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Sample records for early-diverged eukaryote trypanosoma

  1. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O 2 # sm b ullet# - ) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR Gi ) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T final ) with Fe 3+ ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK a = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR Gi reacts with O 2 # sm b ullet# - with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k 1 = 1.0 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T 1 ; this in turn rapidly decays to the T final state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR Gi is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  2. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  3. Metabolic reprogramming during the Trypanosoma brucei life cycle [version 2; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry K. Smith

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolic activity is a highly complex, dynamic, regulated process that is influenced by numerous factors, including extracellular environmental signals, nutrient availability and the physiological and developmental status of the cell. The causative agent of sleeping sickness, Trypanosoma brucei, is an exclusively extracellular protozoan parasite that encounters very different extracellular environments during its life cycle within the mammalian host and tsetse fly insect vector. In order to meet these challenges, there are significant alterations in the major energetic and metabolic pathways of these highly adaptable parasites. This review highlights some of these metabolic changes in this early divergent eukaryotic model organism.

  4. Metabolic reprogramming during the Trypanosoma brucei life cycle [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry K. Smith

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolic activity is a highly complex, dynamic, regulated process that is influenced by numerous factors, including extracellular environmental signals, nutrient availability and the physiological and developmental status of the cell. The causative agent of sleeping sickness, Trypanosoma brucei, is an exclusively extracellular protozoan parasite that encounters very different extracellular environments during its life cycle within the mammalian host and tsetse fly insect vector. In order to meet these challenges, there are significant alterations in the major energetic and metabolic pathways of these highly adaptable parasites. This review highlights some of these metabolic changes in this early divergent eukaryotic model organism.

  5. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine; Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Janzen, Christian J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). ► TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. ► TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  6. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  7. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Chloroplast Genome Evolution in Early Diverged Leptosporangiate Ferns

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. c...

  9. Chloroplast genome evolution in early diverged leptosporangiate ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. cinnamomea. In addition, putative RNA editing sites in the cp genome were rare in O. cinnamomea, even though the sites were frequently predicted to be present in leptosporangiate ferns. The complete cp genome sequence of Diplopterygium glaucum (Gleicheniales) was 151,007 bp and has a 9.7 kb inversion between the trnL-CAA and trnVGCA genes when compared to O. cinnamomea. Several repeated sequences were detected around the inversion break points. The complete cp genome sequence of Lygodium japonicum (Schizaeales) was 157,142 bp and a deletion of the rpoC1 intron was detected. This intron loss was shared by all of the studied species of the genus Lygodium. The GC contents and the effective numbers of codons (ENCs) in ferns varied significantly when compared to seed plants. The ENC values of the early diverged leptosporangiate ferns showed intermediate levels between eusporangiate and core leptosporangiate ferns. However, our phylogenetic tree based on all of the cp gene sequences clearly indicated that the cp genome similarity between O. cinnamomea (Osmundales) and eusporangiate ferns are symplesiomorphies, rather than synapomorphies. Therefore, our data is in agreement with the view that Osmundales is a distinct early diverged lineage in the leptosporangiate ferns.

  10. Genomic minimalism in the early diverging intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Hilary G; McArthur, Andrew G; Gillin, Frances D; Aley, Stephen B; Adam, Rodney D; Olsen, Gary J; Best, Aaron A; Cande, W Zacheus; Chen, Feng; Cipriano, Michael J; Davids, Barbara J; Dawson, Scott C; Elmendorf, Heidi G; Hehl, Adrian B; Holder, Michael E; Huse, Susan M; Kim, Ulandt U; Lasek-Nesselquist, Erica; Manning, Gerard; Nigam, Anuranjini; Nixon, Julie E J; Palm, Daniel; Passamaneck, Nora E; Prabhu, Anjali; Reich, Claudia I; Reiner, David S; Samuelson, John; Svard, Staffan G; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2007-09-28

    The genome of the eukaryotic protist Giardia lamblia, an important human intestinal parasite, is compact in structure and content, contains few introns or mitochondrial relics, and has simplified machinery for DNA replication, transcription, RNA processing, and most metabolic pathways. Protein kinases comprise the single largest protein class and reflect Giardia's requirement for a complex signal transduction network for coordinating differentiation. Lateral gene transfer from bacterial and archaeal donors has shaped Giardia's genome, and previously unknown gene families, for example, cysteine-rich structural proteins, have been discovered. Unexpectedly, the genome shows little evidence of heterozygosity, supporting recent speculations that this organism is sexual. This genome sequence will not only be valuable for investigating the evolution of eukaryotes, but will also be applied to the search for new therapeutics for this parasite.

