of the single-ion model for all the compounds investigalted and also for some other intermetallides of the RCo 5 type in which spontaneous spin reorien tation transitions do not occur

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of rare earth-Sn3 compounds for 119Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.P.; Friedt, J.M.; Shenoy, G.K.; Percheron, A.; Achard, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of RESn 3 compounds (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Yb) have been investigated using the 23.8keV Moessbauer resonance of 119 Sn. The isomer shifts and quadrupole interactions are nearly the same in all compounds. The transferred magnetic fields and their orientation with respect to the principal electric field gradient axis at various Sn sites in the magnetically ordered state of RESn 3 (RE=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd) have been utilized to get information about the magnetic structure. An evaluation of the transferred fields in PrSn 3 and NdSn 3 shows that the spin density at the Sn nucleus is nearly the same in both compounds [fr

  10. Separation of pure Cerium oxides from rare earth compounds. Homogeneous precipitation using Urea-Hydrogen Peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, K.; Abrao, E.

    1975-01-01

    The obtainment of ceric oxide (CeO 2 ) of purity higher than 97% by application of homogeneous precipitation technique is described. The selective separation of cerium was reached by hydrolysis of urea in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, using a rare earths concentrate named rare earths chloride, a natural mixture of all lanthanides provenient from the industrialization of monazite. The best conditions for the preparation of CeO 2 of 94% purity are: 35-70g R 2 O 3 /1 and pH2,0 hydrolysis temperature: 88-90 0 C, urea/R 2 O 3 ratio: 4, H 2 O 2 /Ce 2 O 3 ratio: 1,5-5,0 and hydrolysis duration: 4 hours. A leaching procedure of the precipitate with 0,25-0,75M NHO 3 leads to a product of 97-99,5% CeO 2

  11. Higher order magnetic modulation structures in rare earth metal, alloys and compounds under extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, S.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic materials consisting of rare earth ions form modulation structures such as a helical or sinusoidal structure caused by the oscillating magnetic interaction between rare earth ions due to RKKY magnetic interaction. These modulation structures, in some cases, develop further to higher order modulation structures by additional modulations caused by higher order crystalline electric field, magnetic interactions such as spin-lattice interaction, external magnetic field and pressure. The higher order modulation structures are observed in a spin-slip structure or a helifan structure in Ho, and a tilt helix structure in a TbEr alloy. Paramagnetic ions originated from frustration generate many magnetic phases under applied external magnetic field. KUR neutron diffraction groups have performed the development and adjustment of high-pressure instruments and external magnetic fields for neutron diffraction spectrometers. The studies of 'neutron diffraction under extreme conditions' by the seven groups are described in this report. (Y. Kazumata)

  12. A model of gettering effects of rare-earth elements in III-V compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrobár, Fedor; Procházková, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 8 (2006), s. 643-- ISSN 0009-2770. [Sjezd chemických společností /58./. Ústí nad Labem, 04.09.2006-08.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/06/0153 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : semiconductor technology * rare earth metals * getters Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.431, year: 2006

  13. Addition compounds between same phosphinoxides and hexafluorophosphates of rare earths (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.M. da; Melo, S.M.; Souza, E.F. de; Almeida, M.A. de

    1984-01-01

    Coordination compounds were prepared from salts of lanthanide hexafluorophosphates and three different phosphine oxides: methyldiphenylphosphine oxide (MDPPO), diphenylcyclohexylphosphine oxide (DPcHPO) and phosphoric acid trimethylester (TMxPO). The analytical results indicated the following general formulae : Ln(PF 6 ) 3 .5DPChPO where Ln = La, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy; Ln(PF 6 ) 3 6MDPPO, where Ln = La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Tm; Ln(PF 6 ) 3 .7TMxPO, where Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb. The vibrational studies in the infrared region showed that all the phosphine oxides coordination are through the oxygen of the phosphoryl group and confirmed the non-coordination character of the PF - 6 ion. Fluorescence spectra in the visible region for the Eu (III) compounds, at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated the microsymmetry C sub(3v) as the most probable for the Eu (III) in the compounds Eu (PF 6 ) 3 .5DPChPO and Eu (PF 6 ) 3 .7TMxPO. The symmetry site of the Eu (PF 6 ) 3 .6MDPPO compound is octahedral with tetragonal distortion. (Author) [pt

  14. Exchange interactions and magnetic properties of hexagonal rare-earth-cobalt compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burzo, E.

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic properties of some GdxY1-xCo4A compounds with A = Co, Si or B are analysed including the pressure effects. Isomorphous structure transitions, parallelly with changes of cobalt moments from high spin states to low spin states, were shown as pressure increases. The magnetic data, obtained from band structures, were compared with those predicted by the mean field model.

  15. Electronic response of rare-earth magnetic-refrigeration compounds GdX2 (X = Fe and Co)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Samir; Ahuja, Ushma; Kumar, Kishor; Heda, N. L.

    2018-05-01

    We present the Compton profiles (CPs) of rare-earth-transition metal compounds GdX2 (X = Fe and Co) using 740 GBq 137Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental momentum densities, we have also computed the CPs, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken population (MP) using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Local density and generalized gradient approximations within density functional theory (DFT) along with the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (B3LYP and PBE0) have been considered under the framework of LCAO scheme. It is seen that the LCAO-B3LYP based momentum densities give a better agreement with the experimental data for both the compounds. The energy bands and DOS for both the spin-up and spin-down states show metallic like character of the reported intermetallic compounds. The localization of 3d electrons of Co and Fe has also been discussed in terms of equally normalized CPs and MP data. Discussion on magnetization using LCAO method is also included.

  16. Competition/coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in iron pnictides probed by muon spin rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Soshi; Kadono, Ryosuke

    2009-01-01

    The presence of macroscopic phase separation into superconducting and magnetic phases in LaFeAsO 1-x F x and CaFe 1-x Co x AsF is demonstrated by muon spin rotation (μSR) measurement across their phase boundaries (x=0.06 for LaFeAsO 1-x F x and x=0.075-0.15 for CaFe 1-x Co x AsF). In LaFeAsO 0.94 F 0.06 , both magnetism and superconductivity develop simultaneously below a common critical temperature, T m ≅T c ≅18 K, where the magnetism is characterized by strong randomness. A similar, but more distinct segregation of these two phases is observed in CaFe 1-x Co x AsF, where the magnetic phase retains T m close to that of the parent compound (T c m ≅80-120 K) and the superconducting volume fraction is mostly proportional to the Co content x. The close relationship between magnetism and superconductivity is discussed based on these experimental observations. Concerning the superconducting phase, an assessment is made on the anisotropy of the order parameter in the superconducting state of LaFeAsO 1-x F x , CaFe 1-x Co x AsF and Ba 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 (x=0.4) based on the temperature dependence of superfluid density [n s (T)] measured by μSR. The gap parameter, 2Δ/k B T c , determined from n s (T) exhibits a tendency that values in the hole-doped pnictides (Ba 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 ) are much greater than those in electron-doped ones (LaFeAsO 1-x F x and CaFe 1-x Co x AsF), suggesting a difference in the coupling to bosons mediating the Cooper pairs between relevant d electron bands.

  17. The new ternary pnictides Er12Ni30P21 and Er13Ni25As19: Crystal structures and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryshchyn, Stepan; Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Zhak, Olga; Zelinska, Mariya; Pivan, Jean-Yves; Duppel, Viola; Simon, Arndt; Kienle, Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    The new ternary pnictides Er 12 Ni 30 P 21 and Er 13 Ni 25 As 19 have been synthesized from the elements. They crystallize with hexagonal structures determined from single-crystal X-ray data for Er 12 Ni 30 P 21 (space group P6 3 /m, a=1.63900(3) nm, c=0.37573(1) nm, Z=1, R F =0.062 for 1574 F-values and 74 variable parameters), and for Er 13 Ni 25 As 19 (Tm 13 Ni 25 As 19 -type structure, space group P6-bar , a=1.6208(1) nm, c=0.38847(2) nm, Z=1, R F =0.026 for 1549 F-values and 116 variable parameters). These compounds belong to a large family of hexagonal structures with a metal-metalloid ratio of 2:1. HRTEM investigations were conducted to probe for local ordering of the disordered structure at the nanoscale. The magnetic properties of the phosphide Er 12 Ni 30 P 21 have been studied in the temperature of range 2 eff =9.59 μ B corresponds to the theoretical value of Er 3+ . - Graphical abstract: The new ternary pnictides Er 12 Ni 30 P 21 and Er 13 Ni 25 As 19 have been synthesized from the elements. They crystallize with hexagonal structures determined from single-crystal X-ray data. The compounds belong to a large family of structures with a metal-metalloid ratio of 2:1. HRTEM investigations were conducted to probe for local ordering of the disordered structure at the nanoscale. Display Omitted

  18. Magnetization, Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy and the Crystalline Electric Field in Rare-Earth Al2 Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purwins, H. -G.; Walker, E.; Barbara, B.

    1974-01-01

    a quantitative quantum mechanical description of the magnetization and the related magnetocrystalline anisotropy in terms of a cubic crystalline electric field and an isotropic exchange interaction. The parameters used in this description can be unified to good approximation to all REAl2 intermetallic compounds......Magnetization measurements are reported for single crystals of PrAl2 in the range from 4.2K to 30K for magnetic fields up to 150 kOe applied in the (100), (110) and (111) directions. For these measurements, together with the magnetization results obtained earlier for TbAl2 the authors give...

  19. Low temperature anomalies in the lattice parameters of rare earth compounds and UPd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluemacher, D.

    1980-01-01

    Using a low temperature diffractometer, intermediate valence effects and crystal defects can be identified from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters and the Debye-Waller factor. For polycrystalline powder samples the measuring error are too large. For intermediate valence systems the relative change in the 4f-level population probability can be calculated together with the anisotropic effects on the lattice parameters and on the unit cell colume. Pronounced effects on the lattice parameters can be observed in the case of RE Cu 2 Si 2 compounds with crystal fields. (DG) [de

  20. Coordination compounds of metals with imidazoles and benzimidazoles. [Metals: V, Th, Mo, Cd, rare earths, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikova, G A; Molodkin, A K; Kukalenko, S S

    1988-12-01

    Methods of preparation, composition and structure of UO/sub 2//sup 2+/, Th/sup 4+/, Mo/sup 3+/, Cd/sup 2+/, Ln/sup 3+/ metal ion complexes with imidazoles and benzimidazoles are considered in reviews of native and foreign literature of up to 1985. Complexes are customarily prepared by direct interaction of ligands with inorganic salts in different organic solvents. Complex composition is defined by the nature of complexing metal and inorganic salt anion, ligand volume and basicity, as well as solvent characteristics. Effect of R substituent in imidazole and benzimidazole side chain on composition of coordination compounds is considered.

  1. Organic compounds in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz-Analogues of prebiotic chemistry on early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Mayer, Christian; Schmitz, Oliver J; Rosendahl, Pia; Bronja, Amela; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinz F

    2017-01-01

    The origin of life is still an unsolved mystery in science. Hypothetically, prebiotic chemistry and the formation of protocells may have evolved in the hydrothermal environment of tectonic fault zones in the upper continental crust, an environment where sensitive molecules are protected against degradation induced e.g. by UV radiation. The composition of fluid inclusions in minerals such as quartz crystals which have grown in this environment during the Archean period might provide important information about the first organic molecules formed by hydrothermal synthesis. Here we present evidence for organic compounds which were preserved in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz minerals from Western Australia. We found a variety of organic compounds such as alkanes, halocarbons, alcohols and aldehydes which unambiguously show that simple and even more complex prebiotic organic molecules have been formed by hydrothermal processes. Stable-isotope analysis confirms that the methane found in the inclusions has most likely been formed from abiotic sources by hydrothermal chemistry. Obviously, the liquid phase in the continental Archean crust provided an interesting choice of functional organic molecules. We conclude that organic substances such as these could have made an important contribution to prebiotic chemistry which might eventually have led to the formation of living cells.

  2. Half-Metallic Ferromagnetism and Stability of Transition Metal Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bang-Gui

    It is highly desirable to explore robust half-metallic ferromagnetic materials compatible with important semiconductors for spintronic applications. A state-of-the-art full potential augmented plane wave method within the densityfunctional theory is reliable enough for this purpose. In this chapter we review theoretical research on half-metallic ferromagnetism and structural stability of transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides. We show that some zincblende transition metal pnictides are half-metallic and the half-metallic gap can be fairly wide, which is consistent with experiment. Systematic calculations reveal that zincblende phases of CrTe, CrSe, and VTe are excellent half-metallic ferromagnets. These three materials have wide half-metallic gaps, are low in total energy with respect to the corresponding ground-state phases, and, importantly, are structurally stable. Halfmetallic ferromagnetism is also found in wurtzite transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides and in transition-metal doped semiconductors as well as deformed structures. Some of these half-metallic materials could be grown epitaxially in the form of ultrathin .lms or layers suitable for real spintronic applications.

  3. Development of Powder-in-Tube Processed Iron Pnictide Wires and Tapes

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanwei

    2011-06-01

    The development of PIT fabrication process of iron pnictide superconducting wires and tapes has been reviewed. Silver was found to be the best sheath material, since no reaction layer was observed between the silver sheath and the superconducting core. The grain connectivity of iron pnictide wires and tapes has been markedly improved by employing Ag or Pb as dopants. At present, critical current densities in excess of 3750 A /cm 2 (I c = 37.5 A) at 4.2 K have been achieved in Ag-sheathed SrKFeAs wires prepared with the above techniques, which is the highest value obtained in iron-based wires and tapes so far. Moreover, Ag-sheathed Sm-1111 superconducting tapes were successfully prepared by PIT method at temperatures as low as ̃ 900 °C, instead of commonly used temperatures of ̃ 1200 °C. These results demonstrate the feasibility of producing superconducting pnictide composite wires, even grain boundary properties require much more attention. © 2010 IEEE.

  4. Structure and electronic properties of ordered binay thin-film compounds of rare earths with transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.

    2004-01-01

    The present thesis deals with preparation of structurally ordered thin-film compounds of the rare-earths Ce and Dy with the transition metals Pd, Rh, and Ni as well as with investigations of their crystalline and electronic structures. Typically 10 nm-thick films were grown in-situ by deposition of the rare-earth metals onto single crystalline transitionmetal substrates or alternatively by codeposition of both constituents onto a W(110) single crystal. In both cases deposition was followed by short-term annealing at temperatures of 400-1000 C to achieve crystalline order. The latter was analyzed by means of low-energy electron-diffraction (LEED) and evaluated on the basis of a simple kinematic theory. The electronic structure was investigated by means of angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), partially exploiting synchrotron radiation from BESSY. The studies concentrate mainly on the behavior of the valence bands as a function of structure and composition of the thin films, particularly under consideration of surface phenomena. Measured energy dispersions were compared with results of LDA-LCAO calculations performed in the framework of this thesis. Observed shifts of the energy bands by up to 1 eV are attributed in the light of a simple model to incomplete screening of the photoemission final states. (orig.)

  5. Magnetocaloric effect in textured rare earth intermetallic compound ErNi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Sankar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Melt-spun ErNi crystallizes in orthorhombic FeB-type structure (Space group Pnma, no. 62 similar to the arc-melted ErNi compound. Room temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD experiments reveal the presence of texture and preferred crystal orientation in the melt-spun ErNi. The XRD data obtained from the free surface of the melt-spun ErNi show large intensity enhancement for (1 0 2 Bragg reflection. The scanning electron microscopy image of the free surface depicts a granular microstructure with grains of ∼1 μm size. The arc-melted and the melt-spun ErNi compounds order ferromagnetically at 11 K and 10 K (TC respectively. Field dependent magnetization (M-H at 2 K shows saturation behaviour and the saturation magnetization value is 7.2 μB/f.u. for the arc-melted ErNi and 7.4 μB/f.u. for the melt-spun ErNi. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSm close to TC has been calculated from the M-H data. The maximum isothermal magnetic entropy change, -ΔSmmax, is ∼27 Jkg-1K-1 and ∼24 Jkg-1K-1 for the arc-melted and melt-spun ErNi for 50 kOe field change, near TC. The corresponding relative cooling power values are ∼440 J/kg and ∼432 J/kg respectively. Although a part of ΔSm is lost to crystalline electric field (CEF effects, the magnetocaloric effect is substantially large at 10 K, thus rendering melt-spun ErNi to be useful in low temperature magnetic refrigeration applications such as helium gas liquefaction.

  6. Magnetocaloric effect in textured rare earth intermetallic compound ErNi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Aparna; Chelvane, J. Arout; Morozkin, A. V.; Nigam, A. K.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.; Nirmala, R.

    2018-05-01

    Melt-spun ErNi crystallizes in orthorhombic FeB-type structure (Space group Pnma, no. 62) similar to the arc-melted ErNi compound. Room temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments reveal the presence of texture and preferred crystal orientation in the melt-spun ErNi. The XRD data obtained from the free surface of the melt-spun ErNi show large intensity enhancement for (1 0 2) Bragg reflection. The scanning electron microscopy image of the free surface depicts a granular microstructure with grains of ˜1 μm size. The arc-melted and the melt-spun ErNi compounds order ferromagnetically at 11 K and 10 K (TC) respectively. Field dependent magnetization (M-H) at 2 K shows saturation behaviour and the saturation magnetization value is 7.2 μB/f.u. for the arc-melted ErNi and 7.4 μB/f.u. for the melt-spun ErNi. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSm) close to TC has been calculated from the M-H data. The maximum isothermal magnetic entropy change, -ΔSmmax, is ˜27 Jkg-1K-1 and ˜24 Jkg-1K-1 for the arc-melted and melt-spun ErNi for 50 kOe field change, near TC. The corresponding relative cooling power values are ˜440 J/kg and ˜432 J/kg respectively. Although a part of ΔSm is lost to crystalline electric field (CEF) effects, the magnetocaloric effect is substantially large at 10 K, thus rendering melt-spun ErNi to be useful in low temperature magnetic refrigeration applications such as helium gas liquefaction.

  7. Cure and mechanical properties of carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR) vulcanized by alkaline earth metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulyapitak, Tulyapong

    Compounds of carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR) with alkaline metal oxides and hydroxide were prepared, and their cure and mechanical properties were investigated. Magnesium oxide (MgO) with different specific surface areas (45, 65, and 140 m2/g) was used. Increased specific surface area and concentration of MgO resulted in higher cure rate. Optimum stiffness, tensile strength, and ultimate strain required an equimolar amount of acidity and MgO. The effect of specific surface area on tensile properties was not significant. Crosslink density of XNBR-MgO vulcanizates increased with increased amounts of MgO. ATR-IR spectroscopy showed that neutralization occurs in two steps: (1) During mixing and storage, MgO reacts with carboxyl groups (RCOOH) to give RCOOMgOH. (2) Upon curing, these react bimolecularly to form RCOOMgOOCR and Mg(OH)2. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis revealed an ionic transition at higher temperature, in addition to the glass transition. The ionic transition shifts to higher temperature with increasing MgO concentration. Like MgO-XNBR systems, cure rates of XNBR-calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and XNBR-barium oxide (BaO) compounds increased with increased content of curing agents. Curing by these two agents resulted in ionic crosslinks. To ensure optimum tensile properties, equimolar amounts of carboxyl groups and curing agents were required. Dynamic mechanical analysis revealed the ionic transition in these two systems. It shifted to higher temperature with increased amounts of curing agents. In contrast to MgO, Ca(OH)2, and BaO, calcium oxide (CaO) gave results similar to those for thermally cured samples. No ionic transition was observed in XNBR-CaO systems. Tensile strength of XNBR depended on the strength of ionic crosslinks, which was dependent on the size of the alkaline metal ions.

  8. Spectroscopic and magnetic properties of rare-earth elements and their anomalous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoud, Y.

    1991-07-01

    Using the impurity Anderson model in the large N f approximation, where N f is the orbital and spin degeneracy of the f level, we calculate the zero temperature static paramagnetic susceptibility of light rare earth metallic systems. The calculation is performed for large values of the Coulomb U f f electron-electron interactions with respect of the V hybridization of f 1 and f 2 configurations with the conduction states (i.e. f 0 configuration): We only keep the leading terms in a development in successive powers of 1/U f f and V. Our numerical results on the magnetic susceptibility start from a simple analytic expression and are discussed in terms of the f level position, the hybridization V, the shape and filling of the conduction band and also the finite U f f effects. Finally we present calculated curves for the susceptibility versus V in connection with the α γ transition of cerium and utilizing the same parameters as those used previously to obtain core level L I II absorption spectra: Also in the case of the susceptibility, the hybridization appears to be an important parameter to describe the phase change from γ to α cerium. (author). 17 refs., 6 figs

  9. X-ray absorption experiments on rare earth and uranium compounds under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiester, G.

    1987-01-01

    After an introduction into the phenomenon of the mixed valency and the method of measuring the microstructures by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the area of the L edges under pressure, the results of investigations at selected substitutes of the chalcogenides and puictides of the rare earths and the uranium were given. Thus, pressure-induced valency transitions in YbS and YbTe, instabilities in valency and structural phase transitions in EUS and SmTe as well as the change in the electron structure in USb under pressure were investigated in order to answer questions of solid state physics (e.g. semiconductor-metal transitions, correlation between valency and structural phase transitions). Hybridization effects in L III spectra of formally tetravalent Ca are analyzed at CeF 4 and CeO 2 (insulators) and the role of final state effects in the L III spectra are analyzed at EuP 2 P 2 and TmSe-TmTe (semiconductor systems). (RB) [de

  10. Reproducing the organic matter model of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia and testing the ecotoxicity of functionalized charcoal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Linhares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain organic compounds similar to the ones found in the organic matter of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE using a chemical functionalization procedure on activated charcoal, as well as to determine their ecotoxicity. Based on the study of the organic matter from ADE, an organic model was proposed and an attempt to reproduce it was described. Activated charcoal was oxidized with the use of sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance was performed to verify if the spectra of the obtained products were similar to the ones of humic acids from ADE. The similarity between spectra indicated that the obtained products were polycondensed aromatic structures with carboxyl groups: a soil amendment that can contribute to soil fertility and to its sustainable use. An ecotoxicological test with Daphnia similis was performed on the more soluble fraction (fulvic acids of the produced soil amendment. Aryl chloride was formed during the synthesis of the organic compounds from activated charcoal functionalization and partially removed through a purification process. However, it is probable that some aryl chloride remained in the final product, since the ecotoxicological test indicated that the chemical functionalized soil amendment is moderately toxic.

  11. EPR studies of excited state exchange and crystal-field effects in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.Y.; Sugawara, K.; Cooper, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    EPR in excited crystal-field states of Tm 3+ , Pr 3+ , and Tb 3+ in singlet-ground-state systems and in the excited state of Ce 3+ in CeP are reviewed. Because one is looking at a crystal-field excited state resonance, the exchange, even if isotropic, does not act as a secular perturbation. This means that one obtains different effects and has access to more information about the dynamic effects of exchange than in conventional paramagnetic resonance experiments. The Tm and Pr monopnictides studied are paramagnetic at all temperatures. The most striking feature of the behavior of the GAMMA 5 /sup (2)/ EPR in the Tm compounds is the presence of an anomalous maximum in the temperature dependence of the g-factor. The relationship of this effect to anisotropic exchange is discussed. The results of the EPR of the excited GAMMA 5 /sup (2)/ level of Tb 3 + (g-factor becomes very large at T/sub N/ in antiferromagnetic TbX (X = P, As, Sb) and that of the excited GAMMA 8 level of Ce 3+ in antiferromagnetic CeP will also be reported. For sufficient dilution of the Tb 3+ in the terbium monopnictides, the systems become paramagnetic (Van Vleck paramagnets) down to 0 0 K. The Tb 3+ excited state resonance EPR in Tb/sub 0.1/ La/sub 0.9/P was studied as an example of behavior in such systems. 10 fig

  12. Volatile organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol in the Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbally, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Recent research, when considered as a whole, suggests that a substantial fraction of both gas-phase and aerosol atmospheric organics have not been, or have very rarely been, directly measured. A review of the global budget for organic gases shows that we cannot account for the loss of approximately half the non-methane organic carbon entering the atmosphere. We suggest that this unaccounted-for loss most likely occurs through formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), indicating that the source for these aerosols is an order of magnitude larger than current estimates. There is evidence that aged secondary organic aerosol can participate in both direct and indirect (cloud modifying) radiative forcing and that this influence may change with other global climate change. Even though our knowledge of the organic composition of the atmosphere is limited, these compounds clearly influence the reactive chemistry of the atmosphere and the formation, composition, and climate impact of aerosols A major challenge in the coming decade of atmospheric chemistry research will be to elucidate the sources, structure, chemistry, fate and influences of these clearly ubiquitous yet poorly constrained organic atmospheric constituents

  13. Rare-earth metal compounds with a novel ligand 2-methoxycinnamylidenepyruvate: A thermal and spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, C.T., E-mail: claudiocarvalho@ufgd.edu.br [Federal University of Grande Dourados, UFGD, 79.804-970 Dourados, MS (Brazil); Oliveira, G.F. [Federal University of Grande Dourados, UFGD, 79.804-970 Dourados, MS (Brazil); Fernandes, J. [Federal University of Grande Dourados, UFGD, 79.804-970 Dourados, MS (Brazil); Federal University of Mato Grosso, UFMT, 78.060-900 Cuiabá, MT (Brazil); Federal University of Goiás, UFG, 74.690-900, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, 14.801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, A.B. [Federal University of Mato Grosso, UFMT, 78.060-900 Cuiabá, MT (Brazil); Ionashiro, E.Y. [Federal University of Goiás, UFG, 74.690-900, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Ionashiro, M. [Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, 14.801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-10

    Highlights: • 2-Methoxycinnamylidenepyruvate as a novel ligand for the synthesis of complexes. • Complexes with well-defined structural arrangements. • Thermal decomposition dependent on the nature of the metal ion. • Study by TG/FT-IR and TG/MS of the gaseous products released. • Potential technological application. - Abstract: Compounds of 2-methoxycinnamylidenepyruvate with trivalent lanthanide ions (Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) were obtained in solid state and studied mainly in terms of their thermal and spectroscopic properties. The analyses of the characterization were performed by thermogravimetric system coupled to a mass and infrared spectrometer (TG–DTA/MS and TG–DTA/FT-IR), X-ray powder diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (FT-IR), preliminary study of fluorescence as well as classical technique of titration with EDTA. From these results, it was possible to establish the stoichiometry, thermal behavior, hydration water content, and the gaseous products released in the thermal decomposition steps, and suggest the type of metal-ligand coordination.

  14. Local probe investigations of the electronic phase diagrams of iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materne, Philipp

    2015-09-24

    In this work, the electronic phase diagrams of Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Fe{sub 1+y}Te were investigated using muon spin relaxation and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Single crystals of Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} with x = 0.00, 0.35, 0.50, and 0.67 were examined. The undoped 122 parent compound CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is a semi metal and shows antiferromagnetic commensurate spin density wave order below 167 K. By hole doping via Na substitution, the magnetic order is suppressed and superconductivity emerges including a Na-substitution level region, where both phases coexist. Upon Na substitution, a tilting of the magnetic moments out of the ab-plane is found. The interaction of the magnetic and superconducting order parameter in this coexistence region was studied and a nanoscopic coexistence of both order parameters is found. This is proven by a reduction of the magnetic order parameter of 7 % in x = 0.50 below the superconducting transition temperature. This reduction was analysed using Landau theory and a systematic correlation between the reduction of the magnetic order parameter and the ratio of the transition temperatures, T{sub c}/T{sub N}, for the 122 family of the iron pnictides is presented. The magnetic phase transition is accompanied by a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition. The lattice dynamics at temperatures above and below this magneto-structural phase transition were studied and no change in the lattice dynamics were found. However, the lattice for finite x is softer than for the undoped compound. For x = 0.67, diluted magnetic order is found. Therefore, the magnetism in Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is persistent even at optimal doping. The superconducting state is investigated by measuring the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth, where two superconducting gaps with a weighting of nearly 50:50 are obtained. A temperature independent anisotropy of the magnetic penetration depth γ{sub

  15. Local probe investigations of the electronic phase diagrams of iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materne, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the electronic phase diagrams of Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 and Fe 1+y Te were investigated using muon spin relaxation and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Single crystals of Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 with x = 0.00, 0.35, 0.50, and 0.67 were examined. The undoped 122 parent compound CaFe 2 As 2 is a semi metal and shows antiferromagnetic commensurate spin density wave order below 167 K. By hole doping via Na substitution, the magnetic order is suppressed and superconductivity emerges including a Na-substitution level region, where both phases coexist. Upon Na substitution, a tilting of the magnetic moments out of the ab-plane is found. The interaction of the magnetic and superconducting order parameter in this coexistence region was studied and a nanoscopic coexistence of both order parameters is found. This is proven by a reduction of the magnetic order parameter of 7 % in x = 0.50 below the superconducting transition temperature. This reduction was analysed using Landau theory and a systematic correlation between the reduction of the magnetic order parameter and the ratio of the transition temperatures, T c /T N , for the 122 family of the iron pnictides is presented. The magnetic phase transition is accompanied by a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition. The lattice dynamics at temperatures above and below this magneto-structural phase transition were studied and no change in the lattice dynamics were found. However, the lattice for finite x is softer than for the undoped compound. For x = 0.67, diluted magnetic order is found. Therefore, the magnetism in Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 is persistent even at optimal doping. The superconducting state is investigated by measuring the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth, where two superconducting gaps with a weighting of nearly 50:50 are obtained. A temperature independent anisotropy of the magnetic penetration depth γ λ = 1.5(4) is obtained, which is much smaller compared to other 122 compounds

  16. Rare earth-based quaternary Heusler compounds MCoVZ (M = Lu, Y; Z = Si, Ge with tunable band characteristics for potential spintronic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Heusler compounds (MHCs have recently attracted great attention since these types of material provide novel functionalities in spintronic and magneto-electronic devices. Among the MHCs, some compounds have been predicted to be spin-filter semiconductors [also called magnetic semiconductors (MSs], spin-gapless semiconductors (SGSs or half-metals (HMs. In this work, by means of first-principles calculations, it is demonstrated that rare earth-based equiatomic quaternary Heusler (EQH compounds with the formula MCoVZ (M = Lu, Y; Z = Si, Ge are new spin-filter semiconductors with total magnetic moments of 3 µB. Furthermore, under uniform strain, there are physical transitions from spin-filter semiconductor (MS → SGS → HM for EQH compounds with the formula LuCoVZ, and from HM → SGS → MS → SGS → HM for EQH compounds with the formula YCoVZ. Remarkably, for YCoVZ EQH compounds there are not only diverse physical transitions, but also different types of spin-gapless feature that can be observed with changing lattice constants. The structural stability of these four EQH compounds is also examined from the points of view of formation energy, cohesive energy and mechanical behaviour. This work is likely to inspire consideration of rare earth-based EQH compounds for application in future spintronic and magneto-electronic devices.

  17. Rare earths: preparation of spectro chemically pure standards, study of their carbonates and synthesis of a new compound series - the peroxy carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carlos Alberto da Silva

    1996-05-01

    In this work the following studies are concerned: I) preparation of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium oxides for use as spectro chemically pure standards; II) behavior of the rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) carbonates soluble in ammonium carbonate and mixture of ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, and III) synthesis and characterization of rare earth peroxy carbonates - a new series of compounds. Data for the synthesis and characterization of the rare earths peroxy carbonates described for the first time in this work are presented and discussed. With the aid of thermal analysis (TG-DTG) the thermal stability and the stoichiometric composition for new compounds were established and a mechanism of thermal decomposition was proposed. The peroxy carbonate was prepared by the addition of hydrogen peroxyde to the complexed soluble rare earths carbonates. These studies included also the determinations of active oxygen, the total rare earth oxide by gravimetry and complexometry and the C, H and N contents by microanalysis. The new compounds were also investigated by infrared spectroscopy. (author)

  18. Low-temperature phase MnBi compound: A potential candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly, V.; Wu, X.; Smillie, L.; Shoji, T.; Kato, A.; Manabe, A.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The spin reorientation temperature of MnBi is suppressed by nanoscale grain refinement. • Hardness parameter of MnBi reaches as large as 2.8 at 580 K. • MnBi has a great potential as a hard phase in rare-earth free nanocomposite magnets. • Improving the surface passivity is a remaining task for MnBi-based permanent magnets. - Abstract: The low-temperature phase (LTP) MnBi is one of the few rare-earth free compounds that exhibit a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in the order of 10 6 J/m 3 . A large coercive field (μ 0 H cj ) above 1 T can be obtained readily by reducing the crystallite size (D) through mechanical grinding (MG). The room-temperature H cj values follow a phenomenological expression μ 0 H cj = μ 0 H a (δ/D) n where the anisotropy field (μ 0 H a ) is ∼4 T, the Bloch wall width (δ) is 7 nm and the exponent (n) is about 0.7 in our study. The grain refinement upon MG is accompanied by suppression of the spin reorientation transition temperature (T SR ) from 110 K to below 50 K. The coercive field starts to exhibit positive temperature dependence approximately 50 K above T SR and the room-temperature magnetic hardening induced by MG could partially be brought about by the lowered onset of this positive temperature dependence. The suppression of T SR by MG is likely to be induced by the surface anisotropy with which the 2nd order crystal field term is enhanced. One of the shortcomings of LTP-MnBi is its poor phase stability under the ambient atmosphere. The spontaneous magnetization decreases considerably after room-temperature aging for 1 week. This is due to oxidation of Mn which leads to decomposition of the MnBi phase. Hence, the surface passivity needs to be established before this material is considered for a permanent magnet in practical uses. Another shortcoming is the limited spontaneous magnetization. The theoretical upper limit of the maximum energy product in LTP-MnBi remains only a quarter of that in Nd 2

  19. The RMgSn{sub 2} series of compounds (R = rare earth metal). Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solokha, Pavlo; Minetti, Riccardo; De Negri, Serena; Saccone, Adriana [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova (Italy); Pereira, Laura Cristina J.; Goncalves, Antonio P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, EN 10, Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela (Portugal)

    2017-06-30

    The novel isostructural series of phases RMgSn{sub 2} (R = Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) is presented. They were prepared by direct synthesis in an induction furnace and subsequently annealed at 500 C. Their crystal structures were determined through single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of the Ce representative [I anti 42m, tI32-LaMgSn{sub 2}, Z = 8, a = 0.82863(3) nm, c = 1.23129(5) nm] and confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis of the other members of the series. Rietveld refinements were also performed on the homologues with R = Pr, Tm, and Y. The title phases show a unique space distribution of atoms, characterized by the presence of a Sn-Sn dumbbell distanced at around 0.29 nm. Their structures are related to those of a few binary AeTt{sub 3} (Ae = alkaline earth; Tt = Si, Ge; I4/mmm, tI32-YbSi{sub 3}) compounds that are stable at high pressure, characterized by a more complex 3D covalently bonded Tt network. Compounds CeMgSn{sub 2} and TbMgSn{sub 2} were magnetically characterized; they show paramagnetic behavior with the presence of ferromagnetic interactions, more pronounced in the case of TbMgSn{sub 2}, as suggested by the Curie-Weiss temperatures, determined in the high-temperature range, of 0.96 and 27.6 K for CeMgSn{sub 2} and TbMgSn{sub 2}, respectively. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Electronic Phase Separation in the Slightly Underdoped Iron Pnictide Superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, J.T.; Inosov, D.S.; Niedermayer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a combined study of the slightly underdoped novel pnictide superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 by means of x-ray powder diffraction, neutron scattering, muon-spin rotation (µSR), and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Static antiferromagnetic order sets in below Tm70 K as inferred from......-state regions on a lateral scale of several tens of nanometers. Our findings indicate that such mesoscopic phase separation can be considered an intrinsic property of some iron pnictide superconductors....

