WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth combining dynamics

  1. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  2. Making the Earth: Combining dynamics and chemistry in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jade C.; Lauretta, Dante S.; O'Brien, David P.

    2010-02-01

    No terrestrial planet formation simulation completed to date has considered the detailed chemical composition of the planets produced. While many have considered possible water contents and late veneer compositions, none have examined the bulk elemental abundances of the planets produced as an important check of formation models. Here we report on the first study of this type. Bulk elemental abundances based on disk equilibrium studies have been determined for the simulated terrestrial planets of O'Brien et al. [O'Brien, D.P., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., 2006. Icarus 184, 39-58]. These abundances are in excellent agreement with observed planetary values, indicating that the models of O'Brien et al. [O'Brien, D.P., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., 2006. Icarus 184, 39-58] are successfully producing planets comparable to those of the Solar System in terms of both their dynamical and chemical properties. Significant amounts of water are accreted in the present simulations, implying that the terrestrial planets form "wet" and do not need significant water delivery from other sources. Under the assumption of equilibrium controlled chemistry, the biogenic species N and C still need to be delivered to the Earth as they are not accreted in significant proportions during the formation process. Negligible solar photospheric pollution is produced by the planetary formation process. Assuming similar levels of pollution in other planetary systems, this in turn implies that the high metallicity trend observed in extrasolar planetary systems is in fact primordial.

  3. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The i...

  4. Making the Earth: Combining Dynamics and Chemistry in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Jade C; O'Brien, David P

    2009-01-01

    No terrestrial planet formation simulation completed to date has considered the detailed chemical composition of the planets produced. While many have considered possible water contents and late veneer compositions, none have examined the bulk elemental abundances of the planets produced as an important check of formation models. Here we report on the first study of this type. Bulk elemental abundances based on disk equilibrium studies have been determined for the simulated terrestrial planets of O'Brien et al. (2006). These abundances are in excellent agreement with observed planetary values, indicating that the models of O'Brien et al. (2006) are successfully producing planets comparable to those of the Solar System in terms of both their dynamical and chemical properties. Significant amounts of water are accreted in the present simulations, implying that the terrestrial planets form "wet" and do not need significant water delivery from other sources. Under the assumption of equilibrium controlled chemistry...

  5. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The initial whole-Earth decompression is expected to result in a global system of major primary decompression cracks appearing in the rigid crust which persist as the basalt feeders for the global, mid-oceanic ridge system. As the Earth subsequently decompresses, the area of the Earth's surface increases by the formation of secondary decompression cracks, often located near the continental margins, presently identified as oceanic trenches. These secondary decompression cracks are subsequently in-filled with basalt, extruded fr...

  6. Polar Misunderstandings: Earth's Dynamic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the movement of Earth's north and south poles. The Earth's poles may be a bit more complex and dynamic than what many students and teachers believe. With better understanding, offer them up as a rich landscape for higher-level critical analysis and subject integration. Possible curriculum tie-ins include magnets, Earth…

  7. The Dynamic Earth: Recycling Naturally!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Allison, Elizabeth; Fowler, Lisa; Glaze, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article begins with a thought-provoking question: What do you think of when you hear the term "recycle?" Many think about paper, glass, aluminum cans, landfills, and reducing waste by reusing some of these materials. How many of us ever consider the way the systems of Earth dynamically recycle its materials? In the following…

  8. Dynamics of a Snowball Earth ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; Gildor, Hezi; Losch, Martin; Macdonald, Francis A; Schrag, Daniel P; Tziperman, Eli

    2013-03-01

    Geological evidence suggests that marine ice extended to the Equator at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (about 750 to 635 million years ago), inspiring the Snowball Earth hypothesis that the Earth was globally ice-covered. In a possible Snowball Earth climate, ocean circulation and mixing processes would have set the melting and freezing rates that determine ice thickness, would have influenced the survival of photosynthetic life, and may provide important constraints for the interpretation of geochemical and sedimentological observations. Here we show that in a Snowball Earth, the ocean would have been well mixed and characterized by a dynamic circulation, with vigorous equatorial meridional overturning circulation, zonal equatorial jets, a well developed eddy field, strong coastal upwelling and convective mixing. This is in contrast to the sluggish ocean often expected in a Snowball Earth scenario owing to the insulation of the ocean from atmospheric forcing by the thick ice cover. As a result of vigorous convective mixing, the ocean temperature, salinity and density were either uniform in the vertical direction or weakly stratified in a few locations. Our results are based on a model that couples ice flow and ocean circulation, and is driven by a weak geothermal heat flux under a global ice cover about a kilometre thick. Compared with the modern ocean, the Snowball Earth ocean had far larger vertical mixing rates, and comparable horizontal mixing by ocean eddies. The strong circulation and coastal upwelling resulted in melting rates near continents as much as ten times larger than previously estimated. Although we cannot resolve the debate over the existence of global ice cover, we discuss the implications for the nutrient supply of photosynthetic activity and for banded iron formations. Our insights and constraints on ocean dynamics may help resolve the Snowball Earth controversy when combined with future geochemical and geological observations.

  9. Dynamic active earth pressure on retaining structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepankar Choudhury; Santiram Chatterjee

    2006-12-01

    Earth-retaining structures constitute an important topic of research in civil engineering, more so under earthquake conditions. For the analysis and design of retaining walls in earthquake-prone zones, accurate estimation of dynamic earth pressures is very important. Conventional methods either use pseudo-static approaches of analysis even for dynamic cases or a simple single-degree of freedom model for the retaining wall–soil system. In this paper, a simplified two-degree of freedom mass–spring–dashpot (2-DOF) dynamic model has been proposed to estimate the active earth pressure at the back of the retaining walls for translation modes of wall movement under seismic conditions. The horizontal zone of influence on dynamic earth force on the wall is estimated. Results in terms of displacement, velocity and acceleration-time history are presented for some typical cases, which show the final movement of the wall in terms of wall height, which is required for the design. The non-dimensional design chart proposed in the present study can be used to compute the total dynamic earth force on the wall under different input ground motion and backfill conditions. Finally, the results obtained have been compared with those of the available Scott model and the merits of the present results have been discussed.

  10. Ontology of Earth's nonlinear dynamic complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Hassan; Davarpanah, Armita

    2017-04-01

    As a complex system, Earth and its major integrated and dynamically interacting subsystems (e.g., hydrosphere, atmosphere) display nonlinear behavior in response to internal and external influences. The Earth Nonlinear Dynamic Complex Systems (ENDCS) ontology formally represents the semantics of the knowledge about the nonlinear system element (agent) behavior, function, and structure, inter-agent and agent-environment feedback loops, and the emergent collective properties of the whole complex system as the result of interaction of the agents with other agents and their environment. It also models nonlinear concepts such as aperiodic, random chaotic behavior, sensitivity to initial conditions, bifurcation of dynamic processes, levels of organization, self-organization, aggregated and isolated functionality, and emergence of collective complex behavior at the system level. By incorporating several existing ontologies, the ENDCS ontology represents the dynamic system variables and the rules of transformation of their state, emergent state, and other features of complex systems such as the trajectories in state (phase) space (attractor and strange attractor), basins of attractions, basin divide (separatrix), fractal dimension, and system's interface to its environment. The ontology also defines different object properties that change the system behavior, function, and structure and trigger instability. ENDCS will help to integrate the data and knowledge related to the five complex subsystems of Earth by annotating common data types, unifying the semantics of shared terminology, and facilitating interoperability among different fields of Earth science.

  11. Geoid anomalies in a dynamic earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, M. A.; Hager, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    Potential and surface deformation Love numbers for internal loading have been calculated in order to obtain a dynamically consistent relationship between the geoid and the earth's response to internal buoyancy forces. These quantities depend on the depth and harmonic degree of loading, and can be integrated as Green functions to obtain the dynamic response due to an arbitrary distribution of internal density contrasts. Constructing a series of spherically symmetric, self-gravitating flow models for a variety of radial Newtonian viscosity variations and flow configurations, and calculating relaxation times for spherically symmetric viscous earth models, it is demonstrated that boundary deformation due to internal loading reaches its equilibrium value on the same time scale as postglacial rebound; this is much less time than the time scale for significant change in the convective flow pattern.

  12. Future Satellite Gravimetry and Earth Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flury, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    Currently, a first generation of dedicated satellite missions for the precise mapping of the Earth’s gravity field is in orbit (CHAMP, GRACE, and soon GOCE). The gravity data from these satellite missions provide us with very new information on the dynamics of planet Earth. In particular, on the mass distribution in the Earth’s interior, the entire water cycle (ocean circulation, ice mass balance, continental water masses, and atmosphere), and on changes in the mass distribution. The results are fascinating, but still rough with respect to spatial and temporal resolution. Technical progress in satellite-to-satellite tracking and in gravity gradiometry will allow more detailed results in the future. In this special issue, Earth scientists develop visions of future applications based on follow-on high-precision satellite gravimetry missions.

  13. Global ENA Imaging of Earth's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between singly charged ions of Earth's magnetosphere and its neutral exosphere and upper atmosphere gives rise to Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). This has enabled several missions to remotely image the global injection dynamics of the ring current and plasma sheet, the outflow of ions from Earth's polar regions, and the location of the sub-solar magnetopause. In this presentation we review ENA observations by the Astrid, IMAGE, TWINS and IBEX missions. We focus on results from the IMAGE/HENA Camera including observations of proton and oxygen ion injections in to the ring current and their impact on the force-balance and ionospheric coupling in the inner magnetosphere. We report also on the status of inversion techniques for retrieving the ion spatial and pitch-angle distributions from ENA images. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future next steps in ENA instrumentation and analysis capabilities required to deliver the science as recommended by the Heliophysics Decadal Survey.

  14. Imprint of Galactic dynamics on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A connection between climate and the Solar system's motion perpendicular to the Galactic plane during the last 200 Myr years is studied. An imprint of galactic dynamics is found in a long-term record of the Earth's climate that is consistent with variations in the Solar system oscillation around ......(arm)/rho(interarm) approximate to 1.5-1.8), and finally, using current knowledge of spiral arm positions, a pattern speed of Omega(P) = 13.6 +/- 1.4 km s(-1) kpc(-1) is determined....

  15. Earth system multi-body restriction dynamics model research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Qingxian; BI; Siwen; GONG; Huili

    2006-01-01

    Research provides a theoretical basis for an Earth system multi-body mechanics model and its dynamics, including the Earth system multi-body restriction function and its power, Earth system multi-body restriction under decreasing generalized velocity and decreasing partial palstance, the Earth system multi-body decreasing generalized force, a moving mechanics function, and the Earth system multi-body restriction's wattful and wattless forces.

  16. Combined Industry, Space and Earth Science Data Compression Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Aaron B. (Editor); Renner, Robert L. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The sixth annual Space and Earth Science Data Compression Workshop and the third annual Data Compression Industry Workshop were held as a single combined workshop. The workshop was held April 4, 1996 in Snowbird, Utah in conjunction with the 1996 IEEE Data Compression Conference, which was held at the same location March 31 - April 3, 1996. The Space and Earth Science Data Compression sessions seek to explore opportunities for data compression to enhance the collection, analysis, and retrieval of space and earth science data. Of particular interest is data compression research that is integrated into, or has the potential to be integrated into, a particular space or earth science data information system. Preference is given to data compression research that takes into account the scien- tist's data requirements, and the constraints imposed by the data collection, transmission, distribution and archival systems.

  17. Sea level and vertical motion of continents from dynamic earth models since the Late Cretaceous

    OpenAIRE

    Spasojevic, Sonja; Gurnis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic earth models are used to better understand the impact of mantle dynamics on the vertical motion of continents and regional and global sea level change since the Late Cretaceous. A hybrid approach combines inverse and forward models of mantle convection and accounts for the principal contributors to long-term sea level change: the evolving distribution of ocean floor age, dynamic topography in oceanic and continental regions, and the geoid. We infer the relative importance of dynamic v...

  18. Dynamics of dipolar defects in rare earth-doped alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Forrest Taylor

    also describe an experimental technique that would combine dielectric relaxation (with its dynamic information) and EPR (with its structural information). Unfortunately, experimental difficulties have thus far prevented this technique from being realized.

  19. Electromagnetic Calculation of Combined Earthing System with Ring Earth Electrode and Vertical Rods for Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiaki; Yasuda, Yoh; Ueda, Toshiaki

    With the worldwide spread of wind turbine installations, various problems such as landscape issues, bird strikes and grid connections have arisen. Protection of wind turbines from lightning is cited as one of the main problems. Wind turbines are often struck by lightning because of their open-air locations, such as in mountainous areas, and their special configuration and very-high construction. Especially, low-voltage and control circuits can fail or suffer burnout while blades can incur serious damage if struck by lightning. Wind turbine failures caused by lightning strikes account for approximately 25% of all failures. The problem is regarded as a global one that needs immediate resolution. It is important to understand the impedance characteristics of wind turbine earthing systems from the viewpoint of lightning protection. A report from IEC TR61400-24 recommends a “ring earth electrode”. This was originally defined in IEC 61024 (currently revised and re-numbered as IEC 62305), where such an electrode is recommended to reduce touch and step voltages in households and buildings. IEC TR61400-24 also recommended additional electrodes of vertical or horizontal rods. However, these concepts have not been fully discussed from the viewpoint of its application to wind turbines. To confirm the effect of a combination of a ring earth electrode and additional vertical rods for protection of a wind turbine, this report uses the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to present an electromagnetic transient analysis on such a wind turbine earthing system. The results show that an optimal combination can be arranged from viewpoints of lightning protection and construction cost. Thus, this report discusses how to establish a quantitative design methodology of the wind turbine earthing system to provide effective lightning protection.

  20. Earth Orientation Parameters from repro- cessing and combination efforts (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothacher, M.; Steigenberger, P.; Thaller, D.

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years two major improvements have been achieved concerning the determination of Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP): (1) A few GPS analysis centers started to reprocess long time intervals (≍10 years) of global GPS data to obtain very homogeneous and much refined time series of EOPs, considerably improving the modeling of the observations (ionospheric corrections of higher order, satellite and receiver antenna phase center patterns, atmospheric mapping function, etc.). The effect of these reprocessing and modeling efforts on polar motion, LOD and nutation rates will be shown. (2) With various activities (IERS SINEX Combination Campaign, IERS Combination Pilot Project, IERS Call for Long Time Series) the IERS has promoted the rigorous combination of the different space geodetic techniques. Such a combination is not only important to guarantee EOP results referring to a unique reference frame, but it also allows to make use of the complementarity of the space techniques (e.g., UT1 from VLBI densified in time using LOD from GPS). We show results from the CONT02 campaign to illustrate the benefits but also the critical issues of such a rigorous combination of the different observation techniques. Finally, we will give an outlook at what might be a future, very consistent and highly accurate set of IERS products, resulting from the combination of the space geodetic techniques.

  1. Monitoring the Earth's Dynamic Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Applegate, David; Townshend, John B.

    2008-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey's Geomagnetism Program is to monitor the Earth's magnetic field. Using ground-based observatories, the Program provides continuous records of magnetic field variations covering long timescales; disseminates magnetic data to various governmental, academic, and private institutions; and conducts research into the nature of geomagnetic variations for purposes of scientific understanding and hazard mitigation. The program is an integral part of the U.S. Government's National Space Weather Program (NSWP), which also includes programs in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSWP works to provide timely, accurate, and reliable space weather warnings, observations, specifications, and forecasts, and its work is important for the U.S. economy and national security. Please visit the National Geomagnetism Program?s website, http://geomag.usgs.gov, where you can learn more about the Program and the science of geomagnetism. You can find additional related information at the Intermagnet website, http://www.intermagnet.org.

  2. The Formation and Dynamics of Super-Earth Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Super-Earths, objects slightly larger than Earth and slightly smaller than Uranus, have found a special place in exoplanetary science. As a new class of planetary bodies, these objects have challenged models of planet formation at both ends of the spectrum and have triggered a great deal of research on the composition and interior dynamics of rocky planets in connection to their masses and radii. Being relatively easier to detect than an Earth-sized planet at 1 AU around a G star, super-Earths have become the focus of worldwide observational campaigns to search for habitable planets. With a range of masses that allows these objects to retain moderate atmospheres and perhaps even plate tectonics, super-Earths may be habitable if they maintain long-term orbits in the habitable zones of their host stars. Given that in the past two years a few such potentially habitable super-Earths have in fact been discovered, it is necessary to develop a deep understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of these obje...

  3. Mathematical modeling of earth's dynamical systems a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Slingerland, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical Modeling of Earth's Dynamical Systems gives earth scientists the essential skills for translating chemical and physical systems into mathematical and computational models that provide enhanced insight into Earth's processes. Using a step-by-step method, the book identifies the important geological variables of physical-chemical geoscience problems and describes the mechanisms that control these variables. This book is directed toward upper-level undergraduate students, graduate students, researchers, and professionals who want to learn how to abstract complex systems into sets of dynamic equations. It shows students how to recognize domains of interest and key factors, and how to explain assumptions in formal terms. The book reveals what data best tests ideas of how nature works, and cautions against inadequate transport laws, unconstrained coefficients, and unfalsifiable models. Various examples of processes and systems, and ample illustrations, are provided. Students using this text should be f...

  4. Earth Observation of Vegetation Dynamics in Global Drylands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Feng

    Land degradation in global drylands has been a concern related to both the local livelihoods and the changes in terrestrial biosphere, especially in the context of substantial global environmental changes. Earth Observation (EO) provides a unique way to assess the vegetation dynamics over the past...

  5. Dynamics of Rotation of Super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Callegari, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamics of rotation of several close-in terrestrial exoplanets candidates. In our model, the rotation of the planet is disturbed by the torque of the central star due to the asymmetric equilibrium figure of the planet. We use surfaces of section to explore numerically the rotation phase space of the systems adopting different sets of parameters and initial conditions close to the main spin-orbit resonant states. We show that, depending on some parameters of the system like the radius and mass of the planet, orbital eccentricity etc, the rotation can be strongly perturbed and a chaotic layer around the synchronous state may occupy a significant region of the phase space. 55 Cnc e is an example.

  6. Dynamic Flood Vulnerability Mapping with Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, B.; Kuhn, C.; Max, S. A.; Sullivan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellites capture the rate and character of environmental change from local to global levels, yet integrating these changes into flood exposure models can be cost or time prohibitive. We explore an approach to global flood modeling by leveraging satellite data with computing power in Google Earth Engine to dynamically map flood hazards. Our research harnesses satellite imagery in two main ways: first to generate a globally consistent flood inundation layer and second to dynamically model flood vulnerability. Accurate and relevant hazard maps rely on high quality observation data. Advances in publicly available spatial, spectral, and radar data together with cloud computing allow us to improve existing efforts to develop a comprehensive flood extent database to support model training and calibration. This talk will demonstrate the classification results of algorithms developed in Earth Engine designed to detect flood events by combining observations from MODIS, Landsat 8, and Sentinel-1. Our method to derive flood footprints increases the number, resolution, and precision of spatial observations for flood events both in the US, recorded in the NCDC (National Climatic Data Center) storm events database, and globally, as recorded events from the Colorado Flood Observatory database. This improved dataset can then be used to train machine learning models that relate spatial temporal flood observations to satellite derived spatial temporal predictor variables such as precipitation, antecedent soil moisture, and impervious surface. This modeling approach allows us to rapidly update models with each new flood observation, providing near real time vulnerability maps. We will share the water detection algorithms used with each satellite and discuss flood detection results with examples from Bihar, India and the state of New York. We will also demonstrate how these flood observations are used to train machine learning models and estimate flood exposure. The final stage of

  7. A New Basis of Geoscience: Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Neither plate tectonics nor Earth expansion theory is sufficient to provide a basis for understanding geoscience. Each theory is incomplete and possesses problematic elements, but both have served as stepping stones to a more fundamental and inclusive geoscience theory that I call Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics (WEDD). WEDD begins with and is the consequence of our planet's early formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant and permits deduction of:(1) Earth's internal composition, structure, and highly-reduced oxidation state; (2) Core formation without whole-planet melting; (3) Powerful new internal energy sources - proto-planetary energy of compression and georeactor nuclear fission energy; (4) Georeactor geomagnetic field generation; (5) Mechanism for heat emplacement at the base of the crust resulting in the crustal geothermal gradient; (6) Decompression driven geodynamics that accounts for the myriad of observations attributed to plate tectonics without requiring physically-impossible mantle convection, an...

  8. Atmospheric dynamics of Earth-like tidally locked aquaplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Merlis, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of atmospheres of Earth-like aquaplanets that are tidally locked to their star, that is, planets whose orbital period is equal to the rotation period about their spin axis, so that one side always faces the star and the other side is always dark. As extreme cases illustrating the effects of slow and rapid rotation, we consider planets with rotation periods equal to one current Earth year and one current Earth day. The dynamics responsible for the surface climate (e.g., winds, temperature, precipitation) and the general circulation of the atmosphere are discussed in light of existing theories of atmospheric circulations. For example, as expected from the increasing importance of Coriolis accelerations relative to inertial accelerations as the rotation rate increases, the winds are approximately isotropic and divergent at leading order in the slowly rotating atmosphere but are predominantly zonal and rotational in the rapidly rotating atmosphere. Free-atmospheric horizontal temperature va...

  9. PôDET: A Centre for Earth Dynamical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestroffer, D.; Deleflie, F.

    2013-11-01

    The monitoring of the Earth space environment has gained some importance these last decades, in particular at the European level, partly because the phenomenon which origin come from space can have socio-economic consequences; and also because our understanding of those phenomenon - their associated prediction and risks - is still limited. For instance, the Space Situational Awareness programme (SSA) at ESA has set up in 2013 a centre and network for aspects connected to space debris (SST), to space weather (SW), and to near-Earth objects (NEO). At IMCCE, the Pôle sur la dynamique de l'environnement terrestre} (PODET, \\url{podet.imcce.fr}) for the Earth dynamical environment is studying effects and prediction for natural and artificial objects gravitating in the Earth vicinity. These studies englobe near-Earth objects, asteroids, comets, meteoroids, meteorite streams, and space debris. For all object types that are concerned, a general scheme of a functional analysis has been developed. It encompasses data acquisition with dedicated observations--essentially astrometric--or database queries, orbit determination or adjustment, prediction and ephemerides, and eventually impact probability computation and data dissemination. We develop here the general context of this action, the PôDET project, its scientific objectives, interaction with other disciplines, and the development in progress for dedicated tools.

  10. Dynamical Constraints on Outer Planets in Super-Earth Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Matthew J.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers secular interactions within multi-planet systems. In particular we consider dynamical evolution of known planetary systems resulting from an additional hypothetical planet on an eccentric orbit. We start with an analytical study of a general two-planet system, showing that a planet on an elliptical orbit transfers all of its eccentricity to an initially circular planet if the two planets have comparable orbital angular momenta. Application to the single Super-Earth system...

  11. Reveal protein dynamics by combining computer simulation and neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Liang; Smith, Jeremy; CenterMolecular Biophysics Team

    2014-03-01

    Protein carries out most functions in living things on the earth through characteristic modulation of its three-dimensional structure over time. Understanding the microscopic nature of the protein internal motion and its connection to the function and structure of the biomolecule is a central topic in biophysics, and of great practical importance for drug design, study of diseases, and the development of renewable energy, etc. Under physiological conditions, protein exhibits a complex dynamics landscape, i.e., a variety of diffusive and conformational motions occur on similar time and length scales. This variety renders difficult the derivation of a simplified description of protein internal motions in terms of a small number of distinct, additive components. This difficulty is overcome by our work using a combined approach of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and the Neutron Scattering experiments. Our approach enables distinct protein motions to be characterized separately, furnishing an in-depth understanding of the connection between protein structure, dynamics and function.

  12. On the spin-axis dynamics of a Moonless Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gongjie; Batygin, Konstantin, E-mail: gli@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The Institute for Theory and Computation, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    The variation of a planet's obliquity is influenced by the existence of satellites with a high mass ratio. For instance, Earth's obliquity is stabilized by the Moon and would undergo chaotic variations in the Moon's absence. In turn, such variations can lead to large-scale changes in the atmospheric circulation, rendering spin-axis dynamics a central issue for understanding climate. The relevant quantity for dynamically forced climate change is the rate of chaotic diffusion. Accordingly, here we re-examine the spin-axis evolution of a Moonless Earth within the context of a simplified perturbative framework. We present analytical estimates of the characteristic Lyapunov coefficient as well as the chaotic diffusion rate and demonstrate that even in absence of the Moon, the stochastic change in Earth's obliquity is sufficiently slow to not preclude long-term habitability. Our calculations are consistent with published numerical experiments and illustrate the putative system's underlying dynamical structure in a simple and intuitive manner.

  13. The Contribution of GGOS to Understanding Dynamic Earth Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Geodesy is the science of the Earth's shape, size, gravity and rotation, including their evolution in time. Geodetic observations play a major role in the solid Earth sciences because they are fundamental for the understanding and modeling of Earth system processes. Changes in the Earth's shape, its gravitational field, and its rotation are caused by external forces acting on the Earth system and internal processes involving mass transfer and exchange of angular and linear momentum. Thus, variations in these geodetic quantities of the Earth reflect and constrain mechanical and thermo-dynamic processes in the Earth system. Mitigating the impact on human life and property of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, debris flows, landslides, land subsidence, sea level change, tsunamis, floods, storm surges, hurricanes and extreme weather is an important scientific task to which geodetic observations make fundamental contributions. Geodetic observations can be used to monitor the pre-eruptive deformation of volcanoes and the pre-seismic deformation of earthquake fault zones, aiding in the issuance of volcanic eruption and earthquake warnings. They can also be used to rapidly estimate earthquake fault motion, aiding in the modeling of tsunami genesis and the issuance of tsunami warnings. Geodetic observations are also used in other areas of the Earth sciences, not just the solid Earth sciences. For example, geodesy contributes to atmospheric science by supporting both observation and prediction of the weather by geo-referencing meteorological observing data and by globally tracking change in stratospheric mass and lower tropospheric water vapor fields. Geodetic measurements of refraction profiles derived from satellite occultation data are routinely assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Geodesy contributes to hydrologic studies by providing a unique global reference system for measurements of: sub-seasonal, seasonal and secular movements

  14. An Earth multi-body system elasticity and plasticity dynamics model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qingxian; BI Siwen; GONG Huili

    2006-01-01

    Research on the elasticity and plasticity dynamics of the Earth multi-body system, including the Earth multi-body system stratum-block's equivalent inertia force system and generalized inertia force, the Earth multi-body system stratum-block's equivalent inertia force system expressed with partial velocity and partial palstance, and Earth multi-body system generalized inertia force expressed with partial velocity and partial palstance. This research provides a theoretical foundation for further investigation of Earth multi-body dynamics.

  15. Teaching Earth Dynamics: What's Wrong with Plate Tectonics Theory?

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    Textbooks frequently extol plate tectonics theory without questioning what might be wrong with the theory or without discussing a competitive theory. How can students be taught to challenge popular ideas when they are only presented a one-sided view? In just a few pages, I describe more than a century of geodynamic ideas. I review what is wrong with plate tectonics theory and with Earth expansion theory, and describe my new Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics Theory, which unifies the two previous dominant theories in a self- consistent manner. Along the way, I disclose details of what real science is all about, details all too often absent in textbooks and classroom discussions. In these few pages, I only touch on highlights and just part the curtain a bit so that teachers might glimpse ways to bring to their students some of the richness and excitement of discovery that becomes evident when one begins to question prevailing, currently popular perceptions of our world.

  16. Report of the panel on earth structure and dynamics, section 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewonski, Adam M.; Mcadoo, David C.; Oconnell, Richard J.; Smylie, Douglas E.; Yoder, Charles F.

    1991-01-01

    The panel identified problems related to the dynamics of the core and mantle that should be addressed by NASA programs. They include investigating the geodynamo based on observations of the Earth's magnetic field, determining the rheology of the mantle from geodetic observations of post-glacial vertical motions and changes in the gravity field, and determining the coupling between plate motions and mantle flow from geodetic observations of plate deformation. Also emphasized is the importance of support for interdisciplinary research to combine various data sets with models which couple rheology, structure and dynamics.

  17. Comparison and validation of combined GRACE/GOCE models of the Earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate global models of the Earth's gravity field are needed in various applications: in geodesy - to facilitate the production of a unified global height system; in oceanography - as a source of information about the reference equipotential surface (geoid); in geophysics - to draw conclusions about the structure and composition of the Earth's interiors, etc. A global and (nearly) homogeneous set of gravimetric measurements is being provided by the dedicated satellite mission Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In particular, Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) data acquired by this mission are characterized by an unprecedented accuracy/resolution: according to the mission objectives, they must ensure global geoid modeling with an accuracy of 1 - 2 cm at the spatial scale of 100 km (spherical harmonic degree 200). A number of new models of the Earth's gravity field have been compiled on the basis of GOCE data in the course of the last 1 - 2 years. The best of them take into account also the data from the satellite gravimetry mission Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE), which offers an unbeatable accuracy in the range of relatively low degrees. Such combined models contain state-of-the-art information about the Earth's gravity field up to degree 200 - 250. In the present study, we compare and validate such models, including GOCO02, EIGEN-6S, and a model compiled in-house. In addition, the EGM2008 model produced in the pre-GOCE era is considered as a reference. The validation is based on the ability of the models to: (i) predict GRACE K-Band Ranging (KBR) and GOCE SGG data (not used in the production of the models under consideration), and (ii) synthesize a mean dynamic topography model, which is compared with the CNES-CLS09 model derived from in situ oceanographic data. The results of the analysis demonstrate that the GOCE SGG data lead not only to significant improvements over continental areas with a poor coverage with

  18. Magnetization dynamics in rare earth doped NiFe films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Matthias; Woltersdorf, Georg; Back, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D- 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Thiele, Jan-Ulrich; Schabes, Manfred [Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, 3403 Yerba Buena Road, San Jose, CA 95135 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The influence of rare earth dopants on the damping parameter and the resulting possibility to control this parameter were investigated. In our experiments NiFe films were doped with Dysprosium, Holmium, Terbium, and Gadolinium. The magnetization dynamics of these rare earth doped films was mainly studied by means of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and network-analyzer ferromagnetic resonance. It is demonstrated that the doping of a NiFe film by a small amount of rare earth elements (Holmium, Terbium and Dysprosium) greatly effects its magnetic relaxation rate. This additional damping is proportional to the doping level. Compared to the pure NiFe film it is possible to increase the damping parameter of the magnetic film by two orders of magnitude. On the other hand Gadolinium as a dopant has no influence on the damping parameter. For small dopant concentrations the in and out-of-plane FMR measurements at various frequencies can be well described by the same damping parameter. This is expected for the Gilbert damping term in the equation of motion. Therefore the increased damping can be attributed to an increased rate of transfer of angular momentum from the spin system to the lattice.

  19. This dynamic earth: the story of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kious, W. Jacquelyne; Tilling, Robert I.

    1996-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the emergence of the theory of plate tectonics started a revolution in the earth sciences. Since then, scientists have verified and refined this theory, and now have a much better understanding of how our planet has been shaped by plate-tectonic processes. We now know that, directly or indirectly, plate tectonics influences nearly all geologic processes, past and present. Indeed, the notion that the entire Earth's surface is continually shifting has profoundly changed the way we view our world.People benefit from, and are at the mercy of, the forces and consequences of plate tectonics. With little or no warning, an earthquake or volcanic eruption can unleash bursts of energy far more powerful than anything we can generate. While we have no control over plate-tectonic processes, we now have the knowledge to learn from them. The more we know about plate tectonics, the better we can appreciate the grandeur and beauty of the land upon which we live, as well as the occasional violent displays of the Earth's awesome power.This booklet gives a brief introduction to the concept of plate tectonics and complements the visual and written information in This Dynamic Planet (see Further reading), a map published in 1994 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Smithsonian Institution. The booklet highlights some of the people and discoveries that advanced the development of the theory and traces its progress since its proposal. Although the general idea of plate tectonics is now widely accepted, many aspects still continue to confound and challenge scientists. The earth-science revolution launched by the theory of plate tectonics is not finished.

  20. Monitoring Earth's reservoir and lake dynamics from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Eilander, D.; Schellekens, J.; Winsemius, H.; Gorelick, N.; Erickson, T.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2016-12-01

    Reservoirs and lakes constitute about 90% of the Earth's fresh surface water. They play a major role in the water cycle and are critical for the ever increasing demands of the world's growing population. Water from reservoirs is used for agricultural, industrial, domestic, and other purposes. Current digital databases of lakes and reservoirs are scarce, mainly providing only descriptive and static properties of the reservoirs. The Global Reservoir and Dam (GRanD) database contains almost 7000 entries while OpenStreetMap counts more than 500 000 entries tagged as a reservoir. In the last decade several research efforts already focused on accurate estimates of surface water dynamics, mainly using satellite altimetry, However, currently they are limited only to less than 1000 (mostly large) water bodies. Our approach is based on three main components. Firstly, a novel method, allowing automated and accurate estimation of surface area from (partially) cloud-free optical multispectral or radar satellite imagery. The algorithm uses satellite imagery measured by Landsat, Sentinel and MODIS missions. Secondly, a database to store reservoir static and dynamic parameters. Thirdly, a web-based tool, built on top of Google Earth Engine infrastructure. The tool allows estimation of surface area for lakes and reservoirs at planetary-scale at high spatial and temporal resolution. A prototype version of the method, database, and tool will be presented as well as validation using in-situ measurements.

  1. Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Knopf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We compare coupled nonlinear climate models and their simplified forced counterparts with respect to predictability and phase space topology. Various types of uncertainty plague climate change simulation, which is, in turn, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the currently preferred strategy for simulating the climate system, or the Earth System at large, is the coupling of sub-system modules (representing, e.g. atmosphere, oceans, global vegetation, this paper explicitly addresses the errors and indeterminacies generated by the coupling procedure. The focus is on a comparison of forced dynamics as opposed to fully, i.e. intrinsically, coupled dynamics. The former represents a particular type of simulation, where the time behaviour of one complex systems component is prescribed by data or some other external information source. Such a simplifying technique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources, in particular when massive model inter-comparisons need to be carried out. Our contribution to the debate is based on the investigation of two representative model examples, namely (i a low-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean simulator, and (ii a replica-like simulator embracing corresponding components.Whereas in general the forced version (ii is able to mimic its fully coupled counterpart (i, we show in this paper that for a considerable fraction of parameter- and state-space, the two approaches qualitatively differ. Here we take up a phenomenon concerning the predictability of coupled versus forced models that was reported earlier in this journal: the observation that the time series of the forced version display artificial predictive skill. We present an explanation in terms of nonlinear dynamical theory. In particular we observe an intermittent version of artificial predictive skill, which we call on-off synchronization, and trace it back to the appearance of unstable periodic orbits. We also

  2. Atmospheric dynamics of Earth-like tidally locked aquaplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Schneider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations of atmospheres of Earth-like aquaplanets that are tidally locked to their star, that is, planets whose orbital period is equal to the rotation period about their spin axis, so that one side always faces the star and the other side is always dark. Such simulations are of interest in the study of tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets and as illustrations of how planetary rotation and the insolation distribution shape climate. As extreme cases illustrating the effects of slow and rapid rotation, we consider planets with rotation periods equal to one current Earth year and one current Earth day. The dynamics responsible for the surface climate (e.g., winds, temperature, precipitation and the general circulation of the atmosphere are discussed in light of existing theories of atmospheric circulations. For example, as expected from the increasing importance of Coriolis accelerations relative to inertial accelerations as the rotation rate increases, the winds are approximately isotropic and divergent at leading order in the slowly rotating atmosphere but are predominantly zonal and rotational in the rapidly rotating atmosphere. Free-atmospheric horizontal temperature variations in the slowly rotating atmosphere are generally weaker than in the rapidly rotating atmosphere. Interestingly, the surface temperature on the night side of the planets does not fall below ~240 K in either the rapidly or slowly rotating atmosphere; that is, heat transport from the day side to the night side of the planets efficiently reduces temperature contrasts in either case. Rotational waves and eddies shape the distribution of winds, temperature, and precipitation in the rapidly rotating atmosphere; in the slowly rotating atmosphere, these distributions are controlled by simpler divergent circulations. Both the slowly and rapidly rotating atmospheres exhibit equatorial superrotation. Systematic variation of the planetary rotation rate shows that the

  3. Research on the Earth system multi-body force system dynamical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xiaofei; BI; Siwen; WU; Fei; DONG; Qianlin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the binding force and freedom force of Earth system, and describes force moment to point and line and force system in the Earth system. It introduces the force theory of the Earth system multi-body force system from special or equivalent force system of Earth system mechanics, general force and no-power force of Earth system. Finally it describes the force and moment of nodes of Earth system and provides basic model for the research of the Earth system multi-body dynamics.

  4. On the Origin of Dynamically Isolated Hot Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königl, Arieh; Giacalone, Steven; Matsakos, Titos

    2017-09-01

    A distinct population of planetary systems that contain dynamically isolated, Earth-size planets with orbital periods {P}{orb}∼ 1 day was recently identified in an analysis of data from the Kepler planet candidate catalog. We argue that these objects could represent the remnant rocky cores of giant planets that arrived at the stellar vicinity on high-eccentricity orbits and were rapidly stripped of their gaseous envelopes after crossing their respective Roche limits (RLs) {a}{{R},{{p}}}. In this picture, objects with {P}{orb}≳ 1 day are mostly “early” cores that originated in planets with an initial periastron distance {a}{per,0}≤slant {a}{{R},{{p}}}; they had high initial eccentricities but their orbits underwent fast tidal circularization after the cores were exposed. Objects with {P}{orb}≲ 1 day are, by contrast, mostly “late” cores that originated in planets with {a}{per,0}> {a}{{R},{{p}}}; these planets underwent orbital circularization to a radius > {a}{per,0} but eventually reached {a}{{R},{{p}}} through tidal orbital decay. This picture naturally accounts for the spatial distribution of hot Earths and for the similarity of their inferred occurrence rate to that of hot Jupiters, and it fits well with the interpretation of the so-called sub-Jovian desert in the orbital-period–planetary-mass plane in terms of high-eccentricity planet migration to the vicinity of the RL.

  5. Dynamically hot Super-Earths from outer giant planet scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chelsea X; Deibert, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The hundreds of multiple planetary systems discovered by the Kepler mission are typically observed to reside in close-in ($\\lesssim0.5$ AU), low-eccentricity, and low-inclination orbits. We run N-body experiments to study the effect that unstable outer ($\\gtrsim1$ AU) giant planets, whose end orbital configurations resemble those in the Radial Velocity population, have on these close-in multiple Super-Earth systems. Our experiments show that the giant planets greatly reduce the multiplicity of the inner Super-Earths and the surviving population can have large eccentricities ($e\\gtrsim0.3$) and inclinations ($i\\gtrsim20^\\circ$) at levels that anti-correlate with multiplicity. Consequently, this model predicts the existence of a population of dynamically hot single-transiting planets with typical eccentricities and inclinations in the ranges of $\\sim 0.2-0.5$ and $\\sim 10^\\circ-40^\\circ$. We show that these results can explain the following observations: (i) the recent eccentricity measurements of Kepler super-...

  6. Dynamical constraints on outer planets in super-Earth systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Matthew J.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers secular interactions within multi-planet systems. In particular, we consider dynamical evolution of known planetary systems resulting from an additional hypothetical planet on an eccentric orbit. We start with an analytical study of a general two-planet system, showing that a planet on an elliptical orbit transfers all of its eccentricity to an initially circular planet if the two planets have comparable orbital angular momenta. Application to the single super-Earth system HD 38858 shows that an additional hypothetical planet below current radial velocity (RV) constraints with M sini = 3-10 M⊕, semi-major axis 1-10 au and eccentricity 0.2-0.8 is unlikely to be present from the eccentricity that would be excited in the known planet (albeit cyclically). However, additional planets in proximity to the known planet could stabilize the system against secular perturbations from outer planets. Moreover, these additional planets can have an M sini below RV sensitivity and still affect their neighbours. For example, application to the two super-Earth system 61 Vir shows that an additional hypothetical planet cannot excite high eccentricities in the known planets, unless its mass and orbit lie in a restricted area of parameter space. Inner planets in HD 38858 below RV sensitivity would also modify conclusions above about excluded parameter space. This suggests that it may be possible to infer the presence of additional stabilizing planets in systems with an eccentric outer planet and an inner planet on an otherwise suspiciously circular orbit. This reinforces the point that the full complement of planets in a system is needed to assess its dynamical state.

  7. Dynamics of the earth's ring current - Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The development of currents within an arbitrary distribution of particles trapped in the geomagnetic field is described. These currents combine to form the earth's ring current and thus are responsible for the worldwide depressions of surface magnetic field strength during periods of magnetic activity known as magnetic storms. Following a brief review of trapped particle motion in magnetic fields, ring current development is described and presented in terms of basic field and particle distribution parameters. Experimental observations then are presented and discussed within the theoretical framework developed earlier. New results are presented which, in the area of composition and charge state observations, hold high promise in solving many long standing ring current problems. Finally, available experimental results will be used to assess the present understanding as to ring current sources, generation, and dissipation.

  8. Solar Dynamics and Its Effects on the Heliosphere and Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D. N; Schwartz, S. J; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2007-01-01

    The SOHO and Cluster missions form a single ESA cornerstone. Yet they observe very different regions in our solar system: the solar atmosphere on one hand and the Earth’s magnetosphere on the other. At the same time the Ulysses mission provides observations in the third dimension of the heliosphere, and many others add to the picture from the Lagrangian point L1 to the edge of the heliosphere. It is the aim of this ISSI volume to tie these observations together in addressing the topic of Solar Dynamics and its Effects on the Heliosphere and Earth, thus contributing to the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. The volume starts out with an assessment and description of the reasons for solar dynamics and how it couples into the heliosphere. The three subsequent sections are each devoted to following one chain of events from the Sun all the way to the Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere: The normal solar wind chain, the chain associated with coronal mass ejections, and the solar energetic particl...

  9. Prototyping Dynamic Earth Science Data Visualization on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. T.; Zhou, A. Y.; Rodriguez, J.; Hall, J. R.; Thompson, C. K.

    2016-12-01

    Current solutions for rapid map-based visualization of Earth Science data products on the web typically provide static image representations of the data that have been transformed or abstracted away from the actual source data values. The color pixels within these images are generally confined to 256 bins, which represent a limited precision of values. The accuracy of these values may be sufficient for introductory analysis, but inadequate for scientific analysis.New technologies are emerging that enable visualizations based on the underlying source data values of the imagery within a web browser. By having interactive access to source data values, high quality analysis within a web application can be achieved by leveraging server-side data access instead of downloading entire data files and processing them locally. This enables on-the-fly tasks ranging from hovering over a point to see its raw value, dynamically applying a color palette, modifying the color scale (e.g., from linear to logarithmic) to highlight variations in the data, or performing statistical analysis of data values within a selected region. This presentation highlights findings from an ongoing effort by NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services to investigate various technologies and file formats that make these types of dynamic data visualizations possible.

  10. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  11. Earth Evolution and Dynamics (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Trond H.

    2016-04-01

    in our understanding of the dynamics of true polar wander. Dramatic improvements in computational capacity and numerical methods that efficiently model mantle flow while incorporating surface tectonics, plumes, and subduction, have emerged to facilitate further study - We are now capitalizing on these recent advances so as to generate a new Earth model that links plate tectonics with shallow and deep mantle convection through time, and which includes elements such as deeply subducted slabs and stable thermochemical piles with plumes that rise from their edges. It is still unclear, though, why lower mantle structures similar to today would have existed since the Early Phanerozoic (540 Ma), and perhaps for much longer time. Could large-scale upwellings act as an anchor for mantle structure that also controls where downward flow and subduction occurs? Or could it be that subduction keeps itself in place? These are open questions, and at the moment we do not even know with certainty whether Tuzo and Jason were spatially stable for much longer than 300 Myr; we can only state that their stability before Pangea formed is consistent with palaeomagnetic and geological data, but is not necessarily required.

  12. Plumes and Earth's Dynamic History : from Core to Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, V. E.

    2002-12-01

    the order of 10 Ma or less, often resulting in continental breakup; the bulk of the volume actually erupted in 1 Ma or less. This makes LIPs the remnants of major geodynamic events, with fluxes possibly matching, over short time scales, the crustal production of mid-ocean ridges. The correlation between trap ages, extinctions and oceanic anoxia events proposed over a decade ago has improved steadily, to the point that trap ages may form much of the underlying structure of the geological time scale. The five largest mass extinctions in the last 260 Ma coincide with five traps, making a causal connection between the two unavoidable. The plume hypothesis provides a useful and exciting complement to the now conventional plate tectonics paradigm, and can provide a unified underlying mechanism to explain the few, key times when Earth's dynamics behaved in a rather catastrophic way, of which our current world bears the memory. Plumes may express couplings between the Earth's very different envelopes. They are a singular mode in which the Earth's engine liberates its heat when normal plate tectonics do not suffice. They may modulate the intensity of many global phenomena, from reversal frequency generated in the liquid core to major continental breakup and finally to mass extinctions. The remarkably rich, diverse and exciting geophysical disciplines of geomagnetism and paleomagnetism, which are the lecturer's main practical tools, have provided many of the key observations that have led to this view.

  13. Dynamical Evolution of the Earth-Moon Progenitors - Whence Theia?

    CERN Document Server

    Quarles, Billy

    2014-01-01

    We present integrations of a model Solar System with five terrestrial planets (beginning ~30-50 Myr after the formation of primitive Solar System bodies) in order to determine the preferred regions of parameter space leading to a giant impact that resulted in the formation of the Moon. Our results indicate which choices of semimajor axes and eccentricities for Theia (the proto-Moon) at this epoch can produce a late Giant Impact, assuming that Mercury, Venus, and Mars are near the current orbits. We find that the likely semimajor axis of Theia, at the epoch when our simulations begin, depends on the assumed mass ratio of Earth-Moon progenitors (8/1, 4/1, or 1/1). The low eccentricities of the terrestrial planets are most commonly produced when the progenitors have similar semimajor axes at the epoch when our integrations commence. Additionally, we show that mean motion resonances among the terrestrial planets and perturbations from the giant planets can affect the dynamical evolution of the system leading to a...

  14. Dynamical Constraints on Outer Planets in Super-Earth Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Read, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers secular interactions within multi-planet systems. In particular we consider dynamical evolution of known planetary systems resulting from an additional hypothetical planet on an eccentric orbit. We start with an analytical study of a general two-planet system, showing that a planet on an elliptical orbit transfers all of its eccentricity to an initially circular planet if the two planets have comparable orbital angular momenta. Application to the single Super-Earth system HD38858 shows that an additional hypothetical planet below current radial velocity (RV) constraints with {\\textit{Msini}}=3-10M$_\\oplus$, semi-major axis 1-10au and eccentricity 0.2-0.8 is unlikely to be present from the eccentricity that would be excited in the known planet (albeit cyclically). However, additional planets in proximity to the known planet could stabilise the system against secular perturbations from outer planets. Moreover these additional planets can have an {\\textit{Msini}} below RV sensitivity and sti...

  15. Imaging-Duration Embedded Dynamic Scheduling of Earth Observation Satellites for Emergent Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Niu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present novel two-stage dynamic scheduling of earth observation satellites to provide emergency response by making full use of the duration of the imaging task execution. In the first stage, the multiobjective genetic algorithm NSGA-II is used to produce an optimal satellite imaging schedule schema, which is robust to dynamic adjustment as possible emergent events occur in the future. In the second stage, when certain emergent events do occur, a dynamic adjusting heuristic algorithm (CTM-DAHA is applied to arrange new tasks into the robust imaging schedule. Different from the existing dynamic scheduling methods, the imaging duration is embedded in the two stages to make full use of current satellite resources. In the stage of robust satellite scheduling, total task execution time is used as a robust indicator to obtain a satellite schedule with less imaging time. In other words, more imaging time is preserved for future emergent events. In the stage of dynamic adjustment, a compact task merging strategy is applied to combine both of existing tasks and emergency tasks into a composite task with least imaging time. Simulated experiments indicate that the proposed method can produce a more robust and effective satellite imaging schedule.

  16. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N [ORNL; Yin, Junqi [ORNL; Landau, David P [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Brown, Greg [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  17. A Dynamic Earth: 50 Years of Observations from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the surface of the Earth began more than a half century ago with the earliest space missions. The global geopolitical environment at the beginning of the space age fueled advances in rocketry and human exploration, but also advances in remote sensing. At the same time that space-based Earth Observations were developing, global investments in infrastructure that were initiated after World War II accelerated large projects such as the construction of highways, the expansion of cities and suburbs, the damming of rivers, and the growth of big agriculture. These developments have transformed the Earth s surface at unprecedented rates. Today, we have a remarkable library of 50 years of observations of the Earth taken by satellite-based sensors and astronauts, and these images and observations provide insight into the workings of the Earth as a system. In addition, these observations record the footprints of human activities around the world, and illustrate how our activities contribute to the changing face of the Earth. Starting with the iconic "Blue Marble" image of the whole Earth taken by Apollo astronauts, we will review a timeline of observations of our planet as viewed from space.

  18. Penetration Dynamics of Earth Penetration Warhead into Composite Target Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Roy

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Attempts have been made to develop a suitable computer code that can find solutions to the axi-symmetric penetration of an Earth Penetrating Warhead yielding complete space-time histories of the resistive force offered by the target medium. The consequent warhead deceleration and velocity reduction, the resulting axial compressive stress developed in warhead casing as the penetration process progresses into the composite target media consisting of hard concrete of specified thickness followed by earth soil have been discussed.

  19. Enabling the dynamic coupling between sensor web and Earth system models - The Self-Adaptive Earth Predictive Systems (SEPS) framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, L.; Yu, G.; Chen, N.

    2007-12-01

    The self-adaptation concept is the central piece of the control theory widely and successfully used in engineering and military systems. Such a system contains a predictor and a measurer. The predictor takes initial condition and makes an initial prediction and the measurer then measures the state of a real world phenomenon. A feedback mechanism is built in that automatically feeds the measurement back to the predictor. The predictor takes the measurement against the prediction to calculate the prediction error and adjust its internal state based on the error. Thus, the predictor learns from the error and makes a more accurate prediction in the next step. By adopting the self-adaptation concept, we proposed the Self-adaptive Earth Predictive System (SEPS) concept for enabling the dynamic coupling between the sensor web and the Earth system models. The concept treats Earth System Models (ESM) and Earth Observations (EO) as integral components of the SEPS coupled by the SEPS framework. EO measures the Earth system state while ESM predicts the evolution of the state. A feedback mechanism processes EO measurements and feeds them into ESM during model runs or as initial conditions. A feed-forward mechanism analyzes the ESM predictions against science goals for scheduling optimized/targeted observations. The SEPS framework automates the Feedback and Feed-forward mechanisms (the FF-loop). Based on open consensus-based standards, a general SEPS framework can be developed for supporting the dynamic, interoperable coupling between ESMs and EO. Such a framework can support the plug-in-and-play capability of both ESMs and diverse sensors and data systems as long as they support the standard interfaces. This presentation discusses the SEPS concept, the service-oriented architecture (SOA) of SEPS framework, standards of choices for the framework, and the implementation. The presentation also presents examples of SEPS to demonstrate dynamic, interoperable, and live coupling of

  20. Combining nutation and surface gravity observations to estimate the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Yann; Lambert, Sébastien; Rosat, Séverine; Nurul Huda, Ibnu; Bizouard, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nutation time series derived from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and time varying surface gravity data recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SG) have long been used separately to assess the Earth's interior via the estimation of the free core and inner core resonance effects on nutation or tidal gravity. The results obtained from these two techniques have been shown recently to be consistent, making relevant the combination of VLBI and SG observables and the estimation of Earth's interior parameters in a single inversion. We present here the intermediate results of the ongoing project of combining nutation and surface gravity time series to improve estimates of the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies. We use VLBI nutation time series spanning 1984-2016 derived by the International VLBI Service for geodesy and astrometry (IVS) as the result of a combination of inputs from various IVS analysis centers, and surface gravity data from about 15 SG stations. We address here the resonance model used for describing the Earth's interior response to tidal excitation, the data preparation consisting of the error recalibration and amplitude fitting for nutation data, and processing of SG time-varying gravity to remove any gaps, spikes, steps and other disturbances, followed by the tidal analysis with the ETERNA 3.4 software package, the preliminary estimates of the resonant periods, and the correlations between parameters.

  1. True Color Earth Data Set Includes Seasonal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckli, Reto; Vermote, Eric; Saleous, Nazmi; Simmon, Robert; Herring, David

    2006-01-01

    Space exploration has changed our visual perception of planet Earth. In the 1950s, satellites revolutionized weather forecasting. Astronaut photography in the early 1970s showed us the Earth in color, the so-called `Blue Marble' (Figure 1, left). Since 1972, satellite sensors have been acquiring atmosphere, land, ice, and ocean data with increasing spectral and spatial resolution. Satellite remote sensing systems such as the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) help us to understand and monitor Earth's physical, chemical, and biological processes [Running et al., 1999]. The false-color Earth image shown in the center of Figure 1, named Blue Marble, was created in 2000 with data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES 8), and the Sea viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). New sensors such as the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), aboard NASA Terra and Aqua satellites, allow the derivation of a wide range of geophysical parameters from measured radiances of a single sensor.

  2. Dynamic Bayesian Combination of Multiple Imperfect Classifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Edwin; Psorakis, Ioannis; Smith, Arfon

    2012-01-01

    Classifier combination methods need to make best use of the outputs of multiple, imperfect classifiers to enable higher accuracy classifications. In many situations, such as when human decisions need to be combined, the base decisions can vary enormously in reliability. A Bayesian approach to such uncertain combination allows us to infer the differences in performance between individuals and to incorporate any available prior knowledge about their abilities when training data is sparse. In this paper we explore Bayesian classifier combination, using the computationally efficient framework of variational Bayesian inference. We apply the approach to real data from a large citizen science project, Galaxy Zoo Supernovae, and show that our method far outperforms other established approaches to imperfect decision combination. We go on to analyse the putative community structure of the decision makers, based on their inferred decision making strategies, and show that natural groupings are formed. Finally we present ...

  3. SIMULATION OF EARTH'S POLES DYNAMICS USING ASK-ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Cherednychenko N. A.; Lutsenko Y. V.; Trunev A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Based on local semantic information models, we have examined the dependence of the dynamics of the displacement of the pole positions of celestial objects. We have also developed and differentiated an analysis of ASK-pole modeling of dynamics within sixty-year cycles of reference points and substantiated reasons for the population inversion and singular states in the dynamics of the pole

  4. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  5. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  6. SIMULATION OF EARTH'S POLES DYNAMICS USING ASK-ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednychenko N. A.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on local semantic information models, we have examined the dependence of the dynamics of the displacement of the pole positions of celestial objects. We have also developed and differentiated an analysis of ASK-pole modeling of dynamics within sixty-year cycles of reference points and substantiated reasons for the population inversion and singular states in the dynamics of the pole

  7. Earth Orientation Parameters from VLBI and GNSS Combined at the Normal Equation Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jean-Yves; Lambert, Sébastien; Bizouard, Christian; Becker, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Current reference series (C04) of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) are produced by a weighted combination of Earth orientation parameters (EOP) time series built up by combination centers of each technique (VLBI, GNSS, Laser ranging, DORIS). In the future, we plan to produce EOP by a direct combination of the normal equation of the four techniques. We present an intermediate step of this project: a combination of VLBI and GNSS pre-reduced, constraint-free, normal equations with the DYNAMO geodetic analysis software package developed and maintained by the French GRGS (Groupe de Recherche en Géodésie Spatiale). The used normal equations are those produced separately by the IVS and IGS combination centers. Our series cover 2002-2016. The estimation strategy consists of fixing quasar coordinates to their optimal values given by the latest realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), and most of station coordinates to the ITRF 2014 except for stations undergoing strong nonlinear displacements caused by, e.g., postseismic relaxation. These station coordinates are estimated as time series. The resulting EOP series are compared to intra-technique combinations and to the IERS-C04 reference series.

  8. Combining Molecular Dynamics and Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of a system consisting of electrons and ions is often treated in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, with electrons in their instantaneous ground state. This approach cannot capture many interesting processes that involved excitation of electrons and its effects on the coupled electron-ion dynamics. The time scale needed to accurately resolve the evolution of electron dynamics is atto-seconds. This poses a challenge to the simulation of important chemical processes that typically take place on time scales of pico-seconds and beyond, such as reactions at surfaces and charge transport in macromolecules. We will present a methodology based on time-dependent density functional theory for electrons, and classical (Ehrenfest) dynamics for the ions, that successfully captures such processes. We will give a review of key features of the method and several applications. These illustrate how the atomic and electronic structure evolution unravels the elementary steps that constitute a chemical reaction. In collaboration with: G. Kolesov, D. Vinichenko, G. Tritsaris, C.M. Friend, Departments of Physics and of Chemistry and Chemical Biology.

  9. Understanding the Earth Systems: Expressions of Dynamic and Cyclic Thinking Among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzri, Or; Ben Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Cohen, Carmit; Orion, Nir

    2015-12-01

    In this two-part study, we examine undergraduate university students' expression of two important system thinking characteristics—dynamic thinking and cyclic thinking—focusing particularly on students of geology. The study was conducted using an Earth systems questionnaire designed to elicit and reflect either dynamic or cyclic thinking. The study's first part was quantitative. Its population consisted of a research group (223 students majoring in geology or physical geography) and a control group (312 students with no background in geology). The students were asked to rate their agreement with each statement on a Likert scale. Overall, the students in the research group expressed higher levels of dynamic thinking than those in the control group. The geology students showed relatively strong dynamic thinking toward the geosphere and hydrosphere, but not the biosphere. In cyclic thinking, their levels were significantly higher for all Earth systems, suggesting a connection between learning about different cycles in Earth systems, developing cyclic thinking and applying it to other Earth cycles. The second part was qualitative and administered only to the students who majored in geology. They were asked to freely explain their answers to the questionnaire's statements. Our aim was to identify recurring patterns in how these students express their dynamic and cyclic thinking. Their explanations were given to four experts in the field of Earth science, who then presented, in a semi-structured interview, the recurring characteristics of dynamic thinking that they found in the students' explanations.