  11. Proximity Interactions among Basal Body Components in Trypanosoma brucei Identify Novel Regulators of Basal Body Biogenesis and Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Quang Dang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal body shares similar architecture with centrioles in animals and is involved in nucleating flagellar axonemal microtubules in flagellated eukaryotes. The early-branching Trypanosoma brucei possesses a motile flagellum nucleated from the basal body that consists of a mature basal body and an adjacent pro-basal body. Little is known about the basal body proteome and its roles in basal body biogenesis and flagellar axoneme assembly in T. brucei. Here, we report the identification of 14 conserved centriole/basal body protein homologs and 25 trypanosome-specific basal body proteins. These proteins localize to distinct subdomains of the basal body, and several of them form a ring-like structure surrounding the basal body barrel. Functional characterization of representative basal body proteins revealed distinct roles in basal body duplication/separation and flagellar axoneme assembly. Overall, this work identified novel proteins required for basal body duplication and separation and uncovered new functions of conserved basal body proteins in basal body duplication and separation, highlighting an unusual mechanism of basal body biogenesis and inheritance in this early divergent eukaryote.

  12. Inorganic phosphate uptake in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Claudia F; Dos-Santos, André L A; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2014-07-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential nutrient for all organisms. The route of Pi utilization begins with Pi transport across the plasma membrane. Here, we analyzed the gene sequences and compared the biochemical profiles, including kinetic and modulator parameters, of Pi transporters in unicellular eukaryotes. The objective of this review is to evaluate the recent findings regarding Pi uptake mechanisms in microorganisms, such as the fungi Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the parasite protozoans Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, Leishmania infantum and Plasmodium falciparum. Pi uptake is the key step of Pi homeostasis and in the subsequent signaling event in eukaryotic microorganisms. Biochemical and structural studies are important for clarifying mechanisms of Pi homeostasis, as well as Pi sensor and downstream pathways, and raise possibilities for future studies in this field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Plastid Phylogenomic Analyses Resolve Tofieldiaceae as the Root of the Early Diverging Monocot Order Alismatales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yang; Ma, Peng-Fei; Li, Hong-Tao; Yang, Jun-Bo; Wang, Hong; Li, De-Zhu

    2016-04-06

    The predominantly aquatic order Alismatales, which includes approximately 4,500 species within Araceae, Tofieldiaceae, and the core alismatid families, is a key group in investigating the origin and early diversification of monocots. Despite their importance, phylogenetic ambiguity regarding the root of the Alismatales tree precludes answering questions about the early evolution of the order. Here, we sequenced the first complete plastid genomes from three key families in this order:Potamogeton perfoliatus(Potamogetonaceae),Sagittaria lichuanensis(Alismataceae), andTofieldia thibetica(Tofieldiaceae). Each family possesses the typical quadripartite structure, with plastid genome sizes of 156,226, 179,007, and 155,512 bp, respectively. Among them, the plastid genome ofS. lichuanensisis the largest in monocots and the second largest in angiosperms. Like other sequenced Alismatales plastid genomes, all three families generally encode the same 113 genes with similar structure and arrangement. However, we detected 2.4 and 6 kb inversions in the plastid genomes ofSagittariaandPotamogeton, respectively. Further, we assembled a 79 plastid protein-coding gene sequence data matrix of 22 taxa that included the three newly generated plastid genomes plus 19 previously reported ones, which together represent all primary lineages of monocots and outgroups. In plastid phylogenomic analyses using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference, we show both strong support for Acorales as sister to the remaining monocots and monophyly of Alismatales. More importantly, Tofieldiaceae was resolved as the most basal lineage within Alismatales. These results provide new insights into the evolution of Alismatales as well as the early-diverging monocots as a whole. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Comparative Genomics of Early-Diverging Brucella Strains Reveals a Novel Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Williams, Kelly P.; Mane, Shrinivasrao P.; Shukla, Maulik; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Dickerman, Allan W.; Mason, Steven; Moriyón, Ignacio; O’Callaghan, David; Whatmore, Adrian M.; Sobral, Bruno W.; Tiller, Rebekah V.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Frace, Michael A.; De Castro, Cristina; Molinaro, Antonio; Boyle, Stephen M.; De, Barun K.; Setubal, João C.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brucella species are Gram-negative bacteria that infect mammals. Recently, two unusual strains (Brucella inopinata BO1T and B. inopinata-like BO2) have been isolated from human patients, and their similarity to some atypical brucellae isolated from Australian native rodent species was noted. Here we present a phylogenomic analysis of the draft genome sequences of BO1T and BO2 and of the Australian rodent strains 83-13 and NF2653 that shows that they form two groups well separated from the other sequenced Brucella spp. Several important differences were noted. Both BO1T and BO2 did not agglutinate significantly when live or inactivated cells were exposed to monospecific A and M antisera against O-side chain sugars composed of N-formyl-perosamine. While BO1T maintained the genes required to synthesize a typical Brucella O-antigen, BO2 lacked many of these genes but still produced a smooth LPS (lipopolysaccharide). Most missing genes were found in the wbk region involved in O-antigen synthesis in classic smooth Brucella spp. In their place, BO2 carries four genes that other bacteria use for making a rhamnose-based O-antigen. Electrophoretic, immunoblot, and chemical analyses showed that BO2 carries an antigenically different O-antigen made of repeating hexose-rich oligosaccharide units that made the LPS water-soluble, which contrasts with the homopolymeric O-antigen of other smooth brucellae that have a phenol-soluble LPS. The results demonstrate the existence of a group of early-diverging brucellae with traits that depart significantly from those of the Brucella species described thus far. PMID:22930339