  1. Progress in Studing Solar-earth Source Compound Heat Pump%太阳能-土壤源复合热泵的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张来栋; 郭风全

    2013-01-01

    介绍了太阳能-土壤源复合热泵的工作原理和技术特点,比较了不同太阳能-土壤源复合热泵的系统组成及其性能指标,提出了当前复合热泵所存在的问题与相关建议,并对其发展前景做了展望。%Working principle and performance characteristics of solar-earth source compound heat pump are described, and the system component and indicators are compared between different solar-earth source compound heat pumps. The problems existing in the compound heat pump and related suggestion are put forward, and the development prospect is expected.

  2. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  3. Theory of Two-Magnon Raman Scattering in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. C.

    2011-08-15

    Although the parent iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides are itinerant antiferromagnets, the use of local moment picture to understand their magnetic properties is still widespread. We study magnetic Raman scattering from a local moment perspective for various quantum spin models proposed for this new class of superconductors. These models vary greatly in the level of magnetic frustration and show a vastly different two-magnon Raman response. Light scattering by two-magnon excitations thus provides a robust and independent measure of the underlying spin interactions. In accord with other recent experiments, our results indicate that the amount of magnetic frustration in these systems may be small.

  4. Superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in cuprates and pnictides: Evidence of the role of Coulomb correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, J.D.; Malozovsky, Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • In a layered 2D cuprates the long-range order antiferromagnetism is driven mainly by the Van Hove singularity. • The long-range antiferromagnetism quickly disappear with doping away from the Van Hove singularity. • For pnictides the antiferromagnetism exists as a result of the nesting condition. • Since the doping steadily changes the nesting conditions, the antiferromagnetism and superconductivity may coexist. -- Abstract: We consider the Hubbard model in terms of the perturbative diagrammatic approach (UN F ⩽1) where the interaction between two electrons with antiparallel spins in the lowest order of perturbation is described by the short-range repulsive contact (on-site) interaction (U>0). We argue that in layered 2D cuprates the long-range order antiferromagnetism is driven mainly by the Van Hove singularity, whereas in the case of pnictides the antiferromagnetism exists as a result of the nesting condition. We show that when the interaction is quite strong (UN F ≈1) in the case of the Van Hove singularity the electron system undergoes the antiferromagnetic phase transition with the log-range order parameter and large insulating gap. The long-range antiferromagnetism quickly disappear, as shown, with the doping away from the Van Hove singularity, but the antiferromagnetic short-range correlation persists (UN F < 1) due to Coulomb repulsive interaction which is the mechanism for superconductivity in cuprates. We argue that in the case of pnictides the antiferromagnetism appears when the nesting conditions for the Fermi surface are met. Since the doping steadily changes the nesting conditions, the antiferromagnetism and superconductivity may coexist as has been observed in pnictides. We show that the proximity of the antiferromagnetism and superconductivity implies the repulsive interaction between electrons, which turns into attractive between quasiparticles as shown by the authors in the article published on the same issue as this one

  5. Point-contact spectroscopic studies on normal and superconducting AFe2As2-type iron pnictide single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xin; Park, W K; Greene, L H; Yuan, H Q; Chen, G F; Luo, G L; Wang, N L; Sefat, A S; McGuire, M A; Jin, R; Sales, B C; Mandrus, D; Gillett, J; Sebastian, Suchitra E

    2010-01-01

    Point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy is applied to investigate the gap structure in iron pnictide single-crystal superconductors of the AFe 2 As 2 (A = Ba, Sr) family ('Fe-122'). The observed point-contact junction conductance curves, G(V), can be divided into two categories: one where Andreev reflection is present for both (Ba 0.6 K 0.4 )Fe 2 As 2 and Ba(Fe 0.9 Co 0.1 ) 2 As 2 , and the other with a V 2/3 background conductance universally observed, extending even up to 100 meV for Sr 0.6 Na 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 and Sr(Fe 0.9 Co 0.1 ) 2 As 2 . The latter is also observed in point-contact junctions on the nonsuperconducting parent compound BaFe 2 As 2 and superconducting (Ba 0.6 K 0.4 )Fe 2 As 2 crystals. Mesoscopic phase-separated coexistence of magnetic and superconducting orders is considered to explain distinct behaviors in the superconducting samples. For Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 , double peaks due to Andreev reflection with a strongly sloping background are frequently observed for point contacts on freshly cleaved c-axis surfaces. If normalized using a background baseline and analyzed using the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk model, the data show a gap size of ∼ 3.0-4.0 meV with 2Δ 0 /k B T c ∼ 2.0-2.6, consistent with the smaller gap size reported for the LnFeAsO family ('Fe-1111'). For the Ba(Fe 0.9 Co 0.1 ) 2 As 2 , the G(V) curves typically display a zero-bias conductance peak.

  6. Calculations of the magnetic properties of R{sub 2}M{sub 14}B intermetallic compounds (R=rare earth, M=Fe, Co)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masaaki, E-mail: masaaki.ito@neel.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Institut Néel, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Yano, Masao [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Dempsey, Nora M. [CNRS, Institut Néel, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Givord, Dominique [CNRS, Institut Néel, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP166, 38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The hard magnetic properties of “R–M–B” (R=rare earth, M=mainly Fe) magnets derive from the specific intrinsic magnetic properties encountered in Fe-rich R{sub 2}M{sub 14}B compounds. Exchange interactions are dominated by the 3d elements, Fe and Co, and may be modeled at the macroscopic scale with good accuracy. Based on classical formulae that relate the anisotropy coefficients to the crystalline electric field parameters and exchange interactions, a simple numerical approach is used to derive the temperature dependence of anisotropy in various R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds (R=Pr, Nd, Dy). Remarkably, a unique set of crystal field parameters give fair agreement with the experimentally measured properties of all compounds. This implies reciprocally that the properties of compounds that incorporate a mixture of different rare-earth elements may be predicted accurately. This is of special interest for material optimization that often involves the partial replacement of Nd with another R element and also the substitution of Co for Fe. - Highlights: • Anisotropy constants derived from CEF parameters of R{sub 2}M{sub 14}B compounds (M=Fe, Co). • Anisotropy constants of all R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds using unique set of CEF parameters. • Moment non-collinearity in magnetization processes under B{sub app} along hard axis.

  7. Calculations of the magnetic properties of R2M14B intermetallic compounds (R=rare earth, M=Fe, Co)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaaki; Yano, Masao; Dempsey, Nora M.; Givord, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The hard magnetic properties of “R–M–B” (R=rare earth, M=mainly Fe) magnets derive from the specific intrinsic magnetic properties encountered in Fe-rich R 2 M 14 B compounds. Exchange interactions are dominated by the 3d elements, Fe and Co, and may be modeled at the macroscopic scale with good accuracy. Based on classical formulae that relate the anisotropy coefficients to the crystalline electric field parameters and exchange interactions, a simple numerical approach is used to derive the temperature dependence of anisotropy in various R 2 Fe 14 B compounds (R=Pr, Nd, Dy). Remarkably, a unique set of crystal field parameters give fair agreement with the experimentally measured properties of all compounds. This implies reciprocally that the properties of compounds that incorporate a mixture of different rare-earth elements may be predicted accurately. This is of special interest for material optimization that often involves the partial replacement of Nd with another R element and also the substitution of Co for Fe. - Highlights: • Anisotropy constants derived from CEF parameters of R 2 M 14 B compounds (M=Fe, Co). • Anisotropy constants of all R 2 Fe 14 B compounds using unique set of CEF parameters. • Moment non-collinearity in magnetization processes under B app along hard axis.

  8. High pressure structural phase transition of neodymium mono pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagare, Gitanjali; Ojha, P.; Sanyal, S.P.; Aynyas, Mahendra

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated theoretically the high-pressure structural phase transition of two neodymium mono NdX (X=As, Sb) using an interionic potential theory with necessary modification to include the effect of Coulomb screening by the delocalized f electrons of Nd ion. These compounds exhibits first order crystallographic phase transition from their NaCl (B 1 ) phase to body centered tetragonal (BCT) at 27 GPa and 15.3 GPa respectively. We also calculated the Nd-Nd distance as a function of pressure. (author)

  9. Effect of introduction atoms on effective exchange field in ferrimagnetic rare earth compounds and 3d-transition metal compounds such as R2Fe17 and RFe11Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, S.A.; Tereshina, I.S

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic compounds R 2 Fe 17 and RFe 11 Ti, as well as their hydrides and nitrides are studied. The change in the exchange fields, effecting the rare earth (RE) ions both from the side of the Fe sublattice and from the side of other RE ions in the process of hydrogenation and nitration is determined and Curie temperature dependence of the source compounds, their hydrides and nitrides on the de Genes factor is identified. It is established that in the course of the light atoms (H and N) introduction into the crystalline lattice of the R 2 Fe 17 and RFe 11 Ti compounds there takes place significant increase in the Curie temperature, in the Fe-Fe exchange interactions and decrease in the R-R interactions. This may be interpreted as the result of the oc curing changes in the electron structures of such compounds and indirect exchange interactions [ru

  10. Low-temperature phase MnBi compound: A potential candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ly, V.; Wu, X.; Smillie, L. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Shoji, T.; Kato, A.; Manabe, A. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Suzuki, K., E-mail: kiyonori.suzuki@monash.edu [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The spin reorientation temperature of MnBi is suppressed by nanoscale grain refinement. • Hardness parameter of MnBi reaches as large as 2.8 at 580 K. • MnBi has a great potential as a hard phase in rare-earth free nanocomposite magnets. • Improving the surface passivity is a remaining task for MnBi-based permanent magnets. - Abstract: The low-temperature phase (LTP) MnBi is one of the few rare-earth free compounds that exhibit a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in the order of 10{sup 6} J/m{sup 3}. A large coercive field (μ{sub 0}H{sub cj}) above 1 T can be obtained readily by reducing the crystallite size (D) through mechanical grinding (MG). The room-temperature H{sub cj} values follow a phenomenological expression μ{sub 0}H{sub cj} = μ{sub 0}H{sub a}(δ/D){sup n} where the anisotropy field (μ{sub 0}H{sub a}) is ∼4 T, the Bloch wall width (δ) is 7 nm and the exponent (n) is about 0.7 in our study. The grain refinement upon MG is accompanied by suppression of the spin reorientation transition temperature (T{sub SR}) from 110 K to below 50 K. The coercive field starts to exhibit positive temperature dependence approximately 50 K above T{sub SR} and the room-temperature magnetic hardening induced by MG could partially be brought about by the lowered onset of this positive temperature dependence. The suppression of T{sub SR} by MG is likely to be induced by the surface anisotropy with which the 2nd order crystal field term is enhanced. One of the shortcomings of LTP-MnBi is its poor phase stability under the ambient atmosphere. The spontaneous magnetization decreases considerably after room-temperature aging for 1 week. This is due to oxidation of Mn which leads to decomposition of the MnBi phase. Hence, the surface passivity needs to be established before this material is considered for a permanent magnet in practical uses. Another shortcoming is the limited spontaneous magnetization. The theoretical upper limit of the maximum

  11. Upper critical and irreversibility fields in Ni- and Co-doped pnictide bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolo, Martin; Singleton, John; Solenov, Dmitry; Jiang, Jianyi; Weiss, Jeremy; Hellstrom, Eric

    2018-05-01

    A comprehensive study of upper critical and irreversibility magnetic fields in Ba(Fe0.95Ni0.05)2As2 (large grain and small grain samples), Ba(Fe0.94Ni0.06)2As2, Ba(Fe0.92Co0.08)2As2, and Ba(Fe0.92Co0.09)2As2 polycrystalline bulk pnictide superconductors was made in pulsed fields of up to 65 T. The full magnetic field-temperature (H-T) phase diagrams, starting at 1.5 K, were measured. The higher temperature, upper critical field Hc2 data are well described by the one-band Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (WHH) model. At low temperatures, the experimental data depart from the fitted WHH curves, suggesting an emergence of a new phase that could be attributed to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state. The large values of the Maki fitting parameter α indicate that the Zeeman pair breaking dominates over the orbital pair breaking and spin-paramagnetic pair-breaking effect is significant in these materials. Possible multi-band structure of these materials is lumped into effective parameters of the single-band model. Table of measured physical parameters allows us to compare these pnictide superconductors for different Co- and Ni- doping levels and granularity.

  12. An improvement study on the closed chamber distillation system for recovery of renewable salts from salt wastes containing radioactive rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, H.C.; Cho, Y.Z.; Lee, T.K.; Kim, I.T.; Park, G.I.; Lee, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an improvement study on the closed chamber distillation system for recovery of renewable salts from salt wastes containing radioactive rare earth compounds was performed to determine optimum operating conditions. It was very important to maintain the pressure in the distillation chamber below 10 Torr for a high efficiency (salt recovery >99 %) of the salt distillation. This required increasing the salt vaporization and condensation rates in the distillation system. It was confirmed that vaporization and condensation rates could be improved controlling the given temperature of top of the condensation chamber. In the distillation tests of the salt wastes containing rare earth compounds, the operation time at a given temperature was greatly reduced changing the given temperature of top of the condensation chamber from 780 to 700 deg C. (author)

  13. Crystal growth and physical properties of Ferro-pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aswartham, Saicharan

    2012-11-08

    The thesis work presented here emphasizes important aspects of crystal growth and the influence of chemical substitution in Fe-As superconductors. High temperature solution growth technique is one of most powerful and widely used technique to grow single crystals of various materials. The biggest advantage of high temperature solution growth technique is the, possibility of growing single crystals from both congruently and incongruently melting materials. Solution growth technique has the potential to control high vapour pressures, given the fact that, in Fe-based superconductors elements with high vapour pressure like As, K, Li and Na have to be handled during the crystal growth procedure. In this scenario high temperature solution growth is the best suitable growth technique to synthesize sizable homogeneous single crystals. Using self-flux high temperature solution growth technique, large centimeter-sized high quality single crystals of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} were grown. This pristine compound BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} undergoes structural and magnetic transition at T{sub S/N} = 137 K. By suppressing this magnetic transition and stabilizing tetragonal phase with chemical substitution, like Co-doping and Na-doping, bulk superconductivity is achieved. Superconducting transitions of as high as T{sub c} = 34 K with Na substitution and T{sub c} = 25 K with Co-doping were obtained. A combined electronic phase diagram has been achieved for both electron doping with Co and hole doping with Na in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. Single crystals of LiFe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}As with x = 0, 0.025, 0.05 and 0.075 were grown by a self-flux high temperature solution growth technique. The charge doping in LiFeAs is achieved with the Co-doping in Fe atoms. The superconducting properties investigated by means of temperature dependent magnetization and resistivity revealed that superconductivity is shifted to lower temperatures and with higher amount of charge carriers superconductivity is killed

  14. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction studies on iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liran

    2010-09-19

    }){sub 2}As{sub 2} is one of the first materials where single crystals are available. The thermal expansion results on the undoped compound with x = 0 show a large anomaly at the combined magnetic and structural transition which is far sharper than that for polycrystalline systems. Upon doping, both transitions are suppressed and their splitting is visible in the thermal expansion data. The high precision thermal expansion and magnetostriction results presented in this work are among the first data on the novel family of iron-based superconductors. A valuable insight in the respective ordering phenomena and the thermodynamic properties is provided.

  15. Prebiotic Synthesis of Methionine and Other Sulfur-Containing Organic Compounds on the Primitive Earth: A Contemporary Reassessment Based on an Unpublished 1958 Stanley Miller Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eric T.; Cleaves, H. James; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Original extracts from an unpublished 1958 experiment conducted by the late Stanley L. Miller were recently found and analyzed using modern state-of-the-art analytical methods. The extracts were produced by the action of an electric discharge on a mixture of methane (CH4), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Racemic methionine was farmed in significant yields, together with other sulfur-bearing organic compounds. The formation of methionine and other compounds from a model prebiotic atmosphere that contained H2S suggests that this type of synthesis is robust under reducing conditions, which may have existed either in the global primitive atmosphere or in localized volcanic environments on the early Earth. The presence of a wide array of sulfur-containing organic compounds produced by the decomposition of methionine and cysteine indicates that in addition to abiotic synthetic processes, degradation of organic compounds on the primordial Earth could have been important in diversifying the inventory of molecules of biochemical significance not readily formed from other abiotic reactions, or derived from extraterrestrial delivery.

  16. Magnetic properties of compounds Ba/sub 3/Fesub(2-x)Msub(x)UO/sub 9/ with M=Y, Sc, In and rare earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenet, J C; Berthon, J [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Poix, P [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1979-01-01

    The compounds Ba/sub 3/Fesub(2-x)Msub(x)UO/sub 9/ crystallize in the perovskite type system. The magnetic behavior of these compounds is different when M/sup 3 +/ is dia- or paramagnetic. When M/sup 3 +/ is diamagnetic, the magnetic exchange interaction between A and B sublattices is strongly antiferromagnetic, the (UO/sub 6/)/sup 6 -/ clusters having a special effect. When M/sup 3 +/ is paramagnetic, the perovskite compounds have three magnetic sublattices. In the third one are placed rare earth ions M/sup 3 +/; in this case the A-B exchange interactions are antiferromagnetic but the interactions with the third sublattice are probably slightly ferromagnetic. This special feature and the fact that a temperature of compensation is missing differentiate these perovskites from the garnets.

  17. Structural features of layered iron pnictide oxides (Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2})(Sr{sub 4}M{sub 2}O{sub 6})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, H., E-mail: tuogino@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-TRIP, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Sato, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Kawaguchi, N.; Ushiyama, K. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-TRIP, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Katsura, Y. [Magnetic Materials Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Horii, S. [JST-TRIP, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kochi University of Technology, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Kishio, K.; Shimoyama, J. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-TRIP, Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Structural features of newly found perovskite-based iron pnictide oxide system have been studied. Compared to REFePnO system, perovskite-based system tend to have smaller Pn-Fe-Pn angle and higher pnictogen height owing to low electronegativity of alkaline earth metal and small repulsive force between pnictogen and oxigen atoms. As-Fe-As angles of (Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2})(Sr{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 6}), (Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2})(Sr{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and (Fe{sub 2}Pn{sub 2})(Sr{sub 4}MgTiO{sub 6}) are close to ideal tetrahedron and those pnictogen heights of about 1.40 A are close to NdFeAsO with optimized carrier concentration. These structural features of this system may lead to realization of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in this system.

  18. Magnetic properties of Fe-rich rare-earth intermetallic compounds with a ThMn12 structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, K.; Tawara, Y.; Osugi, R.; Shimao, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sm(Fe/sub 1-//sub x/M/sub x/) 12 ternary compounds based on the tetragonal ThMn 12 structure where M is Ti, Si, V, Cr, and Mo were investigated. M atoms have a preference for site occupation. Ti atoms occupy the 8i or 8j site and Cr atoms occupy the 8i site. Curie temperatures on Sm(M,Fe) 12 compounds are around 590 K except for the SmMo 2 Fe 10 compound (T/sub c/ = 483 K). The SmTiFe 11 and SmSi 2 Fe 10 compounds have a high saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy

  19. Universal spectral signatures in pnictides and cuprates: the role of quasiparticle-pair coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, William; Mauger, Alain; Noat, Yves

    2017-11-08

    Understanding the physical properties of a large variety of high-T c superconductors (SC), the cuprate family as well as the more recent iron-based superconductors, is still a major challenge. In particular, these materials exhibit the 'peak-dip-hump' structure in the quasiparticle density of states (DOS). The origin of this structure is explained within our pair-pair interaction (PPI) model: The non-superconducting state consists of incoherent pairs, a 'Cooper-pair glass' which, due to the PPI, undergoes a Bose-like condensation below T c to the coherent SC state. We derive the equations of motion for the quasiparticle operators showing that the DOS 'peak-dip-hump' is caused by the coupling between quasiparticles and excited pair states, or 'super-quasiparticles'. The renormalized SC gap function becomes energy-dependent and non retarded, reproducing accurately the experimental spectra of both pnictides and cuprates, despite the large difference in gap value.

  20. Progress of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets by the diffusion of non-rare earth elements and their alloy compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Meng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that the coercivity (HC and corrosivity of sintered NdFeB magnets are closely related to the components and microstructure of their intergranular phase.The traditional smelting NdFeB magnets with adding heavy rare earth elements can modify intergranular phase to improve the HC and corrosion resistance of magnets.However,it makes the additives be homogenously distributed on the main phase,and causes magnetic decrease and cost increase.With the addition of non-rare earth materials into grain boundary,the microstructure of intergranular phase as well as its electrochemical potential and wettability can be optimized.As a result,the amount of heavy rare earth elements and cost of magnets could be reduced whilst the HC and corrosion resistance of magnets can be improved.This paper summarized the research on regulating the components and the microstructure of intergranular phase in sintered NdFeB magnets by non-rare earth metals and compounds,and its influence on coercivity and corrosion resistance.

  1. Crystalline electric field at the rare-earth sites in RxY1-xCo5+y compounds (R= Dy and Tb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiufeng; Jin Hanmin; Chen Hong; Guo Guanghua; Zhao Tiesong

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic properties of R x Y 1-x Co 5+y compounds are reproduced well by a calculation based on the single-ion model. The values of the exchange field H cx and crystalline-electric-field parameters A m n at the rare-earth ion sites in R x Y 1-x Co 5+y (R = Dy and Tb) are evaluated by fitting the calculations to the experiments. The experiments include the temperature dependence of the spontaneous magnetization, the temperature dependence of the normalized magnetic moments of the rare-earth ions, the temperature dependence of the cone angle, the magnetization curves along the crystal axes at 4.2 K, and the hyperfine field at the Dy ion site

  2. Study of the hyperfine magnetic field acting on Ce probes substituting for the rare earth and the magnetic ordering in intermetallic compounds RAg (R=rare earth) by first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Luciano Fabricio Dias

    2006-01-01

    In this work the magnetic hyperfine field acting on Ce atoms substituting the rare-earths in R Ag compounds (R = Gd e Nd) was studied by means of first-principles electronic structure calculations. The employed method was the Augmented Plane Waves plus local orbitals (APW+lo), embodied in the WIEN2k program, within the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and with the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) for the exchange and correlation potential. The super-cell approach was utilized in order to simulate for the Ce atoms acting as impurities in the R Ag matrix. In order to improve for correlation effects within the 4f shells, a Hubbard term was added to the DFT Hamiltonian, within a procedure called GGA+U. It was found that the magnetic hyperfine field (MHF) generated by the Ce 4f electron is the main component of the total MHF and that the Ce 4f ground state level is probably a combination of the m l = -2 and m l = -1 sub-levels. In addition, the ground-state magnetic structure was determined for Ho Ag and Nd Ag by observing the behavior of the total energy as a function of the lattice volume for several possible magnetic ordering in these compounds, namely, ferromagnetic, and the (0,0,π), (π,π,0) and ((π,π,π) types of anti-ferromagnetic ordering of rare-earth atoms. It was found that the ground-state magnetic structure is anti-ferromagnetic of type (π,π,0) for both, the Ho Ag and Nd Ag compounds. The energy difference of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering is very small in the case of the Nd Ag compound. (author)

  3. Strong luminescence of rare earth compounds in ionic liquids: Luminescent properties of lanthanide(III) iodides in the ionic liquid 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudring, Anja-Verena; Babai, Arash; Arenz, Sven; Giernoth, Ralf; Binnemans, K.; Driesen, Kris; Nockemann, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purposely designed ionic liquids can be excellent solvents for spectroscopic studies of rare earth compounds. Absorption, excitation and emission spectra of LnI 3 (Ln = Nd, Dy and Tb) in the ionic liquid 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide are presented. Electronic transitions were assigned from the energy level diagrams for Ln(III). Emission lifetimes for DyI 3 in [C 12 mim][Tf 2 N] are discussed. Traces of water dramatically reduce the otherwise long lifetimes and comparatively high quantum yields

  4. Multifunctional phenomena in rare-earth intermetallic compounds with a laves phase structure: giant magnetostriction and magnetocaloric effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, I.; Cwik, J.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Politova, G.; Burkhanov, G.; Chzhan, V.; Ilyushin, A.; Miller, M.; Zaleski, A.; Nenkov, K.; Schultz, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 11 (2014), s. 2504604 ISSN 0018-9464 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : giant magnetostriction * Laves phase structure * magnetic anisotropy * magnetocaloric effect * rare-earth intermetallic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2014

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy of 151Eu and 153Eu. Applications to structural chemistry and electronic properties of rare-earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Marc.

    1975-01-01

    The decrease of the 151 Eu isomer shift on hydrogenation of a dilute EuPd alloy (2.5at% Eu) is discussed in term of the volume effect on the charge density at the nucleus. It is shown from 153 Eu Moessbauer spectroscopy in rare earth titanates that a vibrational anisotropy lead to the observation of a Goldanskii-Karyagin effect [fr

  6. Luminescence and structural properties of RbGdS.sub.2./sub. compounds doped by rare earth elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jarý, Vítězslav; Havlák, Lubomír; Bárta, J.; Mihóková, Eva; Nikl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 6 (2013), s. 1226-1229 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01011017 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : luminescence * X-ray diffraction * crystal structure * optical materials * ternary sulfides * rare earth s doping Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.075, year: 2013

  7. Tuning the Origin of Magnetic Relaxation by Substituting the 3d or Rare-Earth Ions into Three Isostructural Cyano-Bridged 3d-4f Heterodinuclear Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Zhen; Xie, Shuang; Li, Hui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Hua; Liu, Li; Dong, Xun-Qing; He, Wei-Xun; Ren, Jin-Chao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Powell, Annie K

    2015-11-02

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged 3d-4f compounds, [YFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (1), [DyFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (2), and [DyCo(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (3), were successfully assembled by site-targeted substitution of the 3d or rare-earth ions. All compounds have been structurally characterized to display slightly distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal local coordination geometry around the rare-earth ions. Magnetic analyses revealed negligible magnetic coupling in compound 1, antiferromagnetic intradimer interaction in 2, and weak ferromagnetic coupling through dipolar-dipolar interaction in 3. Under an applied direct-current (dc) field, 1 (Hdc = 2.5 kOe, τ0 = 1.3 × 10(-7) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) and 3 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 7.1 × 10(-11) s, and Ueff/kB = 63 K) respectively indicated magnetic relaxation behavior based on a single [Fe(III)]LS ion and a Dy(III) ion; nevertheless, 2 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 9.7 × 10(-8) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) appeared to be a single-molecule magnet based on a cyano-bridged DyFe dimer. Compound 1, which can be regarded as a single-ion magnet of the [Fe(III)]LS ion linked to a diamagnetic Y(III) ion in a cyano-bridged heterodimer, represents one of the rarely investigated examples based on a single Fe(III) ion explored in magnetic relaxation behavior. It demonstrated that the introduction of intradimer magnetic interaction of 2 through a cyano bridge between Dy(III) and [Fe(III)]LS ions negatively affects the energy barrier and χ″(T) peak temperature compared to 3.

  8. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a_0), bulk modulus (B_0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Neetu, E-mail: neetumanish@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AISECT University Bhopal, 464993 (India); Srivastava, Vipul [Department of Engineering Physics, NRI Institute of Research & Technology, Raisen Road, Bhopal, 462021 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  10. Magnetic and noncentrosymmetric Weyl fermion semimetals in the R AlGe family of compounds (R =rare earth )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoqing; Singh, Bahadur; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Huang, Shin-Ming; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Belopolski, Ilya; Alidoust, Nasser; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Zheng, Hao; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Xiao; Bian, Yi; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Bansil, Arun; Hsu, Han; Jia, Shuang; Neupert, Titus; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2018-01-01

    Weyl semimetals are novel topological conductors that host Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. In this Rapid Communication, we propose a new type of Weyl semimetal state that breaks both time-reversal symmetry and inversion symmetry in the R AlGe (R =rare -earth ) family. Compared to previous predictions of magnetic Weyl semimetal candidates, the prediction of Weyl nodes in R AlGe is more robust and less dependent on the details of the magnetism because the Weyl nodes are generated already by the inversion breaking and the ferromagnetism acts as a simple Zeeman coupling that shifts the Weyl nodes in k space. Moreover, R AlGe offers remarkable tunability, which covers all varieties of Weyl semimetals including type I, type II, inversion breaking, and time-reversal breaking, depending on a suitable choice of the rare-earth elements. Furthermore, the unique noncentrosymmetric and ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal state in R AlGe enables the generation of spin currents.

  11. Effect of rapid quenching on the magnetism and magnetocaloric effect of equiatomic rare earth intermetallic compounds RNi (R = Gd, Tb and Ho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajivgandhi, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Arout Chelvane, J. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Quezado, S.; Malik, S.K. [Departamento de F’ısica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59072-970 (Brazil); Nirmala, R., E-mail: nirmala@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Melt-spinning yields microcrystalline RNi (R = Gd, Tb and Ho) samples with texture. • The texture-induced anisotropy affects magnetic and magnetocaloric properties. • Melt-spinning helps one engineer magnetocaloric effect in rare-earth compounds. - Abstract: Magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in RNi (where R = Gd, Tb and Ho) compounds has been studied in their arc-melted and melt-spun forms. The compound GdNi has the orthorhombic CrB-type structure (Space group Cmcm, No. 63) and the compound HoNi has the orthorhombic FeB-type structure (Space group Pnma, No. 62) at room temperature regardless of their synthesis condition. However, arc-melted TbNi orders in a monoclinic structure (Space group P2{sub 1}/m, No. 11) and when it is rapidly quenched to a melt-spun form, it crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure (Space group Pnma, No. 62). The arc-melted GdNi, TbNi and HoNi compounds order ferromagnetically at ∼69 K, ∼67 K and ∼36 K (T{sub C}) respectively. While the melt-spun GdNi shows about 6 K increase in T{sub C}, the ordering temperature of TbNi remains nearly the same in both arc-melted and melt-spun forms. In contrast, a reduction in T{sub C} by about 8 K is observed in melt-spun HoNi, when compared to its arc-melted counterpart. Isothermal magnetic entropy change, ∆S{sub m}, calculated from the field dependent magnetization data indicates an enhanced relative cooling power (RCP) for melt-spun GdNi for field changes of 20 kOe and 50 kOe. A lowered RCP value is observed in melt-spun TbNi and HoNi. These changes could have resulted from the competing shape anisotropy and the granular microstructure induced by the melt-spinning process. Tailoring the MCE of rare earth intermetallic compounds by suitably controlled synthesis techniques is certainly one of the directions to go forward in the search of giant magnetocaloric materials.

  12. Pressure-induced valence and structure change in some anti-Th3P4 structure rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, A.; Hochheimer, H.D.; Jayaraman, A.; Bucher, E.

    1981-01-01

    The anti-Th 3 P 4 structure compounds Yb 4 Bi 3 and Yb 4 Sb 3 have been investigated to 350 kbar by high pressure X-ray diffraction, using the diamond anvil cell. From the P-V data it is found that Yb 4 Bi 3 and Yb 4 Sb 3 are much more compressible, compared to Sm 4 Bi 3 before the valence transition. This suggests that a continuous change in the valence state of Yb takes place with pressure in the two compounds and that they may be in the mixed valent state already at ambient pressure. The ''collapsed'' anti-Th 3 P 4 structure becomes unstable in Yb 4 Bi 3 and Yb 4 Sb 3 and new lines appear at high pressure, that fit the NaCl structure. The latter structure change seems to occur also in the electronically collapsed Sm 4 Bi 3 . The results are presented and discussed. (Auth.)

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of high-magnetic-field XMCD spectra at the L2,3 absorption edges of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Akio; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H; Nojiri, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism(XMCD) spectra at the L 2,3 edges of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds in high magnetic fields are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical study is based on a new framework proposed recently by Kotani. The Zeeman splitting of 4f states, the mixed-valence character of 4f states, and the 4f-5d exchange interaction are incorporated into a single impurity Anderson model. New XMCD experiments in high magnetic fields up to 40 T are carried out for the mixed-valence compounds EuNi 2 (Si 0.18 Ge 0.82 ) 2 and YbInCu 4 by using a miniature pulsed magnet, which was developed recently by Matsuda et al. The XMCD data are taken at 5 K by transmission measurements for incident X-rays with ± helicities at BL39XU in SPring-8. After giving a survey on recent developments in the theory of XMCD spectra for mixed-valence Ce and Yb compounds, we calculate the XMCD spectra of YbInCu 4 at the field-induced valence transition around 32 T by applying the recent theoretical framework and by newly introducing at 32 T a discontinuous change in the Yb 4f level and that in the hybridization strength between the Yb 4f and conduction electrons. The calculated results are compared with the experimental ones.