  10. Implications for the Earth of the early dynamical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, W. M.; Cooperman, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of the Earth, was mainly from sizeable bodies: perhaps moon sized. Models of interaction among small planetesimals which take into account only close encounters all lead to the formation of moon sized objects, thus leading to several 100 in the inner solar system. Longer term interactions, such as secular resonance sweepings, are needed to get these planetesimals together to form the observed terrestrial bodies. After the accumulation of the Earth, during which core formation certainly occurred, further impacts probably influenced the locations of rifting centers in the system of mantle convection and crustal differentiation. They may have affected craton stabilization by promoting lateral heterogeneity, but had little influence on the key problem of early recycling of sial.

  11. Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research (CIDER): Contributions to Education (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research (http://www.deep-earth.org) began its activities in 2003 and has so far held four summer programs of duration ranging from 3 to 7 weeks, funded by the NSF/CSEDI program, with support from and at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara. CIDER's goals are twofold: (1) as a "synthesis center", to provide an environment for transformative studies of Earth's internal dynamics, requiring a concerted multi-disciplinary effort of leading researchers, and (2) to educate a new generation of Earth scientists with a breadth of competence across the disciplines required to understand the dynamic earth: mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry and geomagnetism. CIDER summer programs, so far, have focused on themes related to the Deep Earth: "Reconciling seismic and geochemical heterogeneity in the Earth", "The Earth's transition zone", "Boundary layers in the Earth" and "Fluids and volatiles in the Earth's mantle and core". These programs typically include three weeks of unstructured program designed for senior (assistant professor level and higher) researchers, and a 3-4 weeks "tutorial and workshop" part geared towards advanced graduate students and post-docs, but open also to more senior participants. The first two weeks of the tutorial part include lectures and practical exercises in the different disciplines aimed at providing participants with a basic understanding of the fundamentals and current challenges in disciplines other than their own. During the second week, topics related to the summer program's theme are proposed for further study in a workshop mode by multi-disciplinary groups formed on the fly, continued through the last week or two of the program. These activities often lead to the development of new collaborations and research proposals to the CSEDI program. In 2011, CIDER will hold a summer program at UC Berkeley on the theme "Mountain Building", expanding the scope of the Institute

  12. Quantifying Key Climate Parameter Uncertainties Using an Earth System Model with a Dynamic 3D Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R.; Sriver, R. L.; Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Matthews, D.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections hinge critically on uncertain climate model parameters such as climate sensitivity, vertical ocean diffusivity and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcings. Climate sensitivity is defined as the equilibrium global mean temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Vertical ocean diffusivity parameterizes sub-grid scale ocean vertical mixing processes. These parameters are typically estimated using Intermediate Complexity Earth System Models (EMICs) that lack a full 3D representation of the oceans, thereby neglecting the effects of mixing on ocean dynamics and meridional overturning. We improve on these studies by employing an EMIC with a dynamic 3D ocean model to estimate these parameters. We carry out historical climate simulations with the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) varying parameters that affect climate sensitivity, vertical ocean mixing, and effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. We use a Bayesian approach whereby the likelihood of each parameter combination depends on how well the model simulates surface air temperature and upper ocean heat content. We use a Gaussian process emulator to interpolate the model output to an arbitrary parameter setting. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the posterior probability distribution function (pdf) of these parameters. We explore the sensitivity of the results to prior assumptions about the parameters. In addition, we estimate the relative skill of different observations to constrain the parameters. We quantify the uncertainty in parameter estimates stemming from climate variability, model and observational errors. We explore the sensitivity of key decision-relevant climate projections to these parameters. We find that climate sensitivity and vertical ocean diffusivity estimates are consistent with previously published results. The climate sensitivity pdf is strongly affected by the prior assumptions, and by the scaling

  13. Dynamic Topography at Earth's Surface: Fact or Fiction? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Contributions to Earth’s surface topography range from short-wavelength uncompensated features due to tectonic activity, to variations in crustal structure and long-wavelength deflections of the lithosphere caused by mantle dynamics. The latter we call dynamic topography. Dynamic topography elevates or depresses the surface even if the density anomaly giving rise to flow is deep in the mantle. Dynamic topography is also a major contributor to Earth’s gravitational potential and to surface deformation. However, direct observations of dynamic topography are elusive, because signals are obscured by the isostatic contribution due to crustal and lithospheric structure. The only seemingly unequivocal signals of dynamically supported topography have been found over mantle upwellings on both continents (Africa [Lithgow-Bertelloni and Silver, 1998] and Arabia [Daradich et al., 2004]) and oceanic basins (North-Atlantic [Conrad et al., 2004]). Recent work on Africa’s geomorphic history [Moore et al., 2009] and North Atlantic gravity and topography have called even these results into questions. In downwelling regions (near slabs) no clear signals have been found. I will explore why this dichotomy may exist and relate it to the need for dynamic topography in mantle flow models, with an eye towards the effects of phase transitions, lateral variations in viscosity and layered convection. I will also present recent results on dynamic topography over flat slab segments that overturn the conventional wisdom and explain basin topography in the Andean foreland. Along with the new models I will discuss a recent global lithospheric structure model with which to compute the residual topography, i.e. the “observed” dynamic topography.

  14. Geochemical and planetary dynamical views on the origin of Earth's atmosphere and oceans

    CERN Document Server

    Dauphas, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Earth's volatile elements (H, C, and N) are essential to maintaining habitable conditions for metazoans and simpler life forms. However, identifying the sources (comets, meteorites, and trapped nebular gas) that supplied volatiles to Earth is not straightforward because secondary processes like mantle degassing, crustal recycling, and escape to space modified the composition of the atmosphere. Here, we review two complementary approaches to investigate the origin of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. The geochemical approach uses volatile element abundances and isotopic compositions to identify the possible contributors to the atmosphere and to disentangle the processes that shaped it. In that respect, noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe), elements that are chemically inert and possess several isotopes produced by radioactivity, play a critical role. The dynamical approach uses our knowledge of planetary dynamics to track volatile delivery to the Earth, starting with dust transport in the disk to planet-building ...

  15. Understanding Earth's radiation belt electron dynamics: Van Allen Probes observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Ma, Qianli; Thorne, Richard; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Xiaojia

    2016-10-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during geomagnetic storms using a 3D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the electron evolution observed by Van Allen Probes and simulation, we found that whistler-mode chorus waves play a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV through efficient energy diffusion. By only including radial diffusion driven by ultra-low-frequency waves, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and scattering by whistler-mode waves reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics, and the importance of nonlinear wave-particle interaction may still remain as an open question. We would like to acknowledge AFOSR Award FA9550-15-1-0158, NASA Grants NNX15AI96G, NNX15AF61G, and the NSF Grant AGS 1564510 for supporting this research.

  16. Mantle Dynamics in Super-Earths: Post-Perovskite Rheology and Self-Regulation of Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Tackley, Paul J; Brodholt, John P; Dobson, David P; Valencia, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Simple scalings suggest that super-Earths are more likely than an equivalent Earth-sized planet to be undergoing plate tectonics. Generally, viscosity and thermal conductivity increase with pressure while thermal expansivity decreases, resulting in lower convective vigor in the deep mantle. According to conventional thinking, this might result in no convection in a super-Earth's deep mantle. Here we evaluate this. First, we here extend the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of post-perovskite activation enthalpy of to a pressure of 1 TPa. The activation volume for diffusion creep becomes very low at very high pressure, but nevertheless for the largest super-Earths the viscosity along an adiabat may approach 1030 Pa s in the deep mantle. Second, we use these calculated values in numerical simulations of mantle convection and lithosphere dynamics of planets with up to ten Earth masses. The models assume a compressible mantle including depth-dependence of material properties and plastic yielding induce...

  17. Development of a dynamic web mapping service for vegetation productivity using earth observation and in situ sensors in a sensor web based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L.; Bergsma, A.R.; Chuma, B.; Bruin, de S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Nethe

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Solid Earth Sciences-a HPC challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad Constantin Manea; Marina Manea; Mihai Pomeran; Lucian Besutiu; Luminita Zlagnean

    2012-01-01

    Presently, the Solid Earth Sciences started to move towards implementing High Performance Computational (HPC) research facilities. One of the key tenants of HPC is performance, which strongly depends on the interaction between software and hardware. In this paper, they are presented benchmark results from two HPC systems. Testing a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code specific for Solid Earth Sciences, the HPC system Horus, based on Gigabit Ethernet, performed reasonably well compared with...

  19. A low earth orbit dynamic model for the proton anisotropy validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badavi, Francis F., E-mail: francis.f.badavi@nasa.gov [Christopher Newport University, OSP, 1 University Place, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Ionizing radiation measurements at low earth orbit (LEO) form the ideal tool for the experimental validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear transport code algorithms and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the space transportation system (STS; shuttle) have provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code development by requiring dynamic models of the LEO environment. Previous studies using computer aided design (CAD) models of the international space station (ISS) have demonstrated that the dosimetric prediction for a spacecraft at LEO requires the description of an environmental model with accurate anisotropic as well as dynamic behavior. This paper describes such a model for the trapped proton. The described model is a component of a suite of codes collectively named GEORAD (GEOmagnetic RADiation) which computes cutoff rigidity, trapped proton and trapped electron environments. The web version of GEORAD is named OLTARIS (On-line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space). GEORAD suite is applicable to radiation environment prediction at LEO, medium earth orbit (MEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) at quiet solar periods. GEORAD interest is in the study of long term effect of the trapped environment and therefore it does not account for any short term external field contribution due to solar activity. With the concentration of the paper on the LEO protons only, the paper presents the validation of the trapped proton model within GEORAD with reported measurements from the compact environment anomaly sensor (CEASE) science instrument package, flown onboard the tri-service experiment-5 (TSX-5) satellite during the period of June 2000 to July 2006. The spin stabilized satellite was flown in a 410 x 1710 km, 69{sup o} inclination elliptical orbit, allowing it to be exposed to a broad range of the LEO regime. The paper puts particular emphasize on the validation of the

  20. Earth's Inner Core dynamics induced by the Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Lasbleis, M; Cardin, P; Labrosse, S

    2015-01-01

    Seismic studies indicate that the Earth's inner core has a complex structure and exhibits a strong elastic anisotropy with a cylindrical symmetry. Among the various models which have been proposed to explain this anisotropy, one class of models considers the effect of the Lorentz force associated with the magnetic field diffused within the inner core. In this paper we extend previous studies and use analytical calculations and numerical simulations to predict the geometry and strength of the flow induced by the poloidal component of the Lorentz force in a neutrally or stably stratified growing inner core, exploring also the effect of different types of boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). Unlike previous studies, we show that the boundary condition that is most likely to produce a significant deformation and seismic anisotropy is impermeable, with negligible radial flow through the boundary. Exact analytical solutions are found in the case of a negligible effect of buoyancy forces in the inne...

  1. China’s Rare Earths Supply Forecast in 2025: A Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Ge

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The supply of rare earths in China has been the focus of significant attention in recent years. Due to changes in regulatory policies and the development of strategic emerging industries, it is critical to investigate the scenario of rare earth supplies in 2025. To address this question, this paper constructed a dynamic computable equilibrium (DCGE model to forecast the production, domestic supply, and export of China’s rare earths in 2025. Based on our analysis, production will increase by 10.8%–12.6% and achieve 116,335–118,260 tons of rare-earth oxide (REO in 2025, based on recent extraction control during 2011–2016. Moreover, domestic supply and export will be 75,081–76,800 tons REO and 38,797–39,400 tons REO, respectively. The technological improvements on substitution and recycling will significantly decrease the supply and mining activities of rare earths. From a policy perspective, we found that the elimination of export regulations, including export quotas and export taxes, does have a negative impact on China’s future domestic supply of rare earths. The policy conflicts between the increase in investment in strategic emerging industries, and the increase in resource and environmental taxes on rare earths will also affect China’s rare earths supply in the future.

  2. Combined Earth orientation parameters based on homogeneous and continuous VLBI and GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Daniela; Krügel, Manuela; Rothacher, Markus; Tesmer, Volker; Schmid, Ralf; Angermann, Detlef

    2007-06-01

    The CONT02 campaign is of great interest for studies combining very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) with other space-geodetic techniques, because of the continuously available VLBI observations over 2 weeks in October 2002 from a homogeneous network. Especially, the combination with the Global Positioning System (GPS) offers a broad spectrum of common parameters. We combined station coordinates, Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) and troposphere parameters consistently in one solution using technique- specific datum-free normal equation systems. In this paper, we focus on the analyses concerning the EOPs, whereas the comparison and combination of the troposphere parameters and station coordinates are covered in a companion paper in Journal of Geodesy. In order to demonstrate the potential of the VLBI and GPS space-geodetic techniques, we chose a sub-daily resolution for polar motion (PM) and universal time (UT). A consequence of this solution set-up is the presence of a one-to-one correlation between the nutation angles and a retrograde diurnal signal in PM. The Bernese GPS Software used for the combination provides a constraining approach to handle this singularity. Simulation studies involving both nutation offsets and rates helped to get a deeper understanding of this singularity. With a rigorous combination of UT1 UTC and length of day (LOD) from VLBI and GPS, we showed that such a combination works very well and does not suffer from the systematic effects present in the GPS-derived LOD values. By means of wavelet analyses and the formal errors of the estimates, we explain this important result. The same holds for the combination of nutation offsets and rates. The local geodetic ties between GPS and VLBI antennas play an essential role within the inter-technique combination. Several studies already revealed non-negligible discrepancies between the terrestrial measurements and the space-geodetic solutions. We demonstrate to what extent these discrepancies

  3. A resonant family of dynamically cold small bodies in the near-Earth asteroid belt

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2013-01-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) moving in resonant, Earth-like orbits are potentially important. On the positive side, they are the ideal targets for robotic and human low-cost sample return missions and a much cheaper alternative to using the Moon as an astronomical observatory. On the negative side and even if small in size (2-50 m), they have an enhanced probability of colliding with the Earth causing local but still significant property damage and loss of life. Here we show that the recently discovered asteroid 2013 BS45 is an Earth co-orbital, the sixth horseshoe librator to our planet. In contrast with other Earth's co-orbitals, its orbit is strikingly similar to that of the Earth yet at an absolute magnitude of 25.8, an artificial origin seems implausible. The study of the dynamics of 2013 BS45 coupled with the analysis of NEO data show that it is one of the largest and most stable members of a previously undiscussed dynamically cold group of small NEOs experiencing repeated trappings in the 1:1 commensurabi...

  4. Earth's deformation due to the dynamical perturbations of the fluid outer core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建桥; 孙和平

    2002-01-01

    The elasto-gravitational deformation response of the Earth's solid parts to the perturbations of the pressure and gravity on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the solid inner core boundary (ICB), due to the dynamical behaviors of the fluid outer core (FOC), is discussed. The internal load Love numbers, which are formulized in a general form in this study, are employed to describe the Earth's deformation. The preliminary reference Earth model (PREM) is used as an example to calculate the internal load Love numbers on the Earth's surface, CMB and ICB, respectively. The characteristics of the Earth's deformation variation with the depth and the perturbation periods on the boundaries of the FOC are also investigated. The numerical results indicate that the internal load Love numbers decrease quickly with the increasing degree of the spherical harmonics of the displacement and depend strongly on the perturbation frequencies, especially on the high frequencies. The results, obtained in this work, can be used to construct the boundary conditions for the core dynamics of the long-period oscillations of the Earth's fluid outer core.

  5. A MODIFIED GIFFLER AND THOMPSON ALGORITHM COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC SLACK TIME FOR SOLVING DYNAMIC SCHEDULE PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanti Octavia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A Modified Giffler and Thompson algorithm combined with dynamic slack time is used to allocate machines resources in dynamic nature. It was compared with a Real Time Order Promising (RTP algorithm. The performance of modified Giffler and Thompson and RTP algorithms are measured by mean tardiness. The result shows that modified Giffler and Thompson algorithm combined with dynamic slack time provides significantly better result compared with RTP algorithm in terms of mean tardiness.

  6. Minding the gap: Thinking through spatiotemporal scaling challenges in Earth surface dynamics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viles, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Research into the dynamics of Earth's surface is diverse, interdisciplinary and challenging, but also an important geoscience contribution to understanding human-landscape interactions in the Anthropocene. Scale issues often thwart our ability to provide answers to important questions of how the Earth's surface has changed in the past and may change in the future. This paper reflects on four major common components of Earth surface dynamics research projects (i.e. how to identify and frame a research question, how to design a study to answer that question, difficulties with data, how to use data to answer the question) and identifies the most important spatiotemporal scale challenges. A case study of an experimental study of rock breakdown in arid environments is used to illustrate these challenges, and to demonstrate the importance of clear conceptualisation and critical thinking in overcoming them.

  7. Improving the accuracy of GRACE Earth's gravitational field using the combination of different inclinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zheng; Chenggang Shao; Jun Luo; Houze Xu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the GRACE Earth's gravitational field complete up to degree and order 120 is recovered based on the combination of different inclinations using the energy conservation principle.The results show that because different inclinations of satellite are sensitive to the geopotential coefficients with different degrees/and orders m.the design of GRACE exploiting 89° inclination can effectively improve the accuracy of geopotential zonal harmonic coefficients.However,it is less sensitive to the geopotential tesseral harmonic coefficients.Accordingly.the second group of GRACE exploiting lower inclination is required to determine high-accurately the geopotential tesseral harmonic coefficients and cover the shortage of the single group of GRACE exploiting 89° inclination.Two groups of GRACE individually exploiting 89°+(82°-84°)inclinations are the optimal combination of the Earth'S gravitational field recovery complete up to degree and order 120.In the degree 120,the joint accuracy of cumulative geoid height based on two groups of GRACE individually exploiting 89° and 83° inclinations is averagely two times higher than the accuracy of a group of GRACE exploiting 89° inclination.

  8. The IGS-combined station coordinates, earth rotation parameters and apparent geocenter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, R.; Piraszewski, M.

    2009-03-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) routinely generates a number of weekly, daily and sub-daily products. Station coordinates and velocities, earth rotation parameters (ERPs) and apparent geocenter are among these products generated weekly by the IGS Reference Frame Coordinator. They have been determined since 1999 by combining independent estimates from at least seven IGS Analysis Centers (ACs). Two Global Network Associate Analysis Centers (GNAACs) also provide independent combinations using the same AC weekly solutions and they are currently used to quality control the IGS combination. The combined solutions are aligned to an IGS realization (IGS05) of the ITRF2005 using a carefully selected set of the IGS Reference Frame (RF) stations (nominally 132). During the combination process, the contributing solutions are compared and outliers are removed to ensure a high level of consistency of the estimated parameters. The ACs and the weekly combined solution are consistent at the 1-2 and 3-4 mm levels for the horizontal and vertical components. Similarly, the excess Length of Day (LOD), the pole positions and pole rates are consistent at the 10μs, 0.03-0.05 mas and 0.10-0.20 mas/day levels, respectively. The consistency of the apparent geocenter estimate is about 5 mm in the X and Y components and 10 mm in the Z component. Comparison of the IGS-combined ERP estimates with the IERS Bulletin A suggests a small bias of the order of -0.04 mas and + 0.05 mas (both ±0.05 mas) in the x and y components.

  9. Dynamics of the earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere (geophysical monograph series)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of the Earth's Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere draws together current knowledge of the radiation belts prior to the launch of Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RPSP) and other imminent space missions, making this volume timely and unique. The volume will serve as a useful benchmark at this exciting and pivotal period in radiation belt research in advance of the new discoveries that the RPSP mission will surely bring. Highlights include the following: a review of the current state of the art of radiation belt science; a complete and up-to-date account of the wave-particle interactions that control the dynamical acceleration and loss processes of particles in the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere; a discussion emphasizing the importance of the cross-energy coupling of the particle populations of the radiation belts, ring current, and plasmasphere in controlling the dynamics of the inner magnetosphe...

  10. Dynamics and the Wilson Cycle: An EarthScope vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinger, Cynthia; Humphreys, Eugene; Williams, Michael; van der Lee, Suzan; Levin, Vadim; Webb, Laura; Becker, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Wilson's model has two major components, each with distinctive observables. Initial subduction of ocean lithosphere collides continents across a closing ocean basin, creating a mountain range; rifting then initiates within the collisional orogeny and progresses to create oceanic spreading and creation of a new ocean basin. Subduction eventually initiates near the old, cold, and heavily sedimented continental margin, leading to subduction, and repeating the cycle. This model is largely kinematic in nature, and predictive in application. We re-evaluate the Wilson Cycle in light of process-oriented perspectives afforded by the surface to mantle Earthscope results. Repeating episodes of mountain building by means of continental collisions remains clear, but new observations augment or diverge from Wilson's concepts. A 'new' component stems from observations from both the East and West coasts: translational fault systems played critical roles in continental accretion, collision, and rifting. Earthscope data sets also have enabled imaging of the structure of western U.S. lithosphere with unprecedented detail. From new and existing data sets, we conclude that collision occurs in 'ribbons' in large part linked to the shapes of the landmasses colliding landmasses, and deformation includes a major component of transform tectonics. Post-orogenic gravitational collapse may occur far inboard of the site of collision. A third 'new' feature is that plate coupling with the mantle leads to deformation outside the classic Wilson Cycle. For example, the passive margin of eastern N. America shows tectonic activity, uplift, and magmatism long after the onset of seafloor spreading, demonstrating the dynamic nature of lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling. A 'fourth' observation is that lateral density contrasts and volatile migration during subduction and collision effectively refertilize mantle lithosphere, and pre-condition later tectonic cycles.

  11. The complex dynamics of the seasonal component of Earth's surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vecchio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the climate system has been investigated by analyzing the complex seasonal oscillation of monthly averaged temperatures recorded at 1167 stations covering the whole USA. We found the presence of an orbit-climate relationship on time scales remarkably shorter than the Milankovitch period related to the nutational forcing. The relationship manifests itself through occasional destabilization of the phase of the seasonal component due to the local changing of balance between direct insolation and the net energy received by the Earth. Quite surprisingly, we found that the local intermittent dynamics is modulated by a periodic component of about 18.6 yr due to the nutation of Earth, which represents the main modulation of the Earth's precession. The global effect in the last century results in a cumulative phase-shift of about 1.74 days towards earlier seasons, in agreement with the phase shift expected from Earth's precession. The climate dynamics of the seasonal cycle can be described through a nonlinear circle-map, indicating that the destabilization process can be associated to intermittent transitions from quasi-periodicity to chaos.

  12. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  13. Gas giant planets as dynamical barriers to inward-migrating super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Izidoro, Andre; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Hersant, Franck; Pierens, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth's size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. In fact, the Solar System is particularly outstanding in its lack of "hot super-Earths" (or "mini-Neptunes"). These planets -- or their building blocks -- may have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter's early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn's core) from becoming hot super-Earths. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in supe...

  14. Dynamic Processes of Cross-Tail Current in the Near-Earth Magnetotail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xing-Qiang; MA Zhi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Current dynamic processes in realistic magnetotail geometry are studied by Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)simulations under various driven conditions and Hall effects. Associated with the external driving force, a thin current sheet with a broad extent is built up in the near-Earth magnetotail. The time evolution for the formation of the current sheet comprises two phases: slow growth and a fast impulsive phase before the near-Earth disruption of the current sheet resulting from the fast magnetic reconnection. The simulation results indicate that as the external driving force increases, the site and the tailward speed of the near-Earth current disruption region are closer to the Earth and faster, respectively. Whether the near-Earth disruption of the current sheet takes place or not is mainly controlled by Hall effects. It is found that there is no sudden disruption of the current sheet in the near-Earth region if the ion inertial length is below di = 0.04.

  15. The source of the Earth's long wavelength geoid anomalies: Implications for mantle and core dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, B. H.; Richards, M. A.; Oconnell, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field result mainly from density contrasts associated with convection in the mantle. Direct interpretation of the geoid for mantle convection is complicated by the fact that convective flow results in dynamically maintained deformation of the surface of the Earth, the core mantle boundary (CMB), and any interior chemical boundaries which might exist. These boundary deformations effect the geoid opposite in sign and are comparable in magnitude to those of the interior density contrasts driving the flow. The total difference of two relatively large quantities.

  16. Comparative Examination of Reconnection-Driven Magnetotail Dynamics at Mercury and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    becomes quasi-periodic. Unlike the Earth, solar wind dynamic pressure increases at Mercury couple directly to its large iron core. Magnetic fields due to induction currents in Mercury's interior strongly resist compression of the dayside magnetosphere. The effects of such inductive coupling on magnetotail dynamics at Mercury remains to be determined.

  17. U32: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Longer Combination Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrolino, Joseph [National Transportation Research Center (NTRC); Spezia, Tony [National Transportation Research Center (NTRC); Arant, Michael [Clemson University; Broshears, Eric [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Chitwood, Caleb [Battelle; Colbert, Jameson [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Hathaway, Richard [Western Michigan University; Keil, Mitch [Western Michigan University; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Pape, Doug [Battelle; Patterson, Jim [Hendrickson; Pittro, Collin [Battelle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the safety and stability of longer combination vehicles (LCVs), in particular a triple trailer combination behind a commercial tractor, which has more complicated dynamics than the more common tractor in combination with a single semitrailer. The goal was to measure and model the behavior of LCVs in simple maneuvers. Example maneuvers tested and modeled were single and double lane changes, a gradual lane change, and a constant radius curve. In addition to test track data collection and a brief highway test, two computer models of LCVs were developed. One model is based on TruckSim , a lumped parameter model widely used for single semitrailer combinations. The other model was built in Adams software, which more explicitly models the geometry of the components of the vehicle, in terms of compliant structural members. Among other results, the models were able to duplicate the experimentally measured rearward amplification behavior that is characteristic of multi-unit combination vehicles.

  18. Methodology for the combination of sub-daily Earth rotation from GPS and VLBI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, T.; Bernhard, L.; Nothnagel, A.; Steigenberger, P.; Tesmer, S.

    2012-03-01

    A combination procedure of Earth orientation parameters from Global Positioning System (GPS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations was developed on the basis of homogeneous normal equation systems. The emphasis and purpose of the combination was the determination of sub-daily polar motion (PM) and universal time (UT1) for a long time-span of 13 years. Time series with an hourly resolution and a model for tidal variations of PM and UT1-TAI (dUT1) were estimated. In both cases, 14-day nutation corrections were estimated simultaneously with the ERPs. Due to the combination procedure, it was warranted that the strengths of both techniques were preserved. At the same time, only a minimum of de-correlating or stabilizing constraints were necessary. Hereby, a PM time series was determined, whose precision is mainly dominated by GPS observations. However, this setup benefits from the fact that VLBI delivered nutation and dUT1 estimates at the same time. An even bigger enhancement can be seen for the dUT1 estimation, where the high-frequency variations are provided by GPS, while the long term trend is defined by VLBI. The estimated combined tidal PM and dUT1 model was predominantly determined from the GPS observations. Overall, the combined tidal model for the first time completely comprises the geometrical benefits of VLBI and GPS observations. In terms of root mean squared (RMS) differences, the tidal amplitudes agree with other empirical single-technique tidal models below 4 μ as in PM and 0.25 μ s in dUT1. The noise floor of the tidal ERP model was investigated in three ways resulting in about 1 μ as for diurnal PM and 0.07 μ s for diurnal dUT1 while the semi-diurnal components have a slightly better accuracy.

  19. Sea-ice dynamics strongly promote Snowball Earth initiation and destabilize tropical sea-ice margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Voigt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Snowball Earth bifurcation, or runaway ice-albedo feedback, is defined for particular boundary conditions by a critical CO2 and a critical sea-ice cover (SI, both of which are essential for evaluating hypotheses related to Neoproterozoic glaciations. Previous work has shown that the Snowball Earth bifurcation, denoted as (CO2, SI*, differs greatly among climate models. Here, we study the effect of bare sea-ice albedo, sea-ice dynamics and ocean heat transport on (CO2, SI* in the atmosphere–ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM with Marinoan (~ 635 Ma continents and solar insolation (94% of modern. In its standard setup, ECHAM5/MPI-OM initiates a~Snowball Earth much more easily than other climate models at (CO2, SI* ≈ (500 ppm, 55%. Replacing the model's standard bare sea-ice albedo of 0.75 by a much lower value of 0.45, we find (CO2, SI* ≈ (204 ppm, 70%. This is consistent with previous work and results from net evaporation and local melting near the sea-ice margin. When we additionally disable sea-ice dynamics, we find that the Snowball Earth bifurcation can be pushed even closer to the equator and occurs at a hundred times lower CO2: (CO2, SI* ≈ (2 ppm, 85%. Therefore, the simulation of sea-ice dynamics in ECHAM5/MPI-OM is a dominant determinant of its high critical CO2 for Snowball initiation relative to other models. Ocean heat transport has no effect on the critical sea-ice cover and only slightly decreases the critical CO2. For disabled sea-ice dynamics, the state with 85% sea-ice cover is stabilized by the Jormungand mechanism and shares characteristics with the Jormungand climate states. However, there is no indication of the Jormungand bifurcation and hysteresis in ECHAM5/MPI-OM. The state with 85% sea-ice cover therefore is a soft Snowball state rather than a true

  20. Dynamical sequestration of the Moon-forming impactor in co-orbital resonance with Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.; Hartmann, William K.

    2016-09-01

    Recent concerns about the giant impact hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, and an associated "isotope crisis" may be assuaged if the impactor was a local object that formed near Earth. We investigated a scenario that may meet this criterion, with protoplanets assumed to originate in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. Using N-body numerical simulations we explored the dynamical consequences of placing Mars-mass companions in various co-orbital configurations with a proto-Earth of 0.9 Earth-masses (M⊕). We modeled 162 different configurations, some with just the four terrestrial planets and others that included the four giant planets. In both the 4- and 8-planet models we found that a single Mars-mass companion typically remained a stable co-orbital of Earth for the entire 250 million year (Myr) duration of our simulations (59 of 68 unique simulations). In an effort to destabilize such a system we carried out an additional 94 simulations that included a second Mars-mass co-orbital companion. Even with two Mars-mass companions sharing Earth's orbit about two-thirds of these models (66) also remained stable for the entire 250 Myr duration of the simulations. Of the 28 2-companion models that eventually became unstable 24 impacts were observed between Earth and an escaping co-orbital companion. The average delay we observed for an impact of a Mars-mass companion with Earth was 102 Myr, and the longest delay was 221 Myr. In 40% of the 8-planet models that became unstable (10 out of 25) Earth collided with the nearly equal mass Venus to form a super-Earth (loosely defined here as mass ≥1.7 M⊕). These impacts were typically the final giant impact in the system and often occurred after Earth and/or Venus has accreted one or more of the other large objects. Several of the stable configurations involved unusual 3-planet hierarchical co-orbital systems.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Solid Earth Sciences–a HPC challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Zlagnean

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Presently, the Solid Earth Sciences started to move towards implementing High Performance Computational (HPC research facilities. One of the key tenants of HPC is performance, which strongly depends on the interaction between software and hardware. In this paper, they are presented benchmark results from two HPC systems. Testing a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code specific for Solid Earth Sciences, the HPC system Horus, based on Gigabit Ethernet, performed reasonably well compared with its counterpart CyberDyn, based on Infiniband QDR fabric. However, the HPCC CyberDyn based on low-latency high-speed QDR network dedicated to MPI traffic outperformed the HPCC Horus. Due to the high-resolution simulations involved in geodynamic research studies, HPC facilities used in Earth Sciences should benefit from larger up-front investment in future systems that are based on high-speed interconnects.

  2. Earth surface dynamics - dispatches from the flats (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Earth's surface is shaped by the physical, chemical and biological processes operating on it and the interactions amongst them. No single discipline can lay claim to this surface, nor offer a full explanation of its dynamics. Only interdisciplinary approaches can unlock answers to key questions such as how do erosion and tectonics interact to build mountains, how do landscapes respond to climate change, how can we read processes from the sedimentary record, what is the role of erosion in Earth's carbon cycle, and how can we give reliable early warning of damaging earth surface process events? The wastelands between established academic fields are rich and bountiful and replete with steep learning curves and pitfalls for the naïve. In this lecture, I shall scour the interfaces of geophysics, geochemistry and geomorphology for understanding of the mechanisms, controls and impacts of mass wasting in steep mountain settings, ending up in remarkably flat places to find new insight into the dynamics of Earth's surface.

  3. Gas Giant Planets as Dynamical Barriers to Inward-Migrating Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Izidoro da Costa, Andre; Raymond, Sean

    2015-08-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth’s size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. In fact, the Solar System is particularly outstanding in its lack of “hot super-Earths” (or “mini-Neptunes”). These planets —or their building blocks—may have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter’s early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn’s core) from becoming hot super-Earths. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in super-Earths.

  4. Functional network macroscopes for probing past and present Earth system dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donges, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth, as viewed from a physicist's perspective, is a dynamical system of great complexity. Functional complex networks are inferred from observational data and model runs or constructed on the basis of theoretical considerations. Representing statistical interdependencies or causal interactions between objects (e.g., Earth system subdomains, processes, or local field variables), functional complex networks are conceptually well-suited for naturally addressing some of the fundamental questions of Earth system analysis concerning, among others, major dynamical patterns, teleconnections, and feedback loops in the planetary machinery, as well as critical elements such as thresholds, bottlenecks, and switches. The first part of this talk concerns complex network theory and network-based time series analysis. Regarding complex network theory, the novel contributions include consistent frameworks for analyzing the topology of (i) general networks of interacting networks and (ii) networks with vertices of heterogeneously distributed weights, as well as (iii) an analytical theory for describing spatial networks. In the realm of time series analysis, (i) recurrence network analysis is put forward as a theoretically founded, nonlinear technique for the study of single, but possibly multivariate time series. (ii) Coupled climate networks are introduced as an exploratory tool of data analysis for quantitatively characterizing the intricate statistical interdependency structure within and between several fields of time series. The second part presents applications for detecting dynamical transitions (tipping points) in time series and studying bottlenecks in the atmosphere's general circulation structure. The analysis of paleoclimate data reveals a possible influence of large-scale shifts in Plio-Pleistocene African climate variability on events in human evolution. This presentation summarizes the contents of the dissertation titled "Functional network macroscopes for

  5. A combined transmission spectrum of the Earth-sized exoplanets TRAPPIST-1 b and c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Julien; Wakeford, Hannah R; Gillon, Michaël; Lewis, Nikole K; Valenti, Jeff A; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Burgasser, Adam J; Burdanov, Artem; Delrez, Laetitia; Jehin, Emmanuël; Lederer, Susan M; Queloz, Didier; Triaud, Amaury H M J; Van Grootel, Valérie

    2016-09-01

    Three Earth-sized exoplanets were recently discovered close to the habitable zone of the nearby ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 (ref. 3). The nature of these planets has yet to be determined, as their masses remain unmeasured and no observational constraint is available for the planetary population surrounding ultracool dwarfs, of which the TRAPPIST-1 planets are the first transiting example. Theoretical predictions span the entire atmospheric range, from depleted to extended hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. Here we report observations of the combined transmission spectrum of the two inner planets during their simultaneous transits on 4 May 2016. The lack of features in the combined spectrum rules out cloud-free hydrogen-dominated atmospheres for each planet at ≥10σ levels; TRAPPIST-1 b and c are therefore unlikely to have an extended gas envelope as they occupy a region of parameter space in which high-altitude cloud/haze formation is not expected to be significant for hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. Many denser atmospheres remain consistent with the featureless transmission spectrum-from a cloud-free water-vapour atmosphere to a Venus-like one.

  6. A combined transmission spectrum of the Earth-sized exoplanets TRAPPIST-1 b and c

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Julien; Wakeford, Hannah R.; Gillon, Michaël; Lewis, Nikole K.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burdanov, Artem; Delrez, Laetitia; Jehin, Emmanuël; Lederer, Susan M.; Queloz, Didier; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Van Grootel, Valérie

    2016-09-01

    Three Earth-sized exoplanets were recently discovered close to the habitable zone of the nearby ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 (ref. 3). The nature of these planets has yet to be determined, as their masses remain unmeasured and no observational constraint is available for the planetary population surrounding ultracool dwarfs, of which the TRAPPIST-1 planets are the first transiting example. Theoretical predictions span the entire atmospheric range, from depleted to extended hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. Here we report observations of the combined transmission spectrum of the two inner planets during their simultaneous transits on 4 May 2016. The lack of features in the combined spectrum rules out cloud-free hydrogen-dominated atmospheres for each planet at ≥10σ levels; TRAPPIST-1 b and c are therefore unlikely to have an extended gas envelope as they occupy a region of parameter space in which high-altitude cloud/haze formation is not expected to be significant for hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. Many denser atmospheres remain consistent with the featureless transmission spectrum—from a cloud-free water-vapour atmosphere to a Venus-like one.

  7. A combined transmission spectrum of the Earth-sized exoplanets TRAPPIST-1 b and c

    CERN Document Server

    de Wit, Julien; Gillon, Michael; Lewis, Nikole K; Valenti, Jeff A; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Burgasser, Adam J; Delrez, Laetitia; Jehin, Emmanuel; Lederer, Susan M; Triaud, Amaury H M J; Van Grootel, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Three Earth-sized exoplanets were recently discovered close to the habitable zone of the nearby ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. The nature of these planets has yet to be determined, since their masses remain unmeasured and no observational constraint is available for the planetary population surrounding ultracool dwarfs, of which the TRAPPIST-1 planets are the first transiting example. Theoretical predictions span the entire atmospheric range from depleted to extended hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. Here, we report a space-based measurement of the combined transmission spectrum of the two inner planets made possible by a favorable alignment resulting in their simultaneous transits on 04 May 2016. The lack of features in the combined spectrum rules out cloud-free hydrogen-dominated atmospheres for each planet at 10-$\\sigma$ levels; TRAPPIST-1 b and c are hence unlikely to harbor an extended gas envelope as they lie in a region of parameter space where high-altitude cloud/haze formation is not expected to be s...

  8. The combined EarthScope data set at the IRIS DMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C.; Sharer, G.; Benson, R.; Ahern, T.

    2007-12-01

    The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) is the perpetual archive and access point for an ever-increasing variety of geophysical data in terms of volume, geographic distribution and scientific value. A particular highlight is the combined data set produced by the EarthScope project. The DMC archives data from each of the primary components: USArray, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) & the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Growing at over 4.6 gigabytes per day, the USArray data set currently totals approximately 5 terabytes. Composed of four separate sub-components: the Permanent, Transportable, Flexible and Magnetotelluric Arrays, the USArray data set provides a multi-scale view of the western United States at present and the conterminous United States when it is completed. The primary data from USArray are in the form of broadband and short-period seismic recordings and magnetotelluric measurements. Complementing the data from USArray are the short- period, borehole seismic data and borehole and laser strain data from PBO. The DMC also archives the high- resolution seismic data from instruments in the SAFOD main and pilot drill holes. The SAFOD seismic data is available in two forms: lower-rate monitoring channels sampled at 250 hertz and full resolution channels varying between 1 and 4 kilohertz. Beyond data collection and archive management the DMC performs value-added functions. All data arriving at the DMC as real-time data streams are processed by QUACK, an automated Quality Control (QC) system. All the measurements made by this system are stored in a database and made available to data contributors and users via a web interface including customized report generation. In addition to the automated QC measurements, quality control is performed on USArray data at the DMC by a team of analysts. The primary functions of the analysts are to routinely report data quality assessment to the respective network operators and log serious, unfixable data

  9. Assessing life's effects on the interior dynamics of planet Earth using non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Dyke

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Vernadsky described life as the geologic force, while Lovelock noted the role of life in driving the Earth's atmospheric composition to a unique state of thermodynamic disequilibrium. Here, we use these notions in conjunction with thermodynamics to quantify biotic activity as a driving force for geologic processes. Specifically, we explore the hypothesis that biologically-mediated processes operating on the surface of the Earth, such as the biotic enhancement of weathering of continental crust, affect interior processes such as mantle convection and have therefore shaped the evolution of the whole Earth system beyond its surface and atmosphere. We set up three simple models of mantle convection, oceanic crust recycling and continental crust recycling. We describe these models in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics in which the generation and dissipation of gradients is central to driving their dynamics and that such dynamics can be affected by their boundary conditions. We use these models to quantify the maximum power that is involved in these processes. The assumption that these processes, given a set of boundary conditions, operate at maximum levels of generation and dissipation of free energy lead to reasonable predictions of core temperature, seafloor spreading rates, and continental crust thickness. With a set of sensitivity simulations we then show how these models interact through the boundary conditions at the mantle-crust and oceanic-continental crust interfaces. These simulations hence support our hypothesis that the depletion of continental crust at the land surface can affect rates of oceanic crust recycling and mantle convection deep within the Earth's interior. We situate this hypothesis within a broader assessment of surface-interior interactions by setting up a work budget of the Earth's interior to compare the maximum power estimates that drive interior processes to the power that is associated with biotic activity

  10. Effect of the Earth's surface topography on the quasi-dynamic earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, M.; Hirahara, K.

    2014-12-01

    For quasi-dynamic earthquake cycle simulations (ECSs) using BIEM, we have developed a method of calculating slip response function (SRF) in a homogeneous elastic medium with an arbitrary shaped Earth's surface topography (Ohtani and Hirahara, 2013; Paper1). In this study, we report the improvement in our method. Following Hok and Fukuyama (2011), we set the Earth's surface as a free surface, in addition to the fault interface, in a homogeneous full-space medium. Then, using the analytic solution in full-space, we can calculate the Earth's surface deformation, then the SRF change. The surface cell setting determines the accuracy. For reducing the computational amount, we use the different sizes of the surface region and its divided subfault cells, depending on the fault depth. Paper1 used the uniform size for surface cells. Here, we improved our method where the Earth's surface cells closer to the trench have the finer sizes for achieving more accuracy. With such numerical SRF, we performed the quasi-dynamic ECS on a model, where the Earth's surface is convex upward. Basically, with this topography, the slip behavior approaches the full-space case, from the half-space with flat surface case. This is because the distance from the Earth's surface to the fault becomes large. When we set two asperities with negative A - B in the positive A - B background at 10km and 35km depths, the two asperities rupture independently. The recurrence time of the shallow asperity is Trshalf = 34.95, Trsflat = 34.89, and Trsactual =32.82 years, when using analytic SRF in half-space, and numerical SRF with flat surface and with actual topography, respectively. For each case, the recurrence time of the deep asperity is Tr1_dhalf = 26.80, Tr1_dflat = 26.89, and Tr1_dactual =26.69 years. Thus, the shallower asperity is more affected by the Earth's surface topography than the deeper one, because the distance change rate from the surface to the fault is larger. On the other hand, when we set

  11. Learning Human Actions by Combining Global Dynamics and Local Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guan; Yang, Shuang; Tian, Guodong; Yuan, Chunfeng; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of human action recognition through combining global temporal dynamics and local visual spatio-temporal appearance features. For this purpose, in the global temporal dimension, we propose to model the motion dynamics with robust linear dynamical systems (LDSs) and use the model parameters as motion descriptors. Since LDSs live in a non-Euclidean space and the descriptors are in non-vector form, we propose a shift invariant subspace angles based distance to measure the similarity between LDSs. In the local visual dimension, we construct curved spatio-temporal cuboids along the trajectories of densely sampled feature points and describe them using histograms of oriented gradients (HOG). The distance between motion sequences is computed with the Chi-Squared histogram distance in the bag-of-words framework. Finally we perform classification using the maximum margin distance learning method by combining the global dynamic distances and the local visual distances. We evaluate our approach for action recognition on five short clips data sets, namely Weizmann, KTH, UCF sports, Hollywood2 and UCF50, as well as three long continuous data sets, namely VIRAT, ADL and CRIM13. We show competitive results as compared with current state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Z-Earth: 4D topography from space combining short-baseline stereo and lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, T. J.; Akkari, H.; Kaab, A. M.; Lamare, M. L.; Doyon, G.; Costeraste, J.

    2013-12-01

    The advent of free-of-charge global topographic data sets SRTM and Aster GDEM have enabled testing a host of geoscience hypotheses. Availability of such data is now considered standard, and though resolved at 30-m to 90-m pixel size, they are today regarded as obsolete and inappropriate given the regularly updated sub-meter imagery coming through web services like Google Earth. Two features will thus help meet the current topographic data needs of the Geoscience communities: field-scale-compatible elevation datasets (i.e. meter-scale digital models and sub-meter elevation precision) and provision for regularly updated topography to tackle earth surface changes in 4D, while retaining the key for success: data availability at no charge. A new space borne instrumental concept called Z-Earth has undergone phase 0 study at CNES, the French space agency to fulfill these aims. The scientific communities backing this proposal are that of natural hazards, glaciology and biomass. The system under study combines a short-baseline native stereo imager and a lidar profiler. This combination provides spatially resolved elevation swaths together with absolute along-track elevation control point profiles. Acquisition is designed for revisit time better than a year. Intended products not only target single pass digital surface models, color orthoimages and small footprint full-wave-form lidar profiles to update existing topographic coverage, but also time series of them. 3D change detection targets centimetre-scale horizontal precision and metric vertical precision, in complement of -now traditional- spectral change detection. To assess the actual concept value, two real-size experiments were carried out. We used sub-meter-scale Pleiades panchromatic stereo-images to generate digital surface models and check them against dense airborne lidar coverages, one heliborne set purposely flown in Corsica (50-100pts/sq.m) and a second one retrieved from OpenTopography.org (~10pts/sq.m.). In

  13. Determination of rare earth elements in high purity rare earth oxides by liquid chromatography, thermionic mass spectrometry and combined liquid chromatography/thermionic mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijfhoorn, D. E.; Stray, H.; Hjelmseth, H.

    1993-03-01

    A high-performance liquid Chromatographie (HPLC) method for the determination of rare earth elements in rocks has been modified and used for the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in high purity rare earth oxides. The detection limit was 1-1.5 ng or 2-3 mg/kg when a solution corresponding to 0.5 mg of the rare earth oxide was injected. The REE determination was also carried out by adding a mixture of selected REE isotopes to the sample and analysing the collected HPLC-fractions by mass spectrometry (MS) using a thermionic source. Since the matrix element was not collected, interference from this element during the mass spectrometric analysis was avoided. Detection limits as low as 0.5 mg/kg could then be obtained. Detection limits as low as 0.05 mg/kg were possible by MS without HPLC-pre-separation, but this approach could only be used for those elements that were not affected by the matrix. Commercial samples of high purity Nd 2O 3, Gd 2O 3 and Dy 2O 3 were analysed in this study, and a comparison of results obtained by HPLC, combined HPLC/MS and direct MS are presented.

  14. Computation of a combined spherical-elastic and viscous-half-space earth model for ice sheet simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bueler, E; Kallen-Brown, J A; Bueler, Ed; Lingle, Craig S.; Kallen-Brown, Jed A.

    2006-01-01

    This report starts by describing the continuum model used by Lingle & Clark (1985) to approximate the deformation of the earth under changing ice sheet and ocean loads. That source considers a single ice stream, but we apply their underlying model to continent-scale ice sheet simulation. Their model combines Farrell's (1972) elastic spherical earth with a viscous half-space overlain by an elastic plate lithosphere. The latter half-space model is derivable from calculations by Cathles (1975). For the elastic spherical earth we use Farrell's tabulated Green's function, as do Lingle & Clark. For the half-space model, however, we propose and implement a significantly faster numerical strategy, a spectral collocation method (Trefethen 2000) based directly on the Fast Fourier Transform. To verify this method we compare to an integral formula for a disc load. To compare earth models we build an accumulation history from a growing similarity solution from (Bueler, et al.~2005) and and simulate the coupled (ic...

  15. Hadley cell dynamics of a cold and virtually dry Snowball Earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Aiko; Held, Isaac; Marotzke, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    We use the full-physics atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 to investigate a cold and virtually dry Snowball Earth atmosphere that results from specifying sea ice as the surface boundary condition everywhere, corresponding to a frozen aquaplanet, while keeping total solar irradiance at its present-day value of 1365 Wm-2. The aim of this study is the investigation of the zonal-mean circulation of a Snowball Earth atmosphere, which, due to missing moisture, might constitute an ideal though yet unexplored testbed for theories of atmospheric dynamics. To ease comparison with theories, incoming solar insolation follows permanent equinox conditions with disabled diurnal cycle. The meridional circulation consists of a thermally direct cell extending from the equator to 45 N/S with ascent in the equatorial region, and a weak thermally indirect cell with descent between 45 and 65 N/S and ascent in the polar region. The former cell corresponds to the present-day Earth's Hadley cell, while the latter can be viewed as an eddy-driven Ferrell cell; the present-day Earth's direct polar cell is missing. The Hadley cell itself is subdivided into a vigorous cell confined to the troposphere and a weak deep cell reaching well into the stratosphere. The dynamics of the vigorous Snowball Earth Hadley cell differ substantially from the dynamics of the present-day Hadley cell. The zonal momentum balance shows that in the poleward branch of the vigorous Hadley cell, mean flow meridional advection of absolute vorticity is not only balanced by eddy momentum flux convergence but also by vertical diffusion. Inside the poleward branch, eddies are more important in the upper part and vertical diffusion is more important in the lower part. Vertical diffusion also contributes to the meridional momentum balance as it decelerates the vigorous Hadley cell by downgradient momentum mixing between its poleward and equatorward branch. Zonal winds, therefore, are not in thermal wind balance in

  16. Mantle dynamics in super-Earths: Post-perovskite rheology and self-regulation of viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Ammann, M.; Brodholt, J. P.; Dobson, D. P.; Valencia, D.

    2013-07-01

    The discovery of extra-solar "super-Earth" planets with sizes up to twice that of Earth has prompted interest in their possible lithosphere and mantle dynamics and evolution. Simple scalings suggest that super-Earths are more likely than an equivalent Earth-sized planet to be undergoing plate tectonics. Generally, viscosity and thermal conductivity increase with pressure while thermal expansivity decreases, resulting in lower convective vigour in the deep mantle, which, if extralopated to the largest super-Earths might, according to conventional thinking, result in no convection in their deep mantles due to the very low effective Rayleigh number. Here we evaluate this. First, as the mantle of a super-Earth is made mostly of post-perovskite we here extend the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of post-perovskite activation enthalpy of to a pressure of 1 TPa, for both slowest diffusion (upper-bound rheology) and fastest diffusion (lower-bound rheology) directions. Along a 1600 K adiabat the upper-bound rheology would lead to a post-perovskite layer of a very high (˜1030 Pa s) but relatively uniform viscosity, whereas the lower-bound rheology leads to a post-perovskite viscosity increase of ˜7 orders of magnitude with depth; in both cases the deep mantle viscosity would be too high for convection. Second, we use these DFT-calculated values in statistically steady-state numerical simulations of mantle convection and lithosphere dynamics of planets with up to ten Earth masses. The models assume a compressible mantle including depth-dependence of material properties and plastic yielding induced plate-like lithospheric behaviour. Results confirm the likelihood of plate tectonics for planets with Earth-like surface conditions (temperature and water) and show a self-regulation of deep mantle temperature. The deep mantle is not adiabatic; instead feedback between internal heating, temperature and viscosity regulates the temperature such that the viscosity has the

  17. Earthdata Search: Combining New Services and Technologies for Earth Science Data Discovery, Visualization, and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P.; Pilone, D.

    2014-12-01

    A host of new services are revolutionizing discovery, visualization, and access of NASA's Earth science data holdings. At the same time, web browsers have become far more capable and open source libraries have grown to take advantage of these capabilities. Earthdata Search is a web application which combines modern browser features with the latest Earthdata services from NASA to produce a cutting-edge search and access client with features far beyond what was possible only a couple of years ago. Earthdata Search provides data discovery through the Common Metadata Repository (CMR), which provides a high-speed REST API for searching across hundreds of millions of data granules using temporal, spatial, and other constraints. It produces data visualizations by combining CMR data with Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) image tiles. Earthdata Search renders its visualizations using custom plugins built on Leaflet.js, a lightweight mobile-friendly open source web mapping library. The client further features an SVG-based interactive timeline view of search results. For data access, Earthdata Search provides easy temporal and spatial subsetting as well as format conversion by making use of OPeNDAP. While the client hopes to drive adoption of these services and standards, it provides fallback behavior for working with data that has not yet adopted them. This allows the client to remain on the cutting-edge of service offerings while still boasting a catalog containing thousands of data collections. In this session, we will walk through Earthdata Search and explain how it incorporates these new technologies and service offerings.

  18. Google Earth-based dynamic visualization system for storm surge flood routing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Donghai; Wang Qian; Zuo Wentao

    2013-01-01

    To describe the dynamic process of flood routing intuitively and realistically when storm surge disaster occurs,a method for ArcGIS data and Google Earth (GE) data integration is proposed,which realizes the impor-ting and integrating of basic geographic information into GE. Based on SketchUp and AutoCAD software,three-dimension (3D) visualization of seawall and other tidal defense structures is achieved. By employing Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC),the related system modules and storm surge flood routing dynamic visualization system are developed. Therefore,dynamic visualization of flood routing process and interactive query of sub-merged area and inundated depth are implemented. A practical application case study of Tianjin Binhai New Area provides decision-making support for coastal seawall planning and storm surge disaster prevention and reduction.

  19. Magnetic Order and Spin Dynamics in a Hexagonal Rare Earth Manganite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, J. S.; Singh, D. K.; Elizabeth, S.; Harikrishnan, S.; Lynn, J. W.

    2011-03-01

    Hexagonal rare earth manganites, RMn O3 R = Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Y, or Sc), have attracted a great deal of recent attention as magnetoelectric multiferroics as most of these systems are ferroelectric at room temperature and display magnetic order below TN ~ 100 K. This magnetic order can be quite complex, as both the R and Mn ions lie on geometrically frustrated triangular lattices. DyMn O3 is typically orthorhombic, but can also be grown in the hexagonal phase; Dy 0.5 Y0.5 Mn O3 displays the hexagonal phase and is magnetically diluted at the rare earth site. We have used neutron scattering experiments to explore the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of Dy 0.5 Y0.5 Mn O3 .

  20. Molecular dynamics of liquid alkaline-earth metals near the melting point

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Baria; A R Jani

    2010-10-01

    Results of the studies of the properties like binding energy, the pair distribution function (), the structure factor (), specific heat at constant volume, velocity autocorrelation function (VACF), radial distribution function, self-diffusion coefficient and coordination number of alkaline-earth metals (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) near melting point using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique using a pseudopotential proposed by us are presented in this article. Good agreement with the experiment is achieved for the binding energy, pair distribution function and structure factor, and these results compare favourably with the results obtained by other such calculations, showing the transferability of the pseudopotential used from solid to liquid environment in the case of alkaline-earth metals.

  1. Cross-Spectral Analysis of Earth's Geoid and Shape Reveals Dynamic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, R. L.; Menard, J.; Watkinson, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Vertical deviations of the planet's surface due to large-scale dynamics should be expressed as topography measured with respect to an equipotential `level' surface, like the geoid. However, this dynamic effect must be separated from others affecting topography, such as isostatic compensation, effective rigidity, and enhancement via crustal deformation and volcanism. Conventional procedures used to isolate `dynamic topography' involve model-dependent corrections to Earth's shape, which introduce additional assumptions and uncertainties related to the density, strength, thickness, and thermal properties of crustal and mantle rock layers. Alternatively, global cross-spectral analysis of gravity and shape data offers a means of isolating the dynamic signal prior to the introduction of geophysical hypotheses. It is well-known that Earth's gravity and shape are poorly-correlated at long wavelengths. This is expressed in regional gravity disturbance maps as a low amplitude bias, the origin of which, although unknown, is reasonably associated with large-scale dynamics. This signal dominates the harmonic geoid, leading to the counter-intuitive observations that trenches and island arcs are associated with geoid highs, and that the Himalaya-Tibet plateau occupies a geoid low. Here it is shown that Earth's geoid-shape admittance exhibits a distinct change at spherical harmonic degree 13, from high-and-variable to low and nearly constant. This is coincident with a change in the gravity-topography degree correlation, from low-and-variable, to consistently above 0.57. Thus the `dynamic anomaly', defined as the 13th partial sum of the disturbance gravity field, exhibits a range of -82 to +56 mGal. Scaled by the mean surface gravity gradient of -0.3082 mGal/m, and referenced to the harmonic geoid, a long-wavelength topographic surface is found with range -121 to +170 m. Coincidentally, all earthquakes with centroids deeper than about 255 km have epicenters within or adjacent to

  2. Effect of Rheology on Mantle Dynamics and Plate Tectonics in Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Ammann, M. W.; Brodholt, J. P.; Dobson, D. P.; Valencia, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    The discovery of extra-solar "super-Earth" planets with sizes up to twice that of Earth has prompted interest in their possible lithosphere and mantle dynamics and evolution. Simple scalings [1,2] suggest that super-Earths are more likely than an equivalent Earth-sized planet to be undergoing plate tectonics. Generally, viscosity and thermal conductivity increase with pressure while thermal expansivity decreases, resulting in lower convective vigor in the deep mantle, which, if extralopated to the largest super-Earths might, according to conventional thinking, result a very low effective Rayleigh number in their deep mantles and possibly no convection there. Here we evaluate this. (i) As the mantle of a super-Earth is made mostly of post-perovskite we here extend the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of post-perovskite activation enthalpy of [3] to a pressure of 1 TPa. The activation volume for diffusion creep becomes very low at very high pressure, but nevertheless for the largest super-Earths the viscosity along an adiabat may approach 10^30 Pa s in the deep mantle, which would be too high for convection. (ii) We use these DFT-calculated values in numerical simulations of mantle convection and lithosphere dynamics of planets with up to ten Earth masses. The models assume a compressible mantle including depth-dependence of material properties and plastic yielding induced plate-like lithospheric behavior, solved using StagYY [4]. Results confirm the likelihood of plate tectonics and show a novel self-regulation of deep mantle temperature. The deep mantle is not adiabatic; instead internal heating raises the temperature until the viscosity is low enough to facilitate convective loss of the radiogenic heat, which results in a super-adiabatic temperature profile and a viscosity increase with depth of no more than ~3 orders of magnitude, regardless of what is calculated for an adiabat. It has recently been argued [5] that at very high pressures, deformation

  3. Commons problems, common ground: Earth-surface dynamics and the social-physical interdisciplinary frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the archetypal "tragedy of the commons" narrative, local farmers pasture their cows on the town common. Soon the common becomes crowded with cows, who graze it bare, and the arrangement of open access to a shared resource ultimately fails. The "tragedy" involves social and physical processes, but the denouement depends on who is telling the story. An economist might argue that the system collapses because each farmer always has a rational incentive to graze one more cow. An ecologist might remark that the rate of grass growth is an inherent control on the common's carrying capacity. And a geomorphologist might point out that processes of soil degradation almost always outstrip processes of soil production. Interdisciplinary research into human-environmental systems still tends to favor disciplinary vantages. In the context of Anthropocene grand challenges - including fundamental insight into dynamics of landscape resilience, and what the dominance of human activities means for processes of change and evolution on the Earth's surface - two disciplines in particular have more to talk about than they might think. Here, I use three examples - (1) beach nourishment, (2) upstream/downstream fluvial asymmetry, and (3) current and historical "land grabbing" - to illustrate a range of interconnections between physical Earth-surface science and common-pool resource economics. In many systems, decision-making and social complexity exert stronger controls on landscape expression than do physical geomorphological processes. Conversely, human-environmental research keeps encountering multi-scale, emergent problems of resource use made 'common-pool' by water, nutrient and sediment transport dynamics. Just as Earth-surface research can benefit from decades of work on common-pool resource systems, quantitative Earth-surface science can make essential contributions to efforts addressing complex problems in environmental sustainability.