  15. Meiosis and Haploid Gametes in the Pathogen Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Lori; Bailey, Mick; Carrington, Mark; Gibson, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Summary In eukaryote pathogens, sex is an important driving force in spreading genes for drug resistance, pathogenicity, and virulence [1]. For the parasitic trypanosomes that cause African sleeping sickness, mating occurs during transmission by the tsetse vector [2, 3] and involves meiosis [4], but haploid gametes have not yet been identified. Here, we show that meiosis is a normal part of development in the insect salivary glands for all subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, including the human...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma_brucei_L.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NL.png Trypanoso...ma_brucei_S.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanoso...ma+brucei&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=121 ...

  17. Autophagy in unicellular eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.A.K.W.

    2010-01-01

    Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components

  18. Eukaryotic systematics: a user's guide for cell biologists and parasitologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Giselle; Dorrell, Richard G; Schlacht, Alexander; Dacks, Joel B

    2011-11-01

    Single-celled parasites like Entamoeba, Trypanosoma, Phytophthora and Plasmodium wreak untold havoc on human habitat and health. Understanding the position of the various protistan pathogens in the larger context of eukaryotic diversity informs our study of how these parasites operate on a cellular level, as well as how they have evolved. Here, we review the literature that has brought our understanding of eukaryotic relationships from an idea of parasites as primitive cells to a crystallized view of diversity that encompasses 6 major divisions, or supergroups, of eukaryotes. We provide an updated taxonomic scheme (for 2011), based on extensive genomic, ultrastructural and phylogenetic evidence, with three differing levels of taxonomic detail for ease of referencing and accessibility (see supplementary material at Cambridge Journals On-line). Two of the most pressing issues in cellular evolution, the root of the eukaryotic tree and the evolution of photosynthesis in complex algae, are also discussed along with ideas about what the new generation of genome sequencing technologies may contribute to the field of eukaryotic systematics. We hope that, armed with this user's guide, cell biologists and parasitologists will be encouraged about taking an increasingly evolutionary point of view in the battle against parasites representing real dangers to our livelihoods and lives.

  19. mRNA localization mechanisms in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysangela R Alves

    Full Text Available Asymmetric mRNA localization is a sophisticated tool for regulating and optimizing protein synthesis and maintaining cell polarity. Molecular mechanisms involved in the regulated localization of transcripts are widespread in higher eukaryotes and fungi, but not in protozoa. Trypanosomes are ancient eukaryotes that branched off early in eukaryote evolution. We hypothesized that these organisms would have basic mechanisms of mRNA localization. FISH assays with probes against transcripts coding for proteins with restricted distributions showed a discrete localization of the mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Moreover, cruzipain mRNA was found inside reservosomes suggesting new unexpected functions for this vacuolar organelle. Individual mRNAs were also mobilized to RNA granules in response to nutritional stress. The cytoplasmic distribution of these transcripts changed with cell differentiation, suggesting that localization mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of stage-specific protein expression. Transfection assays with reporter genes showed that, as in higher eukaryotes, 3'UTRs were responsible for guiding mRNAs to their final location. Our results strongly suggest that Trypanosoma cruzi have a core, basic mechanism of mRNA localization. This kind of controlled mRNA transport is ancient, dating back to early eukaryote evolution.