  14. A tale of two metals: contrasting criticalities in the pnictides and hole-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, N. E.; Buhot, J.; Licciardello, S.

    2018-05-01

    The iron-based high temperature superconductors share a number of similarities with their copper-based counterparts, such as reduced dimensionality, proximity to states of competing order, and a critical role for 3d electron orbitals. Their respective temperature-doping phase diagrams also contain certain commonalities that have led to claims that the metallic and superconducting (SC) properties of both families are governed by their proximity to a quantum critical point (QCP) located inside the SC dome. In this review, we critically examine these claims and highlight significant differences in the bulk physical properties of both systems. While there is now a large body of evidence supporting the presence of a (magnetic) QCP in the iron pnictides, the situation in the cuprates is much less apparent, at least for the end point of the pseudogap phase. We argue that the opening of the normal state pseudogap in cuprates, so often tied to a putative QCP, arises from a momentum-dependent breakdown of quasiparticle coherence that sets in at much higher doping levels but which is driven by the proximity to the Mott insulating state at half filling. Finally, we present a new scenario for the cuprates in which this loss of quasiparticle integrity and its evolution with momentum, temperature and doping plays a key role in shaping the resultant phase diagram. This key issues review is dedicated to the memory of Dr John Loram whose pioneering measurements, analysis and ideas inspired much of its content.

  15. Novel Electronic Structures of Ru-pnictides RuPn (Pn = P, As, Sb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, H.; Toriyama, T.; Konishi, T.; Ohta, Y.

    Density-functional-theory-based electronic structure calculations are made to consider the novel electronic states of Ru-pnictides RuP and RuAs where the intriguing phase transitions and superconductivity under doping of Rh have been reported. We find that there appear nearly degenerate flat bands just at the Fermi level in the high-temperature metallic phase of RuP and RuAs; the flat-band states come mainly from the 4dxy orbitals of Ru ions and the Rh doping shifts the Fermi level just above the flat bands. The splitting of the flat bands caused by their electronic instability may then be responsible for the observed phase transition to the nonmagnetic insulating phase at low temperatures. We also find that the band structure calculated for RuSb resembles that of the doped RuP and RuAs, which is consistent with experiment where superconductivity occurs in RuSb without Rh doping.

  16. Hundness versus Mottness in a three-band Hund model with relevance for iron-pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Katharina M.; Delft, Jan von; Weichselbaum, Andreas [Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Yin, Zhiping; Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers University, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The recently discovered iron pnictide superconductors (as well as chalcogenides, ruthenates, and other 4d transition metal oxides) show puzzling anomalous properties, like a coherence-incoherence crossover, also in the normal state. While there is consensus about strong correlation effects playing a key role in these materials, their precise origin (Coulomb repulsion or Hund's rule coupling between electrons of different orbitals) has been under debate as one of the major open questions in the field many years. In a recent detailed study of the Hund metal problem the coherence-incoherence crossover was shown to be connected to spin-orbital separation and to be clearly driven by Hund's rule coupling. In order to better understand the differences between Mott insulators and Hund metals we explore the phase diagram for a three-band model with Coulomb repulsion and Hund's rule coupling on a Bethe lattice at 1/3 filling using the numerical renormalization group to obtain a numerically exact dynamical mean-field theory solution.

  17. Role of multiorbital effects in the magnetic phase diagram of iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Morten H.; Scherer, Daniel D.; Kotetes, Panagiotis; Andersen, Brian M.

    2017-07-01

    We elucidate the pivotal role of the band structure's orbital content in deciding the type of commensurate magnetic order stabilized within the itinerant scenario of iron pnictides. Recent experimental findings in the tetragonal magnetic phase attest to the existence of the so-called charge and spin ordered density wave over the spin-vortex crystal phase, the latter of which tends to be favored in simplified band models of itinerant magnetism. Here we show that employing a multiorbital itinerant Landau approach based on realistic band structures can account for the experimentally observed magnetic phase, and thus shed light on the importance of the orbital content in deciding the magnetic order. In addition, we remark that the presence of a hole pocket centered at the Brillouin zone's M point favors a magnetic stripe rather than a tetragonal magnetic phase. For inferring the symmetry properties of the different magnetic phases, we formulate our theory in terms of magnetic order parameters transforming according to irreducible representations of the ensuing D4 h point group. The latter method not only provides transparent understanding of the symmetry-breaking schemes but also reveals that the leading instabilities always belong to the {A1 g,B1 g} subset of irreducible representations, independently of their C2 or C4 nature.

  18. Ultrafast observation of critical nematic fluctuations and giant magnetoelastic coupling in iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Aaron; Li, Tianqi; Ran, Sheng; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Schmalian, Joerg; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Perakis, Ilias E.; Wang, Jigang

    2014-02-01

    Many of the iron pnictides have strongly anisotropic normal-state characteristics, important for the exotic magnetic and superconducting behaviour these materials exhibit. Yet, the origin of the observed anisotropy is unclear. Electronically driven nematicity has been suggested, but distinguishing this as an independent degree of freedom from magnetic and structural orders is difficult, as these couple together to break the same tetragonal symmetry. Here we use time-resolved polarimetry to reveal critical nematic fluctuations in unstrained Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. The femtosecond anisotropic response, which arises from the two-fold in-plane anisotropy of the complex refractive index, displays a characteristic two-step recovery absent in the isotropic response. The fast recovery appears only in the magnetically ordered state, whereas the slow one persists in the paramagnetic phase with a critical divergence approaching the structural transition temperature. The dynamics also reveal a gigantic magnetoelastic coupling that far exceeds electron-spin and electron-phonon couplings, opposite to conventional magnetic metals.

  19. Observation of the Josephson effect on Ba-122 iron pnictide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Noor; Schmidt, Stefan; Doering, Sebastian; Tympel, Volker; Schmidl, Frank; Seidel, Paul [Friedrich-Schiller- Universitaet Jena, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany); Wolf, Thomas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hermann-von- Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of the first Fe-based superconductors in 2006, extensive effort has been directed characterizing and modeling the novel properties of these exotic materials. Therefore Josephson junction offer ways to investigate the fundamental properties of iron pnictides. We use Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals, prepared by a self-flux method, with an optimal Co concentration of 0.065 (critical temperature T{sub c}=23.5 K). We realize Josephson junctions along the c-axis. To prepare them a newly developed surface polishing as well as standard thin film technologies are used. The artificial barrier consists of thin sputtered layers of various materials, normal conductors as well as insulators. A thermally evaporated double layer film of Pb and In was used as the counter electrode. For the characterization of the Josephson effect we will present temperature dependent I-V characteristics as well as I{sub c} R{sub n} - T dependencies and measurements under microwave radiation, including. Additionally results from tunneling and Andreev spectroscopy i.e temperature dependent dI/dV - V spectra are shown.

  20. Multilayer photosensitive structures based on porous silicon and rare-earth-element compounds: Study of spectral characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsanov, N. Yu.; Latukhina, N. V., E-mail: natalat@yandex.ru; Lizunkova, D. A.; Rogozhina, G. A. [Samara National Research University (Russian Federation); Stepikhova, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The spectral characteristics of the specular reflectance, photosensitivity, and photoluminescence (PL) of multilayer structures based on porous silicon with rare-earth-element (REE) ions are investigated. It is shown that the photosensitivity of these structures in the wavelength range of 0.4–1.0 μm is higher than in structures free of REEs. The structures with Er{sup 3+} ions exhibit a luminescence response at room temperature in the spectral range from 1.1 to 1.7 μm. The PL spectrum of the erbium impurity is characterized by a fine line structure, which is determined by the splitting of the {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} multiplet of the Er{sup 3+} ion. It is shown that the structures with a porous layer on the working surface have a much lower reflectance in the entire spectral range under study (0.2–1.0 μm).

  1. X-Ray diffraction on rare earth-3d Laves phase compound ErCo2 in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagasaki, Katsuma; Notsu, Shiko; Takaesu, Yoshinao; Nakama, Takao; Sakai, Eijiro; Koyama, Keiichi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Burkov, Alexander T.

    2006-01-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction method is used to investigate the effect of magnetic ordering and external magnetic field on crystal structure of Laves phase intermetallic compound ErCo 2 . The diffraction patterns were recorded at temperatures from 300K down to 8.5K in magnetic field up to 5T. Distortion of the room-temperature cubic structure was found in magnetically ordered state below 32K. The symmetry at low temperature is rhombohedral in agreement with literature results, or lower symmetry than it. However the symmetry of the unit cell increases to cubic in external magnetic field of 5T

  2. Fe-Cluster Compounds of Chalcogenides: Candidates for Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnet and Magnetic Nodal-Line Topological Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kim, Minsung; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2017-12-04

    Fe-cluster-based crystal structures are predicted for chalcogenides Fe 3 X 4 (X = S, Se, Te) using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Topologically different from the well-studied layered structures of iron chalcogenides, the newly predicted structures consist of Fe clusters that are either separated by the chalcogen atoms or connected via sharing of the vertex Fe atoms. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that these structures have competitive or even lower formation energies than the experimentally synthesized Fe 3 X 4 compounds and exhibit interesting magnetic and electronic properties. In particular, we show that Fe 3 Te 4 can be a good candidate as a rare-earth-free permanent magnet and Fe 3 S 4 can be a magnetic nodal-line topological material.

  3. Calculation of the magnetic properties of pseudo-ternary R2M14B intermetallic compounds (R = rare earth, M = Fe, Co

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gómez Eslava

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The extrinsic properties of NdFeB-based magnets can be tuned through partial substitution of Nd by another rare-earth element and Fe by Co, as such substitution leads to a modification in the intrinsic properties of the main phase. Optimisation of a magnet's composition through trial and error is time consuming and not straightforward, since the interplay existing between magnetocrystalline anisotropy and coercivity is not completely understood. In this paper we present a model to calculate the intrinsic magnetic properties of pseudo-ternary Nd2Fe14B-based compounds. As concrete examples, which are relevant for the optimisation of NdFeB-based high-performance magnets used in (hybrid electric vehicles and wind turbines, we consider partial substitution of Nd by Dy or Tb, and Fe by Co.

  4. Structure and magnetism of new rare-earth-free intermetallic compounds: Fe3+xCo3−xTi2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan Balasubramanian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of a set of new rare-earth-free magnetic compounds, which form the Fe3Co3Ti2-type hexagonal structure with P-6m2 symmetry. Neutron powder diffraction shows a significant Fe/Co anti-site mixing in the Fe3Co3Ti2 structure, which has a strong effect on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy as revealed by first-principle calculations. Increasing substitution of Fe atoms for Co in the Fe3Co3Ti2 lattice leads to the formation of Fe4Co2Ti2, Fe5CoTi, and Fe6Ti2 with significantly improved permanent-magnet properties. A high magnetic anisotropy (13.0 Mergs/cm3 and saturation magnetic polarization (11.4 kG are achieved at 10 K by altering the atomic arrangements and decreasing Fe/Co occupancy disorder.

  5. Electronically- and crystal-structure-driven magnetic structures and physical properties of RScSb (R = rare earth) compounds. A neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, C [Institut Lauer-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Dhar, S K [TIFR, Mumbai (India); Kulkarni, R [TIFR, Mumbai (India); Provino, A [Inst. SPIN-CNR, Genova (Italy); Univ. of Genova (Italy); Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Paudyal, Durga [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Manfrinetti, Pietro [Inst. SPIN-CNR, Genova (Italy); Univ. of Genova (Italy); Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Gschneidner, Karl A [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-08-14

    The synthesis of the new equiatomic RScSb ( R = La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) compounds has been recently reported. These rare earth compounds crystallize in two different crystal structures, adopting the CeScSi-type ( I 4/ mmm) for the lighter R (La-Nd, Sm) and the CeFeSi-type (P4 /nmm) structure for the heavier R ( R = Gd-Tm, Lu, Y). Here we report the results of neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity measurements on some of these compounds ( R = Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb). Band structure calculations have also been performed on CeScSb and GdScGe (CeScSi-type), and on GdScSb and TbScSb (CeFeSi-type) to compare and understand the exchange interactions in CeScSi and CeFeSi structure types. The neutron diffraction investigation shows that all five compounds order magnetically, with the highest transition temperature of 66 K in TbScSb and the lowest of about 9 K in CeScSb. The magnetic ground state is simple ferromagnetic (τ = [0 0 0]) in CeScSb, as well in NdScSb for 32 >T > 22 K. Below 22 K a second magnetic transition, with propagation vector τ = [¼ ¼ 0], appears in NdScSb. PrScSb has a magnetic structure within, determined by mostly ferromagnetic interactions and antiferromagnetic alignment of the Pr-sites connected through the I-centering ( τ = [1 0 0]). A cycloidal spiral structure with a temperature dependent propagation vector τ = [δ δ ½] is found in TbScSb. The results of magnetization and heat capacity lend support to the main conclusions derived from neutron diffraction. As inferred from a sharp peak in magnetization, GdScSb orders antiferromagnetically at 56 K. First principles calculations show lateral shift of spin split bands towards lower energy from the Fermi level as the CeScSi-type structure changes to the CeFeSi-type structure. This rigid shift may force the system to transform from exchange split ferromagnetic state to the antiferromagnetic state in RScSb compounds (as seen for example in GdScSb and TbScSb) and is proposed to

  6. Structures and heats of formation of simple alkaline earth metal compounds: fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides for Be, Mg, and Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Feller, David; Gole, James L; Dixon, David A

    2010-09-02

    Geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are predicted for the simple alkaline earth (Be, Mg and Ca) fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] level including core-valence correlation with the aug-cc-pwCVnZ basis sets up to n = 5 in some cases. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic effects, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were necessary to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation. The calculated geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are compared with the available experimental data. For a number of these alkaline earth compounds, the experimental geometries and energies are not reliable. MgF(2) and BeF(2) are predicted to be linear and CaF(2) is predicted to be bent. BeOH is predicted to be bent, whereas MgOH and CaOH are linear. The OBeO angle in Be(OH)(2) is not linear, and the molecule has C(2) symmetry. The heat of formation at 298 K for MgO is calculated to be 32.3 kcal/mol, and the bond dissociation energy at 0 K is predicted to be 61.5 kcal/mol.

  7. Metallicity of Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 6}P{sub 5} with single and double copper-pnictide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li, E-mail: lil2@ornl.gov [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Parker, David [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chi, Miaofang [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Sefat, Athena S., E-mail: sefata@ornl.gov [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-06-25

    We report thermodynamic and transport properties, and also theoretical calculations, for Cu-based compound Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 6}P{sub 5} and compare with CaCu{sub 2-δ}P{sub 2}. Both materials have layers of edge-sharing copper pnictide tetrahedral CuP{sub 4}, similar to Fe–As and Fe–Se layers (with FeAs{sub 4}, FeSe{sub 4}) in the iron-based superconductors. Despite the presence of this similar transition-metal pnictide layer, we find that both Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 6}P{sub 5} and CaCu{sub 2-δ}P{sub 2} have temperature-independent magnetic susceptibility and show metallic behavior with no evidence of either magnetic ordering or superconductivity down to 1.8 K CaCu{sub 2-δ}P{sub 2} is slightly off-stoichiometric, with δ = 0.14. Theoretical calculations suggest that unlike Fe 3d-based magnetic materials with a large density of states (DOS) at the Fermi surface, Cu have comparatively low DOS, with the majority of the 3d spectral weight located well below Fermi level. The room-temperature resistivity value of Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 6}P{sub 5} is only 9 μΩ-cm, due to a substantial plasma frequency and an inferred electron-phonon coupling λ of 0.073 (significantly smaller than that of metallic Cu). Also, microscopy result shows that Cu–Cu distance along the c-axis within the double layers can be very short (2.5 Å), even shorter than metallic elemental copper bond (2.56 Å). The value of dρ/dT for CaCu{sub 2-δ}P{sub 2} at 300 K is approximately three times larger than in Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 6}P{sub 5}, which suggests the likelihood of stronger electron-phonon coupling. This study shows that the details of Cu–P layers and bonding are important for their transport characteristics. In addition, it emphasizes the remarkable character of the DOS of ‘122’ iron-based materials, despite much structural similarities. - Highlights: • A comprehensive study on Cu-based compound Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 6}P{sub 5} and compare with CaCu{sub 2-δ}P{sub 2}. • Both materials have layers of

  8. Large D-2 theory of superconducting fluctuations in a magnetic field and its application to iron pnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James M; Tesanović, Zlatko

    2010-07-16

    A Ginzburg-Landau approach to fluctuations of a layered superconductor in a magnetic field is used to show that the interlayer coupling can be incorporated within an interacting self-consistent theory of a single layer, in the limit of a large number of neighboring layers. The theory exhibits two phase transitions-a vortex liquid-to-solid transition is followed by a Bose-Einstein condensation into the Abrikosov lattice-illustrating the essential role of interlayer coupling. By using this theory, explicit expressions for magnetization, specific heat, and fluctuation conductivity are derived. We compare our results with recent experimental data on the iron-pnictide superconductors.

  9. Improvement of the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of high-density polyethylene by free radical trapping of rare earth compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Shiya; Zhao, Li; Han, Ligang [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: guozhenghong@nit.zju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); Fang, Zhengping [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Polyethylene filled with ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared. • A low Yb loading improved thermal stability of PE obviously by radical trapping. • Yb(OTf){sub 3} is expected to be an efficient thermal stabilizer for the polymer. - Abstract: A kind of rare earth compound, ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Yb(OTf){sub 3}), was introduced into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by melt compounding to investigate the effect of Yb(OTf){sub 3} on the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE. The results of thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the addition of Yb(OTf){sub 3} made the thermal degradation temperatures dramatically increased, the oxidative induction time (OIT) extended, and the enthalpy (ΔH{sub d}) reduced. Very low Yb(OTf){sub 3} loading (0.5 wt%) in HDPE could increase the onset degradation temperature in air from 334 to 407 °C, delay the OIT from 11.0 to 24.3 min, and decrease the ΔH{sub d} from 61.0 to 13.0 J/g remarkably. Electron spin resonance spectra (ESR), thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), rheological investigation and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) indicated that the free radicals-trapping ability of Yb(OTf){sub 3} was responsible for the improved thermal and thermo-oxidative stability.

  10. Rare earth germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth germanates attract close attention both as an independent class of compounds and analogues of a widely spread class of natural and synthetic minerals. The methods of rare earth germanate synthesis (solid-phase, hydrothermal) are considered. Systems on the basis of germanium and rare earth oxides, phase diagrams, phase transformations are studied. Using different chemical analysese the processes of rare earth germanate formation are investigated. IR spectra of alkali and rare earth metal germanates are presented, their comparative analysis being carried out. Crystal structures of the compounds, lattice parameters are studied. Fields of possible application of rare earth germanates are shown

  11. A compounded rare-earth iron garnet single crystal exhibiting stable Faraday rotation against wavelength and temperature variation in the 1.55 μm band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.C.; Huang, M.; Li Miao

    2006-01-01

    The Bi, Tb and Yb partially substituted iron garnet bulk single crystals of Tb 3- x - y Yb y Bi x Fe 5 O 12 were grown by using Bi 2 O 3 /B 2 O 3 as flux and accelerated crucible rotation technique for single-crystal growth. Faraday rotation (FR) spectra showed that the specific FR of the (Tb 0.91 Yb 1.38 Bi 0.71 )Fe 5 O 12 crystal under magnetic field at saturation was measured to be about -1617 o /cm at λ=1.55 μm, Faraday rotation wavelength coefficient (FWC, 0.009%/nm) in the wavelength range of 1.50-1.62 μm and Faraday rotation temperature coefficient (FTC, 3.92x10 -5 /K) at λ=1.55 μm were even smaller than that of YIG. It is proven that through combining two types of Bi-substituted rare-earth iron garnets with opposite FWC and FTC signs, the compound rare-earth iron garnets with low FWC and FTC may be obtained due to the compensation effect. The saturation magnetization of (Tb 0.91 Yb 1.38 Bi 0.71 ) Fe 5 O 12 crystal is 0.48x10 6 A/M and is also much smaller than that of YIG. We have found empirically that there is a simple relationship between the FR θ f (x) and Bi content x for Tb 3- x - y Yb y Bi x Fe 5 O 12 , which is given by θ f (x)=(-2759x+400) o /cm

  12. Ball-milled nano-colloids of rare-earth compounds as liquid gain media for capillary optical amplifiers and lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darayas; Blockmon, Avery; Ochieng, Vanesa; Lewis, Ashley; Wright, Donald M.; Lewis, Danielle; Valentine, Rueben; Valentine, Maucus; Wesley, Dennis; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Darwish, Abdalla M.; Sarkisov, Avedik S.

    2017-02-01

    Nano-colloids and nano-crystals doped with ions of rare-earth elements have recently attracted a lot of attention in the scientific community due to their potential applications as biomarkers, fluorescent inks, gain media for lasers and optical amplifiers. Many rare-earth doped materials of different compositions, shapes and size distribution have been prepared by different synthetic methods, such as chemical vapor deposition, sol-gel process, micro-emulsion techniques, gas phase condensation methods, hydrothermal methods and laser ablation. In this paper micro-crystalline powder of the rare-earthdoped compound NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ was synthesized using a simple wet process followed by baking in open air. Under 980 nm diode laser excitation strong fluorescence in the 100 nm band around 1531-nm peak was observed from the synthesized micro-powder. The micro-powder was pulverized using a ball mill and prepared in the form of nano-colloids in different liquids. The particle size of the obtained nano-colloids was measured using an atomic force microscope and a dynamic light scatterometer. The size of the nano-particles was close to 100-nm. The nano-colloids were utilized as a filling media in capillary optical amplifiers and lasers. The gain of a 7-cm-long capillary optical amplifier (150-micron inner diameter) was as high as 6 dB at 200 mW pump power. The synthesized nano-colloids and the active optical components using them can be potentially used in optical communication, signal processing, optical computing, and other applications.

  13. X-radiographic study of rare-earth compounds with special regardment of modulated structures. The response of the crystal structure to stoichiometry deviations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisegang, Tilmann

    2010-01-01

    Even shortly after World War II, as large amounts of ultrapure rare earths (RE) became available for scientific research, a large reservoir of peculiar phenomena was uncovered. These had not been investigated before or were completely unknown. Examples of these phenomena are, magnetic ordering, the KONDO effect, quantum critical points, heavy fermion behaviour, as well as superconductivity. A strong influence of small variations of the chemical composition on the physical properties had been observed. The main focus of the present thesis is the detailed elucidation of the crystal structure of fundamental representatives of this class of substances, as well as the influence of dedicated variations of the chemical composition on their structure and properties. In particular, the characterisation of modulated crystals is an important facet. A large spectrum of physical methods, especially X-ray diffraction, is employed in the investigations. Results on oriented intergrowth in the Y-Ni-B-C system, incommensurately ordered vacancies in the Ce-Si system, incorporation of stacking faults as well as commensurately ordered transition metal atoms (TM) in the RE-TM-Si system and site specific occupancy in the Y-Mn-Fe-O system are presented. Their elucidation is reported for the first time. It is shown which consequences the structural peculiarities will have on the physical properties. An objective of this thesis is to give an overview of the possible ''answers'' that can be obtained with regard to the influence of the crystal structure of rare earth transition metal compounds on deviations of the chemical composition. (orig.)

  14. Structures and Heats of Formation of Simple Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds II: Fluorides, Chlorides, Oxides, and Hydroxides for Ba, Sr, and Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2018-01-11

    Geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, heats of formation, bond dissociation energies, cohesive energies, and selected fluoride affinities (difluorides) are predicted for the late alkaline earth (Sr, Ba, and Ra) oxides, fluorides, chlorides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory CCSD(T) level. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic and pseudopotential corrections, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were included to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation following the Feller-Peterson-Dixon methodology. The calculated values are compared to the experimental data where available. In some cases, especially for Ra compounds, there are no experimental results, or the experimental energetics and geometries are not reliable or have very large error bars. All of the Sr, Ba, and Ra difluorides, dichlorides, and dihydroxides are bent structures with the OMO bond angles decreasing going down the group. The cohesive energies of bulk Be dihalides are predicted to be quite low, while those of Ra are relatively large. The fluoride affinities show that the difluorides are moderately strong Lewis acids and that such trifluorides may form under the appropriate experimental conditions.

  15. Hydrogen and syngas production by catalytic gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) using alkali and alkaline-earth metals compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abdol Ghaffar; Hisoriev, Hikmat; Zarnegar, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Hamed

    2018-01-02

    The steam gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) in presence of alkali and alkaline-earth metal compounds catalysts was studied to enhance the yield of syngas and reduce its tar content through cracking and reforming of condensable fractions. The commercial catalysts used include NaOH, KHCO 3 , Na 3 PO 4 and MgO. The gasification runs carried out with a research scale, biomass gasification unit, show that the NaOH has a strong potential for production of hydrogen, along with the added advantages of char converting and tar destruction, allowing enhancement of produced syngas caloric value. When the temperature increased from 700°C to 900°C, the tar content in the gas sharply decreased, while the hydrogen yield increased. Increasing steam/biomass ratio significantly increased hydrogen yield and tar destruction; however, the particle size in the range of 0.5-2.5 mm played a minor role in the process.

  16. The Phenomenology of Iron Pnictides Superconductors Explained in the Framework of -Wave Three-Band Eliashberg Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ummarino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The s-wave three-band Eliashberg theory can simultaneously reproduce the experimental critical temperatures and the gap values of the superconducting materials LaFeAsO0.9F0.1, Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 as exponent of the more important families of iron pnictides. In this model the dominant role is played by interband interactions and the order parameter undergoes a sign reversal between hole and electron bands (±-wave symmetry. The values of all the gaps (with the exact experimental critical temperature can be obtained by using high values of the electron-boson coupling constants and small typical boson energies (in agreement with experiments.

  17. Sandwich-type mixed tetrapyrrole rare-earth triple-decker compounds. Effect of the coordination geometry on the single-molecule-magnet nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinglan; Wang, Hailong; Sun, Wei; Cao, Wei; Tao, Jun; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-08-05

    Employment of the raise-by-one step method starting from M(TClPP)(acac) (acac = monoanion of acetylacetone) and [Pc(OPh)8]M'[Pc(OPh)8] led to the isolation and free modulation of the two rare-earth ions in the series of four mixed tetrapyrrole dysprosium sandwich complexes {(TClPP)M[Pc(OPh)8]M'[Pc(OPh)8]} [1-4; TClPP = dianion of meso-tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl)porphyrin; Pc(OPh)8 = dianion of 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(phenoxyl)phthalocyanine; M-M' = Dy-Dy, Y-Dy, Dy-Y, and Y-Y]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals different octacoordination geometries for the two metal ions in terms of the twist angle (defined as the rotation angle of one coordination square away from the eclipsed conformation with the other) between the two neighboring tetrapyrrole rings for the three dysprosium-containing isostructural triple-decker compounds, with the metal ion locating between an inner phthalocyanine ligand and an outer porphyrin ligand with a twist angle of 9.64-9.90° and the one between two phthalocyanine ligands of 25.12-25.30°. Systematic and comparative studies over the magnetic properties reveal magnetic-field-induced single-molecule magnet (SMM), SMM, and non-SMM nature for 1-3, respectively, indicating the dominant effect of the coordination geometry of the spin carrier, instead of the f-f interaction, on the magnetic properties. The present result will be helpful for the future design and synthesis of tetrapyrrole lanthanide SMMs with sandwich molecular structures.

  18. Electroluminescence color tuning between green and red from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices fabricated by spin-coating of rare-earth (terbium + europium) organic compounds on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Toshihiro; Hattori, Fumihiro; Iwata, Hideyuki; Ohzone, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Color tunable electroluminescence (EL) from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with the rare-earth elements Tb and Eu is reported. Organic compound liquid sources of (Tb + Ba) and Eu with various Eu/Tb ratios from 0.001 to 0.4 were spin-coated on an n+-Si substrate and annealed to form an oxide insulator layer. The EL spectra had only peaks corresponding to the intrashell Tb3+/Eu3+ transitions in the spectral range from green to red, and the intensity ratio of the peaks was appropriately tuned using the appropriate Eu/Tb ratios in liquid sources. Consequently, the EL emission colors linearly changed from yellowish green to yellowish orange and eventually to reddish orange on the CIE chromaticity diagram. The gate current +I G current also affected the EL colors for the medium-Eu/Tb-ratio device. The structure of the surface insulator films analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has four layers, namely, (Tb4O7 + Eu2O3), [Tb4O7 + Eu2O3 + (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x ], (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x , and SiO x -rich oxide. The EL mechanism proposed is that electrons injected from the Si substrate into the SiO x -rich oxide and Tb/Eu/Ba-silicate layers become hot electrons accelerated in a high electric field, and then these hot electrons excite Tb3+ and Eu3+ ions in the Tb4O7/Eu2O3 layers resulting in EL emission from Tb3+ and Eu3+ intrashell transitions.

  19. An investigation of the use of cerium and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for the protection of polymeric epoxy compounds in the low Earth orbit environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piness, Jessica Miriam

    Low Earth orbit presents many hazards for composites including atomic oxygen, UV radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroids, and high energy protons. Atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation are of concern for space-bound polymeric materials as they degrade the polymers used as matrices for carbon fiber composites, which are used in satellites and space vehicles due to their high strength to weight ratios. Epoxy-amine thermosets comprise a common class of matrix due to processability and good thermal attributes. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) have shown the ability to reduce erosion in polyimides, polyurethanes, and other polymers when exposed to atomic oxygen. The POSS particle is composed of a SiO1.5 cage from which up to eight organic pendant groups are attached at the silicon corners of the cage. POSS reduced atomic oxygen impact on polymers by a process known as glassification wherein the organic pendants are removed from the cage upon atomic oxygen exposure and then the cage rearranges to a passive silica network. In addition, POSS shows good UV absorbance in the UVb and UVc ranges and POSS can aid dispersion of titanium dioxide in a nanocomposite. In this work, Chapter I focuses on hazards in low Earth orbit, strategies for protecting organic material in orbit, and the capabilities of POSS. Chapter II details the experimental practices used in this work. Chapter III focuses on work to induce POSS phase separation and layering at the surface of an epoxy-amine thermoset. Generally, POSS is dispersed throughout a nanocomposite, and in the process of erosion by atomic oxygen, some polymer mass loss is lost before enough POSS is exposed to begin glassification. Locating POSS at a surface of composite could possibly reduce this mass loss and the objective of this research was to investigate the formation of POSS-rich surfaces. Three POSS derivatives with different pendant groups were chosen. The POSS derivatives had a range of miscibilities

  20. Ternary CaCu4P2-type pnictides AAg4Pn2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C.; Mar, Arthur

    2012-08-01

    Four ternary pnictides AAg4Pn2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 °C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg4Pn2 adopt the trigonal CaCu4P2-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3¯m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) Å, c=24.041(3) Å for SrAg4As2; a=4.5352(2) Å, c=23.7221(11) Å for EuAg4As2; a=4.7404(4) Å, c=25.029(2) Å for SrAg4Sb2; a=4.7239(3) Å, c=24.689(2) Å for EuAg4Sb2), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl2Si2-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn2Pn2 by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M2Pn2]2- slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg4As2 and SrAg4Sb2 revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals.

  1. Superconductivity in the ternary rare-earth (Y, La, and Lu) compounds RPd2Si2 and RRh2Si2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, T.T.M.; Lu, G.; Menovsky, A.A.; Nieuwenhuys, G.J.; Kes, P.H.; Mydosh, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the superconducting and metallurgical properties of the ternary compounds RPd2Si2 and RRh2Si2 with R = Y, La, and Lu. All RPd2Si2 compounds and LaRh2Si2 were found to be type-I superconductors below 1 K. A detailed metallurgical analysis shows that segregation of second phases

  2. White lines at the Lsub(I), Lsub(II), and Lsub(III) absorption edges of some rare earth compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, K B; Sharma, B K; Jain, D C [Rajasthan Univ., Jaipur (India). Dept. of Physics; Sinha, A I.P. [Banasthali Vidyapeeth (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1980-11-01

    The paper reports the appearance of white lines (WLS) at all the three L-absorption edges of the sulfur coordinated thiosalicylic acid compounds of Sm, Tb, and Dy. The profiles of the observed WLS are presented and discussed.

  3. Rare earth germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    From the viewpoint of structural chemistry and general regularities controlling formation reactions of compounds and phases in melts, solid and gaseous states, recent achievements in the chemistry of rare earth germanates are generalized. Methods of synthesizing germanates, systems on the base of germanium oxides and rare earths are considered. The data on crystallochemical characteristics are tabulated. Individual compounds of scandium germanate are also characterized. Processes of germanate formation using the data of IR-spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis are studied. The structure and morphotropic series of rare earth germanates and silicates are determined. Fields of their present and possible future application are considered

  4. Rare earth octacyanomolybdates(4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubritskaya, D.I.; Sergeeva, A.N.; Pisak, Yu.V.

    1980-01-01

    Optimal conditions for synthesis of rare-earth octacyanomolybdates(4) of the Ln 4 [Mo(CN) 8 ] 3 xnH 2 O composition (where Ln is a rare-earth element, other than Pr, Pm, Lu, Tb) have been worked out. The synthesis has been accomplished by neutralization with octacianomolybdic acid with rare-earth carbonates. The composition and structure of the compounds synthesized have been studied by infrared-spectroscopy. It has been established that rare-earth octacyanomolybdates(4) form three isostructural groups

  5. The temperature dependence of the Moessbauer parameters and the magnetic properties of the RFe2 (R = Y or rare earth) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.; Burzo, E.; Morariu, M.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature dependence of hyperfine fields and quadrupole splitting is presented for the following compounds: DyFe 2 , HoFe 2 , ErFe 2 , TmFe 2 , and YFe 2 . Moessbauer studies were made by an ERLON-type equipment. A 57 Co in Cu source was employed. Data were stored for a velocity range of +- 10 mm/sec using a DIDAC-4000 analyzer. The spectra were fitted by a IBM-370 type computer using a FORTRAN programme. The measurements were carried out in a temperature range from 77 K to the Curie temperature. Quadrupole splitting for all compounds varied continuously with temperature up to the Curie temperature where a sudden change was observed. The magnetic behaviour of the YFe 2 and DyFe 2 compounds was analyzed. Moessbauer results were discussed in connection with the magnetic data. (Z.S.)