  4. Orthogonal combination of local binary patterns for dynamic texture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Guo, Xuejun; Klein, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic texture (DT) is an extension of texture to the temporal domain. Recognizing DTs has received increasing attention. Volume local binary pattern (VLBP) is the most widely used descriptor for DTs. However, it is time consuming to recognize DTs using VLBP due to the large scale of data and the high dimensionality of the descriptor itself. In this paper, we propose a new operator called orthogonal combination of VLBP (OC-VLBP) for DT recognition. The original VLBP is decomposed both longitudinally and latitudinally, and then combined to constitute the OC-VLBP operator, so that the dimensionality of the original VLBP descriptor is lowered. The experimental results show that the proposed operator significantly reduces the computational costs of recognizing DTs without much loss in recognizing accuracy.

  5. Global patterns in Earth's dynamic topography since the Jurassic: the role of subducted slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rubey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the spatial and temporal evolution of Earth's long-wavelength surface dynamic topography since the Jurassic using a series of high-resolution global mantle convection models. These models are Earth-like in terms of convective vigour, thermal structure, surface heat-flux and the geographic distribution of heterogeneity. The models generate a degree-2-dominated spectrum of dynamic topography with negative amplitudes above subducted slabs (i.e. circum-Pacific regions and southern Eurasia and positive amplitudes elsewhere (i.e. Africa, north-western Eurasia and the central Pacific. Model predictions are compared with published observations and subsidence patterns from well data, both globally and for the Australian and southern African regions. We find that our models reproduce the long-wavelength component of these observations, although observed smaller-scale variations are not reproduced. We subsequently define geodynamic rules for how different surface tectonic settings are affected by mantle processes: (i locations in the vicinity of a subduction zone show large negative dynamic topography amplitudes; (ii regions far away from convergent margins feature long-term positive dynamic topography; and (iii rapid variations in dynamic support occur along the margins of overriding plates (e.g. the western US and at points located on a plate that rapidly approaches a subduction zone (e.g. India and the Arabia Peninsula. Our models provide a predictive quantitative framework linking mantle convection with plate tectonics and sedimentary basin evolution, thus improving our understanding of how subduction and mantle convection affect the spatio-temporal evolution of basin architecture.

  6. Global patterns in Earth's dynamic topography since the Jurassic: the role of subducted slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubey, Michael; Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian; Rhodri Davies, D.; Williams, Simon E.; Dietmar Müller, R.

    2017-09-01

    We evaluate the spatial and temporal evolution of Earth's long-wavelength surface dynamic topography since the Jurassic using a series of high-resolution global mantle convection models. These models are Earth-like in terms of convective vigour, thermal structure, surface heat-flux and the geographic distribution of heterogeneity. The models generate a degree-2-dominated spectrum of dynamic topography with negative amplitudes above subducted slabs (i.e. circum-Pacific regions and southern Eurasia) and positive amplitudes elsewhere (i.e. Africa, north-western Eurasia and the central Pacific). Model predictions are compared with published observations and subsidence patterns from well data, both globally and for the Australian and southern African regions. We find that our models reproduce the long-wavelength component of these observations, although observed smaller-scale variations are not reproduced. We subsequently define geodynamic rules for how different surface tectonic settings are affected by mantle processes: (i) locations in the vicinity of a subduction zone show large negative dynamic topography amplitudes; (ii) regions far away from convergent margins feature long-term positive dynamic topography; and (iii) rapid variations in dynamic support occur along the margins of overriding plates (e.g. the western US) and at points located on a plate that rapidly approaches a subduction zone (e.g. India and the Arabia Peninsula). Our models provide a predictive quantitative framework linking mantle convection with plate tectonics and sedimentary basin evolution, thus improving our understanding of how subduction and mantle convection affect the spatio-temporal evolution of basin architecture.

  7. A dynamical study on the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets II: The super Earth HD 40307 g

    CERN Document Server

    Brasser, R; Kokubo, E

    2014-01-01

    HARPS and it Kepler results indicate that half of solar-type stars host planets with periods P<100 d and masses M < 30 M_E. These super Earth systems are compact and dynamically cold. Here we investigate the stability of the super Earth system around the K-dwarf HD40307. It could host up to six planets, with one in the habitable zone. We analyse the system's stability using numerical simulations from initial conditions within the observational uncertainties. The most stable solution deviates 3.1 sigma from the published value, with planets e and f not in resonance and planets b and c apsidally aligned. We study the habitability of the outer planet through the yearly-averaged insolation and black-body temperature at the pole. Both undergo large variations because of its high eccentricity and are much more intense than on Earth. The insolation variations are precession dominated with periods of 40 kyr and 102 kyr for precession and obliquity if the rotation period is 3 d. A rotation period of about 1.5 d ...

  8. Dynamic Inlet Distortion Prediction with a Combined Computational Fluid Dynamics and Distortion Synthesis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, W. P.; Ladd, J. A.; Yuhas, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for predicting peak dynamic inlet distortion. This procedure combines Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and distortion synthesis analysis to obtain a prediction of peak dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern. A prediction of the steady state total pressure pattern at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane is first obtained using an appropriate CFD flow solver. A corresponding inlet turbulence pattern is obtained from the CFD solution via a correlation linking root mean square (RMS) inlet turbulence to a formulation of several CFD parameters representative of flow turbulence intensity. This correlation was derived using flight data obtained from the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program and several CFD solutions at conditions matching the flight test data. A distortion synthesis analysis is then performed on the predicted steady state total pressure and RMS turbulence patterns to yield a predicted value of dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern.

  9. Semi-brittle rheology and ice dynamics in DynEarthSol3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Liz C.; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo; Tan, Eh; Catania, Ginny A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a semi-brittle rheology and explore its potential for simulating glacier and ice sheet deformation using a numerical model, DynEarthSol3D (DES), in simple, idealized experiments. DES is a finite-element solver for the dynamic and quasi-static simulation of continuous media. The experiments within demonstrate the potential for DES to simulate ice failure and deformation in dynamic regions of glaciers, especially at quickly changing boundaries like glacier termini in contact with the ocean. We explore the effect that different rheological assumptions have on the pattern of flow and failure. We find that the use of a semi-brittle constitutive law is a sufficient material condition to form the characteristic pattern of basal crevasse-aided pinch-and-swell geometry, which is observed globally in floating portions of ice and can often aid in eroding the ice sheet margins in direct contact with oceans.

  10. Dynamic performance of magneto-optical Bi-substituted rare-earth iron garnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiguang Li; Changxi Yang; Enyao Zhang; Guofan Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ The dynamic performances of magneto-optical Bi-substituted rare-earth iron garnet (BIG) under different external magnetic fields and at different frequencies are experimentally studied. The measurement data indicate that the Faraday rotation angle is almost proportional to the external magnetic field when the garnet is far less saturated, while there is good switch performance when it is saturated. The higher the working frequency is, the larger the saturation magnetic field and the phase delay of Faraday angle relative to the field. The saturation fields and the phase delays at different frequencies are measured. The dynamic performance of the BIG determines the performance of BIG-based optical devices. To get the better performance of such devices, the garnets with small dampness and large stiffness should be chosen elaborately.

  11. Toward more realistic projections of soil carbon dynamics by Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Ahlström, Anders; Allison, Steven D.; Batjes, Niels H.; Brovkin, V.; Carvalhais, Nuno; Chappell, Adrian; Ciais, Philippe; Davidson, Eric A.; Finzi, Adien; Georgiou, Katerina; Guenet, Bertrand; Hararuk, Oleksandra; Harden, Jennifer; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Jiang, L.; Koven, Charles; Jackson, Robert B.; Jones, Chris D.; Lara, M.; Liang, J.; McGuire, Anthony; Parton, William; Peng, Changhui; Randerson, J.; Salazar, Alejandro; Sierra, Carlos A.; Smith, Matthew J.; Tian, Hanqin; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O; Torn, Margaret S.; van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Wang, Ying; West, Tristram O.; Wei, Yaxing; Wieder, William R.; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xia; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil carbon (C) is a critical component of Earth system models (ESMs), and its diverse representations are a major source of the large spread across models in the terrestrial C sink from the third to fifth assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Improving soil C projections is of a high priority for Earth system modeling in the future IPCC and other assessments. To achieve this goal, we suggest that (1) model structures should reflect real-world processes, (2) parameters should be calibrated to match model outputs with observations, and (3) external forcing variables should accurately prescribe the environmental conditions that soils experience. First, most soil C cycle models simulate C input from litter production and C release through decomposition. The latter process has traditionally been represented by first-order decay functions, regulated primarily by temperature, moisture, litter quality, and soil texture. While this formulation well captures macroscopic soil organic C (SOC) dynamics, better understanding is needed of their underlying mechanisms as related to microbial processes, depth-dependent environmental controls, and other processes that strongly affect soil C dynamics. Second, incomplete use of observations in model parameterization is a major cause of bias in soil C projections from ESMs. Optimal parameter calibration with both pool- and flux-based data sets through data assimilation is among the highest priorities for near-term research to reduce biases among ESMs. Third, external variables are represented inconsistently among ESMs, leading to differences in modeled soil C dynamics. We recommend the implementation of traceability analyses to identify how external variables and model parameterizations influence SOC dynamics in different ESMs. Overall, projections of the terrestrial C sink can be substantially improved when reliable data sets are available to select the most representative model structure

  12. Toward more realistic projections of soil carbon dynamics by Earth system models: SOIL CARBON MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yiqi; Ahlstrom, Anders; Allison, Steven D.; Batjes, Niels H.; Brovkin, Victor; Carvalhais, N.; Chappell, Adrian; Ciais, Philippe; Davidson, Eric A.; Finzi, Adien; Georgiou, Katerina; Guenet, Bertrand; Hararuk, Oleksandra; Harden, Jennifer W.; He, Yujie; Hopkins, Francesca; Jiang, Lifen; Koven, C.; Jackson, Robert B.; Jones, Chris D.; Lara, Mark J.; Liang, Junyi; McGuire, A. David; Parton, William J.; Peng, Changhui; Randerson, J.; Salazar, Alejandro; Sierra , Carlos A.; Smith, Matthew J.; Tian, Hanqin; Todd-Brown, Katherine EO; Torn, Margaret S.; van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Wang, Ying Ping; West, Tristram O.; Wei, Yaxing; Wieder, William R.; Xia, Jianyang; Xu, Xia; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-21

    Soil carbon (C) is a critical component of Earth system models (ESMs) and its diverse representations are a major source of the large spread across models in the terrestrial C sink from the 3rd to 5th assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Improving soil C projections is of a high priority for Earth system modeling in the future IPCC and other assessments. To achieve this goal, we suggest that (1) model structures should reflect real-world processes, (2) parameters should be calibrated to match model outputs with observations, and (3) external forcing variables should accurately prescribe the environmental conditions that soils experience. Firstly, most soil C cycle models simulate C input from litter production and C release through decomposition. The latter process has traditionally been represented by 1st-order decay functions, regulated primarily by temperature, moisture, litter quality, and soil texture. While this formulation well captures macroscopic SOC dynamics, better understanding is needed of their underlying mechanisms as related to microbial processes, depth-dependent environmental controls, and other processes that strongly affect soil C dynamics. Secondly, incomplete use of observations in model parameterization is a major cause of bias in soil C projections from ESMs. Optimal parameter calibration with both pool- and flux-based datasets through data assimilation is among the highest priorities for near-term research to reduce biases among ESMs. Thirdly, external variables are represented inconsistently among ESMs, leading to differences in modeled soil C dynamics. We recommend the implementation of traceability analyses to identify how external variables and model parameterizations influence SOC dynamics in different ESMs. Overall, projections of the terrestrial C sink can be substantially improved when reliable datasets are available to select the most representative model structure, constrain parameters, and

  13. Exploiting Oceanic Residual Depth to Quantify Present-day Dynamic Topography at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; White, Nicky

    2014-05-01

    Convective circulation within the mantle causes vertical motions at the Earth's surface. This dynamic topography is time dependent and occurs on wavelengths of 1000s km with maximum amplitudes of ±2 km. Convective simulation models have been used extensively to make predictions of dynamic topography and have thus far out-paced observational constraints. Here, the well-established relationship between seafloor subsidence and age is used to produce a global map of residual depth anomalies in the oceanic realm. Care is taken to remove other causes of topography, including an isostatic correction for sedimentary loading that takes compaction into account, a correction for variable oceanic crustal thickness, and lithospheric thickening with age away from mid-ocean ridge spreading centres. A dataset including over 1000 seismic reflection profiles and 300 modern wide-angle refraction experiments has been amassed, primarily on old ocean floor adjacent to the continents. Calculation of residual depth yields a map of present-day dynamic topography with amplitudes significantly larger than the errors associated with the corrections. One of the most interesting results occurs along the west coast of Africa, where two full 2000 km wavelengths of dynamic topography have been captured with amplitudes ±1 km that correlate well with the long-wavelength free air gravity anomaly. Comparison with predictive models reveal poor to moderate correlations. This is a direct result of the limited resolution of the mantle tomography models used to set-up convection simulations and also the currently poor understanding of viscosity structure within the Earth. It is hoped that this residual depth dataset should provide an excellent surface boundary constraint for future convective simulation.

  14. A combined mean dynamic topography model - DTU16MDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole; Nielsen, Karina; Maximenko, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    The new DTU16MDT is obtained by combining the geodetic mean dynamic topography DTU15MDT with drifter mean velocities. DTU15MDT had been derived using the gravity model EIGEN-6C4 combined with the DTU15MSS mean sea surface model. The EIGEN-6C4 is derived using the full series of GOCE data and provides a better resolution. The better resolution fixes a few problems related to geoid signals in the former model DTU13MDT. Slicing in the GOCO05S gravity model up to harmonic degree 150 has solved some issues related to striations. Compared to the DTU13MSS, the DTU15MSS has been derived by including re-tracked CRYOSAT-2 altimetry also, hence, increasing its resolution. Also, some issues in the Polar regions have been solved. Finally, the filtering was re-evaluated by adjusting the quasi-gaussian filter width to optimize the fit to drifter velocities. Subsequently, the drifter velocities were integrated to enhance the resolution of the MDT. The results show that the new MDT resolves the details of the ocean circulation much better. Finally, mean drifter velocities have been integrated in the computations for the combined MDT model.

  15. Dynamics and control of a solar collector system for near Earth object deflection *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen-Ping Gong; Jun-Feng Li; Yun-Feng Gao

    2011-01-01

    A solar collector system is a possible method using solar energy to deflect Earth-threatening near-Earth objects. We investigate the dynamics and control of a solar collector system including a main collector (MC) and secondary collector (SC).The MC is used to collect the sunlight to its focal point, where the SC is placed and directs the collected light to an asteroid. Both the relative position and attitude of the two collectors should be accurately controlled to achieve the desired optical path. First,the dynamical equation of the relative motion of the two collectors in the vicinity of the asteroid is modeled. Secondly, the nonlinear sliding-mode method is employed to design a control law to achieve the desired configuration of the two collectors. Finally,the deflection capability of this solar collector system is compared with those of the gravitational tractor and solar sail gravitational tractor. The results show that the solar collector is much more efficient with respect to deflection capability.

  16. Topology of sustainable management in dynamical Earth system models with desirable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzig, J.; Kittel, T.

    2015-03-01

    To keep the Earth system in a desirable region of its state space, such as the recently suggested "tolerable environment and development window", "planetary boundaries", or "safe (and just) operating space", one not only needs to understand the quantitative internal dynamics of the system and the available options for influencing it (management), but also the structure of the system's state space with regard to certain qualitative differences. Important questions are: which state space regions can be reached from which others with or without leaving the desirable region? Which regions are in a variety of senses "safe" to stay in when management options might break away, and which qualitative decision problems may occur as a consequence of this topological structure? In this article, as a complement to the existing literature on optimal control which is more focussed on quantitative optimization and is much applied in both the engineering and the integrated assessment literature, we develop a mathematical theory of the qualitative topology of the state space of a dynamical system with management options and desirable states. We suggest a certain terminology for the various resulting regions of the state space and perform a detailed formal classification of the possible states with respect to the possibility of avoiding or leaving the undesired region. Our results indicate that before performing some form of quantitative optimization, the sustainable management of the Earth system may require decisions of a more discrete type that come in the form of several dilemmata, e.g., choosing between eventual safety and uninterrupted desirability, or between uninterrupted safety and increasing flexibility. We illustrate the concepts and dilemmata with conceptual models from classical mechanics, climate science, ecology, economics, and coevolutionary Earth system modelling and discuss their potential relevance for the climate and sustainability debate.

  17. Study of the Efficacy of CC-2 and Fuller's Earth Combination as a Decontaminant against Sulphur Mustard (Mustard Gas Dermal Intoxication in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Decontamination efficacy of Fuller's earth and CC-2 independently; and in different combinations was evaluated against toxicity of sulphur mustard applied percutaneously on mice. Maximum protection was obtained with Fuller's earth and CC-2 in a combination of 80:20(w/w.

  18. Modeling of Dynamic Deformation of The Earth Crust: A Tool For Evaluation of Future Earthquakes Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, A.; Sokolov, V.; Loh, C.-H.; Wen, K.-L.

    The method for evaluation of seismic and geodynamic hazard, which is based on the models of dynamic deformation of the Earth' crust, is proposed. The 4D-model of deformation (x, y, z, t - geographic coordinates, depth, time) is constructed on the basis the geophysical data: Global Positioning System (GPS) network, Persistent Sea Water Level (PSWL) monitoring and seismic catalogues. It is possible to utilize also other indirect geophysical data that reflect the dynamic process of the Earth' crust deformation. The process of deformation is considered in the form of interaction of slow-propagating waves of deformation, the moving velocities of which vary from 0.05 per year up to 300 km per year, and the effective widths of which are about sev- eral tens of kilometers. The main goal of the modeling is to determine characteristics of these waves (fronts) of dynamic deformation on the basis of observed data. The possible seismic events (earthquakes), on the one hand, could be revealed by analysis of distribution of deformation inside the Earth' crust. The recent 1999 Chi-Chi, Tai- wan, earthquake (M=7.6) is used as an example. On the other hand, it is proposed to consider seismic events as the peculiar points of the field of dynamic deformation - the moments of interaction of four and more fronts of deformation. The 5D-model (ge- ographic coordinates, depth, time, magnitude), which describes the seismic process statistically, is used for evaluation of the earthquakes magnitude. The 4D/5D-models are applied jointly for compilation of theoretical seismic catalogue for the nearest tens and hundreds years (future and past) that, in turn, is used for purposes of seismic zona- tion and hazard assessment. The process and results of the modeling are described for the case of Taiwan region. When comparing the real and modeled seismic catalogues, it has been shown that the standard errors of determination of the earthquake param- eters do not exceed 5-10 km by coordinates, 0

  19. Let Our Powers Combine! Harnessing NASA's Earth Observatory Natural Event Tracker (EONET) in Worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Min Minnie; Ward, Kevin; Boller, Ryan; Gunnoe, Taylor; Baynes, Kathleen; King, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Constellations of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites orbit the earth to collect images and data about the planet in near real-time. Within hours of satellite overpass, you can discover where the latest wildfires, severe storms, volcanic eruptions, and dust and haze events are occurring using NASA's Worldview web application. By harnessing a repository of curated natural event metadata from NASA Earth Observatory's Natural Event Tracker (EONET), Worldview has moved natural event discovery to the forefront and allows users to select events-of-interest from a curated list, zooms to the area, and adds the most relevant imagery layers for that type of natural event. This poster will highlight NASA Worldviews new natural event feed functionality.

  20. A combined GPS/GLONASS global solution for the determination of diurnal and semi-diurnal Earth rotation variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englich, S.; Weber, R.; Schuh, H.

    2009-04-01

    Due to the global distribution of the IGS stations and the availability of continuous tracking data, GNSS observation data is very well suited for the investigation of high-frequency variations of the Earth rotation parameters (ERP). The majority of obtainable observations stems from the GPS system, but the number of stations equipped with combined GPS/GLONASS receivers is steadily increasing. One drawback in GPS only studies is that the orbital period of the GPS satellites is in a deep 2:1 resonance with Earth rotation. Consequently orbital errors which propagate to the ERP estimation limit the accurate determination of ERP variations in this frequency band (K1, K2). The purpose of this study is to make use of the rising availability of globally distributed GLONASS data for investigating the benefits of a combined GPS/GLONASS approach for the examination of diurnal and semi-diurnal Earth rotation variations. The observation data of 2008 from more than 120 IGS sites, of which around one third track GPS as well as GLONASS satellites, was chosen for analysis. We compared coordinate repeatabilities, ERP, and subsequently derived tidal variations calculated from a GPS stand-alone and a combined GPS/GLONASS solution.

  1. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining Brownian Dynamics and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic Molecular Dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P.G. Bolhuis and P.R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 43}, 21: 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale BD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm we discuss its performance. The rotational BD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of e.g. protein signalling networks.

  2. Potential Effects of Heliogeophysical Activity on the Dynamics of Sudden Cardiac Death at Earth Middle Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E.; Mustafa, F.

    2017-01-01

    Limited studies exist on comparing the possible effects of heliogeophysical activity (solar and geomagnetic) on the dynamics of sudden cardiac death (SCD) as a function of latitude on Earth. In this work we continue our earlier studies concerning the changing space environment and SCD dynamics at middle latitudes. The study covered 25 to 80-year old males and females, and used medical data provided by all emergency and first medical aid stations in the Grand Baku Area, Azerbaijan. Data coverage includedthe second peak of Solar Cycle 23 and its descending activity years followed by its long-lasting minimum. Gradation of geomagnetic activity into six levels was introduced to study the effect of space weather on SCD. The ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) test was applied to study the significance of the geomagnetic activity effect, estimated by different geomagnetic indices, on SCD dynamics. Variations inthe number of SCDs occurring on days preceding and following the development of geomagnetic storms were also studied. Results revealed that the SCD number was largest on days of very low geomagnetic activity and on days proceeding and following geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Vulnerability for males was found to be higher around days of major and severe geomagnetic storms. Females, on the other hand, were more threatened around days of lower intensity storms. It is concluded that heliogeophysical activity could be considered as one of the regulating external/environmental factors in human homeostasis.

  3. Integrated earth system dynamic modeling for life cycle impact assessment of ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbault, Damien; Rivière, Mylène; Rugani, Benedetto; Benetto, Enrico; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia

    2014-02-15

    Despite the increasing awareness of our dependence on Ecosystem Services (ES), Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) does not explicitly and fully assess the damages caused by human activities on ES generation. Recent improvements in LCIA focus on specific cause-effect chains, mainly related to land use changes, leading to Characterization Factors (CFs) at the midpoint assessment level. However, despite the complexity and temporal dynamics of ES, current LCIA approaches consider the environmental mechanisms underneath ES to be independent from each other and devoid of dynamic character, leading to constant CFs whose representativeness is debatable. This paper takes a step forward and is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of using an integrated earth system dynamic modeling perspective to retrieve time- and scenario-dependent CFs that consider the complex interlinkages between natural processes delivering ES. The GUMBO (Global Unified Metamodel of the Biosphere) model is used to quantify changes in ES production in physical terms - leading to midpoint CFs - and changes in human welfare indicators, which are considered here as endpoint CFs. The interpretation of the obtained results highlights the key methodological challenges to be solved to consider this approach as a robust alternative to the mainstream rationale currently adopted in LCIA. Further research should focus on increasing the granularity of environmental interventions in the modeling tools to match current standards in LCA and on adapting the conceptual approach to a spatially-explicit integrated model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Obtaining a Pragmatic Representation of Fire Disturbance in Dynamic Vegetation Models by Assimilating Earth Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzas, Euripides; Quegan, Shaun

    2015-04-01

    Fire constitutes a violent and unpredictable pathway of carbon from the terrestrial biosphere into the atmosphere. Despite fire emissions being in many biomes of similar magnitude to that of Net Ecosystem Exchange, even the most complex Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) embedded in IPCC General Circulation Models poorly represent fire behavior and dynamics, a fact which still remains understated. As DVMs operate on a deterministic, grid cell-by-grid cell basis they are unable to describe a host of important fire characteristics such as its propagation, magnitude of area burned and stochastic nature. Here we address these issues by describing a model-independent methodology which assimilates Earth Observation (EO) data by employing image analysis techniques and algorithms to offer a realistic fire disturbance regime in a DVM. This novel approach, with minimum model restructuring, manages to retain the Fire Return Interval produced by the model whilst assigning pragmatic characteristics to its fire outputs thus allowing realistic simulations of fire-related processes such as carbon injection into the atmosphere and permafrost degradation. We focus our simulations in the Arctic and specifically Canada and Russia and we offer a snippet of how this approach permits models to engage in post-fire dynamics hitherto absent from any other model regardless of complexity.

  5. A Comprehensive Structural Dynamic Analysis Approach for Multi Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, Scott; Bayandor, Javid; Siddens, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The anticipated NASA Mars Sample Return Mission (MSR) requires a simple and reliable method in which to return collected Martian samples back to earth for scientific analysis. The Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) is NASA's proposed solution to this MSR requirement. Key aspects of the MMEEV are its reliable and passive operation, energy absorbing foam-composite structure, and modular impact sphere (IS) design. To aid in the development of an EEV design that can be modified for various missions requirements, two fully parametric finite element models were developed. The first model was developed in an explicit finite element code and was designed to evaluate the impact response of the vehicle and payload during the final stage of the vehicle's return to earth. The second model was developed in an explicit code and was designed to evaluate the static and dynamic structural response of the vehicle during launch and reentry. In contrast to most other FE models, built through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) pre-processor, the current model was developed using a coding technique that allows the analyst to quickly change nearly all aspects of the model including: geometric dimensions, material properties, load and boundary conditions, mesh properties, and analysis controls. Using the developed design tool, a full range of proposed designs can quickly be analyzed numerically and thus the design trade space for the EEV can be fully understood. An engineer can then quickly reach the best design for a specific mission and also adapt and optimize the general design for different missions.

  6. Stories from dynamic Earth: developing your sense of place through Landsat-based citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Kennedy, R. E.; Nolin, A. W.; Hughes, J.; Bianchetti, R. A.; O'Connell, K.; Morrell, P.

    2016-12-01

    Many citizen science activities provide opportunities to understand a specific location on Earth at human scale and to collect local ecological knowledge that can improve the scientific endeavor of monitoring Earth. However, it can be challenging to comprehend ecological changes occurring at larger spatial and temporal scales. Based on the results of two professional development workshops designed for Oregon middle school science teachers in 2011-2013 and 2013-2016, we describe how working with multi-decade Landsat imagery transformed participants and students. Collaborating with scientists, the teachers used 30 years of time-series Landsat imagery with LandTrendr and IceTrendr algorithms to distill several study sites in Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (U.S) into periods of consistent long or short-duration landscape dynamics (e.g. stable areas, forestry activities, flooding, urbanization, tree growth). Using the spatial, tabular, and graphic outputs from this process, the teachers created climate change curriculum aligned to state and national standards. Web-enabled visualization tools, such as Google Earth, provided a platform that engaged students in understanding the drivers of their local landscape changes. Students and teachers reported increased interest in and understanding of their landscape. In addition to fulfilling classroom needs, the activities contributed data used in regional carbon modeling and land cover monitoring throughout California, Oregon, and Washington (U.S). We will discuss strategies and challenges to translating expert-level scientific data, models, methods, vocabulary, and conclusions into citizen science materials that support place-based climate change education across age ranges and educational disciplines. Finally, we share ways you can deepen your own sense of place while participating in citizen science activities that improve land cover and land use monitoring at local, regional, and global scales.

  7. A Comparative Examination of Plasmoid Structure and Dynamics at Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The circulation of plasma and magnetic flux within planetary magnetospheres is governed by the solar wind-driven Dungey and planetary rotation-driven cycles. The Dungey cycle is responsible for all circulation at Mercury and Earth. Jupiter and Saturn's magnetospheres are dominated by the Vasyliunas cycle, but there is evidence for a small Dungey cycle contribution driven by the solar wind. Despite these fundamental differences, all well-observed magnetospheres eject relatively large parcels of the hot plasma, termed plasmoids, down their tails at high speeds. Plasmoids escape from the restraining force of the planetary magnetic field through reconnection in the equatorial current sheet separating the northern and southern hemispheres of the magnetosphere. The reconnection process gives the magnetic field threading plasmoids a helical or flux rope-type topology. In the Dungey cycle reconnection also provides the primary tailward force that accelerates plasmoids to high speeds as they move down the tail. We compare the available observations of plasmoids at Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn for the purpose of determining the relative role of plasmoids and the reconnection process in the dynamics these planetary magnetic tails.

  8. Tidal Q of a Super Earth: Dynamical Constraints from the GJ 876 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Puranam, Abhijit; Batygin, Konstantin

    2016-05-01

    GJ 876 is an M-dwarf star 15 light-years from Earth and is the closest known star to harbor a multi-planetary system. This system stands out as an extraordinary member of the extrasolar planetary aggregate, due to the rapid dynamical chaos exhibited by the Laplace resonance of the outer three planets, and the high eccentricity of the non-resonant inner planet. While the origins of chaotic motion within this system are well understood, the mechanism through which the innermost planet maintains its high eccentricity in face of tidal dissipation remains elusive. In this work, we used analytic methods and numerical simulations to show that angular momentum transfer between the resonant chain and the innermost planet stochastically pumps the eccentricity of latter. In light of such interactions, the innermost planet’s eccentricity constitutes an observable proxy for its tidal circularization timescale. Quantitatively, our analysis yields a tidal Q of order a few thousand for an extrasolar super-Earth, GJ 876d.

  9. Stormtime Dynamics of the Relativistic Electron Flux in Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    A state-vector representation is a powerful technique for describing complex plasma systems. Its framework can be adapted for classification methods which can be used to analyze the system's history and for prediction methods which can serve to forecast its future activity. A state-vector description is developed for the electron flux dynamics in Earth's radiation belts, based on an 11-year (1993-2003) dataset of high-cadence flux measurements from a low-Earth (SAMPEX) orbit over a wide L range and at a fixed energy (2-6 MeV). A clustering algorithm is used to divide the state space into regions, or clusters of vectors, and it becomes evident that flux intensifications during storms correspond to characteristic transitions in state space following geoeffective interplanetary disturbances (such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections and high-speed streams). Examples are discussed to show that the classification is valid for medium-term (several-days) and long-term (solar-cycle-phase) timescales. The state-vector representation is then used as the basis of a predictive model of the flux distribution given upstream solar wind measurements. It is found that model accuracy of storm prediction is maximized if the model is tuned at a highly nonlinear regime. The relation to earlier state representations and models of the radiation belt flux is discussed.

  10. Observed changes in the Earth's dynamic oblateness from GRACE data and geophysical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Ditmar, P; Riva, R

    A new methodology is proposed to estimate changes in the Earth's dynamic oblateness ([Formula: see text] or equivalently, [Formula: see text]) on a monthly basis. The algorithm uses monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity solutions, an ocean bottom pressure model and a glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) model. The resulting time series agree remarkably well with a solution based on satellite laser ranging (SLR) data. Seasonal variations of the obtained time series show little sensitivity to the choice of GRACE solutions. Reducing signal leakage in coastal areas when dealing with GRACE data and accounting for self-attraction and loading effects when dealing with water redistribution in the ocean is crucial in achieving close agreement with the SLR-based solution in terms of de-trended solutions. The obtained trend estimates, on the other hand, may be less accurate due to their dependence on the GIA models, which still carry large uncertainties.

  11. GPS Based Reduced-Dynamic Orbit Determination for Low Earth Orbiters with Ambiguity Fixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-increasing number of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO for scientific missions, the precise determination of the position and velocity of the satellite is a necessity. GPS (Global Positioning System based reduced-dynamic orbit determination (RPOD method is commonly used in the post processing with high precision. This paper presents a sequential RPOD strategy for LEO satellite in the framework of Extended Kalman Filter (EKF. Precise Point Positioning (PPP technique is used to process the GPS observations, with carrier phase ambiguity resolution using Integer Phase Clocks (IPCs products. A set of GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment mission data is used to test and validate the RPOD performance. Results indicate that orbit determination accuracy could be improved by 15% in terms of 3D RMS error in comparison with traditional RPOD method with float ambiguity solutions.

  12. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel.

  13. Evolution of the protolunar disk: dynamics, cooling timescale and implantation of volatiles onto the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Charnoz, Charnoz

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that the Moon accreted from the protolunar disk that was assembled after the last giant impact on Earth. Due to its high temperature, the protolunar disk may act as a thermochemical reactor in which the material is processed before being incorporated into the Moon. Outstanding issues like devolatilisation and istotopic evolution are tied to the disk evolution, however its lifetime, dynamics and thermodynamics are unknown. Here, we numerically explore the long term viscous evolution of the protolunar disk using a one dimensional model where the different phases (vapor and condensed) are vertically stratified. Viscous heating, radiative cooling, phase transitions and gravitational instability are accounted for whereas Moon s accretion is not considered for the moment. The viscosity of the gas, liquid and solid phases dictates the disk evolution. We find that (1) the vapor condenses into liquid in about 10 years, (2) a large fraction of the disk mass flows inward forming a hot and compact liquid di...

  14. Terahertz lattice dynamics of the potassium rare-earth binary molybdates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poperezhai, S.; Gogoi, P.; Zubenko, N.; Kutko, K.; Kutko, V. I.; Kovalev, A. S.; Kamenskyi, D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a systematic study of low-energy lattice vibrations in the layered systems KY(MoO4)2, KDy(MoO4)2, KEr(MoO4)2, and KTm(MoO4)2. A layered crystal structure and low symmetry of the local environment of the rare-earth ion cause the appearance of vibrational and electronic excitations in Terahertz frequencies. The interaction between these excitations leads to sophisticated dynamical properties, including non-linear effects in paramagnetic resonance spectra. The THz study in magnetic field allows for the clear distinction between lattice vibrations and electronic excitations. We measured the THz transmission spectra and show that the low energy lattice vibrations in binary molybdates can be well described within the quasi-one-dimensional model. The developed model describes the measured far-infrared spectra, and results of our calculations agree with previous Raman and ultrasound studies.

  15. Modelling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Contrasting results on the magnitude of the dynamic component of topography motivate us to analyse the sources of uncertainties affecting long wavelength topography modelling. We obtain a range of mantle density structures from thermo-chemical interpretation of available seismic tomography models...... too large. A truly interdisciplinary approach, combining constraints from the geological record with a multi-methodological interpretation of geophysical observations, is required to tackle the challenging task of linking the surface topography to deep processes....

  16. Alternative Earths: The Diverse Chapters of Sustained Habitability on a Dynamic Early Earth and Their Astrobiological Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    The oldest signs of animal life appear in the geologic record 600 to 700 million years ago. For the four billion years prior, our planet experienced dramatic changes that paved the way for this milestone. Beyond the establishment of Earth's earliest oceans 4.3 billion years ago (Ga), the single most important environmental transformation in history may have been the first permanent rise of atmospheric oxygen around 2.3 Ga. Before this Great Oxidation Event (GOE), Earth's atmosphere and oceans were virtually devoid of this gas, which forms the basis for all macroscopic life. Yet full oxygenation was a long, drawn out process. This talk will lay out the state-of-the-art in our understanding of Earth's early oxygenation, with an emphasis on the delay between the first biological oxygen production, tentatively placed at 3 Ga, and the appearance of animals almost 2.5 billion years later. Recent work suggests transient oxygenation episodes occurred prior to the GOE. Once permanently present in the atmosphere, oxygen may have risen to very high levels and then nose-dived. Then, at least a billion years of dominantly oxygen-free conditions in the deep ocean followed, beneath an atmosphere and shallow oceans much leaner in oxygen than previous estimates indicated. Deficiencies in oxygen and associated nutrients may have, in turn, set a challenging course for many of the oceans' inhabitants, explaining persistently low populations and diversities of eukaryotes. The latest data suggest these billion-plus years of intermediate oxygen were followed by increases in both ocean and atmosphere oxygen contents and eukaryotic diversity 750 to 800 million years ago. Novel, rock-bound proxies and complementary numerical models are now steering our views of co-evolving life and marine and atmospheric chemistry, including greenhouse gas controls on climate. New findings are revealing various states of planetary habitability that differ greatly from the Earth we know today. These

  17. Crustal decoupling and mantle dynamics on Venus: implications for Earth-like planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghail, Richard

    2013-04-01

    (intraplate) continental interiors. The higher background heat flux results in a higher incidence of intraplate volcanism than on Earth, in a relatively random distribution that mirrors the near-random distribution of impact craters and results in the observed mean surface age. While these conditions occur on Venus in basaltic crust because of its extreme surface conditions, it offers insight into mantle dynamics beneath Pangaea or an Earth-like planet entirely covered by continental crust. An ESA M-class mission, EnVision, is proposed to undertake InSAR measurements at Venus to determine rates of ground displacement in order to distinguish between these two models.

  18. Interconnection of tectonic stresses in the Earth's crust and dynamics of the groundwater basin functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneshov, Vycheslav; Trifonova, Tatiana; Trifonov, Dmitriy; Arakelian, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    1. Possible influence of tectonic stresses on the occurrence of catastrophic floods by the mechanism of modification of the 3D-cracknet of the rock formations and the transit of the groundwater in this natural transport system in the conditions of functioning of the river catchment basin is discussed. Several floods (not freshets) took place in 2013-2014, which probably could be associated with corresponding seismic processes in the Earth's crust, are considered. 2. A river basin formation in the mountain slope can be considered as a self-organizing staged process of its evolution passing through several non-equilibrium but steady-state conditions. The controlling parameter is the process of the crack spreading out. Crack development up the slope but downward substance transit, stipulates a feedback within the unified 3D-river basin system. 3. We have briefly described and rendered the mechanism of the influence of seismic activity on the occurrence of concrete floods with the use of combined maps of groundwater resources and the boundaries of lithospheric plates on the territory and the revealed regularities in seismic waves propagation and interaction with groundwater. 4. In the practical aspect a proposed hypothesis can be useful during the definition of potentially dangerous areas for catastrophic water events taking into account the interference of the state of the underground hydrosphere and the tectonic structure of the rheological section of bowels of the earth on the concrete territories under some adjustable (seismic) conditions.

  19. Relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution under pressure: Combining molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrini, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Hinsen, K. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Calligari, P. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bellissent-Funel, M.-C. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kneller, G.R. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: kneller@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2008-04-18

    This paper presents a study of the influence of non-denaturing hydrostatic pressure on the relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution, which combines molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. We compare results obtained at ambient pressure and at 3 kbar. Experiments have been performed at pD 4.6 and at a protein concentration of 60 mg/ml. For both pressures we checked the monodispersity of the protein solution by small angle neutron scattering. To interpret the simulation results and the experimental data, we adopt the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model for the internal relaxation dynamics of the protein. On the experimental side, global protein motions are accounted for by the model of free translational diffusion, neglecting the much slower rotational diffusion. We find that the protein dynamics in the observed time window from about 1 to 100 ps is slowed down under pressure, while its fractal characteristics is preserved, and that the amplitudes of the motions are reduced by about 20%. The slowing down of the relaxation is reduced with increasing q-values, where more localized motions are seen.

  20. Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients for their interaction with helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, X.; Dalgarno, A.; Groenenboom, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the rare-earth-metal atoms are calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. The frequency-dependent polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies are used to determine the isotropic and orientation-dependent van der Waals coefficients for th

  1. From Planet Earth to Society: a new dynamics in Portugal about Geosciences Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elizabeth; Abreu Sá, Artur; José Roxo, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Since the United Nations General Assembly declared the year 2008 as the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE), during the triennium 2007-2009, under the motto Earth Sciences for Society, many impacts and changes were generated among the Portuguese society. Today is possible to say that those were due to the work of the Portuguese National Committee for the IYPE. After 2009, the Portuguese National Commission for UNESCO created the Portuguese National Committee for the International Programme of Geosciences (IGCP) with the main goal to continue the work done during the IYPE. Among those activities, a Workshop entitled "InFormation in Context" was organized by the UNESCO NatCom - Portugal, in collaboration with the IGCP National Committee and the National Public Television (RTP). This activity was created to reach specially journalists, aiming to give them more information in context, related to Earth matters, mainly related to natural hazards and Climate Change. It is essential that society knows its degree of vulnerability to the occurrence of extreme natural phenomena, which are the basis of natural catastrophes, with serious social and economic consequences. Thus, it is crucial the development of a culture of prevention and precaution, which hinges on a correct information, based in scientific knowledge on causes and consequences of extreme natural phenomena. At the same time, it is necessary the implementation of mitigation and adaptation measures, based on the analysis and cartography of risks, and in an effective monitoring process. During these workshops particular emphasis was given to the need to inform and educate the society in general, and students in particular, to the reality of living in a dynamic planet. Particular importance was given to natural hazards, such as those resulting from earthquakes landslides, floods, droughts, heat and cold waves and storms, which are those with the greatest potential danger in Portugal. An informed society is a

  2. Evaluation of a regional model climatology in Europe using dynamical downscaling from a seamless Earth prediction approach (EC-Earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Montavez, Juan P.; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2010-05-01

    Climate and weather forecasting applications share a common ancestry and build on the same physical principles. Nevertheless, climate research and numerical weather prediction are commonly seen as different disciplines. The emerging concept of "seamless prediction" forges weather forecasting and climate change studies into a single framework (Palmer et al., 2008). In principle, as models develop towards higher resolution and more feedbacks are included, some aspects of model uncertainty should reduce. However, global models can only resolve processes down to 50-100 km at present. Moreover, users of climate information often require much higher detail and downscaling methods are needed to provide regional climate information consistent with global climate trajectories. Therefore, this work presents an evaluation of the ability of a regional climate model (RCM) to reproduce the present climatology over Europe using a high resolution (25 km). The RCM used in this study is a climate version of the MM5 model (Fernández et al., 2007). The analysis here focuses on the annual and seasonal biases and variability for temperature (mean, maximum and minimum) and precipitation. The statistical parameters are obtained by interpolating the simulated values on the E-OBS gridded dataset from the European Climate Assessment & Dataset (ECA&D) at a resolution of 0.5° for the period 1990-2000. The novel approach of this contribution is that the driving model is EC-Earth version 2 (Hazeleger et al., 2010), which follows the seamless prediction approach to provide climate forcings to the regional model. The atmospheric model of EC-Earth is based on ECMWF's Integrated Forecast System, cycle 31r1, corresponding to the current seasonal forecast system of ECMWF. The standard configuration runs at T159 horizontal spectral resolution with 62 vertical levels. The ocean component is based on version 2 of the NEMO model with a horizontal resolution of nominally 1 degree and 42 vertical levels

  3. Combining docking and molecular dynamic simulations in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Hernán; Bliznyuk, Andrey A; Gready, Jill E

    2006-09-01

    A rational approach is needed to maximize the chances of finding new drugs, and to exploit the opportunities of potential new drug targets emerging from genomic and proteomic initiatives, and from the large libraries of small compounds now readily available through combinatorial chemistry. Despite a shaky early history, computer-aided drug design techniques can now be effective in reducing costs and speeding up drug discovery. This happy outcome results from development of more accurate and reliable algorithms, use of more thoughtfully planned strategies to apply them, and greatly increased computer power to allow studies with the necessary reliability to be performed. Our review focuses on applications and protocols, with the main emphasis on critical analysis of recent studies where docking calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were combined to dock small molecules into protein receptors. We highlight successes to demonstrate what is possible now, but also point out drawbacks and future directions. The review is structured to lead the reader from the simpler to more compute-intensive methods. Thus, while inexpensive and fast docking algorithms can be used to scan large compound libraries and reduce their size, more accurate but expensive MD simulations can be applied when a few selected ligand candidates remain. MD simulations can be used: during the preparation of the protein receptor before docking, to optimize its structure and account for protein flexibility; for the refinement of docked complexes, to include solvent effects and account for induced fit; to calculate binding free energies, to provide an accurate ranking of the potential ligands; and in the latest developments, during the docking process itself to find the binding site and correctly dock the ligand a priori.

  4. The role of land surface dynamics in glacial inception: a study with the UVic Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, K.J.; Weaver, A.J.; Matthews, H.D. [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria (Canada); Cox, P.M. [Hadley Centre, Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    The first results of the UVic Earth System Model coupled to a land surface scheme and a dynamic global vegetation model are presented in this study. In the first part the present day climate simulation is discussed and compared to observations. We then compare a simulation of an ice age inception (forced with 116 ka BP orbital parameters and an atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration of 240 ppm) with a preindustrial run (present day orbital parameters, atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] = 280 ppm). Emphasis is placed on the vegetation's response to the combined changes in solar radiation and atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. A southward shift of the northern treeline as well as a global decrease in vegetation carbon is observed in the ice age inception run. In tropical regions, up to 88% of broadleaf trees are replaced by shrubs and C{sub 4} grasses. These changes in vegetation cover have a remarkable effect on the global climate: land related feedbacks double the atmospheric cooling during the ice age inception as well as the reduction of the meridional overturning in the North Atlantic. The introduction of vegetation related feedbacks also increases the surface area with perennial snow significantly. (orig.)

  5. Seismic response of earth dams considering dynamic properties of unsaturated zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is conventionally assumed in the analysis and design of earth dams that the soil located above the phreatic line, i.e. the uppermost seepage flow line, is completely dry. However, there is often an unsaturated flow of water through an unsaturated zone above this borderline and variation in moisture content in this zone results in variation of matric suction throughout this region. Variation of matric suction, in turn, results in variation of effective stresses in this zone. In this research, the seismic response of earth dams in terms of the displacement and acceleration at the crown of the dam as well as the stress distribution in the dam body is investigated. Taking into account the effect of unsaturated zone, a comparison is made to investigate the effect of conventional simplification in ignoring the dynamic characteristics of the unsaturated zone above the phreatic line and the more complicated analysis which includes the unsaturated zone. A function for the soil-water retention curve (SWRC was assigned to the soil in the unsaturated zone to determine the variation of matric suction in this zone and analyses were made using finite difference software (FLAC. Results are then compared to the conventional method for homogeneous dams. In these analyzes the soil shear modulus was assumed to vary with the mean effective stress both for saturated and unsaturated zones. Among various results, it was notable that the history of crest x-displacement, and acceleration show higher values in models accounting for the unsaturated region. It was attributed to the considerably lower values of damping ratio in the crest region in the unsaturated models.

  6. Study of the dynamics of meteoroids through the Earth's atmosphere and retrieval of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe Cordero Tercero, Maria; Farah-Simon, Alejandro; Velázquez-Villegas, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    When a comet , asteroid or meteoroid impact with a planet several things can happen depending on the mass, velocity and composition of the impactor, if the planet or moon has an atmosphere or not, and the angle of impact. On bodies without an atmosphere like Mercury or the Moon, every object that strikes their surfaces produces impact craters with sizes ranging from centimeters to hundreds and even thousands of kilometers across. On bodies with an atmosphere, this encounter can produce impact craters, meteorites, meteors and fragmentation. Each and every one of these phenomena is interesting because they provide information about the surfaces and the geological evolution of solar system bodies. Meteors (shooting stars) are luminous wakes on the sky due to the interaction between the meteoroid and the Earth's atmosphere. A meteoroid is asteroidal or cometary material ranging in size from 2 mm to a few tens of meters. The smallest tend to evaporate at heights between 80 and 120 km. Objects of less than 2 mm are called micrometeorites. If the meteor brightness exceeds the brightness of Venus, the phenomenon is called a bolide or fireball. If a meteoroid, or a fragment of it, survives atmospheric ablation and it can be recovered on the ground, that piece is called a meteorite. Most meteoroids 2 meters long fragment suddenly into the atmosphere, it produces a shock wave that can affect humans and their environment like the Chelyabinsk event occurred on February 15, 2013 an two less energetic events in Mexico in 2010 and 2011. To understand the whole phenomenon, we proposed a video camera network for observing meteors. The objectives of this network are to: a) contribute to the study of the fragmentation of meteoroids in the Earth's atmosphere, b) determine values of important physical parameters; c ) study seismic waves produced by atmospheric shock waves, d) study the dynamics of meteoroids and f ) recover and study meteorites. During this meeting, the academic

  7. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation. PMID:27589770

  8. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-08-31

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation.

  9. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret McCaul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8, small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation.

  10. Combining Google Earth and GIS mapping technologies in a dengue surveillance system for developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobieszczyk Magdalena E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne illness that places significant burden on tropical developing countries with unplanned urbanization. A surveillance system using Google Earth and GIS mapping technologies was developed in Nicaragua as a management tool. Methods and Results Satellite imagery of the town of Bluefields, Nicaragua captured from Google Earth was used to create a base-map in ArcGIS 9. Indices of larval infestation, locations of tire dumps, cemeteries, large areas of standing water, etc. that may act as larval development sites, and locations of the homes of dengue cases collected during routine epidemiologic surveying were overlaid onto this map. Visual imagery of the location of dengue cases, larval infestation, and locations of potential larval development sites were used by dengue control specialists to prioritize specific neighborhoods for targeted control interventions. Conclusion This dengue surveillance program allows public health workers in resource-limited settings to accurately identify areas with high indices of mosquito infestation and interpret the spatial relationship of these areas with potential larval development sites such as garbage piles and large pools of standing water. As a result, it is possible to prioritize control strategies and to target interventions to highest risk areas in order to eliminate the likely origin of the mosquito vector. This program is well-suited for resource-limited settings since it utilizes readily available technologies that do not rely on Internet access for daily use and can easily be implemented in many developing countries for very little cost.

  11. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  12. Ultrafast pump-probe dynamics of iron oxide based earth pigments for applications to ancient pottery manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafana, Tana E.; Brown, William; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast pump-probe microscopy provides unique dynamics for natural iron oxide and iron hydroxide earth pigments, despite their chemical similarity. First, we conducted a pump-probe spectroscopy study on heat-treated hematite (the pure red iron oxide mineral) and found the pump-probe dynamics to be temperature dependent. Second, we investigated pottery fired under known conditions and observed firing dependent pump-probe dynamics. Finally, we imaged a New World potshard from the North Carolina Museum of Art. Our results indicate that pump-probe microscopy could be a useful tool in elucidating pottery manufacture.

  13. Effect of combinative addition of strontium and rare earth elements on corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Jie-xin; CHEN Qiu-rong; XU Nai-xin; WEI Zhong-ling

    2008-01-01

    The influence of strontium(Sr) and rare earth(RE) elements on the corrosion behavior of AZ91D magnesium alloy was investigated by conventional corrosion testing and electrochemical measurements in 3.5% NaCI solution. After comparing the mass loss and hydrogen evolution of the samples, the microstruetures of the alloys and the morphologies of their corrosion product films were characterized by electron probe microanalysis-energy dispersive spectrometry(EPMA-EDS) and Auger electron spectroscopy(AES). Compared with individual addition of Sr or RE to AZ91D, the combinative addition of 0.5% Sr and 1% RE to AZ91D successfully decreases the corrosion rate further, which can be attributed to the depression of micro-galvanic couples, as well as the formation of more protective film due to aluminum enrichment. The combinative addition of strontium and rare earth elements to AZ91D magnesium alloy appears to he a promising approach to increase its corrosion resistance.

  14. Combined analysis of KamLAND and Borexino neutrino signals from Th and U decays in the Earth's interior

    CERN Document Server

    Fogli, G L; Palazzo, A; Rotunno, A M

    2010-01-01

    The KamLAND and Borexino experiments have detected electron antineutrinos produced in the decay chains of natural thorium and uranium (Th and U geoneutrinos). We analyze the energy spectra of current geoneutrino data in combination with solar and long-baseline reactor neutrino data, with marginalized three-neutrino oscillation parameters. We consider the case with unconstrained Th and U event rates in KamLAND and Borexino, as well as cases with fewer degrees of freedom, as obtained by successively assuming for both experiments a common Th/U ratio, a common scaling of Th+U event rates, and a chondritic Th/U value. In combination, KamLAND and Borexino can reject the null hypothesis (no geoneutrino signal) at 5 sigma. Interesting bounds or indications emerge on the Th+U geoneutrino rates and on the Th/U ratio, in broad agreement with typical Earth model expectations. Conversely, the results disfavor the hypothesis of a georeactor in the Earth's core, if its power exceeds a few TW. The interplay of KamLAND and Bo...

  15. Geomagnetic secular variation as a window on the dynamics of Earth's core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A.

    2010-12-01

    One of the forefront questions of planetary geophysics is to understand how magnetic fields can be spontaneously created by so-called dynamo action. Giant strides have been taken in recent years in understanding the theory of convectively driven dynamos; yet equally important is the marriage between theory and observation. I will argue that we are on the cusp of a new level of understanding brought about by new methods for incorporating observations and theory. In 1950 Sir Edward Bullard wrote an influential paper entitled "The westward drift of the Earth's magnetic field", with coauthors C Freedman, H Gellman and J Nixon. A comprehensive study of observations was tied together with the then nascent dynamo theory to infer properties of the dynamics of the core. Sixty years on, we have a much enriched understanding of the theory of convectively driven dynamos, and an even more comprehensive database of observations stretching back several centuries. Equally important are the new satellite observations that provide global coverage with unprecedented accuracy over the last decade. In this talk I will try to show how the interplay between theory and observation can lead to understanding of force balances in the core, and interactions between the core and the overlying mantle.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of an earth-air heat exchanger for ventilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczkowski, Andrzej; Suchorab, Zbigniew; Czechowska-Kosacka, Aneta

    2017-07-01

    Directive 2010/31/EU (EPBD Recast) obligates European Union members to improve energetic performance of the buildings. One of the crucial standards of energy-saving buildings are the passive houses, which are characterized by annual maximum space heating below 15 kWh/(m2.a) and the use of the specific primary energy for all domestic applications (also heating, hot water production and electricity) below 120 kWh/(m2.a). To achieve this standard there should be applied the solutions based on ground energy acquisition. One of them is the earth-air heat exchanger (EAHC) for ventilation systems. The article presents numerical simulations conducted by solving partial differential equations for three dimensional heat transfer. For the simulations it was applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique. The efficiency of EAHC was considered under different values of external temperature during the winter period (from -24 to -8 °C). Obtained results prove linear correlation with calculations of EAHC according to standards of the Polish National Energy Conservation Agency (NAPE). The slope of regression between outlet temperatures calculated with CFD model and NAPE standards, equals 0.59 which means, that according the CFD model, the efficiency of the exchanger is lower.

  17. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Virid, Sparisoma

    2015-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of alti...

  18. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  19. Meteorite Impact-Induced Rapid NH3 Production on Early Earth: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-12-01

    NH3 is an essential molecule as a nitrogen source for prebiotic amino acid syntheses such as the Strecker reaction. Previous shock experiments demonstrated that meteorite impacts on ancient oceans would have provided a considerable amount of NH3 from atmospheric N2 and oceanic H2O through reduction by meteoritic iron. However, specific production mechanisms remain unclear, and impact velocities employed in the experiments were substantially lower than typical impact velocities of meteorites on the early Earth. Here, to investigate the issues from the atomistic viewpoint, we performed multi-scale shock technique-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The results revealed a rapid production of NH3 within several picoseconds after the shock, indicating that shocks with greater impact velocities would provide further increase in the yield of NH3. Meanwhile, the picosecond-order production makes one expect that the important nitrogen source precursors of amino acids were obtained immediately after the impact. It was also observed that the reduction of N2 proceeded according to an associative mechanism, rather than a dissociative mechanism as in the Haber-Bosch process.

  20. Escape dynamics and fractal basins boundaries in the three-dimensional Earth-Moon system

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The orbital dynamics of a spacecraft, or a comet, or an asteroid in the Earth-Moon system in a scattering region around the Moon using the three dimensional version of the circular restricted three-body problem is numerically investigated. The test particle can move in bounded orbits around the Moon or escape through the openings around the Lagrange points $L_1$ and $L_2$ or even collide with the surface of the Moon. We explore in detail the first four of the five possible Hill's regions configurations depending on the value of the Jacobi constant which is of course related with the total orbital energy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on the phase space mixing by classifying initial conditions of orbits in several two-dimensional types of planes and distinguishing between four types of motion: (i) ordered bounded, (ii) trapped chaotic, (iii) escaping and (iv) collisional. In particular, we locate the different basins and we relate them with the corresponding spatial distributions of the escape and c...

  1. Dynamical systems for modeling the evolution of the magnetic field of stars and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, H.