  20. Structural model of a putrescine-cadaverine permease from Trypanosoma cruzi predicts residues vital for transport and ligand binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soysa, R.; Venselaar, H.; Poston, J.; Ullman, B.; Hasne, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    The TcPOT1.1 gene from Trypanosoma cruzi encodes a high affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter belonging to the APC (amino acid/polyamine/organocation) transporter superfamily. No experimental three-dimensional structure exists for any eukaryotic member of the APC family, and thus the structural

  1. THE CYTOSOLIC AND GLYCOSOMAL GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI - KINETIC-PROPERTIES AND COMPARISON WITH HOMOLOGOUS ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMBEIR, AM; LOISEAU, AM; KUNTZ, DA; VELLIEUX, FM; MICHELS, PAM; OPPERDOES, FR

    1991-01-01

    The protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma brucei has two NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, each with a different localization within the cell. One isoenzyme is found in the cytosol, as in other eukaryotes, while the other is found in the glycosome, a microbody-like

  2. Eukaryotic Cell Panorama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. This report describes the scientific results that support an illustration of a eukaryotic cell, enlarged by one million times to show the distribution and arrangement of macromolecules. The panoramic cross section includes eight panels that extend…

  3. Eukaryotic cell flattening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Albert; Westendorf, Christian; Erlenkamper, Christoph; Galland, Edouard; Franck, Carl; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    Eukaryotic cell flattening is valuable for improving microscopic observations, ranging from bright field to total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this talk, we will discuss traditional overlay techniques, and more modern, microfluidic based flattening, which provides a greater level of control. We demonstrate these techniques on the social amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum, comparing the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  4. Comparative Genomics of Eukaryotes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, V. van

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on developing comparative genomics methods in eukaryotes, with an emphasis on applications for gene function prediction and regulatory element detection. In the past, methods have been developed to predict functional associations between gene pairs in prokaryotes. The challenge

  5. Plastid phylogenomics of the cool-season grass subfamily: clarification of relationships among early-diverging tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Jeffery M; Wysocki, William P; Barrett, Craig F; Soreng, Robert J; Davis, Jerrold I; Clark, Lynn G; Kelchner, Scot A; Pires, J Chris; Edger, Patrick P; Mayfield, Dustin R; Duvall, Melvin R

    2015-05-04

    Whole plastid genomes are being sequenced rapidly from across the green plant tree of life, and phylogenetic analyses of these are increasing resolution and support for relationships that have varied among or been unresolved in earlier single- and multi-gene studies. Pooideae, the cool-season grass lineage, is the largest of the 12 grass subfamilies and includes important temperate cereals, turf grasses and forage species. Although numerous studies of the phylogeny of the subfamily have been undertaken, relationships among some 'early-diverging' tribes conflict among studies, and some relationships among subtribes of Poeae have not yet been resolved. To address these issues, we newly sequenced 25 whole plastomes, which showed rearrangements typical of Poaceae. These plastomes represent 9 tribes and 11 subtribes of Pooideae, and were analysed with 20 existing plastomes for the subfamily. Maximum likelihood (ML), maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) robustly resolve most deep relationships in the subfamily. Complete plastome data provide increased nodal support compared with protein-coding data alone at nodes that are not maximally supported. Following the divergence of Brachyelytrum, Phaenospermateae, Brylkinieae-Meliceae and Ampelodesmeae-Stipeae are the successive sister groups of the rest of the subfamily. Ampelodesmeae are nested within Stipeae in the plastome trees, consistent with its hybrid origin between a phaenospermatoid and a stipoid grass (the maternal parent). The core Pooideae are strongly supported and include Brachypodieae, a Bromeae-Triticeae clade and Poeae. Within Poeae, a novel sister group relationship between Phalaridinae and Torreyochloinae is found, and the relative branching order of this clade and Aveninae, with respect to an Agrostidinae-Brizinae clade, are discordant between MP and ML/BI trees. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses strongly support Airinae and Holcinae as the successive sister groups of a Dactylidinae