  6. Ternary CaCu4P2-type pnictides AAg4Pn2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C.; Mar, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Four ternary pnictides AAg 4 Pn 2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 °C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg 4 Pn 2 adopt the trigonal CaCu 4 P 2 -type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) Å, c=24.041(3) Å for SrAg 4 As 2 ; a=4.5352(2) Å, c=23.7221(11) Å for EuAg 4 As 2 ; a=4.7404(4) Å, c=25.029(2) Å for SrAg 4 Sb 2 ; a=4.7239(3) Å, c=24.689(2) Å for EuAg 4 Sb 2 ), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl 2 Si 2 -type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn 2 Pn 2 by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M 2 Pn 2 ] 2− slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg 4 As 2 and SrAg 4 Sb 2 revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg 4 As 2 and related pnictides adopt a CaCu 4 P 2 -type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: ► AAg 4 Pn 2 are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu 4 P 2 -type structure. ► Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl 2 Si 2 -type slabs. ► Ag–Ag bonding develops through attractive d 10 –d 10 interactions.

  7. Ternary CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Four ternary pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 Degree-Sign C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} adopt the trigonal CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) A, c=24.041(3) A for SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.5352(2) A, c=23.7221(11) A for EuAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.7404(4) A, c=25.029(2) A for SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}; a=4.7239(3) A, c=24.689(2) A for EuAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn{sub 2}Pn{sub 2} by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}]{sup 2-} slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2} revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and related pnictides adopt a CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-Ag bonding develops through attractive d{sup 10}-d{sup 10} interactions.

  8. Growth of doped and pure monocrystalline fibers and gradient crystals of REMO_4 compounds (RE = rare earths and M = Nb and Ta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octaviano, E.S.; Levada, C.L.; Missiato, O.; Semenzato, M.J.; Silva, R.A.; Andreeta, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    A desirable alternative for a faster development, characterization and application of material of technological interest has been the growth of single crystal fibers by LHPG - Laser Heated Pedestal Growth. In this work it was reported the growth of pure, doped and gradient single crystal fibers of the chemical formulation REMO_4 (M = Nb e Ta, e RE= Rare Earth), characterized through primary techniques such as X-Ray and optical spectroscopy. (author)

  9. 3D Printing of Polymer-Bonded Rare-Earth Magnets With a Variable Magnetic Compound Fraction for a Predefined Stray Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Groenefeld, Martin; Schuschnigg, Stephan; Teliban, Iulian; Vogler, Christoph; Wautischer, Gregor; Windl, Roman; Suess, Dieter

    2017-08-25

    Additive manufacturing of polymer-bonded magnets is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to manufacture previously. Also, new possibilities to create a specific stray field around the magnet are triggered. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer-bonded magnets with a variable magnetic compound fraction distribution. This means the saturation magnetization can be adjusted during the printing process to obtain a required external field of the manufactured magnets. A low-cost, end-user 3D printer with a mixing extruder is used to mix permanent magnetic filaments with pure polyamide (PA12) filaments. The magnetic filaments are compounded, extruded, and characterized for the printing process. To deduce the quality of the manufactured magnets with a variable magnetic compound fraction, an inverse stray field framework is developed. The effectiveness of the printing process and the simulation method is shown. It can also be used to manufacture magnets that produce a predefined stray field in a given region. This opens new possibilities for magnetic sensor applications. This setup and simulation framework allows the design and manufacturing of polymer-bonded permanent magnets, which are impossible to create with conventional methods.

  10. Study of the hyperfine magnetic field acting on Ce probes substituting for the rare earth and the magnetic ordering in intermetallic compounds RAg (R=rare earth) by first principles calculations; Estudo do campo hiperfino magnetico na sonda de Ce colocada nos compostos intermetalicos do tipo RAg (R=terra rara) e do ordenamento magnetico desses compostos usando calculos de primeiros principios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Luciano Fabricio Dias

    2006-07-01

    In this work the magnetic hyperfine field acting on Ce atoms substituting the rare-earths in R Ag compounds (R = Gd e Nd) was studied by means of first-principles electronic structure calculations. The employed method was the Augmented Plane Waves plus local orbitals (APW+lo), embodied in the WIEN2k program, within the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and with the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) for the exchange and correlation potential. The super-cell approach was utilized in order to simulate for the Ce atoms acting as impurities in the R Ag matrix. In order to improve for correlation effects within the 4f shells, a Hubbard term was added to the DFT Hamiltonian, within a procedure called GGA+U. It was found that the magnetic hyperfine field (MHF) generated by the Ce 4f electron is the main component of the total MHF and that the Ce 4f ground state level is probably a combination of the m{sub l} = -2 and m{sub l} = -1 sub-levels. In addition, the ground-state magnetic structure was determined for Ho Ag and Nd Ag by observing the behavior of the total energy as a function of the lattice volume for several possible magnetic ordering in these compounds, namely, ferromagnetic, and the (0,0,{pi}), ({pi},{pi},0) and (({pi},{pi},{pi}) types of anti-ferromagnetic ordering of rare-earth atoms. It was found that the ground-state magnetic structure is anti-ferromagnetic of type ({pi},{pi},0) for both, the Ho Ag and Nd Ag compounds. The energy difference of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering is very small in the case of the Nd Ag compound. (author)

  11. New half-metallic materials with an alkaline earth element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Koichi; Geshi, Masaaki; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2004-01-01

    New candidates for half-metallic materials were theoretically designed recently by Geshi et al. The materials are calcium pnictides, i.e. CaP, CaAs and CaSb. When the zinc-blende structure was assumed, these compounds showed half-metallic electronic band-structure, in which a curious flat band was found. To explain this magnetism, we investigated characters of orbitals on this flat band of CaAs. The hybridization of p states of As with d states of Ca is shown to be essential for formation of a flat band made of localized orbitals. The appearance of complete spin polarization in the flat band suggests that the flat-band mechanism is relevant for the ferromagnetism. A connection from the first-principles result to a solvable Hubbard model with a flat band is discussed

  12. Life on Earth: From Chemicals in Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses experimental evidence for the existence of organic material in the solar system prior to the earth's formation. Indicates that the earth could have received much of its organic compounds from meteors falling on its primitive surface. (CC)

  13. High Eu 4f low-energy oscillator strength in the isostructural rare-earth Zintl compounds EuIn2X2 (X = P,As)

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra

    2012-04-11

    The isostructral Zintl compounds EuIn2X2 (X = P,As) are investigated within density functional theory. We employ the local spin density approximation with onsite interaction (LSDA + U) for varying U from 0 eV to 7 eV to model the Coulomb repulsion of the Eu 4f electrons. The LSDA + U optical conductivity disagrees with the experimental spectrum, while the simple LSDA is successful. Contrary to the expectation, it is found that EuIn2X2 (X = P,As) has a large oscillator strength for the f → d transitions in the low-energy range (below 1.5 eV) in which effects of the joint density of states play a key role. The materials show a sizeable magneto-optical Kerr effect.

  14. High Eu 4f low-energy oscillator strength in the isostructural rare-earth Zintl compounds EuIn2X2 (X = P,As)

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    The isostructral Zintl compounds EuIn2X2 (X = P,As) are investigated within density functional theory. We employ the local spin density approximation with onsite interaction (LSDA + U) for varying U from 0 eV to 7 eV to model the Coulomb repulsion of the Eu 4f electrons. The LSDA + U optical conductivity disagrees with the experimental spectrum, while the simple LSDA is successful. Contrary to the expectation, it is found that EuIn2X2 (X = P,As) has a large oscillator strength for the f → d transitions in the low-energy range (below 1.5 eV) in which effects of the joint density of states play a key role. The materials show a sizeable magneto-optical Kerr effect.

  15. Preparation of polymeric fibers immobilizing inorganic compounds, enzymes, and extractants designed for radionuclide decontamination, ultrapure water production, and rare-earth metal purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kyoichi

    2014-01-01

    To remove and recover targeted ions and molecules at a high rate, inorganic compounds, enzymes, and extractants were immobilized onto a commercially available 6-nylon fiber by radiation-induced graft polymerization and subsequent chemical modifications. Fibrous supports with a smaller diameter provide a larger external interface area with liquids. Modified fibers are fabricated into various shapes such as wound filter and braid according to application sites. First, insoluble cobalt ferrocyanide-impregnated fiber was prepared via precipitation by immersing ferrocyanide ion-bound anion-exchange fiber in cobalt chloride solution. Cobalt ferrocyanide impregnated onto the polymer chain grafted onto the fiber specifically captured cesium ions in seawater. Similarly, sodium titanate impregnated onto a cation-exchange fiber selectively captured strontium ions in seawater. Second, urease was bound by an anion-exchange graft chain, followed by enzymatic cross-linking among urease molecules with transglutaminase. The bed charged with the urease-immobilized fiber exhibited a quantitative hydrolysis of urea at a high space velocity of urea solution. Third, an acidic extractant (HDEHP, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate) was impregnated onto a dodecylamino-group-containing polymer chain grafted onto the 6-nylon fiber. Distribution coefficients of the HDEHP-impregnated fiber for neodymium and dysprosium agreed well with those in n-dodecane. (author)

  16. Rare earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coqblin, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the different properties of rare-earths and actinides, either as pure metals or as in alloys or compounds. Three different cases are considered: (i) First, in the case of 'normal' rare-earths which are characterized by a valence of 3, we discuss essentially the magnetic ordering, the coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism and the properties of amorphous rare-earth systems. (ii) Second, in the case of 'anomalous' rare-earths, we distinguish between either 'intermediate-valence' systems or 'Kondo' systems. Special emphasis is given to the problems of the 'Kondo lattice' (for compounds such as CeAl 2 ,CeAl 3 or CeB 6 ) or the 'Anderson lattice' (for compounds such as TmSe). The problem of neutron diffraction in these systems is also discussed. (iii) Third, in the case of actinides, we can separate between the d-f hybridized and almost magnetic metals at the beginning of the series and the rare-earth like the metals after americium. (orig.)

  17. Metal-insulator transition and superconductivity induced by Rh doping in the binary pnictides RuPn (Pn=P, As, Sb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Daigorou; Takayama, Tomohiro; Hashizume, Daisuke; Takagi, Hidenori

    2012-04-01

    Binary ruthenium pnictides, RuP and RuAs, with an orthorhombic MnP structure, were found to show a metal to a nonmagnetic insulator transition at TMI = 270 and 200 K, respectively. In the metallic region above TMI, a structural phase transition, accompanied with a weak anomaly in the resistivity and the magnetic susceptibility, indicative of a pseudogap formation, was identified at Ts = 330 and 280 K, respectively. These two transitions were suppressed by substituting Ru with Rh. We found superconductivity with a maximum Tc = 3.7 and 1.8 K in a narrow composition range around the critical point for the pseudogap phase, Rh content xc = 0.45 and 0.25 for Ru1-xRhxP and Ru1-xRhxAs, respectively, which may provide us with a nonmagnetic route to superconductivity at a quantum critical point.

  18. X-radiographic study of rare-earth compounds with special regardment of modulated structures. The response of the crystal structure to stoichiometry deviations; Roentgengraphische Untersuchung von Seltenerdverbindungen mit besonderer Beruecksichtigung modulierter Strukturen. Die Antwort der Kristallstruktur auf Stoechiometrieabweichungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisegang, Tilmann

    2010-04-09

    Even shortly after World War II, as large amounts of ultrapure rare earths (RE) became available for scientific research, a large reservoir of peculiar phenomena was uncovered. These had not been investigated before or were completely unknown. Examples of these phenomena are, magnetic ordering, the KONDO effect, quantum critical points, heavy fermion behaviour, as well as superconductivity. A strong influence of small variations of the chemical composition on the physical properties had been observed. The main focus of the present thesis is the detailed elucidation of the crystal structure of fundamental representatives of this class of substances, as well as the influence of dedicated variations of the chemical composition on their structure and properties. In particular, the characterisation of modulated crystals is an important facet. A large spectrum of physical methods, especially X-ray diffraction, is employed in the investigations. Results on oriented intergrowth in the Y-Ni-B-C system, incommensurately ordered vacancies in the Ce-Si system, incorporation of stacking faults as well as commensurately ordered transition metal atoms (TM) in the RE-TM-Si system and site specific occupancy in the Y-Mn-Fe-O system are presented. Their elucidation is reported for the first time. It is shown which consequences the structural peculiarities will have on the physical properties. An objective of this thesis is to give an overview of the possible ''answers'' that can be obtained with regard to the influence of the crystal structure of rare earth transition metal compounds on deviations of the chemical composition. (orig.)

  19. Rare earths: preparation of spectro chemically pure standards, study of their carbonates and synthesis of a new compound series - the peroxy carbonates; Terras-raras: obtencao de padroes espectroquimicos, estudo dos carbonatos e sintese dos peroxicarbonatos. Uma nova serie de compostos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Carlos Alberto da Silva

    1996-05-01

    In this work the following studies are concerned: I) preparation of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium oxides for use as spectro chemically pure standards; II) behavior of the rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) carbonates soluble in ammonium carbonate and mixture of ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, and III) synthesis and characterization of rare earth peroxy carbonates - a new series of compounds. Data for the synthesis and characterization of the rare earths peroxy carbonates described for the first time in this work are presented and discussed. With the aid of thermal analysis (TG-DTG) the thermal stability and the stoichiometric composition for new compounds were established and a mechanism of thermal decomposition was proposed. The peroxy carbonate was prepared by the addition of hydrogen peroxyde to the complexed soluble rare earths carbonates. These studies included also the determinations of active oxygen, the total rare earth oxide by gravimetry and complexometry and the C, H and N contents by microanalysis. The new compounds were also investigated by infrared spectroscopy. (author)

  20. Muon Spin Relaxation Studies of RFeAsO and MFe2As2 Based Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Muon spin relaxation measurements of a variety of iron pnictide systems have revealed commensurate long range magnetic order in the parent compounds which can change to incommensurate order with carrier doping. Magnetic order gives way to superconductivity with increased doping; however there are regions of the phase diagrams where the two phenomena co-exist. In the case of Ba1-xKxFe2As2 there is phase separation into superconducting and magnetic domains, whereas in Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 the coexistence is apparently microscopic for x=0.035->0.048. Transverse field muon spin rotation measurements of single crystal Ba(Fe1-xCox)2 and Sr(Fe1-xCox)2 exhibit an Abrikosov vortex lattice from which we are able to determine the magnetic field penetration depth and Ginzburg-Landau parameter. The temperature variation of the superfluid density is well described by a two-gap model. In Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2, both the superconducting TC and the superfluid density decrease with increasing doping above x=0.06; in all of the pnictides we find that the superfluid density obeys the same nearly linear scaling with TC as found in the cuprates.

  1. Rare earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranstone, D A

    1979-01-01

    Rare earth elements are commonly extracted from the minerals monazite, bastnaesite, and xenotine. New uses for these elements are constantly developing; they have found applications in glass polishing, television tube phosphors, high-strength low-alloy steels, magnets, catalysts, refractory ceramics, and hydrogen sponge alloys. In Canada, rare earths have been produced as byproducts of the uranium mining industry, but there was no production of rare earths in 1978 or 1979. The world sources of and markets for the rare earth elements are discussed.

  2. Rare earth metals, rare earth hydrides, and rare earth oxides as thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasgnier, M.

    1980-01-01

    The review deals with pure rare earth materials such as rare earth metals, rare earth hydrides, and rare earth oxides as thin films. Several preparation techniques, control methods, and nature of possible contaminations of thin films are described. These films can now be produced in an extremely well-known state concerning chemical composition, structure and texture. Structural, electric, magnetic, and optical properties of thin films are studied and discussed in comparison with the bulk state. The greatest contamination of metallic rare earth thin films is caused by reaction with hydrogen or with water vapour. The compound with an f.c.c. structure is the dihydride LnH 2 (Ln = lanthanides). The oxygen contamination takes place after annealing at higher temperatures. Then there appears a compound with a b.c.c. structure which is the C-type sesquioxide C-Ln 2 O 3 . At room atmosphere dihydride light rare earth thin films are converted to hydroxide Ln(OH) 3 . For heavy rare earth thin films the oxinitride LnNsub(x)Osub(y) is observed. The LnO-type compound was never seen. The present review tries to set the stage anew for the investigations to be undertaken in the future especially through the new generations of electron microscopes

  3. Emergence of high-mobility minority holes in the electrical transport of the Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Huynh, K. K.; Heguri, S.; Oguro, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    In Fe pnictide (Pn) superconducting materials, neither Mn nor Cr doping to the Fe site induces superconductivity, even though hole carriers are generated. This is in strong contrast with the superconductivity appearing when holes are introduced by alkali-metal substitution on the insulating blocking layers. We investigate in detail the effects of Mn doping on magnetotransport properties in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 for elucidating the intrinsic reason. The negative Hall coefficient for x =0 estimated in the low magnetic field (B ) regime gradually increases as x increases, and its sign changes to a positive one at x =0.020 . Hall resistivities as well as simultaneous interpretation using the magnetoconductivity tensor including both longitudinal and transverse transport components clarify that minority holes with high mobility are generated by the Mn doping via spin-density wave transition at low temperatures, while original majority electrons and holes residing in the paraboliclike Fermi surfaces of the semimetallic Ba (FeAs )2 are negligibly affected. Present results indicate that the mechanism of hole doping in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 is greatly different from that of the other superconducting FePn family.

  4. Rare earths 1998 market update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourre, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The rare earth industry has always been a world of rapid change with the emergence of new markets, new ores and new players, as well as the disappearance of old applications. Rare earth based products are used in a great diversity of applications such as hard disk drives, CD drives, batteries, capacitors, pigments, ceramics, polishing powders, fuel cells, flints, catalyst converter, fluid cracking catalysts, etc. South East Asia holds the largest share of the known reserve of rare earth ores and is one of the major markets for rare earth compounds; in the last ten years, China has become the largest producer of rare earth intermediates as well as an important exporter of separated rare earth elements. Today, China has approximately 150 factories producing rare earth compounds, most of which are experiencing financial difficulties due to the lack of knowledge of true market needs, lack of control of their distribution channels and production over-capacity. Recently the Chinese rare earth producers have recognized the situation and efforts are underway to rationalize rare earth production. Japan has dominated many of the major application markets, and is by far the largest market for metal and alloy products. This will remain the case for the next five years; however, new countries are emerging as significant users of rare earth products such as Korea, Taiwan and Malaysia. During the last ten years rare earth producers adjusted to several radical changes that affected the raw materials, the application mix and the price structure. New producers have emerged, especially from China; some have subsequently stopped their activities while others have focused their efforts in a specific market segment

  5. Rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference was held from September 12 to 13, 1984 in Jetrichovice, Czechoslovakia. The participants heard 16 papers of which 4 were inputted in INIS. These papers dealt with industrial separation processes of rare earths, the use of chemical methods of separation from the concentrate of apatite and bastnesite, the effect of the relative permittivity of solvents in the elution of rare earth elements from a cation exchanger, and the determination of the content of different rare earth elements using X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. (E.S.)

  6. Rare earth-rich cadmium compounds RE{sub 10}TCd{sub 3} (RE = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu; T = Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt) with an ordered Co{sub 2}Al{sub 5}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Theresa; Klenner, Steffen; Heletta, Lukas; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2018-04-01

    Eighteen new rare earth-rich intermetallic phases RE{sub 10}TCd{sub 3} (RE = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu; T = Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt) were obtained by induction melting of the elements in sealed niobium ampoules followed by annealing in muffle furnaces. All samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. The structures of four representatives were refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: ordered Co{sub 2}Al{sub 5} type, P6{sub 3}/mmc, a = 951.2(1), c = 962.9(2) pm, wR = 0.0460, 595 F{sup 2} values, 20 parameters for Er{sub 10}RhCd{sub 3}; a = 945.17(4), c = 943.33(4), wR = 0.0395, 582 F{sup 2} values, 21 parameters for Lu{sub 9.89}PdCd{sub 3.11}; a = 964.16(6), c = 974.93(6) pm, wR = 0.0463, 614 F{sup 2} values, 21 parameters for Y{sub 10}Ir{sub 1.09}Cd{sub 2.91}; a = 955.33(3), c = 974.56(3) pm, wR = 0.0508, 607 F{sup 2} values, 22 refined parameters for Dy{sub 9.92}IrCd{sub 3.08}. Refinements of the occupancy parameters revealed small homogeneity ranges resulting from RE/Cd, respectively T/Cd mixing. The basic building units of the RE{sub 10}TCd{sub 3} phases are transition metal-centered RE{sub 6} trigonal prisms (TP) that are condensed with double-pairs of empty RE{sub 6} octahedra via common triangular faces. A second type of rods is formed by slightly distorted RE3 rate at Cd{sub 6}RE{sub 6} icosahedra which are condensed via Cd{sub 3} triangular faces. The shortest interatomic distances occur for RE-T, compatible with strong covalent bonding interactions. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed for RE{sub 10}RhCd{sub 3} (RE = Dy-Tm, Lu), RE{sub 10}IrCd{sub 3} (RE = Er, Tm, Lu) and RE{sub 10}PtCd{sub 3} (RE = Y, Lu). While Y{sub 10}PtCd{sub 3} and Lu{sub 10}TCd{sub 3} (T = Rh, Ir, Pt) show Pauli paramagnetic behavior, the compounds containing paramagnetic rare earth elements show Curie-Weiss behavior (the experimental magnetic moments indicate stable trivalent RE{sup 3+}) and magnetic ordering at low temperatures

  7. Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  8. Vortex-glass state in the isovalent optimally doped pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.68P0.32)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem-Sugui, S., Jr.; Mosqueira, J.; Alvarenga, A. D.; Sóñora, D.; Crisan, A.; Ionescu, A. M.; Sundar, S.; Hu, D.; Li, S.-L.; Luo, H.-Q.

    2017-05-01

    We report on isochamp magneto-resistivity and ac susceptibility curves obtained in a high-quality single crystal of the isovalent optimally doped pnictide BaFe2(As{}0.68P{}0.32)2 with superconducting temperature T c = 27.8 K for H∥c-axis. Plots of the logarithmic derivative of the resistivity curves allowed the identification of a vortex-glass (VG) phase and to obtain the values of the critical glass temperature T g, the temperature T * marking the transition to the liquid phase and of the critical exponent s. The presence of the VG phase is confirmed by detailed measurements of the third harmonic signal of the ac magnetic susceptibility. The modified VG model was successfully applied to the data allowing the obtention of the temperature independent VG activation energy U b . The activation energy U 0 obtained from the Arrhenius plots in the flux-flow region are compared with U b and with U 0 obtained from flux-creep measurements on a M(H) isothermal in the same sample. A phase diagram of the studied sample is constructed showing the T g glass line, the T * line representing a transition (melting) to the liquid phase, the mean field temperature T c(H) line and the H p line obtained from the peaks in isothermal critical current, J c(H) curves, which are explained in terms of a softening of the vortex lattice. The glass line was fitted by a theory presented in the literature which considers the effect of disorder.

  9. Chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Half-wave potentials show no evidence for the existence of Md(I) in aqueous solution. Microchemical studies of anhydrous transplutonium halides used absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Five transplutonium elements were prepared. Superconductivity was observed and characterzed in Am metal. The heats of vaporization of 243 Am and 249 Cf were determined to be 60 and 46.9 kcal/mol, respectively. The solution heat of Cm metal in 1 N Hcl at 298 0 K is 606.4 +- 1.8 kJ/mol. Some chalcogenides and pnictides of Cm, Bk, and Cf were prepared, and the crystal structure of Am Te/sub 2-x/ was refined. Behavior of 243 Am and several tellurides under high pressure was studied. Structure of a cryptate of Sm was studied; its formula is [Sm(No 3 )(C 18 H 36 N 2 O 6 )][Sm(NO 3 ) 5 ].H 2 O. X-ray fluorescence cross sections are given as function of atomic number, for the 59.6 keV photon from 2 4 1 Am. A sensitive micromagnetic susceptometer was constructed and calibrated for actinides. A spectroelectrochemical study (absorption spectra recorded at various applied potentials) was made of U and Eu in aqueous solution. Two studies were carried out in connection with nuclear waste isolation: adsorption of rare earths, actinides, and alkali metals on clay minerals and radiation damage to kaolin and attapulgite from 253 Es. A new method is being developed for U exploration. 13 figures, 5 tables

  10. Hole doping by pressure on the 1111 pnictides CaFeAsF and SrFeAsF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Daniele C; Sow, Amadou; Núñez-Regueiro, Manuel; Garbarino, Gastón; Weht, Ruben; Zhu, Xiyu; Han, Fei; Cheng, Peng; Ju, Jing; Hu Wen, Hai

    2014-01-01

    We determine the pressure phase diagram of the 1111 compounds CaFeAsF and SrFeAsF, up to 20 GPa and down to 4 K by electrical resistivity measurements and the change of structure up to 40 GPa at room temperature. The antiferromagnetic transition temperature, as determined by the derivative peak, shows a minimum at ∼5 GPa (10 GPa) for the Ca (Sr) compound. For CaFeAsF, superconductivity appears at this minimum, coincident with the development of a previously reported monoclinic phase. For SrFeAsF, where the orthorhombic and the monoclinic phase were reported to coexist, superconductivity exists above P≥1 GPa. Both phase diagrams can be scaled by a shift of ∼10 GPa pressure at which the volume of SrFeAsF and that of CaFeAsF at ambient pressure coincide. The difference of our phase diagram with that of electron-doped 1111 samples is accounted for by hole doping under pressure, which we verified through electron band structure calculations. (papers)

  11. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  12. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  13. Inorganic, coordination and organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Separation of cations and anions of inorganic, coordination and metalloorganic compounds by the method of liquid column chromatography is considered. Common scheme of multicomponent cation mixture is suggesteed. Separation conditions, adsrbents, eluents, pH value solution concenstration, elution rate are also suggested. Separation of rare earth elements Cs, Be, Cd, Te, Th, U, Mo, Re, V, Ru, Zr, In compounds is considered as an example of liquid column chromatography application. Data on column chromatography application are summarized in a table

  14. Earth thermics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, M

    1960-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the Earth are described, including terrestrial heat flow, internal temperatures and thermal history. The value of the geothermal gradient has been considered to be 3/sup 0/C/100 m but measured values are slightly different. The values of terrestrial heat flow are relatively constant and are calculated be about 2.3 x 10 to the minus 6 cal/cm/sup 2/ sec (2.3 HFU). The Earth's internal temperature can be calculated from the adiabatic temperature gradient of adiabatic expansion. Using Simon's equation No. 9, a value of 2100-2500/sup 0/C is obtained, this is much lower than it was previously thought to be. The value of 2.3 HFU can easily be obtained from this internal temperature figure.

  15. Epitaxial growth and electronic structure of a layered zinc pnictide semiconductor, β-BaZn2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Zewen; Ran, Fan-Yong; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    BaZn 2 As 2 is expected for a good p-type semiconductor and has two crystalline phases of an orthorhombic α phase and a higher-symmetry tetragonal β phase. Here, we report that high-quality epitaxial films of the tetragonal β-BaZn 2 As 2 were grown on single-crystal MgO (001) substrates by a reactive solid-phase epitaxy technique. Out-of-plane and in-plane epitaxial relationships between the film and the substrate were BaZn 2 As 2 (00 l)//MgO (001) and BaZn 2 As 2 [200]//MgO [200], respectively. The full-widths at half maximum were 0.082° for a 008 out-of-plane rocking curve and 0.342° for a 200 in-plane rocking curve. A step-and-terrace structure was observed by atomic force microscopy. The band gap of β-BaZn 2 As 2 was evaluated to be around 0.2 eV, which is much smaller than that of a family compound LaZnOAs (1.5 eV). Density functional theory calculation using the Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof hybrid functionals supports the small band gap. - Highlights: • High-quality epitaxial β-BaZn 2 As 2 films were obtained. • The band gap of β-BaZn 2 As 2 was evaluated to around 0.2 eV. • Hybrid Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof calculation supports the small band gap

  16. Organolanthanoid compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Up to little more than a decade ago organolanthanoid compounds were still a curiosity. Apart from the description of an isolated number of cyclopentadienyl and indenyl derivatives, very few significant contributions had been made to this interesting sector of organometallic chemistry. However, subsequent systematic studies using modern preparative and analytical techniques, together with X-ray single crystal structure determinations, enabled the isolation and characterization of a large number of very interesting homoleptic and heteroleptic compounds in which the lanthanoid is bound to hydrogen, to substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl groups, to allyl or alkynyl groups, or even to phosphorus ylides, trimethylsilyl, and carbonylmetal groups. These compounds, which are all extremely sensitive to oxygen and water, open up new possibilities in the field of catalysis and have great potential in organic synthesis - as recent studies with pentamethylcyclopentadienyl derivatives, organolanthanoid(II) compounds, and hexamethyllanthanoid complexes have already shown. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z. P.

    2001-01-01

    The role of radiation chemical processes in prebiotic time of earth history and their influence on arise of organic life on Earth has been discussed. The formation of chiral compounds in prebiotic s oup' and its further evolution for creation of bioorganic molecules was also presented and discussed as an alternative of existing hypothesis of cosmic origin of biologic life in the Earth

  18. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  19. Multipurpose Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  20. Polymer compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    A Polymer compound comprising a polymer (a) that contains cyclic imidesgroups and a polymer (b) that contains monomer groups with a 2,4-diamino-1,3,5-triazine side group. According to the formula (see formula) whereby themole percentage ratio of the cyclic imides groups in the polymer compoundwith

  1. Mesoionic Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organic Chemistry. Kamatak University,. Dharwad. Her research interests are synthesis, reactions and synthetic utility of sydnones. She is currently working on electrochemical and insecticidal/antifungal activities for some of these compounds. Keywords. Aromaticity, mesoionic hetero- cycles, sydnones, tandem re- actions.

  2. Rare earth (3) pivalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'mina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.; Zoan An' Tu; Ch'eu Tkhi Nguet; Troyanov, S.I.; Rykov, A.N.; Korenev, Yu.M.

    1994-01-01

    Depending on synthesis conditions rare earth pivalates can be obtained in the form of either adducts NPiv·HPiv or hydrates MPiv 3 ·mH 2 O. Adducts are the most stable form of pivalates. Heating of adducts result in formation of corresponding MPiv 3 . MPiv 3 ·nHPiv compounds are characterized by IR-spectroscopy and thermal analysis data. Behaviour of MPiv 3 was studied in the regime of vacuum sublemation. Using mass spectroscopy of NdPiv 3 it was shown that gaseous phase above MPiv 3 had complex composition and contained ligomer fragments. X-ray structure analysis of [NdPiv 3 ·3HPiv] was conducted

  3. Rare Earth Polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskovic, Colette

    2017-09-19

    Longstanding and important applications make use of the chemical and physical properties of both rare earth metals and polyoxometalates of early transition metals. The catalytic, optical, and magnetic features of rare earth metal ions are well-known, as are the reversible multielectron redox and photoredox capabilities of polyoxomolybdates and polyoxotungstates. The combination of rare earth ions and polyoxometalates in discrete molecules and coordination polymers is of interest for the unique combination of chemical and physical properties that can arise. This Account surveys our efforts to synthesize and investigate compounds with rare earth ions and polyoxometalates (RE-POMs), sometimes with carboxylate-based organic coligands. Our general synthetic approach is "bottom-up", which affords well-defined nanoscale molecules, typically in crystalline form and amenable to single-crystal X-ray diffraction for structure determination. Our particular focus is on elucidation of the physical properties conferred by the different structural components with a view to ultimately being able to tune these properties chemically. For this purpose, we employ a variety of spectroscopic, magnetochemical, electrochemical, and scattering techniques in concert with theoretical modeling and computation. Studies of RE-POM single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have utilized magnetic susceptibility, inelastic neutron scattering, and ab initio calculations. These investigations have allowed characterization of the crystal field splitting of the rare earth(III) ions that is responsible for the SMM properties of slow magnetic relaxation and magnetization quantum tunneling. Such SMMs are promising for applications in quantum computing and molecular spintronics. Photophysical measurements of a family of hybrid RE-POMs with organic ligands have afforded insights into sensitization of Tb(III) and Eu(III) emission through both organic and polyoxometalate chromophores in the same molecule. Detailed

  4. Structural studies of novel coordination compounds run in the Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipin, M.Yu.; Starikova, Z.A.; Yanovskij, A.I.; Dolgushin, F.M.; Lysenko, K.A.; Khrustalev, V.N.; Vorontsov, I.I.; Korlyukov, A.A.; Andreev, G.B.; Neretin, I.S.

    2001-01-01

    The results of the investigation into structural chemistry of coordination compounds taking place in the X-ray Laboratory of the Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences are given. The review gives an idea on the tendencies to structural researches of complexes of varying categories of coordination compounds, among which are lithium, strontium, cadmium compounds, rare earth compounds, transuranium compounds, transition element compounds, carboranes, fullerenes. An attempt was made to prove the structure and reveal the novel structural and crystallochemical regularities in the studied series of relative compounds. The outlooks for the following progress of studies on this field are determined [ru

  5. Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

    1981-09-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of 248 CmP and 248 CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms

  6. Processing of monazite at the rare earth division,Udyogamandal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, N.S.; Thulasidoss, S.; Ramachandran, T.V.; Swaminathan, T.V.; Prasad, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    The processing techniques adopted at the Rare Earth Division of the Indian Rare Earths Limited at Udyogamandal, for the production of rare earth compounds of various compositions and purity grades are reviewed. Over 100 different compounds are produced and marketed, and these include mixed rare earths chloride, crude thorium concentrate, cerium oxide, cerium hydrate, rare earths carbonate, didymium salts and individual rare earth oxides and salts. Also, the trisodium phosphate obtained as byproduct in the processing of monazite, is recovered and marketed. The process scheme for monazite essentially involves alkaline digestion of ground monazite, removal of the by-product trisodium phosphate, separation of thorium through preferential dissolution of rare earths hydroxide in hydrochloric acid under controlled pH and temperature conditions followed by purification, and evaporation of the chloride solution to yield pure rare earths chloride. Part of the chloride is utilised for the production of individual rare earth compounds after separation by solvent extraction and ion exchange processes. Individual rare earth compounds of 99.99 %+ purity are regularly produced to cater to the demand within the country. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Compound odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas have been extensively reported in the dental literature, and the term refers to tumors of odontogenic origin. Though the exact etiology is still unknown, the postulated causes include: local trauma, infection, inheritance and genetic mutation. The majority of the lesions are asymptomatic; however, may be accompanied with pain and swelling as secondary complaints in some cases. Here, we report a case of a compound odontome in a 14 year old patient.