    2016-02-01

    The cycles of solar magnetic activity are connected with a solar dynamo that operates in the convective zone. Solar dynamo mechanism is based on the combined action of the differential rotation and the alpha-effect. Application of these concepts allows us to get an oscillating solution as a wave of the toroidal field propagating from middle latitudes to the equator. We investigated the dynamo model with the meridional circulation by the low-mode approach. This approach is based on an assumption that the solar magnetic field can be described by non-linear dynamical systems with a relatively small number of parameters. Such non-linear dynamical systems are based on the equations of dynamo models. With this method dynamical systems have been built for media which contains the meridional flow and thickness of the convection zone of the star. It was shown the possibility of coexistence of quiasi-biennial and 22-year cycle. We obtained the different regimes (oscillations, vacillations, dynamo-bursts) depending on the value of the dynamo-number, the meridional circulation, and thickness of the convection zone. We discuss the features of these regimes and compare them with the observed features of evolution of the solar and geo magnetic fields. We built theoretical paleomagnetic time scale and butterfly-diagrams for the helicity and toroidal magnetic field for different regimes.

  2. Modeling 25 years of spatio-temporal surface water and inundation dynamics on large river basin scale using time series of Earth observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimhuber, Valentin; Tulbure, Mirela G.; Broich, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The usage of time series of Earth observation (EO) data for analyzing and modeling surface water extent (SWE) dynamics across broad geographic regions provides important information for sustainable management and restoration of terrestrial surface water resources, which suffered alarming declines and deterioration globally. The main objective of this research was to model SWE dynamics from a unique, statistically validated Landsat-based time series (1986-2011) continuously through cycles of flooding and drying across a large and heterogeneous river basin, the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia. We used dynamic linear regression to model remotely sensed SWE as a function of river flow and spatially explicit time series of soil moisture (SM), evapotranspiration (ET), and rainfall (P). To enable a consistent modeling approach across space, we modeled SWE dynamics separately for hydrologically distinct floodplain, floodplain-lake, and non-floodplain areas within eco-hydrological zones and 10km × 10km grid cells. We applied this spatial modeling framework to three sub-regions of the MDB, for which we quantified independently validated lag times between river gauges and each individual grid cell and identified the local combinations of variables that drive SWE dynamics. Based on these automatically quantified flow lag times and variable combinations, SWE dynamics on 233 (64 %) out of 363 floodplain grid cells were modeled with a coefficient of determination (r2) greater than 0.6. The contribution of P, ET, and SM to the predictive performance of models differed among the three sub-regions, with the highest contributions in the least regulated and most arid sub-region. The spatial modeling framework presented here is suitable for modeling SWE dynamics on finer spatial entities compared to most existing studies and applicable to other large and heterogeneous river basins across the world.

  3. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Lammert; Bergsma, Aldo; Chuma, Beatus; de Bruin, Sytze

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources.

  4. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytze de Bruin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS. A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources.

  5. Early evolution and dynamics of Earth from a molten initial stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louro Lourenço, Diogo; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    It is now well established that most of the terrestrial planets underwent a magma ocean stage during their accretion. On Earth, it is probable that at the end of accretion, giant impacts like the hypothesised Moon-forming impact, together with other sources of heat, melted a substantial part of the mantle. The thermal and chemical evolution of the resulting magma ocean most certainly had dramatic consequences on the history of the planet. Considerable research has been done on magma oceans using simple 1-D models (e.g.: Abe, PEPI 1997; Solomatov, Treat. Geophys. 2007; Elkins-Tanton EPSL 2008). However, some aspects of the dynamics may not be adequately addressed in 1-D and require the use of 2-D or 3-D models. Moreover, new developments in mineral physics that indicate that melt can be denser than solid at high pressures (e.g.: de Koker et al., EPSL 2013) can have very important impacts on the classical views of the solidification of magma oceans (Labrosse et al., Nature 2007). The goal of our study is to understand and characterize the influence of melting on the long-term thermo-chemical evolution of rocky planet interiors, starting from an initial molten state (magma ocean). Our approach is to model viscous creep of the solid mantle, while parameterizing processes that involve melt as previously done in 1-D models, including melt-solid separation at all melt fractions, the use of an effective diffusivity to parameterize turbulent mixing, coupling to a parameterized core heat balance and a radiative surface boundary condition. These enhancements have been made to the numerical code StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). We present results for the evolution of an Earth-like planet from a molten initial state to present day, while testing the effect of uncertainties in parameters such as melt-solid density differences, surface heat loss and efficiency of turbulent mixing. Our results show rapid cooling and crystallization until the rheological transition then much slower

  6. Mathematical analysis of a viscoelastic-gravitational layered earth model for magmatic intrusion in the dynamic case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Arjona

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. It makes necessary to consider inelastic properties in deformation modelling. As a continuation of work done previously by some of the authors, this work is concerned with the proof that the perturbed equations representing the viscoelastic-gravitational displacements resulting from body forces embedded in a layered Earth model leads to a well-posed problem even for any kind of domains, with the natural boundary and transmission conditions. A homogeneous or stratified viscoelastic half-space has often been used as a simple earth model to calculate the displacements and gravity changes. Here we give a constructive proof of the existence of weak solutions and we show the uniqueness and the continuous dependence with respect to the initial data of weak solutions of the dynamic coupled viscoelastic-gravitational field equations.

  7. Modelling Earth's surface topography: Decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, M.; Cammarano, F.; Tackley, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    . Considering chemical heterogeneities in correspondence with the lower mantle Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) helps to decrease the peak-to-peak amplitudes of dynamic topography and geoid, but significantly reduces the correlation between synthetic and observed geoid. The correlation coefficients between all our residual and dynamic topography maps (a total of 220 and 198, respectively) is <0.55 (average = ∼0.19). The correlation slightly improves when considering only the very long-wavelength components of the maps (average = ∼0.23). We therefore conclude that a robust determination of dynamic topography is not feasible since current uncertainties affecting crustal density, mantle density and mantle viscosity are still too large. A truly interdisciplinary approach, combining constraints from the geological record with a multi-methodological interpretation of geophysical observations, is required to tackle the challenging task of linking the surface topography to deep processes.

  8. DREAM4: Combining genetic and dynamic information to identify biological networks and dynamical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Greenfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current technologies have lead to the availability of multiple genomic data types in sufficient quantity and quality to serve as a basis for automatic global network inference. Accordingly, there are currently a large variety of network inference methods that learn regulatory networks to varying degrees of detail. These methods have different strengths and weaknesses and thus can be complementary. However, combining different methods in a mutually reinforcing manner remains a challenge. METHODOLOGY: We investigate how three scalable methods can be combined into a useful network inference pipeline. The first is a novel t-test-based method that relies on a comprehensive steady-state knock-out dataset to rank regulatory interactions. The remaining two are previously published mutual information and ordinary differential equation based methods (tlCLR and Inferelator 1.0, respectively that use both time-series and steady-state data to rank regulatory interactions; the latter has the added advantage of also inferring dynamic models of gene regulation which can be used to predict the system's response to new perturbations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our t-test based method proved powerful at ranking regulatory interactions, tying for first out of methods in the DREAM4 100-gene in-silico network inference challenge. We demonstrate complementarity between this method and the two methods that take advantage of time-series data by combining the three into a pipeline whose ability to rank regulatory interactions is markedly improved compared to either method alone. Moreover, the pipeline is able to accurately predict the response of the system to new conditions (in this case new double knock-out genetic perturbations. Our evaluation of the performance of multiple methods for network inference suggests avenues for future methods development and provides simple considerations for genomic experimental design. Our code is publicly available at http://err.bio.nyu.edu/inferelator/.

  9. Down Converter Device Combining Rare-Earth Doped Thin Layer and Photonic Crystal for c-Si Based Solar Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Deschamps, Thierry; Peretti, Romain; Lalouat, Loïc; Fourmond, Erwann; Fave, Alain; Guille, Antoine; Pereira, António; Moine, Bernard; Seassal, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop ultra-compact structures enabling an efficient conversion of single high energy photon (UV) to two lower energy photons (IR). The proposed structure combines rare-earths doped thin layer allowing the down-conversion process with a photonic crystal (PhC), in order to control and enhance the down-conversion using optical resonances. On the top of the rare-earths doped layer, a silicon nitride (SiN) 2D planar PhC is synthesized. For that, SiN is first deposited by PECVD. After holographic lithography and reactive ion etching, a periodic square lattice of holes is generated on the SiN layer. The PhC topographical parameters as well as the layers thickness are optimized using Finite-Difference-Time-Domain simulations. The design and realization of such PhC-assisted down-converter structures is presented. Optical simulations demonstrate that the PhC leads to the establishment of resonant modes located in the underneath doped layer, allowing a drastic enhancement of the absorption ...

  10. Separating iterative solution model of generalized nonlinear dynamic least squares for data processing in building of digital earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶华学; 郭金运

    2003-01-01

    Data coming from different sources have different types and temporal states. Relations between one type of data and another ones, or between data and unknown parameters are almost nonlinear. It is not accurate and reliable to process the data in building the digital earth with the classical least squares method or the method of the common nonlinear least squares. So a generalized nonlinear dynamic least squares method was put forward to process data in building the digital earth. A separating solution model and the iterative calculation method were used to solve the generalized nonlinear dynamic least squares problem. In fact, a complex problem can be separated and then solved by converting to two sub-problems, each of which has a single variable. Therefore the dimension of unknown parameters can be reduced to its half, which simplifies the original high dimensional equations.

  11. Dynamics of a combined Medea-underdominant population transformation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Chaitanya S; Reeves, Richard Guy; Reed, Floyd A

    2014-05-07

    Transgenic constructs intended to be stably established at high frequencies in wild populations have been demonstrated to "drive" from low frequencies in experimental insect populations. Linking such population transformation constructs to genes which render them unable to transmit pathogens could eventually be used to stop the spread of vector-borne diseases like malaria and dengue. Generally, population transformation constructs with only a single transgenic drive mechanism have been envisioned. Using a theoretical modelling approach we describe the predicted properties of a construct combining autosomal Medea and underdominant population transformation systems. We show that when combined they can exhibit synergistic properties which in broad circumstances surpass those of the single systems. With combined systems, intentional population transformation and its reversal can be achieved readily. Combined constructs also enhance the capacity to geographically restrict transgenic constructs to targeted populations. It is anticipated that these properties are likely to be of particular value in attracting regulatory approval and public acceptance of this novel technology.

  12. Constraining proposed combinations of ice history and Earth rheology using VLBI determined baseline length rates in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Davis, J. L.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1993-01-01

    We predict the present-day rates of change of the lengths of 19 North American baselines due to the glacial isostatic adjustment process. Contrary to previously published research, we find that the three dimensional motion of each of the sites defining a baseline, rather than only the radial motions of these sites, needs to be considered to obtain an accurate estimate of the rate of change of the baseline length. Predictions are generated using a suite of Earth models and late Pleistocene ice histories, these include specific combinations of the two which have been proposed in the literature as satisfying a variety of rebound related geophysical observations from the North American region. A number of these published models are shown to predict rates which differ significantly from the VLBI observations.

  13. Combining Facial Dynamics With Appearance for Age Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibeklioğlu, H.; Alnajar, F.; Salah, A.A.; Gevers, T.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the age of a human from the captured images of his/her face is a challenging problem. In general, the existing approaches to this problem use appearance features only. In this paper, we show that in addition to appearance information, facial dynamics can be leveraged in age estimation. We

  14. Biogeophysical feedbacks enhance Arctic terrestrial carbon sink in regional Earth system dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Continued warming of the Arctic will likely accelerate terrestrial carbon (C cycling by increasing both uptake and release of C. There are still large uncertainties in modelling Arctic terrestrial ecosystems as a source or sink of C. Most modelling studies assessing or projecting the future fate of C exchange with the atmosphere are based an either stand-alone process-based models or coupled climate–C cycle general circulation models, in either case disregarding biogeophysical feedbacks of land surface changes to the atmosphere. To understand how biogeophysical feedbacks will impact on both climate and C budget over Arctic terrestrial ecosystems, we apply the regional Earth system model RCA-GUESS over the CORDEX-Arctic domain. The model is forced with lateral boundary conditions from an GCMs CMIP5 climate projection under the RCP 8.5 scenario. We perform two simulations with or without interactive vegetation dynamics respectively to assess the impacts of biogeophysical feedbacks. Both simulations indicate that Arctic terrestrial ecosystems will continue to sequester C with an increased uptake rate until 2060s–2070s, after which the C budget will return to a weak C sink as increased soil respiration and biomass burning outpaces increased net primary productivity. The additional C sinks arising from biogeophysical feedbacks are considerable, around 8.5 Gt C, accounting for 22% of the total C sinks, of which 83.5% are located in areas of Arctic tundra. Two opposing feedback mechanisms, mediated by albedo and evapotranspiration changes respectively, contribute to this response. Albedo feedback dominates over winter and spring season, amplifying the near-surface warming by up to 1.35 K in spring, while evapotranspiration feedback dominates over summer exerting the evaporative cooling by up to 0.81 K. Such feedbacks stimulate vegetation growth with an earlier onset of growing-season, leading to compositional changes in woody plants and vegetation

  15. GRACE, time-varying gravity, Earth system dynamics and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, B.; Bonin, J.A.; Chambers, D.P.; Riva, R.E.M.; Sasgen, I.; Wahr, J.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous observations of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field have recently become available at an unprecedented resolution of a few hundreds of kilometers. The gravity field is a product of the Earth's mass distribution, and these data—provided by the satellites of the Gravity Recover

  16. Dynamic probability evaluation of safety levels of earth-rockfill dams using Bayesian approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-wu FAN; Shu-hai JIANG; Ming ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    In order to accurately predict and control the aging process of dams, new information should be collected continuously to renew the quantitative evaluation of dam safety levels. Owing to the complex structural characteristics of dams, it is quite difficult to predict the time-varying factors affecting their safety levels. It is not feasible to employ dynamic reliability indices to evaluate the actual safety levels of dams. Based on the relevant regulations for dam safety classification in China, a dynamic probability description of dam safety levels was developed. Using the Bayesian approach and effective information mining, as well as real-time information, this study achieved more rational evaluation and prediction of dam safety levels. With the Bayesian expression of discrete stochastic variables, the a priori probabilities of the dam safety levels determined by experts were combined with the likelihood probability of the real-time check information, and the probability information for the evaluation of dam safety levels was renewed. The probability index was then applied to dam rehabilitation decision-making. This method helps reduce the difficulty and uncertainty of the evaluation of dam safety levels and complies with the current safe decision-making regulations for dams in China. It also enhances the application of current risk analysis methods for dam safety levels.

  17. Combined effect of successive competition periods on population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Anazawa, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of competition between individuals on population dynamics when they compete for different resources during different seasons or during different growth stages. Individuals are assumed to compete for a single resource during each of these periods according to one of the following competition types: scramble, contest, or an intermediate between the two. The effect of two successive competition periods is determined to be expressed by simple relations on produc...

  18. Assessment of patellar maltracking using combined static and dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.G.; Ostlere, S.J.; Pal, C.; Phillips, A.; Reid, H. [Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington, Oxford OX3 9JW (United Kingdom); Dodd, C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington, Oxford OX3 9JW (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    Between January 1995 and Jul 1997, 474 patients with anterior knee pain resistant to conservative treatment were referred for MR of the knee. The MR examination consisted of routine sequences with an additional patellofemoral dynamic examination using a technique that has been developed at this institution. The dynamic study examines both knees simultaneously, with the patient supine and the quadriceps loaded. No gating or restraint apparatus is needed. Patellar subluxation or tilt was present in 188(40%) of cases, bilateral in 104 and unilateral in 84 cases (right 39, left 45). It was classified as mild in 51%, moderate in 39% and severe in 10%. Subluxation was more prevalent in females than males (42% vs. 37%) and this was most obvious in the severe group where 68% were female. In 90 knees selected at random, four measurements of patellofemoral morphology were obtained using reconstructed images from a volume gradient echo sequence. These measurements were correlated with the degree of subluxation or tilt. A tibial tubercle distance greater than 20 mm, a femoral sulcus angle greater than 150 degrees, sulcus depth less than 4 mm were specific for subluxation but no measurement proved to be sufficiently sensitive to preclude a tracking study. MRI can be used to define more precisely the anatomy of the extensor mechanism and its relationship to the femur and tibia, in both a static and dynamic setting. In this way, patients with anterior knee pain can be classified more accurately and the outcomes of treatment more reliably assessed. (orig.)

  19. The role of dynamics on the habitability of an Earth-like planet

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat-Lohinger, E

    2015-01-01

    From the numerous detected planets outside the Solar system, no terrestrial planet comparable to our Earth has been discovered so far. The search for an Exo-Earth is certainly a big challenge which may require the detections of planetary systems resembling our Solar system in order to find life like on Earth. However, even if we find Solar system analogues, it is not certain that a planet in Earth position will have similar circumstances as those of Earth. Small changes in the architecture of the giant planets can lead to orbital perturbations which may change the conditions of habitability for a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone (HZ). We present a numerical investigation where we first study the motion of test-planets in a particular Jupiter-Saturn configuration for which we can expect strong gravitational perturbations on the motion at Earth position according to a previous work. In this study, we show that these strong perturbations can be reduced significantly by the neighboring planets of Earth. I...

  20. Development, Deployment, and Assessment of Dynamic Geological and Geophysical Models Using the Google Earth APP and API: Implications for Undergraduate Education in the Earth and Planetary Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Gobert, J.

    2009-12-01

    We previously reported on innovative techniques for presenting data on virtual globes such as Google Earth using emergent Collada models that reveal subsurface geology and geophysics. We here present several new and enhanced models and linked lesson plans to aid deployment in undergraduate geoscience courses, along with preliminary results from our assessment of their effectiveness. The new Collada models are created with Google SketchUp, Bonzai3D, and MeshLab software, and are grouped to cover (i) small scale field mapping areas; (ii) regional scale studies of the North Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Appalachian Orogen, and the Pacific Ring of Fire; and (iii) global scale studies of terrestrial planets, moons, and asteroids. Enhancements include emergent block models with three-dimensional surface topography; models that conserve structural orientation data; interactive virtual specimens; models that animate plate movements on the virtual globe; exploded 3-D views of planetary mantles and cores; and server-generated dynamic KML. We tested volunteer students and professors using Silverback monitoring software, think-aloud verbalizations, and questionnaires designed to assess their understanding of the underlying geo-scientific phenomena. With the aid of a cohort of instructors across the U.S., we are continuing to assess areas in which users encounter difficulties with both the software and geoscientific concepts. Preliminary results suggest that it is easy to overestimate the computer expertise of novice users even when they are content knowledge experts (i.e., instructors), and that a detailed introduction to virtual globe manipulation is essential before moving on to geoscience applications. Tasks that seem trivial to developers may present barriers to non-technical users and technicalities that challenge instructors may block adoption in the classroom. We have developed new models using the Google Earth API which permits enhanced interaction and dynamic feedback and

  1. Core Analysis Combining MT (TIPPER) and Dielectric Sensors (Sans EC) in Earth and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mound, Michael C.; Dudley, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    On terrestrial planets and moons of our solar system cores reveal details about a geological structure's formation, content, and history. The strategy for the search for life is focused first on finding water which serves as a universal solvent, and identifying the rocks which such solvent act upon to release the constituent salts, minerals, ferrites, and organic compounds and chemicals necessary for life. Dielectric spectroscopy measures the dielectric properties of a medium as a function of frequency. Reflection measurements in the frequency range from 300 kHz to 300 MHz were carried out using RF and microwave network analyzers interrogating SansEC Sensors placed on clean geological core samples. These were conducted to prove the concept feasibility of a new geology instrument useful in the field and laboratory. The results show that unique complex frequency spectra can be acquired for a variety of rock core samples. Using a combination of dielectric spectroscopy and computer simulation techniques the magnitude and phase information of the frequency spectra can be converted to dielectric spectra. These low-frequency dielectric properties of natural rock are unique, easily determined, and useful in characterizing geology. TIPPER is an Electro-Magnetic Passive-Source Geophysical Method for Detecting and Mapping Geothermal Reservoirs and Mineral Resources. This geophysical method uses distant lightning and solar wind activity as its energy source. The most interesting deflections are caused by the funneling of electrons into more electrically conductive areas like mineralized faults, water or geothermal reservoirs. We propose TIPPER to be used with SansEC for determining terrain/ocean chemistry, ocean depth, geomorphology of fracture structures, and other subsurface topography characteristics below the ice crust of Jovian moons. NASA envisions lander concepts for exploration of these extraterrestrial icy surfaces and the oceans beneath. One such concept would use a

  2. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkun, Yaman; Gur, Mert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD). In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG) protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  3. V-type Near-Earth asteroids: dynamics, close encounters and impacts with terrestrial planets

    CERN Document Server

    Galiazzo, M A; Bancelin, D

    2016-01-01

    Asteroids colliding with planets vary in composition and taxonomical type. Among Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) are the V-types, basaltic asteroids that are classified via spectroscopic observations. In this work, we study the probability of V-type NEAs colliding with Earth, Mars and Venus, as well as the Moon. We perform a correlational analysis of possible craters produced by V-type NEAs. To achieve this, we performed numerical simulations and statistical analysis of close encounters and impacts between V-type NEAs and the terrestrial planets over the next 10 Myr. We find that V-type NEAs can indeed have impacts with all the planets, the Earth in particular, at an average rate of once per 12 Myr. There are four candidate craters on Earth that were likely caused by V-type NEAs.

  4. Combination ultracapacitor-battery performance dependence on drive cycle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John M.; Deshpande, Uday [Maxwell Technologies, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Dougherty, Thomas J. [Monolith Engines, Inc., Waukesha, WI (United States); Bohn, Thedore P. [Argonne National Lab. (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Automotive performance and economy assessments are generally made using the UDDS, urban dynamometer drive schedule, to quantify vehicle attributes against a cycle representative of how individuals actually drive. But how does selection of drive cycle influence the sizing and efficiency of the ESS, energy storage system? In this paper three representative driving schedules are used to evaluate the energy storage system current demanded of the ultracapacitors in combination with the lithium-ion battery, but a simpler, more generic electric vehicle drive cycle is used to make the comparisons. The drive cycle current demand is then imposed on the hybridized battery to identify via multi-attribute characterization the trade-offs between ultracapacitor useable energy, voltage window and power electronic converter input current requirement. A value proposition is made that demonstrates that today, using the Maxwell Technologies dry electrode processing technique, Thi{sub c}kFLEX trademark, that energy optimized lithium-ion battery can be realized having substantial cost savings over conventional processing. This cost save in turn becomes the budget for the ultracapacitors and dc-dc converter used to decouple power and energy in the combination energy storage system. Our finding is the Maxwell electrode process enables the cost savings on lithium-ion needed to realize the combined ultracapacitor plus lithium-ion performance goals. (orig.)

  5. Spherical robot of combined type: Dynamics and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Alexander A.; Pivovarova, Elena N.; Ivanova, Tatyana B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with free and controlled motions of a spherical robot of combined type moving by displacing the center of mass and by changing the internal gyrostatic momentum. Equations of motion for the nonholonomic model are obtained and their first integrals are found. Fixed points of the reduced system are found in the absence of control actions. It is shown that they correspond to the motion of the spherical robot in a straight line and in a circle. A control algorithm for the motion of the spherical robot along an arbitrary trajectory is presented. A set of elementary maneuvers (gaits) is obtained which allow one to transfer the spherical robot from any initial point to any end point.

  6. Thermal, dynamic and compositional aspects of the core-forming Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Core formation is the most important and singular differentiation event in the history of a terrestrial planet. It almost certainly involved the downward migration of a partially or wholly molten iron alloy through a silicate and oxide mantle, and was contemporaneous with accretion. Several important, unresolved issues which have implications for mantle and core geochemistry, the thermal history of the Earth, and the origin of geomagnetism are addressed: whether the early Earth was molten; whether core formation involved low or high pressure geochemistry, or both; early Earth mantle homogenization; whether equilibration established between core forming material and the mantle through which it migrated; and how much iron is stranded and unable to reach the core.

  7. Relation between the Electromagnetic Processes in the Near-Earth Space and Dynamics of the Biological Resources in Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L. N.; Shirochkov, A. V.

    It is a well-established fact that the electromagnetic processes of different kind occurring in the near- Earth space produce significant effects in the Earth's atmosphere at all altitudes including the ground surface. There are some indications that these processes could influence at least indirectly the human health conditions. In this study we explore relation between perturbations in the solar wind (dynamics of its density, velocity, intensity of the interplanetary magnetic field) and long- term changes in population of some species of Arctic fauna (lemmings, polar foxes, deers, wolves, elks etc.) It was found out that the best statistical coupling between various Space Weather parameters and the changes in populations of the Arctic fauna species appears when the solar wind dynamic pressure magnitude is taken as one of these parameters. It was shown that the secular variations of the solar UV radiation expressed as the Total Solar Irradiance appears to be a space parameter, showing the best correlation with the changes in population of the Arctic fauna species. Such high correlation coefficients as 0.8 are obtained. It is premature now to discuss exact physical mechanisms, which could explain the obtained relations. A possible mutual dependence of some climatic factors and fauna population in Arctic on the Space Weather parameters is discussed in this connection. Conclusion is made that the electromagnetic fields of space origin is an important factor determining dynamics of population of the Arctic fauna species.

  8. Control of Rhyzopertha dominica in stored rough rice through a combination of diatomaceous earth and varietal resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaowaluk Chanbang; Frank H Arthur; Gerald E. Wilde; James E. Throne

    2008-01-01

    Adults of Rhyzopertha dominica(F.),the lesser grain borer, were exposed on four varieties of rough rice with Dobie indices of susceptibility of 1.1 to 1.1 (low), and four varieties with Dobie indices of susceptibility of 3.4 to 3.8 (high). The varieties with low and high Dobie indices were classified as resistant and susceptible, respectively, to R. dominica.The purpose of the study was to evaluate control of R. dominica through the use of diatomaceous earth (DE) in combination with rice varieties that were either susceptible or resistant to R. dominica. The rice was treated with varying rates of the commercial DE lnsecto(R), up to a maximum of 1000 mg DE/kg of rice. Adult mortality at each application rate of DE was generally greater on three of four resistant varieties compared to three of four susceptible varieties. Progeny production from the parental generation exposed on the rice was also greater in 3 of the 4 resistant varieties compared to 3 of the 4 susceptible varieties at DE rates of 500 mg/kg or more. Progeny production in rice treated with a maximum rate of 1000 mg/kg DE ranged from 7-44 adults on the resistant varieties compared to 75-155adults on the susceptible varieties. At DE rates of 500, 750, and 1000 mg/kg, the percentage of insect-damaged kernels (IDK) was also greater in 3/4 resistant varieties than in the susceptible varieties. Results show combining the use of DE with varietal resistance of rough rice to R. dominica could be used to limit populations of this insect in stored rice and help prevent economic damage.

  9. Effects of combined thiamethoxam and diatomaceous earth on mortality and progeny production of four Pakistani populations of Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae) on wheat, rice and maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioassays were conducted to evaluate the effects of combining thiamethoxam at 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg with the diatomaceous earth (DE) formulation, SilicoSec, at the rate of 100 mg/kg against four diverse populations of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae) th...

  10. Construction of Hierarchical Models for Fluid Dynamics in Earth and Planetary Sciences : DCMODEL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y. O.; Takehiro, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Odaka, M.; Ishiwatari, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Nishizawa, S.; Ishioka, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    ) is a collection of various sample programs using ``SPML''. These sample programs provide the basekit for simple numerical experiments of geophysical fluid dynamics. For example, SPMODEL includes 1-dimensional KdV equation model, 2-dimensional barotropic, shallow water, Boussinesq models, 3-dimensional MHD dynamo models in rotating spherical shells. These models are written in the common style in harmony with SPML functions. ``Deepconv'' (Sugiyama et al., 2010) and ``Dcpam'' are a cloud resolving model and a general circulation model for the purpose of applications to the planetary atmospheres, respectively. ``Deepconv'' includes several physical processes appropriate for simulations of Jupiter and Mars atmospheres, while ``Dcpam'' does for simulations of Earth, Mars, and Venus-like atmospheres. ``Rdoc-f95'' is a automatic generator of reference manuals of Fortran90/95 programs, which is an extension of ruby documentation tool kit ``rdoc''. It analyzes dependency of modules, functions, and subroutines in the multiple program source codes. At the same time, it can list up the namelist variables in the programs.

  11. Life, death and revival of debris-flow fans on Earth and Mars : fan dynamics and climatic inferences

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, T.

    2016-01-01

    Alluvial fans are ubiquitous landforms in high-relief regions on Earth and Mars. They have a semi-conical shape and are located at the transition between highlands and adjacent basins. Alluvial fans can form by a range of processes including debris flows, which are water-laden masses of soil and rock with volumetric sediment concentrations exceeding 40%. In this thesis, I aim to (1) unravel the formative dynamics of debris-flow fans and, building on these insights, to (2) reconstruct hydrolog...

  12. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  13. Seismic response of earth dams considering dynamic properties of unsaturated zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariyan, M.; Habibagahi, G.; Nikooee, E.

    2016-01-01

    It is conventionally assumed in the analysis and design of earth dams that the soil located above the phreatic line, i.e. the uppermost seepage flow line, is completely dry. However, there is often an unsaturated flow of water through an unsaturated zone above this borderline and variation in

  14. Seismic response of earth dams considering dynamic properties of unsaturated zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariyan, M.; Habibagahi, G.; Nikooee, E.

    2016-01-01

    It is conventionally assumed in the analysis and design of earth dams that the soil located above the phreatic line, i.e. the uppermost seepage flow line, is completely dry. However, there is often an unsaturated flow of water through an unsaturated zone above this borderline and variation in moistu

  15. Assessing the physical nature of near-Earth asteroids through their dynamical histories

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Julio A; Gallardo, Tabaré; Gutiérrez, Jorge N

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a sample of 139 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), defined as those that reach perihelion distances $q 4.8$ au), having Tisserand parameters $2 4.8$ au of cometary origin, but it could be even lower if the NEAs in unstable orbits listed before turn out to be {\\it bona fide} asteroids from the main belt.

  16. Dynamics of Space Particles and Spacecrafts Passing by the Atmosphere of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Martins Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research studies the motion of a particle or a spacecraft that comes from an orbit around the Sun, which can be elliptic or hyperbolic, and that makes a passage close enough to the Earth such that it crosses its atmosphere. The idea is to measure the Sun-particle two-body energy before and after this passage in order to verify its variation as a function of the periapsis distance, angle of approach, and velocity at the periapsis of the particle. The full system is formed by the Sun, the Earth, and the particle or the spacecraft. The Sun and the Earth are in circular orbits around their center of mass and the motion is planar for all the bodies involved. The equations of motion consider the restricted circular planar three-body problem with the addition of the atmospheric drag. The initial conditions of the particle or spacecraft (position and velocity are given at the periapsis of its trajectory around the Earth.

  17. Chemo-dynamical deuterium fractionation in the early solar nebula: The origin of water on Earth and in asteroids and comets

    CERN Document Server

    Albertsson, T; Henning, Th

    2014-01-01

    Formation and evolution of water in the Solar System and the origin of water on Earth constitute one of the most interesting questions in astronomy. The prevailing hypothesis for the origin of water on Earth is by delivery through water-rich small Solar system bodies. In this paper, the isotopic and chemical evolution of water during the early history of the solar nebula, before the onset of planetesimal formation, is studied. A gas-grain chemical model that includes multiply-deuterated species and nuclear spin-states is combined with a steady-state solar nebula model. To calculate initial abundances, we simulated 1 Myr of evolution of a cold and dark TMC1-like prestellar core. Two time-dependent chemical models of the solar nebula are calculated over 1 Myr: (1) a laminar model and (2) a model with 2D turbulent mixing. We find that the radial outward increase of the H2O D/H ratio is shallower in the chemo-dynamical nebular model compared to the laminar model. This is related to more efficient de-fractionation...

  18. High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets 1: terrestrial accretion and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Raymond, S N; Lunine, J I; Raymond, Sean N.; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2005-01-01

    The final stage in the formation of terrestrial planets consists of the accumulation of ~1000-km ``planetary embryos'' and a swarm of billions of 1-10 km ``planetesimals.'' During this process, water-rich material is accreted by the terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies from beyond roughly 2.5 AU. We present results from five high-resolution dynamical simulations. These start from 1000-2000 embryos and planetesimals, roughly 5-10 times more particles than in previous simulations. Each simulation formed 2-4 terrestrial planets with masses between 0.4 and 2.6 Earth masses. The eccentricities of most planets were ~0.05, lower than in previous simulations, but still higher than for Venus, Earth and Mars. Each planet accreted at least the Earth's current water budget. We demonstrate several new aspects of the accretion process: 1) The feeding zones of terrestrial planets change in time, widening and moving outward. Even in the presence of Jupiter, water-rich material from beyond 2.5 AU is not accret...

  19. Is Earth F**ked? Dynamical Futility of Global Environmental Management and Possibilities for Sustainability via Direct Action Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    wErnEr, B.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental challenges are dynamically generated within the dominant global culture principally by the mismatch between short-time-scale market and political forces driving resource extraction/use and longer-time-scale accommodations of the Earth system to these changes. Increasing resource demand is leading to the development of two-way, nonlinear interactions between human societies and environmental systems that are becoming global in extent, either through globalized markets and other institutions or through coupling to global environmental systems such as climate. These trends are further intensified by dissipation-reducing technological advances in transactions, communication and transport, which suppress emergence of longer-time-scale economic and political levels of description and facilitate long-distance connections, and by predictive environmental modeling, which strengthens human connections to a short-time-scale virtual Earth, and weakens connections to the longer time scales of the actual Earth. Environmental management seeks to steer fast scale economic and political interests of a coupled human-environmental system towards longer-time-scale consideration of benefits and costs by operating within the confines of the dominant culture using a linear, engineering-type connection to the system. Perhaps as evidenced by widespread inability to meaningfully address such global environmental challenges as climate change and soil degradation, nonlinear connections reduce the ability of managers to operate outside coupled human-environmental systems, decreasing their effectiveness in steering towards sustainable interactions and resulting in managers slaved to short-to-intermediate-term interests. In sum, the dynamics of the global coupled human-environmental system within the dominant culture precludes management for stable, sustainable pathways and promotes instability. Environmental direct action, resistance taken from outside the dominant culture, as in

  20. Static and Dynamic Structure Factors with Account of the Ion Structure for High-temperature Alkali and Alkaline Earth Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykova, S P; Tkachenko, I M

    2010-01-01

    The $e-e$, $e-i$, $i-i$ and charge-charge static structure factors are calculated for alkali and Be$^{2+}$ plasmas using the method described by Gregori et al. in \\cite{bibGreg2006}. The dynamic structure factors for alkali plasmas are calculated using the method of moments \\cite{bibAdam83}, \\cite{bibAdam93}. In both methods the screened Hellmann-Gurskii-Krasko potential, obtained on the basis of Bogolyubov's method, has been used taking into account not only the quantum-mechanical effects but also the ion structure \\cite{bib73}. PACS: 52.27.Aj (Alkali and alkaline earth plasmas, Static and dynamic structure factors), 52.25.Kn (Thermodynamics of plasmas), 52.38.Ph (X-ray scattering)

  1. On Flare-CME Characteristics from Sun to Earth Combining Remote-Sensing Image Data with In Situ Measurements Supported by Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the well-observed flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from 1 October 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of effects - from Sun to Earth - to better understand the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere associated with the flare and CME using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based instruments. We also track the CME signature off-limb with combined extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white-light data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). By applying the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) reconstruction method and total mass to stereoscopic STEREO-SOHO ( Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in the interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the magnetic cloud (MC) from in situ measurements from Wind. This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results, as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We find that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are lower in the interplanetary space by ˜ 50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating an erosion process. A CME mass increase of 10% is observed over a range of {˜} 4 - 20 R_{⊙}. The temporal evolution of the CME

  2. Dynamical analysis on the transitivity of Jupiter Family Comets to Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erece, Orhan; Aslan, Gürkan; Eker, Zeki; Kaplan, Murat

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the contribution of JFC (Jupiter Family Comet) population to NEA (Near-Earth Asteroid) region by integrating their orbits forward in time. To test and compare the statistics we also integrated NEAs having Tisserand parameters from 2 to 3 and their clones backward in time. As a result, 31.9% of orbits turned out to be Earth-crossing orbits for forward integrations while 66.7% of NEAs reached JFC region for backward integrations. From another point of view, when the number of chosen body population is considered; 304 JFC region body is possibly going to reach NEA orbits, 254 NEA region body look like come from JFC region in a comparable time interval. These results substantially support each other.

  3. Effect of spacer layer on the magnetization dynamics of permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chen, E-mail: ronanluochen@gmail.com; Yin, Yuli; Zhang, Dong; Jiang, Sheng; Yue, Jinjin; Zhai, Ya, E-mail: yazhai@seu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-05-07

    The permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers with different types (Gd and Nd) and thicknesses of spacer layer are investigated using frequency dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements at room temperature, which shows different behaviors with different rare earth spacer layers. By fitting the frequency dependence of the FMR resonance field and linewidth, we find that the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy retains its value for all samples, the perpendicular anisotropy remains almost unchanged for different thickness of Gd layer but the values are tailored by different thicknesses of Nd layer. The Gilbert damping is almost unchanged with different thicknesses of Gd; however, the Gilbert damping is significantly enhanced from 8.4×10{sup −3} to 20.1×10{sup −3} with 6 nm of Nd and then flatten out when the Nd thickness rises above 6 nm.

  4. New Synthetic Biology Tools to Track Microbial Dynamics in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Cheng, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Microbes drive processes in the Earth system far exceeding their physical scale, mediating significant fluxes in the global C and N cycles. The tools of synthetic biology have the potential to significantly improve our understanding of microbes' role in the Earth system; however, these tools have not yet seen wide laboratory use because synthetically "programmed" microbes typically report by fluorescing (expressing green fluorescent protein), making them challenging to deploy into many Earth materials, the majority of which are not transparent and are heterogeneous (soils, sediments, and biomass). We are developing a new suite of biosensors that report instead by releasing gases. We will provide an overview of the use of gas-reporting biosensors in biogeochemistry and will report the development of the systematics of these sensors. These sensors will make tractable the testing of gene expression hypotheses derived from metagenomics data. Examples of processes that could be tracked non-invasively with gas sensors include coordination of biofilm formation, nitrification, rhizobial infection of plant roots, and at least some forms of methanogenesis, all of which are managed by an easily-engineered cell-cell communication system. Another relatively simple process to track with gas sensors is horizontal gene transfer. Successful development of gas biosensors for Earth science applications will require addressing issues including: engineering the intensity and selectivity of microbial gas production to maximize the signal to noise using the tools of synthetic biology; normalizing the gas reporter signal to cell population size, since the number of cells and gene expression both contribute to gas production; managing gas diffusion effects on signal shape; and developing multiple gases that can be used in parallel to report on multiple biological processes in parallel. We will report on progress addressing each of these issues.

  5. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  6. Dynamical Effects on the Habitable Zone for Earth-like Exomoons

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    With the detection of extrasolar moons (exomoons) on the horizon, it is important to consider their potential for habitability. If we consider the circumstellar Habitable Zone (HZ, often described in terms of planet semi-major axis and orbital eccentricity), we can ask, "How does the HZ for an Earth-like exomoon differ from the HZ for an Earth-like exoplanet?" For the first time, we use 1D latitudinal energy balance modelling to address this question. The model places an Earth-like exomoon in orbit around a Jupiter mass planet, which in turn orbits a Sun-like star. The exomoon's surface temperature is evolved under the action of stellar insolation, atmospheric cooling, heat diffusion, eclipses and tidal heating. We use this model to carry out two separate investigations. In the first, four test cases are run to investigate in detail the dependence of the exomoon climate on orbital direction, orbital inclination, and on the frequency of stellar eclipse by the host planet. We find that lunar orbits which are re...

  7. Fifty years dynamics of Russian forests: Impacts on the earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvidenko, Anatoly; Schepaschenko, Dmitry; Kraxner, Florian

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents a succinct history of Russian forests during the time period of 1960-2010 and reanalysis of their impacts on global carbon and nitrogen cycles. We present dynamics of land cover change (including major categories of forest land) and biometric characteristics of forests (species composition, age structure, growing stock volume etc.) based on reconciling all relevant information (data of forest and land inventories, official forest management statistics, multi-sensor remote sensing products, data of forest pathological monitoring etc.). Completeness and reliability of background information was different during the period of the study. Forest inventory data and official statistics were partially modified based on relevant auxiliary information and used for 1960-2000. The analysis for 2001-2010 was provided with a crucial use of multi-sensor remote sensing data. For this last period a hybrid forest mask was developed at resolution of 230m by integration of 8 remote sensing products and using geographical weighted regression and data of crowdsourcing. During the considered 50 years forested areas of Russia substantially increased by middle of 1990s and slightly declined (at about 5%) after. Indicators needed for assessment of carbon and nitrogen cycles of forest ecosystems were defined for the entire period (aggregated estimates by decades for 1960-2000 and yearly for 2001-2010) based on unified methodology with some peculiarities following from availability of information. Major results were obtained by landscape-ecosystem method that uses as comprehensive as possible empirical and semi-empirical information on ecosystems and landscapes in form of an Integrated Land Information System and complimentary combines pool- and flux-based methods. We discuss and quantify major drivers of forest cover change (socio-economic, environmental and climatic) including forest management (harvest, reforestation and afforestation), impacts of seasonal weather on

  8. A dynamically-packed planetary system around GJ667C with three super-Earths in its habitable zone

    CERN Document Server

    Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Gerlach, Enrico; Barnes, Rory; Heller, René; Jenkins, James S; Wende, Sebastian; Vogt, Steven S; Butler, R Paul; Reiners, Ansgar; Jones, Hugh R A

    2013-01-01

    Since low-mass stars have low luminosities, orbits at which liquid water can exist on Earth-sized planets are relatively close-in, which produces Doppler signals that are detectable using state-of-the-art Doppler spectroscopy. GJ 667C is already known to be orbited by two super-Earth candidates. We investigate whether the data supports the presence of additional companions. We obtain new Doppler measurements from HARPS extracted spectra and combined them with those obtained from the PFS and HIRES spectrographs. We used Bayesian and periodogram-based methods to re-assess the number of candidates and evaluated the confidence of each detection. Among other tests, we validated the planet candidates by analyzing correlations of each Doppler signal activity indices and investigate quasi-periodicity. Doppler measurements of GJ 667C are described better by six Keplerian-like signals: the two known candidates (b and c); three additional few-Earth mass candidates with periods of 92, 62 and 39 days (d, e and f); a cold ...

  9. Revisit of Dynamical Mechanisms of Transporting Asteroids in the 3:1 Resonance to the Near-Earth Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Hui Ji; Lin Liu

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that the asteroids in the main belt trapped in the 3:1 Mean Motion Resonance (MMR) with Jupiter (at semi-major axes ~2.5 AU) are few in number, forming one of the so-called Kirkwood Gaps. Wisdom pointed out that chaotic motion of such asteroids can increase their eccentricities and make them approach and cross the orbit of Mars (or even the Earth). We numerically investigated the orbital evolution of the asteroids involved in 3:1 MMR (NEOs) over millions of years and revisited the dynamical mechanisms of trasporitng such asteroids into the NEO region. The results show that the dynamical evolution of the asteroids around 2.5 AU is mainly dominated by the 3:1 resonance, the υ5 and υ6 secular resonances and the Kozai resonance, and these bodies can evolve into NEOs through several of the dynamical mechanisms, so indicating possible dynamical origin of the NEOs.

  10. Signal Processing Technique for Combining Numerous MEMS Gyroscopes Based on Dynamic Conditional Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Jieyu Liu; Qiang Shen; Weiwei Qin

    2015-01-01

    A signal processing technique is presented to improve the angular rate accuracy of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) gyroscope by combining numerous gyroscopes. Based on the conditional correlation between gyroscopes, a dynamic data fusion model is established. Firstly, the gyroscope error model is built through Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) process to improve overall performance. Then the conditional covariance obtained through dynamic conditional cor...

  11. Combined-dynamic mode"dip-pen" nanolithography and physically nanopatterning along single DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; WANG Ying; WU Haiping; ZHANG Yi; ZHANG Zhixiang; ZHOU Xingfei; LI Minqian; HU Jun

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force micriscope (AFM)-based dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is an emerging approach for constructing nanostructures on material surfaces such as gold, silicon and silicon oxide. Although DPN is a powerful technique, it has not shown its ability of direct-writing and patterning of nanostructures on surfaces of soft materials, for example biomacromolecules. Direct depositing on soft surfaces becomes possible with the introduction of a combined-dynamic mode DPN rather than mostly used contact mode DPN or tapping mode DPN. In this report, the combined dynamic mode DPN is used for direct depositing protein ink on DNA molecules at the nanometer scale.

  12. A combined analysis of basaltic melting and shear wave velocity anomalies to constrain dynamic support of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöcking, Marthe; White, Nicky; Maclennan, John; Fitton, Godfrey

    2017-04-01

    The region of western North America that encompasses the Basin and Range Province, the Snake River Plain and the Colorado Plateau is about 2 km higher than cratonic North America. This topographic difference broadly coincides with variations in lithospheric thickness (i.e. Mexico, and inverse modeling of regional drainage networks together suggest that this regional uplift occurred during Cenozoic time in at least two discrete phases. Earthquake tomographic models have imaged low velocity material beneath the bulk of western North America, including a ring-shaped anomaly encompassing the Colorado Plateau itself. Basaltic magmatism coincides with these low velocity zones and indicates an overall increase in melt volume at 40 Ma, as well as an abrupt change from lithospheric to asthenospheric signatures at 5 Ma. To investigate the quantitative relationship between seismic velocity anomalies and basaltic magmatism, we have analyzed >260 samples from volcanic centers throughout western North America for major, trace and rare earth elements using ICP-MS and XRF techniques. For asthenospheric samples, we observe a correlation between slow shear wave velocity anomalies and basaltic geochemistry. Using a combination of petrologic observations, forward and inverse modeling of major and rare earth elements, and shear wave velocity anomalies from tomographic models, we determine depth of melting and melt fraction. We explore the possibility that volatiles, anomalous source composition and/or temperature can give rise to basaltic magmatism and regional uplift. We then calculate mantle temperatures from shear wave velocity profiles beneath each volcanic field. In this way, we exploit a variety of approaches to constrain lithospheric thickness and mantle potential temperature. Our combined geochemical and geophysical results yield excess temperatures of 50-80 °C beneath a 60 km thin lithospheric plate. A dynamic topographic model of progressive lithospheric erosion over

  13. Earth system modelling on system-level heterogeneous architectures: EMAC (version 2.42) on the Dynamical Exascale Entry Platform (DEEP)

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Michalis; Christoudias, Theodoros; Morillo, Julián; Alvarez, Damian; Merx, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We examine an alternative approach to heterogeneous cluster-computing in the many-core era for Earth system models, using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg (ECHAM)/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model as a pilot application on the Dynamical Exascale Entry Platform (DEEP). A set of autonomous coprocessors interconnected together, called Booster, complements a conventional HPC Cluster and increases its computing ...

  14. Multi-Mission Earth Vehicle Subsonic Dynamic Stability Testing and Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Fremaux, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of flight. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs for an array of missions and develop and visualize the trade space. Testing in NASA Langley?s Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) was conducted to significantly improve M-SAPE?s subsonic aerodynamic models. Vehicle size and shape can be driven by entry flight path angle and speed, thermal protection system performance, terminal velocity limitations, payload mass and density, among other design parameters. The objectives of the VST testing were to define usable subsonic center of gravity limits, and aerodynamic parameters for 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) simulations, for a range of MMEEV designs. The range of MMEEVs tested was from 1.8m down to 1.2m diameter. A backshell extender provided the ability to test a design with a much larger payload for the 1.2m MMEEV.

  15. Super Earths and Dynamical Stability of Planetary Systems: First Parallel GPU Simulations Using GENGA

    CERN Document Server

    Elser, S; Stadel, J G

    2013-01-01

    We report on the stability of hypothetical Super-Earths in the habitable zone of known multi-planetary systems. Most of them have not yet been studied in detail concerning the existence of additional low-mass planets. The new N-body code GENGA developed at the UZH allows us to perform numerous N-body simulations in parallel on GPUs. With this numerical tool, we can study the stability of orbits of hypothetical planets in the semi-major axis and eccentricity parameter space in high resolution. Massless test particle simulations give good predictions on the extension of the stable region and show that HIP 14180 and HD 37124 do not provide stable orbits in the habitable zone. Based on these simulations, we carry out simulations of 10 Earth mass planets in several systems (HD 11964, HD 47186, HD 147018, HD 163607, HD 168443, HD 187123, HD 190360, HD 217107 and HIP 57274). They provide more exact information about orbits at the location of mean motion resonances and at the edges of the stability zones. Beside the ...

  16. Dynamical Stability of Earth-Like Planetary Orbits in Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    David, E M; Fatuzzo, M; Adams, F C; David, Eva-Marie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Fatuzzo, Marco; Adams, Fred C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the stability of an Earth-like planet orbiting a solar mass star in the presence of an outer-lying intermediate mass companion. The overall goal is to estimate the fraction of binary systems that allow Earth-like planets to remain stable over long time scales. We numerically determine the planet's ejection time $\\tauej$ over a range of companion masses ($M_C$ = 0.001 -- 0.5 $M_\\odot$), orbital eccentricities $\\epsilon$, and semi-major axes $a$. This suite of $\\sim40,000$ numerical experiments suggests that the most important variables are the companion's mass $M_C$ and periastron distance $\\rmin$ = $a(1-\\epsilon)$ to the primary star. At fixed $M_C$, the ejection time is a steeply increasing function of $\\rmin$ over the range of parameter space considered here (although the ejection time has a distribution of values for a given $\\rmin$). Most of the integration times are limited to 10 Myr, but a small set of integrations extend to 500 Myr. For each companion mass, we find fitting formulae ...

  17. A dynamic regrouping based sequential dynamic programming algorithm for unit commitment of combined heat and power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Aiying; Hakonen, Henri; Lahdelma, Risto

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the unit commitment (UC) in multi-period combined heat and power (CHP) production planning under the deregulated power market. In CHP plants (units), generation of heat and power follows joint characteristics, which implies that it is difficult to determine the relative cost...... efficiency of the plants. We introduce in this paper the DRDP-RSC algorithm, which is a dynamic regrouping based dynamic programming (DP) algorithm based on linear relaxation of the ON/OFF states of the units, sequential commitment of units in small groups. Relaxed states of the plants are used to reduce...... the dimension of the UC problem and dynamic regrouping is used to improve the solution quality. Numerical results based on real-life data sets show that this algorithm is efficient and optimal or near-optimal solutions with very small optimality gap are obtained....

  18. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  19. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  20. The hills are alive: Earth surface dynamics in the University of Arizona Landscape Evolution Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, S.; Troch, P. A.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Huxman, T. E.; Pelletier, J. D.; Dontsova, K.; Niu, G.; Chorover, J.; Zeng, X.

    2012-12-01

    To meet the challenge of predicting landscape-scale changes in Earth system behavior, the University of Arizona has designed and constructed a new large-scale and community-oriented scientific facility - the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO). The primary scientific objectives are to quantify interactions among hydrologic partitioning, geochemical weathering, ecology, microbiology, atmospheric processes, and geomorphic change associated with incipient hillslope development. LEO consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1 meter of basaltic tephra ground to homogenous loamy sand and contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. Each ~1000 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation), to facilitate better quantification of evapotraspiration. Each landscape has an engineered rain system that allows application of precipitation at rates between3 and 45 mm/hr. These landscapes are being studied in replicate as "bare soil" for an initial period of several years. After this initial phase, heat- and drought-tolerant vascular plant communities will be introduced. Introduction of vascular plants is expected to change how water, carbon, and energy cycle through the landscapes, with potentially dramatic effects on co-evolution of the physical and biological systems. LEO also provides a physical comparison to computer models that are designed to predict interactions among hydrological, geochemical, atmospheric, ecological and geomorphic processes in changing climates. These computer models will be improved by comparing their predictions to physical measurements made in

  1. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J.L.; Farmer, D.K.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the mod

  2. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    OpenAIRE

    R. Fernandes; F. Braunschweig; Lourenço, F.; R. Neves

    2015-01-01

    The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response) of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable shoreline risk levels from ships has b...

  3. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    OpenAIRE

    R. Fernandes; F. Braunschweig; Lourenço, F.; R. Neves

    2016-01-01

    The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response) of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable individual vessel accident risk levels and shoreline cont...

  4. Development of Dynamic Ellipsometry for Measurements or Iron Conductivity at Earth's Core Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Sean Campbell [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Ao, Tommy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davis, Jean-Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Seagle, Christopher T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Jung-Fu [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bernstein, Aaron [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The CHEDS researchers are engaged in a collaborative research project to study the properties of iron and iron alloys under Earth’s core conditions. The Earth’s core, inner and outer, is composed primarily of iron, thus studying iron and iron alloys at high pressure and temperature conditions will give the best estimate of its properties. Also, comparing studies of iron alloys with known properties of the core can constrain the potential light element compositions found within the core, such as fitting sound speeds and densities of iron alloys to established inner- Earth models. One of the lesser established properties of the core is the thermal conductivity, where current estimates vary by a factor of three. Therefore, one of the primary goals of this collaboration is to make relevant measurements to elucidate this conductivity.

  5. Dynamics of asteroids and near-Earth objects from Gaia Astrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bancelin, D; Thuillot, W

    2016-01-01

    Gaia is an astrometric mission that will be launched in spring 2013. There are many scientific outcomes from this mission and as far as our Solar System is concerned, the satellite will be able to map thousands of main belt asteroids (MBAs) and near-Earth objects (NEOs) down to magnitude < 20. The high precision astrometry (0.3-5 mas of accuracy) will allow orbital improvement, mass determination, and a better accuracy in the prediction and ephemerides of potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). We give in this paper some simulation tests to analyse the impact of Gaia data on known asteroids' orbit, and their value for the analysis of NEOs through the example of asteroid (99942) Apophis. We then present the need for a follow-up network for newly discovered asteroids by Gaia, insisting on the synergy of ground and space data for the orbital improvement.

  6. Bond disproportionation and dynamical charge fluctuations in the perovskite rare-earth nickelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. J.; Haverkort, M. W.; Sawatzky, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present a theory describing the local electronic properties of the perovskite rare-earth nickelates—materials which have negative charge transfer energies, strong O 2 p - Ni 3 d covalence, and breathing-mode lattice distortions at the origin of highly studied metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic ordering transitions. Utilizing a full-orbital, full-correlation double-cluster approach, we find strong charge fluctuations, in agreement with a bond disproportionation interpretation. The double-cluster formulation permits the inclusion of necessary orbital degeneracies and Coulomb interactions to calculate resonant x-ray spectral responses, with which we find excellent agreement with well-established experimental results. This previously absent, crucial link between theory and experiment provides validation of the recently proposed bond disproportionation theory, and provides an analysis methodology for spectroscopic studies of engineered phases of nickelates and other high-valence transition-metal compounds.

  7. Dynamical study of low Earth orbit debris collision avoidance using ground based laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Khalifa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to investigate the orbital velocity changes due to the effect of ground based laser force. The resulting perturbations of semi-major axis, miss distance and collision probability of two approaching objects are studied. The analytical model is applied for low Earth orbit debris of different eccentricities and area to mass ratio and the numerical test shows that laser of medium power ∼5 kW can perform a small change ΔV‾ of an average magnitude of 0.2 cm/s which can be accumulated over time to be about 3 cm/day. Moreover, it is confirmed that applying laser ΔV‾ results in decreasing collision probability and increasing miss distance in order to avoid collision.

  8. Dynamics of Binary Near-Earth Asteroid System (35107) 1991 VH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Shantanu P.; Margot, J. L.; Busch, M. W.; Taylor, P. A.; Nolan, M. C.; Howell, E. S.; Giorgini, J. D.; Benner, L. A. M.; Brozovic, M.; Magri, C.

    2012-05-01

    Near-Earth Asteroid (35107) 1991 VH was discovered to be a binary in March 1997, based on its light-curve (IAUC 6607). It made a very close approach to the Earth in August 2008 at a distance of 0.045 AU. We used this opportunity to secure an extensive radar data set with the Arecibo S-band (2380 MHz, 13 cm wavelength) planetary radar system, including range-Doppler images with spatial resolution as fine as 15 m. The images (spanning 14 days) reveal that the primary is roughly spheroidal with a radius of 650 m. The range extent of the secondary in these images varies from less than 100 m to more than 200 m indicating that it is highly elongated. The radar data provide an excellent determination of the mutual orbit: The orbital period is 32 hours, the eccentricity is 0.05, and the total system mass is 1.5e12 kg. Numerical simulations of the spin of the elongated secondary in this eccentric mutual orbit reveal a large region of chaos in the phase space, similar to that observed in Saturn’s moon Hyperion (Wisdom, Peale, Mignard 1984). The chaotic region surrounds the 1:2, 1:1, 3:2 and 2:1 spin-orbit resonances, but allows for islands of stability around the 1:2 and 1:1 spin-orbit states. The secondary’s echo bandwidths indicate that its spin rate indeed lies within or very close to this chaotic region. To date no acceptable fit to the sequence of secondary images has been found under the assumption of synchronous spin. Saturn’s moon Hyperion is the only solar system object known so far to have a chaotic spin state (Wisdom, Peale, Mignard 1984).

  9. Robust Optimal Design of a Nonlinear Dynamic Vibration Absorber Combining Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Borges

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic vibration absorbers are discrete devices developed in the beginning of the last century used to attenuate the vibrations of different engineering structures. They have been used in several engineering applications, such as ships, power lines, aeronautic structures, civil engineering constructions subjected to seismic induced excitations, compressor systems, etc. However, in the context of nonlinear dynamics, few works have been proposed regarding the robust optimal design of nonlinear dynamic vibration absorbers. In this paper, a robust optimization strategy combined with sensitivity analysis of systems incorporating nonlinear dynamic vibration absorbers is proposed. Although sensitivity analysis is a well known numerical technique, the main contribution intended for this study is its extension to nonlinear systems. Due to the numerical procedure used to solve the nonlinear equations, the sensitivities addressed herein are computed from the first-order finite-difference approximations. With the aim of increasing the efficiency of the nonlinear dynamic absorber into a frequency band of interest, and to augment the robustness of the optimal design, a robust optimization strategy combined with the previous sensitivities is addressed. After presenting the underlying theoretical foundations, the proposed robust design methodology is performed for a two degree-of-freedom system incorporating a nonlinear dynamic vibration absorber. Based on the obtained results, the usefulness of the proposed methodology is highlighted.