  6. Phylogenetic position of the giant anuran trypanosomes Trypanosoma chattoni, Trypanosoma fallisi, Trypanosoma mega, Trypanosoma neveulemairei, and Trypanosoma ranarum inferred from 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald S; Wright, André-Denis G; Barta, John R; Desser, Sherwin S

    2002-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the kinetoplastid flagellates were inferred from comparisons of small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. These included 5 new gene sequences, Trypanosoma fallisi (2,239 bp), Trypanosoma chattoni (2,180 bp), Trypanosoma mega (2,211 bp), Trypanosoma neveulemairei (2,197 bp), and Trypanosoma ranarum (2,203 bp). Trees produced using maximum-parsimony and distance-matrix methods (least-squares, neighbor-joining, and maximum-likelihood), supported by strong bootstrap and quartet-puzzle analyses, indicated that the trypanosomes are a monophyletic group that divides into 2 major lineages, the salivarian trypanosomes and the nonsalivarian trypanosomes. The nonsalivarian trypanosomes further divide into 2 lineages, 1 containing trypanosomes of birds, mammals, and reptiles and the other containing trypanosomes of fish, reptiles, and anurans. Among the giant trypanosomes, T. chattoni is clearly shown to be distantly related to all the other anuran trypanosome species. Trypanosoma mega is closely associated with T. fallisi and T. ranarum, whereas T. neveulemairei and Trypanosoma rotatorium are sister taxa. The branching order of the anuran trypanosomes suggests that some toad trypanosomes may have evolved by host switching from frogs to toads.

  7. Troglitazone induces differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denninger, Viola; Figarella, Katherine; Schoenfeld, Caroline; Brems, Stefanie; Busold, Christian; Lang, Florian; Hoheisel, Joerg; Duszenko, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite causing sleeping sickness, is transmitted by the tsetse fly and undergoes a complex lifecycle including several defined stages within the insect vector and its mammalian host. In the latter, differentiation from the long slender to the short stumpy form is induced by a yet unknown factor of trypanosomal origin. Here we describe that some thiazolidinediones are also able to induce differentiation. In higher eukaryotes, thiazolidinediones are involved in metabolism and differentiation processes mainly by binding to the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ. Our studies focus on the effects of troglitazone on bloodstream form trypanosomes. Differentiation was monitored using mitochondrial markers (membrane potential, succinate dehydrogenase activity, inhibition of oxygen uptake by KCN, amount of cytochrome transcripts), morphological changes (Transmission EM and light microscopy), and transformation experiments (loss of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein coat and increase of dihydroliponamide dehydrogenase activity). To further investigate the mechanisms responsible for these changes, microarray analyses were performed, showing an upregulation of expression site associated gene 8 (ESAG8), a potential differentiation regulator

  8. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  9. Meiosis and haploid gametes in the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Lori; Bailey, Mick; Carrington, Mark; Gibson, Wendy

    2014-01-20

    In eukaryote pathogens, sex is an important driving force in spreading genes for drug resistance, pathogenicity, and virulence. For the parasitic trypanosomes that cause African sleeping sickness, mating occurs during transmission by the tsetse vector and involves meiosis, but haploid gametes have not yet been identified. Here, we show that meiosis is a normal part of development in the insect salivary glands for all subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, including the human pathogens. By observing insect-derived trypanosomes during the window of peak expression of meiosis-specific genes, we identified promastigote-like (PL) cells that interacted with each other via their flagella and underwent fusion, as visualized by the mixing of cytoplasmic red and green fluorescent proteins. PL cells had a short, wide body, a very long anterior flagellum, and either one or two kinetoplasts, but only the anterior kinetoplast was associated with the flagellum. Measurement of nuclear DNA contents showed that PL cells were haploid relative to diploid metacyclics. Trypanosomes are among the earliest diverging eukaryotes, and our results support the hypothesis that meiosis and sexual reproduction are ubiquitous in eukaryotes and likely to have been early innovations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 'Candidatus Megaira polyxenophila' gen. nov., sp. nov.: considerations on evolutionary history, host range and shift of early divergent rickettsiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Schrallhammer