  8. K2Ln2As2Se9 (Ln = Sm, Gd): the first quaternary rare-earth selenoarsenate compounds with a 3D framework containing chairlike As2Se4 units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuandong; Bensch, Wolfgang

    2009-04-06

    The new compounds K(2)Ln(2)As(2)Se(9) (Ln = Sm, Gd) were obtained by applying the reactive flux method. The structure consists of a three-dimensional (3D) [Ln(2)As(2)Se(9)](2-) framework with K(+) ion-filling tunnels running along the b axis. The two unique Ln(3+) cations are coordinated by two Se(2)(2-) dumbbells, two AsSe(3)(3-) pyramids, and one chairlike As(2)Se(4)(2-) unit in a bicapped trigonal-prismatic geometry. The Ln(3+)-centered trigonal prisms share triangular faces with neighboring prisms, forming one-dimensional chains along the b axis. These chains are linked to each other to form layers by sharing Se(2-) anions on the capped sites of the trigonal prisms. The As(2)Se(4) units connect these layers to form the 3D framework.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of some pseudo-binary and ternary compounds at high curie temperature prepared in the systems: -) rare earth (Nd, Sm) iron hydrogen, -) gadolinium iron aluminium, and -) uranium iron or cobalt silicon or germanium; Proprietes structurales et magnetiques de quelques composes pseudobinaires et ternaires ferromagnetiques a temperature de curie elevee prepares dans les systemes: -) terres rares Nd Sm fer hydrogene, -) gadolinium fer aluminium, and -) uranium fer ou cobalt silicium ou germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlureau, T

    1991-07-15

    This work highlights the importance of crystal and chemical studies for understanding the magnetic properties of systems as complex as inter-metallic compounds involving rare-earth elements, uranium, silicon or germanium. With a view of finding new compounds with high Curie temperature and strong magneto-crystal anisotropy, it appears that uranium compounds such as UFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, UCo{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, U(Fe{sub 10-x}Co{sub x})Si{sub 2} and U{sub 2}M{sub 17-y}X{sub y} where M is Fe or Co and Y is Si or Ge, are interesting because of the 5f orbital that can form bands through direct overlapping and can link itself very strongly with orbitals of nearby atoms.

  10. Microstructure study of the rare-earth intermetallic compounds R5(SixGe1-x)4 and R5(SixGe1-x)3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The unique combination of magnetic properties and structural transitions exhibited by many members of the R5(SixGe1-x)4 family (R = rare earths, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) presents numerous opportunities for these materials in advanced energy transformation applications. Past research has proven that the crystal structure and magnetic ordering of the R5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds can be altered by temperature, magnetic field, pressure and the Si/Ge ratio. Results of this thesis study on the crystal structure of the Er5Si4 compound have for the first time shown that the application of mechanical forces (i.e. shear stress introduced during the mechanical grinding) can also result in a structural transition from Gd5Si4-type orthorhombic to Gd5Si2Ge2-type monoclinic. This structural transition is reversible, moving in the opposite direction when the material is subjected to low-temperature annealing at 500 °C.

  11. Electronic and magnetic structure of RENi{sub 2}Mn{sub x}-compounds (RE = rare earth, x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25) with respect to ErNi{sub 2}Mn{sub x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balinski, Kamil; Kuepper, Karsten [Department of Physics, Osnabrueck University (Germany); Chrobak, Artur [Department of Physics, University of Silesia in Katowice (Poland); Kuznetzsova, T.V.; Mushnikov, N.V.; Marchenkov, V.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Rare earth (RE) and transition metal (T) compounds are research field since the 1960s. Because of huge magnetocalorical effect and giant magnetostriction the RE-T-compounds are excellent for applications like magnetic cooling or hydrogen storage devices. Besides of that RE-Ni{sub 2}-type of alloys are, due to the relatively simple crystal structure and the fact that Ni{sub 2} does not indicate any %behavior with result in an magnetic moment, excellent candidates for studies of magnetic behavior of RE's and their binding partners. The electronic structure of ErNi{sub 2}Mn{sub x} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25) is characterized by XPS and ResPES, the magnetic structure is investigated by SQUID and PPMS techniques, and resistivity measurements are made. Variation in Mn concentration revealed the position of Mn 3d-states at 1.7 eV. The XPS intensity at 1.7 eV can be correlated with the behavior of the Curie temperature and the resistivity. While similar RENi{sub 2}Mn{sub x}-systems, where RE had been replaced by Gd and Tb, highest resistivity, Curie temperature and the highest Mn 3d-valence band state intensity were observed at x = 0.5. ErNi{sub 2}Mn{sub x}-system behave different and show the mentioned maxima at x = 1.25.

  12. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  13. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  14. Why Earth Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  15. Relaxation phenomena and host exchange parameters in Tm van Vleck compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevin, V.; Levin, R.; Shaltiel, D.; Baberschke, K.; Davidov, D.

    1977-01-01

    The ESR linewidth of Gd in TmP (measured by Sugawara et al (Phys. Rev.; B11 (1975)) TmSb and TmBi (measured in the present work and by Davidov and Baberschke (Phys. Lett.; A51:144 (1975)) exhibits an appreciable temperature dependence. This behaviour is attributed to the fluctuation spectra of the host Tm ions. The previous theory (Davidov et al (Phys. Rev.; B15:2771 (1977)) for impurity relaxation in weakly coupled van Vleck paramagnets based on the Bloch-Redfield kinetic equation is extended here and applied to the interpretation of the ESR linewidth in the Tm pnictides. In particular the second moment calculation of the host fluctuation spectra has been extended to include both pair correlation and autocorrelation contributions. Explicit expressions are given for Tm and Pr cubic van Vleck compounds. Using the crystalline field as extracted from independent neutron scattering techniques and the Gd-Tm exchange from the ESR g shift, the Tm-Tm host exchange has been estimated by fitting theory to the experimental results. The host exchange parameter in TmSb is very small confirming previous studies on this compound. (author)

  16. Compound odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcelo Vargas Pinto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common types of odontogenic tumors, as they are considered more as a developmental anomaly (hamartoma than as a true neoplasia. The aim of the present study is to describe a clinical case of compound odontoma, analyzing its most commonsigns, its region of location, the decade of life and patient’s gender, disorders that may occur as well as the treatment proposed. In order to attain this objective, the method was description of the present clinical case and bibliographic revision, arriving at the result that the treatment for this type of lesion invariably is surgical removal (enucleation and curettage and the prognosis is excellent. The surgical result was followed up in the post-operative period by radiographic exam, and it was possible to conclude that there was complete cicatrization and tissue repair.

  17. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  18. The industry of metallic rare earths (R.E.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, P.

    1979-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed: rare earths resources (rare earths abondance and world reserves, main ores). Rare earths separation and purification (ionic exchange, solvent extraction). Metallic rare earths and their mixtures, metallothermic reduction of oxides or fluorides (Ca, Mg, Al, Si or rare earth metals), Co-reduction process for intermetallic compounds (SmCo 5 ). Industrial applications of metallic rare earths (traditional applications such as flints, nodular cast iron, steel refining, magnesium industrie, applications under development such as rare earths/cobalt magnets, LaNi 5 for hydrogen storage, special alloys (automotive post combustion), magnetostrictive alloys). Economical problems: rare earth are elements relatively abundant and often at easily accessible prices. However, this group of 15 elements are liable to certain economical restraints. It is difficult to crack ore for only one rare earth. Availability of one given rare earth must be associated with the other corresponding rare earths to absorb all the other rare earths in other applications. Rare-earth industry has a strong expanding rate. 20% per year average for 6 years with Rhone-Poulenc. Thanks to their exceptional, specific characteristics rare earths have a bright future particularly for their metals

  19. Structure and physical properties of RT{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=rare earth, T=Ni, Pd) compounds with the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, V.W.; Yazici, D.; White, B.D. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Dilley, N.R. [Quantum Design, 6325 Lusk Boulevard, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Friedman, A.J.; Brandom, B. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Maple, M.B., E-mail: mbmaple@physics.ucsd.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Eleven new compounds, R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb) and R Pd{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Ce, Pr, Sm), were grown as single crystals in high temperature cadmium-rich solutions. They crystallize in the cubic CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}-type structure (Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z=8) as characterized by measurements of powder X-ray diffraction. Electrical resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements were performed on R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb) single crystals. Whereas YNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} and LaNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} exhibit unremarkable metallic behavior, when magnetic moments from localized 4f electron states (Gd{sup 3+}–Tb{sup 3+}) are embedded into this host, they exhibit ferromagnetic order with values of the Curie temperature T{sub C} for R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Gd, and Tb) which scale with the de Gennes factor. - Graphical abstract: Specific heat divided by temperature C/T vs. T for single crystals of R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Gd, and Tb). Left inset: Low temperature C/T vs. T{sup 2} for LaNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20}. The solid line represents a linear fit of the data. Right inset: Low-temperature C/T data vs. T for R=Ce–Nd, Gd, and Tb; magnetic ordering temperatures are indicated by arrows. - Highlights: • R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb) single crystals synthesized for the first time. • R Pd{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Ce, Pr, Sm) single crystals synthesized for the first time. • Single crystals are of good metallurgical quality (large RRR values). • NdNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N}=1.5 K. • R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Sm, Gd, Tb) order ferromagnetically.

  20. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  1. On fluorozirconates and fluorohafnates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Yu.M.; Antipov, P.I.; Novoselova, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    It has been shown by the method of X-ray phase analysis that on interaction between rare-earth fluorides and zirconium and hafnium tetrafluorides, compounds with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 molar ratios of components are formed. Compounds of the LnHfF 4 type are prepared for all rare-earths. Fluoro-metals of the LnHf 2 F 11 composition are typical only of light lanthanides from lanthanum to neodymium, while pentafluorated salts Ln(EF 5 ) 3 are formed in the reaction between EF 4 with fluorides of heavy rare-earth elements from samarium to lutecium, as well as with yttrium trifluoride. Parameters of unit cells of heptafluohafnates and pentafluometallates are determined

  2. Preparation, thermogravimetric study and infrared spectra of rare earth acetates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graehlert, X.; Starke, M.

    1992-01-01

    The anhydrous and the hydrated acetates of Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu have been prepared. The compounds obtained have been investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. The thermal decomposition of the rare earth acetates may proceed via various steps. It depends on both the number of crystal water molecules in the acetates and the rare earth element's behaviour. (orig.)

  3. Sc, Y, La-Lu - Rare Earth Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    At present extensive efforts are being made in completing work on system number Rare Earth Elements. Part A is devoted to the occurrence of these elements on the earth and in the universe. Part B deals with the pure metals; the 7 volumes published cover the description of the separation from the raw materials, the preparation of pure metals,their uses and toxicology, the physical properties of nuclei, atoms, molecules, and isotopes; in addition the behavior of ions in solution and the electrochemical behavior of rare earth elements are described. The compounds are described in Part C. Part D with 6 volumes has been devoted to the description of coordination compounds and is completed. The volume ''Rare Earth Elements C 10'' deals with the rare earth tellurides, oxide tellurides, tellurates, telluride halides, tellurate halides, sulfide tellurides, selenide tellurides, and alkali rare earth tellurates. Another topic of this volume are the compounds of the rare earth elements with polonium. So far as meaningful and in accordance with all earlier volumes of ''Rare Earth Elements'' Series C, comparative data are presented in sections preceding treatment of the individual compounds and systems

  4. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  5. Rare earth sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Shatskij, V.M.; Pokrovskij, A.N.; Chizhov, S.M.; Bal'kina, T.I.; Suponitskij, Yu.L.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental works on the study of synthesis conditions, structure and physico-chemical properties of rare earth, scandium and yttrium sulfates, have been generalized. Phase diagrams of solubility and fusibility, thermodynamic and crystallochemical characteristics, thermal stability of hydrates and anhydrous sulfates of rare earths, including normal, double (with cations of alkali and alkaline-earth metals), ternary and anion-mixed sulfates of rare earths, as well as their adducts, are considered. The state of ions of rare earths, scandium and yttrium in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions is discussed. Data on the use of rare earth sulfates are given

  6. Quantum Theory of Rare-Earth Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Takashi; Akai, Hisazumi

    2018-04-01

    Strong permanent magnets mainly consist of rare earths (R) and transition metals (T). The main phase of the neodymium magnet, which is the strongest magnet, is Nd2Fe14B. Sm2Fe17N3 is another magnet compound having excellent magnetic properties comparable to those of Nd2Fe14B. Their large saturation magnetization, strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and high Curie temperature originate from the interaction between the T-3d electrons and R-4f electrons. This article discusses the magnetism of rare-earth magnet compounds. The basic theory and first-principles calculation approaches for quantitative description of the magnetic properties are presented, together with applications to typical compounds such as Nd2Fe14B, Sm2Fe17N3, and the recently synthesized NdFe12N.

  7. Isotopically modified compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter the nomenclature of isotopically modified compounds in Slovak language is described. This chapter consists of following parts: (1) Isotopically substituted compounds; (2) Specifically isotopically labelled compounds; (3) Selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (4) Non-selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (5) Isotopically deficient compounds.

  8. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing....

  9. Moessbauer study of the YFe3 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, W.G.; Kuzmin, R.N.; Vardapetyan, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear Gamma Recoilless Resonance measurement was carried out on iron sites in the YFe 3 compound at 80 and 295 K to obtain information on the iron sublattice in the absence of rare-earth magnetic moment. The results of the measurement are reported. (Z.S.)

  10. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Dolgos, Michelle; Graham, Matt W.; Nyman, May

    2018-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. Here we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH3)2SO)3(RE)NbO(C2O4)3((CH3)2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C2O2= oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb˭O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for the smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. We attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.

  11. Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, Shelby G.; Asrar, Ghassem; Backlund, Peter W.

    1994-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the Earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic Earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the Earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the Earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment.

  12. Mission to Planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.S.; Backlund, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment. 8 refs

  13. Determination of active oxygen content in rare earth peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carlos A.S.; Abrao, Alcidio

    1993-01-01

    The content of active oxygen in rare earth peroxides have been determined after the dissolution of the samples with hydrocloridic acid in the presence of potassium iodide. The free generated iodine is titrated with sodium thiosulfate using starch as indicator. The oxidation of iodide to the free iodine indicates the presence of a higher valence state rare earth oxide, until now specifically recognized for the oxides of cerium (Ce O 2 ), praseodymium (Pr 6 O 1 1) and terbium (TB 4 O 7 ). recently the authors synthesized a new series of rare earth compounds, the peroxides. These new compounds were prepared by precipitating the rare earth elements complexed with carbonate ion by addition of hydrogen peroxide. the authors demonstrated that all rare earth elements, once solubilized by complexing with carbonate ion, are quantitatively precipitated as peroxide by addition of hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  14. Purification process for aqueous solutions of rare earths by liquid-liquid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollat, A.; Sabot, J.L.; Burgard, M.; Delloye, T.

    1986-01-01

    Alkaline earth metals are removed by liquid-liquid extraction between on aqueous nitric phase of impure rare earth compounds and an organic phase of polyether (crown ether). This process is particularly suited to removal of Ca, Ba and Ra contained in nitric solutions of rare earths [fr

  15. Nuclear orientation on rare earth nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.

    1998-01-01

    A hyperfine interaction study of the light rare earth elements, Ce, Pr, Nd and Pm, in the rare earth nickel and CeNi 2 Al 5 compounds by means of the low temperature nuclear orientation is summarised. The magnitudes and directions of the magnetic hyperfine fields obtained through measurements of γ-ray anisotropy and angular distributions reveal the magnetic structures of the ions. The experiments extracted peculiar results for the magnetic properties of the ions, and show certain novel features of the technique to the study of solid-state magnetism. Copyright (1998) Australian Journal of Physics

  16. Features of rare earth element (3) complexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, L.I.

    1991-01-01

    Reasons for nonobeyance to the regularity of tetrad ''W'' effect of rare earth chelate complex compounds are discussed in the review. The concept of metal-ligand ionic bond in rare earth complexes is put in the basis of the consideration. From this viewpoint mutual influence of ligands in lower, higher, polynuclear and different-ligand complexes, formed by the ligands of low, medium and high denticity, is discussed. Problems of intermolecular interaction of complexes with different structure are considered in relation to problems of variation of chelate volatility and selectivity in the processes of sublimation and precipitation

  17. Rubber compounding and processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This chapter presents an overview on the compounding and processing techniques of natural rubber compounds. The introductory portion deals with different types of rubbers and principles of rubber compounding. The primary and secondary fillers used...

  18. Digital Earth – A sustainable Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahavir

    2014-01-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth

  19. The earth's gravitational field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . But to say that gravity acts downwards is not correct. Gravity acts down, no matter where you stand on the Earth. It is better to say that on Earth gravity pulls objects towards the centre of the Earth. So no matter where you are on Earth all objects fall... pull than objects at the poles. In combination, the equatorial bulge and the effects of centrifugal force mean that sea-level gravitational acceleration increases from about 9.780 m/s² at the equator to about 9.832 m/s² at the poles, so an object...

  20. Geomagnetic field of earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delipetrev, Marjan; Delipetrev, Blagoj; Panovska, Sanja

    2008-01-01

    In this paper is introduced the theory of geomagnetic field of the Earth. A homogenous and isotropic sphere is taken for a model of Earth with a bar magnet at its center as a magnetic potential. The understanding of the real origin of geomagnetic field produced from differential rotation of inner core with respect to the outer core of Earth is here presented. Special attention is given to the latest observed data of the established net of geomagnetic repeat stations in the Republic of Macedonia. Finally, the maps of elements of geomagnetic field and the equation for calculation of normal magnetic field of Earth are provided. (Author)

  1. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zaki; Lamb, Christopher A.; Ross, Shane D.

    2012-12-01

    The list of detected near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is constantly growing. NEAs are likely targets for resources to support space industrialization, as they may be the least expensive source of certain needed raw materials. The limited supply of precious metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating in the form of asteroids around the solar system. Precious metals make up a significant fraction NEAs by mass, and even one metallic asteroid of ˜1km size and fair enrichment in platinum-group metals would contain twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are ˜1000 NEAs with a diameter of greater than 1 km. Capturing these asteroids around the Earth would expand the mining industry into an entirely new dimension. Having such resources within easy reach in Earth's orbit could provide an off-world environmentally friendly remedy for impending terrestrial shortages, especially given the need for raw materials in developing nations. In this paper, we develop and implement a conceptually simple algorithm to determine trajectory characteristics necessary to move NEAs into capture orbits around the Earth. Altered trajectories of asteroids are calculated using an ephemeris model. Only asteroids of eccentricity less than 0.1 have been studied and the model is restricted to the ecliptic plane for simplicity. We constrain the time of retrieval to be 10 years or less, based on considerations of the time to return on investment. For the heliocentric phase, constant acceleration is assumed. The acceleration required for transporting these asteroids from their undisturbed orbits to the sphere of influence of the Earth is the primary output, along with the impulse or acceleration necessary to effect capture to a bound orbit once the Earth's sphere of influence is reached. The initial guess for the constant acceleration is provided by a new estimation method, similar in spirit to Edelbaum's. Based on the

  2. Solid-phase synthesis of compounds of europium and terbium with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds under mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovskaya, I.V.; Karasev, V.E.

    2000-01-01

    Effect of solvents and parameters of mechanical treatment on basic regularities of synthesis of rare earth compounds with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds is studied. It is shown that interaction on europium (3) and terbium (3) nitrates with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds leads to formation of compounds of Ln(NO 3 )·2D composition, where Ln=Eu, Tb; D=2,2-dipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, diphenylguanidine. Effect of conditions of mechanical treatment and different additions on process and yield of products is studied. Compounds prepared are characterized by the methods of chemical element analysis, IR spectroscopy and luminescent spectroscopy [ru

  3. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  4. EARTH FROM SPACE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. EARTH FROM SPACE · Slide 2 · Earth System · Slide 4 · Global water cycle · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Direct Observations of Recent Climate Change · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Snow cover and Arctic sea ice are decreasing · Polar Melting & Global Heat Transport · Antarctica: Melting and Thickening · Slide 14 · Slide 15.

  5. Earth and Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosygin, Yu A

    1986-12-01

    Rocks, the age of which according to certain data exceeds considerably the recognized age of the Earth and approximates the age of the Universe, have been detected on the Earth. There is a necessity to coordinate the geological data with cosmological structures.

  6. Hands On Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  7. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  8. Earth System Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  9. Actinide-pnictide (An-Pn) bonds spanning non-metal, metalloid, and metal combinations (An=U, Th; Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rookes, Thomas M.; Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gregson, Matthew; Tuna, Floriana; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2018-01-26

    The synthesis and characterisation is presented of the compounds [An(Tren{sup DMBS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] and [An(Tren{sup TIPS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] [Tren{sup DMBS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiMe{sub 2}Bu{sup t}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi; An=Th, Pn=P, As; Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb; An=Th, Pn=P, As, Sb]. The U-Sb and Th-Sb moieties are unprecedented examples of any kind of An-Sb molecular bond, and the U-Bi bond is the first two-centre-two-electron (2c-2e) one. The Th-Bi combination was too unstable to isolate, underscoring the fragility of these linkages. However, the U-Bi complex is the heaviest 2c-2e pairing of two elements involving an actinide on a macroscopic scale under ambient conditions, and this is exceeded only by An-An pairings prepared under cryogenic matrix isolation conditions. Thermolysis and photolysis experiments suggest that the U-Pn bonds degrade by homolytic bond cleavage, whereas the more redox-robust thorium compounds engage in an acid-base/dehydrocoupling route. (copyright 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  10. Sanskrit Compound Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Vipul; Kulkarni, Amba

    Sanskrit is very rich in compound formation. Typically a compound does not code the relation between its components explicitly. To understand the meaning of a compound, it is necessary to identify its components, discover the relations between them and finally generate a paraphrase of the compound. In this paper, we discuss the automatic segmentation and type identification of a compound using simple statistics that results from the manually annotated data.

  11. A study of new rare-earth metal group-13 chalcohalides. Structures, chemistry, and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorhout, P.K.; Van Calcar, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Several new quaternary compounds from the rare-earth metal group-13 chalcohalide family have been prepared from alkaline earth halide flux reactions of binary and elemental starting materials. One compound, for example, Ca 2 La 6G a 2 S 1 4 , crystallizes as needles in an hexagonal cell while another, more disordered structure, La 11 Ga 19 Cl 6 S 42 , crystallizes as monoclinic plates. The former is a condensed structure with channels that contain the alkaline earth element while the latter forms a layered structure containing rare-earth halide clusters within interlayer galleries. These compounds are new members of a family of rare-earth metal main-group chalcogenides which show promise as electroluminescent materials. Structural and spectroscopic studies of these and related compounds will be discussed

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  13. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  14. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  15. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  16. Project Earth Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Project Earth Science: Astronomy, Revised 2nd Edition, involves students in activities that focus on Earth's position in our solar system. How do we measure astronomical distances? How can we look back in time as we gaze across vast distances in space? How would our planet be different without its particular atmosphere and distance to our star? What are the geometries among Earth, the Moon, and the Sun that yield lunar phases and seasons? Students explore these concepts and others in 11 teacher-tested activities.

  17. Earth formation porosity log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining the porosity of earth formations in the vicinity of a cased well borehole is described, comprising the steps of: irradiating the earth formations in the vicinity of the cased well borehole with fast neutrons from a source of fast neutrons passed into the borehole; and generating a signal representative of the fast neutron population present in the well borehole at a location in the borehole, the signal is functionally related to the porosity of the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole

  18. Earth before life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  19. Chromates (3) and chromates (5) of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suponitskij, Yu.L.

    1986-01-01

    Data on preparation methods, structure and properties of chromates (3, 5) and mixed chromates (3) of rare earths, scandium and yttrium are generalized. Phase diagrams of systems Ln 2 O 3 -Cr 2 O 3 (Ln - rare earths, Sc, Y), chemical and thermodynamic properties of chromates (3, 5), their crystal structure and character of thermal decomposition are considered. Application fields of the compounds mentioned are suggested

  20. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  1. Rare earths production and marketing opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falconnet, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The rare earths (RE) market is relatively small. The total production during 1968 was only 10000 tons (REO) which rose to 27000 tons (REO) during 1985. The three major areas of application, which are volume market for ceric rare earths are catalysts, glass ceramics and metallurgy. Among the other uses of rare earths, the permanent magnets, lamp phosphors and fine ceramics have registered significant growth in RE consumption. Monazite and bastnasite are the main natural source for rare earths and processing of these for one of the rare earths in high demand leads to over production of some others not in demand, thus creating a balance problem. The growth in RE market has always been influenced by the technology shifts and product substitution. For example, the RE consumption during 1974/76 for desulfurization of steel had substantially decreased due to the usage of calcium. Similarly, 1985 had witnessed a drastic cut in the use of REs in fluid cracking due to the introduction of stabilized zeolites which contain less REO. Thus, the overall compound growth rate of demand was only 3.9 % per year during the period 1970-1985. At present, 37 % of the rare earths production goes to the glass/ceramics industry, 33 % for catalyst and 25 % to metallurgy. The price of REs constantly shows a downward trend. This trend coupled with the rapid changes taking place in the various technological fields, demands greater flexibility and high marketing skills from the RE producers. The key factor for future expansion of RE market will be the development of 'high volume' application of ceric rare earths. (author) 2 figs., 8 tabs

  2. A crystal chemical approach to superconductivity. I. A bond-valence sum analysis of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebau, Friedrich; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Wang, Xiqu

    2011-01-01

    A crystal-chemical approach to superconductivity is described that is intended to complement the corresponding physical approach. The former approach takes into account the distinction between the stoichiometric valence ( stoich V) and the structural valence ( struct V) which is represented by the bond-valence sums (BVS). Through calculations of BVS values from crystal-structure data determined at ambient temperature and pressure it has been found that in chalcogenides und pnictides of the transition metals Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, Hf, and Zr the atoms of the potential superconducting units yield values of vertical stroke BVS vertical stroke = vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke ≥ 1.11 x vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke, whereas the atoms of the charge reservoirs have in general values of vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke. In corresponding compounds which contain the same elements but are not becoming superconducting, nearly all atoms are found to have vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke. For atoms of oxocuprates that are not becoming superconducting and for atoms of the charge reservoirs of oxocuprates that become superconducting, the relation vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke seems also to be fulfilled, with the exception of Ba. However, in several oxocuprates the relation vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke = 1.11 x vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke for the atoms that become superconducting units is violated. These violations seem to indicate that in oxocuprates it is the local bond-valence distribution rather than the bond-valence sums that is essential for superconductivity. The present analysis can possibly be used to predict, by a simple consideration of ambient-T, P structures, whether a compound can become an unconventional superconductor at low T, under high P and/or by doping, or not. (orig.)

  3. Earth's variable rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  4. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...... and accepted. The European Space Agency mission Gaia is a proposed space observatory, designed to perform a highly accurate census of our galaxy, the Milky Way, and beyond. Through accurate measurement of star positions, Gaia is expected to discover thousands of extra-solar planets and follow the bending...... of starlight by the Sun, and therefore directly observe the structure of space-time. This thesis explores several aspects of the observation of NEOs with Gaia, emphasising detection of NEOs and the quality of orbits computed from Gaia observations. The main contribution is the work on motion detection...

  5. Earth study from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  6. Earth's electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    The earth becomes charged during thunderstorm activity and discharges through the weak conducting atmosphere. Balloon and rocket studies infer that a high altitude electric field penetrates virtually unattenuated through the atmosphere, at least as far as balloon heights. The field has two primary sources. At low and mid latitudes, interaction between the earth's magnetic field and the neutral wind creates electric fields. At latitudes above 60 0 , the high altitude electrical structure is dominated by the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetic field. The auroral light is emitted by atmospheric atoms and molecules excited by electrons with potentials of many thousands volts. The potentials are induced by the solar wind. Recent satellite data shows that the electrons get this energy by passing through a localized electric field about 6000 km above the auroral zone. Several rocket and satellite experiments used to study the earth's electric field are discussed

  7. Near Earth Asteroid Scout

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Near-Earth Asteroid Scout, or NEA Scout, is a 6U CubeSat developed jointly between NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. NASA...

  8. Gambling with the earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Muir, H

    2000-01-01

    The probability that dangerous Earth-devouring particles will be born at a new accelerator in the US may be tiny, but scientists have played down the devastating potential costs in their risk assessments according to a physicist (1 page).

  9. Jupiter and planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included

  10. Earth retaining structures manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-29

    The objectives of this policy are to obtain statewide uniformity, establish standard : procedures and delineate responsibility for the preparation and review of plans, : design and construction control of earth retaining structures. In addition, it i...

  11. Earliest life on earth

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Suzanne D

    2010-01-01

    This volume integrates the latest findings on earliest life forms, identified and characterized in some of the oldest rocks on Earth. It places emphasis on the integration of analytical methods with observational techniques and experimental simulations.

  12. Raw materials for advanced ceramics: rare earths separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, D.R.; Nobre, J.S.M.; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of obtaining purified rare earths oxidesis related, mainly to the increasing use of these compounds as raw materials for advanced ceramics. Processes of rare earths separation and purification are almost always based on the solvent extraction, fractional precipitation and ion exchange chromatography techniques, whose association depends on the initial concentrate and on the desired purity. This paper describes some steps of fractionation of didymium carbonate by using the solvent extraction and fractional precipitation techniques. The experimental conditions presented here have enable the production of lantanium, neodimium - praseodimium, samarium - gadolinium and ytrium concentrates, which constitute the intermediate fractions of the overall process to obtain high purity rare earths. (author) [pt

  13. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from monazite sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Vanessa L; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Three fungal strains were found to be capable of bioleaching rare earth elements from monazite, a rare earth phosphate mineral, utilizing the monazite as a phosphate source and releasing rare earth cations into solution. These organisms include one known phosphate solubilizing fungus, Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015, as well as two newly isolated fungi: an Aspergillus terreus strain ML3-1 and a Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F. Although monazite also contains the radioactive element Thorium, bioleaching by these fungi preferentially solubilized rare earth elements over Thorium, leaving the Thorium in the solid residual. Adjustments in growth media composition improved bioleaching performance measured as rare earth release. Cell-free spent medium generated during growth of A. terreus strain ML3-1 and Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F in the presence of monazite leached rare earths to concentrations 1.7-3.8 times those of HCl solutions of comparable pH, indicating that compounds exogenously released by these organisms contribute substantially to leaching. Organic acids released by the organisms included acetic, citric, gluconic, itaconic, oxalic, and succinic acids. Abiotic leaching with laboratory prepared solutions of these acids was not as effective as bioleaching or leaching with cell-free spent medium at releasing rare earths from monazite, indicating that compounds other than the identified organic acids contribute to leaching performance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Optimal Safety EarthingEarth Electrode Sizing Using A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper a deterministic approach in the sizing of earth electrode using the permissible touch voltage criteria is presented. The deterministic approach is effectively applied in the sizing of the length of earth rod required for the safe earthing of residential and facility buildings. This approach ensures that the earthing ...

  15. A study on artificial rare earth (RE2O3) based neutron absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIM, Kyung-O; Kyung KIM, Jong

    2015-01-01

    A new concept of a neutron absorption material (i.e., an artificial rare earth compound) was introduced for criticality control in a spent fuel storage system. In particular, spent nuclear fuels were considered as a potential source of rare earth elements because the nuclear fission of uranium produces a full range of nuclides. It was also found that an artificial rare earth compound (RE 2 O 3 ) as a High-Level Waste (HLW) was naturally extracted from pyroprocessing technology developed for recovering uranium and transuranic elements (TRU) from spent fuels. In this study, various characteristics (e.g., activity, neutron absorption cross-section) were analyzed for validating the application possibility of this waste compound as a neutron absorption material. As a result, the artificial rare earth compound had a higher neutron absorption probability in the entire energy range, and it can be used for maintaining sub-criticality for more than 40 years on the basis of the neutron absorption capability of Boral™. Therefore, this approach is expected to vastly improve the efficiency of radioactive waste management by simultaneously keeping HLW and spent nuclear fuel in a restricted space. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in PWR spent fuels. • Extraction of artificial rare earth compound using pyroprocessing technology. • Characteristic analysis of artificial rare earth elements. • Performance evaluation of artificial rare earth for criticality control.

  16. Radiological aspects in a monazite based rare earth production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikumar, M.; Sujata, R.; Chinnaesakki, S.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.; Nair, N.N.G.