  10. Modeling 25 years of spatio-temporal surface water and inundation dynamics on large river basin scale using time series of earth observation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Heimhuber

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The usage of time series of earth observation (EO data for analyzing and modeling surface water dynamics (SWD across broad geographic regions provides important information for sustainable management and restoration of terrestrial surface water resources, which suffered alarming declines and deterioration globally. The main objective of this research was to model SWD from a unique validated Landsat-based time series (1986–2011 continuously through cycles of flooding and drying across a large and heterogeneous river basin, the Murray–Darling Basin (MDB in Australia. We used dynamic linear regression to model remotely sensed SWD as a function of river flow and spatially explicit time series of soil moisture (SM, evapotranspiration (ET and rainfall (P. To enable a consistent modeling approach across space, we modeled SWD separately for hydrologically distinct floodplain, floodplain-lake and non-floodplain areas within eco-hydrological zones and 10 km × 10 km grid cells. We applied this spatial modeling framework (SMF to three sub-regions of the MDB, for which we quantified independently validated lag times between river gauges and each individual grid cell and identified the local combinations of variables that drive SWD. Based on these automatically quantified flow lag times and variable combinations, SWD on 233 (64 % out of 363 floodplain grid cells were modeled with r2 ≥ 0.6. The contribution of P, ET and SM to the models' predictive performance differed among the three sub-regions, with the highest contributions in the least regulated and most arid sub-region. The SMF presented here is suitable for modeling SWD on finer spatial entities compared to most existing studies and applicable to other large and heterogeneous river basins across the world.

  11. Modelling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    . We account for pressure, temperature and compositional effects as inferred by mineral physics to relate seismic velocity with density. Mantle density models are coupled to crustal density distributions obtained with a similar methodology. We compute isostatic topography and associated residual...... topography maps and perform instantaneous mantle flow modelling to calculate the dynamic topography. We explore the effects of proposed mantle 1-D viscosities and also test a 3D pressure- and temperature-dependent viscosity model. We find that the patterns of residual and dynamic topography are robust...... mantle density and viscosity models. These extremely high values would be associated with a magnitude of geoid undulations that is not in agreement with observations. Considering chemical heterogeneities in correspondence with the lower mantle Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) helps...

  12. Modelling the Earth's static and time-varying gravity field using a combination of GRACE and GOCE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is modelling the static and time-varying parts of the Earth's gravity field at the global scale based on data acquired by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In addition, a new

  13. Modelling the Earth's static and time-varying gravity field using a combination of GRACE and GOCE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of the thesis is modelling the static and time-varying parts of the Earth's gravity field at the global scale based on data acquired by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE). In addition, a new methodol

  14. Control of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) in stored rough rice through a combination of diatomaceous earth and varietal resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), the lesser grain borer, were exposed on four varieties of rough rice each with low (Jupiter, Bengal, Wells, Progue) and high (Rico, M-205, Akita, and Cocodrie) Dobie indices of susceptibility, and treated with varying rates of the commercial diatomaceous earth (D...

  15. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS FOR THE DISCRETE PARTICLE MODEL BY DISTINCT ELEMENT METHOD : APPLICATION TO CALCULATION OF COEFFICIENT OF EARTH PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    大西, 泰史

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform to earth pressure coefficient calculation simulation using the Distinct Element Method (DEM). Earth pressure theory has been established since long ago and is still in use. Therefore, simulation based on Coulomb and Rankine's theory of earth pressure is carried out to confirm usability of DEM. As a result of the static earth pressure coefficient calculation simulation, good results were obtained. However, in the passive earth pressure coefficient calcul...

  16. Meteoric cosmogenic Beryllium-10 adsorbed to river sediment and soil: Applications for Earth-surface dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall scavenges meteoric cosmogenic 10Be from the atmosphere. 10Be falls to the Earth's surface, where it binds tightly to sediment particles in non-acidic soils over the life-span of those soils. As such, meteoric 10Be has the potential to be an excellent geochemical tracer of erosion and stability of surfaces in a diverse range of natural settings. Meteoric 10Be has great potential as a recorder of first-order erosion rates and soil residence times. Even though this tracer was first developed in the late 1980s and showed great promise as a geomorphic tool, it was sidelined in the past two decades with the rise of the "sister nuclide", in situ10Be, which is produced at a known rate inside quartz minerals. Since these early days, substantial progress has been made in several areas that now shed new light on the applicability of the meteoric variety of this cosmogenic nuclide. Here, we revisit the potential of this tracer and we summarize the progress: (1) the atmospheric production and fallout is now described by numeric models, and agrees with present-day measurements and paleo-archives such as from rain and ice cores; (2) short-term fluctuations in solar modulation of cosmic rays or in the delivery of 10Be are averaged out over the time scale soils accumulate; (3) in many cases, the delivery of 10Be is not dependent on the amount of precipitation; (4) we explore where 10Be is retained in soils and sediment; (5) we suggest a law to account for the strong grain-size dependence that controls adsorption and the measured nuclide concentrations; and (6) we present a set of algebraic expressions that allows calculation of both soil or sediment ages and erosion rates from the inventory of meteoric 10Be distributed through a vertical soil column. The mathematical description is greatly simplified if the accumulation of 10Be is at a steady state with its export through erosion. In this case, a surface sample allows for the calculation of an erosion rate. Explored

  17. Frontiers in Geomorphometry and Earth Surface Dynamics: possibilities, limitations and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofia, Giulia; Hillier, John K.; Conway, Susan J.

    2016-09-01

    Geomorphometry, the science of quantitative land-surface analysis, has become a flourishing interdisciplinary subject, with applications in numerous fields. The interdisciplinarity of geomorphometry is its greatest strength and also one of its major challenges. Gaps are still present between the process focussed fields (e.g. soil science, glaciology, volcanology) and the technical domain (such as computer science, statistics …) where approaches and theories are developed. Thus, interesting geomorphometric applications struggle to jump between process-specific disciplines, but also struggle to take advantage of advances in computer science and technology. This special issue is therefore focused on facilitating cross-fertilization between disciplines, and highlighting novel technical developments and innovative applications of geomorphometry to various Earth-surface processes. The issue collects a variety of contributions which fall into two main categories: Perspectives and Research, further divided into "Research and innovative techniques" and "Research and innovative applications". It showcases potentially exciting developments and tools which are the building blocks for the next step-change in the field.

  18. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Estes, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on Tethering in Earth Orbit deals with three topics: (1) Investigation of the propagation of longitudinal and transverse waves along the upper tether. Specifically, the upper tether is modeled as three massive platforms connected by two perfectly elastic continua (tether segments). The tether attachment point to the station is assumed to vibrate both longitudinally and transversely at a given frequency. Longitudinal and transverse waves propagate along the tethers affecting the acceleration levels at the elevator and at the upper platform. The displacement and acceleration frequency-response functions at the elevator and at the upper platform are computed for both longitudinal and transverse waves. An analysis to optimize the damping time of the longitudinal dampers is also carried out in order to select optimal parameters. The analytical evaluation of the performance of tuned vs. detuned longitudinal dampers is also part of this analysis. (2) The use of the Shuttle primary Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters for blowing away a recoiling broken tether is discussed. A microcomputer system was set up to support this operation. (3) Most of the effort in the tether plasma physics study was devoted to software development. A particle simulation code has been integrated into the Macintosh II computer system and will be utilized for studying the physics of hollow cathodes.

  19. Data-based modelling of the Earth's dynamic magnetosphere: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tsyganenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the main advances in the area of data-based modelling of the Earth's distant magnetic field achieved during the last two decades. The essence and the principal goal of the approach is to extract maximum information from available data, using physically realistic and flexible mathematical structures, parameterized by the most relevant and routinely accessible observables. Accordingly, the paper concentrates on three aspects of the modelling: (i mathematical methods to develop a computational "skeleton" of a model, (ii spacecraft databases, and (iii parameterization of the magnetospheric models by the solar wind drivers and/or ground-based indices. The review is followed by a discussion of the main issues concerning further progress in the area, in particular, methods to assess the models' performance and the accuracy of the field line mapping. The material presented in the paper is organized along the lines of the author Julius-Bartels' Medal Lecture during the General Assembly 2013 of the European Geosciences Union.

  20. Data-based modelling of the Earth's dynamic magnetosphere: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.

    2013-10-01

    This paper reviews the main advances in the area of data-based modelling of the Earth's distant magnetic field achieved during the last two decades. The essence and the principal goal of the approach is to extract maximum information from available data, using physically realistic and flexible mathematical structures, parameterized by the most relevant and routinely accessible observables. Accordingly, the paper concentrates on three aspects of the modelling: (i) mathematical methods to develop a computational "skeleton" of a model, (ii) spacecraft databases, and (iii) parameterization of the magnetospheric models by the solar wind drivers and/or ground-based indices. The review is followed by a discussion of the main issues concerning further progress in the area, in particular, methods to assess the models' performance and the accuracy of the field line mapping. The material presented in the paper is organized along the lines of the author Julius-Bartels' Medal Lecture during the General Assembly 2013 of the European Geosciences Union.

  1. Making other Earths: Dynamical Simulations of Terrestrial Planet Formation and Water Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Raymond, S N; Lunine, J I; Raymond, Sean N.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from 42 simulations of late stage planetary accretion, focusing on the delivery of volatiles (primarily water) to the terrestrial planets. Our simulations include both planetary "embryos" (defined as Moon to Mars sized protoplanets) and planetesimals, assuming that the embryos formed via oligarchic growth. We investigate volatile delivery as a function of Jupiter's mass, position and eccentricity, the position of the snow line, and the density (in solids) of the solar nebula. In all simulations, we form 1-4 terrestrial planets inside 2 AU, which vary in mass and volatile content. In 42 simulations we have formed 43 planets between 0.8 and 1.5 AU, including 11 "habitable" planets between 0.9 and 1.1 AU. These planets range from dry worlds to "water worlds" with 100+ oceans of water (1 ocean = 1.5x10^24 g), and vary in mass between 0.23 and 3.85 Earth masses. There is a good deal of stochastic noise in these simulations, but the most important parameter is the planetesimal mass we choose, whi...

  2. A Novel Machine Learning Based Method of Combined Dynamic Environment Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Mao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In practical engineerings, structures are often excited by different kinds of loads at the same time. How to effectively analyze and simulate this kind of dynamic environment of structure, named combined dynamic environment, is one of the key issues. In this paper, a novel prediction method of combined dynamic environment is proposed from the perspective of data analysis. First, the existence of dynamic similarity between vibration responses of the same structure under different boundary conditions is theoretically proven. It is further proven that this similarity can be established by a multiple-input multiple-output regression model. Second, two machine learning algorithms, multiple-dimensional support vector machine and extreme learning machine, are introduced to establish this model. To test the effectiveness of this method, shock and stochastic white noise excitations are acted on a cylindrical shell with two clamps to simulate different dynamic environments. The prediction errors on various measuring points are all less than ±3 dB, which shows that the proposed method can predict the structural vibration response under one boundary condition by means of the response under another condition in terms of precision and numerical stability.

  3. Analysis of Dynamic Performance of a Kalman Filter for Combining Multiple MEMS Gyroscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic performance of a Kalman filter (KF was analyzed, which is used to combine multiple measurements of a gyroscopes array to reduce the noise and improve the accuracy of the individual sensors. A principle for accuracy improvement by the KF was briefly presented to obtain an optimal estimate of input rate signal. In particular, the influences of some crucial factors on the KF dynamic performance were analyzed by simulations such as the factors input signal frequency, signal sampling, and KF filtering rate. Finally, a system that was comprised of a six-gyroscope array was designed and implemented to test the dynamic performance. Experimental results indicated that the 1σ error for the combined rate signal was reduced to about 0.2°/s in the constant rate test, which was a reduction by a factor of more than eight compared to the single gyroscope. The 1σ error was also reduced from 1.6°/s to 0.48°/s in the swing test. It showed that the estimated angular rate signal could well reflect the dynamic characteristic of the input signal in dynamic conditions.

  4. EUDAT strategies for handling dynamic data in the solid Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto; Evans, Peter; Kemps-Snijder, Mark; Heikkinen, Jani; Buck, Justin; Misutka, Jozef; Drude, Sebastian; Fares, Massimo; Cacciari, Claudio; Fiameni, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Some dynamic data is generated by sensors which produce data streams that may be temporarily incomplete (owing to latencies or temporary interruptions of the transmission lines between the field sensors and the data acquisition centres) and that may consequently fill up over time (automatically or after manual intervention). Dynamic data can also be generated by massive crowd sourcing where, for example, experimental collections of data can be filled up at random moments. The nature of dynamic data makes it difficult to handle for various reasons: a) establishing valid policies that guide early replication for data preservation and access optimization is not trivial, b) identifying versions of such data - thus making it possible to check their integrity - and referencing the versions is also a challenging task, and c) performance issues are extremely important since all these activities must be performed fast enough to keep up with the incoming data stream. There is no doubt that both applications areas (namely data from sensors and crowdsourcing) are growing in their relevance for science, and that appropriate infrastructure support (by initiatives such as EUDAT) is vital to handle these challenges. In addition, data must be citeable to encourage transparent, reproducible science, and to provide clear metrics for assessing the impact of research, which also drives funding choices. Data stream in real time often undergo changes/revisions while they are still growing, as new data arrives, and they are revised as missing data is recovered, or as new calibration values are applied. We call these "dynamic" data sets, DDS. A common form of DDS is time series data in which measurements are obtained on a regular schedule, with a well-defined sample rate. Examples include the hourly temperature in Barcelona, and the displacement (a 3-D vector quantity) of a seismograph from its rest position, which may record at a rate of 100 or more samples per second. These form streams

  5. Dynamic closed-loop test for real-time drift angle adjustment of space camera on the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Cao, Xiaotao; Wang, Dong; Wu, Weiping; Xu, Shuyan

    2010-10-01

    In order to eliminate the influence of aircraft attitude angle to the image quality of space camera, and assure that the drift angle of space camera could be accurately adjusted at the orbit, a novel closed-loop test method is provided for real-time drift angle adjustment of space camera on the Earth. A long focal length dynamic aim generator is applied to simulate the image motion and the variety drift angle, and to detect the precision of the image motion compensation machinery and the capability of the drift angle control system. The computer system is used to control the dynamic aim generator, accomplish the data processing, transmit and receive the data information. The seamless connection and the data transmission between the aim generator and the aircraft simulation devices are constituted. The command, parameter and drift angle data transmitted by the simulation devices are received by the space camera at the real time, then the photos are taken and the draft angle is adjusted simultaneously. It is shown that the drift angle can be accurately tracked by the space camera at the real time, and the detective method satisfies the test requirement.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Cold Water Super-Earths: The Case of Occluded CH4 and its Outgassing

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Amit; Podolak, Morris

    2014-01-01

    We study the transport of methane in the external water envelopes surrounding water-rich super-Earths and estimate its outgassing into the atmosphere. We investigate the influence of methane on the thermodynamics and mechanics of the water mantle. We find that including methane in the water matrix introduces a new phase (filled ice) resulting in hotter planetary interiors. This effect renders the super-ionic and reticulating phases accessible to relatively low mass planets lacking a H/He atmosphere. We model the thermal and structural profile of the planetary crust and discuss five possible crustal regimes. The formation of methane clathrate in the subsurface is shown to inhibit the formation of a subterranean ocean. This effect results in increased stresses on the lithosphere making modes of ice plate tectonics possible. The dynamics of the tectonic plates are analysed. We derive overturn and resurfacing time scales as well as the melt fraction underneath spreading centers. Ice mantle dynamics is found to be...

  7. Non-resonant secular dynamics of trans-Neptunian objects perturbed by a distant super-Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillenfest, Melaine; Fouchard, Marc; Tommei, Giacomo; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2017-08-01

    We use a secular model to describe the non-resonant dynamics of trans-Neptunian objects in the presence of an external ten-Earth-mass perturber. The secular dynamics is analogous to an "eccentric Kozai mechanism" but with both an inner component (the four giant planets) and an outer one (the eccentric distant perturber). By the means of Poincaré sections, the cases of a non-inclined or inclined outer planet are successively studied, making the connection with previous works. In the inclined case, the problem is reduced to two degrees of freedom by assuming a non-precessing argument of perihelion for the perturbing body. The size of the perturbation is typically ruled by the semi-major axis of the small body: we show that the classic integrable picture is still valid below about 70 AU, but it is progressively destroyed when we get closer to the external perturber. In particular, for a>150 AU, large-amplitude orbital flips become possible, and for a>200 AU, the Kozai libration islands at ω =π /2 and 3π /2 are totally submerged by the chaotic sea. Numerous resonance relations are highlighted. The most large and persistent ones are associated with apsidal alignments or anti-alignments with the orbit of the distant perturber.

  8. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Dilina, E-mail: dilinanp@physast.uga.edu; Landau, David P. [Center for Simulational Physics, The University of Georgia, Georgia 30602 (United States); Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Brown, Gregory [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  9. Phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N [ORNL; Landau, David P [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Yin, Junqi [ORNL; Brown, Greg [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian pa- rameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer sim- ulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, addi- tional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  10. Fast and simultaneously determination of light and heavy rare earth elements in monazite using combination of ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraeni, Anni; Arianto, Fernando; Mutalib, Abdul; Pratomo, Uji; Bahti, Husein H.

    2017-05-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) are elements that a lot of function for life, such as metallurgy, optical devices, and manufacture of electronic devices. Sources of REE is present in the mineral, in which each element has similar properties. Currently, to determining the content of REE is used instruments such as ICP-OES, ICP-MS, XRF, and HPLC. But in each instruments, there are still have some weaknesses. Therefore we need an alternative analytical method for the determination of rare earth metal content, one of them is by a combination of UV-Visible spectrophotometry and multivariate analysis, including Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Principal Component Regression (PCR), and Partial Least Square Regression (PLS). The purpose of this experiment is to determine the content of light and medium rare earth elements in the mineral monazite without chemical separation by using a combination of multivariate analysis and UV-Visible spectrophotometric methods. Training set created 22 variations of concentration and absorbance was measured using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer, then the data is processed by PCA, PCR, and PLSR. The results were compared and validated to obtain the mathematical equation with the smallest percent error. From this experiment, mathematical equation used PLS methods was better than PCR after validated, which has RMSE value for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Sm, Eu, and Tb respectively 0.095; 0.573; 0.538; 0.440; 3.387; 1.240; 1.870; and 0.639.

  11. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  12. Capturing Earth Science Learning Dynamics: Communication Interactions of ESE Teachers and Children Occurring in Online, Classroom, and Small-Group Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, C. W.; Prince, B. L.

    2002-12-01

    While the processes of schooling in science are usually measured in the resulting skills and products that students acquire or generate, another way to understand science learning is to explore the interactions and discourse that occur during actual learning activities. To investigate the dynamics of inquiry-based learning of earth science, we have explored the patterns that emerge in several learning environments: when teachers create dialog with other teachers in online ESE courses; when they teach earth science lessons in their classrooms; when they discuss their teaching perspectives in interviews; and when small groups of children engage in learning earth science together. By observing and scoring lesson exchanges, preserving online discussions, and documenting words and interactions in audio or video recordings, we are able to distinguish communication configurations that occur when teachers and children engage in the learning of earth science that would otherwise be invisible.

  13. Earth Occultation Imaging Applied to BATSE -- Application to a Combined BATSE-GBM Survey of the Hard X-Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuan; Case, Gary; Ling, James; Wheaton, William

    2013-01-01

    A combined BATSE-GBM hard X-ray catalog is presented based on Earth Occultation Imaging applied to a reanalysis of BATSE data. An imaging approach has been developed for the reanalysis of Earth Occultation analysis of BATSE data. The standard occultation analysis depends on a predetermined catalog of potential sources, so that a real source not present in the catalog may induce systematic errors when source counts associated with an uncatalogued source are incorrectly attributed to catalog sources. The goal of the imaging analysis is to find a complete set of hard X-ray sources, including sources not in the original BATSE occultation catalog. Using the imaging technique, we have identified 15 known sources and 17 unidentified sources and added them to the BATSE occultation catalog. The resulting expanded BATSE catalog of sources observed during 1991-2000 is compared to the ongoing GBM survey.

  14. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  15. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of Earth's Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data show that bright night-side high-latitude W emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. These analyses will be reviewed. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques (and more) that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. New results will be presented showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. A strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions will be demonstrated. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  16. Combining Coarse-Grained Protein Models with Replica-Exchange All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wabik, Jacek; Gront, Dominik; Kouza, Maksim; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  17. Combining Coarse-Grained Protein Models with Replica-Exchange All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Koliński

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  18. Combining coarse-grained protein models with replica-exchange all-atom molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabik, Jacek; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Gront, Dominik; Kouza, Maksim; Koliński, Andrzej

    2013-05-10

    We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  19. Signal Processing Technique for Combining Numerous MEMS Gyroscopes Based on Dynamic Conditional Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyu Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A signal processing technique is presented to improve the angular rate accuracy of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS gyroscope by combining numerous gyroscopes. Based on the conditional correlation between gyroscopes, a dynamic data fusion model is established. Firstly, the gyroscope error model is built through Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH process to improve overall performance. Then the conditional covariance obtained through dynamic conditional correlation (DCC estimator is used to describe the correlation quantitatively. Finally, the approach is validated by a prototype of the virtual gyroscope, which consists of six-gyroscope array. The experimental results indicate that the weights of gyroscopes change with the value of error. Also, the accuracy of combined rate signal is improved dramatically compared to individual gyroscope. The results indicate that the approach not only improves the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope, but also discovers the fault gyroscope and eliminates its influence.

  20. Ultrafast electron, lattice and spin dynamics on rare earth metal surfaces. Investigated with linear and nonlinear optical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, I.E.

    2006-03-15

    This thesis presents the femtosecond laser-induced electron, lattice and spin dynamics on two representative rare-earth systems: The ferromagnetic gadolinium Gd(0001) and the paramagnetic yttrium Y(0001) metals. The employed investigation tools are the time-resolved linear reflectivity and second-harmonic generation, which provide complementary information about the bulk and surface/interface dynamics, respectively. The femtosecond laser excitation of the exchange-split surface state of Gd(0001) triggers simultaneously the coherent vibrational dynamics of the lattice and spin subsystems in the surface region at a frequency of 3 THz. The coherent optical phonon corresponds to the vibration of the topmost atomic layer against the underlying bulk along the normal direction to the surface. The coupling mechanism between phonons and magnons is attributed to the modulation of the exchange interaction J between neighbour atoms due to the coherent lattice vibration. This leads to an oscillatory motion of the magnetic moments having the same frequency as the lattice vibration. Thus these results reveal a new type of phonon-magnon coupling mediated by the modulation of the exchange interaction and not by the conventional spin-orbit interaction. Moreover, we show that coherent spin dynamics in the THz frequency domain is achievable, which is at least one order of magnitude faster than previously reported. The laser-induced (de)magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic Gd(0001) thin films have been studied. Upon photo-excitation, the nonlinear magneto-optics measurements performed in this work show a sudden drop in the spin polarization of the surface state by more than 50% in a <100 fs time interval. Under comparable experimental conditions, the time-resolved photoemission studies reveal a constant exchange splitting of the surface state. The ultrafast decrease of spin polarization can be explained by the quasi-elastic spin-flip scattering of the hot electrons among spin

  1. The Earth's free core nutation: Formulation of dynamics and estimation of eigenperiod from the very-long-baseline interferometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.; Hsieh, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The free-core nutation (FCN) is a rotational normal mode of the Earth's outer core. We derive the equations of motion for FCN w.r.t. both the inertia space F0 and the uniformly rotating frame FΩ, and show that the two sets of equations are invariant in form under the reference frame transformation, as required by physics. The frequency-domain formulation describes the FCN resonance (to nearby tidal signals), which has been exploited to estimate the complex eigenfrequency of FCN, or its eigenperiod P and quality factor Q. On the other hand, our time-domain formulation in terms of temporal convolution describes the response of the free FCN under a (continual) excitation. The convolution well explains the dynamic behaviors of FCN in the observed very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) data (in F0), including the undulation of the FCN amplitude and the apparent fluctuations in the period and phase over time, as well as the temporal concurrence of a large phase jump with the near-zero amplitude during ∼ 1998- 2000, in complete analogy to the observed behavior of the Chandler wobble (in FΩ). The reverse, deconvolution process is further exploited to yield optimal estimates for FCN's eigenfrequency using the VLBI data, following the approach of Furuya and Chao (1996) of locating minimum excitation power. While this method is found to be insensitive to Q owing to the short timespan of the data, we obtain the estimate of P = 441 ± 4.5 sidereal days (sd) where the 1-sigma uncertainty is assessed via extensive Monte Carlo simulations. This value is closer to the theoretical value of ∼460 sd predicted by Earth models assuming hydrostatic equilibrium than do the prior estimates (425-435 sd) by the resonance method. The deconvolution process also yields the excitation function as a by-product, the physical sources of which await further studies.

  2. Study of the Dynamics of Meteoroids Through the Earth's Atmosphere and Retrieval of Meteorites: The Mexican Meteor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Tercero, M. G.; Farah Simon, A.; Velazquez-Villegas, F.

    2016-12-01

    When a comet , asteroid or meteoroid impact with a planet several things can happen depending on the mass, velocity and composition of the impactor, if the planet or moon has an atmosphere or not, and the angle of impact. On bodies without an atmosphere like Mercury or the Moon, every object that strikes their surfaces produces impact craters with sizes ranging from centimeters to hundreds and even thousands of kilometers across. On bodies with an atmosphere, this encounter can produce impact craters, meteorites, meteors and fragmentation. Each one of these phenomena is interesting because they provide information about the surfaces and the geological evolution of solar system bodies. Meteors are luminous wakes on the sky due to the interaction between the meteoroid and the Earth's atmosphere. A meteoroid is asteroidal or cometary material ranging in size from 2 mm to a few tens of meters. The smallest tend to evaporate at heights between 80 and 120 km. Objects of less than 2 mm are called micrometeorites. If the meteor brightness exceeds the brightness of Venus, the phenomenon is called a bolide or fireball. If a meteoroid, or a fragment of it, survives atmospheric ablation and it can be recovered on the ground, that piece is called a meteorite. Most meteoroids 2 meters long fragment suddenly into the atmosphere, it produces a shock wave that can affect humans and their environment like the Chelyabinsk event occurred on February 15, 2013 an two less energetic events in Mexico in 2010 and 2011. To understand the whole phenomenon, we proposed a video camera network for observing meteors. The objectives of this network are to: a) contribute to the study of the fragmentation of meteoroids in the Earth's atmosphere, b) determine values of important physical parameters; c) study seismic waves produced by atmospheric shock waves, d) study the dynamics of meteoroids and f) recover and study meteorites. During this meeting, the progress of the project will be presented.

  3. A user-friendly earth system model of low complexity: the ESCIMO system dynamics model of global warming towards 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randers, Jorgen; Golüke, Ulrich; Wenstøp, Fred; Wenstøp, Søren

    2016-11-01

    We have made a simple system dynamics model, ESCIMO (Earth System Climate Interpretable Model), which runs on a desktop computer in seconds and is able to reproduce the main output from more complex climate models. ESCIMO represents the main causal mechanisms at work in the Earth system and is able to reproduce the broad outline of climate history from 1850 to 2015. We have run many simulations with ESCIMO to 2100 and beyond. In this paper we present the effects of introducing in 2015 six possible global policy interventions that cost around USD 1000 billion per year - around 1 % of world GDP. We tentatively conclude (a) that these policy interventions can at most reduce the global mean surface temperature - GMST - by up to 0.5 °C in 2050 and up to 1.0 °C in 2100 relative to no intervention. The exception is injection of aerosols into the stratosphere, which can reduce the GMST by more than 1.0 °C in a decade but creates other serious problems. We also conclude (b) that relatively cheap human intervention can keep global warming in this century below +2 °C relative to preindustrial times. Finally, we conclude (c) that run-away warming is unlikely to occur in this century but is likely to occur in the longer run. The ensuing warming is slow, however. In ESCIMO, it takes several hundred years to lift the GMST to +3 °C above preindustrial times through gradual self-reinforcing melting of the permafrost. We call for research to test whether more complex climate models support our tentative conclusions from ESCIMO.

  4. The combination of system dynamics and game theory in analyzing oligopoly markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a hybrid method of game theory and dynamic systems to study the behavior of firms in an oligopoly market. The aim of this study is to build a model for an oligopoly game on the basis of feedback loops and system dynamics approach and to solve the resulted problems under some special conditions where traditional game theory methods are unable to handle. The method includes a combination of qualitative methods including interviews with industry experts to prepare the model and quantitative methods of system dynamics, simulation methodologies and game theory. The results indicate that competitive behavior and the important parameters such as volume of demand, interest rates and price fluctuation will be stabilized after a transition period.

  5. Dynamic Simulations of Combined Transmission and Distribution Systems using Parallel Processing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Aristidou, P; Van Cutsem, T

    2014-01-01

    Simulating a power system with both transmission and distribution networks modeled in detail is a huge computational challenge. In this paper, we propose a Schur-complement-based domain decomposition algorithm to provide accurate, detailed dynamic simulations of the combined system. The simulation procedure is accelerated with the use of parallel programming techniques, taking advantage of the parallelization opportunities inherent in domain decomposition algorithms. The proposed algorithm is...

  6. Dynamic imaging of cytosolic zinc in Arabidopsis roots combining FRET sensors and RootChip technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanquar, Viviane; Grossmann, Guido; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Merkx, Maarten; Thomine, Sébastien; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-04-01

    Zinc plays a central role in all living cells as a cofactor for enzymes and as a structural element enabling the adequate folding of proteins. In eukaryotic cells, metals are highly compartmentalized and chelated. Although essential to characterize the mechanisms of Zn(2+) homeostasis, the measurement of free metal concentrations in living cells has proved challenging and the dynamics are difficult to determine. Our work combines the use of genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors and a novel microfluidic technology, the RootChip, to monitor the dynamics of cytosolic Zn(2+) concentrations in Arabidopsis root cells. Our experiments provide estimates of cytosolic free Zn(2+) concentrations in Arabidopsis root cells grown under sufficient (0.4 nM) and excess (2 nM) Zn(2+) supply. In addition, monitoring the dynamics of cytosolic [Zn(2+) ] in response to external supply suggests the involvement of high- and low-affinity uptake systems as well as release from internal stores. In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of genetically encoded FRET sensors and microfluidics provides an attractive tool to monitor the dynamics of cellular metal ion concentrations over a wide concentration range in root cells. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Shock waves simulated using the dual domain material point method combined with molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Dhakal, Tilak R.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we combine the dual domain material point method with molecular dynamics in an attempt to create a multiscale numerical method to simulate materials undergoing large deformations with high strain rates. In these types of problems, the material is often in a thermodynamically nonequilibrium state, and conventional constitutive relations or equations of state are often not available. In this method, the closure quantities, such as stress, at each material point are calculated from a molecular dynamics simulation of a group of atoms surrounding the material point. Rather than restricting the multiscale simulation in a small spatial region, such as phase interfaces, or crack tips, this multiscale method can be used to consider nonequilibrium thermodynamic effects in a macroscopic domain. This method takes the advantage that the material points only communicate with mesh nodes, not among themselves; therefore molecular dynamics simulations for material points can be performed independently in parallel. The dual domain material point method is chosen for this multiscale method because it can be used in history dependent problems with large deformation without generating numerical noise as material points move across cells, and also because of its convergence and conservation properties. To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of this method, we compare the results of a shock wave propagation in a cerium crystal calculated using the direct molecular dynamics simulation with the results from this combined multiscale calculation.

  8. Dynamic Ecocentric Assessment Combining Emergy and Data Envelopment Analysis: Application to Wind Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Martín-Gamboa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of current life-cycle approaches show an anthropocentric standpoint for the evaluation of human-dominated activities. However, this perspective is insufficient when it comes to assessing the contribution of natural resources to production processes. In this respect, emergy analysis evaluates human-driven systems from a donor-side perspective, accounting for the environmental effort performed to make the resources available. This article presents a novel methodological framework, which combines emergy analysis and dynamic Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA for the ecocentric assessment of multiple resembling entities over an extended period of time. The use of this approach is shown through a case study of wind energy farms. Furthermore, the results obtained are compared with those of previous studies from two different angles. On the one hand, a comparison with results from anthropocentric approaches (combined life cycle assessment and DEA is drawn. On the other hand, results from similar ecocentric approaches, but without a dynamic model, are also subject to comparison. The combined use of emergy analysis and dynamic DEA is found to be a valid methodological framework for the computation of resource efficiency and the valuation of ecosystem services. It complements traditional anthropocentric assessments while appropriately including relevant time effects.

  9. Woody Plant Cover Dynamics in Sahelian Drylands from Earth Observation Based Seasonal Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, M.; Hiernaux, P.; Fensholt, R.; Tagesson, T.; Rasmussen, K.; Mbow, C.

    2015-12-01

    Woody plants play an important role in drylands primary productivity and peoples' livelihood, however, due to their scattered appearance, quantifying and monitoring their abundance over a large area is challenging. From in situ measured woody cover we develop a phenology driven model to estimate the canopy cover of woody species in the Sahelian drylands. Annual maps are applied to monitor dynamics of woody populations in relation to climate and anthropogenic interference. The model estimates the total canopy cover of all woody phanerophytes and the concept is based on the significant difference in phenophases of dryland trees, shrubs and bushes as compared to that of the herbaceous plants. Whereas annual herbaceous are only green during the rainy season and senescence occurs shortly after flowering towards the last rains, most woody plants remain photosynthetically active over large parts of the year. We use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) seasonal metrics representing the dry season to reproduce in situ woody cover at 77 field sites (178 observations in 3x3 km plots between 2000 and 2014) in Niger, Mali and Senegal. The extrapolation to Sahel scale shows agreement between VGT and MODIS at an almost nine times higher woody cover than in the global tree cover product MOD44B which only captures trees of a certain minimum size. Trends over 15 years show that the pattern is closely related to population density and land cover/use. A negative woody cover change can be observed in densely populated areas, but a positive change is seen in sparsely populated regions. Whereas woody cover in cropland is generally stable, it is strongly positive in savannas and woodland. Discrepancies between the countries are huge and also deforestation can be observed at a more local scale. The method is applicable and derived woody cover maps of the Sahel are freely available. They represent an improvement of existing products and a

  10. Enabling dynamic access to dynamic petascale Earth Systems and Environmental data collections is easy: citing and reproducing the actual data extracts used in research publications is NOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, L. A.; Wang, J.; Si, W.; Druken, K. A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Klump, J. F.; Car, N. J.; Trenham, C.

    2015-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) at the Australian National University (ANU) has collocated over 10 PB of national and international Earth Systems and Environmental data assets within a HPC facility to create the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI: in many cases they are processed to higher-level data products. Individual data sets within these collections can range from multi-petabyte climate models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution data sets. All data are quality assured to being 'published' and made accessible as services. Persistent identifiers are assigned during publishing at both the collection and data set level: the granularity and version control on persistent identifiers depend on the dataset. However, most NERDIP collections are dynamic: either new data is being appended, or else models/derivative products are being revised with new data, or changed as processing methods are improved. Further, because the data are accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: inevitably such extracts underpin traditional 'publications'. Being able to reproduce these exact data extracts can be difficult and for the very larger data sets preserving a copy of large data extracts is out of the question. A solution is for the researcher to use provenance workflows that at a minimum capture the version of the data set used, the query and the time of extraction. In parallel, the data provider needs to implement version controls on the data and deploy tracking systems that time stamp when new data are appended, or when modifications are made to existing data and record what these changes are. Where, when and how persistent identifiers are minted on these large and dynamically changing data sets is still open to debate.

  11. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Warin Krityakiarana; Jariya Budworn; Chatchawan Khajohnanan; Nutchanad Suramas; Watcharaporn Puritasang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated) on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years) were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated) (CG), n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14). Method: Before inducing D...

  12. Granular Flow Dynamics on Earth, Moon, and Mars from analytical, numerical and field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, A.; Mangeney, A.; Mhge, D.

    2010-12-01

    Prediction of landslides dynamics remains difficult in spite of a considerable body of work. A number of previous studies have been based on runout analysis in relation to mean dissipation calibration via the friction coefficient. However, the shape of the initial scar is generally unknown in real cases, which weakens landslide material spreading predictions and has alters calibration parameters of numerical models. We study numerically the effects of scar geometry on flow and distribution of the deposits and show that the initial shape of the scar, independent of the friction coefficient, does not affect the runout distance. In contrast, 3D tests show that the shape of the final deposits is a function of the scar geometry, and hence information on initial scar geometry and initial volume involved in the mass spreading may be retrieved from analysis of final deposit morphology. From an analytical solution we show here why the classical mobility (defined as the ratio between total height and runout distance) decreases when the volume increases, as is generally observed in geological data. We thus introduce analytically a new mobility variable obtained from geomorphic measurements reflecting the intrinsic dissipation independent of the aspect ratio, of the volume of the granular mass involved, of the underlying topography, and of the initial scar geometry. Comparison between experimental results, terrestrial, Lunar and Martian cases highlights a larger new mobility measure of natural granular flows compared to dry mass spreading simulated in the laboratory. In addition, landslides in a similar geological context give a single value showing the robustness of this new parameter. Finally, the new mobility provides a first order estimate of the effective friction required in models to reproduce the extent of the deposits in a given geological context. This enables a feedback analysis method for retrieving the volume and shape of the initial landslide material and then

  13. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS RESPONSE OF CASING PIPE UNDER COMBINED WAVE-CURRENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG You-gang; GU Jia-yang; ZUO Jian-li; MIN Jian-qin

    2005-01-01

    The vortex-induced nonlinear vibration of casing pipes in the deep water was studied considering the loads of current and combined wave-current. The vortex-induced vibration equation of a casing pipe was set up considering the beam mode and Morison's nonlinear fluid loads as well as the vortex-excited loads. The approach of calculating vortex-excited nonlinear vibration by Galerkin's method was proposed. The natural vibration frequencies and modes were obtained, and the response including primary resonance induced by current and the composite resonance under combined wave-current for the 170 m long casing pipe in the 160 m depth of water were investigated. The results show that the dynamics response of casing pipe obviously increases, and the complicated response behaviors of casing pipe are described under combined wave-current.

  14. A stochastic model of the dynamics of HIV under a combination therapeutic intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VSS Yadavalli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance to single therapeutic treatment in HIV infected individuals has promoted research into combined treatments. In this paper we propose a stochastic model under combined therapeutic treatment by extending the model of HIV pathogenesis under treatment by anti-viral drugs given in [Perelson AS, Neumann AU, Markowits M, Leonard JM & Ho DD, 1996, "HIV-1 dynamics in vivo virion clearance rate, infected cell life span, and viral generation time", Science New Series, 271, pp. 1582-1586]. Variance and co-variance structures of variables are obtainable via this approach in addition to the mean numbers of free HIV, infectious free HIV and non-infectious free HIV that were obtained by Perelson et al. Comparing simulated data for before and after treatment indicates the importance of combined treatment and its overall effect(s.

  15. Galvanic vestibular stimulation combines with Earth-horizontal rotation in roll to induce the illusion of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erich; Bartl, Klaus; Glasauer, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Human head rotation in roll around an earth-horizontal axis constitutes a vestibular stimulus that, by its rotational component, acts on the semicircular canals (SCC) and that, by its tilt of the gravity vector, also acts on the otoliths. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is thought to resemble mainly a rotation in roll. A superposition of sinusoidal GVS with a natural earth-horizontal roll movement was therefore applied in order to cancel the rotation effects and to isolate the otolith activation. By self-adjusting the amplitude and phase of GVS, subjects were able to minimize their sensation of rotation and to generate the perception of a linear translation. The final adjustments are in the range of a model that predicts SCC activation during natural rotations and GVS. This indicates that the tilt-translation ambiguity of the otoliths is resolved by SCC-otolith interaction. It is concluded that GVS might be able to cancel rotations in roll and that the residual tilt of the gravitoinertial force is possibly interpreted as a linear translation.

  16. Effects of configuration parameters on lateral dynamics of tractor–two trailer combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguo Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimum configuration parameters of tractor–trailer combinations for lateral stability performance are proposed by adjusting the length of dolly and the second trailer’s center of gravity. A linear yaw plane model of vehicle combinations is adopted for dynamic analysis, and the model is calibrated by TruckSim. According to the yaw rate rearward amplification ratio of lateral response index, and combining the simulation results of MATLAB/Simulink, dolly and the second trailer are the dominate factors for lateral stability of vehicle combinations. Simulation results show that the distance between articulation joints of dolly is 1.6 m; simultaneously, the rate of distance between front hitch and center of gravity of the second trailer to its front and rear wheelbase is 0.41 and may gain the best lateral performance. Compared with configuration parameters of the original vehicle combinations, the results also illustrate that the one derived from adjustment approach reduces high-speed rearward amplification ratio by 11.4%. The proposed approach might be used for identifying desired design variables of the tractor–two trailer combinations and provided theoretical basis for stability tests.

  17. Combining NASA/JPL One-Way Optical-Fiber Light-Speed Data with Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Doppler-Shift Data to Characterise 3-Space Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, Reginald T

    2009-01-01

    We combine data from two high precision NASA/JPL experiments: (i) the one-way speed of light experiment using optical fibers: Krisher T.P., Maleki L., Lutes G.F., Primas L.E., Logan R.T., Anderson J.D. and Will C.M., Phys. Rev. D, vol 42, 731-734, 1990, and (ii) the spacecraft earth-flyby doppler shift data: Anderson J.D., Campbell J.K., Ekelund J.E., Ellis J. and Jordan J.F., Phys. Rev. Lett., vol 100, 091102, 2008, to give the solar-system galactic 3-space average speed of 486km/s in the direction RA=4.29hrs, Dec=-75.0deg. Turbulence effects (gravitational waves) are also evident. Data also reveals the 30km/s orbital speed of the earth and the sun inflow component at 1AU of 42km/s and also 615km/s near the sun, and for the first time, experimental measurement of the 3-space 11.2km/s inflow of the earth. The NASA/JPL data is in remarkable agreement with that determined in other light speed anisotropy experiments, such as Michelson-Morley (1887), Miller (1933), DeWitte (1991), Torr and Kolen (1981), Cahill (2...

  18. Combining NASA/JPL One-Way Optical-Fiber Light-Speed Data with Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Doppler-Shift Data to Characterise 3-Space Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We combine data from two high precision NASA / JPL experiments: (i the one-way speed of light experiment using optical fibers: Krisher T.P., Maleki L., Lutes G.F., Pri- mas L.E., Logan R.T., Anderson J.D. and Will C.M. Phys. Rev. D , 1990, v. 42, 731–734, and (ii the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler shift data: Anderson J.D., Campbell J.K., Ekelund J.E., Ellis J. and Jordan J.F. Phys. Rev. Lett. , 2008, v. 100, 091102, to give the solar-system galactic 3-space average speed of 486 km / s in the direction RA = 4.29 h , Dec = -75.0°. Turbulence effects (gravitational waves are also evident. Data also reveals the 30 km / s orbital speed of the Earth and the Sun inflow component at 1AU of 42 km / s and also 615 km / s near the Sun, and for the first time, experimental measure- ment of the 3-space 11.2 km / s inflow of the Earth. The NASA / JPL data is in remark- able agreement with that determined in other light speed anisotropy experiments, such as Michelson-Morley (1887, Miller (1933, Torr and Kolen (1981, DeWitte (1991, Cahill (2006, Munera (2007, Cahill and Stokes (2008 and Cahill (2009.

  19. Combining NASA/JPL One-Way Optical-Fiber Light-Speed Data with Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Doppler-Shift Data to Characterise 3-Space Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We combine data from two high precision NASA/JPL experiments: (i the one-way speed of light experiment using optical fibers: Krisher T.P., Maleki L., Lutes G.F., Primas L.E., Logan R.T., Anderson J.D. and Will C.M. Phys. Rev. D, 1990, v.42, 731-734, and (ii the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler shift data: Anderson J.D., Campbell J.K., Ekelund J.E., Ellis J. and Jordan J.F. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008, v.100, 091102, to give the solar-system galactic 3-space average speed of 486 km/s in the direction RA = 4.29 h, Dec = -75.0 Deg. Turbulence effects (gravitational waves are also evident. Data also reveals the 30 km/s orbital speed of the Earth and the Sun inflow component at 1AU of 42 km/s and also 615 km/s near the Sun, and for the first time, experimental measurement of the 3-space 11.2 km/s inflow of the Earth. The NASA/JPL data is in remarkable agreement with that determined in other light speed anisotropy experiments, such as Michelson-Morley (1887, Miller (1933, Torr and Kolen (1981, DeWitte (1991, Cahill (2006, Munera (2007, Cahill and Stokes (2008 and Cahill (2009.

  20. A trio of horseshoes: past, present and future dynamical evolution of Earth co-orbital asteroids 2015 XX169, 2015 YA and 2015 YQ1

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that a quasi-steady-state flux of minor bodies moving in and out of the co-orbital state with the Earth may exist. Some of these objects are very good candidates for future in situ study due to their favourable dynamical properties. In this paper, we show that the recently discovered near-Earth asteroids 2015 XX169, 2015 YA and 2015 YQ1 are small transient Earth co-orbitals. These new findings increase the tally of known Earth co-orbitals to 17. The three of them currently exhibit asymmetric horseshoe behaviour subjected to a Kozai resonance and their short-term orbital evolution is rather unstable. Both 2015 YA and 2015 YQ1 may leave Earth's co-orbital zone in the near future as they experience close encounters with Venus, the Earth-Moon system and Mars. Asteroid 2015 XX169 may have remained in the vicinity of, or trapped inside, the 1:1 mean motion resonance with our planet for many thousands of years and may continue in that region for a significant amount of time into the future.

  1. A Geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture Provides for Disaster Management, Measurement of Soil Moisture, and Measurement of Earth-Surface Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Soren; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A GEO-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) could provide daily coverage of basically all of North and South America with very good temporal coverage within the mapped area. This affords a key capability to disaster management, tectonic mapping and modeling, and vegetation mapping. The fine temporal sampling makes this system particularly useful for disaster management of flooding, hurricanes, and earthquakes. By using a fairly long wavelength, changing water boundaries caused by storms or flooding could be monitored in near real-time. This coverage would also provide revolutionary capabilities in the field of radar interferometry, including the capability to study the interferometric signature immediately before and after an earthquake, thus allowing unprecedented studies of Earth-surface dynamics. Preeruptive volcano dynamics could be studied as well as pre-seismic deformation, one of the most controversial and elusive aspects of earthquakes. Interferometric correlation would similarly allow near real-time mapping of surface changes caused by volcanic eruptions, mud slides, or fires. Finally, a GEO SAR provides an optimum configuration for soil moisture measurement that requires a high temporal sampling rate (1-2 days) with a moderate spatial resolution (1 km or better). From a technological point of view, the largest challenges involved in developing a geosynchronous SAR capability relate to the very large slant range distance from the radar to the mapped area. This leads to requirements for large power or alternatively very large antenna, the ability to steer the mapping area to the left and right of the satellite, and control of the elevation and azimuth angles. The weight of this system is estimated to be 2750 kg and it would require 20 kW of DC-power. Such a system would provide up to a 600 km ground swath in a strip-mapping mode and 4000 km dual-sided mapping in a scan-SAR mode.

  2. A virtual, interactive and dynamic excursion in Google Earth on soil management and conservation (AgroGeovid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwalleghem, Tom; Giráldez, Juan Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Many courses on natural resources require hands-on practical knowledge and experience that students traditionally could only acquire by expensive and time-consuming field excursions. New technologies and social media however provide an interesting alternative to train students and help them improve their practical knowledge. AgroGeovid is a virtual excursion, based on Google Earth, Youtube, Facebook and Twitter that is aimed at agricultural engineering students, but equally useful for any student interested in soil management and conservation, e.g. geography, geology and environmental resources. Agrogeovid provides the framework for teachers and students to upload geotagged photos, comments and discussions. After the initial startup phase, where the teacher uploaded material on e.g. soil erosion phenomena, soil conservation structures and different soil management strategies under different agronomic systems, students contributed with their own material gathered throughout the academic year. All students decided to contribute via Facebook, in stead of Twitter, which was not known to most of them. The final result was a visual and dynamic tool which students could use to train and perfect skills adopted in the classroom using case-studies and examples from their immediate environment.

  3. Insights Into the Dynamics of Planetary Interiors Through the Study of Global Distribution of Volcanoes: Method Calibration on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canon-Tapia, E.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing of volcanic vents at a planetary scale can provide clues about the dynamics of planetary interiors through the identification of patterns on their global distribution. Until present, however, studies of this type usually have focused on volcanic features of a specific type, have been made with databases filtered before the main analysis, or have concentrated on relatively small regions. In this work, the description of the distribution of volcanic features observed over the entire surface of the Earth is obtained using the Fisher kernel and an extensive database of submarine and subaereal volcanoes. The analysis uses a series of criteria of geological and statistical nature, and different types of clustering thus obtained are mutually compared. As a result, we designed an automated algorithm capable to identify volcanic groupings that are associated to tectonic features following a hierarchy of statistical significance levels, and requiring a minimum of prior geological information. It is suggested that this algorithm has the potential to complete a similar analysis capable to yield unbiased insights concerning the probable occurrence of tectonic features in other planets.

  4. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  5. A combined dynamic analysis method for geometrically nonlinear vibration isolators with elastic rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhan; Zheng, Gangtie

    2016-08-01

    A combined analysis method is developed in the present paper for studying the dynamic properties of a type of geometrically nonlinear vibration isolator, which is composed of push-pull configuration rings. This method combines the geometrically nonlinear theory of curved beams and the Harmonic Balance Method to overcome the difficulty in calculating the vibration and vibration transmissibility under large deformations of the ring structure. Using the proposed method, nonlinear dynamic behaviors of this isolator, such as the lock situation due to the coulomb damping and the usual jump resulting from the nonlinear stiffness, can be investigated. Numerical solutions based on the primary harmonic balance are first verified by direct integration results. Then, the whole procedure of this combined analysis method is demonstrated and validated by slowly sinusoidal sweeping experiments with different amplitudes of the base excitation. Both numerical and experimental results indicate that this type of isolator behaves as a hardening spring with increasing amplitude of the base excitation, which makes it suitable for isolating both steady-state vibrations and transient shocks.

  6. Structure and dynamics of cold water super-Earths: the case of occluded CH{sub 4} and its outgassing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, A.; Podolak, M. [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sasselov, D., E-mail: amitlevi.planetphys@gmail.com [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    In this work, we study the transport of methane in the external water envelopes surrounding water-rich super-Earths. We investigate the influence of methane on the thermodynamics and mechanics of the water mantle. We find that including methane in the water matrix introduces a new phase (filled ice), resulting in hotter planetary interiors. This effect renders the super-ionic and reticulating phases accessible to the lower ice mantle of relatively low-mass planets (∼5 M{sub E} ) lacking a H/He atmosphere. We model the thermal and structural profile of the planetary crust and discuss five possible crustal regimes which depend on the surface temperature and heat flux. We demonstrate that the planetary crust can be conductive throughout or partly confined to the dissociation curve of methane clathrate hydrate. The formation of methane clathrate in the subsurface is shown to inhibit the formation of a subterranean ocean. This effect results in increased stresses on the lithosphere, making modes of ice plate tectonics possible. The dynamic character of the tectonic plates is analyzed and the ability of this tectonic mode to cool the planet is estimated. The icy tectonic plates are found to be faster than those on a silicate super-Earth. A mid-layer of low viscosity is found to exist between the lithosphere and the lower mantle. Its existence results in a large difference between ice mantle overturn timescales and resurfacing timescales. Resurfacing timescales are found to be 1 Ma for fast plates and 100 Ma for sluggish plates, depending on the viscosity profile and ice mass fraction. Melting beneath spreading centers is required in order to account for the planetary radiogenic heating. The melt fraction is quantified for the various tectonic solutions explored, ranging from a few percent for the fast and thin plates to total melting of the upwelled material for the thick and sluggish plates. Ice mantle dynamics is found to be important for assessing the composition of

  7. Analogue Correction Method of Errors by Combining Statistical and Dynamical Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Hongli; CHOU Jifan

    2006-01-01

    Based on the atmospheric analogy principle, the inverse problem that the information of historical analogue data is utilized to estimate model errors is put forward and a method of analogue correction of errors (ACE) of model is developed in this paper. The ACE can combine effectively statistical and dynamical methods, and need not change the current numerical prediction models. The new method not only adequately utilizes dynamical achievements but also can reasonably absorb the information of a great many analogues in historical data in order to reduce model errors and improve forecast skill.Furthermore, the ACE may identify specific historical data for the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the particularity of current forecast. The qualitative analyses show that the ACE is theoretically equivalent to the principle of the previous analogue-dynamical model, but need not rebuild the complicated analogue-deviation model, so has better feasibility and operational foreground. Moreover, under the ideal situations, when numerical models or historical analogues are perfect, the forecast of the ACE would transform into the forecast of dynamical or statistical method, respectively.

  8. Patient Prognosis from Vital Sign Time Series: Combining Convolutional Neural Networks with a Dynamical Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Li-wei; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Snoek, Jasper; Nemati, Shamim

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a stacked switching vector-autoregressive (SVAR)-CNN architecture to model the changing dynamics in physiological time series for patient prognosis. The SVAR-layer extracts dynamical features (or modes) from the time-series, which are then fed into the CNN-layer to extract higher-level features representative of transition patterns among the dynamical modes. We evaluate our approach using 8-hours of minute-by-minute mean arterial blood pressure (BP) from over 450 patients in the MIMIC-II database. We modeled the time-series using a third-order SVAR process with 20 modes, resulting in first-level dynamical features of size 20×480 per patient. A fully connected CNN is then used to learn hierarchical features from these inputs, and to predict hospital mortality. The combined CNN/SVAR approach using BP time-series achieved a median and interquartile-range AUC of 0.74 [0.69, 0.75], significantly outperforming CNN-alone (0.54 [0.46, 0.59]), and SVAR-alone with logistic regression (0.69 [0.65, 0.72]). Our results indicate that including an SVAR layer improves the ability of CNNs to classify nonlinear and nonstationary time-series. PMID:27790623

  9. Efficiency Enhancement of an Envelope Tracking Power Amplifier Combining Supply Shaping and Dynamic Biasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafuri, Felice Francesco; Sira, Daniel; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to improve the performance of envelope tracking (ET) power amplifiers (PAs). The method consists of combining the supply modulation that characterizes the envelope tracking architecture with supply shaping and dynamic biasing. The inclusion of dynamic biasing allows...... of the input envelope by means of two shaping functions jointly designed on the basis of a single-tone characterization. The presented technique is demonstrated by means of measurements on a commercial GaAs HBT power amplifier. Measured results showed a PA power added efficiency (PAE) of 51.9%, an error vector...... magnitude (EVM) of 1.2% and an adjacent channel power ratio (ACPR) of -39.4/-43.5 dBc. The presented transmitter architecture allowed an improvement of 12% PAE compared to a classical ET transmitter where the measured PA was biased in class-AB, maintaining the linearity indicators....

  10. A Combined Network Architecture Using Art2 and Back Propagation for Adaptive Estimation of Dynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einar Sørheim

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available A neural network architecture called ART2/BP is proposed. Thc goal has been to construct an artificial neural network that learns incrementally an unknown mapping, and is motivated by the instability found in back propagation (BP networks: after first learning pattern A and then pattern B, a BP network often has completely 'forgotten' pattern A. A network using both supervised and unsupervised training is proposed, consisting of a combination of ART2 and BP. ART2 is used to build and focus a supervised backpropagation network consisting of many small subnetworks each specialized on a particular domain of the input space. The ART2/BP network has the advantage of being able to dynamically expand itself in response to input patterns containing new information. Simulation results show that the ART2/BP network outperforms a classical maximum likelihood method for the estimation of a discrete dynamic and nonlinear transfer function.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles in fluid environment: combining molecular dynamics and Lattice-Boltzmann

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenev, Petr

    2017-06-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between magnetic nanoparticles suspended in the Newtonian liquid are accounted for using a combination of the lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics simulations. Nanoparticle is modelled by the system of molecular dynamics material points (which form structure resembles raspberry) coupled to the lattice Boltzmann fluid. The hydrodynamic coupling between the colloids is studied by simulations of the thermo-induced rotational diffusion of two raspberry objects. It was found that for the considered range of model parameters the approaching of the raspberries leads to slight retard of the relaxation process. The presence of the weak magnetic dipolar interaction between the objects leads to modest decrease of the relaxation time and the extent of the acceleration of the diffusion is intensified along with magnetic forces.

  12. Accurate dynamic power estimation for CMOS combinational logic circuits with real gate delay model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omnia S. Fadl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic power estimation is essential in designing VLSI circuits where many parameters are involved but the only circuit parameter that is related to the circuit operation is the nodes’ toggle rate. This paper discusses a deterministic and fast method to estimate the dynamic power consumption for CMOS combinational logic circuits using gate-level descriptions based on the Logic Pictures concept to obtain the circuit nodes’ toggle rate. The delay model for the logic gates is the real-delay model. To validate the results, the method is applied to several circuits and compared against exhaustive, as well as Monte Carlo, simulations. The proposed technique was shown to save up to 96% processing time compared to exhaustive simulation.

  13. Combination of dynamic transformation and dynamic recrystallization for realizing ultrafine-grained steels with superior mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lijia; Park, Nokeun; Tian, Yanzhong; Shibata, Akinobu; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is an important grain refinement mechanism to fabricate steels with high strength and high ductility (toughness). The conventional DRX mechanism has reached the limitation of refining grains to several microns even though employing high-strain deformation. Here we show a DRX phenomenon occurring in the dynamically transformed (DT) ferrite, by which the required strain for the operation of DRX and the formation of ultrafine grains is significantly reduced. The DRX of DT ferrite shows an unconventional temperature dependence, which suggests an optimal condition for grain refinement. We further show that new strategies for ultra grain refinement can be evoked by combining DT and DRX mechanisms, based on which fully ultrafine microstructures having a mean grain size down to 0.35 microns can be obtained without high-strain deformation and exhibit superior mechanical properties. This study will open the door to achieving optimal grain refinement to nanoscale in a variety of steels requiring no high-strain deformation in practical industrial application.