    Full Text Available "Neglected Rickettsiaceae" (i.e. those harboured by non-hematophagous eukaryotic hosts display greater phylogenetic variability and more widespread dispersal than pathogenic ones; yet, the knowledge about their actual host range and host shift mechanism is scarce. The present work reports the characterization following the full-cycle rRNA approach (SSU rRNA sequence, specific in situ hybridization, and ultrastructure of a novel rickettsial bacterium, herewith proposed as 'Candidatus Megaira polyxenophila' gen. nov., sp. nov. We found it in association with four different free-living ciliates (Diophrys oligothrix, Euplotes octocarinatus, Paramecium caudatum, and Spirostomum sp., all belonging to Alveolata, Ciliophora; furthermore it was recently observed as intracellular occurring in Carteria cerasiformis and Pleodorina japonica (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated the belonging of the candidate new genus to the family Rickettsiaceae (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales as a sister group of the genus Rickettsia. In situ observations revealed the ability of the candidate new species to colonize either nuclear or cytoplasmic compartments, depending on the host organism. The presence of the same bacterial species within different, evolutionary distant, hosts indicates that 'Candidatus Megaira polyxenophila' recently underwent several distinct host shifts, thus suggesting the existence of horizontal transmission pathways. We consider these findings as indicative of an unexpected spread of rickettsial infections in aquatic communities, possibly by means of trophic interactions, and hence propose a new interpretation of the origin and phylogenetic diversification of rickettsial bacteria.

  11. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.; Oke, Muse; Hamdan, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  12. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  13. A new species of Trachytherus (Notoungulata: Mesotheriidae) from the late Oligocene (Deseadan) of Southern Peru and the middle latitude diversification of early diverging mesotheriids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockey, Bruce J; Billet, Guillaume; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo

    2016-05-18

    Herein we describe a new species of early diverging mesotheriid notoungulate from the late Oligocene of Moquegua, Peru. This taxon, Trachytherus ramirezi sp. nov., is distinctive in terms of a few characteristics that appear plesiomorphic as compared to those of other described mesotheriids, even other species referred to Trachytherus. Such plesiomorphic traits include the absence of an upper diastema and a lack of heart-shaped incisive foramina, traits that are generally present in other mesotheriids. Our phylogenetic analysis of described early divergent mesotheriids indicates that T. ramirezi was the earliest to diverge. This analysis also confirms the paraphyletic nature of the "genus" Trachytherus.          Geographically, T. ramirezi clusters among T. alloxus, T. subandinus, and T. spegazzinianus, all of which are known from a discrete region in the middle latitudes of western South America that we refer to as the Bolivian Orocline Region (BOR). Our palaeobiogeographic reconstruction using maximum parsimony identifies the BOR as a possible ancestral area for the Mesotheriidae and as an important region for their diversification. For the more exclusive Mesotheriinae, the BOR was reconstructed as the ancestral area, an area from which some mesotheriines would have later dispersed to southern South America. Uncertainty concerning the ancestral area, for the Mesotheriidae-which could be BOR or southern South America area (or both)-is possibly due to the ignorance of the phylogenetic affinities for the undescribed mesotheriid remains reported from Tinguirirican localities. The present description of T. ramirezi therefore adds to the high taxonomic diversity of early mesotheriid species in the relatively small area of the BOR and emphasizes the likely role played by this topographically dynamic area on mesotheriid evolution during a significant time in the history of the clade.

  14. Comparative analysis of the kinomes of three pathogenic trypanosomatids: Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Pauline N

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The trypanosomatids Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi cause some of the most debilitating diseases of humankind: cutaneous leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease. These protozoa possess complex life cycles that involve development in mammalian and insect hosts, and a tightly coordinated cell cycle ensures propagation of the highly polarized cells. However, the ways in which the parasites respond to their environment and coordinate intracellular processes are poorly understood. As a part of an effort to understand parasite signaling functions, we report the results of a genome-wide analysis of protein kinases (PKs of these three trypanosomatids. Results Bioinformatic searches of the trypanosomatid genomes for eukaryotic PKs (ePKs and atypical PKs (aPKs revealed a total of 176 PKs in T. brucei, 190 in T. cruzi and 199 in L. major, most of which are orthologous across the three species. This is approximately 30% of the number in the human host and double that of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The representation of various groups of ePKs differs significantly as compared to humans: trypanosomatids lack receptor-linked tyrosine and tyrosine kinase-like kinases, although they do possess dual-specificity kinases. A relative expansion of the CMGC, STE and NEK groups has occurred. A large number of unique ePKs show no strong affinity to any known group. The trypanosomatids possess few ePKs with predicted transmembrane domains, suggesting that receptor ePKs are rare. Accessory Pfam domains, which are frequently present in human ePKs, are uncommon in trypanosomatid ePKs. Conclusion Trypanosomatids possess a large set of PKs, comprising approximately 2% of each genome, suggesting a key role for phosphorylation in parasite biology. Whilst it was possible to place most of the trypanosomatid ePKs into the seven established groups using bioinformatic analyses, it has not been