    2011-01-01

    One of the largest reserves of monazite in the world is present in the Indian subcontinent. Monazite ore has around 8-9% thorium oxide and nearly 60% Rare earth oxides. Selective acid extraction is used to separate the composite rare earths. The main radiological hazard arises from the presence of thorium and its daughter products. Monitoring of the radiation field and air activity in the rare earths plant is done routinely to reduce the radiation exposure to plant personnel. The separation of uranium and rare earths from Thorium concentrate separated from Monazite is being done as a part of the THRUST (Thorium Retrieval, Recovery of Uranium and Re-storage of Thorium) project from 2004 at Indian Rare Earths Limited, Udyogamandal. The radiological aspect for this extraction of uranium and rare earths was studied. The general radiation field in the rare earth production plant was 0.3-5.0 μGyh -1 and the average short lived air activity was 46 ± 7 mWL. The long lived air activity arising from 232 Th is very insignificant radiologically. The occupational radiation exposure for the rare earths separation plant is only 6 % of the total dose and the estimated average individual dose is 1.6 mSv per year. Studies were also done to estimate the residual radioactivity in the separated rare earth compounds using gamma spectrometry and the results showed significant presence of 227 Ac arising due to the protactinium fraction in the thorium concentrate. This activity is not detectable in a freshly separated rare earth compound but can buildup with time. (author)

  17. Preparation and physical properties of rare earth, alkaline earth, and transition metal ternary chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgobiani, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    A study was made on current-voltage characteristics, temperature dependences of electric conductivity and currents of thermoinduced depolarization of monocrystals, including EuGa 2 S 4 and (Ga 2 S 3 ) 1-x (Eu 2 O 3 ) x solid solutions. It is shown that these compounds, activated by europium, cerium, neodymium and other rare earths, manifest effective luminescence under the effect of ultraviolet and X-radiation, as well as under the effect of electron beams and electric field

  18. Electronic phase diagrams and competing ground states of complex iron pnictides and chalcogenides. A Moessbauer spectroscopy and muon spin rotation/relaxation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamusella, Sirko

    2017-03-01

    In this thesis the superconducting and magnetic phases of LiOH(Fe,Co)(Se,S), CuFeAs/CuFeSb, and LaFeP{sub 1-x}As{sub x}O - belonging to the 11, 111 and 1111 structural classes of iron-based arsenides and chalcogenides - are investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and muon spin rotation/relaxation (μSR). Of major importance in this study is the application of high magnetic fields in Moessbauer spectroscopy to distinguish and characterize ferro- (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) order. A user-friendly Moessbauer data analysis program was developed to provide suitable model functions not only for high field spectra, but relaxation spectra or parameter distributions in general. In LaFeP{sub 1-x}As{sub x}O the reconstruction of the Fermi surface is described by the vanishing of the Γ hole pocket with decreasing x. The continuous change of the orbital character and the covalency of the d-electrons is shown by Moessbauer spectroscopy. A novel antiferromagnetic phase with small magnetic moments of ∼ 0.1 μ{sub B} state is characterized. The superconducting order parameter is proven to continuously change from a nodal to a fully gapped s-wave like Fermi surface in the superconducting regime as a function of x, partially investigated on (O,F) substituted samples. LiOHFeSe is one of the novel intercalated FeSe compounds, showing strongly increased T{sub C} = 43 K mainly due to increased interlayer spacing and resulting two-dimensionality of the Fermi surface. The primary interest of the samples of this thesis is the simultaneously observed ferromagnetism and superconductivity. The local probe techniques prove that superconducting sample volume gets replaced by ferromagnetic volume. Ferromagnetism arises from magnetic order with T{sub C} = 10 K of secondary iron in the interlayer. The tendency of this system to show (Li,Fe) disorder is preserved upon (Se,S) substitution. However, superconductivity gets suppressed. The results of Moessbauer spectroscopy

  19. Spontaneous magnetoelastic effects in gadolinium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindbaum, A.; Rotter, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This poster is a short summary of a recently published handbook chapter, where the spontaneous magnetoelastic effects in Gd compounds are reviewed showing that the strain dependence of the magnetic exchange interactions leads to significant effects. These effects are equal in magnitude to well established single ion contributions in other rare earth compounds with non vanishing orbital momentum (coming from the strain dependence of the crystal field). In some cases the exchange contribution can produce giant magnetostriction (GMS) or induce structural phase transitions. In order to extract the influence of the Gd- Gd exchange interactions, we consider only Gd compounds with partner elements showing no or only weak induced magnetic moments. The current status of the theory is presented and compared to measurements performed by temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and results of dilatometric measurements. (author)

  20. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  1. Earth and planetary sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetherill, G.W.; Drake, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The earth is a dynamic body. The major surface manifestation of this dynamism has been fragmentation of the earth's outer shell and subsequent relative movement of the pieces on a large scale. Evidence for continental movement came from studies of geomagnetism. As the sea floor spreads and new crust is formed, it is magnetized with the polarity of the field at the time of its formation. The plate tectonics model explains the history, nature, and topography of the oceanic crust. When a lithospheric plate surmounted by continental crust collides with an oceanic lithosphere, it is the denser oceanic lithosphere that is subducted. Hence the ancient oceans have vanished and the knowledge of ancient earth will require deciphering the complex continental geological record. Geochemical investigation shows that the source region of continental rocks is not simply the depleted mantle that is characteristic of the source region of basalts produced at the oceanic ridges. The driving force of plate tectonics is convection within the earth, but much remains to be learned about the convection and interior of the earth. A brief discussion of planetary exploration is given

  2. The earth's hydrological cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, R-M; Calisto, M; Destouni, G; Gurney, R; Johannessen, J; Kerr, Y; Lahoz, WA; Rast, M

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive presentation of our present understanding of the Earth's Hydrological cycle and the problems, consequences and impacts that go with this topic. Water is a central component in the Earth's system. It is indispensable for life on Earth in its present form and influences virtually every aspect of our planet's life support system. On relatively short time scales, atmospheric water vapor interacts with the atmospheric circulation and is crucial in forming the Earth's climate zones. Water vapor is the most powerful of the greenhouse gases and serves to enhance the tropospheric temperature. The dominant part of available water on Earth resides in the oceans. Parts are locked up in the land ice on Greenland and Antarctica and a smaller part is estimated to exist as groundwater. If all the ice over the land and all the glaciers were to melt, the sea level would rise by some 80 m. In comparison, the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is small; it amounts to ~ 25 kg/m2, or the ...

  3. Modeling the earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  4. The Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  5. Magnetic properties of rare-earth intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayr, H.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the concepts at present used to explain the magnetic properties of rare-earth intermetallics which have been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Rare-earth intermetallics with the formula Rsub(a)Bsub(b) are divided according to the magnetic moment of the B atom(s). If there is no magnetic moment present at the B-site, the exchange is only between the magnetic moments at the R-sites, which can only be of indirect character. One possible model is still the RKKY model, although it usually gives in practice only a qualitative description of the magnetic properties. Typical R-B compounds with the B-moment equal to zero are (for instance) the RA1 2 compounds, and related compounds such as the RZn and RCd compounds as well as compounds of the general formula RB 2 (B = Ni, Os, Ir, Pd, Ru or Rh). Of all intermetallics with nonzero B-moment, the R-3d intermetallics are the most important. These intermetallics can be formed with Mn, Fe, Co and Ni. In these systems there exist in principle three interactions, namely between the R-R, R-3d and 3d-3d atoms. The most important is usually the latter interaction. After a short discussion of the crystal structures which occur with R-3d intermetallics, the basic magnetic properties of R-3d intermetallics are presented. These properties are discussed with respect to the formation of a magnetic moment at the 3d site in the framework of present band theories. Special emphasis is given to a discussion of the localized or itinerant character of 3d electrons. (author)

  6. Crystal chemistry and magnetic properties of ternary rare earth sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plug, C.M.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1977-01-01

    The results of magnetic measurements on two groups of ternary rare earth sulphides are described, the MLnS 2 (M=Li, Na, K) type of compounds and the series Ln 2 ZrS 5 , where Ln denotes one of the rare earths. None of these compounds is metallic, excluding the possibility of RKKY-interaction. In chapter II a survey of the relevant theory on magnetic properties and crystal field splitting is given. In spite of the similarity in chemical properties of the rare earths, the crystal chemistry of their compounds is rather complex. This is due to the lanthanide contraction. The third chapter deals with the description and classification of the numerous crystal structures of both ternary and binary rare earth sulphides that have been observed. Rather simple relations between various structures are presented using a new method of structure classification. The magnetic interactions expected to be based on superexchange via the anions, which is usually very structure dependent. Experiments to study the crystallographic ordering, applying both X-ray and electron diffraction methods and the results of the magnetic measurements on the compounds MLnS 2 are reported in chapter IV. The compounds Ln 2 ZrS 5 are candidates for a systematic study of the variation of the magnetic properties along the rare earth series. The results of magnetic measurements on these compounds are presented in chapter V, combined with the results of specific heat measurements. Also the magnetic structure of two representatives, Tb 2 ZrS 5 and Dy 2 ZrS 5 , determined by neutron diffraction experiments below the ordering temperature, is reported

  7. Use of crown compounds and cryptands in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazius, Eh.; Yansen, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    Possibilities of crown compound and crypton application in amalytical chemistry for separation (extraction, chromatography) and determination of different cations and anions are considered. It is marked that monomeric cyclic polyethers are mainly used for separation and determination of alkali and alkaline earth metals. Linear polymers of cyclic polyethers are exclusively used for extraction of their salts. Cross-linked polymeric cyclic polyethers permit to carry out the separation and determination of most of cations (including transition, rare earth elements, actinides), anions and organic compounds. 99 refs.; 10 figs.; 8 tabs

  8. X-ray powder diffraction data on miscellaneous lanthanide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.; Hughes, T.E.

    1978-08-01

    Recent work on neutron absorbing materials has produced various new X-ray diffraction powder patterns of compounds of the lanthanides. Various inconsistencies in previously published data have been noted, and accurate measurements have been made of the lattice parameters of the rare earth oxides Sm 2 0 3 , Eu 2 0 3 , Gd 2 0 3 which have the monoclinic rare earth type B- structure, as well as Eu0. These data are recorded for reference. The optimum conditions for obtaining X-ray powder diffraction data from europium compounds are also noted. (author)

  9. Earth's Trojan asteroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Martin; Wiegert, Paul; Veillet, Christian

    2011-07-27

    It was realized in 1772 that small bodies can stably share the same orbit as a planet if they remain near 'triangular points' 60° ahead of or behind it in the orbit. Such 'Trojan asteroids' have been found co-orbiting with Jupiter, Mars and Neptune. They have not hitherto been found associated with Earth, where the viewing geometry poses difficulties for their detection, although other kinds of co-orbital asteroid (horseshoe orbiters and quasi-satellites) have been observed. Here we report an archival search of infrared data for possible Earth Trojans, producing the candidate 2010 TK(7). We subsequently made optical observations which established that 2010 TK(7) is a Trojan companion of Earth, librating around the leading Lagrange triangular point, L(4). Its orbit is stable over at least ten thousand years.

  10. How Big is Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  11. On some derived compounds of fluorides of Cerium III or IV: defined compounds and non stoichiometric phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse, Jean-Pierre

    1968-01-01

    This research study addresses the study of rare earth fluorides. It reports the preparation and study of new fluoro-cerates (IV) in order to complete the set of already known compounds (ammonium fluoro-cerate, and alkaline earth compounds), the study of binary CeF 3 binary systems, monovalent and divalent fluorides, and CeF 3 -NF 2 -N'F ternary systems, and the study of non stoichiometric phases in CeF 3 oxides, sulphides and selenides [fr

  12. Teaching earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, Michael F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  13. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  14. IR and the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf; Stevenson, Hayley

    2017-01-01

    , in the end, one finite interconnected space. Together these two starting points make for the basic conundrum of Inter- national Relations and the Earth: how does a divided world live on a single globe? This introduction first provides an overview of the recent rise of ‘the environment’ in international......, ‘what has the environment ever done for IR?’, before the plan for the rest of the book sketches the content and direction of the ensuing chapters that explore the problematique of International Relations and the Earth....

  15. Characterization, electrical transport and magnetic properties of the rare earth misfit layer compounds (TbS)(1.21)NbS2, (TbS)(1.20)TaS2, (DyS)(1.22)NbS2 and (DyS)(1.21)TaS2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, W.Y.; Meetsma, A.; deBoer, J.L.; Wiegers, G.A

    1996-01-01

    X-ray powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction of the title compounds showed that they are planar intergrowth compounds, built of alternating sandwiches TS2 (T=Nb, Ta) and double layers LnS (Ln=Tb, Dy), present in three orientational variants related by rotations of 120 degrees around the c axis

  16. Process for making rare earth metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruesi, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    An uncombined metal or a metal compound such as a sulfide, oxide, carbonate or sulfate is converted in a liquid salt bath to the corresponding metal chloride by reacting it with chlorine gas or a chlorine donor. The process applies to metals of groups 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4a, 5a and 8 of the periodic table and to the rare earth metals. The chlorine donor may be ferric or sulfur chloride. The liquid fused salt bath is made up of chlorides of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, ammonia, zinc and ferric iron. Because the formed metal chlorides are soluble in the liquid fused salt bath, they can be recovered by various conventional means

  17. The Earth's Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's plasmasphere is an inner part of the magneteosphere. It is located just outside the upper ionosphere located in Earth's atmosphere. It is a region of dense, cold plasma that surrounds the Earth. Although plasma is found throughout the magnetosphere, the plasmasphere usually contains the coldest plasma. Here's how it works: The upper reaches of our planet's atmosphere are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun, and they are ionized with electrons that are freed from neutral atmospheric particles. The results are electrically charged negative and positive particles. The negative particles are electrons, and the positive particles are now called ions (formerly atoms and molecules). If the density of these particles is low enough, this electrically charged gas behaves differently than it would if it were neutral. Now this gas is called plasma. The atmospheric gas density becomes low enough to support the conditions for a plasma around earth at about 90 kilometers above Earth's surface. The electrons in plasma gain more energy, and they are very low in mass. They move along Earth's magnetic field lines and their increased energy is enough to escape Earth's gravity. Because electrons are very light, they don't have to gain too much kinetic energy from the Sun's ultraviolet light before gravity loses its grip on them. Gravity is not all that holds them back, however. As more and more electrons begin to escape outward, they leave behind a growing net positive electric charge in the ionosphere and create a growing net negative electric charge above the ionosphere; an electric field begins to develop (the Pannekoek-Rosseland E-field). Thus, these different interacting charges result in a positively charged ionosphere and negatively charged region of space above it. Very quickly this resulting electric field opposed upward movement of the electrons out of the ionosphere. The electrons still have this increased energy, however, so the electric field doesn't just

  18. On the luminescence of perovskite type rare earth gallates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianmei, Y.; Qingyuan, W.; Shuzhen, L.; Lianren, S.; Mingyu, C.

    1985-01-01

    It has been reported that perovskite type lanthanum gallates may be a good host material for laser and luminescence, but in the rare earth gallates studied, the numbers of perovskite type are less than that of the garnet type and there is less report on their spectroscopic properties in the literature. In this paper synthesis and spectroscopic properties of these compounds are studied

  19. Mechanism of structural type formation of rare earth polychalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'micheva, G.M.; Eliseev, A.A.; Khalina, S.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    It proved to be possible to obtain the structural motives not only of all the known polychalcogenides of rare earth elements but to forecast compounds not yet existing on the basis of two initial structural motives. All the structural motives can be divided into superstructures and polytypes as to the mechanism of their formation [ru

  20. Alkaline-earth metal phenylphosphonates and their intercalation chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, L.; Svoboda, J.; Zima, Vítězslav; Pospíšil, M.; Kovář, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 9 (2018), s. 2867-2880 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-10639S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : intercalation * layered compounds * alkaline-earth metal phenylphosphonates Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.029, year: 2016

  1. Antiferromagnetic ordering of Er2NiSi3 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Ternary intermetallics of the stoichiometric composition R 2 TX 3 , where, R = rare earth element, T = d-electron transition metal and X= p-electron element, crystallizes in hexagonal A1B 2 type crystal structure with space group P6/mmm. We report here the synthesis and basic magnetic properties of the compound Er 2 NiSi 3 . Paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic phase change occurs below 5.4 K for this compound. (author)

  2. "Galileo Calling Earth..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide presents an activity for helping students understand how data from the Galileo spacecraft is sent to scientists on earth. Students are asked to learn about the concepts of bit-rate and resolution and apply them to the interpretation of images from the Galileo Orbiter. (WRM)

  3. Bones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  4. Our bubbling Earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    In several places on earth large volumes of gas are seen to escape. These gases are usually dominated by CO2. The emissions are associated with volcanic activity, and are attributed to magma degassing. It will be shown that in the case of Milos this explanation is unacceptable for quantitative

  5. Cosmic rays on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted. (GSCH)

  6. Earth as art 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2016-03-29

    Landsat 8 is the latest addition to the long-running series of Earth-observing satellites in the Landsat program that began in 1972. The images featured in this fourth installment of the Earth As Art collection were all acquired by Landsat 8. They show our planet’s diverse landscapes with remarkable clarity.Landsat satellites see the Earth as no human can. Not only do they acquire images from the vantage point of space, but their sensors record infrared as well as visible wavelengths of light. The resulting images often reveal “hidden” details of the Earth’s land surface, making them invaluable for scientific research.As with previous Earth As Art exhibits, these Landsat images were selected solely for their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation—only for your viewing pleasure. What do you see in these unique glimpses of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastlines?

  7. Google Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  8. How life shaped Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-05

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet.

  9. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  10. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  11. Earth Science Misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, William C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a list of over 50 commonly held misconceptions based on a literature review found in students and adults. The list covers earth science topics such as space, the lithosphere, the biosphere, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the cryosphere. (KR)

  12. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  13. Handbook on the physics and chemistry of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Eyring, L.

    1982-01-01

    This handbook is a six-volume work which covers the entire rare earth field in an integrated manner. Each chapter is a comprehensive, up-to-date, critical review of a particular segment of the field. The first volume is devoted to the rare earth metals, the second to rare earth alloys and intermetallics, and the third and fourth volumes to the non-metallic rare earth materials, including solutions, complexes and bioinorganic substances, in addition to solid inorganic compounds. The electronic structure of these unique elements is the primary basis of understanding their physical, metallurgical and chemical natures. The interrelationship of the 4f and valence electrons and the observed optical, electrical, magnetic, crystallographic, elastic, thermal, mechanical, chemical, geochemical and biological behaviors is brought forth time and again throughout the chapters. Also discussed are the preparative, separation and solution chemistry of the elements and their compounds and the various chemical and physical analytical methods for determining the rare earths in various materials and impurities in a rare earth matrix. Vol. 5 is a update complement of the previous volumes. Volume 6 is concerned with ternary and higher order materials. (Auth.)

  14. Squeezing clathrate cages to host trivalent rare-earth guests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Department of Chemistry; Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); He, Yuping [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Mordvinova, Natalia E. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, CNRS UMR (France); Lebedev, Oleg [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, CNRS UMR (France); Kovnir, Kirill [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Department of Chemistry; Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Strike difference of the trivalent rare-earth cations from their alkali and alkaline-earth peers is in the presence of localized 4f-electrons and strong spin-orbit coupling. Placing trivalent rare-earth cations inside the fullerene molecules or in between the blocks of itinerant magnetic intermetallics gave rise to plethora of fascinating properties and materials. A long-time missing but hardly desired piece is the semiconducting or metallic compound where rare-earth cations are situated inside the oversized polyhedral cages of three-dimensional framework. In this work we present a synthesis of such compounds, rare-earth containing clathrates Ba8-xRxCu16P30. The unambiguous proofs of their composition and crystal structure were achieved by a combination of synchrotron powder diffraction, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction, scanning-transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Our quantum-mechanical calculations and experimental characterizations show that the incorporation of the rare-earth cations significantly enhances the hole mobility and concentration which results in the drastic increase in the thermoelectric performance.

  15. Study of rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Tai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    Benefiting from unique properties of 4f electrons, rare earth based compounds are known for offering a versatile playground for condensed matter physics research as well as industrial applications. This thesis focuses on three specific examples that further explore the rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures.

  16. Coated air-stable cobalt--rare earth alloy particles and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeggil, J.C.; Charles, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for producing novel air-stable coated particles of a magnetic transition metal-rare earth alloys. An organometallic compound which decomposes at a temperature below 500 0 C is heated to produce a metal vapor which is contacted with particles of a transition metal-rare earth alloy to deposit a metal coating on the particles. (U.S.)

  17. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.A.; Saunders, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th and 40 K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 10 6 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)

  18. The Earth's Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, scientists have been able to monitor our changing planet in ways never before possible. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, has given researchers an unprecedented view of the biological engine that drives life on Earth-the countless forms of plants that cover the land and fill the oceans. 'There is no question the Earth is changing. SeaWiFS has enabled us, for the first time, to monitor the biological consequences of that change-to see how the things we do, as well as natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life,' said Gene Carl Feldman, SeaWiFS project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. SeaWiFS data, based on continuous daily global observations, have helped scientists make a more accurate assessment of the oceans' role in the global carbon cycle. The data provide a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies as well as global climate-change modeling. The images of the Earth's changing land, ocean and atmosphere from SeaWiFS have documented many previously unrecognized phenomena. The image above shows the global biosphere from June 2002 measured by SeaWiFS. Data in the oceans is chlorophyll concentration, a measure of the amount of phytoplankton (microscopic plants) living in the ocean. On land SeaWiFS measures Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, an indication of the density of plant growth. For more information and images, read: SeaWiFS Sensor Marks Five Years Documenting Earth'S Dynamic Biosphere Image courtesy SeaWiFS project and copyright Orbimage.

  19. Global recovery process of thorium and rare earths in a nitrate medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cailly, F.; Mottot, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The aqueous solution of thorium and rare earth nitrates, obtained by leaching the ore with nitric acid, is extracted by an organic phosphorous compound (phosphate, phosphonate, phosphinate or phosphine oxide) and a cationic extractant chosen among phosphoric acid di-esters. Extraction of thorium and rare earths is possible even in presence of phosphate ions in the aqueous solution. Thorium and rare earths are separated by liquid-liquid extraction of the organic phase

  20. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  1. Visualizing Earth Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Stibbon, E.; Harris, R.

    2016-12-01

    Earth materials are fundamental to art. They are pigments, they are clay, they provide form and color. Earth scientists, however, rarely attempt to make the physical properties of Earth materials visible through art, and similarly many artists use Earth materials without fully understanding their physical and chemical properties. Here we explore the intersection between art and science through study of the physical properties of Earth materials as characterized in the laboratory, and as transferred to paper using different techniques and suspending media. One focus of this collaboration is volcanic ash. Ash is interesting scientifically because its form provides information on the fundamental processes that drive volcanic eruptions, and determines its transport properties, and thus its potential to affect populations far downwind of the volcano. Ash properties also affect its behavior as an art material. From an aesthetic point of view, ash lends a granular surface to the image; it is also uncontrollable, and thus requires engagement between artist and medium. More fundamentally, using ash in art creates an exchange between the medium and the subject matter, and imparts something of the physical, visceral experience of volcanic landscapes to the viewer. Another component of this work uses powdered rock as a printing medium for geologic maps. Because different types of rock create powders with different properties (grain size distributions and shapes), the geology is communicated not only as color, but also by the physical characteristics of the material as it interacts with the paper. More importantly, the use of actual rocks samples as printing material for geologic maps not only makes a direct connection between the map and the material it represents, but also provides an emotional connection between the map, the viewer and the landscape, its colors, textures and geological juxtapositions. Both case studies provide examples not only of ways in which artists can

  2. Towards earth AntineutRino TomograpHy (EARTH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Meijer, R. J.; Smit, F. D.; Brooks, F. D.; Fearick, R. W.; Wortche, H. J.; Mantovani, F.

    2006-01-01

    The programme Earth AntineutRino TomograpHy (EARTH) proposes to build ten underground facilities each hosting a telescope. Each telescope consists of many detector modules, to map the radiogenic heat sources deep in the interior of the Earth by utilising direction sensitive geoneutrino detection.

  3. Inaugeral lecture - Meteorite impacts on Earth and on the Earth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is some controversial evidence for the theory that the first life on Earth itself may have been transported here on meteorites from Mars. The possibility of a major meteorite impact on Earth in the near future emphasizes the dramatic nature of these recent discoveries, which are having deep impacts in the Earth sciences ...

  4. Addition compounds between trifluoromethanessulfonates and N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Rare-earth complex ions were prepared using dissolution of hydrated lanthnide compounds in the species used as ligand, N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) followed by evaporation of the ligand excess, and by crystallization of the dissolved complexes in DMA medium using chloroform as precipitating agent. (M.J.C.) [pt

  5. CHARGE-TRANSFER BETWEEN LAYERS IN MISFIT LAYER COMPOUNDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIEGERS, GA

    1995-01-01

    Electron donation from MX double layers to TX(2) sandwiches, the interlayer bonding and the localization of conduction electrons in misfit layer compounds (MX)(p)(TX(2))(n) (M=Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi, rare earth metals; T=Ti, V, Cr, Nb, Ta; X=S, Se; 1.08

  6. Physics of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Frank D.; Davis, Paul M.

    he fourth edition of Physics of the Earth maintains the original philosophy of this classic graduate textbook on fundamental solid earth geophysics, while being completely revised, updated, and restructured into a more modular format to make individual topics even more accessible. Building on the success of previous editions, which have served generations of students and researchers for nearly forty years, this new edition will be an invaluable resource for graduate students looking for the necessary physical and mathematical foundations to embark on their own research careers in geophysics. Several completely new chapters have been added and a series of appendices, presenting fundamental data and advanced mathematical concepts, and an extensive reference list, are provided as tools to aid readers wishing to pursue topics beyond the level of the book. Over 140 student exercises of varying levels of difficulty are also included, and full solutions are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521873628.

  7. Alkaline earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The beryllium ion has a relatively small ionic radius. As a consequence of this small size, its hydrolysis reactions begin to occur at a relatively low pH. To determine the stability and solubility constants, however, the Gibbs energy of the beryllium ion is required. In aqueous solution calcium, like the other alkaline earth metals, only exists as a divalent cation. The size of the alkaline earth cations increases with increasing atomic number, and the calcium ion is bigger than the magnesium ion. The hydrolysis of barium(II) is weaker than that of strontium(II) and also occurs in quite alkaline pH solutions, and similarly, only the species barium hydroxide has been detected. There is only a single experimental study on the hydrolysis of radium. As with the stability constant trend, it would be expected that the enthalpy of radium would be lower than that of barium due to the larger ionic radius.

  8. Heat-pipe Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics.

  9. Earth before life

    OpenAIRE

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Results Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome i...

  10. Electromagnetic compatibility and earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque Henao, Alan; Casas Ospina, Favio

    2001-01-01

    It is such the increment of applications of electric and electronic equipment in the modern companies that the lack of control of the electromagnetic perturbations, brings, get big losses and difficulties in the normal operations. The paper contribute to ago with base in the challenges that day-by-day are confronting, where the settings to earth, to be the foundation of the electric building, are fundamental for a good coexistence among the different equipment s

  11. Earth-ionosphere cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, A.; Polk, C.

    1976-01-01

    To analyze ELF wave propagation in the earth-ionosphere cavity, a flat earth approximation may be derived from the exact equations, which are applicable to the spherical cavity, by introducing a second-order or Debye approximation for the spherical Hankel functions. In the frequency range 3 to 30 Hz, however, the assumed conditions for the Debye approximation are not satisfied. For this reason an exact evaluation of the spherical Hankel functions is used to study the effects of the flat earth approximation on various propagation and resonance parameters. By comparing the resonance equation for a spherical cavity with its flat earth counterpart and by assuming that the surface impedance Z/sub i/ at the upper cavity boundary is known, the relation between the eigenvalue ν and S/sub v/, the sine of the complex angle of incidence at the lower ionosphere boundary, is established as ν(ν + 1) = (kaS/sub v/) 2 . It is also shown that the approximation ν(ν + 1) approximately equals (ν + 1/2) 2 which was used by some authors is not adequate below 30 Hz. Numerical results for both spherical and planar stratification show that (1) planar stratification is adequate for the computation of the lowest three ELF resonance frequencies to within 0.1 Hz; (2) planar stratification will lead to errors in cavity Q and wave attenuation which increase with frequency; (3) computation of resonance frequencies to within 0.1 Hz requires the extension of the lower boundary of the ionosphere to a height where the ratio of conduction current to displacement current, (sigma/ωepsilon 0 ), is less than 0.3; (4) atmospheric conductivity should be considered down to ground level in computing cavity Q and wave attenuation

  12. Superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; D& #x27; Urso, Brian R [Clinton, TN

    2012-07-10

    A superhydrophobic powder is prepared by coating diatomaceous earth (DE) with a hydrophobic coating on the particle surface such that the coating conforms to the topography of the DE particles. The hydrophobic coating can be a self assembly monolayer of a perfluorinated silane coupling agent. The DE is preferably natural-grade DE where organic impurities have been removed. The superhydrophobic powder can be applied as a suspension in a binder solution to a substrate to produce a superhydrophobic surface on the substrate.

  13. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  14. Characterising Super-Earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of Super-Earths has formally begun with the detection of transiting low-mass exoplanets CoRoT-7b and GJ 1214b. In the path of characterising super-Earths, the first step is to infer their composition. While the discovery data for CoRoT-7b, in combination with the high atmospheric mass loss rate inferred from the high insolation, suggested that it was a rocky planet, the new proposed mass values have widened the possibilities. The combined mass range 1−10 M⊕ allows for a volatile-rich (and requires it if the mass is less than 4 M⊕ , an Earth-like or a super-Mercury-like composition. In contrast, the radius of GJ 1214b is too large to admit a solid composition, thus it necessarily to have a substantial gas layer. Some evidence suggests that within this gas layer H/He is a small but non-negligible component. These two planets are the first of many transiting low-mass exoplanets expected to be detected and they exemplify the limitations faced when inferring composition, which come from the degenerate character of the problem and the large error bars in the data.

  15. Afganistan and rare earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. Dobrescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted for in the twentieth century and coal in the nineteenth century: the engine of a new industrial revolution. Future energy will be produced increasingly by more sophisticated technological equipment based not just on steel and concrete, but incorporating significant quantities of metals and rare earths. Widespread application of these technologies will result in an exponential increase in demand for such minerals, and what is worrying is that minerals of this type are almost nowhere to be found in Europe and in other industrialized countries in the world, such as U.S. and Japan, but only in some Asian countries, like China and Afghanistan.

  16. Compounding around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding is universal in its prevalence. Variations in disease patterns, culture, and tradition; the role of government in health care; and the availability of essential equipment and required agents shape a compounding profile unique to each country worldwide. In the following reflections, pharmacists form Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Germany, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United States describe their experiences in the compounding setting unique to their practice and their nation. The unifying theme in their comments is the dedication of each contributor to enabling recovery and ensuring the good health of his or her clients.

  17. Biota and biomolecules in extreme environments on Earth: implications for life detection on Mars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, J.W.; Roling, W.F.M.; Elsaesser, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2014-01-01

    The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids) occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the

  18. Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhorter, Sean William [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 can be thought of as being formed from two 32434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd2MgGe2 and Gd2InGe2 both possess the same 32434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd5(SixGe1-x)4, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo2FeB2 crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo2FeB2, Zr3Al2, Mn2AlB2 and W2CoB2 crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd2AlGe2 forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how

  19. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  1. MEA 86 Compound data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data file contains the full raw parameter data for the 86 compounds tested in the developmental MEA assay, as well as Area Under the Curve (AUC) calculations...

  2. CeNi{sub 3}-type rare earth compounds: crystal structure of R{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} (R=Y, Gd–Tm) and magnetic properties of {Gd–Er}{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, {Tb, Dy}{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si and Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7.68}Si{sub 1.32}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozkin, A.V., E-mail: morozkin@tech.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, House 1, Building 3, GSP-1, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Yapaskurt, V.O. [Department of Petrology, Geological Faculty Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nirmala, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Quezado, S.; Malik, S.K. [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59082-970 (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The crystal structure of new CeNi{sub 3}-type {Y, Gd–Tm}{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} (P63/mmc. N 194, hP24) compounds has been established using powder X-ray diffraction studies. The magnetism of Tb{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si and Dy{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si is dominated by rare earth sublattice and the magnetic properties of R{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} (R =Gd–Er) and Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7.68}Si{sub 1.32} are determined by both rare earth and cobalt sublattices. Magnetization data indicate ferromagnetic ordering of {Tb, Dy}{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si at 32 K and 21 K, respectively. Gd{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} and Tb{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} exhibit ferromagnetic ordering at 309 K and 209 K, respectively, whereas Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, Ho{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} and Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7.68}Si{sub 1.32} show a field dependent ferromagnetic-like ordering at 166 K, 124 K, 84 K and 226 K, respectively followed by a low temperature transition at 34 K for Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, 18 K for Ho{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, 56 K for Er{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, 155 K and 42 K for Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7.68}Si{sub 1.32}. Among these compounds, Dy{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si shows largest magnetocaloric effect (isothermal magnetic entropy change) of −11.6 J/kg·K at 18 K in field change of 50 kOe, whereas Tb{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} and Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7.68}Si{sub 1.32} exhibit best permanent magnet properties in the temperature range of 2–5 K with remanent magnetization of 11.95 μ{sub B}/fu, 12.86 μ{sub B}/fu and 14.4 μ{sub B}/fu, respectively and coercive field of 3.0 kOe, 1.9 kOe and 4.4 kOe, respectively. - Highlights: • {Y, Gd–Tm}{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the CeNi{sub 3}-type structure. • {Gd-Er}{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2} show ferrimagnetic ordering at 309 K, 209 K, 166 K, 124 K and 84 K. • Dy{sub 3}Co{sub 7.68}Si{sub 1.32} exhibits magnetic transitions at 226 K, 155 K and 42 K. • {Tb-Er}{sub 3}Co{sub 7}Al{sub 2

  3. Unlock your Compound Management

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen Eller

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical industry faces the increased demand for innovative medicines against various diseases. In this regard, the compound library in pharmaceutical industry is the most valuable asset. However, the compound distribution from the library into the screening plates is often still done manually and binds highly qualified resources to very time-consuming, tedious and error-prone tasks. To overcome these challenges, Chemspeed launched the first automated true one-to-one gravimetric "pi...

  4. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  5. Chalcogenides formed by trivalent rare earth elements with d-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flao, Zh.; Laruehl', P.; Olitro, R.