  14. A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

  15. Forced nutations of the earth: Influence of inner core dynamics. I - Theory. II - Numerical results and comparisons. III - Very long interferometry data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, P. M.; Buffett, Bruce A.; Herring, Thomas A.; Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1991-01-01

    A treatment is presented of the nutation problem for an oceanless, elastic, spheroidally stratified earth, with the dynamical role of the inner core explicitly included in the formulation. Solving the enlarged system of equations shows that a new almost diurnal eigenfrequency emerges. A rough estimate places it not far from the prograde annual tidal excitation frequency, so that possible resonance effects on nutation amplitudes need careful consideration. Tables are provided that exhibit the sensitivities of various relevant quantities, the eigenfrequencies and the coefficients which appear in the resonance expansion, as well as the nutation amplitudes at important tidal frequencies, to possible errors in the earth parameters which enter the theory set forth. Finally, the analysis of 798 VLBI experiments performed between July 1980 and February 1989 and the determination from this analysis of corrections to selected coefficients in the International Astronomical Union 1980 theory of the nutations of the earth are discussed.

  16. Oblique Whistler-Mode Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Energy Distribution, Origins, and Role in Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, Anton; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mourenas, Didier; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Shastun, Vitalii; Mozer, Forrest

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we review recent spacecraft observations of oblique whistler-mode waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere as well as the various consequences of the presence of such waves for electron scattering and acceleration. In particular, we survey the statistics of occurrences and intensity of oblique chorus waves in the region of the outer radiation belt, comprised between the plasmapause and geostationary orbit, and discuss how their actual distribution may be explained by a combination of linear and non-linear generation, propagation, and damping processes. We further examine how such oblique wave populations can be included into both quasi-linear diffusion models and fully nonlinear models of wave-particle interaction. On this basis, we demonstrate that varying amounts of oblique waves can significantly change the rates of particle scattering, acceleration, and precipitation into the atmosphere during quiet times as well as in the course of a storm. Finally, we discuss possible generation mechanisms for such oblique waves in the radiation belts. We demonstrate that oblique whistler-mode chorus waves can be considered as an important ingredient of the radiation belt system and can play a key role in many aspects of wave-particle resonant interactions.

  17. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Neves, R.

    2016-02-01

    The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response) of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable individual vessel accident risk levels and shoreline contamination risk from ships has been developed, integrating numerical metocean forecasts and oil spill simulations with vessel tracking automatic identification systems (AIS). The risk rating combines the likelihood of an oil spill occurring from a vessel navigating in a study area - the Portuguese continental shelf - with the assessed consequences to the shoreline. The spill likelihood is based on dynamic marine weather conditions and statistical information from previous accidents. The shoreline consequences reflect the virtual spilled oil amount reaching shoreline and its environmental and socio-economic vulnerabilities. The oil reaching shoreline is quantified with an oil spill fate and behaviour model running multiple virtual spills from vessels along time, or as an alternative, a correction factor based on vessel distance from coast. Shoreline risks can be computed in real time or from previously obtained data. Results show the ability of the proposed methodology to estimate the risk properly sensitive to dynamic metocean conditions and to oil transport behaviour. The integration of meteo-oceanic + oil spill models with coastal vulnerability and AIS data in the quantification of risk enhances the maritime situational awareness and the decision support model, providing a more realistic approach in the assessment of shoreline impacts. The risk assessment from historical data can help finding typical risk patterns ("hot spots") or developing sensitivity analysis to specific conditions, whereas real

  18. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fernandes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable shoreline risk levels from ships has been developed, integrating numerical metocean forecasts and oil spill simulations with vessel tracking automatic identification systems (AIS. The risk rating combines the likelihood of an oil spill occurring from a vessel navigating in a study area – Portuguese Continental shelf – with the assessed consequences to the shoreline. The spill likelihood is based on dynamic marine weather conditions and statistical information from previous accidents. The shoreline consequences reflect the virtual spilled oil amount reaching shoreline and its environmental and socio-economic vulnerabilities. The oil reaching shoreline is quantified with an oil spill fate and behaviour model running multiple virtual spills from vessels along time. Shoreline risks can be computed in real-time or from previously obtained data. Results show the ability of the proposed methodology to estimate the risk properly sensitive to dynamic metocean conditions and to oil transport behaviour. The integration of meteo-oceanic + oil spill models with coastal vulnerability and AIS data in the quantification of risk enhances the maritime situational awareness and the decision support model, providing a more realistic approach in the assessment of shoreline impacts. The risk assessment from historical data can help finding typical risk patterns, "hot spots" or developing sensitivity analysis to specific conditions, whereas real time risk levels can be used in the prioritization of individual ships, geographical areas, strategic tug

  19. UNIFIED METHOD OF SEPARATE AND COMBINED CALCULATION OF WATER AND EARTH PRESSURES%水土压力分算与合算的统一算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪新

    2011-01-01

    Applying combined calculation of water and earth pressures for clay leads to a result which is more close to the field measurement value, however, obviously violates the principle of effective stress. Based on characteristics of the pore water in soil, it is assumed that the bound water absorbed by the clay particles in the soil offsets part of soil pore, and finally physical parameters such as void ratio, boundary water content, particle analysis, etc. are introduced to calculation of water and earth pressures on retaining structures to propose a coefficient ξ which can be calculated through physical parameters of soil and to provide the method of measuring the value of ξ through permeability tests. With the coefficient ξ, the effective stress intensity index and total stress intensity index are integrated in one strength formula. A new calculation method to unify the separate calculation and combined calculation of water and earth pressures is proposed to carry out the transition between results of the two conventional calculation methods and provide a new idea for solving the jump problem between the two results. According to the theory analysis of this paper, the measured permeability coefficient-void ratio curve will have a translational move in a forward direction along e-axis. The more clay particles that soil contains will have the larger translation, which has been verified by experimental data of related literatures. Separate calculation of water and earth pressures is too conventional for sand soil containing clay particles while combined calculation of water and earth pressures for clay with high void ratio can't guarantee the safety. Water and earth pressures on retaining structure are related not only to the soil categories, but also the void ratio.%以土中孔隙水特征为基础,假定土体中的黏性土颗粒吸附的结合水会抵消一部分土中孔隙,最终把土的孔隙比、界限含水量、颗粒分析等物理参数引入土水

  20. Dynamic Decoupling for Combined Shape and Gauge Control System in Wide Strip Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINGHU Ke-zhi; HE An-rui; YANG Quan; ZHAO Lin; GUO Xiao-bo

    2008-01-01

    The precision of profile and thickness is the most important target for wide strip rolling, but the coupling of profile control and thickness control is ignored in rolling schedule, which holds down the simultaneous quality improvement of profile and thickness. A cross-coupled process control model for combined shape and gauge control was developed on the basis of the fact that both controls for profile and thickness are realized by controlling the rolling gap. A dynamic deeoupling controller was then proposed to decouple the model. Both the simulation results and the online production data are valid and ensure the quality of the deeoupling controller.

  1. Conduit dynamics and post explosion degassing on Stromboli: A combined UV camera and numerical modeling treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, A. J. S.; James, M. R.; Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Delle Donne, D.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent gas flux measurements have shown that Strombolian explosions are often followed by periods of elevated flux, or “gas codas,” with durations of order a minute. Here we present UV camera data from 200 events recorded at Stromboli volcano to constrain the nature of these codas for the first time, providing estimates for combined explosion plus coda SO2 masses of ≈18–225 kg. Numerical simulations of gas slug ascent show that substantial proportions of the initial gas mass can be distributed into a train of “daughter bubbles” released from the base of the slug, which we suggest, generate the codas, on bursting at the surface. This process could also cause transitioning of slugs into cap bubbles, significantly reducing explosivity. This study is the first attempt to combine high temporal resolution gas flux data with numerical simulations of conduit gas flow to investigate volcanic degassing dynamics. PMID:27478285

  2. Combining Kepler and HARPS Occurrence Rates to Infer the Period-Mass-Radius Distribution of Super-Earths/Sub-Neptunes

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfgang, A

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Search (HARPS) has found that 30-50% of GK dwarfs in the solar neighborhood host planets with sub-Neptune masses in orbits of P < 50 days. At first glance, this overall occurrence rate seems inconsistent with the planet frequency measured during Q0-Q2 of the Kepler Mission, whose 1,235 detected planetary candidates imply that ~ 15% of main sequence dwarfs harbor short-period planets with R_pl < 4 R_Earth. A rigorous comparison between the two surveys is difficult, however, as they observe different stellar populations and measure different planetary properties. Here we report the results of a Monte Carlo study that can account for this discrepancy via plausible distributions of planetary compositions. We find that a population concurrently consisting of (1) dense silicate-iron planets and (2) low-density gas-dominated worlds provides a natural fit to the current data. In this scenario, the fraction of dense planets decreases with increasing mass, from f_r...

  3. Combined biogeophysical and biogeochemical effects of large-scale forest cover changes in the MPI earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bathiany

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Afforestation and reforestation have become popular instruments of climate mitigation policy, as forests are known to store large quantities of carbon. However, they also modify the fluxes of energy, water and momentum at the land surface. Previous studies have shown that these biogeophysical effects can counteract the carbon drawdown and, in boreal latitudes, even overcompensate it due to large albedo differences between forest canopy and snow. This study investigates the role forest cover plays for global climate by conducting deforestation and afforestation experiments with the earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-ESM. Complete deforestation of the tropics (18.75° S–15° N exerts a global warming of 0.4 °C due to an increase in CO2 concentration by initially 60 ppm and a decrease in evapotranspiration in the deforested areas. In the northern latitudes (45° N–90° N, complete deforestation exerts a global cooling of 0.25 °C after 100 years, while afforestation leads to an equally large warming, despite the counteracting changes in CO2 concentration. Earlier model studies are qualitatively confirmed by these findings. As the response of temperature as well as terrestrial carbon pools is not of equal sign at every land cell, considering forests as cooling in the tropics and warming in high latitudes seems to be true only for the spatial mean, but not on a local scale.

  4. Combined biogeophysical and biogeochemical effects of large-scale forest cover changes in the MPI earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bathiany

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Afforestation and reforestation have become popular instruments of climate mitigation policy, as forests are known to store large quantities of carbon. However, they also modify the fluxes of energy, water and momentum at the land surface. Previous studies have shown that these biogeophysical effects can counteract the carbon drawdown and, in boreal latitudes, even overcompensate it due to large albedo differences between forest canopy and snow. This study investigates the role forest cover plays for global climate by conducting deforestation and afforestation experiments with the earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-ESM. Complete deforestation of the tropics (18.75° S–15° N exerts a global warming of 0.4 °C due to an increase in CO2 concentration by initially 60 ppm and a decrease in evapotranspiration in the deforested areas. In the northern latitudes (45° N–90° N, complete deforestation exerts a global cooling of 0.25 °C after 100 years, while afforestation leads to an equally large warming, despite the counteracting changes in CO2 concentration. Earlier model studies are qualitatively confirmed by these findings. As the response of temperature as well as terrestrial carbon pools is not of equal sign at every land cell, considering forests as cooling in the tropics and warming in high latitudes seems to be true only for the spatial mean, but not on a local scale.

  5. Topology of sustainable management of dynamical systems with desirable states: from defining planetary boundaries to safe operating spaces in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzig, Jobst; Kittel, Tim; Donges, Jonathan; Molkenthin, Nora

    2016-04-01

    To keep the Earth System in a desirable region of its state space, such as defined by the recently suggested "tolerable environment and development window", "guardrails", "planetary boundaries", or "safe (and just) operating space for humanity", one not only needs to understand the quantitative internal dynamics of the system and the available options for influencing it (management), but also the structure of the system's state space with regard to certain qualitative differences. Important questions are: Which state space regions can be reached from which others with or without leaving the desirable region? Which regions are in a variety of senses "safe" to stay in when management options might break away, and which qualitative decision problems may occur as a consequence of this topological structure? In this work, we develop a mathematical theory of the qualitative topology of the state space of a dynamical system with management options and desirable states, as a complement to the existing literature on optimal control which is more focussed on quantitative optimization and is much applied in both the engineering and the integrated assessment literature. We suggest a certain terminology for the various resulting regions of the state space and perform a detailed formal classification of the possible states with respect to the possibility of avoiding or leaving the undesired region. Our results indicate that before performing some form of quantitative optimization such as of indicators of human well-being for achieving certain sustainable development goals, a sustainable and resilient management of the Earth System may require decisions of a more discrete type that come in the form of several dilemmas, e.g., choosing between eventual safety and uninterrupted desirability, or between uninterrupted safety and larger flexibility. We illustrate the concepts and dilemmas drawing on conceptual models from climate science, ecology, coevolutionary Earth System modeling

  6. The CERES S'COOL Project: Dynamic NASA Earth Science Education and Public Outreach for Formal and Informal Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.; Harte, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project began in 1997 as a collaboration between a Virginia Middle School teacher, and several NASA Langley Research Center scientists. The project's aim is to involve classroom students in observing and reporting cloud parameters to assist in the validation of NASA's CERES satellite instruments, thus connecting classroom science work to the outside world. In 2007, S'COOL added a Citizen Science component called ROVER. ROVER is geared toward informal observers not tied to one observation location. The S'COOL Project has been successful due to a combination of its flexibility of implementation, training and involvement opportunities, intuitive and free resources, and this authentic connection to an ongoing scientific activity. Through S'COOL's multiple participation avenues, all participants are invited to collect cloud data following S'COOL guidelines. Their cloud data is later matched with corresponding satellite data. Within a week of submitting their report, a participant will be sent a "match" email, if their observation aligns to a satellite overpass. This "match" shows their ground report next to the satellite data for comparison and analysis. All ground observations and satellite matches are archived in a S'COOL database, accessible to the public. This multi-step process enables an on-going, two-way interaction between students and NASA, which is much more engaging than more typical one-way outreach experiences. To complement and enable the cloud observation component, the S'COOL website offers formal and informal education communities a wide variety of atmospheric science related learning resources. These educator created resources are supplemented with carefully crafted background information from the science team. Alignment of the project to the Next Generation Science Standards is underway now, and will highlight the many science process skills involved

  7. Solar Flare Five-Day Predictions from Quantum Detectors of Dynamical Space Fractal Flow Turbulence: Gravitational Wave Diminution and Earth Climate Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Space speed fluctuations, which have a 1 / f spectrum, are shown to be the cause of solar flares. The direction and magnitude of the space flow has been detected from numer- ous different experimental techniques, and is close to the normal to the plane of the ecliptic. Zener diode data shows that the fluctuations in the space speed closely match the Sun Solar Cycle 23 flare count, and reveal that major solar flares follow major space speed fluctuations by some 6 days. This implies that a warning period of some 5 days in predicting major solar flares is possible using such detectors. This has significant conse- quences in being able to protect various spacecraft and Earth located electrical systems from the subsequent arrival of ejected plasma from a solar flare. These space speed fluctuations are the actual gravitational waves, and have a significant magnitude. This discovery is a significant application of the dynamical space phenomenon and theory. We also show that space flow turbulence impacts on the Earth’s climate, as such tur- bulence can input energy into systems, which is the basis of the Zener Diode Quantum Detector. Large scale space fluctuations impact on both the sun and the Earth, and as well explain temperature correlations with solar activity, but that the Earth temperatures are not caused by such solar activity. This implies that the Earth climate debate has been missing a key physical process. Observed diminishing gravitational waves imply a cooling epoch for the Earth for the next 30 years.

  8. Part I. Lattice dynamics of rare earth tritin intermetallic compounds. Part II. Lattice hardening from fission fragment recoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    The lattice dynamical behavior of RESn/sub 3/ (RE = La,Ce,Pr,Nd,Sm,Eu,Gd,Yb) compounds were investigated using temperature dependent /sup 119/Sn Mossbauer spectroscopy over the range 78 < T < 320K. The temperature dependence of the recoil-free fraction (f) is nearly identical for Re = (La,Ce,Nd,Sm,Gd)Sn/sub 3/ compounds. EuSn/sub 3/ and YbSn/sub 3/ show a slightly greater temperature variation in In f than the other rare earth tritin compounds. All compounds exhibit curvature over the measured temperature range suggesting motional anharmonicity at the tin site. Analysis of the spectral doublet in each compound in terms of the Goldanskii-Karyagin effect show > at 300K. The In f versus temperature data for CeSn/sub 3/ display an anomalous softening of the lattice centered at 140K. This behavior indicates strong electro-elastic coupling of the electronic instability in cerium at this temperature. Using the 14.4 keV radiation in /sup 57/Fe and the 23.8 keV radiation in /sup 119/Sn, temperature dependent Mossbauer effect measurements were carried out on samples of USn/sub 3/ and UFe/sub 2/ prepared with both depleted and /sup 235/U enriched uranium. Blank experiments to gauge the effect of ..gamma.. radiation and fast neturons were performed with /sup 60/Co and reactor irradiations, using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Hi Flux facility. Lattice temperatures (O/sub m/) for the blanks and for samples in which approx.0.01% of the /sup 235/U was allowed to fission were calculated from the temperature dependence of the recoil-free fraction over the temperature range 78 < T < 320K.

  9. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Resulting from Earth-Directed CMEs Using SOHO and ACE Combined Data During Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2017-02-01

    In this work a total of 266 interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (SOHO/LASCO) and then studied by in situ observations from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft, are presented in a new catalog for the time interval 1996 - 2009 covering Solar Cycle 23. Specifically, we determine the characteristics of the CME which is responsible for the upcoming ICME and the associated solar flare, the initial/background solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions before the arrival of the CME, the conditions in the sheath of the ICME, the main part of the ICME, the geomagnetic conditions of the ICME's impact at Earth and finally we remark on the visual examination for each event. Interesting results revealed from this study include the high correlation coefficient values of the magnetic field Bz component against the Ap index (r = 0.84), as well as against the Dst index (r = 0.80) and of the effective acceleration against the CME linear speed (r = 0.98). We also identify a north-south asymmetry for X-class solar flares and an east-west asymmetry for CMEs associated with strong solar flares (magnitude ≥ M1.0) which finally triggered intense geomagnetic storms (with Ap ≥179). The majority of the geomagnetic storms are determined to be due to the ICME main part and not to the extreme conditions which dominate inside the sheath. For the intense geomagnetic storms the maximum value of the Ap index is observed almost 4 hours before the minimum Dst index. The amount of information makes this new catalog the most comprehensive ICME catalog for Solar Cycle 23.

  10. Dynamics of domain walls with lines in rare-earth orthoferrites in magnetic and electric fields with exchange relaxation processes taken into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekomasov, E. G.

    2003-08-01

    The influence of exchange relaxation on the dynamics of domain walls with a "fine structure" in rare-earth orthoferrites in the presence of external magnetic and electric fields is investigated. A system of differential equations is obtained which describe the dynamics of a domain wall with a solitary line. The dependence of the steady-state velocity of the domain wall and line on the values of the relaxation parameters and on the components of the magnetic and electric fields is found. The results are compared with the known experimental results.

  11. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyin, Hexi; CHEN Yang; Li, Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small...

  12. The Influence of Earth Temperature on the Dynamic Characteristics of Frozen Soil and the Parameters of Ground Motion on Sites of Permafrost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lanmin; Zhang Dongli; Wu Zhijian; Ma Wei; Li Xiaojun

    2004-01-01

    Earth temperature is one of the most important factors influencing the mechanical properties of frozen soil. Based on the field investigation of the characteristics of ground deformation and ground failure caused by the Ms8.1 earthquake in the west of the Kuniun Mountain Pass,China, the influence of temperature on the dynamic constitutive relationship, dynamic elastic modulus, damping ratio and dynamic strength of frozen soil was quantitatively studied by means of the dynamic triaxial test. Moreover, the characteristics of ground motion on a permafrost site under different temperatures were analyzed for the four profiles of permafrost along the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Railway using the time histories of ground motion acceleration with 3 exceedance probabilities of the Kunlun Mountains area. The influences of temperature on the seismic displacement, velocity, acceleration and response spectrum on permafrost ground were studied quantitatively. A scientific basis was presented for earthquake disaster mitigation for engineering foundations, highways and underground engineering in permafrost areas.

  13. Dynamic Pricing in Cloud Manufacturing Systems under Combined Effects of Consumer Structure, Negotiation, and Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed a game-theory based framework to model the dynamic pricing process in the cloud manufacturing (CMfg system. We considered a service provider (SP, a broker agent (BA, and a dynamic service demander (SD population that is composed of price takers and bargainers in this study. The pricing processes under linear demand and constant elasticity demand were modeled, respectively. The combined effects of SD population structure, negotiation, and demand forms on the SP’s and the BA’s equilibrium prices and expected revenues were examined. We found that the SP’s optimal wholesale price, the BA’s optimal reservation price, and posted price all increase with the proportion of price takers under linear demand but decrease with it under constant elasticity demand. We also found that the BA’s optimal reservation price increases with bargainers’ power no matter under what kind of demand. Through analyzing the participants’ revenues, we showed that a dynamic SD population with a high ratio of price takers would benefit the SP and the BA.

  14. Reaction mechanisms of aqueous monoethanolamine with carbon dioxide: a combined quantum chemical and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gyeong S; Stowe, Haley M; Paek, Eunsu; Manogaran, Dhivya

    2015-01-14

    Aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) has been extensively studied as a solvent for CO2 capture, yet the underlying reaction mechanisms are still not fully understood. Combined ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to revisit and identify key elementary reactions and intermediates in 25-30 wt% aqueous MEA with CO2, by explicitly taking into account the structural and dynamic effects. Using static quantum chemical calculations, we also analyzed in more detail the fundamental interactions involved in the MEA-CO2 reaction. We find that both the CO2 capture by MEA and solvent regeneration follow a zwitterion-mediated two-step mechanism; from the zwitterionic intermediate, the relative probability between deprotonation (carbamate formation) and CO2 removal (MEA regeneration) tends to be determined largely by the interaction between the zwitterion and neighboring H2O molecules. In addition, our calculations clearly demonstrate that proton transfer in the MEA-CO2-H2O solution primarily occurs through H-bonded water bridges, and thus the availability and arrangement of H2O molecules also directly impacts the protonation and/or deprotonation of MEA and its derivatives. This improved understanding should contribute to developing more comprehensive kinetic models for use in modeling and optimizing the CO2 capture process. Moreover, this work highlights the importance of a detailed atomic-level description of the solution structure and dynamics in order to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying the reaction of CO2 with aqueous amines.

  15. A combined structural dynamics approach identifies a putative switch in factor VIIa employed by tissue factor to initiate blood coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ole H; Rand, Kasper D; Østergaard, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) requires tissue factor (TF) to attain full catalytic competency and to initiate blood coagulation. In this study, the mechanism by which TF allosterically activates FVIIa is investigated by a structural dynamics approach that combines molecular dynamics (MD...

  16. A Decision Support Systems Using A Combined Dynamic Model For Integrated Watershed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, E.; Ostrowski, M.

    In this context A Decision Support System (DSS) is presented using a combined dy- namic model for Integrated Watershed Management (IWM) in a small urbanized basin in Japan. In order to improve today's often unsustainable watershed management, the causes of water problems, which interact with each other, must be identified and adequate actions must be chosen to solve the problems. To achieve the ultimate goal of sustain- able development (SD) for water it is essential to develop and apply generic DSSs. A DSS is frequently defined as a combination of a management information system, a model base and an evaluation / assessment module. The EU Water Framework Di- rectives recently established have a narrow time schedule requiring fast action into this direction, which does hardly allow to develop completely new tolls. Thus we are trying to combine different existing dynamic models that incorporate an urban man- agement model, a water quality analysis model, a groundwater analysis model and a water supply model including geographical information system data. With this com- bined model, the most appropriate and sustainable water management plan in an urban area will be developed while considering land use, ground water level, allocation of drainage system, sewerage, water supply works, water quality, and quantity. Because of sharing input data, using this combined model requires less data than using sev- eral separate models. The DSS can also be used to determine the optimum location of gages and monitoring sites. As a case study, the research will deal with the Taguri-river basin in Japan. This basin is located near Tokyo. Although the area in this basin has about 8 km2 only, there are densely build-up areas, paddy fields, and non-developed areas. The river is polluted due to wastewater from point resources: households, and non-point resources: roads and fields, etc. Overpumping of aquifers results in sinking groundwater tables and land subsidence. Moreover, a decrease

  17. Combined Application of Si and Mn for Correcting Fe Toxicity of Rice(Oryza sativa L.) on a Red Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAOZONG-WEN; LINDONG-JIAO; 等

    1994-01-01

    Based on the fact that Fe toxicity which is usually characterized by leaf oranging and low yield can be obviously subdued by application of Si or Mn due to counteraction.between Fe and Si or Mn.A pot experiment was conducted with four treatments of CK,Si,Mn and Si+Mn to further study the effect of combined application of Si and Mn on rice growth on red earths.Water-soluble SI,Fe and Mn were measured.and electron probe was used to study Si,Mn,Fe and Ca in root cross sections.Combined application of Si and Mn could increas water-soluble Si and Mn but reduce water-soluble Fe,thus being favorable for correctiong Fe toxicity.Electron probe study showed obvous differences of Si,Fe,Mn,and Ca in rice roots between CK and the other three treatments.The combined applicatioin of Si and Mn could reduce leaf oranging and improve rice growth.The Si+Mn treatment had a higher plant height,lower number of oranging leaves and a 25.0% higher rice yield than CK and showed a better effect on rice growth than the treatment of sole Si or Mn.

  18. Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

  19. Magnetic materials at finite temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenbach, Markus [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perera, Meewanage Dilina N. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Center for Simulational Physics; Landau, David P [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Center for Simulational Physics; Nicholson, Don M. [Univ. of North Carolina, Asheville, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Yin, Junqi [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). National Inst. for Computational Sciences; Brown, Greg [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles-derived simulations.

  20. Controlling plasmonic orbital angular momentum by combining geometric and dynamic phases

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Qilong; Liu, Hongchao; Huang, Xuguang; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Tunable orbit angular momentum (OAM) of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is theoretically studied with appropriately designed metasurfaces. By controlling both the orientation angle and spatial position of nano aperture array on an ultrathin gold film, the field distributions of the surface waves can be engineered to contain both spin dependent and independent OAM components. Simultaneous control over the geometric phase and optical path difference induced phase (dynamic phase) provides extra degrees of freedom for manipulating OAM of SPPs. We show that arbitrary combination of OAM numbers can be realized for the SPPs excited by incident light of different circular polarizations. The results provides powerful control over the OAM of SPPs, which will have potential applications on optical trapping, imaging, communications and quantum information processing.

  1. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Holst, Niels; Bøjer, Ole Mission;

    2015-01-01

    A functional approach to predicting shifts in weed floras in response to management or environmental change requires the combination of data on weed traits with analytical frameworks that capture the filtering effect of selection pressures on traits. A weed traits database (WTDB) was designed......, populated and analysed, initially using data for 19 common European weeds, to begin to consolidate trait data in a single repository. The initial choice of traits was driven by the requirements of empirical models of weed population dynamics to identify correlations between traits and model parameters....... These relationships were used to build a generic model, operating at the level of functional traits, to simulate the impact of increasing herbicide and fertiliser use on virtual weeds along gradients of seed weight and maximum height. The model generated ‘fitness contours’ (defined as population growth rates) within...

  2. Combined Population Dynamics and Entropy Modelling Supports Patient Stratification in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Marc; Koschmieder, Steffen; Montazeri, Maryam; Copland, Mhairi; Oehler, Vivian G.; Radich, Jerald P.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Modelling the parameters of multistep carcinogenesis is key for a better understanding of cancer progression, biomarker identification and the design of individualized therapies. Using chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as a paradigm for hierarchical disease evolution we show that combined population dynamic modelling and CML patient biopsy genomic analysis enables patient stratification at unprecedented resolution. Linking CD34+ similarity as a disease progression marker to patient-derived gene expression entropy separated established CML progression stages and uncovered additional heterogeneity within disease stages. Importantly, our patient data informed model enables quantitative approximation of individual patients’ disease history within chronic phase (CP) and significantly separates “early” from “late” CP. Our findings provide a novel rationale for personalized and genome-informed disease progression risk assessment that is independent and complementary to conventional measures of CML disease burden and prognosis.

  3. Estimation of annual energy production using dynamic wake meandering in combination with ambient CFD solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, S.; Machefaux, E.; Hristov, Y. V.; Albano, M.; Threadgill, R.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, combination of the standalone dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) CFD solutions for ambient ABL flows is introduced, and its predictive performance for annual energy production (AEP) is evaluated against Vestas’ SCADA data for six operating wind farms over semi-complex terrains under neutral conditions. The performances of conventional linear and quadratic wake superposition techniques are also compared, together with the in-house implemention of successive hierarchical merging approaches. As compared to our standard procedure based on the Jensen model in WindPRO, the overall results are promising, leading to a significant improvement in AEP accuracy for four of the six sites. While the conventional linear superposition shows the best performance for the improved four sites, the hierarchical square superposition shows the least deteriorated result for the other two sites.

  4. Toward a Deterministic Model of Planetary Formation VI: Dynamical Interaction and Coagulation of Multiple Rocky Embryos and Super-Earth Systems around Solar Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ida, S

    2010-01-01

    Radial velocity and transit surveys indicate that solar-type stars bear super-Earths, with mass and period up to ~ 20 M_E and a few months, are more common than those with Jupiter-mass gas giants. In many cases, these super-Earths are members of multiple-planet systems in which their mutual dynamical interaction has influenced their formation and evolution. In this paper, we modify an existing numerical population synthesis scheme to take into account protoplanetary embryos' interaction with their evolving natal gaseous disk, as well as their close scatterings and resonant interaction with each other. We show that it is possible for a group of compact embryos to emerge interior to the ice line, grow, migrate, and congregate into closely-packed convoys which stall in the proximity of their host stars. After the disk-gas depletion, they undergo orbit crossing, close scattering, and giant impacts to form multiple rocky Earths or super-Earths in non-resonant orbits around ~ 0.1AU with moderate eccentricities of ~...

  5. Microbial dynamics in a High Arctic glacier forefield: a combined field, laboratory, and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James A.; Arndt, Sandra; Šabacká, Marie; Benning, Liane G.; Barker, Gary L.; Blacker, Joshua J.; Yallop, Marian L.; Wright, Katherine E.; Bellas, Christopher M.; Telling, Jonathan; Tranter, Martyn; Anesio, Alexandre M.

    2016-10-01

    Modelling the development of soils in glacier forefields is necessary in order to assess how microbial and geochemical processes interact and shape soil development in response to glacier retreat. Furthermore, such models can help us predict microbial growth and the fate of Arctic soils in an increasingly ice-free future. Here, for the first time, we combined field sampling with laboratory analyses and numerical modelling to investigate microbial community dynamics in oligotrophic proglacial soils in Svalbard. We measured low bacterial growth rates and growth efficiencies (relative to estimates from Alpine glacier forefields) and high sensitivity of bacterial growth rates to soil temperature (relative to temperate soils). We used these laboratory measurements to inform parameter values in a new numerical model and significantly refined predictions of microbial and biogeochemical dynamics of soil development over a period of roughly 120 years. The model predicted the observed accumulation of autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass. Genomic data indicated that initial microbial communities were dominated by bacteria derived from the glacial environment, whereas older soils hosted a mixed community of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. This finding was simulated by the numerical model, which showed that active microbial communities play key roles in fixing and recycling carbon and nutrients. We also demonstrated the role of allochthonous carbon and microbial necromass in sustaining a pool of organic material, despite high heterotrophic activity in older soils. This combined field, laboratory, and modelling approach demonstrates the value of integrated model-data studies to understand and quantify the functioning of the microbial community in an emerging High Arctic soil ecosystem.

  6. HybridArc: A novel radiation therapy technique combining optimized dynamic arcs and intensity modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robar, James L., E-mail: james.robar@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Thomas, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    This investigation focuses on possible dosimetric and efficiency advantages of HybridArc-a novel treatment planning approach combining optimized dynamic arcs with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. Application of this technique to two disparate sites, complex cranial tumors, and prostate was examined. HybridArc plans were compared with either dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or IMRT plans to determine whether HybridArc offers a synergy through combination of these 2 techniques. Plans were compared with regard to target volume dose conformity, target volume dose homogeneity, sparing of proximal organs at risk, normal tissue sparing, and monitor unit (MU) efficiency. For cranial cases, HybridArc produced significantly improved dose conformity compared with both DCA and IMRT but did not improve sparing of the brainstem or optic chiasm. For prostate cases, conformity was improved compared with DCA but not IMRT. Compared with IMRT, the dose homogeneity in the planning target volume was improved, and the maximum doses received by the bladder and rectum were reduced. Both arc-based techniques distribute peripheral dose over larger volumes of normal tissue compared with IMRT, whereas HybridArc involved slightly greater volumes of normal tissues compared with DCA. Compared with IMRT, cranial cases required 38% more MUs, whereas for prostate cases, MUs were reduced by 7%. For cranial cases, HybridArc improves dose conformity to the target. For prostate cases, dose conformity and homogeneity are improved compared with DCA and IMRT, respectively. Compared with IMRT, whether required MUs increase or decrease with HybridArc was site-dependent.

  7. Boolean network identification from perturbation time series data combining dynamics abstraction and logic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, M; Paulevé, L; Schaub, T; Siegel, A; Guziolowski, C

    2016-11-01

    Boolean networks (and more general logic models) are useful frameworks to study signal transduction across multiple pathways. Logic models can be learned from a prior knowledge network structure and multiplex phosphoproteomics data. However, most efficient and scalable training methods focus on the comparison of two time-points and assume that the system has reached an early steady state. In this paper, we generalize such a learning procedure to take into account the time series traces of phosphoproteomics data in order to discriminate Boolean networks according to their transient dynamics. To that end, we identify a necessary condition that must be satisfied by the dynamics of a Boolean network to be consistent with a discretized time series trace. Based on this condition, we use Answer Set Programming to compute an over-approximation of the set of Boolean networks which fit best with experimental data and provide the corresponding encodings. Combined with model-checking approaches, we end up with a global learning algorithm. Our approach is able to learn logic models with a true positive rate higher than 78% in two case studies of mammalian signaling networks; for a larger case study, our method provides optimal answers after 7min of computation. We quantified the gain in our method predictions precision compared to learning approaches based on static data. Finally, as an application, our method proposes erroneous time-points in the time series data with respect to the optimal learned logic models.

  8. Conformal optical design with combination of static and dynamic aberration corrections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Li Lin; Huang Yi-Fan; Liu Jia-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Conformal domes that are shaped to meet aerodynamic requirements can increase range and speed for the host platform. Because these domes typically deviate greatly from spherical surface descriptions, a variety of aberrations are induced which vary with the field-of-regard (FOR) angle. A system for correcting optical aberrations created by a conformal dome has an outer surface and an inner surface. Optimizing the inner surface is regard as static aberration correction. A deformable mirror is placed at the position of the secondary mirror in the two-mirror all reflective imaging system, which is the dynamic aberration correction. An ellipsoidal MgF2 conformal dome with a fineness ratio of 1.0 is designed as an example. The FOR angle is 00°-30°, and the design wavelength is 4 μm. After the optimization at 7zoom positions by using the design tools Code V, the root-mean-square (RMS) spot size is reduced to approximately 0.99 to 1.48 times the diffraction limit. The design results show that the performances of the conformal optical systems can be greatly improved by the combination of the static correction and the dynamic correction.

  9. Combined MRI-PET dissects dynamic changes in plant structures and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Siegfried; Menzel, Marion I; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Roeb, Gerhard W; Bühler, Jonas; Minwuyelet, Senay; Blümler, Peter; Temperton, Vicky M; Hombach, Thomas; Streun, Matthias; Beer, Simone; Khodaverdi, Maryam; Ziemons, Karl; Coenen, Heinz H; Schurr, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Unravelling the factors determining the allocation of carbon to various plant organs is one of the great challenges of modern plant biology. Studying allocation under close to natural conditions requires non-invasive methods, which are now becoming available for measuring plants on a par with those developed for humans. By combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), we investigated three contrasting root/shoot systems growing in sand or soil, with respect to their structures, transport routes and the translocation dynamics of recently fixed photoassimilates labelled with the short-lived radioactive carbon isotope (11)C. Storage organs of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and radish plants (Raphanus sativus) were assessed using MRI, providing images of the internal structures of the organs with high spatial resolution, and while species-specific transport sectoralities, properties of assimilate allocation and unloading characteristics were measured using PET. Growth and carbon allocation within complex root systems were monitored in maize plants (Zea mays), and the results may be used to identify factors affecting root growth in natural substrates or in competition with roots of other plants. MRI-PET co-registration opens the door for non-invasive analysis of plant structures and transport processes that may change in response to genomic, developmental or environmental challenges. It is our aim to make the methods applicable for quantitative analyses of plant traits in phenotyping as well as in understanding the dynamics of key processes that are essential to plant performance.

  10. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  11. The implementation of a MiXed Layer model (MXL, v1.0) for the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Pozzer, A.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new submodel for the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy): the MiXed Layer (MXL) model for the diurnal dynamics of the convective boundary layer, including explicit representations of entrainment and surface fluxes. Through the MESSy interface, MXL is coupled with modules that represent other processes relevant to chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In combination, these provide a computationally inexpensive tool that is ideally suited for the analysis of field data, for evaluating new parametrizations for 3-D models, and for performing systematic sensitivity analyses. A case study for the DOMINO campaign in Southern Spain is shown to demonstrate the use and performance of MXL/MESSy in reproducing and analysing field observations.

  12. Development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture will be discussed. The IGCC reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power using Illinois No.6 coal as the feed. The plant includes an entrained, downflow, General Electric Energy (GEE) gasifier with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC), a two-stage water gas shift (WGS) conversion process, and two advanced 'F' class combustion turbines partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit (ASU). A subcritical steam cycle is considered for heat recovery steam generation. Syngas is selectively cleaned by a SELEXOL acid gas removal (AGR) process. Sulfur is recovered using a two-train Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. A multistage intercooled compressor is used for compressing CO2 to the pressure required for sequestration. Using Illinois No.6 coal, the reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power. The plant-wide steady-state and dynamic IGCC simulations have been generated using the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign} process simulators, respectively. The model is generated based on the Case 2 IGCC configuration detailed in the study available in the NETL website1. The GEE gasifier is represented with a restricted equilibrium reactor model where the temperature approach to equilibrium for individual reactions can be modified based on the experimental data. In this radiant-only configuration, the syngas from the Radiant Syngas Cooler (RSC) is quenched in a scrubber. The blackwater from the scrubber bottom is further cleaned in the blackwater treatment plant. The cleaned water is returned back to the scrubber and also used for slurry preparation. The acid gas from the sour water stripper (SWS) is sent to the Claus plant. The syngas from the scrubber passes through a sour shift process. The WGS reactors are modeled as adiabatic plug flow reactors with rigorous kinetics based on

  13. Combined Dynamic Time Warping with Multiple Sensors for 3D Gesture Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyo-Rim; Kim, TaeYong

    2017-08-17

    Cyber-physical systems, which closely integrate physical systems and humans, can be applied to a wider range of applications through user movement analysis. In three-dimensional (3D) gesture recognition, multiple sensors are required to recognize various natural gestures. Several studies have been undertaken in the field of gesture recognition; however, gesture recognition was conducted based on data captured from various independent sensors, which rendered the capture and combination of real-time data complicated. In this study, a 3D gesture recognition method using combined information obtained from multiple sensors is proposed. The proposed method can robustly perform gesture recognition regardless of a user's location and movement directions by providing viewpoint-weighted values and/or motion-weighted values. In the proposed method, the viewpoint-weighted dynamic time warping with multiple sensors has enhanced performance by preventing joint measurement errors and noise due to sensor measurement tolerance, which has resulted in the enhancement of recognition performance by comparing multiple joint sequences effectively.

  14. Dynamic simulations of geologic materials using combined FEM/DEM/SPH analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J P; Johnson, S M

    2008-03-26

    An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC now includes implementations of Cosserat point theory and cohesive elements. This approach directly simulates the transition from continuum to discontinuum behavior, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture within a combined finite element/discrete element framework. In addition, there are many application involving geologic materials where fluid-structure interaction is important. To facilitate solution of this class of problems a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) capability has been incorporated into LDEC to simulate fully coupled systems involving geologic materials and a saturating fluid. We will present results from a study of a broad range of geomechanical problems that exercise the various components of LDEC in isolation and in tandem.

  15. Combined Dynamic Light Scattering and Raman Spectroscopy Approach for Characterizing the Aggregation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Neil Lewis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the physicochemical properties of protein therapeutics and their aggregates is critical for developing formulations that enhance product efficacy, stability, safety and manufacturability. Analytical challenges are compounded for materials: (1 that are formulated at high concentration, (2 that are formulated with a variety of excipients, and (3 that are available only in small volumes. In this article, a new instrument is described that measures protein secondary and tertiary structure, as well as molecular size, over a range of concentrations and formulation conditions of low volume samples. Specifically, characterization of colloidal and conformational stability is obtained through a combination of two well-established analytical techniques: dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. As the data for these two analytical modalities are collected on the same sample at the same time, the technique enables direct correlation between them, in addition to the more straightforward benefit of minimizing sample usage by providing multiple analytical measurements on the same aliquot non-destructively. The ability to differentiate between unfolding and aggregation that the combination of these techniques provides enables insights into underlying protein aggregation mechanisms. The article will report on mechanistic insights for aggregation that have been obtained from the application of this technique to the characterization of lysozyme, which was evaluated as a function of concentration and pH.

  16. Dynamic modeling and evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell - combined heat and power system operating strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanaeda, Kimihiro; Mueller, Fabian; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, Scott

    Operating strategies of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) systems are developed and evaluated from a utility, and end-user perspective using a fully integrated SOFC-CHP system dynamic model that resolves the physical states, thermal integration and overall efficiency of the system. The model can be modified for any SOFC-CHP system, but the present analysis is applied to a hotel in southern California based on measured electric and heating loads. Analysis indicates that combined heat and power systems can be operated to benefit both the end-users and the utility, providing more efficient electric generation as well as grid ancillary services, namely dispatchable urban power. Design and operating strategies considered in the paper include optimal sizing of the fuel cell, thermal energy storage to dispatch heat, and operating the fuel cell to provide flexible grid power. Analysis results indicate that with a 13.1% average increase in price-of-electricity (POE), the system can provide the grid with a 50% operating range of dispatchable urban power at an overall thermal efficiency of 80%. This grid-support operating mode increases the operational flexibility of the SOFC-CHP system, which may make the technology an important utility asset for accommodating the increased penetration of intermittent renewable power.

  17. The breakthrough curve combination for xenon sampling dynamics in a carbon molecular sieve column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-jiang, Liu; Zhan-ying, Chen; Yin-zhong, Chang; Shi-lian, Wang; Qi, Li; Yuan-qing, Fan; Huai-mao, Jia; Xin-jun, Zhang; Yun-gang, Zhao

    2015-01-21

    In the research of xenon sampling and xenon measurements, the xenon breakthrough curve plays a significant role in the xenon concentrating dynamics. In order to improve the theoretical comprehension of the xenon concentrating procedure from the atmosphere, the method of the breakthrough curve combination for sampling techniques should be developed and investigated under pulse injection conditions. In this paper, we describe a xenon breakthrough curve in a carbon molecular sieve column, the combination curve method for five conditions is shown and debated in detail; the fitting curves and the prediction equations are derived in theory and verified by the designed experiments. As a consequence, the curves of the derived equations are in good agreement with the fitting curves by tested. The retention times of the xenon in the column are 61.2, 42.2 and 23.5 at the flow rate of 1200, 1600 and 2000 mL min(-1), respectively, but the breakthrough times are 51.4, 38.6 and 35.1 min.

  18. Group dynamics in a long-term blind endeavor on Earth: An analog for space missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition group dynamic analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.

    2008-12-01

    In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains M. Lewis and W. Clark (Lewis and Clark Expedition) on an exploration that would become an everlasting part of US national history and pride. Looking back at the events of this exploration, there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we look to colonize the Moon and travel to Mars and beyond (NASA Vision for Space Exploration, 2004): The Lewis and Clark Expedition lasted almost three years and involved a crew of 43 men traveling up the Missouri River to explore the unknown lands and a possible water route to the Pacific Ocean; The Expedition took place far away from customary comfortable environments known to European settlers in the early 18th century; The Expedition involved a remotely confined high-perceived risk environment with high levels of uncertainty providing stresses and every day challenges for the crew; Supplies brought on the mission were limited (mainly a mass/weight issue rather than cost), therefore the discovery and use of environmental resources (In-Situ Resource Utilization approach, including info-resources to mitigate uncertainty) was necessary for crew survival. The environments astronauts will encounter in space and on the Moon and Mars due to high risk and uncertainty will be in many aspects similar to what Lewis and Clark's crew experienced, as environments will be hostile and unforgiving if problems arise and aren't resolved quickly. The analysis provided in this research paper is relevant because the Lewis and Clark Expedition needed to move extensively and with minimal supplies. Polar remote settings, which were analyzed extensively, were different from this expedition due to the fact that these missions did not encompass extensive movement of crew facilities and supplies and were more like space missions orbiting the Earth. Using past space station results of performance on orbit in correlation with a

  19. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warin Krityakiarana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated (CG, n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14. Method: Before inducing DOMS, the range of motion (ROM and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC were measured. The dynamic stretching was performed before inducing DOMS. Subjects performed biceps eccentric exercise at 110% of the predicted one-repetition maximum (1-RM, for each subject, to induce muscle soreness. Pain, ROM and MVC were assessed at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after induction of DOMS. Results: These non-significant results for mode of treatment and time interaction showed that combined treatment, ice bag, or dynamic stretching alone is not effective at significantly reducing the symptoms of DOMS. Conclusion: These results are non-significant, the pattern of the data showed that the combined treatment may be contraindicated in the prevention of DOMS and ice bag or dynamic stretching might be the best choice of treatment. Further investigation is strongly recommended.

  20. Characterization of an earth-filled dam through the combined use of electrical resistivity tomography, P- and SH-wave seismic tomography and surface wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, E.; Cercato, M.; De Donno, G.

    2014-07-01

    The determination of the current state of buildings and infrastructures through non-invasive geophysical methods is a topic not yet covered by technical standards, since the application of high resolution geophysical investigations to structural targets is a relatively new technology. Earth-filled dam investigation is a typical engineering application of this type. We propose the integration of Electrical Resistivity Tomography and P- and SH-wave seismic measurements for imaging the geometry of the dam's body and the underlying soil foundations and to characterize the low strain elastic properties. Because S-wave velocity is closely tied to engineering properties such as shear strength, low-velocity zones in the S-wave velocity models are of particular interest. When acquiring seismic data on earth filled dams, it is not uncommon to encounter highly attenuative surface layers. If only lightweight seismic sources are available, the seismic data generally exhibit a narrow frequency bandwidth: the lack of high frequency components generally prevents from having good quality shallow reflections. If there is no possibility to increase the power as well as the frequency content of the seismic source, the integration of other seismic methods than reflection may be the only available way to achieve a reliable near surface seismic characterization. For these reasons, we combined P- and SH-wave tomography with Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves to image the internal and the underlying soil foundations of an earth filled dam located in Central Italy. In the presence of moderate velocity contrasts, tomographic methods have proven successful in imaging near surface variations along both the horizontal and vertical directions. On the other hand, body wave propagation is severely affected by attenuation under the previously described conditions, so that the quality of picked traveltimes dramatically decreases with offset and, consequently, the tomographic investigation

  1. Jupiter-like planets as dynamical barriers to inward-migrating super-Earths: a new understanding of the origin of Uranus and Neptune and predictions for extrasolar planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Izidoro Da Costa, Andre'; Raymond, Sean

    2014-11-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth's size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. These ``hot super-Earths'' (or ``mini-Neptunes''), or their building blocks, might have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. The Solar System is statistically unusual in its lack of hot super-Earths. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas-giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter's early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn's core) from becoming hot super-Earths. It may actually have been crucial to the very formation of Uranus and Neptune. In fact, the large spin obliquities of these two planets argue that they experienced a stage of giant impacts from multi-Earth mass planetary embryos. We show that the dynamical barrier offered by Jupiter favors the mutual accretion of multiple migrating planetary embryos, favoring the formation of a few massive objects like Uranus and Neptune. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in super-Earths.

  2. Modelling spatial and temporal dynamics of gross primary production in the Sahel from earth-observation-based photosynthetic capacity and quantum efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagesson, Håkan Torbern; Ardoe, Jonas; Cappelaere, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    based on earth observation (EO) (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), renormalized difference vegetation index (RDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and shortwave infrared water stress index (SIWSI)); and (3) to study the applicability of EO upscaled Fopt and α for GPP modelling purposes...... related to RDVI being affected by chlorophyll abundance. Spatial and inter-annual dynamics in Fopt and α were closely coupled to NDVI and RDVI, respectively. Modelled GPP based on Fopt and α upscaled using EO-based indices reproduced in situ GPP well for all except a cropped site that was strongly...

  3. Evidence of a dynamic microbial community structure and predation through combined microbiological and stable isotope characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Bill, M.; Lim, H. C.; Wu, C.; Conrad, M. E.; Williams, K. H.; DePaolo, D. J.; Brodie, E.

    2014-12-01

    The speciation, reactivity and mobility of carbon in the near surface environment is intimately linked to the prevalence, diversity and dynamics of native microbial populations. We utilize this relationship by introducing 13C-labeled acetate to sediments recovered from a shallow aquifer system to track both the cycling of carbon through multiple redox pathways and the associated spatial and temporal evolution of bacterial communities in response to this nutrient source. Results demonstrate a net loss of sediment organic carbon over the course of the amendment experiment. Furthermore, these data demonstrated a source of isotopically labeled inorganic carbon that was not attributable to primary metabolism by acetate-oxidizing microorganisms. Fluid samples analyzed weekly for microbial composition by pyrosequencing of ribosomal RNA genes showed a transient microbial community structure, with distinct occurrences of Azoarcus, Geobacter and multiple sulfate reducing species over the course of the experiment. In combination with DNA sequencing data, the anomalous carbon cycling process is shown to occur exclusively during the period of predominant Geobacter species growth. Pyrosequencing indicated, and targeted cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of several bacteriovorous protozoa, including species of the Breviata, Planococcus and Euplotes genera. Cloning and qPCR analysis demonstrated that Euplotes species were most abundant and displayed a growth trajectory that closely followed that of the Geobacter population. These results suggest a previously undocumented secondary turnover of biomass carbon related to protozoan grazing that was not sufficiently prevalent to be observed in bulk concentrations of carbon species in the system, but was clearly identifiable in the partitioning of carbon isotopes. The impact of predator-prey relationships on subsurface microbial community dynamics and therefore the flux of carbon through a system via the microbial biomass

  4. Microbial and Organic Fine Particle Transport Dynamics in Streams - a Combined Experimental and Stochastic Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Jen; Davies-Colley, Rob; Stott, Rebecca; Sukias, James; Nagels, John; Sharp, Alice; Packman, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    Transport dynamics of microbial cells and organic fine particles are important to stream ecology and biogeochemistry. Cells and particles continuously deposit and resuspend during downstream transport owing to a variety of processes including gravitational settling, interactions with in-stream structures or biofilms at the sediment-water interface, and hyporheic exchange and filtration within underlying sediments. Deposited cells and particles are also resuspended following increases in streamflow. Fine particle retention influences biogeochemical processing of substrates and nutrients (C, N, P), while remobilization of pathogenic microbes during flood events presents a hazard to downstream uses such as water supplies and recreation. We are conducting studies to gain insights into the dynamics of fine particles and microbes in streams, with a campaign of experiments and modeling. The results improve understanding of fine sediment transport, carbon cycling, nutrient spiraling, and microbial hazards in streams. We developed a stochastic model to describe the transport and retention of fine particles and microbes in rivers that accounts for hyporheic exchange and transport through porewaters, reversible filtration within the streambed, and microbial inactivation in the water column and subsurface. This model framework is an advance over previous work in that it incorporates detailed transport and retention processes that are amenable to measurement. Solute, particle, and microbial transport were observed both locally within sediment and at the whole-stream scale. A multi-tracer whole-stream injection experiment compared the transport and retention of a conservative solute, fluorescent fine particles, and the fecal indicator bacterium Escherichia coli. Retention occurred within both the underlying sediment bed and stands of submerged macrophytes. The results demonstrate that the combination of local measurements, whole-stream tracer experiments, and advanced modeling

  5. Geometrical geodesy techniques in Goddard earth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The method for combining geometrical data with satellite dynamical and gravimetry data for the solution of geopotential and station location parameters is discussed. Geometrical tracking data (simultaneous events) from the global network of BC-4 stations are currently being processed in a solution that will greatly enhance of geodetic world system of stations. Previously the stations in Goddard earth models have been derived only from dynamical tracking data. A linear regression model is formulated from combining the data, based upon the statistical technique of weighted least squares. Reduced normal equations, independent of satellite and instrumental parameters, are derived for the solution of the geodetic parameters. Exterior standards for the evaluation of the solution and for the scale of the earth's figure are discussed.

  6. Life, death and revival of debris-flow fans on Earth and Mars : fan dynamics and climatic inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, T.

    2016-01-01

    Alluvial fans are ubiquitous landforms in high-relief regions on Earth and Mars. They have a semi-conical shape and are located at the transition between highlands and adjacent basins. Alluvial fans can form by a range of processes including debris flows, which are water-laden masses of soil and

  7. Aiming at a 1-cm orbit for low earth orbiters: Reduced-dynamic and kinematic precise orbit determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.N.A.M.; Van den IJssel, J.

    2003-01-01

    The computation of high-accuracy orbits is a prerequisite for the success of Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) missions such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE. The mission objectives of these satellites cannot be reached without computing orbits with an accuracy at the few cm level. Such a level of accuracy might be a

  8. Life, death and revival of debris-flow fans on Earth and Mars : fan dynamics and climatic inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, T.

    2016-01-01

    Alluvial fans are ubiquitous landforms in high-relief regions on Earth and Mars. They have a semi-conical shape and are located at the transition between highlands and adjacent basins. Alluvial fans can form by a range of processes including debris flows, which are water-laden masses of soil and roc

  9. Life, death and revival of debris-flow fans on Earth and Mars : fan dynamics and climatic inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, T.

    2016-01-01

    Alluvial fans are ubiquitous landforms in high-relief regions on Earth and Mars. They have a semi-conical shape and are located at the transition between highlands and adjacent basins. Alluvial fans can form by a range of processes including debris flows, which are water-laden masses of soil and roc

  10. Combining user logging with eye tracking for interactive and dynamic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Kristien; Coltekin, Arzu; De Maeyer, Philippe; Dupont, Lien; Fabrikant, Sara; Incoul, Annelies; Kuhn, Matthias; Slabbinck, Hendrik; Vansteenkiste, Pieter; Van der Haegen, Lise

    2015-12-01

    User evaluations of interactive and dynamic applications face various challenges related to the active nature of these displays. For example, users can often zoom and pan on digital products, and these interactions cause changes in the extent and/or level of detail of the stimulus. Therefore, in eye tracking studies, when a user's gaze is at a particular screen position (gaze position) over a period of time, the information contained in this particular position may have changed. Such digital activities are commonplace in modern life, yet it has been difficult to automatically compare the changing information at the viewed position, especially across many participants. Existing solutions typically involve tedious and time-consuming manual work. In this article, we propose a methodology that can overcome this problem. By combining eye tracking with user logging (mouse and keyboard actions) with cartographic products, we are able to accurately reference screen coordinates to geographic coordinates. This referencing approach allows researchers to know which geographic object (location or attribute) corresponds to the gaze coordinates at all times. We tested the proposed approach through two case studies, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the applied methodology. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed approach is discussed with respect to other fields of research that use eye tracking-namely, marketing, sports and movement sciences, and experimental psychology. From these case studies and discussions, we conclude that combining eye tracking and user-logging data is an essential step forward in efficiently studying user behavior with interactive and static stimuli in multiple research fields.

  11. Latent evidence detection using a combination of near infrared and high dynamic range photography: an example using bloodstains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, John; Montes, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we use bloodstains to illustrate an approach for identifying latent evidence on dark cloth using near infrared (NIR) photography combined with high dynamic range (HDR) photography techniques. NIR photography alone has been used to capture latent evidence that cannot be seen in normal ambient light. HDR techniques combine multiple bracketed photographs of the same image to increase the dynamic range of the photograph which can provide greater contrast. Using NIR photography alone, we were able to detect a bloodstain up to a 1/16 dilution, an improvement over previous studies. Combining NIR photography with the HDR process resulted in a noticeable increase in visibility up to 1/16 dilution when compared to NIR photographs alone. At 1/32 dilution, we were able to detect bloodstains that were not visible using NIR alone. NIR is a useful tool for imaging latent evidence, and combining NIR with HDR consistently provides better results over NIR alone.

  12. A COMBINED PARAMETRIC QUADRATIC PROGRAMMING AND PRECISE INTEGRATION METHOD BASED DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF ELASTIC-PLASTIC HARDENING/SOFTENING PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪武; 张新伟

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to develop a new algorithm for numericalsolution of dynamic elastic-plastic strain hardening/softening problems. The gradientdependent model is adopted in the numerical model to overcome the result mesh-sensitivity problem in the dynamic strain softening or strain localization analysis.The equations for the dynamic elastic-plastic problems are derived in terms of theparametric variational principle, which is valid for associated, non-associated andstrain softening plastic constitutive models in the finite element analysis. The preciseintegration method, which has been widely used for discretization in time domain ofthe linear problems, is introduced for the solution of dynamic nonlinear equations.The new algorithm proposed is based on the combination of the parametric quadraticprogramming method and the precise integration method and has all the advantagesin both of the algorithms. Results of numerical examples demonstrate not only thevalidity, but also the advantages of the algorithm proposed for the numerical solutionof nonlinear dynamic problems.