    1981-01-01

    Data on ternary compounds formed by trivalent rare earth elements with 3d-, 4d- and 5d-elements of the Periodic system is presented. Compounds of 3d-elements both in bivalent and trivalent states are considered. The main attention is paid to the structure of the compounds. Description of a great number of new structural types of compounds is given. In certain cases the structure has not been deciphered and, besides, structural investigations with monocrystals are not numerous. Attention is drawn to the existence of nonstoichiometric compounds. References to the works on investigation of thermal (melting temperature), magnetic, optical and electric properties as well as Moessbauer effect are presented

  6. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  7. Stovetop Earth Pecan Pie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    Many fluid mechanical experiments with direct applications to Earth Science are performed with sugary syrups using conceptually straightforward procedures. Corn syrup has indeed proven to be a godsend for those studying convection and related non-linear phenomena. In addition, however, it gives experimentalists a deep physical intuition for the interior workings of hot planets. The basic concepts behind plate tectonics and mantle convection are not difficult; indeed, although they may not be aware of it, most students probably have a basic intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics gained in their daily life. However, the large size and long time scale of geophysical processes may be quite intimidating to young students. Even a simple geophysical experiment requires a complicated array of coolers, heaters and measuring and recording equipment. It is of interest to introduce students to the geodynamical concepts that can be visualized in a high-tech lab using familiar processes and equipment. Using a homemade apparatus and grocery store supplies, I propose using a 'Stove-top Earth pecan pie' to introduce simple geodynamic concepts to middle- and high-school students. The initially cold syrup heats up and the pecans begin to float (continent formation), the syrup begins to convect (mantle convection), and convection slows down after the heat is removed (secular cooling). Even Wilson cycles can be simulated by moving the pan to one side or the other of the stovetop or heating element. The activity formally introduces students to convection and its application to the earth, and makes them think about plate motion, heat transfer, scaling, and experimental procedures. As an added bonus, they can eat their experiments after recess!

  8. Growth of doped and pure monocrystalline fibers and gradient crystals of REMO{sub 4} compounds (RE = rare earths and M = Nb and Ta); Crescimento de fibras monocristalinas puras e dopadas, e cristais gradientes de compostos REMO{sub 4} (RE= terras raras e M = Nb e Ta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Octaviano, E.S.; Levada, C.L.; Missiato, O., E-mail: esoctaviano@if.sc.usp.br [Academia da Forca Aerea, Campo Fontenelle, Pirassununga , SP (Brazil). Div. de Ensino; Semenzato, M.J.; Silva, R.A.; Andreeta, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    A desirable alternative for a faster development, characterization and application of material of technological interest has been the growth of single crystal fibers by LHPG - Laser Heated Pedestal Growth. In this work it was reported the growth of pure, doped and gradient single crystal fibers of the chemical formulation REMO{sub 4} (M = Nb e Ta, e RE= Rare Earth), characterized through primary techniques such as X-Ray and optical spectroscopy. (author)

  9. Bones of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Correa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The film Bones of the Earth (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014 is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective creation is built. A sense of community, on-going inquiry, connections and social commitment inform the creative process. As a result, the video’s nearly five intense minutes are a metaphor for the search for personal meaning, connection with nature and intersubjective positioning in a world that undergoes constant change.

  10. The Solid Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, C. M. R.

    2005-02-01

    The second edition of this acclaimed textbook has been brought fully up-to-date to reflect the latest advances in geophysical research. It is designed for students in introductory geophysics courses who have a general background in the physical sciences, including introductory calculus. New to this edition are a section of color plates and separate sections on the earth's mantle and core. The book also contains an extensive glossary of terms, and includes numerous exercises for which solutions are available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org. First Edition Hb (1990): 0-521-37025-6 First Edition Pb (1990): 0-521-38590-3

  11. Between Earth and Sky

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    to rescue architecture from the sterile impasse of late-modernism. In his works the basic elements of lived space become present: the earth, the sky and the `between` of human existence." Jørn Utzon's architecture ranges from the modest to the monumental; from the Kingo courtyard houses, the finest...... of form, material and function, motivated by social values. To this essentially regional response, Utzon combines a fascination for the architectural legacies of foreign cultures. These influences include the architecture of the ancient Mayan civilisation, as well as the Islamic world, China and Japan...

  12. Climate in Earth history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, W. H.; Crowell, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Complex atmosphere-ocean-land interactions govern the climate system and its variations. During the course of Earth history, nature has performed a large number of experiments involving climatic change; the geologic record contains much information regarding these experiments. This information should result in an increased understanding of the climate system, including climatic stability and factors that perturb climate. In addition, the paleoclimatic record has been demonstrated to be useful in interpreting the origin of important resources-petroleum, natural gas, coal, phosphate deposits, and many others.

  13. Earth's ozone layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper contain the actual results of investigations of the influence of the human activity on the Earth's ozone layer. History of the ozone measurements and of the changes in its concentrations within the last few years are given. The influence of the trace gases on both local and global ozone concentrations are discussed. The probable changes of the ozone concentrations are presented on the basis of the modelling investigations. The effect of a decrease in global ozone concentration on human health and on biosphere are also presented. (author). 33 refs, 36 figs, 5 tabs

  14. Contribution for the studies of rare earth dithionates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the synthesis and investigation of some properties of rare earth dithionates. The rare earth dithionates were prepared from the respective sulphates, by the reaction of the latter with BaS sub(2) O sub(6) in aqueous solutions. The lanthanide ion content was estimated by complexometric titration with EDTA; analysis for H were carried out by microanalysis and the water content was determinated by Karl Fischer titration. This experimental results in addition to thermogravimetric (TG) data gave the stoichiometry of the compounds. (author)

  15. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  16. Peculiarities of structure of rare earth β-diketonates and carboxylates with mostly ionic type of bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'mina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data on β-diketonates and carboxylates of rare earths (3) have been analyzed. Essential features of the compounds structure have been formulated. It is shown that in the compounds mentioned irregular distortions of chelate cycles over the length and angles of bonds are observed, there is no regularity in the ratios of metal-ligand bridge and chelate bond lengths both in the series of compounds of different composition and inside one compound. 2 refs

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the formation of rare earth intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deodhar, S.S.

    1975-01-01

    Heats of reaction of rare earth intermetallics with iron, cobalt and nickel were determined using Differential Thermal Analysis technique. The intermetallic compounds studied were of MgCu 2 type Laves phases and the rare earth elements studied were praseodymium, gadolinium, dyprosium and erbium. The reactions were exothermic and the heats of reaction were generally high. They varied from the low of -2.5 kcal/g mole for Fe 2 Gd to the high of -35.3 kcal/g mole for Ni 2 Er. The magnitudes of heats of reaction were always greater for the intermetallics of heavy rare earth elements. The rare earth intermetallics studied were either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic. The variations in the magnetic moments and the heats of reaction with respect to the atomic number of the rare earth elements followed certain trends. The similarities were observed in the trends of two properties. Electronic configuration for the MgCu 2 type rare earth intermetallics is proposed using Engel--Brewer correlation for metallic structures and the structural features of the Laves phase compounds. Kinetics of the reactions between the rare earth elements and iron, cobalt, and nickel was studied. The rate of reaction was diffusion controlled in each case. The Valensi--Carter equation for the diffusion mechanism satisfactorily described the kinetic behavior. The magnitudes of activation energies and frequency factors were determined. The reactions can be characterized by their reaction temperatures since they always begin at definite temperatures. It was observed that the reaction began at a higher temperature if the activation energy for the reaction was high

  18. Destiny's Earth Observation Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-110 mission commander, looks through the Earth observation window in the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 Truss, weighing in at 27,000 pounds, was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the STS-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  19. Mapping Earth's electromagnetic dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J. J.; Kelbert, A.; Bedrosian, P.

    2017-12-01

    The form of a magnetotelluric impedance tensor, obtained for a given geographic site through simultaneous measurement of geomagnetic and geoelectric field variation, is affected by electrical conductivity structure beneath the measurement site. Building on existing methods for characterizing the symmetry of magnetotelluric impedance tensors, a simple scalar measure is developed for measuring the (frequency dependent) proportion of the impedance tensor that is not just a one-dimensional (1D) function of depth ("non-1D-ness"). These measures are applied to nearly 1000 impedance tensors obtained during magnetotelluric surveys, those for the continental United States and obtained principally through the National Science Foundation's EarthScope project. Across geomagnetic/geoelectric variational periods ranging from 30 s to 3,000 s, corresponding to crustal and upper mantle depths, it is shown that local Earth structure is very often not simply 1D-depth-dependent - often less than 50% of magnetotelluric impedance is 1D. For selected variational frequencies, non-1D-ness is mapped and the relationship between electromagnetic dimensionality and known geological and tectonic structures is discussed. The importance of using realistic surface impedances to accurately evaluate magnetic-storm geoelectric hazards is emphasized.

  20. Is dying the earth?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Garzon, Gustavo

    1994-01-01

    December 21 of 1968, on board the capsule Apollo 8, three astronauts, James A. Lovell, Frank Borman and William Anders, went toward what would be the first orbital flight around the moon. That experience like Lovell said, it makes us realize the insignificant that we are in comparison with the vastness of the universe. With the revolution lovelockiane, the life doesn't already consist on a group of organisms only adapted to its atmosphere by a certain action for external laws. The terrestrial environment, instead of being a physical world regulated by own autonomous laws, is part of an evolutionary system that contains the life and that it should to the phenomena vital part of its rules, its mechanisms and components. The alive beings connected to each other and to the atmosphere they manufacture and they maintain of continuous their atmosphere forming an everything at planetary level, according to Ricard Guerrero (1988). The theory of the earth then, he says, it has found their owner Darwin in James lovelock. The document treats topics like the science concept that it is the life, the earth and the contemporary environment

  1. School, Earth and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Anna; Grieco, Giovanni; Oneta, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Geology needs to be explained and narrated to the people, focusing on the goal of making that big change of mindset that will allow individuals and the entire community to tune into the timing and the ways in which the Earth evolves. In order to achieve these important goals it is necessary to educate children from an early age so that they learn to live an environmentally friendly life. With the project "School, Earth and imagination" we introduce, with a fun and new way, notions and topics in geological and environmental sciences in schools at all levels with the final goal of improving both knowledge and sensibility for these topics into the community. Through this project we start from the children (kindergarten and primary school, ages between 3 and 8 years) because they are the foundation of our society, and without foundations nothing can be built. The "School, Earth and imagination" project wants to give the children a real opportunity to approach reality and in general the surrounding environment, for the first time even before the traditional scholastic experience, with a scientific point of view, experimenting some basic physical concepts like temperature, weight, hardness and so on directly through their body. The project is structured and developed in modules that provide a high flexibility in order to meet needs and requirements of different schools in different situations. Each module is part of the journey of Mariolino, a character that represents a very curious child who introduces basic concepts associating them to geological processes. The Journey of Mariolino, as each module, follows an insistent scheme that starts from the presentation of the problem, follows with its discussion through direct questions and ends with experimentation of the hypotheses that children have proposed to validate the solution of the problem. Each module is independent and never ends without giving children a solution and is always structured with a practical activity

  2. Fluorine-18 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijn, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with the problems involved in the adaption of reactor-produced fluorine-18 to the synthesis of 18 F-labelled organic fluorine compounds. Several 18 F-labelling reagents were prepared and successfully applied. The limitations to the synthetic possibilities of reactor-produced fluoride- 18 become manifest in the last part of the thesis. An application to the synthesis of labelled aliphatic fluoro amino acids has appeared to be unsuccessful as yet, although some other synthetic approaches can be indicated. Seven journal articles (for which see the availability note) are used to compose the four chapters and three appendices. The connecting text gives a survey of known 18 F-compounds and methods for preparing such compounds. (Auth.)

  3. Extraction studies on rare earths using dinonyl phenyl phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anitha, M.; Singh, D.K.; Kotekar, M.K.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Rare earths are widely used in phosphor materials, magnetic substances, alloys, catalyst, lasers, superconductors, solid oxide fuel cells and in nuclear applications. The high value of these elements depends on their effective separation into high purity compounds. The separation into individual rare earths is very difficult to achieve, due to the very low separation factors between two adjacent rare earths arising due to similar chemical properties. Taking the advantage of variation in basicity, the separation is generally accomplished by solvent extraction or ion exchange. There are several references on the separation of rare earth in different media employing various types of extractants such as 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethyhexylphosphonic acid (EHEHPA) and di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) which have been widely used for the separation and purification of rare earths. Dinonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) is an organo phosphorus extractant (pKa = 2.54) and is an aromatic analogue of D2EHPA, which extracts metal ion by cation exchange mechanism. DNPPA was explored to recover rare earths from phosphate media such as wet process phosphoric acid and merchant grade acid. However, there is no information available in literature on DNPPA for RE extraction from chloride medium. Therefore, an attempt has been made in the present study to investigate the feasibility of using DNPPA for extraction of La(III), Dy(III) and Y(III) from chloride medium

  4. Chloric organic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moalem, F.

    2000-01-01

    Since many years ago, hazardous and toxic refuses which are results of human activities has been carelessly without any Biological and Engineering facts and knowledge discharged into our land and water. The effects of discharging those materials in environment are different. Some of refuse materials shows short and other has long-time adverse effects in our environment, Among hazardous organic chemical materials, chlorine, consider, to be the main element. Organic materials with chlorine is called chlorine hydrocarbon as a hazardous compound. This paper discuss the hazardous materials especially chloric organic compound and their misuse effects in environment and human being

  5. Medicinal gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.; Cottrill, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A major use of gold compounds in the pharmaceutical industry is for anti-arthritic agents. The disease itself is not understood and little is known about the way in which the drugs act, but detailed pictures of the distribution of gold in the body are available, and some of the relevant biochemistry is beginning to emerge. The purpose of this article is to give a survey of the types of compounds presently employed in medicine, of the distribution of gold in the body which results from their use, and of some relevant chemistry. Emphasis is placed on results obtained in the last few years

  6. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  7. Prediction of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhanov, Gennady S; Kiselyova, N N

    2009-01-01

    The problems of predicting not yet synthesized intermetallic compounds are discussed. It is noted that the use of classical physicochemical analysis in the study of multicomponent metallic systems is faced with the complexity of presenting multidimensional phase diagrams. One way of predicting new intermetallics with specified properties is the use of modern processing technology with application of teaching of image recognition by the computer. The algorithms used most often in these methods are briefly considered and the efficiency of their use for predicting new compounds is demonstrated.

  8. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  9. Raman scattering study of filled skutterudite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, N; Kojima, R; Hasegawa, T; Takasu, Y; Udagawa, M; Kondo, T; Takeda, N; Ikeno, T; Ishikawa, K; Sugawara, H; Kikuchi, D; Sato, H; Sekine, C; Shirotani, I

    2007-01-01

    Raman scattering of skutterudite compounds RT 4 X 12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Yb, T=Fe, Ru and Os, X=P and Sb) have been measured. All first-order Raman active phonons are observed and are assigned as the pnicogen vibrations. At the low energy region, the second-order phonons, due to the vibration of the rare earth ions with a flat phonon dispersion, are observed in the spectra of RRu 4 P 12 (R=La and Sm) and ROs 4 Sb 12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm). The appearance of the second-order phonons in the spectra is caused by an anharmonic vibrations of rare earth ions in large cage space and a large density of state due to the flat phonon dispersion. However, in spite of the similar cage space, the 2nd-order phonons are hardly observed for RFe 4 Sb 12 and RRu 4 Sb 12 . Thus, these results suggest that the dynamics of the rare earth ion is closely related to not only the cage size but also the electronic state due to the transition metals. Raman spectra of PrRu 4 P 12 show the drastic spectral change due to the metal-insulator transition. The phonon spectra and crystal field excitations due to the structural change have been assigned above and below the transition temperature

  10. Rare earth superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    A review is given of recent experiments on the magnetism of rare earth superlattices. Early experiments in this field were concerned mainly with systems formed by combining a magnetic and a non-magnetic element in a superlattice structure. From results gathered on a variety of systems it has been established that the propagation of magnetic order through the non-magnetic spacer can be understood mostly on the basis of an RKKY-like model, where the strength and range of the coupling depends on the details of the conduction electron susceptibility of the spacer. Recent experiments on more complex systems indicate that this model does not provide a complete description. Examples include superlattices where the constituents can either be both magnetic, adopt different crystal structures (Fermi surfaces), or where one of the constituents has a non-magnetic singlet ground state. The results from such systems are presented and discussed in the context of the currently accepted model. (au)

  11. Earth's Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume provides a comprehensive view on the different sources of the geomagnetic field both in the Earth’s interior and from the field’s interaction with the terrestrial atmosphere and the solar wind. It combines expertise from various relevant areas of geomagnetic and near Earth space...... research with the aim to better characterise the state and dynamics of Earth’s magnetic field. Advances in the exploitation of geomagnetic observations hold a huge potential not only for an improved quantitative description of the field source but also for a better understanding of the underlying processes...... and space observations, and on state-of-the-art empirical models and physics-based simulations. Thus, it provides an in-depth overview over recent achievements, current limitations and challenges, and future opportunities in the field of geomagnetism and space sciences....

  12. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  13. Earth's radiation belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moslehi Fard, M.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of trapped particles in a magnetic field of approximated dipole is described completely in the first part. Second part contains experimental results. The mechanism of radiation belt source ''albedo neutrons'' and also types of dissipation mechanism about radiation belt is explained. The trapped protons and electrons by radiation belt is discussed and the life-time of trapped particles are presented. Finally the magnetic fields of Moon, Venus, Mars, and Saturn, measured by passengers Mariner 4,10 and pioneer 10,11 are indicated. The experimental and theoretical results for the explanation of trapped plasma around the earth which is looked like two internal and external belt have almost good correspondence

  14. Earth's early biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding our own early biosphere is essential to our search for life elsewhere, because life arose on Earth very early and rocky planets shared similar early histories. The biosphere arose before 3.8 Ga ago, was exclusively unicellular and was dominated by hyperthermophiles that utilized chemical sources of energy and employed a range of metabolic pathways for CO2 assimilation. Photosynthesis also arose very early. Oxygenic photosynthesis arose later but still prior to 2.7 Ga. The transition toward the modern global environment was paced by a decline in volcanic and hydrothermal activity. These developments allowed atmospheric O2 levels to increase. The O2 increase created new niches for aerobic life, most notably the more advanced Eukarya that eventually spawned the megascopic fauna and flora of our modern biosphere.

  15. Nitrates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Pushkina, L.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    The systematization of experimental data with account of the last achievements in the field of studying the RE nitrate properties is realized. The methods of production, solubility in aqueous solutions structure, thermodynamic characteristics and thermal stability of nitrate hydrates, RE anhydrous and basic nitrates are considered. The data on RE nirtrate complexing in aqueous solutions are given. Binary nitrates, nitrate solvates and RE nitrate adducts with organic compounds are described. The use of RE nitrates in the course of RE production, in the processes of separation and fine cleaning of RE preparations is considered

  16. The earth and the moon

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The moon is the only body in the solar system outside of the Earth that has been visited by humans. More than 440 pounds of lunar material are brought by NASA and Soviet space missions to Earth for study. The information gleaned about the moon from this relatively small pile of rocks is mind-boggling and stands as the greatest proof that Martian planetary science would be greatly enhanced by returning samples to Earth. Compositional studies of lunar rocks show that the moon and the Earth are made of similar material, and because lunar material has not been reworked through erosion and plate te

  17. Theory of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is an isolated, cooling planet that obeys the 2nd law. Interior dynamics is driven from the top, by cold sinking slabs. High-resolution broad-band seismology and geodesy has confirmed that mantle flow is characterized by narrow downwellings and ~20 broad slowly rising updrafts. The low-velocity zone (LVZ) consists of a hot melange of sheared peridotite intruded with aligned melt-rich lamellae that are tapped by intraplate volcanoes. The high temperature is a simple consequence of the thermal overshoot common in large bodies of convecting fluids. The transition zone consists of ancient eclogite layers that are displaced upwards by slabs to become broad passive, and cool, ridge feeding updrafts of ambient mantle. The physics that is overlooked in canonical models of mantle dynamics and geochemistry includes; the 2nd law, convective overshoots, subadiabaticity, wave-melt interactions, Archimedes' principle, and kinetics (rapid transitions allow stress-waves to interact with melting and phase changes, creating LVZs; sluggish transitions in cold slabs keep eclogite in the TZ where it warms up by extracting heat from mantle below 650 km, creating the appearance of slab penetration). Canonical chemical geodynamic models are the exact opposite of physics and thermodynamic based models and of the real Earth. A model that results from inverting the assumptions regarding initial and boundary conditions (hot origin, secular cooling, no external power sources, cooling internal boundaries, broad passive upwellings, adiabaticity and whole-mantle convection not imposed, layering and self-organization allowed) results in a thick refractory-yet-fertile surface layer, with ancient xenoliths and cratons at the top and a hot overshoot at the base, and a thin mobile D" layer that is an unlikely plume generation zone. Accounting for the physics that is overlooked, or violated (2nd law), in canonical models, plus modern seismology, undermines the assumptions and conclusions of these

  18. Direct or photostimulated luminescence after X-Ray irradiation of divalent europium in alkaline earth compounds containing some halides; Luminescence directe ou photostimulee apres irradiation X de l'europium divalent dans des familles de composes alcalino-terreux comportant un halogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merigou, C

    1990-10-15

    With a view for digitizing of radiological images, the luminescent properties of divalent europium in diverse halogen compounds involving strontium or barium have been studied. In halogen-rich compounds (MCl{sub 2}, M{sub 4}OCl{sub 6}, M{sub 5}SiO{sub 4}Cl{sub 6},... where M is Sr or Ba), the thermal extinction of the emission begins only above 300 K. High densities of coloured spots have been produced with X-ray irradiation. The combining of these 2 features has led to the obtention of high yields for argon laser stimulated luminescence in the case of Sr{sub 5}SiO{sub 4}Cl{sub 5}Br:Eu halogen silicate. Although these yields are high they stay below that of BaXF:Eu which is usually used in photon-stimulated screens.

  19. Field-induced valence transition in rare-earth system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhaya, A.; Ghatak, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic field-induced valence transition in rare-earth compound has been examined based on a pseudospin S=1 Ising model proposed earlier for valence transition. The model includes finite mixing between two pertinent ionic configurations (magnetic and non-magnetic) separated by an energy gap and with intersite interaction between rare-earth ions. Using the mean field approximation the magnetic behaviour and the critical field (H c ) for transition are obtained as a function of energy gap and temperature. The phase boundary defined in terms of reduced field H c /H co and reduced temperature T/T v (T v being valence transition temperature in absence of field) is nearly independent of energy gap. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental observation in Yb- and Eu-compounds

  20. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  1. The Onium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarevsky, Nicolay V.; Slaveykova, Vera; Manev, Stefan; Lazarov, Dobri

    1997-06-01

    The onium salts are of a big interest for theoretical and structural chemistry, and for organic synthesis. Some representatives of the group (e.g. ammonium salts) were known from the oldest times. Many onium salts are met the nature: ammonium salts (either as inorganic salts, and organic derivatives, e.g. aminoacids, salts of biogenic amines and alkaloids, etc.); oxonium salts (plant pigments as anthocyans are organic oxonium compounds), etc. In 1894 C. Hartmann and V. Meyer prepared the first iodonium salts - 4-iododiphenyliodonium hydrogensulfate and diphenyliodonium salts, and suggested the ending -onium for all compounds with properties similar to those of ammonium salts. Nowadays onium compounds of almost all nonmetals are synthesised and studied. A great variety of physical methods: diffraction (e.g. XRD) and spectral methods (IR-, NMR-, and UV-spectra), as well as the chemical properties and methods of preparation of onium salts have been used in determination of the structure of these compounds. The application of different onium salts is immense. Ammonium, phosphonium and sulfonium salts are used as phase-transfer catalysts; diazonium salts - for the preparation of dyes, metalochromic and pH-indicators. All the onium salts and especially diazonium and iodonium salts are very useful reagents in organic synthesis.

  2. Forecasting of superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskii, E.M.; Gribulya, V.G.; Kiseleva, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    In forecasting new superconducting intermetallic compounds of the A15 and Mo 3 Se types most promising from the viewpoint of high critical temperature Tsub(c), high critical magnetic fields Hsub(c), and high critical currents and in estimating their transition temperature it is proposed to apply cybernetic methods of computer learning

  3. NATURAL POLYACETYLENE COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Nasukhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In article the review of the initial stage of researches of natural polyacetylene compounds is resulted. The high reactionary ability leading to fast oxidation and degradation of these compounds, especially at influence of Uf-light, oxygen of air, pH and other factors, has caused the serious difficulties connected with an establishment of structure and studying of their physical and chemical properties. Therefore the greatest quantity of works of this stage is connected with studying of essential oils of plants from families Apiaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Campanulaceae, Olacaceae, Pittosporaceae and Santalaceae where have been found out, basically, diacetylene compounds. About development of physical and chemical methods of the analysis of possibility of similar researches have considerably extended. More than 2000 polyacetylenes are known today, from them more than 1100 are found out in plants fam. Asteraceae. Revolution in the field of molecular biology has allowed to study processes of biosynthesis of these compounds intensively.

  4. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain

  5. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  6. Hyperon compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1987-11-01

    The formation of various hypernuclei from K - absorption at rest is discussed from the viewpoints of compound decay of highly excited hypernuclei in contrast to the direct reaction mechanism. Recent (stopped K - , π) experiments at KEK as well as old data of emulsion and bubble chamber experiments are discussed. Some future direction of hypernuclear spectroscopy is suggested. (author)

  7. Toxicology of perfluorinated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Thorsten [Hessian State Laboratory, Wiesbaden (Germany); Mattern, Daniela; Brunn, Hubertus [Hessian State Laboratory, Giessen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Perfluorinated compounds [PFCs] have found a wide use in industrial products and processes and in a vast array of consumer products. PFCs are molecules made up of carbon chains to which fluorine atoms are bound. Due to the strength of the carbon/fluorine bond, the molecules are chemically very stable and are highly resistant to biological degradation; therefore, they belong to a class of compounds that tend to persist in the environment. These compounds can bioaccumulate and also undergo biomagnification. Within the class of PFC chemicals, perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorosulphonic acid are generally considered reference substances. Meanwhile, PFCs can be detected almost ubiquitously, e.g., in water, plants, different kinds of foodstuffs, in animals such as fish, birds, in mammals, as well as in human breast milk and blood. PFCs are proposed as a new class of 'persistent organic pollutants'. Numerous publications allude to the negative effects of PFCs on human health. The following review describes both external and internal exposures to PFCs, the toxicokinetics (uptake, distribution, metabolism, excretion), and the toxicodynamics (acute toxicity, subacute and subchronic toxicities, chronic toxicity including carcinogenesis, genotoxicity and epigenetic effects, reproductive and developmental toxicities, neurotoxicity, effects on the endocrine system, immunotoxicity and potential modes of action, combinational effects, and epidemiological studies on perfluorinated compounds). (orig.)

  8. Chemical compounds in teak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Viana da Silva Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinone compounds are largely generated at extractive fraction of the woods in a complex and variable biological system. The literature has indications for many segments from food industry to pharmaceutical industry. Within the field of industrial use of wood, they are less desirable since they are treated only as incidental substances in production strings of pulp, paper, charcoal, and sawmill. In spite of its small amount, compared to other chemical compounds called essential, these substances have received special attention from researchers revealing a diverse range of offerings to market products textiles, pharmaceuticals, colorants, and other polymers, for which are being tested and employed. Quinones are found in fungi, lichens, and mostly in higher plants. Tectona grandis, usually called teak, is able to biosynthesize anthraquinones, which is a quinone compound, byproduct of secondary metabolism. This species provides wood that is much prized in the furniture sector and can also be exploited for metabolites to supply the market in quinone compounds and commercial development of new technologies, adding value to the plantations of this species within our country.

  9. Possibility study of use rare earth deposit from Araxa, Minas Gerais State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    Prospecting work done by Instituto de Pesquisas Radioativas on the Barreiro area (Araxa, M.G.) has shown the existence of a rare earth deposit of about 700.000 ton, averaging 13,5 % rare earth oxide, mainly associated to the mineral monazite. In a first stage, the conventional mineral dressing methods were tried to treat the monazite. This was followed by a study of a chemical process for the production of rare earth compounds of commercial grade. The conventional methods of mineral dressing tested did not lead to satisfactory results. This was assumed to be due to insufficient liberation of the monazite. However, the application of the chemical process to the natural material, using concentrated sulfuric acid in the initial attack, allowed more than 90% rare earth extraction and a subsequent yield of commercial grade rare earth oxide, with over 75% rare earth recovery. (author)

  10. Synthesis and study of rare earth complexonates with ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanova, N.D.; Martynenko, L.I.; Kolleganov, M.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    Solid complexonates with ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid of HMZxnH 2 O and KMLxnH 2 O composition are synthesized for the Y, Sc and rare earths. The compounds were studied by different physicochemical methods. According to data on IR and electron spectroscopy the conclusion is made on-COOH-group coordination in protonated HML complexes. The complexes are X-ray amorphous, they have polymeric structure

  11. China's rare-earth industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  12. Selenium-75-labelled foliate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A saturation method to analyze a foliate is presented; it uses competitive reaction of the compound to be measured and of a radioactive-labelled version of this compound with a reagent specific to this compound present in insufficient quantity to combine with the whole of the compound and its labelled version, separation of the bound compound from its non-bound homologue and measurement of the radioactivity concentration in the bound compound, the non-bound compound or both. The radioactive isotope used in the labelled foliate is selenium 75 [fr

  13. Next-generation digital earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodchild, M.F.; Guo, H.; Annoni, A.; Bian, L.; Bie, de K.; Campbell, F.; Craglia, M.; Ehlers, M.; Genderen, van J.; Skidmore, A.K.; Wang, C.; Woodgate, P.

    2012-01-01

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google

  14. LIMNOLOGICAL OPTOMETRY: EXAMINING EARTH'S EYE

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Thoreau's Walden, a lake is described as the landscape's most expressive feature and the earth's eye. Collectively, scientists are charged by society to assess, monitor, and remedy maladies of earth's eye in the same way optometrists maintain the health of the human eye. This ...

  15. Melting in super-earths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  16. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  17. Introductory mathematics for earth scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2009-01-01

    Any quantitative work in earth sciences requires mathematical analysis and mathematical methods are essential to the modelling and analysis of the geological, geophysical and environmental processes involved. This book provides an introduction to the fundamental mathematics that all earth scientists need.

  18. Teaching Waves with Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logiurato, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Google Earth is a huge source of interesting illustrations of various natural phenomena. It can represent a valuable tool for science education, not only for teaching geography and geology, but also physics. Here we suggest that Google Earth can be used for introducing in an attractive way the physics of waves. (Contains 9 figures.)

  19. Thermodynamics of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, Frank D

    2010-01-01

    Applications of elementary thermodynamic principles to the dynamics of the Earth lead to robust, quantitative conclusions about the tectonic effects that arise from convection. The grand pattern of motion conveys deep heat to the surface, generating mechanical energy with a thermodynamic efficiency corresponding to that of a Carnot engine operating over the adiabatic temperature gradient between the heat source and sink. Referred to the total heat flux derived from the Earth's silicate mantle, the efficiency is 24% and the power generated, 7.7 x 10 12 W, causes all the material deformation apparent as plate tectonics and the consequent geological processes. About 3.5% of this is released in seismic zones but little more than 0.2% as seismic waves. Even major earthquakes are only localized hiccups in this motion. Complications that arise from mineral phase transitions can be used to illuminate details of the motion. There are two superimposed patterns of convection, plate subduction and deep mantle plumes, driven by sources of buoyancy, negative and positive respectively, at the top and bottom of the mantle. The patterns of motion are controlled by the viscosity contrasts (>10 4 : 1) at these boundaries and are self-selected as the least dissipative mechanisms of heat transfer for convection in a body with very strong viscosity variation. Both are subjects of the thermodynamic efficiency argument. Convection also drives the motion in the fluid outer core that generates the geomagnetic field, although in that case there is an important energy contribution by compositional separation, as light solute is rejected by the solidifying inner core and mixed into the outer core, a process referred to as compositional convection. Uncertainty persists over the core energy balance because thermal conduction is a drain on core energy that has been a subject of diverse estimates, with attendant debate over the need for radiogenic heat in the core. The geophysical approach to

  20. Rotation of a Moonless Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Barnes, Jason W.; Chambers, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We numerically explore the obliquity (axial tilt) variations of a hypothetical moonless Earth. Previous work has shown that the Earth's Moon stabilizes Earth's obliquity such that it remains within a narrow range, between 22.1 deg and 24.5 deg. Without lunar influence, a frequency-map analysis by Laskar et al. showed that the obliquity could vary between 0 deg. and 85 deg. This has left an impression in the astrobiology community that a large moon is necessary to maintain a habitable climate on an Earth-like planet. Using a modified version of the orbital integrator mercury, we calculate the obliquity evolution for moonless Earths with various initial conditions for up to 4 Gyr. We find that while obliquity varies significantly more than that of the actual Earth over 100,000 year timescales, the obliquity remains within a constrained range, typically 20-25 deg. in extent, for timescales of hundreds of millions of years. None of our Solar System integrations in which planetary orbits behave in a typical manner show obliquity accessing more than 65% of the full range allowed by frequency-map analysis. The obliquities of moonless Earths that rotate in the retrograde direction are more stable than those of pro-grade rotators. The total obliquity range explored for moonless Earths with rotation periods shorter than 12 h is much less than that for slower-rotating moonless Earths. A large moon thus does not seem to be needed to stabilize the obliquity of an Earth-like planet on timescales relevant to the development of advanced life.

  1. Changes in earth's dipole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2006-11-01

    The dipole moment of Earth's magnetic field has decreased by nearly 9% over the past 150 years and by about 30% over the past 2,000 years according to archeomagnetic measurements. Here, we explore the causes and the implications of this rapid change. Maps of the geomagnetic field on the core-mantle boundary derived from ground-based and satellite measurements reveal that most of the present episode of dipole moment decrease originates in the southern hemisphere. Weakening and equatorward advection of normal polarity magnetic field by the core flow, combined with proliferation and growth of regions where the magnetic polarity is reversed, are reducing the dipole moment on the core-mantle boundary. Growth of these reversed flux regions has occurred over the past century or longer and is associated with the expansion of the South Atlantic Anomaly, a low-intensity region in the geomagnetic field that presents a radiation hazard at satellite altitudes. We address the speculation that the present episode of dipole moment decrease is a precursor to the next geomagnetic polarity reversal. The paleomagnetic record contains a broad spectrum of dipole moment fluctuations with polarity reversals typically occurring during dipole moment lows. However, the dipole moment is stronger today than its long time average, indicating that polarity reversal is not likely unless the current episode of moment decrease continues for a thousand years or more.

  2. When the earth shudders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltese, G.

    The enormous damage that can be caused by earthquakes (500,000 deaths in Tangshan, China, 1976) makes the art and science of earthquake predicting one of the principal objectives of modern geophysics. In this review of the state-of-the-art in earthquake predicting, brief notes are given on several topics: plate tectonics theory, geographic distribution of earthquakes, elastic potential energy storage of rocks, seismic wave typology, comparison of Mercalli and Richter scales, pre-warning signs in nature (strange behaviour of animals, preliminary reduction of seismic wave velocity, variations in local micro-seismicity and physical properties of rocks, etc.), comparison of earthquake energy release models, historical origin of the science of earthquake predicting, implication of fault slip rates and earthquake recurrence models to probabilistic seismic hazard estimates, the time element in prediction making, analysis of examples of correct predictions, pattern recognition instrumentation, earthquake intensity control through fluid injection, correlations between water reservoir level and seismicity, the creation of government programs for the monitoring of the earth's crust and seismic data acquisition, comparison of earthquake prediction and preparedness approaches in Japan and the USA.

  3. Our sustainable Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbach, Raymond L

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that the Earth has been warming monotonically since 1980. Transient to equilibrium temperature changes take centuries to develop, as oceans are slow to respond to atmospheric temperature changes. Atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, from ice core and observatory measurements, display consistent increases from historical averages, beginning in about 1880, and can be associated with the industrial revolution. The climactic consequences of this human dominated increase in atmospheric CO 2 define a geologic epoch that has been termed the 'Anthropocene.' The issue is whether this is a short term, relatively minor change in global climate, or an extreme deviation that lasts for thousands of years. Eight 'myths' that posit the former are examined in light of known data. The analysis strongly suggests the latter. In order to stabilize global temperatures, sharp reductions in CO 2 emissions are required: an 80% reduction beginning in 2050. Two examples of economically sustainable CO 2 emission reduction demonstrate that technological innovation has the potential to maintain our standard of living while stabilizing global temperatures.

  4. Space sickness on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooij, S. A. E.; Bos, J. E.; Groen, E. L.; Bles, W.; Ockels, W. J.

    2007-09-01

    During the first days in space, i.e., after a transition from 1G to 0G, more than 50% of the astro- (and cosmonauts) suffer from the Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS).The symptoms of SAS, like nausea and dizziness, are especially provoked by head movements. Astronauts have mentioned close similarities between the symptoms of SAS and the symptoms they experienced after a 1 hour centrifuge run on Earth, i.e., after a transition from 3G to 1G (denoted by Sickness Induced by Centrifugation, SIC). During several space missions, we related susceptibility to SAS and to SIC in 11 astronauts and found 4 of them being susceptible to both SIC and SAS, and 7 being not susceptible to SIC nor to SAS. This correspondence in susceptibility suggests that SIC and SAS share the same underlying mechanism. To further study this mechanism, several vestibular parameters have been investigated (e.g. postural stability, vestibularly driven eye movements, subjective vertical). We found some striking changes in individual cases that are possibly due to the centrifuge run. However, the variability between subjects generally is very large, making physiological links to SIC and SAS still hard to find.

  5. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  6. Tripolar Mesoionic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Shuki, Araki; Jiro, Mizuya; Naomitsu, Aoyama; Yasuo, Butsugan

    1995-01-01

    Tripolar mesoionic compounds have been synthesized by the reaction of (1,3-diphenyltetrazol-5-ylio)cyclopentadienide (or -indenide) with the dicationic ether salts derived from mesoionic olates and trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride. The structures of the newly prepared mesoionic systems are discussed on the basis of spectroscopic analysis; it is shown that the tripolar [tetrazolium-cyclopentadienide (or indenide)-tetrazolium] canonical structure contributes significantly to the ground state ...

  7. Oligosilanylated Antimony Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Zitz, Rainer; Gatterer, Karl; Reinhold, Crispin R. W.; M?ller, Thomas; Baumgartner, Judith; Marschner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    By reactions of magnesium oligosilanides with SbCl3, a number of oligosilanylated antimony compounds were obtained. When oligosilanyl dianions were used, either the expected cyclic disilylated halostibine was obtained or alternatively the formation of a distibine was observed. Deliberate formation of the distibine from the disilylated halostibine was achieved by reductive coupling with C8K. Computational studies of Sb?Sb bond energies, barriers of pyramidal inversion at Sb, and the conformati...

  8. Labelled compounds. (Pt. B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Jones, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of World War II there has been a tremendous increase in the number of compounds that have been synthesized with radioactive or stable isotopes. They have found application in many diverse fields, so much so, that hardly a single area in pure and applied science has not benefited. Not surprisingly it has been reflected in appearance of related publications. The early proceedings of the Symposia on Advances in Trace Methodology were soon followed by various Euratom sponsored meetings in which methods of preparing and storing labelled compounds featured prominently. In due course a resurgence of interest in stable isotopes, brought about by their greater availability (also lower cost) and partly by development of new techniques such as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (gc-ms), led to the publication of proceedings of several successful conferences. More recently conferences dealing with the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds have been established on a regular basis. In addition to the proceedings of conferences and journal publications individuals left their mark by producing definitive texts, usually on specific nuclides. Only the classic two volume publication of Murray and Williams (Organic syntheses with isotopes, New York 1985), now over 30 years old and out of print, attempted to do justice to several nuclides. With the large amount of work that has been undertaken since then it seems unlikely that an updated edition could be produced. The alternative strategy was to ask scientists currently active to review specific areas and this is the approach adopted in the present series of monographs. In this way it is intended to cover the broad advances that have been made in the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds in the physical and biomedical sciences. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  9. Process for compound transformation

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-12-29

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of using a catalytic system to chemically transform a compound (e.g., a hydrocarbon). In an embodiment, the method does not employ grafting the catalyst prior to catalysis. In particular, embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a process of hydrocarbon (e.g., C1 to C20 hydrocarbon) metathesis (e.g., alkane, olefin, or alkyne metathesis) transformation, where the process can be conducted without employing grafting prior to catalysis.

  10. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  11. Bronzes and relative compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    Preparation and the crystal structure of bronzes based on complex oxides of transition (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Re, Ru and etc.) and alkali metals, as well as oxides of some other elements (Sr, In, La and etc.) are described. Peculiarities of formation of the structure of tetragonal, tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium bronzes and their analogs depending on the chemical composition of these compounds are considered

  12. Magnetic behavior of binary intermetallic compound YPd{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Abhishek [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mazumdar, Chandan [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)], E-mail: chandan.mazumdar@saha.ac.in; Ranganathan, R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2009-05-12

    We report the results of detailed magnetic studies on binary rare-earth-transition metal compound YPd{sub 3}. The results of temperature and magnetic field dependent DC-magnetic measurements along with the results of powder X-ray diffraction measurement and electrical transport have been discussed. The X-ray data suggest a well-defined ordered crystal lattice, free from any detectable impurity phase. Magnetization data exhibits predominant diamagnetic character at higher fields. However, the compound exhibits anomalous behavior at low fields.

  13. Compound Wiretap Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Shamai (Shitz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the compound wiretap channel, which generalizes Wyner's wiretap model to allow the channels to the (legitimate receiver and to the eavesdropper to take a number of possible states. No matter which states occur, the transmitter guarantees that the receiver decodes its message and that the eavesdropper is kept in full ignorance about the message. The compound wiretap channel can also be viewed as a multicast channel with multiple eavesdroppers, in which the transmitter sends information to all receivers and keeps the information secret from all eavesdroppers. For the discrete memoryless channel, lower and upper bounds on the secrecy capacity are derived. The secrecy capacity is established for the degraded channel and the semideterministic channel with one receiver. The parallel Gaussian channel is further studied. The secrecy capacity and the secrecy degree of freedom (s.d.o.f. are derived for the degraded case with one receiver. Schemes to achieve the s.d.o.f. for the case with two receivers and two eavesdroppers are constructed to demonstrate the necessity of a prefix channel in encoder design. Finally, the multi-antenna (i.e., MIMO compound wiretap channel is studied. The secrecy capacity is established for the degraded case and an achievable s.d.o.f. is given for the general case.

  14. Antifungal compounds from cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Tânia K; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P D; Fiore, Marli F; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-04-13

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders.

  15. Toxic compounds in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Antifungal Compounds from Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia K. Shishido

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders.

  17. Compound Wiretap Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper considers the compound wiretap channel, which generalizes Wyner's wiretap model to allow the channels to the (legitimate receiver and to the eavesdropper to take a number of possible states. No matter which states occur, the transmitter guarantees that the receiver decodes its message and that the eavesdropper is kept in full ignorance about the message. The compound wiretap channel can also be viewed as a multicast channel with multiple eavesdroppers, in which the transmitter sends information to all receivers and keeps the information secret from all eavesdroppers. For the discrete memoryless channel, lower and upper bounds on the secrecy capacity are derived. The secrecy capacity is established for the degraded channel and the semideterministic channel with one receiver. The parallel Gaussian channel is further studied. The secrecy capacity and the secrecy degree of freedom ( are derived for the degraded case with one receiver. Schemes to achieve the for the case with two receivers and two eavesdroppers are constructed to demonstrate the necessity of a prefix channel in encoder design. Finally, the multi-antenna (i.e., MIMO compound wiretap channel is studied. The secrecy capacity is established for the degraded case and an achievable is given for the general case.

  18. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  19. Radiation environment of the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    The radiation environment of the earth consists of natural and artificial radiation. This paper explains the distribution and some exposure examples of natural radiation and the relation between life and natural radiation. The earth was born before about 46 hundreds of millions of years. In the present earth, there are some natural radiations with long half-life originated by the earth. They are 232 Th (141 hundreds of millions of years of half-life), 238 U (45 hundreds of millions of years of half-life) and 40 K (13 hundreds of millions of years of half-life). Natural radiation (α-, β-, and γ-ray) from natural radionuclides exists everywhere in the earth. Natural radio nuclides are heat source of the earth, which is about 0.035 μcal/g/y. γ-ray from them is called as ''the earth's crust γ-ray'', which is about 55 nGy/h average of the world and about 50 nGy/h in Japan. The distribution of γ-ray is depended on the kinds of soil and rock. 222 Rn and 230 Rn are rare gases and the concentration of them in a room is larger than outside. Natural radiations originated from the cosmos are proton, ionizing components, neutron component with muon and electron, 3 H, 14 C and 10 Be. Effect of cosmic rays on birth of life, change of temperature, amount of cloud and ultra resistant cell are stated. (S.Y.)

  20. Earth Science Enterprise Technology Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) is dedicated to understanding the total Earth system and the effects of natural and human-induced changes on the global environment. The goals of ESE are: (1) Expand scientific knowledge of the Earth system using NASA's unique vantage points of space, aircraft, and in situ platforms; (2) Disseminate information about the Earth system; and (3) Enable the productive use of ESE science and technology in the public and private sectors. ESE has embraced the NASA Administrator's better, faster, cheaper paradigm for Earth observing missions. We are committed to launch the next generation of Earth Observing System (EOS) missions at a substantially lower cost than the EOS first series. Strategic investment in advanced instrument, spacecraft, and information system technologies is essential to accomplishing ESE's research goals in the coming decades. Advanced technology will play a major role in shaping the ESE fundamental and applied research program of the future. ESE has established an Earth science technology development program with the following objectives: (1) To accomplish ESE space-based and land-based program elements effectively and efficiently; and (2) To enable ESE's fundamental and applied research programs goals as stated in the NASA Strategic Plan.

  1. Nomenclature on an inorganic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This book contains eleven chapters : which mention nomenclature of an inorganic compound with introduction and general principle on nomenclature of compound. It gives the description of grammar for nomenclature such as brackets, diagonal line, asterisk, and affix, element, atom and groups of atom, chemical formula, naming by stoichiometry, solid, neutral molecule compound, ion, a substituent, radical and name of salt, oxo acid and anion on introduction and definition of oxo acid, coordination compound like symbol of stereochemistry , boron and hydrogen compound and related compound.

  2. Our Sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2013-03-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that the Earth has been warming monotonically since 1980. Transient to equilibrium temperature changes take centuries to develop, as the upper levels of the ocean are slow to respond to atmospheric temperature changes. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations, from ice core and observatory measurements, display consistent increases from historical averages, beginning in about 1880. They can be associated with the use of coal ecause of the spread of the industrial revolution from Great Britain to the European continent and beyond. The climactic consequence of this human-dominated increase in atmospheric CO2 has been suggested to define a geologic epoch, termed the ``Anthropocene.'' This could be a short term, relatively minor change in global climate, or an extreme deviation that lasts for thousands of years. In order to stabilize global temperatures, sharp reductions in CO2 emissions are required: an 80% reduction beginning in 2050. U.S. emissions have declined sharply recently because of market conditions leading to the substitution of natural gas for coal for electricity generation. Whether this is the best use for this resource may be questioned, but it nevertheless reduces CO2 production by 67% from a coal-fired power plant, well on the way to the 80% reduction required for global temperature stabilization. Current methods for CO2 capture and storage are not cost effective, and have been slow (if not absent) to introduce at scale. This paper describes research into some potentially economically feasible approaches: cost-effective capture and storage of CO2 from injection of flue gas into subterranean methane-saturated aquifers at the surface; fuels from sunlight without CO2 production; and large-scale electrical energy storage for intermittent (and even constant) electricity generating sources.

  3. Organic chemistry in a CO2 rich early Earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Millan, Maëva; Vettier, Ludovic; Szopa, Cyril

    2017-12-01

    The emergence of life on the Earth has required a prior organic chemistry leading to the formation of prebiotic molecules. The origin and the evolution of the organic matter on the early Earth is not yet firmly understood. Several hypothesis, possibly complementary, are considered. They can be divided in two categories: endogenous and exogenous sources. In this work we investigate the contribution of a specific endogenous source: the organic chemistry occurring in the ionosphere of the early Earth where the significant VUV contribution of the young Sun involved an efficient formation of reactive species. We address the issue whether this chemistry can lead to the formation of complex organic compounds with CO2 as only source of carbon in an early atmosphere made of N2, CO2 and H2, by mimicking experimentally this type of chemistry using a low pressure plasma reactor. By analyzing the gaseous phase composition, we strictly identified the formation of H2O, NH3, N2O and C2N2. The formation of a solid organic phase is also observed, confirming the possibility to trigger organic chemistry in the upper atmosphere of the early Earth. The identification of Nitrogen-bearing chemical functions in the solid highlights the possibility for an efficient ionospheric chemistry to provide prebiotic material on the early Earth.

  4. Earth - South America (first frame of Earth Spin Movie)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by Galileo at about 6:10 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on Dec. 11, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.3 million miles from the planet during the first of two Earth flybys on its way to Jupiter. The color composite used images taken through the red, green and violet filters. South America is near the center of the picture, and the white, sunlit continent of Antarctica is below. Picturesque weather fronts are visible in the South Atlantic, lower right. This is the first frame of the Galileo Earth spin movie, a 500- frame time-lapse motion picture showing a 25-hour period of Earth's rotation and atmospheric dynamics.

  5. Earth observation from the manned low Earth orbit platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huadong; Dou, Changyong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Han, Chunming; Yue, Xijuan

    2016-05-01

    The manned low Earth orbit platforms (MLEOPs), e.g., the U.S. and Russia's human space vehicles, the International Space Station (ISS) and Chinese Tiangong-1 experimental space laboratory not only provide laboratories for scientific experiments in a wide range of disciplines, but also serve as exceptional platforms for remote observation of the Earth, astronomical objects and space environment. As the early orbiting platforms, the MLEOPs provide humans with revolutionary accessibility to the regions on Earth never seen before. Earth observation from MLEOPs began in early 1960s, as a part of manned space flight programs, and will continue with the ISS and upcoming Chinese Space Station. Through a series of flight missions, various and a large amount of Earth observing datasets have been acquired using handheld cameras by crewmembers as well as automated sophisticated sensors onboard these space vehicles. Utilizing these datasets many researches have been conducted, demonstrating the importance and uniqueness of studying Earth from a vantage point of MLEOPs. For example, the first, near-global scale digital elevation model (DEM) was developed from data obtained during the shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM). This review intends to provide an overview of Earth observations from MLEOPs and present applications conducted by the datasets collected by these missions. As the ISS is the most typical representative of MLEOPs, an introduction to it, including orbital characteristics, payload accommodations, and current and proposed sensors, is emphasized. The advantages and challenges of Earth observation from MLEOPs, using the ISS as an example, is also addressed. At last, a conclusive note is drawn.

  6. EarthN: A new Earth System Nitrogen Model

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Benjamin W.; Goldblatt, Colin

    2018-01-01

    The amount of nitrogen in the atmosphere, oceans, crust, and mantle have important ramifications for Earth's biologic and geologic history. Despite this importance, the history and cycling of nitrogen in the Earth system is poorly constrained over time. For example, various models and proxies contrastingly support atmospheric mass stasis, net outgassing, or net ingassing over time. In addition, the amount available to and processing of nitrogen by organisms is intricately linked with and prov...

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of alkaline earth uranyl carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amayri, Samer; Reich, Tobias; Arnold, Thuro; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert

    2005-01-01

    A series of alkaline uranyl carbonates, M[UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ].nH 2 O (M=Mg 2 , Ca 2 , Sr 2 , Ba 2 , Na 2 Ca, and CaMg) was synthesized and characterized by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after nitric acid digestion, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The molecular structure of these compounds was characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Crystalline Ba 2 [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ].6H 2 O was obtained for the first time. The EXAFS analysis showed that this compound consists of (UO 2 )(CO 3 ) 3 clusters similar to the other alkaline earth uranyl carbonates. The average U-Ba distance is 3.90+/-0.02A.Fluorescence wavelengths and life times were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The U-O bond distances determined by EXAFS, TRLFS, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy agree within the experimental uncertainties. The spectroscopic signatures observed could be useful for identifying uranyl carbonate species adsorbed on mineral surfaces

  8. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  9. The earth's shape and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, G D; Wilson, J T

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Shape and Gravity focuses on the progress of the use of geophysical methods in investigating the interior of the earth and its shape. The publication first offers information on gravity, geophysics, geodesy, and geology and gravity measurements. Discussions focus on gravity measurements and reductions, potential and equipotential surfaces, absolute and relative measurements, and gravity networks. The text then elaborates on the shape of the sea-level surface and reduction of gravity observations. The text takes a look at gravity anomalies and structures in the earth's crust; interp

  10. Mass spectra of alkaline earth salts with a FAB source. Complexation with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, J.

    1987-01-01

    With a liquid desorption FAB source it is possible to obtain alkaline earth metal ions complexed by a crown ether. Conditions for formation of these complexes ions are examined for selection of the complexing agent in function of cation size. Behaviour of alkaline and alkaline earth compounds are compared allowing the differentiation of ion extraction phenomena by liquid desorption ion source and solvent extraction [fr

  11. Synthesis and physicochemical study of rare earth complexes with o-hydroxyphenoxymethylphosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alibaeva, Z.M.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Alekseeva, N.A.; Bovin, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth complexes with o-hydroxyphenoxymethylphosphonic acid (C 7 H 9 PO 5 , N 2 L) of the HMl 2 xnH 2 O composition are synthesized. The compounds separated are studied by IR spectroscopy, X-ray phase and elementary analysis methods. The data obtained permit to suppose on the polymer structure of rare earth complexes, except HLaL 2 x2H 2 O which is evidently of the island structure

  12. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  13. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Jerry P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  14. Toxicology of alkylmercury compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Michael; Onishchenko, Natalia; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant and potent neurotoxin whose abundance in the food chain mandates additional studies on the consequences and mechanisms of its toxicity to the central nervous system. Formulation of our new hypotheses was predicated on our appreciation for (a) the remarkable affinity of mercurials for the anionic form of sulfhydryl (-SH) groups, and (b) the essential role of thiols in protein biochemistry. The present chapter addresses pathways to human exposure of various mercury compounds, highlighting their neurotoxicity and potential involvement in neurotoxic injury and neurodegenerative changes, both in the developing and senescent brain. Mechanisms that trigger these effects are discussed in detail.

  15. Compound composite odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kailasam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common type of odontogenic tumors and generally they are asymptomatic. Frequently, it may interfere with the eruption of the teeth. This is a case report of a compound composite odontoma in a 10-year-old girl, which results in failure of eruption of the permanent upper right central incisor while the contralateral tooth had erupted. A calcified mass was seen in the radiograph and was provisionally diagnosed as odontoma following which the odontoma was enucleated. Routine follow-up was done for more than a year and no recurrence was seen. This case report indicates that early diagnosis and management ensures better prognosis.

  16. Flavour Compounds in Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravasio, Davide Antonio

    . This selection of strains was used in fermentations with the aim of identifying new interesting flavour producers. Fermentation profiles, volatile analyses, off-flavour identification and resistance to osmotic/oxidative stress have been addressed to highlight new candidates to use for industrial applications....... This resulted in the identification of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Pichia kluyveri as high producers of esters fruity compounds, which contribute to enhance the complexity of wine and beer product. In addition the strain Debaromyces subglobosus showed high yields of aldehydes and fruity ketones, which...

  17. Safety aspects in rare earths recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, R.

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of rare earths involves mining of beach sands, mineral separation to obtain monazite and its chemical processing to obtain rare earth composites. The composites are then subjected to further chemical treatment to obtain individual rare earths. Although the separated out rare earths are not radioactive, the process for recovery of rare earths involve both radiological as well as conventional hazards. This paper highlights the safety aspects in the mining, mineral separation and chemical processing of monazite to obtain rare earths

  18. Antifouling Compounds from Marine Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Ma, Xuan

    2017-08-28

    In this review, a comprehensive overview about the antifouling compounds from marine invertebrates is described. In total, more than 198 antifouling compounds have been obtained from marine invertebrates, specifically, sponges, gorgonian and soft corals.

  19. Antifouling Compounds from Marine Invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Ma, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    In this review, a comprehensive overview about the antifouling compounds from marine invertebrates is described. In total, more than 198 antifouling compounds have been obtained from marine invertebrates, specifically, sponges, gorgonian and soft corals.

  20. Rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Sebastian; Kersting, Marcel; Heletta, Lukas; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-07-01

    Eight new intermetallic rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium compounds have been synthesized from the elements in sealed niobium ampoules using different annealing sequences in muffle furnaces. The compounds have been characterized by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Sm{sub 9.2}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.8} (a=939.6(2), c=1779(1) pm), Gd{sub 11}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16} (a=951.9(2), c=1756.8(8) pm), and Tb{sub 10.5}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16.5} (a=942.5(1), c=1758.3(4) pm) crystallize with the tetragonal Nd{sub 9.34}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.66} type structure, space group I4/mmm. This structure exhibits a complex condensation pattern of square-prisms and square-antiprisms around the magnesium and ruthenium atoms, respectively. Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=344.0(1), c=2019(1) pm) and Tb{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=341.43(6), c=2054.2(7) pm) adopt the Er{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} structure and Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg (a=337.72(9), c=1129.8(4) pm) is isotypic with Sc{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg. Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=337.35(9), c=2671(1) pm) and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=335.83(5), c=2652.2(5) pm) are the first ternary ordered variants of the Ti{sub 3}Cu{sub 4} type, space group I4/mmm. These five compounds belong to a large family of intermetallics which are completely ordered superstructures of the bcc subcell. The group-subgroup scheme for Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} is presented. The common structural motif of all three structure types are ruthenium-centered rare earth cubes reminicent of the CsCl type. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} samples revealed Pauli paramagnetism of the conduction electrons.

  1. Synthesis and physicochemical investigation of 3-nitro-5-aminobenzoates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makushova, G.N.; Zakharova, T.V.; Shilova, L.I.

    1994-01-01

    The compounds of cerium subgroup rare earth with 3-nitro-5-aminobenzoic acid of composition Ln(C 7 H 5 N 2 O 4 ) 3 ·nH 2 O, where Ln-La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu; n=4-14 not yet described in literature were obtained. Rare earth 3-nitro-5-aminobenzoates were individual crystal substances, as shown by X-ray diffraction; their interplanar distances were calculated. Thermal stability of the derived compounds was studied by means of thermography and thermal gravimetry. The interval of dehydration and start of decomposition of anhydrous salts was determined

  2. Children's knowledge of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Nobes, Gavin; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2011-03-01

    Children everywhere are fascinated by the sky, stars and Sun. Emerging evidence from cultures throughout the world suggests that even young children can acquire knowledge of the Earth and its place in the Universe.

  3. Encyclopedia of earth system science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nierenberg, William Aaron

    1992-01-01

    .... The very diversity of the articles attests to the complexity of earth system science as a unique interdisciplinary venture to place humanity in a position to move wisely to protect the global habitat...

  4. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  5. Earth Science Education in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabdelli, Mohamed

    1999-05-01

    The earth sciences are taught in twelve universities in Morocco and in three other institutions. In addition there are three more earth science research institutions. Earth science teaching has been taking place since 1957. The degree system is a four-year degree, split into two two-year blocks and geology is taught within the geology-biology programme for the first part of the degree. 'Classical' geology is taught in most universities, although applied geology degrees are also on offer in some universities. Recently-formed technical universities offer a more innovative approach to Earth Science Education. Teaching is in French, although school education is in Arabic. There is a need for a reform of the curriculum, although a lead is being taken by the technical universities. A new geological mapping programme promises new geological and mining discoveries in the country and prospects of employment for geology graduates.

  6. The Search for Another Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    /fulltext/reso/021/07/0641-0652. Keywords. Stars, planets, planetary systems, detection. Abstract. Is there life anywhere else in the vast cosmos?Are there planets similar to the Earth? For centuries,these questions baffled ...

  7. Earth Charter and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippi, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    The chapter presents Earth Charter, where are listed the principles in 4 sections: 1) respect and take care of the life community; 2) environmental integrity; social and economic welfare; 4) democracy, no-violence and peace

  8. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Program has evolved over the last two decades, and currently has several core and community components. Core components provide the basic operational capabilities to process, archive, manage and distribute data from NASA missions. Community components provide a path for peer-reviewed research in Earth Science Informatics to feed into the evolution of the core components. The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a core component consisting of twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and eight Science Investigator-led Processing Systems spread across the U.S. The presentation covers how the ESDS Program continues to evolve and benefits from as well as contributes to advances in Earth Science Informatics.

  9. Interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in the compressed Fe-ladder compound BaFe2Se3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Jianjun; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, Cedomir; Xiao, Yuming; Struzhkin, Viktor V. (BNL); (CIW)

    2017-06-01

    High pressure resistance, susceptibility, and Fe K β x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements were performed on Fe-ladder compound BaFe 2 Se 3 . Pressure-induced superconductivity was observed which is similar to the previously reported superconductivity in the BaFe 2 S 3 samples. The slope of local magnetic moment versus pressure shows an anomaly across the insulator-metal transition pressure in the BaFe 2 Se 3 samples. The local magnetic moment is continuously decreasing with increasing pressure, and the superconductivity appears only when the local magnetic moment value is comparable to the one in the iron-pnictide superconductors. Our results indicate that the compressed BaFe 2 C h 3 ( C h = S , Se) is a new family of iron-based superconductors. Despite the crystal structures completely different from the known iron-based superconducting materials, the magnetism in this Fe-ladder material plays a critical role in superconductivity. This behavior is similar to the other members of iron-based superconducting materials.

  10. A umbrella for the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunzig, R.

    2009-01-01

    In front of the global warming threat, the 'geo-engineers' foresee some solutions to change the climate of the Earth, like for instance, by hiding part of the solar radiation. Among the solutions one can notice: the injection of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, the artificial generation of clouds using sea fog generators, or the putting into orbit of disc-shape screens creating a 100000 km x 12000 km elliptical 'umbrella' between the sun and the Earth. (J.S.)

  11. Rare earth industries: Downstream business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The value chain of the rare earths business involves mining, extraction, processing, refining and the manufacture of an extensive range of downstream products which find wide applications in such industries including aerospace, consumer electronics, medical, military, automotive, renewable wind and solar energy and telecommunications. In fact the entire gamut of the high-tech industries depends on a sustainable supply of rare earths elements. The explosive demand in mobile phones is an excellent illustration of the massive potential that the rare earths business offers. In a matter of less than 20 years, the number of cell phones worldwide has reached a staggering 5 billion. Soon, going by the report of their growth in sales, the world demand for cell phones may even exceed the global population. Admittedly, the rare earths business does pose certain risks. Top among the risks are the health and safety risks. The mining, extraction and refining of rare earths produce residues and wastes which carry health and safety risks. The residues from the extraction and refining are radioactive, while their effluent waste streams do pose pollution risks to the receiving rivers and waterways. But, as clearly elaborated in a recent report by IAEA experts, there are technologies and systems available to efficiently mitigate such risks. The risks are Rare Earth manageable. However, it is crucial that the risk and waste management procedures are strictly followed and adhered to. This is where effective monitoring and surveillance throughout the life of all such rare earths facilities is crucial. Fortunately, Malaysia's regulatory standards on rare earths follow international standards. In some areas, Malaysia's regulatory regime is even more stringent than the international guidelines. (author)

  12. Rare earth metal alloy magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, I.R.; Evans, J.M.; Nyholm, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth metal alloy magnets and to methods for their production. The technique is based on the fact that rare earth metal alloys (for e.g. cerium or yttrium) which have been crumbled to form a powder by hydride formation and decomposition can be used for the fabrication of magnets without the disadvantages inherent in alloy particle size reduction by mechanical milling. (UK)

  13. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  14. Molecular modeling of inorganic compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Comba, Peter; Hambley, Trevor W; Martin, Bodo

    2009-01-01

    ... mechanics to inorganic and coordination compounds. Initially, simple metal complexes were modeled, but recently the field has been extended to include organometallic compounds, catalysis and the interaction of metal ions with biological macromolecules. The application of molecular mechanics to coordination compounds is complicated by the numbe...

  15. Organometallic compounds in the environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Craig, P. J

    2003-01-01

    ... of Organometallic Species in the Environment 20 1.10 Stability of Organometallic Compounds in Biological Systems 1.11 G eneral Comments on the Toxicities of Organometallic Compounds 22 1.12 General Considerations on Environmental R eactivity of Organometallic Compounds 24 1.13 Microbial Biotransformation of Metals and M etalloids 25 1.13.1 Introduction 25 1...

  16. Rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Long, Keith R.; Gambogi, Joseph; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The rare-earth elements (REEs) are 15 elements that range in atomic number from 57 (lanthanum) to 71 (lutetium); they are commonly referred to as the “lanthanides.” Yttrium (atomic number 39) is also commonly regarded as an REE because it shares chemical and physical similarities and has affinities with the lanthanides. Although REEs are not rare in terms of average crustal abundance, the concentrated deposits of REEs are limited in number.Because of their unusual physical and chemical properties, the REEs have diverse defense, energy, industrial, and military technology applications. The glass industry is the leading consumer of REE raw materials, which are used for glass polishing and as additives that provide color and special optical properties to the glass. Lanthanum-based catalysts are used in petroleum refining, and cerium-based catalysts are used in automotive catalytic converters. The use of REEs in magnets is a rapidly increasing application. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets, which are the strongest known type of magnets, are used when space and weight are restrictions. Nickel-metal hydride batteries use anodes made of a lanthanum-based alloys.China, which has led the world production of REEs for decades, accounted for more than 90 percent of global production and supply, on average, during the past decade. Citing a need to retain its limited REE resources to meet domestic requirements as well as concerns about the environmental effects of mining, China began placing restrictions on the supply of REEs in 2010 through the imposition of quotas, licenses, and taxes. As a result, the global rare-earth industry has increased its stockpiling of REEs; explored for deposits outside of China; and promoted new efforts to conserve, recycle, and substitute for REEs. New mine production began at Mount Weld in Western Australia, and numerous other exploration and development projects noted in this chapter are ongoing throughout the world.The REE-bearing minerals are

  17. Goldenphilicity: Luminescent gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansores, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the solids and molecules different types of bonds are presented depending on the involved atoms, covalent bonds are common among elements of open shell, where more bond orbitals are filled than anti bond orbitals. It is expected that ionic bonds among closed shell atoms which have charges of opposite sign. Bonds type Van der Waals are presented among molecules which have a bipolar moment. It would not be expected bonds among zero charge species, or more generally with the same nominal charge and in any case the attractive forces would be very small. In fact it is expected that two metallic cations to be repelled each other. There recently is evidence that in organic or organometallic compounds could exist attractive interactions between two cations of the d 8 -d 10 -s 2 families. These bonds are weak but stronger than those of Van der Waals. They are compared with the hydrogen bonds. In this work it was reviewed some examples in which the goldenphilicity plays an important role in the luminescence that the gold complexes present. Examples of mono, bi and trinuclear and the structures that these organometallic compounds could take are examined. (Author)

  18. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a ''demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a ''satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change

  19. Next-generation Digital Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Michael F; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-07-10

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of "big data" has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public's access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.

  20. Charge-order driven multiferroic and magneto-dielectric properties of rare earth manganates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrao, Claudy Rayan; Sahu, Jyoti Ranjan; Ghosh, Anirban

    2010-01-01

    Charge-order driven magnetic ferroelectricity is shown to occur in several rare earth manganates of the general formula, Ln 1-x A x MnO 3 (Ln rare earth, A = alkaline earth). Charge-ordered manganates exhibit dielectric constant anomalies around the charge-ordering or the antiferromagnetic transition temperature. Magnetic fields have a marked effect on the dielectric properties of these compounds, indicating the presence of coupling between the magnetic and electrical order parameters. Magneto-dielectric properties are retained in small particles of the manganates. The observation of magneto-ferroelectricity in these manganates is in accordance with theoretical predictions. (author)