  13. Modeling and Analysis of Coupling Performance of Dynamic Stiffness Models for a Novel Combined Radial-Axial Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangcheng Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined radial-axial magnetic bearing (CRAMB with permanent magnet creating bias flux can reduce the size, cost, and mass and save energy of the magnetic bearing. The CRAMB have three-degree-of-freedom control ability, so its structure and magnetic circuits are more complicated compared to those of the axial magnetic bearing (AMB or radial magnetic bearing (RMB. And the eddy currents have a fundamental impact on the dynamic performance of the CRAMB. The dynamic stiffness model and its cross coupling problems between different degrees of freedom affected for the CRAMB are proposed in this paper. The dynamic current stiffness and the dynamic displacement stiffness models of the CRAMB are deduced by using the method of equivalent magnetic circuit including eddy current effect, but the dynamic current stiffness of the RMB unit is approximately equal to its static current stiffness. The analytical results of an example show that the bandwidth of the dynamic current stiffness of the AMB unit and the dynamic displacement stiffness of the CRAMB is affected by the time-varying control currents or air gap, respectively. And the dynamic current stiffness and the dynamic displacement stiffness between the AMB unit and the RMB unit are decoupled due to few coupling coefficients.

  14. Insights Into the Dynamics of Planetary Interiors Obtained Through the Study of Global Distribution of Volcanoes: Lessons From Earth and Venus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of volcanic features is ultimately controlled by processes taking place beneath the surface of a planet. For this reason, characterization of volcano distribution at a global scale can be used to obtain insights concerning dynamic aspects of planetary interiors. In this work, description of the distribution of volcanic features observed on Earth and Venus is completed using density contours obtained with the Fisher kernel. Attention is focused on similar features observed in both planets. In particular two features are examined with more detail: First, a pattern of groups of clusters defining the boundaries of elliptical regions that tentatively can be associated to large mantle plumes. Second, the existence of a uniform distribution of background volcanism. The former pattern is considered to constitute the first order convective pattern of the mantle in Venus, and although it is present on Earth, it is not as prominent. In contrast, the persistent occurrence of volcanic clusters at a lower significance level, suggests the occurrence of a different scale of mantle convection that controls a more uniformly distributed volcanism. Both, the first order related to large mantle-plumes and the background volcanism are superimposed on Earth to the volcanism controlled by plate tectonics. Consequently, the global distribution of volcanism in both planets reveals that at least three types of mantle convection can take place in the terrestrial planets, and that such types of mantle convection can coexist simultaneously in one given planet, although in each case, a dominant mode is different.

  15. Earth system modelling on system-level heterogeneous architectures: EMAC (version 2.42) on the Dynamical Exascale Entry Platform (DEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Michalis; Christoudias, Theodoros; Morillo, Julián; Alvarez, Damian; Merx, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    We examine an alternative approach to heterogeneous cluster-computing in the many-core era for Earth system models, using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg (ECHAM)/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model as a pilot application on the Dynamical Exascale Entry Platform (DEEP). A set of autonomous coprocessors interconnected together, called Booster, complements a conventional HPC Cluster and increases its computing performance, offering extra flexibility to expose multiple levels of parallelism and achieve better scalability. The EMAC model atmospheric chemistry code (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere (MECCA)) was taskified with an offload mechanism implemented using OmpSs directives. The model was ported to the MareNostrum 3 supercomputer to allow testing with Intel Xeon Phi accelerators on a production-size machine. The changes proposed in this paper are expected to contribute to the eventual adoption of Cluster-Booster division and Many Integrated Core (MIC) accelerated architectures in presently available implementations of Earth system models, towards exploiting the potential of a fully Exascale-capable platform.

  16. An investigation of ozone and planetary boundary layer dynamics over the complex topography of Grenoble combining measurements and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Couach, O.; Balin, I.; Jiménez, R; P. Ristori(CEILAP); Perego, S.; Kirchner, F.; Simeonov, V.; Calpini, B.; H. Bergh

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns an evaluation of ozone (O3) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics over the complex topography of the Grenoble region through a combination of measurements and mesoscale model (METPHOMOD) predictions for three days, during July 1999. The measurements of O3 and PBL structure were obtained with a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, situated 20 km south of Grenoble at Vif (310 m ASL). The combined lidar observations ...

  17. Modeling the Dynamics of Micro- and Macroparticles in a Combined Gas-Discharge Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astashinskii, V. V.; Bogach, M. I.; Burachevskii, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model of the dynamics of micro- and macroparticles in a combined gas-discharge installation that accounts for the processes of metal explosion (heating of a metal in its solid state, melting, heating of the liquid metal, intense evaporation, ionization in metal vapor), a magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma acceleration (on the basis of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws neglecting the plasma viscosity and thermal conductivity), and a description of the processes of energy transfer from a high-velocity stream to accelerated particles. It has been established that the process of melting terminates in 1.3 ns after the start of the discharge and that the evaporation terminates in 480 ns. The stage of cooling starts in 21 μs. The average density of the plasma upon completion of the evaporation process can be estimated to be 1.7·10-5 g/cm3, with the pressure being of the order of 1.5·104 Pa and the total time of discharge, of about 250 μs.

  18. Efficient Determination of Relative Entropy Using Combined Temperature and Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sunhwan; Chipot, Christophe; Roux, Benoît

    2015-05-12

    The performance and accuracy of different simulation schemes for estimating the entropy inferred from free energy calculations are tested. The results obtained from replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations based on a simplified toy model are compared to exact numerically derived ones to assess accuracy and convergence. It is observed that the error in entropy estimation decreases by at least an order of magnitude and the quantities of interest converge much faster when the simulations are coupled via a temperature REMD algorithm and the trajectories from different temperatures are combined. Simulations with the infinite-swapping method and its variants show some improvement over the traditional nearest-neighbor REMD algorithms, but they are more computationally expensive. To test the methodologies further, the free energy profile for the reversible association of two methane molecules in explicit water was calculated and decomposed into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Finally, a strategy based on umbrella sampling computations carried out via simultaneous temperature and Hamiltonian REMD simulations is shown to yield the most accurate entropy estimation. The entropy profile between the two methane molecules displays the characteristic signature of a hydrophobic interaction.

  19. Combining Elastic Network Analysis and Molecular Dynamics Simulations by Hamiltonian Replica Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained elastic network models (ENM) of proteins can be used efficiently to explore the global mobility of a protein around a reference structure. A new Hamiltonian-replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-RexMD) method has been designed that effectively combines information extracted from an ENM analysis with atomic-resolution MD simulations. The ENM analysis is used to construct a distance-dependent penalty (flooding or biasing) potential that can drive the structure away from its current conformation in directions compatible with the ENM model. Various levels of the penalty or biasing potential are added to the force field description of the MD simulation along the replica coordinate. One replica runs at the original force field. By focusing the penalty potential on the relevant soft degrees of freedom the method avoids the rapid increase of the replica number with increasing system size to cover a desired temperature range in conventional (temperature) RexMD simulations. The application to domain motions in lysozyme of bacteriophage T4 and to peptide folding indicates significantly improved conformational sampling compared to conventional MD simulations.

  20. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, J; Holst, N; Bøjer, O Q; Bigongiali, F; Bocci, G; Colbach, N; Dorner, Z; Riemens, M M; Sartorato, I; Sønderskov, M; Verschwele, A

    2015-04-01

    A functional approach to predicting shifts in weed floras in response to management or environmental change requires the combination of data on weed traits with analytical frameworks that capture the filtering effect of selection pressures on traits. A weed traits database (WTDB) was designed, populated and analysed, initially using data for 19 common European weeds, to begin to consolidate trait data in a single repository. The initial choice of traits was driven by the requirements of empirical models of weed population dynamics to identify correlations between traits and model parameters. These relationships were used to build a generic model, operating at the level of functional traits, to simulate the impact of increasing herbicide and fertiliser use on virtual weeds along gradients of seed weight and maximum height. The model generated 'fitness contours' (defined as population growth rates) within this trait space in different scenarios, onto which two sets of weed species, defined as common or declining in the UK, were mapped. The effect of increasing inputs on the weed flora was successfully simulated; 77% of common species were predicted to have stable or increasing populations under high fertiliser and herbicide use, in contrast with only 29% of the species that have declined. Future development of the WTDB will aim to increase the number of species covered, incorporate a wider range of traits and analyse intraspecific variability under contrasting management and environments.

  1. Combined aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem emulating routines (CASPER): Theory and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William H.

    1985-01-01

    The Combined Aerodynamic and Structural Dynamic Problem Emulating Routines (CASPER) is a collection of data-base modification computer routines that can be used to simulate Navier-Stokes flow through realistic, time-varying internal flow fields. The Navier-Stokes equation used involves calculations in all three dimensions and retains all viscous terms. The only term neglected in the current implementation is gravitation. The solution approach is of an interative, time-marching nature. Calculations are based on Lagrangian aerodynamic elements (aeroelements). It is assumed that the relationships between a particular aeroelement and its five nearest neighbor aeroelements are sufficient to make a valid simulation of Navier-Stokes flow on a small scale and that the collection of all small-scale simulations makes a valid simulation of a large-scale flow. In keeping with these assumptions, it must be noted that CASPER produces an imitation or simulation of Navier-Stokes flow rather than a strict numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. CASPER is written to operate under the Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX), which is described in a separate report.

  2. Resting state brain dynamics and its transients: a combined TMS-EEG study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnard, Mireille; Chen, Sophie; Gaychet, Jérôme; Carrere, Marcel; Woodman, Marmaduke; Giusiano, Bernard; Jirsa, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The brain at rest exhibits a spatio-temporally rich dynamics which adheres to systematic behaviours that persist in task paradigms but appear altered in disease. Despite this hypothesis, many rest state paradigms do not act directly upon the rest state and therefore cannot confirm hypotheses about its mechanisms. To address this challenge, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to study brain’s relaxation toward rest following a transient perturbation. Specifically, TMS targeted either the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), i.e. part of the Default Mode Network (DMN) or the superior parietal lobule (SPL), involved in the Dorsal Attention Network. TMS was triggered by a given brain state, namely an increase in occipital alpha rhythm power. Following the initial TMS-Evoked Potential, TMS at MPFC enhances the induced occipital alpha rhythm, called Event Related Synchronisation, with a longer transient lifetime than TMS at SPL, and a higher amplitude. Our findings show a strong coupling between MPFC and the occipital alpha power. Although the rest state is organized around a core of resting state networks, the DMN functionally takes a special role among these resting state networks. PMID:27488504

  3. A model combining oscillations and attractor dynamics for generation of grid cell firing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hasselmo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Different models have been able to account for different features of the data on grid cell firing properties, including the relationship of grid cells to cellular properties and network oscillations. This paper describes a model that combines elements of two major classes of models of grid cells: models using interference of oscillations and models using attractor dynamics. This model includes a population of units with oscillatory input representing input from the medial septum. These units are termed heading angle cells because their connectivity depends upon heading angle in the environment as well as the spatial phase coded by the cell. These cells project to a population of grid cells. The sum of the heading angle input results in standing waves of circularly symmetric input to the grid cell population. Feedback from the grid cell population increases the activity of subsets of the heading angle cells, resulting in the network settling into activity patterns that resemble the patterns of firing fields in a population of grid cells. The properties of heading angle cells firing as conjunctive grid-by-head-direction cells can shift the grid cell firing according to movement velocity. The pattern of interaction of oscillations requires use of separate populations that fire on alternate cycles of the net theta rhythmic input to grid cells, similar to recent neurophysiological data on theta cycle skipping in medial entorhinal cortex.

  4. Path-integral description of combined Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian dynamics in quantum dissipative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, A. M.; Vagov, A.; Axt, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a numerical path-integral iteration scheme for the low-dimensional reduced density matrix of a time-dependent quantum dissipative system. Our approach simultaneously accounts for the combined action of a microscopically modeled pure-dephasing-type coupling to a continuum of harmonic oscillators representing, e.g., phonons, and further environmental interactions inducing non-Hamiltonian dynamics in the inner system represented, e.g., by Lindblad-type dissipation or relaxation. Our formulation of the path-integral method allows for a numerically exact treatment of the coupling to the oscillator modes and moreover is general enough to provide a natural way to include Markovian processes that are sufficiently described by rate equations. We apply this new formalism to a model of a single semiconductor quantum dot which includes the coupling to longitudinal acoustic phonons for two cases: (a) external laser excitation taking into account a phenomenological radiative decay of the excited dot state and (b) a coupling of the quantum dot to a single mode of an optical cavity taking into account cavity photon losses.

  5. Resting state brain dynamics and its transients: a combined TMS-EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnard, Mireille; Chen, Sophie; Gaychet, Jérôme; Carrere, Marcel; Woodman, Marmaduke; Giusiano, Bernard; Jirsa, Viktor

    2016-08-04

    The brain at rest exhibits a spatio-temporally rich dynamics which adheres to systematic behaviours that persist in task paradigms but appear altered in disease. Despite this hypothesis, many rest state paradigms do not act directly upon the rest state and therefore cannot confirm hypotheses about its mechanisms. To address this challenge, we combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to study brain's relaxation toward rest following a transient perturbation. Specifically, TMS targeted either the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), i.e. part of the Default Mode Network (DMN) or the superior parietal lobule (SPL), involved in the Dorsal Attention Network. TMS was triggered by a given brain state, namely an increase in occipital alpha rhythm power. Following the initial TMS-Evoked Potential, TMS at MPFC enhances the induced occipital alpha rhythm, called Event Related Synchronisation, with a longer transient lifetime than TMS at SPL, and a higher amplitude. Our findings show a strong coupling between MPFC and the occipital alpha power. Although the rest state is organized around a core of resting state networks, the DMN functionally takes a special role among these resting state networks.

  6. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, O.W.

    1994-04-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  7. Winter NH low-frequency variability in a hierarchy of low-order stochastic dynamical models of earth-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan

    2017-01-01

    The origin of winter Northern Hemispheric low-frequency variability (hereafter, LFV) is regarded to be related to the coupled earth-atmosphere system characterized by the interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain ranges. On the other hand, observed LFV usually appears as transitions among multiple planetary-scale flow regimes of Northern Hemisphere like NAO + , AO +, AO - and NAO - . Moreover, the interaction between synoptic-scale eddies and the planetary-scale disturbance is also inevitable in the origin of LFV. These raise a question regarding how to incorporate all these aspects into just one framework to demonstrate (1) a planetary-scale dynamics of interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain ranges can really produce LFV, (2) such a dynamics can be responsible for the existence of above multiple flow regimes, and (3) the role of interaction with eddy is also clarified. For this purpose, a hierarchy of low-order stochastic dynamical models of the coupled earth-atmosphere system derived empirically from different timescale ranges of indices of Arctic Oscillation (AO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific/North American (PNA), and length of day (LOD) and related probability density function (PDF) analysis are employed in this study. The results seem to suggest that the origin of LFV cannot be understood completely within the planetary-scale dynamics of the interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain ranges, because (1) the existence of multiple flow regimes such as NAO+, AO+, AO- and NAO- resulted from processes with timescales much longer than LFV itself, which may have underlying dynamics other than topography-jet stream interaction, and (2) we find LFV seems not necessarily to come directly from the planetary-scale dynamics of the interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain, although it can produce similar oscillatory behavior. The feedback/forcing of synoptic-scale eddies on the planetary

  8. Dynamical evolution of interplanetary dust particles trapped in Earth's horseshoe and quasi-satellite co-orbital resonance regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.

    2016-10-01

    We use numerical integrations to model the orbital evolution of IDPs decaying from the asteroid belt into the inner solar system under the influence of radiation pressure, Poynting-Roberston light drag, and solar wind drag. In our models the ratio of radiation pressure to solar gravity ranges from 0.0025 up to 0.02, corresponding to IDP diameters ranging from about 200 microns down to about 25 microns, respectively. In this size range nearly 100% of IDPs become temporarily trapped in mean-motion resonances just outside Earth's orbit. While trapped in these outer resonances the orbital eccentricities of IDPs significantly increases. This causes most IDPs to eventually escape the resonances, allowing their orbits to continue decaying inwards past 1 AU. We've shown previously (Kortenkamp, Icarus 226, 1550-1558, 2013) that significant fractions of IDPs in this size range can subsequently become trapped in Earth's co-orbital horseshoe and quasi-satellite resonance regions, with semi-major axes just inside of 1 AU. Here, we present new results on the long-term effects of Earth's varying orbital eccentricity and inclination on the trapping and evolution of these co-orbital IDPs.

  9. A combination of thermal methods to assess coronary pressure and flow dynamics with a pressure-sensing guide wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Arjen; Van't Veer, Marcel; van der Sligte, Robin A M; Rutten, Marcel C M; Pijls, Nico H J; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2013-03-01

    Measurement of coronary pressure and absolute flow dynamics have shown great potential in discerning different types of coronary circulatory disease. In the present study, the feasibility of assessing pressure and flow dynamics with a combination of two thermal methods, developed in combination with a pressure-sensor-tipped guide wire, was evaluated in an in vitro coronary model. A continuous infusion thermodilution method was employed to determine the average flow, whereas a thermal anemometric method was utilized to assess the pressure and flow dynamics, simultaneously. In the latter method, the electrical power supplied to an element, kept at constant temperature above ambient temperature, was used as a measure for the shear rate. It was found that, using a single calibration function, the method was able to assess coronary pressure and flow dynamics for different flow amplitudes, heart rates, and different pressure wires. However, due to the fact that the thermal anemometric method cannot detect local shear rate reversal, the method was unable to reliably measure flow dynamics close to zero. Nevertheless, the combined methodology was able to reliably assess diastolic hemodynamics. The diastolic peak flow and average diastolic resistance could be determined with a small relative error of (8 ± 7)% and (7 ± 5)%, respectively.

  10. Application of the nonlinear, double-dynamic Taguchi method to the precision positioning device using combined piezo-VCM actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Tien; Fung, Rong-Fong; Wang, Chun-Chao

    2007-02-01

    In this research, the nonlinear, double-dynamic Taguchi method was used as design and analysis methods for a high-precision positioning device using the combined piezo-voice-coil motor (VCM) actuator. An experimental investigation into the effects of two input signals and three control factors were carried out to determine the optimum parametric configuration of the positioning device. The double-dynamic Taguchi method, which permits optimization of several control factors concurrently, is particularly suitable for optimizing the performance of a positioning device with multiple actuators. In this study, matrix experiments were conducted with L9(3(4)) orthogonal arrays (OAs). The two most critical processes for the optimization of positioning device are the identification of the nonlinear ideal function and the combination of the double-dynamic signal factors for the ideal function's response. The driving voltage of the VCM and the waveform amplitude of the PZT actuator are combined into a single quality characteristic to evaluate the positioning response. The application of the double-dynamic Taguchi method, with dynamic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and L9(3(4)) OAs, reduced the number of necessary experiments. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to set the optimum parameters based on the high-precision positioning process.

  11. Dynamic modelling of an adsorption storage tank using a hybrid approach combining computational fluid dynamics and process simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, J.P.B.; Esteves, I.A.A.C.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package has been coupled with the dynamic process simulator of an adsorption storage tank for methane fuelled vehicles. The two solvers run as independent processes and handle non-overlapping portions of the computational domain. The codes exchange data on the boundary interface of the two domains to ensure continuity of the solution and of its gradient. A software interface was developed to dynamically suspend and activate each process as necessary, and be responsible for data exchange and process synchronization. This hybrid computational tool has been successfully employed to accurately simulate the discharge of a new tank design and evaluate its performance. The case study presented here shows that CFD and process simulation are highly complementary computational tools, and that there are clear benefits to be gained from a close integration of the two. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Google Earth and Geo Applications: A Toolset for Viewing Earth's Geospatial Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuxen-Bettman, K.

    2016-12-01

    Earth scientists measure and derive fundamental data that can be of broad general interest to the public and policy makers. Yet, one of the challenges that has always faced the Earth science community is how to present their data and findings in an easy-to-use and compelling manner. Google's Geo Tools offer an efficient and dynamic way for scientists, educators, journalists and others to both access data and view or tell stories in a dynamic three-dimensional geospatial context. Google Earth in particular provides a dense canvas of satellite imagery on which can be viewed rich vector and raster datasets using the medium of Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Through KML, Google Earth can combine the analytical capabilities of Earth Engine, collaborative mapping of My Maps, and storytelling of Tour Builder and more to make Google's Geo Applications a coherent suite of tools for exploring our planet.https://earth.google.com/https://earthengine.google.com/https://mymaps.google.com/https://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/https://www.google.com/streetview/

  13. Combining short- and long-range fluorescence reporters with simulations to explore the intramolecular dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosel, Franziska; Haenni, Dominik; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are increasingly recognized as a class of molecules that can exert essential biological functions even in the absence of a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Understanding the conformational distributions and dynamics of these highly flexible proteins is thus essential for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying their function. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool for probing intramolecular distances and the rapid long-range distance dynamics in IDPs. To complement the information from FRET, we combine it with photoinduced electron transfer (PET) quenching to monitor local loop-closure kinetics at the same time and in the same molecule. Here we employed this combination to investigate the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase. The results show that both long-range dynamics and loop closure kinetics on the sub-microsecond time scale can be obtained reliably from a single set of measurements by the analysis with a comprehensive model of the underlying photon statistics including both FRET and PET. A more detailed molecular interpretation of the results is enabled by direct comparison with a recent extensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of integrase. The simulations are in good agreement with experiment and can explain the deviation from simple models of chain dynamics by the formation of persistent local secondary structure. The results illustrate the power of a close combination of single-molecule spectroscopy and simulations for advancing our understanding of the dynamics and detailed mechanisms in unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

  14. A combined static-dynamic single-dose imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Maria; Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Gullberg, Grant T; Botvinick, Elias H

    2017-08-03

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a clinical mainstay that is typically performed with static imaging protocols and visually or semi-quantitatively assessed for perfusion defects based upon the relative intensity of myocardial regions. Dynamic cardiac SPECT presents a new imaging technique based on time-varying information of radiotracer distribution, which permits the evaluation of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). In this work, a preliminary feasibility study was conducted in a small patient sample designed to implement a unique combined static-dynamic single-dose one-day visit imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT for improving the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifteen patients (11 males, four females, mean age 71 ± 9 years) were enrolled for a combined dynamic and static SPECT (Infinia Hawkeye 4, GE Healthcare) imaging protocol with a single dose of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin administered at rest and a single dose administered at stress in a one-day visit. Out of 15 patients, eleven had selective coronary angiography (SCA), 8 within 6 months and the rest within 24 months of SPECT imaging, without intervening symptoms or interventions. The extent and severity of perfusion defects in each myocardial region was graded visually. Dynamically acquired data were also used to estimate the MBF and CFR. Both visually graded images and estimated CFR were tested against SCA as a reference to evaluate the validity of the methods. Overall, conventional static SPECT was normal in ten patients and abnormal in five patients, dynamic SPECT was normal in 12 patients and abnormal in three patients, and CFR from dynamic SPECT was normal in nine patients and abnormal in six patients. Among those 11 patients with SCA, conventional SPECT was normal in 5, 3 with documented CAD on SCA with an overall accuracy of 64%, sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 83%. Dynamic SPECT image

  15. Assessment of vessel permeability by combining dynamic contrast-enhanced and arterial spin labeling MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ho-Ling; Chang, Ting-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Li, Cheng-He; Lin, Yu-Shi; Wong, Alex M

    2015-06-01

    The forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)), a physiological parameter extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, is weighted by vessel permeability and tissue blood flow. The permeability × surface area product per unit mass of tissue (PS) in brain tumors was estimated in this study by combining the blood flow obtained through pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) and K(trans) obtained through DCE MRI. An analytical analysis and a numerical simulation were conducted to understand how errors in the flow and K(trans) estimates would propagate to the resulting PS. Fourteen pediatric patients with brain tumors were scanned on a clinical 3-T MRI scanner. PCASL perfusion imaging was performed using a three-dimensional (3D) fast-spin-echo readout module to determine blood flow. DCE imaging was performed using a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and the K(trans) map was obtained with the extended Tofts model. The numerical analysis demonstrated that the uncertainty of PS was predominantly dependent on that of K(trans) and was relatively insensitive to the flow. The average PS values of the whole tumors ranged from 0.006 to 0.217 min(-1), with a mean of 0.050 min(-1) among the patients. The mean K(trans) value was 18% lower than the PS value, with a maximum discrepancy of 25%. When the parametric maps were compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the discrepancies between PS and K(trans) appeared to be heterogeneous within the tumors. The PS values could be more than two-fold higher than the K(trans) values for voxels with high K(trans) levels. This study proposes a method that is easy to implement in clinical practice and has the potential to improve the quantification of the microvascular properties of brain tumors.

  16. Combining dynamic stretch and tunable stiffness to probe cell mechanobiology in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Throm Quinlan

    Full Text Available Cells have the ability to actively sense their mechanical environment and respond to both substrate stiffness and stretch by altering their adhesion, proliferation, locomotion, morphology, and synthetic profile. In order to elucidate the interrelated effects of different mechanical stimuli on cell phenotype in vitro, we have developed a method for culturing mammalian cells in a two-dimensional environment at a wide range of combined levels of substrate stiffness and dynamic stretch. Polyacrylamide gels were covalently bonded to flexible silicone culture plates and coated with monomeric collagen for cell adhesion. Substrate stiffness was adjusted from relatively soft (G' = 0.3 kPa to stiff (G' = 50 kPa by altering the ratio of acrylamide to bis-acrylamide, and the silicone membranes were stretched over circular loading posts by applying vacuum pressure to impart near-uniform stretch, as confirmed by strain field analysis. As a demonstration of the system, porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (VIC and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC were plated on soft and stiff substrates either statically cultured or exposed to 10% equibiaxial or pure uniaxial stretch at 1 Hz for 6 hours. In all cases, cell attachment and cell viability were high. On soft substrates, VICs cultured statically exhibit a small rounded morphology, significantly smaller than on stiff substrates (p<0.05. Following equibiaxial cyclic stretch, VICs spread to the extent of cells cultured on stiff substrates, but did not reorient in response to uniaxial stretch to the extent of cells stretched on stiff substrates. hMSCs exhibited a less pronounced response than VICs, likely due to a lower stiffness threshold for spreading on static gels. These preliminary data demonstrate that inhibition of spreading due to a lack of matrix stiffness surrounding a cell may be overcome by externally applied stretch suggesting similar mechanotransduction mechanisms for sensing stiffness and

  17. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission Observations of Energetic Particle Dynamics and Structures Prior To and During Its First Encounters with the Reconnection-Rich Regions of Earth's Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B.; Westlake, J. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Spence, H. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Nakamura, R.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched on 13 March 2015, comprises 4 spacecraft flying in close formation in highly elliptical, near-Earth-equatorial orbits targeting understanding of the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection using Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma laboratory. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation on MMS is one of several fields-and-particles investigations. EPD comprises two sensor types, the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) with one instrument on each of the 4 spacecraft, and the Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) with 2 instruments on each of the 4 spacecraft. EIS measures energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions for protons from 1 MeV. FEEPS measures instantaneous ( 1/3 s) all sky images of energetic electrons from 25 keV to > 0.6 MeV and also measures total ion energy distributions from 45 keV to > 0.5 MeV to be used in conjunction with EIS to measure all-sky ion distributions. During the preparation stages for the prime mission (prior to 1 September 2015), with a 1.2 x 12 RE orbit precessing across the root of the magnetotail, EPD observed energetic particle responses to depolarization fronts and related particle injection features, ion composition and flow dynamics associated with injections, the dynamic formation of trapping-boundary-like features at intermediate magnetic latitudes, striking electron beam and butterfly distributions likely providing precursors to observations of the magnetopause-magnetosphere interface, and intense modulations in association ULF waves. In this overview presentation, we use some of these observations to document the promise that the EPD investigation holds for contributing to the resolution of reconnection-induced particle acceleration and structuring. We then show the early-mission energetic particle structures and dynamics observed at the magnetopause and in association with reconnection events identified by the mission for

  18. Does a dynamic chair increase office workers' movements? - Results from a combined laboratory and field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooten, Wilhelmus J A; Äng, Björn O; Hagströmer, Maria; Conradsson, David; Nero, Håkan; Franzén, Erika

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic chairs have the potential to facilitate movements that could counteract health problems associated with sedentary office work. This study aimed to evaluate whether a dynamic chair can increase movements during desk-based office work. Fifteen healthy subjects performed desk-based office work using a dynamic office chair and compared to three other conditions in a movement laboratory. In a field study, the dynamic office chair was studied during three working days using accelerometry. Equivocal results showed that the dynamic chair increased upper body and chair movements as compared to the conventional chair, but lesser movements were found compared to standing. No differences were found between the conditions in the field study. A dynamic chair may facilitate movements in static desk-based office tasks, but the results were not consistent for all outcome measures. Validation of measuring protocols for assessing movements during desk-based office work is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Expanding earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arguments in favor of an expanding earth are presented. The author believes that the theory of plate tectonics is a classic error in the history of geology. The case for the expanding earth is organized in the following way: introductory review - face of the earth, development of expanding earth concept, necessity for expansion, the subduction myth, and definitions; some principles - scale of tectonic phenomena, non-uniformitarianism, tectonic profile, paleomagnetism, asymmetry of the earth, rotation of the earth, and modes of crustal extension; regional studies - western North America, Central America, South-East Asia, and the rift oceans; tests and cause of expansion. 824 references, 197 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  20. Siberia snow depth climatology derived from SSM/I data using a combined dynamic and static algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippa, M.; Mognard, N.; Le, Toan T.; Josberger, E.G.

    2004-01-01

    One of the major challenges in determining snow depth (SD) from passive microwave measurements is to take into account the spatiotemporal variations of the snow grain size. Static algorithms based on a constant snow grain size cannot provide accurate estimates of snow pack thickness, particularly over large regions where the snow pack is subjected to big spatial temperature variations. A recent dynamic algorithm that accounts for the dependence of the microwave scattering on the snow grain size has been developed to estimate snow depth from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) over the Northern Great Plains (NGP) in the US. In this paper, we develop a combined dynamic and static algorithm to estimate snow depth from 13 years of SSM/I observations over Central Siberia. This region is characterised by extremely cold surface air temperatures and by the presence of permafrost that significantly affects the ground temperature. The dynamic algorithm is implemented to take into account these effects and it yields accurate snow depths early in the winter, when thin snowpacks combine with cold air temperatures to generate rapid crystal growth. However, it is not applicable later in the winter when the grain size growth slows. Combining the dynamic algorithm to a static algorithm, with a temporally constant but spatially varying coefficient, we obtain reasonable snow depth estimates throughout the entire snow season. Validation is carried out by comparing the satellite snow depth monthly averages to monthly climatological data. We show that the location of the snow depth maxima and minima is improved when applying the combined algorithm, since its dynamic portion explicitly incorporate the thermal gradient through the snowpack. The results obtained are presented and evaluated for five different vegetation zones of Central Siberia. Comparison with in situ measurements is also shown and discussed. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined effects of climate and land management on watershed vegetation dynamics in an arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peilong Liu; Lu Hao; Cen Pan; Decheng Zhou; Yongqiang Liu; Ge Sun

    2017-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a key parameter to characterize vegetation dynamics and ecosystemstructure that determines the ecosystem functions and services such as cleanwater supply and carbon sequestration in awatershed. However, linking LAI dynamics and environmental controls (i.e., coupling biosphere, atmosphere, and anthroposphere) remains challenging and such type of...

  2. Point defect dynamics in sodium aluminum hydrides - a combined quasielastic neutron scattering and density functional theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qing; Voss, Johannes; Jacobsen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    we study hydrogen dynamics in undoped and TiCl3-doped samples of NaAlH4 and Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. Hydrogen dynamics is found to be limited and mediated by hydrogen vacancies in both alanate phases, requiring......Understanding the catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex metal hydrides is an essential step towards developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed catalytic effects, and here...

  3. Hydrogen dynamics in Na3AlH6: A combined density functional theory and quasielastic neutron scattering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Johannes; Shi, Qing; Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest

    2007-01-01

    alanate with TiCl3, and here we study hydrogen dynamics in doped and undoped Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. The hydrogen dynamics is found to be vacancy mediated and dominated by localized jump events, whereas long-range bulk......Understanding the elusive catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex hydrides is an essential step toward developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed effects of doping sodium...

  4. Determination of bimetallic architectures in nanometer-scale catalysts by combining molecular dynamics simulations with x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenko, Janis; Keller, Kayla R.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.

    2017-03-01

    Here we present an approach for the determination of an atomic structure of small bimetallic nanoparticles by combining extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and classical molecular dynamics simulations based on the Sutton-Chen potential. The proposed approach is illustrated in the example of PdAu nanoparticles with ca 100 atoms and narrow size and compositional distributions. Using a direct modeling approach and no adjustable parameters, we were able to reproduce the size and shape of nanoparticles as well as the intra-particle distributions of atoms and metal mixing ratios and to explore the influence of these parameters on the local structure and dynamics in nanoparticles.

  5. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Skoog, R.

    2006-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Google Earth is being used as a visualization tool for operational satellite monitoring of the region's volcanoes. Through the abilities of the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) utilized by Google Earth, different datasets have been integrated into this virtual globe browser. Examples include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays with dynamic control, to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through the Google Earth interface to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits; and animated models of ash plumes within Google Earth, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages. The globe also provides an ideal interface for displaying near real-time information on detected thermal anomalies or "hotspot"; pixels in satellite images with elevated brightness temperatures relative to the background temperature. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska collects AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) through its own receiving station. The automated processing that follows includes application of algorithms that search for hotspots close to volcano location, flagging those that meet certain criteria. Further automated routines generate folders of KML placemarkers, which are linked to Google Earth through the network link function. Downloadable KML files have been created to provide links to various data products for different volcanoes and past eruptions, and to demonstrate examples of the monitoring tools developed. These KML files will be made accessible through a new website that will become publicly available in December 2006.

  6. Multi-temporal and multi-platforms remote sensing data for the analysis of open-pit mining earth surface dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zengwen; Chen, Jianping; Li, Ke; Tarolli, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Open-pit mining activities can affect the earth surface processes inducing soil erosion, landslides, and subsidence. The recognition and the analysis of mining induced Earth surface changes and the related processes represent, therefore, a challenge for a sustainable environmental planning for those regions affected by an intense mining activity. The purpose of this study is to monitor the effects of open-pit mining and the associated landform processes using multi-temporal and multi-platforms remote sensing data. The study area consists in an open-pit mine located in Miyun county, northern Beijing. For the study area different datasets are available for different years: a GeoEye image (2011, res. 1m/pix), two pairs of Cartosat - 1 stereo pairs (2009, 2012, res. 2.5m/pix) from which we extracted two DSMs (res. 5m/pix), an UAV aerial photograph (2014, res. 0.07m) and the derived DSM (2014, res. 0.1m). We also obtained a DTM (2014, res. 1m) from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) and a DSM (2014, res. 0.5m) using the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique by a camera. These data served as the basis to recognize, through the application of morphometric indicators, the areas subject to erosion and landsliding. A volumetric estimate of soil loss from 2009 to 2014 has been also quantified using the multiple DSMs provided by the multi-platform. The recognition and the analysis of earth surface dynamics using low-cost multi-temporal and multi-platforms remote sensing such as SfM and UAVs represents a useful tool to mitigate the environmental consequences open-pit mining, and to mitigate the related natural disaster and risk.

  7. Exoplanet dynamics. Asynchronous rotation of Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone of lower-mass stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy; Wu, Hanbo; Menou, Kristen; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-06

    Planets in the habitable zone of lower-mass stars are often assumed to be in a state of tidally synchronized rotation, which would considerably affect their putative habitability. Although thermal tides cause Venus to rotate retrogradely, simple scaling arguments tend to attribute this peculiarity to the massive Venusian atmosphere. Using a global climate model, we show that even a relatively thin atmosphere can drive terrestrial planets' rotation away from synchronicity. We derive a more realistic atmospheric tide model that predicts four asynchronous equilibrium spin states, two being stable, when the amplitude of the thermal tide exceeds a threshold that is met for habitable Earth-like planets with a 1-bar atmosphere around stars more massive than ~0.5 to 0.7 solar mass. Thus, many recently discovered terrestrial planets could exhibit asynchronous spin-orbit rotation, even with a thin atmosphere.

  8. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 (KMBM2) for UVic 2.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, L.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-12-01

    Marine biological production and the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depend on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial/interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic) iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  9. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 (KMBM2 for UVic 2.9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nickelsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine biological production and the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depend on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial/interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  10. Comparison of strategies for combining dynamic linear models with artificial neural networks for detecting diarrhea in slaughter pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dan Børge; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard

    2016-01-01

    The drinking behavior of healthy pigs is known to follow predictable diurnal patterns, and these patterns are further known to change in relation to undesired events such as diarrhea. We therefore expect that automatic monitoring of slaughter pig drinking behavior, combined with machine learning......, can provide early and automatic detection of diarrhea. To determine the best approach to achieve this goal, we compared 36 different strategies for combining a multivariate dynamic linear model (DLM) with an artificial neural network (ANN). We used data collected in 16 pens between November 2013...

  11. Combination Of Static And Dynami,C Stereophotogrammetry For The Kinetic Analysis Of Human Locomotion: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Alex R.; Sheffer, Daniel B.; Jones, D.; Meier, G.; Baumann, Juerg U.

    1989-04-01

    For a deeper understanding of the complexity of human walking movement not only a kinematic analysis , but also a comprehensive three-dimensional biomechanical model of the human body is required to detail the kinetic activities. This research combined static stereophotogrammetric determination of body segment mass parameters with three-dimensional gait analysis by cinephotography, direct linear transformation and two force plates. A method of combining the two independent analyses by defining the anatomical axes of each segment is shown. Practical problems arising in dynamic and stereometric analysis are demonstrated. Power spectra of a normal and a matched subject with spastic diplegia were calculated for a proper design of the kinematic analysis.

  12. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  13. Change in blood pressure in recovery phase after combined (static & dynamic) exercise

    OpenAIRE

    桑村, 由美; 志内, 哲也; 野村, 千景; 幸田, 貴美子; 小原, 繁

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that systolic blood pressure (SBP) elevate but diastolic blood pressure (DBP) do not elevate during dynamic exercise and in statlc isometrlc exercise DBP show respectable elevation. However,changes in SBP and DBP in recovery phase after exercise is unclear.In this study we measured SBP and DBP by auscultatory recording method during recovery phase for 10 minutes. Resting blood pressure was determined immediately before exercise. The exercise was a dynamic (p...

  14. Combination of vehicle routing models and dynamic traffic simulation for city logistics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Grzybwska, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The urban network is a highly dynamic system. Thus, a modern and efficient fleet management in urban areas should account for dynamics of traffic conditions, variability in travel times, changes in demand and fleet availability. All these factors significantly affect the distribution of goods and the provision of services. As a consequence, the freight operations optimizing approaches should be based on the time-dependent travel time estimates rather than on the average static values commonly...

  15. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  16. A novel approach to the dynamical complexity of the Earth's magnetosphere at geomagnetic storm time-scales based on recurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Reik; Balasis, Georgios; Stolbova, Veronika; Wiedermann, Marc; Georgiou, Marina; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are the most prominent global manifestations of out-of-equilibrium magnetospheric dynamics. Investigating the dynamical complexity exhibited by geomagnetic observables can provide valuable insights into relevant physical processes as well as temporal scales associated with this phenomenon. In this work, we introduce several innovative data analysis techniques enabling a quantitative analysis of the Dst index non-stationary behavior. Using recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) and recurrence network analysis (RNA), we obtain a variety of complexity measures serving as markers of quiet- and storm-time magnetospheric dynamics. We additionally apply these techniques to the main driver of Dst index variations, the V BSouth coupling function and interplanetary medium parameters Bz and Pdyn in order to discriminate internal processes from the magnetosphere's response directly induced by the external forcing by the solar wind. The derived recurrence-based measures allow us to improve the accuracy with which magnetospheric storms can be classified based on ground-based observations. The new methodology presented here could be of significant interest for the space weather research community working on time series analysis for magnetic storm forecasts.

  17. An Earth's Future Special Collection: Impacts of the coastal dynamics of sea level rise on low-gradient coastal landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, David M.; Dietrich, J. Casey; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    Rising sea level represents a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems, including altered habitats and increased vulnerability to coastal storms and recurrent inundation. This threat is exemplified in the northern Gulf of Mexico, where low topography, marshes, and a prevalence of tropical storms have resulted in extensive coastal impacts. The ability to facilitate adaptation and mitigation measures relies, in part, on the development of robust predictive capabilities that incorporate complex biological processes with physical dynamics. Initiated in 2010, the 6-year Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise—Northern Gulf of Mexico project applied a transdisciplinary science approach to develop a suite of integrated modeling platforms informed by empirical data that are capable of evaluating a range of climate change scenarios. This special issue highlights resultant integrated models focused on tidal hydrodynamics, shoreline morphology, oyster ecology, coastal wetland vulnerability, and storm surges that demonstrate the need for dynamic models to incorporate feedbacks among physical and biological processes in assessments of sea level rise effects on coastal systems. Effects are projected to be significant, spatially variable and nonlinear relative to sea level rise rates. Scenarios of higher sea level rise rates are projected to exceed thresholds of wetland sustainability, and many regions will experience enhanced storm surges. Influenced by an extensive collaborative stakeholder engagement process, these assessments on the coastal dynamics of sea level rise provide a strong foundation for resilience measures in the northern Gulf of Mexico and a transferable approach for application to other coastal regions throughout the world.

  18. A fully integrated Earth System Model: focus on dynamical coupling of climatic and cryospheric model sub-systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Polina; Volodin, Evgeny; Rybak, Oleg; Huybrechts, Philippe; Korneva, Irina; Kaminskaia, Mariia

    2017-04-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) have been widely used in the recent years for complex studies of the climate system of the planet in the context of interactions between the atmosphere, oceans, ice sheets and the biosphere. Incorporation of the Earth syb-systems with very different spatial and temporal scales and response times into one model is really a challenging task. In particular, coupling of an AO GCM and ice sheet models of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets (GrIS and AIS) requires application of special downscaling procedures. Within the frameworks of our research study, we implemented several coupling strategies. The choice of a strategy is dictated mostly by two factors - by the purpose of the research and by spatial resolution of an AO GCM. Several versions of the latter (called INMCM) were developed in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics (Moscow, Russia). For instance, the version aimed primarily for the relatively long numerical experiments (for e.g. palaeostudies) has spatial resolution of 5°×4°, 21 vertical layers in the atmospheric block, 2.5°×2°, 33 vertical layers in the oceanic block. To provide proper data exchange between the INMCM and GrIS and AIS models (spatial resolution 20×20 km), we employ rather simple buffer (sub-) models, describing regional heat and moisture diffusion. Applying buffer models enables to avoid systematic shifts in INMCM-generated precipitation fields and to much more realistically describe influence orographically driven precipitation (in Greenland) and elevation-temperature dependence. Novel versions of the INMCM with the spatial resolution of 2,5°×2° and higher generate much more realistic climatic fields, therefore the coupling procedure can be simplified to just averaging, resampling and remapping data from the AO GCM global domain to regional domains enclosing ice sheets. Increase in spatial resolution inevitably causes additional computational cost and reduces the area of the ESM application to

  19. Dynamic Theory of Relativistic Electrons Stochastic Heating by Whistler Mode Waves with Application to the Earth Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Hamiltonian approach an electron motion in a coherent packet of the whistler mode waves propagating along the direction of an ambient magnetic field is studied. The physical processes by which these particles are accelerated to high energy are established. Equations governing a particle motion were transformed in to a closed pair of nonlinear difference equations. The solutions of these equations have shown there exists the energetic threshold below that the electron motion is regular, and when the initial energy is above the threshold an electron moves stochastically. Particle energy spectra and pitch angle electron scattering are described by the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations. Calculating the stochastic diffusion of electrons due to a spectrum of whistler modes is presented. The parametric dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the plasma particle density, magnitude of wave field, and the strength of magnetic field is studies. It is shown that significant pitch angle diffusion occurs for the Earth radiation belt electrons with energies from a few keV up to a few MeV.

  20. A New Global Theory of the Earth's Dynamics a Single Cause Can Explain All the Geophysical and Geological Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Rousseau, A

    2005-01-01

    After describing all the contradictions associated with the current Plate Tectonics theory, this paper proposes a model where a single cause can explain all geophysical and geological phenomena. The source of the Earth's activity lies in the difference of the angular velocities of the mantle and of the solid inner core. The friction between both spheres infers heat, which is the cause of the melted iron which constitutes most of the liquid outer core, as well as the source of the global heat flow. The solid inner core angular velocity is supposed to remain steady, while the mantle angular velocity depends on gyroscopic forces (involving acceleration) and slowing down due to external attractions and, principally the motions of mantle plates 2900 km thick. The variations of the geomagnetic field are therefore the direct consequence of the variations of the angular velocity of the mantle relative to that of the inner core. As a result, the biological and tectonic evolutions during geological times are due to tho...

  1. Estimating national forest carbon stocks and dynamics: combining models and remotely sensed information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallman, Luke; Williams, Mathew

    2016-04-01

    Forests are a critical component of the global carbon cycle, storing significant amounts of carbon, split between living biomass and dead organic matter. The carbon budget of forests is the most uncertain component of the global carbon cycle - it is currently impossible to quantify accurately the carbon source/sink strength of forest biomes due to their heterogeneity and complex dynamics. It has been a major challenge to generate robust carbon budgets across landscapes due to data scarcity. Models have been used but outputs have lacked an assessment of uncertainty, making a robust assessment of their reliability and accuracy challenging. Here a Metropolis Hastings - Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MH-MCMC) data assimilation framework has been used to combine remotely sensed leaf area index (MODIS), biomass (where available) and deforestation estimates, in addition to forest planting and clear-felling information from the UK's national forest inventory, an estimate of soil carbon from the Harmonized World Database (HWSD) and plant trait information with a process model (DALEC) to produce a constrained analysis with a robust estimate of uncertainty of the UK forestry carbon budget between 2000 and 2010. Our analysis estimates the mean annual UK forest carbon sink at -3.9 MgC ha-1yr-1 with a 95 % confidence interval between -4.0 and -3.1 MgC ha-1 yr-1. The UK national forest inventory (NFI) estimates the mean UK forest carbon sink to be between -1.4 and -5.5 MgC ha-1 yr-1. The analysis estimate for total forest biomass stock in 2010 is estimated at 229 (177/232) TgC, while the NFI an estimated total forest biomass carbon stock of 216 TgC. Leaf carbon area (LCA) is a key plant trait which we are able to estimate using our analysis. Comparison of median estimates for LCA retrieved from the analysis and a UK land cover map show higher and lower values for LCA are estimated areas dominated by needle leaf and broad leaf forests forest respectively, consistent with ecological

  2. Multi-scale calculation based on dual domain material point method combined with molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Tilak Raj [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-27

    This dissertation combines the dual domain material point method (DDMP) with molecular dynamics (MD) in an attempt to create a multi-scale numerical method to simulate materials undergoing large deformations with high strain rates. In these types of problems, the material is often in a thermodynamically non-equilibrium state, and conventional constitutive relations are often not available. In this method, the closure quantities, such as stress, at each material point are calculated from a MD simulation of a group of atoms surrounding the material point. Rather than restricting the multi-scale simulation in a small spatial region, such as phase interfaces, or crack tips, this multi-scale method can be used to consider non-equilibrium thermodynamic e ects in a macroscopic domain. This method takes advantage that the material points only communicate with mesh nodes, not among themselves; therefore MD simulations for material points can be performed independently in parallel. First, using a one-dimensional shock problem as an example, the numerical properties of the original material point method (MPM), the generalized interpolation material point (GIMP) method, the convected particle domain interpolation (CPDI) method, and the DDMP method are investigated. Among these methods, only the DDMP method converges as the number of particles increases, but the large number of particles needed for convergence makes the method very expensive especially in our multi-scale method where we calculate stress in each material point using MD simulation. To improve DDMP, the sub-point method is introduced in this dissertation, which provides high quality numerical solutions with a very small number of particles. The multi-scale method based on DDMP with sub-points is successfully implemented for a one dimensional problem of shock wave propagation in a cerium crystal. The MD simulation to calculate stress in each material point is performed in GPU using CUDA to accelerate the

  3. Estimating national forest carbon stocks and dynamics: combining models and remotely sensed information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallman, Thomas Luke; Exbrayat, Jean-François; Bloom, Anthony; Williams, Mathew

    2017-04-01

    Forests are a critical component of the global carbon cycle, storing significant amounts of carbon, split between living biomass and dead organic matter. The carbon budget of forests is the most uncertain component of the global carbon cycle - it is currently impossible to quantify accurately the carbon source/sink strength of forest biomes due to their heterogeneity and complex dynamics. It has been a major challenge to generate robust carbon budgets across landscapes due to data scarcity. Models have been used for estimating carbon budgets, but outputs have lacked an assessment of uncertainty, making a robust assessment of their reliability and accuracy challenging. Here a Metropolis Hastings - Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MH-MCMC) data assimilation framework has been used to combine remotely sensed leaf area index (MODIS), biomass (where available) and deforestation estimates, in addition to forest planting information from the UK's national forest inventory, an estimate of soil carbon from the Harmonized World Database (HWSD) and plant trait information with a process model (DALEC) to produce a constrained analysis with a robust estimate of uncertainty of the UK forestry carbon budget between 2000 and 2010. Our analysis estimates the mean annual UK forest carbon sink at -3.9 MgC ha-1 yr-1 with a 95 % confidence interval between -4.0 and -3.1 MgC ha-1yr-1. The UK national forest inventory (NFI) estimates the mean UK forest carbon sink to be between -1.4 and -5.5 MgC ha-1 yr-1. The analysis estimate for total forest biomass stock in 2010 is estimated at 229 (177/232) TgC, while the NFI an estimated total forest biomass carbon stock of 216 TgC. Leaf carbon area (LCA) is a key plant trait which we are able to estimate using our analysis. Comparison of median estimates for (LCA) retrieved from the analysis and a UK land cover map show higher and lower values for LCA are estimated areas dominated by needle leaf and broad leaf forests forest respectively, consistent with

  4. Mammography combined with breast dynamic contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of early breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakun He; Guohui Xu; Jin Ren; Bin Feng; Xiaolei Dong; Hao Lu; Changjiu He

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the application of mammography combined with breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Methods Mammography and DCE-MRI were performed for 120 patients with breast cancer (malignant, 102; benign; 18). Results The sensitivity of mammography for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 66.67%, specificity was 77.78%, and accuracy was 68.33%. The sensitivity of MRI for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 94.12%, specificity was 88.89%, and accuracy was 93.33%. However, the sensitivity of mammography combined with DCE-MRI volume imaging with enhanced water signal (VIEWS) scanning for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 97.06%, specificity was 94.44%, and accuracy was 96.67%. Conclusion Mammography combined with DCE-MRI increased the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of diagnosing early breast cancer.

  5. 黑河土石坝的地震响应和液化分析%Dynamic response of earthquake and liquefaction analysis of the Heihe Earth Dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈飞熊; 李宁; 谢定义

    2000-01-01

    本文根据饱和土体固 液两相介质的振动固结模型,采用非线性静力本构模型(Duncan-Chang模型)及摩尔 库仑强度准则和土的动力模型(Hardin模型)对黑河土石坝进行了地震作用下的动力反应有限元分析,得到了振动期孔压增长与消散过程。分析表明,该坝不会出现液化现象。%Based on the dynamic consolidation model of the saturated soil,the Duncan-Chang Model and the Hardin model are used for the purpose of the dynamic response ana lysis of the Heihe Earth Dam under the seismic load.The development of the gener ation,dispersion and dissipation of the pore water pressure in the dam is studied and the identification of the liquefaction of the dam is conducted.The analysis results show that no liquefaction will happen to the dam during earthquake.

  6. Nonlinearity-induced time-varying harmonic dynamic axle load and its impact on dynamic stability of car-trailer combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Xiao, Hong; Winner, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    A nonlinearity-induced time-varying harmonic dynamic axle load is found in the road test of a car-trailer combination. To understand its influence on system dynamic stability, a corresponding linear single-track model (STM) is proposed. System dynamic stability is described and sensitivity analysis for the system parameters is achieved. The contribution of the harmonic force is quantified by a derived effective axle load. Because the harmonic effect might be time varying in practice, a time-frequency analysis-based parameter identification method is introduced. Experimental study shows that a time-varying harmonic effect really exists. A yaw-rate-based simulation method is designed to simulate this behaviour. The sensitivity analysis of the influence of the harmonic amplitude or phase on dynamic stability is performed with a simulation study. With appropriate modification of the harmonic amplitude and phase shift applied in selected time windows, the time-varying system characteristics in the road test can be simulated very well.

  7. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks: An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation combined with a mapping/reverse mapping procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazutin, A. A.; Glagolev, M. K.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Khokhlov, A. R. [A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds RAS, Vavilova Str. 28, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-07

    An algorithm involving classical molecular dynamics simulations with mapping and reverse mapping procedure is here suggested to simulate the crosslinking of the polystyrene dissolved in dichloroethane by monochlorodimethyl ether. The algorithm comprises consecutive stages: molecular dynamics atomistic simulation of a polystyrene solution, the mapping of atomistic structure onto coarse-grained model, the crosslink formation, the reverse mapping, and finally relaxation of the structure dissolved in dichloroethane and in dry state. The calculated values of the specific volume and the elastic modulus are in reasonable quantitative correspondence with experimental data.

  8. Verification of nonlinear dynamic structural test results by combined image processing and acoustic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tene, Yair; Tene, Noam; Tene, G.

    1993-08-01

    An interactive data fusion methodology of video, audio, and nonlinear structural dynamic analysis for potential application in forensic engineering is presented. The methodology was developed and successfully demonstrated in the analysis of heavy transportable bridge collapse during preparation for testing. Multiple bridge elements failures were identified after the collapse, including fracture, cracks and rupture of high performance structural materials. Videotape recording by hand held camcorder was the only source of information about the collapse sequence. The interactive data fusion methodology resulted in extracting relevant information form the videotape and from dynamic nonlinear structural analysis, leading to full account of the sequence of events during the bridge collapse.

  9. Combined Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Poly-Amido-Saccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stacy L; Lu, Qing; Dane, Eric L; Dominguez, Laura; McKnight, Christopher J; Straub, John E; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-05-25

    Poly-amido-saccharides (PAS) are carbohydrate-based, enantiopure synthetic polymers in which sugar repeat units are joined by amide linkages. This unique and relatively rigid pyranose backbone contributes to their defined helical secondary structure and remarkable chemical properties. Glucose- (glc-) and galactose- (gal-) PAS 10-mer structures are synthesized and investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental measurements. Quantum mechanical DFT energy minimization calculations, as well as experimental observables including circular dichroism, (1)H,(13)C-HSQC, and (1)H,(1)H-NOESY 2D-NMR studies, validated the all-atom simulation models produced using a modified CHARMM force field. Water radial distribution functions show distinct differences in the glc- and gal-PAS systems that correlate well with observed differences in solubility between gal-PASs and glc-PASs. The computational analysis and MD simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, validating the proposed models as reliable representations of novel glc- and gal-PASs.

  10. The Griggs Dynamic Convection Model: a Resource for Learning About Mountain-Building Processes in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G.

    2013-12-01

    Using a physical analog model in the classroom/laboratory setting is just one of the many ways teachers can provide a resource for learning through inquiry; however, well developed physical analog models of natural processes that can be measured and manipulated scientifically by students can be challenging for teachers to obtain. This research analyzes a historical physical analog model--the David Griggs (1939) Dynamic Convection Model, which was used 'to study the effect of sub-crustal convection currents on the continental crust.'--to determine if the model is capable of supporting model-based inquiry-oriented classroom activities. An analogical structure-mapping method developed for assessing the affordances of scale models (Kastens and Rivet, 2010) is used to show that the model has highly transparent surface and structural features, which correspond to Griggs' theory of mountain-building at the levels of attributes, simple relations, higher order relations and systematicity. A variety of experimental parameters for the model (i.e., using different materials, and varying the speeds of the convection cells) are described to give teachers support for developing inquiry-oriented classroom activities. Furthermore, the Griggs dynamic convection model, along with a replica for people to try, will be at the poster session.

  11. Aero-thermo-dynamic analysis of a low ballistic coefficient deployable capsule in Earth re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppardi, G.; Savino, R.; Mongelluzzo, G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with a microsatellite and the related deployable recovery capsule. The aero-brake is folded at launch and deployed in space and is able to perform a de-orbiting controlled re-entry. This kind of capsule, with a flexible, high temperature resistant fabric, thanks to its lightness and modulating capability, can be an alternative to the current "conventional" recovery capsules. The present authors already analyzed the trajectory and the aerodynamic behavior of low ballistic coefficient capsules during Earth re-entry and Mars entry. In previous studies, aerodynamic longitudinal stability analysis and evaluation of thermal and aerodynamic loads for a possible suborbital re-entry demonstrator were carried out in both continuum and rarefied regimes. The present study is aimed at providing preliminary information about thermal and aerodynamic loads and longitudinal stability for a similar deployable capsule, as well as information about the electronic composition of the plasma sheet and its possible influence on radio communications at the altitudes where GPS black-out could occur. Since the computer tests were carried out at high altitudes, therefore in rarefied flow fields, use of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo codes was mandatory. The computations involved both global aerodynamic quantities (drag and longitudinal moment coefficients) and local aerodynamic quantities (heat flux and pressure distributions along the capsule surface). The results verified that the capsule at high altitude (150 km) is self-stabilizing; it is stable around the nominal attitude or at zero angle of attack and unstable around the reverse attitude or at 180° angle of attack. The analysis also pointed out the presence of extra statically stable equilibrium trim points.

  12. Dynamical process of cavitation bubble adsorbed in gold nanoparticle under combined irradiations of laser and ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zheng; XU Jianyi; LIU Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    Under combined irradiation of laser and ultrasound, cavitary bubbles are generated on the surface of gold nanoparticle. The laser-induced thermal effect, ultrasonic cavitation el- fect and the synergistic effect of laser and ultrasound are studied by mean

  13. Crew Earth Observations: Twelve Years of Documenting Earth from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kimberley; Runco, Susan; Wilkinson, M. Justin; Dawson, Melissa; Trenchard, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload was one of the initial experiments aboard the International Space Station, and has been continuously collecting data about the Earth since Expedition 1. The design of the experiment is simple: using state-of-the-art camera equipment, astronauts collect imagery of the Earth's surface over defined regions of scientific interest and also document dynamic events such as storms systems, floods, wild fires and volcanic eruptions. To date, CEO has provided roughly 600,000 images of Earth, capturing views of features and processes on land, the oceans, and the atmosphere. CEO data are less rigorously constrained than other remote sensing data, but the volume of data, and the unique attributes of the imagery provide a rich and understandable view of the Earth that is difficult to achieve from the classic remote sensing platforms. In addition, the length-of-record of the imagery dataset, especially when combined with astronaut photography from other NASA and Russian missions starting in the early 1960s, provides a valuable record of changes on the surface of the Earth over 50 years. This time period coincides with the rapid growth of human settlements and human infrastructure.

  14. Quantum dynamics through conical intersections in macrosystems: Combining effective modes and time-dependent Hartree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Mathias; Gindensperger, Etienne; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2008-05-01

    We address the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of (macro)systems involving a vast number of nuclear degrees of freedom (modes) in the presence of conical intersections. The macrosystem is first decomposed into a system part carrying a few, strongly coupled modes, and an environment, comprising the remaining modes. By successively transforming the modes of the environment, a hierarchy of effective Hamiltonians for the environment can be constructed. Each effective Hamiltonian depends on a reduced number of effective modes, which carry cumulative effects. The environment is described by a few effective modes augmented by a residual environment. In practice, the effective modes can be added to the system's modes and the quantum dynamics of the entire macrosystem can be accurately calculated on a limited time-interval. For longer times, however, the residual environment plays a role. We investigate the possibility to treat fully quantum mechanically the system plus a few effective environmental modes, augmented by the dynamics of the residual environment treated by the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation. While the TDH approximation is known to fail to correctly reproduce the dynamics in the presence of conical intersections, it is shown that its use on top of the effective-mode formalism leads to much better results. Two numerical examples are presented and discussed; one of them is known to be a critical case for the TDH approximation.

  15. A Dynamic Model of the Combined Electricity and Natural Gas Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenkins, Sandra; Annaswamy, Anuradha M.; Hansen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    quantitative modeling in order to garner insights into the effectiveness of various solutions. In this paper, a quantitative model with a dynamic market mechanism is proposed to evaluate the effects of the fuel uncertainty of natural gas-fired power plants on Social Welfare. The results of the model show...

  16. Novel combination of collagen dynamics analysis and transcriptional profiling reveals fibrosis-relevant genes and pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.E.; Emson, C.L.; Verschuren, L.; Erk, M. van; Turner, S.M.; Everts, V.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Stoop, R.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen deposition is a key process during idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; however, little is known about the dynamics of collagen formation during disease development. Tissue samples of early stages of human disease are not readily available and it is difficult to identify changes in collagen conte

  17. Combined analytical and numerical approaches in Dynamic Stability analyses of engineering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Náprstek, Jiří

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic Stability is a widely studied area that has attracted many researchers from various disciplines. Although Dynamic Stability is usually associated with mechanics, theoretical physics or other natural and technical disciplines, it is also relevant to social, economic, and philosophical areas of our lives. Therefore, it is useful to occasionally highlight the general aspects of this amazing area, to present some relevant examples and to evaluate its position among the various branches of Rational Mechanics. From this perspective, the aim of this study is to present a brief review concerning the Dynamic Stability problem, its basic definitions and principles, important phenomena, research motivations and applications in engineering. The relationships with relevant systems that are prone to stability loss (encountered in other areas such as physics, other natural sciences and engineering) are also noted. The theoretical background, which is applicable to many disciplines, is presented. In this paper, the most frequently used Dynamic Stability analysis methods are presented in relation to individual dynamic systems that are widely discussed in various engineering branches. In particular, the Lyapunov function and exponent procedures, Routh-Hurwitz, Liénard, and other theorems are outlined together with demonstrations. The possibilities for analytical and numerical procedures are mentioned together with possible feedback from experimental research and testing. The strengths and shortcomings of these approaches are evaluated together with examples of their effective complementing of each other. The systems that are widely encountered in engineering are presented in the form of mathematical models. The analyses of their Dynamic Stability and post-critical behaviour are also presented. The stability limits, bifurcation points, quasi-periodic response processes and chaotic regimes are discussed. The limit cycle existence and stability are examined together with their

  18. World Wind 3D Earth Viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick; Maxwell, Christopher; Kim, Randolph; Gaskins, Tom

    2007-01-01

    World Wind allows users to zoom from satellite altitude down to any place on Earth, leveraging high-resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D. In addition to Earth, World Wind can also visualize other planets, and there are already comprehensive data sets for Mars and the Earth's moon, which are as easily accessible as those of Earth. There have been more than 20 million downloads to date, and the software is being used heavily by the Department of Defense due to the code s ability to be extended and the evolution of the code courtesy of NASA and the user community. Primary features include the dynamic access to public domain imagery and its ease of use. All one needs to control World Wind is a two-button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed through a simplified menu. A JAVA version will be available soon. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse, or by typing in any location to automatically zoom in to see it. The World Wind install package contains the necessary requirements such as the .NET runtime and managed DirectX library. World Wind can display combinations of data from a variety of sources, including Blue Marble, LandSat 7, SRTM, NASA Scientific Visualization Studio, GLOBE, and much more. A thorough list of features, the user manual, a key chart, and screen shots are available at http://worldwind.arc.nasa.gov.

  19. A combined simulation of high speed train permanent magnet traction system using dynamic reluctance mesh model and Simulink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yan HUANG; Jian-cheng ZHANG; Chuan-ming SUN; Zhang-wen HUANG; Qin-fen LU; You-tong FANG; Li YAO

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a combined dynamic parameter model (DPM) of a high speed train permanent magnet traction system using a dynamic reluctance mesh model and MATLAB Simulink. First, the dynamic reluctance model of the permanent magnet synchronous motor is introduced. Then the combined models of the traction system underid=0 and maximum torque per ampere control are built.Simulations using both constant parameter models and DPM models are carried out. The speed and torque characteristics are obtained. The results confirm that the DPM model provides higher accuracy without much sacrifice of time consumption or computation resource.%目的:提出基于动态磁网络和Simulink的高速铁路牵引传动系统的动态参数模型,提高高速铁路牵引传动系统仿真分析的准确度。  方法:将动态磁网络计算得出的动态参数Ld,Lq等以查表的形式嵌入 Simulink 模型,有效地实现动态参数。  结论:该动态参数模型能在不显著增加仿真运算量和仿真时间的条件下有效地提高计算的准确度。

  20. A combined quasi-continuum/Langevin equation approach to study the self-diffusion dynamics of confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghi, T; Aluru, N R

    2013-03-28

    In this work, we combine our earlier proposed empirical potential based quasi-continuum theory, (EQT) [A. V. Raghunathan, J. H. Park, and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 174701 (2007)], which is a coarse-grained multiscale framework to predict the static structure of confined fluids, with a phenomenological Langevin equation to simulate the dynamics of confined fluids in thermal equilibrium. An attractive feature of this approach is that all the input parameters to the Langevin equation (mean force profile of the confined fluid and the static friction coefficient) can be determined using the outputs of the EQT and the self-diffusivity data of the corresponding bulk fluid. The potential of mean force profile, which is a direct output from EQT is used to compute the mean force profile of the confined fluid. The density profile, which is also a direct output from EQT, along with the self-diffusivity data of the bulk fluid is used to determine the static friction coefficient of the confined fluid. We use this approach to compute the mean square displacement and survival probabilities of some important fluids such as carbon-dioxide, water, and Lennard-Jones argon confined inside slit pores. The predictions from the model are compared with those obtained using molecular dynamics simulations. This approach of combining EQT with a phenomenological Langevin equation provides a mathematically simple and computationally efficient means to study the impact of structural inhomogeneity on the self-diffusion dynamics of confined fluids.

  1. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair C R Dancy

    Full Text Available Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs, critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism.

  2. Description and implementation of a MiXed Layer model (MXL, v1.0) for the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Pozzer, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new submodel for the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy): the MiXed Layer (MXL) model for the diurnal dynamics of the convective boundary layer, including explicit representations of entrainment and surface fluxes. This submodel is embedded in a new MESSy base model (VERTICO), which represents a single atmospheric column. With the implementation of MXL in MESSy, MXL can be used in combination with other MESSy submodels that represent processes related to atmospheric chemistry. For instance, the coupling of MXL with more advanced modules for gas-phase chemistry (such as the Mainz Isoprene Mechanism 2 (MIM2)), emissions, dry deposition and organic aerosol formation than in previous versions of the MXL code is possible. Since MXL is now integrated in the MESSy framework, it can take advantage of future developments of this framework, such as the inclusion of new process submodels. The coupling of MXL with submodels that represent other processes relevant to chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) yields a computationally inexpensive tool that is ideally suited for the analysis of field data, for evaluating new parametrizations for 3-D models, and for performing systematic sensitivity analyses. A case study for the DOMINO campaign in southern Spain is shown to demonstrate the use and performance of MXL/MESSy in reproducing and analysing field observations.

  3. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 for UVic 2.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, L.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-05-01

    Marine biological production as well as the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depends on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial-interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic) iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the sensitivity of the model to parameterized iron ligand concentrations, the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high-resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  4. Modelling the growth of white seabream (Diplodus sargus) and gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) in semi-intensive earth production ponds using the Dynamic Energy Budget approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa, Dalila; Ferreira, Pedro Pousão; Ferreira, Hugo; da Fonseca, Luís Cancela; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Duarte, Pedro

    2013-02-01

    Fish growth models may help understanding the influence of environmental, physiological and husbandry factors on fish production, providing crucial information to maximize the growth rates of cultivated species. The main objectives of this work were to: i) develop and implement an Individual Based Model using a Dynamic Energy Budget (IBM-DEB) approach to simulate the growth of two commercially important Sparidae species in semi-intensive earth ponds, the white seabream which is considered as a potential candidate for Mediterranean aquaculture and the gilthead seabream that has been cultivated since the early 80s; ii) evaluate which model parameters are more likely to affect fish performance, and iii) investigate which parameters might account for growth differences between the cultivated species. The model may be run in two modes: the "state variable" mode, in which an average fish is simulated with a particular parameter set and the "Individual Based Model" (IBM) mode that simulates a population of n fishes, each with its specific parameter set assigned randomly. The IBM mode has the advantage of allowing a quick model calibration and an evaluation of the parameter sets that produce the best fit between predicted and observed fish growth. Results revealed that the model reproduces reasonably well the growth of the two seabreams. Fish performance was mainly affected by parameters related to feed ingestion/assimilation and reserves utilization, suggesting that special attention should be taken in the estimation of these parameters when applying the model to other species. Comparing the DEB parameters set of the two sparids it seems that the white seabream's low growth rates are a result of higher maintenance costs and a lower feed assimilation efficiency. Hence, the development of new feed formulations may be crucial for the success of white seabream production in semi-intensive earth ponds.

  5. Fully Quantum Description of the Zundel Ion: Combining Variational Quantum Monte Carlo with Path Integral Langevin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhat, Félix; Sorella, Sandro; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Casula, Michele

    2017-06-13

    We introduce a novel approach for a fully quantum description of coupled electron-ion systems from first principles. It combines the variational quantum Monte Carlo solution of the electronic part with the path integral formalism for the quantum nuclear dynamics. On the one hand, the path integral molecular dynamics includes nuclear quantum effects by adding a set of fictitious classical particles (beads) aimed at reproducing nuclear quantum fluctuations via a harmonic kinetic term. On the other hand, variational quantum Monte Carlo can provide Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces with a precision comparable to the most-advanced post-Hartree-Fock approaches, and with a favorable scaling with the system size. In order to cope with the intrinsic noise due to the stochastic nature of quantum Monte Carlo methods, we generalize the path integral molecular dynamics using a Langevin thermostat correlated according to the covariance matrix of quantum Monte Carlo nuclear forces. The variational parameters of the quantum Monte Carlo wave function are evolved during the nuclear dynamics, such that the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface is unbiased. Statistical errors on the wave function parameters are reduced by resorting to bead grouping average, which we show to be accurate and well-controlled. Our general algorithm relies on a Trotter breakup between the dynamics driven by ionic forces and the one set by the harmonic interbead couplings. The latter is exactly integrated, even in the presence of the Langevin thermostat, thanks to the mapping onto an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. This framework turns out to be also very efficient in the case of noiseless (deterministic) ionic forces. The new implementation is validated on the Zundel ion (H5O2(+)) by direct comparison with standard path integral Langevin dynamics calculations made with a coupled cluster potential energy surface. Nuclear quantum effects are confirmed to be dominant over thermal effects well beyond

  6. Bi-Bayesian Combined Model for Two-Step Prediction of Dynamic Turning Movement Proportions at Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Short-term prediction of dynamic turning movement proportions at intersections is very important for intelligent transportation systems, but it is impossible to detect turning flows directly through current traffic surveillance devices. Existing prediction models have proved to be rather accurate in general, but not precise enough during every time interval, and can only obtain the one-step prediction. This paper first presents a Bayesian combined model to forecast the entering and exiting flows at intersections, by integrating a nonlinear regression, a moving average, and an autoregressive model. Based on the forecasted traffic flows, this paper further develops an accurate backpropagation neural network model and an efficient Kalman filtering model to predict the dynamic turning movement proportions. Using Bayesian method with both historical information and currently prediction results for error adjustment, this paper finally integrates both the above two prediction models and proposes a Bi-Bayesian combined framework to achieve both one-step and two-step predictions. A case study is implemented based on practical survey data, which are collected at an intersection in Beijing city, including both historical and current data. The reported prediction results indicate that the Bi-Bayesian combined model is rather accurate and stable for on-line applications.

  7. Study on the ultrafast dynamics of o-xylene cation by combined fs-photoelectron imaging-photofragmentation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhu, E-mail: yuzhu.liu@psi.ch; Radi, Peter; Gerber, Thomas; Knopp, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.knopp@psi.ch

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Photoelectron imaging and photofragment spectroscopy are combined. • Photoelectron imaging has been measured to characterize the prepared cation states. • Ultrafast signal decay with time constant of 734 (±61) fs has been observed. - Abstract: Ultrafast dynamics of o-xylene cation has been studied by time resolved fs-photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy in combination with photoelectron imaging (PEI). In the experiment, multiphoton ionization is used to prepare the o-xylene cation characterized by PEI. The ultrafast dynamics of o-xylene ions are measured by monitoring the time dependent parent-ion depletion and the fragment-ion formation, simultaneously. An ultrafast relaxation time of the parent ion of 734 (±61) fs has been observed. The PEI-PF measurements support the interpretation of this relaxation channel to a combination of internal conversion between the two ionic states (D{sub 0} and D{sub 1}) and intramolecular vibrational-energy redistribution process within the D{sub 0} state.

  8. Neural Network for Combining Linear and Non-Linear Modelling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per Printz

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a method to combine linear models with MLP networks. In other words to find a method to make a non-linear and multivariable model that performs at least as good as a linear model, when the training data lacks information.......The purpose of this paper is to develop a method to combine linear models with MLP networks. In other words to find a method to make a non-linear and multivariable model that performs at least as good as a linear model, when the training data lacks information....

  9. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo-García, A. G.; Saavedra-Santana, P.; Juliá-Serdá, G.; Navarro-Mesa, J. L.; Navarro-Esteva, J.; Álvarez-López, X.; Gapelyuk, A.; Penzel, T.; Wessel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95% = 0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique.

  10. A Parallel Processing Approach to Dynamic Simulations of Combined Transmission and Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aristidou, P; Van Cutsem, T

    2015-01-01

    Simulating a power system with both transmission and distribution networks modeled in detail is a huge computational challenge. In this paper, a Schur-complement-based domain decomposition algorithm is proposed to provide accurate, detailed dynamic simulations of such systems. The simulation procedure is accelerated with the use of parallel programming techniques, taking advantage of the parallelization opportunities inherent to domain decomposition algorithms. The proposed algorithm is gener...

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Structure to Combined External Acoustic and Parametric Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. Varoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible structures are frequently subjected to multiple inputs when in the field environment. The accurate determination of the system dynamic response to multiple inputs depends on how much information is available from the excitation sources that act on the system under study. Detailed information include, but are not restricted to appropriate characterization of the excitation sources in terms of their variation in time and in space for the case of distributed loads. Another important aspect related to the excitation sources is how inputs of different nature contribute to the measured dynamic response. A particular and important driving mechanism that can occur in practical situations is the parametric resonance. Another important input that occurs frequently in practice is related to acoustic pressure distributions that is a distributed type of loading. In this paper, detailed theoretical and experimental investigations on the dynamic response of a flexible cantilever beam carrying a tip mass to simultaneously applied external acoustic and parametric excitation signals have been performed. A mathematical model for transverse nonlinear vibration is obtained by employing Lagrange’s equations where important nonlinear effects such as the beam’s curvature and quadratic viscous damping are accounted for in the equation of motion. The beam is driven by two excitation sources, a sinusoidal motion applied to the beam’s fixed end and parallel to its longitudinal axis and a distributed sinusoidal acoustic load applied orthogonally to the beam’s longitudinal axis. The major goal here is to investigate theoretically as well as experimentally the dynamic behavior of the beam-lumped mass system under the action of these two excitation sources. Results from an extensive experimental work show how these two excitation sources interacts for various testing conditions. These experimental results are validated through numerically simulated results

  12. Inferring internal properties of Earth's core dynamics and their evolution from surface observations and a numerical geodynamo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aubert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, direct three-dimensional numerical modelling has been successfully used to reproduce the main features of the geodynamo. Here we report on efforts to solve the associated inverse problem, aiming at inferring the underlying properties of the system from the sole knowledge of surface observations and the first principle dynamical equations describing the convective dynamo. To this end we rely on twin experiments. A reference model time sequence is first produced and used to generate synthetic data, restricted here to the large-scale component of the magnetic field and its rate of change at the outer boundary. Starting from a different initial condition, a second sequence is next run and attempts are made to recover the internal magnetic, velocity and buoyancy anomaly fields from the sparse surficial data. In order to reduce the vast underdetermination of this problem, we use stochastic inversion, a linear estimation method determining the most likely internal state compatible with the observations and some prior knowledge, and we also implement a sequential evolution algorithm in order to invert time-dependent surface observations. The prior is the multivariate statistics of the numerical model, which are directly computed from a large number of snapshots stored during a preliminary direct run. The statistics display strong correlation between different harmonic degrees of the surface observations and internal fields, provided they share the same harmonic order, a natural consequence of the linear coupling of the governing dynamical equations and of the leading influence of the Coriolis force. Synthetic experiments performed with a weakly nonlinear model yield an excellent quantitative retrieval of the internal structure. In contrast, the use of a strongly nonlinear (and more realistic model results in less accurate static estimations, which in turn fail to constrain the unobserved small scales in the time integration of the

  13. Indication for shunt operation of normal pressure hydrocephalus. Combined assessment of infusion test and dynamic CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnai, Takahiro; Nagao, Seigo [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan); Kuyama, Hideyuki

    2000-03-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the diseases that causes a neuro-surgically treatable form of dementia. Although patients with NPH can be treated with shunt operation, reliable indications for the surgery are not yet established. In this study, 20 NPH patients diagnosed by clinical symptoms were subjected to combined assessment by infusion test and dynamic CT scan, a useful diagnostic tool to select a shunt responsive cases. Patients were evaluated by measuring sequential changes in the density of the periventricular lucency (PVL) using dynamic CT scan and continuous lumbar subdural pressure monitoring during an infusion manometric test at a rate of 0.8 ml/min for 30 min. The average lumbar subdural pressure during infusion manometric test in the shunt responsive group was 18.4{+-}5.8 mmHg, which was significantly higher than that in the shunt non-responsive group which was 10.0{+-}4.0 mmHg (p<0.01). The relative changes in PVL density in the dynamic CT was also significantly higher in the shunt responsive group (0.99{+-}0.61 HU) compared to the shunt non-responsive group (0.15{+-}0.32) (p<0.01). Dynamic CT scan with infusion manometric test is useful in the selection of patients with NPH who are likely to respond to shunt surgery. (author)

  14. SHORT DURATIONS OF STATIC STRETCHING WHEN COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC STRETCHING DO NOT IMPAIR REPEATED SPRINTS AND AGILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA and change of direction (COD. Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s. Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total. Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p < 0.001. However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (< 90 s static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments

  15. Combined Measures of Dynamic Bone Quality and Postural Balance--A Fracture Risk Assessment Approach in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson B; Dwivedi, Alok; Shukla, Rakesh; Mani, Ashutosh; Diab, Dima

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated functional measures of neuromuscular integrity and bone's resistance to fracture as a combined tool in discriminating osteoporosis patients with and without fractures. Functional aspects of neuromuscular integrity were quantified with a noninvasive measure of static and dynamic functional postural stability (FPS), and fracture resistance was obtained with bone shock absorption in patients with osteoporosis aged 65-85 and compared our measures with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX [World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases, Sheffield, UK]) in women with osteoporosis, some with and some without vertebral fractures. Patients with vertebral fracture showed larger static FPS (postural sway excursion) in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior directions, suggesting poorer balance. Most of the variables of dynamic FPS showed significant differences between fracture and no-fracture groups (e.g., the fracture group took significantly longer during turning, implying poorer dynamic balance control). Also, compared with healthy control subjects, all 4 dynamic FPS responses for osteoporosis patients with and without fracture were significantly poorer, suggesting potential risk for falls. In summary, patients with osteoporosis who have vertebral fractures (compared with patients with similarly low bone mineral density and other nonfracture risk fractures) have not only lower bone shock absorption damping (ζ) but also increased postural imbalance.

  16. Mechanical behavior of ultrafine-grained materials under combined static and dynamic loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Y.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine-grained (UFG materials have extensive prospects for engineering application due to their excellent mechanical properties. However, the grain size decrease reduces their strain hardening ability and makes UFG materials more susceptible to deformation instability such as shear localization. In most cases, critical shear strain is taken as the criterion for formation of shear localization under impact loading or adiabatic shear band (ASB. Recently, some researchers found that the formation of ASB was determined only by the dynamic loading process and had nothing to do with its static loading history. They proposed for coarse-grained metals a dynamic stored energy-based criterion for ASB and verified it by some experiments. In this study, we will focus on the shear localization behavior of UFG metals such as UFG titanium and magnesium alloy AZ31. Quasi-static loading and dynamic loading will be applied on the same specimen alternately. The shear localization behavior will be analyzed and the criterion of its formation will be evaluated.

  17. A combined uninterruptible power supply and dynamic voltage compensator using a flywheel energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbach, Robert Stephen

    Due to recent technological advances in materials, power electronics, magnetic bearings and controls, the flywheel energy storage system has become a viable alternative to electrochemical batteries. The advantages of the flywheel system are its higher power density, insensitivity to environmental conditions, lack of hazardous materials and ease of checking the charge. One potential use is in a power distribution system. The flywheel energy storage system may be used as both an uninterruptible power supply as well as a means of dynamic voltage compensation to protect critical loads on radial distribution feeders. To perform dynamic voltage compensation, a comparison was performed which shows that the series injection of power is preferable to the shunt injection of power in utilizing the available kVA of the flywheel system motor/generator. The system was designed and modeled using the Electromagnetic Transients Program to ensure a proper dynamic response of the flywheel energy storage system in either mode of operation. The design incorporates a boost converter on the dc link to enable the load voltage to be maintained as the flywheel spins down. The same boost converter also allows for extended operation in the series compensation mode, by implementing a novel control scheme where sinusoidal pulse width modulation control is used for to compensate for smaller supply voltage dips, while the boost converter is used to control the compensation for larger supply voltage dips.

  18. The distribution dynamics and desorption behaviour of mobile pharmaceuticals and caffeine to combined sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajj-Mohamad, M; Darwano, H; Duy, S Vo; Sauvé, S; Prévost, M; Arp, H P H; Dorner, S

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are discharged to the environment from wastewater resource recovery facilities, sewer overflows, and illicit sewer connections. To understand the fate of pharmaceuticals, there is a need to better understand their sorption dynamics to suspended sediments (SS) and settled sediments (StS) in sewer systems. In this study, such sorption dynamics to both SS and StS were assessed using a batch equilibrium method under both static and dynamic conditions. Experiments were performed with natively occurring and artificially modified concentrations of sewer pharmaceuticals (acetaminophen, theophylline, carbamazepine, and a metabolite of carbamazepine) and caffeine. Differences in apparent distribution coefficients, Kd,app, between SS and StS were related to differences in their organic carbon (OC) content, and the practice of artificially modifying the concentration. Kd,app values of modified contaminant concentrations and high OC sediments were substantially higher. Pseudo-second order desorption rates for these mobile compounds were also quantified. Successive flushing events to simulate the addition of stormwater to sewer networks revealed that aqueous concentrations would not necessarily decrease, because the added water will rapidly return to equilibrium concentrations with the sediments. Sorption and desorption kinetics must be considered in addition to dilution, to avoid underestimating the influence of dilution on concentrations of pharmaceuticals discharged to the environment.

  19. Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

  20. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  1. Structure and dynamics of the Earth's polar ionosphere: recent results inferred from incoherent scatter sounders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Dominique [CETP-CNRS, 10-12 Avenue de l' Europe, 78140 Velizy (France)

    2002-08-01

    For 20 years, a large part of ionospheric research has been devoted to high latitudes and in particular to the range 60-70 deg. where an oval of auroras permanently encircles each pole. The auroral light emissions are accompanied by the production of ionization, electric currents and fields. Indeed, the auroral latitudes play a dominant role in the ionospheric electrodynamics because electric fields and currents reach thus at their largest intensities. Observations from low-altitude satellites and from ground-based facilities have contributed to the analysis and modelling of the structure and dynamics of the auroral ionosphere. The results illustrated here are inferred from observations of the European Japanese incoherent scatter radars (EISCAT) based in North Scandinavia. Recently, the field of view of the EISCAT facilities has been extended toward the pole with two radars built in 1996 and 2000 at Spitzbergen (78 deg. N): the EISCAT Svalbard radars. Other ground-based instruments (magnetometers, photometers, etc) have also been deployed at the same location. At first sight, the ionization production in the polar ionosphere is expected to be weak because of the reduced solar illumination. The first observations reveal, in contrast, the presence of intense and variable structures, which are still under investigation. To develop our understanding of these events, we discuss the theoretical results given by the particle penetration from solar origin, and of its effects into the dayside polar ionosphere.

  2. Dynamic loads caused by pressure blasts, steam explosions, and earth quakes; Dynamische Belastungen durch Druckstoesse, Dampfexplosionen und Erdbeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, H.H. [SDK Ingenieurunternehmen GmbH, Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-11-01

    The paper deals with description of structures and the relevant dynamic loads. As to the structures, gas, fluid, or solid structures are to be considered. They determine the characteristic vibrational behaviour of the structures in the interconnected system. The excitation type determines the component that will be induced to change characteristic vibrational behaviour of the structure, depending on the load increasing time and the period of excitation. Three examples are given to illustrate the processes. (Water tank subject to quasi-seismic conditions; pipeline affected by blow-down; shut-off valve for a pipe). (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In diesem Beitrag soll auf die Erfassung der Strukturen und die Erfassung der dynamischen Belastungen eingegangen werden. Zur Erfassung der Strukturen sind `Gas-, Fluid- und Festkoerper-Strukturen` zu beachten. Sie bestimmen das Eigenschwingverhalten im Verbund. Die Erregung bestimmt nun, welcher Bereich aus dem Eigen-Schwingverhalten der Struktur ueber die Lastanstiegs-Zeit und die Zeitdauer der Erregung anregbar ist. Drei Beispiele sollen die Aufgabenstellung erlaeutern (Wasserbehaelter unter erdbebenaehnlichen Bedingungen; Rohrleitung unter `Blow-down-Belastung`; Absperrklappe fuer eine Rohrleitung). (orig./MM)

  3. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Volume 3, part B: The modelling, dynamics, and stability of large Earth pointing orbiting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of large orbiting flexible beams, and platforms and dish type structures oriented along the local horizontal are treated both analytically and numerically. It is assumed that such structures could be gravitationally stabilized by attaching a rigid light-weight dumbbell at the center of mass by a spring loaded hinge which also could provide viscous damping. For the beam, the small amplitude inplane pitch motion, dumbbell librational motion, and the anti-symmetric elastic modes are all coupled. The three dimensional equations of motion for a circular flat plate and shallow spherical shell in orbit with a two-degree-of freedom gimballed dumbbell are also developed and show that only those elastic modes described by a single nodal diameter line are influenced by the dumbbell motion. Stability criteria are developed for all the examples and a sensitivity study of the system response characteristics to the key system parameters is carried out.

  4. Temporal variations of the gravity field and Earth precession-nutation

    CERN Document Server

    Bourda, G

    2007-01-01

    Due to the accuracy now reached by space geodetic techniques, and also considering some modelisations, the temporal variations of some Earth Gravity Field coefficients can be determined. They are due to Earth oceanic and solid tides, as well as geophysical reservoirs masses displacements. They can be related to the variations in the Earth's orientation parameters (through the inertia tensor). Then, we can try to improve our knowledge of the Earth Rotation with those space measurements of the Gravity variations. We have undertaken such a study, using data obtained with the combination of space geodetic techniques. In particular, we use CHAMP data that are more sensitive to such variations and that complete the ones already accumulated (for example with Starlette and LAGEOS I). In this first approach, we focus on the Earth precession nutation, trying to refine it by taking into account the temporal variations of the Earth dynamical flattening. The goal is mainly to understand how Geodesy can influence this fiel...

  5. Combined climate factors alleviate changes in gross soil nitrogen dynamics in heathlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorsne, Anna-Karin; Rutting, Tobias; Ambus, Per

    2014-01-01

    of exposure to three climate change factors, i.e. warming, elevated CO2 (eCO(2)) and summer drought, applied both in isolation and in combination. By conducting laboratory N-15 tracing experiments we show that warming increased both gross N mineralization and nitrification rates. In contrast, gross...

  6. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storkey, J.; Holst, N.; Bøjer, Q.; Bigongiali, F.; Bocci, G.; Colbach, N.; Dorner, Z.; Riemens, M.M.; Sartorato, I.; Sønderskov, M.; Verschwele, A.

    2015-01-01

    A functional approach to predicting shifts in weed floras in response to management or environmental change requires the combination of data on weed traits with analytical frameworks that capture the filtering effect of selection pressures on traits. A weed traits database (WTDB) was designed, popul

  7. Dynamic behaviour of mono bucket foundations subjected to combined transient loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Dam; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results from small scale testing, investigating the effect of transient combined loading of a bucketfoundation. The tests are performed inside a pressure tank at Aalborg University, Denmark. The bucket foundation was installed in dense water saturated sand and transient...

  8. Dynamic behaviour of mono bucket foundations subjected to combined transient loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Dam; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results from small scale testing, investigating the effect of transient combined loading of a bucketfoundation. The tests are performed inside a pressure tank at Aalborg University, Denmark. The bucket foundation was installed in dense water saturated sand and transient...

  9. Dynamic Predictive Density Combinations for Large Data Sets in Economics and Finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Casarin (Roberto); S. Grassi (Stefano); F. Ravazzolo (Francesco); H.K. van Dijk (Herman)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ A Bayesian nonparametric predictive model is introduced to construct time-varying weighted combinations of a large set of predictive densities. A clustering mechanism allocates these densities into a smaller number of mutually exclusive subsets. Using properties of Aitc

  10. Combining Berendsen Thermostat with Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) for Polymer Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moga, Sunita Andreea; Goga, Nicolae; Hadar, Anton

    2013-01-01

    In this article we present a new thermostat - theory and simulation results - obtained by combining two thermostats Berendsen and DPD types. The new thermostat provides a predictable behavior with temperatures that do not deviate from the reference and with thermal rate constant agreement between si

  11. Combination of synoptical-analogous and dynamical methods to increase skill score of monthly air temperature forecasts over Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Valentina; Tscepelev, Valery; Vilfand, Roman; Kulikova, Irina; Kruglova, Ekaterina; Tischenko, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Long-range forecasts at monthly-seasonal time scale are in great demand of socio-economic sectors for exploiting climate-related risks and opportunities. At the same time, the quality of long-range forecasts is not fully responding to user application necessities. Different approaches, including combination of different prognostic models, are used in forecast centers to increase the prediction skill for specific regions and globally. In the present study, two forecasting methods are considered which are exploited in operational practice of Hydrometeorological Center of Russia. One of them is synoptical-analogous method of forecasting of surface air temperature at monthly scale. Another one is dynamical system based on the global semi-Lagrangian model SL-AV, developed in collaboration of Institute of Numerical Mathematics and Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia. The seasonal version of this model has been used to issue global and regional forecasts at monthly-seasonal time scales. This study presents results of the evaluation of surface air temperature forecasts generated with using above mentioned synoptical-statistical and dynamical models, and their combination to potentially increase skill score over Northern Eurasia. The test sample of operational forecasts is encompassing period from 2010 through 2015. The seasonal and interannual variability of skill scores of these methods has been discussed. It was noticed that the quality of all forecasts is highly dependent on the inertia of macro-circulation processes. The skill scores of forecasts are decreasing during significant alterations of synoptical fields for both dynamical and empirical schemes. Procedure of combination of forecasts from different methods, in some cases, has demonstrated its effectiveness. For this study the support has been provided by Grant of Russian Science Foundation (№14-37-00053).

  12. Some physical solutions of Yang's equations for (2) gauge fields, Charap’s equations for pion dynamics and their combination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susanto Chakroborty; Pranab Krishna Chanda

    2004-11-01

    Some previously obtained physical solutions [1–3] of Yang's equations for (2) gauge fields [4], Charap's equations for pion dynamics [5,6] and their combination as proposed by Chakraborty and Chanda [1] have been presented. They represent different physical characteristics, e.g. spreading wave with solitary profile which tends to zero as time tends to infinity, spreading wave packets, solitary wave with oscillatory profile, localised wave with solitary profile which becomes plane wave periodically, and, wave packets which are oscillatory in nature.

  13. A combined EPR and MD simulation study of a nitroxyl spin label with restricted internal mobility sensitive to protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesyan, Vasily S.; Chami, Fatima; White, Gaye F.; Thomson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    EPR studies combined with fully atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and an MD-EPR simulation method provide evidence for intrinsic low rotameric mobility of a nitroxyl spin label, Rn, compared to the more widely employed label MTSL (R1). Both experimental and modelling results using two structurally different sites of attachment to Myoglobin show that the EPR spectra of Rn are more sensitive to the local protein environment than that of MTSL. This study reveals the potential of using the Rn spin label as a reporter of protein motions.

  14. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  15. Research on the Combined Projection Based on the Method of Average Stratified of the Earth%等分分层组合投影研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任留成; 吕泗洲

    2013-01-01

    A kind of new map projection, called multi-level combined projection, was designed in this paper, which was suitable for the geographic grid system of China. It was also the hierarchy grid system partitioned by the latitude 1°, 10°, et al. The basic idea here was to divide the ellipsoid averagely to some level along with latitude according to the theory of differential geometry, and then to establish the projection model for each level. Therefore a new kind map projection was obtained. This kind of map projection could be subdivision according to the different grid scale, and could be developed to a kind of dynamic map projection which was appropriated for multi-resolution grid model. It is show by the distortion computation that the map projection is conformal, and the area distortion and length distortion is also small. Especially in the high latitude area, the distortions are apparently decreased comparing with Mercator projection.%针对中国地理格网(1°、10°等多级格网系统)的分割方法,设计了一种适合该格网系统的新型地图投影——分层组合投影.从微分几何的观点出发,把地球椭球按等纬度分割成若干层圆台,分别建立每个圆台的投影模型,即可得到一种地图投影.这种投影还可根据格网间隔的不同进行细分,从而发展成为一种适合多分辨率格网模型的动态地图投影.通过对该投影进行变形计算表明,该投影可以保持等角,而且面积和长度变形都很小,特别是在高纬度地区,与Mercator投影相比变形明显减小.

  16. Absorption and fluorescence of PRODAN in phospholipid bilayers: a combined quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiklik, Lukasz; Aquino, Adelia J A; Vazdar, Mario; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Pittner, Jiří; Hof, Martin; Lischka, Hans

    2011-10-20

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) were studied by means of the time-dependent density functional theory and the algebraic diagrammatic construction method. The influence of environment, a phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer and water, was taken into account employing a combination of quantum chemical calculations with empirical force-field molecular dynamics simulations. Additionally, experimental absorption and emission spectra of PRODAN were measured in cyclohexane, water, and lipid vesicles. Both planar and twisted configurations of the first excited state of PRODAN were taken into account. The twisted structure is stabilized in both water and a lipid bilayer, and should be considered as an emitting state in polar environments. Orientation of the excited dye in the lipid bilayer significantly depends on configuration. In the bilayer, the fluorescence spectrum can be regarded as a combination of emission from both planar and twisted structures.

  17. A variant of the dynamic programming algorithm for unit commitment of combined heat and power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Aiying; Hakonen, Henri; Lahdelma, Risto

    2008-01-01

    in the system, the number of periods over the planning horizon and the time for solving a single-period economic dispatch problem. We have compared the DP-RSC1 algorithm with realistic power plants against the unit decommitment algorithm and the traditional priority listing method. The results show that the DP...... introduce in this paper the DP-RSC1 algorithm, which is a variant of the dynamic programming (DP) algorithm based on linear relaxation of the ON/OFF states of the units and sequential commitment of units one by one. The time complexity of DP-RSC1 is proportional to the number of generating units...

  18. Combining household income and asset data to identify livelihood strategies and their dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walelign, Solomon Zena; Pouliot, Mariéve; Larsen, Helle Overgaard

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches to identifying and describing rural livelihood strategies, and household movements between strategies over time, in developing countries are imprecise. Here we: (i) present a new statistical quantitative approach combining income and asset data to identify household activity...... choice variables, characterise livelihood strategy clusters, and analyse movements between strategies, and (ii) apply the approach using an environmentally-augmented three-wave household (n = 427) level panel dataset from Nepal. Combining income and asset data provides a better understanding...... of livelihood strategies and household movements between strategies over time than using only income or asset data. Most households changed livelihood strategy at least once over the two three-year periods. A common pathway out of poverty included an intermediate step during which households accumulate assets...

  19. Impact of combined vector-control and vaccination strategies on transmission dynamics of dengue fever: a model-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerer, Gerhart; Currie, Christine S M; Brailsford, Sally C

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever is a vector-borne disease prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions. It is an important public health problem with a considerable and often under-valued disease burden in terms of frequency, cost and quality-of-life. Recent literature reviews have documented the development of mathematical models of dengue fever both to identify important characteristics for future model development as well as to assess the impact of dengue control interventions. Such reviews highlight the importance of short-term cross-protection; antibody-dependent enhancement; and seasonality (in terms of both favourable and unfavourable conditions for mosquitoes). The compartmental model extends work by Bartley (2002) and combines the following factors: seasonality, age-structure, consecutive infection by all four serotypes, cross-protection and immune enhancement, as well as combined vector-host transmission. The model is used to represent dengue transmission dynamics using parameters appropriate for Thailand and to assess the potential impact of combined vector-control and vaccination strategies including routine and catch-up vaccination strategies on disease dynamics. When seasonality and temporary cross-protection between serotypes are included, the model is able to approximate the observed incidence of dengue fever in Thailand. We find vaccination to be the most effective single intervention, albeit with imperfect efficacy (30.2 %) and limited duration of protection. However, in combination, control interventions and vaccination exhibit a marked impact on dengue fever transmission. This study shows that an imperfect vaccine can be a useful weapon in reducing disease spread within the community, although it will be most effective when promoted as one of several strategies for combating dengue fever transmission.

  20. Photochromic Mechanism of a Bridged Diarylethene: Combined Electronic Structure Calculations and Nonadiabatic Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ting; Gao, Yuan-Jun; Wang, Qian; Cui, Ganglong

    2017-02-02

    Intramolecularly bridged diarylethenes exhibit improved photocyclization quantum yields because the anti-syn isomerization that originally suppresses photocyclization in classical diarylethenes is blocked. Experimentally, three possible channels have been proposed to interpret experimental observation, but many details of photochromic mechanism remain ambiguous. In this work we have employed a series of electronic structure methods (OM2/MRCI, DFT, TDDFT, RI-CC2, DFT/MRCI, and CASPT2) to comprehensively study excited state properties, photocyclization, and photoreversion dynamics of 1,2-dicyano[2,2]metacyclophan-1-ene. On the basis of optimized stationary points and minimum-energy conical intersections, we have refined experimentally proposed photochromic mechanism. Only an S1/S0 minimum-energy conical intersection is located; thus, we can exclude the third channel experimentally proposed. In addition, we find that both photocyclization and photoreversion processes use the same S1/S0 conical intersection to decay the S1 system to the S0 state, so we can unify the remaining two channels into one. These new insights are verified by our OM2/MRCI nonadiabatic dynamics simulations. The S1 excited-state lifetimes of photocyclization and photoreversion are estimated to be 349 and 453 fs, respectively, which are close to experimentally measured values: 240 ± 60 and 250 fs in acetonitrile solution. The present study not only interprets experimental observations and refines previously proposed mechanism but also provides new physical insights that are valuable for future experiments.

  1. Strategy for earth explorers in global earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the current NASA Earth System Science initiative is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system. The centerpiece of the Earth System Science initiative will be a set of instruments carried on polar orbiting platforms under the Earth Observing System program. An Earth Explorer program can open new vistas in the earth sciences, encourage innovation, and solve critical scientific problems. Specific missions must be rigorously shaped by the demands and opportunities of high quality science and must complement the Earth Observing System and the Mission to Planet Earth. The committee believes that the proposed Earth Explorer program provides a substantial opportunity for progress in the earth sciences, both through independent missions and through missions designed to complement the large scale platforms and international research programs that represent important national commitments. The strategy presented is intended to help ensure the success of the Earth Explorer program as a vital stimulant to the study of the planet.

  2. Definition of Astrobiology with Liquid Phase Change and Dynamic Cyclic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yas.

    2010-04-01

    Definition of astrobiology is required for three factors of combined inorganic and organic materials of fossils, dynamic changes of gas-liquid-solid phases as min-water Earth with cycle, and space and time factors also in deep space.

  3. Development of response models for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) sensors. Part 1: Dynamic models and computer simulations for the ERBE nonscanner, scanner and solar monitor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim; Choi, Sang H.; Chrisman, Dan A., Jr.; Samms, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic models and computer simulations were developed for the radiometric sensors utilized in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The models were developed to understand performance, improve measurement accuracy by updating model parameters and provide the constants needed for the count conversion algorithms. Model simulations were compared with the sensor's actual responses demonstrated in the ground and inflight calibrations. The models consider thermal and radiative exchange effects, surface specularity, spectral dependence of a filter, radiative interactions among an enclosure's nodes, partial specular and diffuse enclosure surface characteristics and steady-state and transient sensor responses. Relatively few sensor nodes were chosen for the models since there is an accuracy tradeoff between increasing the number of nodes and approximating parameters such as the sensor's size, material properties, geometry, and enclosure surface characteristics. Given that the temperature gradients within a node and between nodes are small enough, approximating with only a few nodes does not jeopardize the accuracy required to perform the parameter estimates and error analyses.

  4. On the dynamics of multiple systems of hot super-Earths and Neptunes: Tidal circularization, resonance and the HD 40307 system

    CERN Document Server

    Papaloizou, John C B

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider the dynamics of a system of hot super-Earths or Neptunes such as HD 40307. We show that, as tidal interaction with the central star leads to small eccentricities, the planets in this system could be undergoing resonant coupling even though the period ratios depart significantly from very precise commensurability. In a three planet system, this is indicated by the fact that resonant angles librate or are associated with long term changes to the orbital elements. We propose that the planets in HD 40307 were in a strict Laplace resonance while they migrated through the disc. After entering the disc inner cavity, tidal interaction would cause the period ratios to increase from two but with the inner pair deviating less than the outer pair, counter to what occurs in HD 40307. However, the relationship between these pairs that occurs in HD 40307 might be produced if the resonance is impulsively modified by an event like a close encounter shortly after the planetary system decouples from the d...

  5. Intact soft clay’s critical response to dynamic stress paths on different combinations of principal stress orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈扬; 周建; 龚晓南; 刘汉龙

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive tests on Hangzhou intact soft clay were performed, which were used to obtain the soils’ critical response to undrained dynamic stress paths under different combinations of principal stress orientation. The different combinations included cyclic principal stress rotation (CPSR for short), cyclic shear with abrupt change of principal stress orientation (CAPSO for short) and cyclic shear with fixed principal stress orientation (CFPSO for short). On one side, under all these stress paths, samples have obvious strain inflection points and shear bands, and the excess pore water pressure is far from the level of initial effective confining pressure at failure. Stress paths of major principal stress orientation (α) alternating from negative and positive have quite different influence on soil’s properties with those in which α is kept negative or positive. On the other side, due to the soil’s strongly initial anisotropy, samples under double-amplitudes CPSR and CAPSO (or single-amplitude CPSR and CFPSO) have similar properties on dynamic shear strength and pore water pressure development tendency when α is kept within ±45°, while have quite different properties when α oversteps ±45°.

  6. A convergence study for SPDEs using combined Polynomial Chaos and Dynamically-Orthogonal schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Minseok [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sapsis, Themistoklis P. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george_karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We study the convergence properties of the recently developed Dynamically Orthogonal (DO) field equations [1] in comparison with the Polynomial Chaos (PC) method. To this end, we consider a series of one-dimensional prototype SPDEs, whose solution can be expressed analytically, and which are associated with both linear (advection equation) and nonlinear (Burgers equation) problems with excitations that lead to unimodal and strongly bi-modal distributions. We also propose a hybrid approach to tackle the singular limit of the DO equations for the case of deterministic initial conditions. The results reveal that the DO method converges exponentially fast with respect to the number of modes (for the problems considered) giving same levels of computational accuracy comparable with the PC method but (in many cases) with substantially smaller computational cost compared to stochastic collocation, especially when the involved parametric space is high-dimensional.

  7. Combined molecular dynamics and analytical model for repetitive cluster bombardment of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Barbara J., E-mail: bjg@psu.edu [Department of Chemistry, 104 Chemistry Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Paruch, Robert J.; Postawa, Zbigniew [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of repetitive bombardment of solids by keV cluster beams have generated so much data that easy interpretations are not possible. Moreover, although the MD simulations remove 3–4 nm of material, that is not sufficient material to determine a depth profile. The recently developed steady-state statistical sputtering model (SS-SSM) uses information from the MD simulations and incorporates it into a set of differential equations to predict a depth profile. In this study the distributions that provide the input to the SS-SSM are compared for simulations of 15 keV bombardment of Ag(1 1 1) by C{sub 60}, Au{sub 3} and Ar{sub 872} cluster beams.

  8. Dynamic and Static Combination Analysis Method of Slope Stability Analysis during Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of laboratory model tests for simulating the slope failure due to vibration, including unreinforced slope and the slope reinforced by using geotextile, show that the slope failure occurs when a cumulative plastic displacement exceeds a certain critical value. To overcome the defects of conventional stability analysis, which evaluates the slope characteristics only by its strength parameters, a numerical procedure considering the stiffness and deformation of materials and geosynthetics is proposed to evaluate the seismic slope stability. In the proposed procedure, the failure of slope is defined when the cumulative plastic displacement calculated by a dynamic response analysis using actual seismic wave exceeds the critical value of displacement estimated by a static stability analysis considering seismic coefficient. The proposed procedure is applied to the laboratory model tests and an actual failure of slope in earthquake. The case study shows the possibility that the proposed procedure gives the realistic evaluation of seismic slope stability.

  9. Hardware/software partitioning based on dynamic combination of maximum entropy and chaos optimization algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-lie; ZHANG Guo-yin; YAO Ai-hong

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that combines the chaos optimization algorithm with the maximum entropy(COA-ME)by using entropy model based on chaos algorithm,in which the maximum entropy is used as the second method of searching the excellent solution.The search direction is improved by chaos optimization algorithm and realizes the selective acceptance of wrong solution.The experimental result shows that the presented algorithm can be used in the partitioning of hardware/software of reconfigurable system.It effectively reduces the local extremum problem,and search speed as well as performance of partitioning is improved.

  10. Models of Hematopoietic Dynamics Following Burn for Use in Combined Injury Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    sizes. Model outputs were compared to combined injury data from animals to verify that trends were accurately predicted. Outputs from these models...time of platelets radio-labeled at t = 1; Simon et al. 1977) were fit to linear, exponential , and Hill decay (Hill coefficient=1) functions (Figure 3.2...ur vi va l t im e (d ay s) Solid Line: Simulated fit to Equation 4 (SSR=9.39) Red Dashed Line: Linear fit (SSR=29.58) Red Dotted Line: Exponential

  11. Projected vegetation changes for the American Southwest: combined dynamic modeling and bioclimatic-envelope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaro, Michael; Mauss, Adrien; Williams, John W

    2012-06-01

    This study focuses on potential impacts of 21st century climate change on vegetation in the Southwest United States, based on debiased and interpolated climate projections from 17 global climate models used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Among these models a warming trend is universal, but projected changes in precipitation vary in sign and magnitude. Two independent methods are applied: a dynamic global vegetation model to assess changes in plant functional types and bioclimatic envelope modeling to assess changes in individual tree and shrub species and biodiversity. The former approach investigates broad responses of plant functional types to climate change, while considering competition, disturbances, and carbon fertilization, while the latter approach focuses on the response of individual plant species, and net biodiversity, to climate change. The dynamic model simulates a region-wide reduction in vegetation cover during the 21st century, with a partial replacement of evergreen trees with grasses in the mountains of Colorado and Utah, except at the highest elevations, where tree cover increases. Across southern Arizona, central New Mexico, and eastern Colorado, grass cover declines, in some cases abruptly. Due to the prevalent warming trend among all 17 climate models, vegetation cover declines in the 21st century, with the greatest vegetation losses associated with models that project a drying trend. The inclusion of the carbon fertilization effect largely ameliorates the projected vegetation loss. Based on bioclimatic envelope modeling for the 21st century, the number of tree and shrub species that are expected to experience robust declines in range likely outweighs the number of species that are expected to expand in range. Dramatic shifts in plant species richness are projected, with declines in the high-elevation evergreen forests, increases in the eastern New Mexico prairies, and a northward shift of the

  12. Temperature Effects on Donor-Acceptor Couplings in Peptides. A Combined Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallrapp, Frank H; Voityuk, Alexander A; Guallar, Victor

    2010-10-12

    We report a quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics study on the temperature dependence of electronic coupling in two short model oligopeptides. Ten nanoseconds replica exchange molecular dynamics was performed on Trp-(Pro)3-Trp and Trp-(Pro)6-Trp peptides in the gas phase in combination with computation of the energy and electronic coupling for thermal hole transfer between Trp residues. The electron transfer parameters were estimated by using the semiempirical INDO/S method together with the charge fragment difference scheme. Conformational analysis of the derived trajectories revealed that the electronic coupling becomes temperature dependent when incorporating structural dynamics of the system. We demonstrate that Trp-(Pro)3-Trp, having only few degrees of freedom, results in relatively weak couplings at low and high temperature and a strong peak at 144 K, whereas the more flexible system Trp-(Pro)6-Trp shows monotonically decreased coupling. Only a few conformations with strong donor-acceptor couplings are shown to be crucial for the overall ET rates. Our results introduce the question whether the T dependence of ET coupling can also be found in large biological systems.

  13. Combined use of the leucoxene ores of the Yarega deposit with the formation of synthetic rutile and wollastonite and the recovery of rare and rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykhov, G. B.; Zablotskaya, Yu. V.; Anisonyan, K. G.; Olyunina, T. V.

    2016-11-01

    A new process of catalytic autoclave desiliconization of the leucoxene concentrate by lime milk with the formation of synthetic rutile and wollastonite is developed. The general laws of the processes occurring under the conditions of pressure leaching of the concentrate are revealed, and the main leaching parameters that ensure selective desiliconization of leucoxene grains are determined. The leucoxene concentrate is shown to contain rare and rare-earth elements. They are concentrated in synthetic rutile during desiliconization, which facilitates their extraction during subsequent chlorination of rutile.

  14. Improved efficacy of ethyl formate against stored grain insects by combination with carbon dioxide in a 'dynamic' application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritos, Victoria S; Damcevski, Katherine A; Dojchinov, Greg

    2006-04-01

    Ethyl formate is being evaluated as a fumigant for stored grain as it is a potential alternative to the ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide and to phosphine, which is under pressure owing to the development of strong resistance in stored grain insects. However, use of ethyl formate faces significant challenges, such as poor penetration through grain, significant losses to grain sorption, high concentrations of fumigant required to control insects, and flammability risks, which have limited its further development. In this study it was found that the combination of carbon dioxide (5-20%) with ethyl formate significantly enhanced efficacy of the fumigant against external living stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica F., and the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst). Dynamic application of ethyl formate and carbon dioxide mixture (100 mg litre-1 ethyl formate, 20% CO2) pumped through a model silo containing wheat (50 kg) for one gas exchange was also investigated. A flow rate of 6 litres min-1 gave a relatively even distribution of fumigant throughout the grain column and similar mortality levels among cultures of S. oryzae and T. castaneum placed at three positions, the top, middle and bottom of the column. Mortality of 99.8% of mixed stage cultures of T. castaneum and 95.1% of S. oryzae was achieved in 3 h exposures to 111 and 185 mg ethyl formate h litre-1 respectively applied by the dynamic method. It is concluded that the combination of carbon dioxide with ethyl formate and dynamic application enhances distribution and efficacy of the fumigant against stored grain insects.

  15. Understanding landscape dynamics over thousand years : combining field and model work : with case study in the Drakensberg foothill, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temme, A.J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The title of this thesis is “Understanding landscape dynamics over thousands of years : combining field and model work, with a case study in the Drakensberg Foothills, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa”. As the title clearly states, the overall objective is an increased knowledge of landscape dynamics thr

  16. Predicting Drug Combination Index and Simulating the Network-Regulation Dynamics by Mathematical Modeling of Drug-Targeted EGFR-ERK Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Yuzong

    2017-01-01

    Synergistic drug combinations enable enhanced therapeutics. Their discovery typically involves the measurement and assessment of drug combination index (CI), which can be facilitated by the development and applications of in-silico CI predictive tools. In this work, we developed and tested the ability of a mathematical model of drug-targeted EGFR-ERK pathway in predicting CIs and in analyzing multiple synergistic drug combinations against observations. Our mathematical model was validated against the literature reported signaling, drug response dynamics, and EGFR-MEK drug combination effect. The predicted CIs and combination therapeutic effects of the EGFR-BRaf, BRaf-MEK, FTI-MEK, and FTI-BRaf inhibitor combinations showed consistent synergism. Our results suggest that existing pathway models may be potentially extended for developing drug-targeted pathway models to predict drug combination CI values, isobolograms, and drug-response surfaces as well as to analyze the dynamics of individual and combinations of drugs. With our model, the efficacy of potential drug combinations can be predicted. Our method complements the developed in-silico methods (e.g. the chemogenomic profile and the statistically-inferenced network models) by predicting drug combination effects from the perspectives of pathway dynamics using experimental or validated molecular kinetic constants, thereby facilitating the collective prediction of drug combination effects in diverse ranges of disease systems.

  17. Combined Néel and Brown rotational Langevin dynamics in magnetic particle imaging, sensing, and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Daniel B., E-mail: dbr@Dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Weaver, John B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Department of Radiology, Geisel School of Medicine, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been studied intensely because of their possible uses in biomedical applications. Biosensing using the rotational freedom of particles has been used to detect biomarkers for cancer, hyperthermia therapy has been used to treat tumors, and magnetic particle imaging is a promising new imaging modality that can spatially resolve the concentration of nanoparticles. There are two mechanisms by which the magnetization of a nanoparticle can rotate, a fact that poses a challenge for applications that rely on precisely one mechanism. The challenge is exacerbated by the high sensitivity of the dominant mechanism to applied fields. Here, we demonstrate stochastic Langevin equation simulations for the combined rotation in magnetic nanoparticles exposed to oscillating applied fields typical to these applications to both highlight the existing relevant theory and quantify which mechanism should occur in various parameter ranges.

  18. EFFECTS OF COMBINED PHYSIOTHERAPY IN CHRONIC ENDOMETRITIS: DYNAMICS OF INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Рlyasunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed immunohistochemical staining of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD16+, CD56+, CD20+, CD138+, and HLA-DR antigen (II class using monoclonal antibodies by “Novocastra” (United Kingdom. The cell were counted in uterine scrapings of patients with verified chronic endometritis (CE. The samples were taken before and after treatment. The endometritis treatment was carried out according to standard procedures. In a group of patients, rehabilitation treatment was made by means of CAPELM-01 “Andro-Gin”, whereas another group was treated by of hormone replacement therapy and combined physiotherapy with CAP-ELM-01 “Andro-Gin”. There was a significant reduction of cytotoxic lymphocytes after treatment applied.

  19. Developing Authentic Research Experiences Using EarthScope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Wallace, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    EarthScope, a decade-long experiment to understand the formation, structure, and evolution of the North American continent, will carry-out active investigations in nearly every county in the US. The excitement of a huge science experiment in one's own backyard piques interest, but teachers need resources and professional development experiences to capitalize upon this excitement and create opportunities for their students' learning. The EarthScope Education and Outreach Network will provide the interface to make EarthScope science, and the advanced technology and modern approaches used to understand Earth, relevant and beneficial to K-16 educators vested in advancing Earth science education. Three obstacles must be overcome for success in carrying out authentic EarthScope research in the classroom. First, scientists and teachers must work together to identify relevant and developmentally appropriate research questions for the target audience. Second, teachers will need professional development experiences that engage them in authentic research and that provide support for introducing a similar research experience in their own classroom. Third, the outcome of the research experience must have value to the scientist, teacher and student to motivate sustained participation by all. The dense array of seismometers being deployed in the USArray component of EarthScope will permit students and the public to see first-hand Earth's dynamic response to both human and natural events in their hometown and around the country. Targeted local experiments will make EarthScope's scientific investigations and discoveries relevant for educational efforts on a region-by-region basis. Combining the real-time seismic data streams from USArray with data and instrumentation from the growing US Educational Seismic Network (USESN) opens up endless possib