  15. Developmental and Ultrastructural Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Trypanosoma herthameyeri n. sp. of Brazilian Leptodactilydae Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Márcia; Sato, Lyslaine H; Ferreira, Robson C; Takata, Carmen S A; Campaner, Marta; Camargo, Erney P; Teixeira, Marta M G; de Souza, Wanderley

    2016-09-01

    We described the phylogenetic affiliation, development in cultures and ultrastructural features of a trypanosome of Leptodacylus chaquensis from the Pantanal biome of Brazil. In the inferred phylogeny, this trypanosome nested into the Anura clade of the basal Aquatic clade of Trypanosoma, but was separate from all known species within this clade. This finding enabled us to describe it as Trypanosoma herthameyeri n. sp., which also infects other Leptodacylus species from the Pantanal and Caatinga biomes. Trypanosoma herthameyeri multiplies as small rounded forms clumped together and evolving into multiple-fission forms and rosettes of epimastigotes released as long forms with long flagella; scarce trypomastigotes and glove-like forms are common in stationary-phase cultures. For the first time, a trypanosome from an amphibian was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, revealing a cytostome opening, well-developed flagellar lamella, and many grooves in pumpkin-like forms. Transmission electron microscopy showed highly developed Golgi complexes, relaxed catenation of KDNA, and a rich set of spongiome tubules in a regular parallel arrangement to the flagellar pocket as confirmed by electron tomography. Considering the basal position in the phylogenetic tree, developmental and ultrastructural data of T. herthameyeri are valuable for evolutionary studies of trypanosome architecture and cell biology. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  16. Genome-wide mapping reveals single-origin chromosome replication in Leishmania, a eukaryotic microbe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Catarina A; Dickens, Nicholas J; Paape, Daniel; Campbell, Samantha J; McCulloch, Richard

    2015-10-19

    DNA replication initiates on defined genome sites, termed origins. Origin usage appears to follow common rules in the eukaryotic organisms examined to date: all chromosomes are replicated from multiple origins, which display variations in firing efficiency and are selected from a larger pool of potential origins. To ask if these features of DNA replication are true of all eukaryotes, we describe genome-wide origin mapping in the parasite Leishmania. Origin mapping in Leishmania suggests a striking divergence in origin usage relative to characterized eukaryotes, since each chromosome appears to be replicated from a single origin. By comparing two species of Leishmania, we find evidence that such origin singularity is maintained in the face of chromosome fusion or fission events during evolution. Mapping Leishmania origins suggests that all origins fire with equal efficiency, and that the genomic sites occupied by origins differ from related non-origins sites. Finally, we provide evidence that origin location in Leishmania displays striking conservation with Trypanosoma brucei, despite the latter parasite replicating its chromosomes from multiple, variable strength origins. The demonstration of chromosome replication for a single origin in Leishmania, a microbial eukaryote, has implications for the evolution of origin multiplicity and associated controls, and may explain the pervasive aneuploidy that characterizes Leishmania chromosome architecture.

  17. Trypanosoma evansi isolated from capybara (Hidrochaeris hidrochaeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Muñoz

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the morphological and biometric characteristics of Trypanosoma isolated from 50 capybaras animals, raised in captivity in the Peruvian Amazon. Trypanosoma was found in 14 blood samples using the microhaematocrit, wide drop, and Giemsa-stain methods and T. evansi was identified through morphological details in all 14 positive samples (the subterminal kinetoplast, the developed undulating membrane, and a long free flagellum were used for the identification of the agent.

  18. Gonococcal attachment to eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, J.F.; Lammel, C.J.; Draper, D.L.; Brown, D.A.; Sweet, R.L.; Brooks, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The attachment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to eukaryotic cells grown in tissue culture was analyzed by use of light and electron microscopy and by labeling of the bacteria with [ 3 H]- and [ 14 C]adenine. Isogenic piliated and nonpiliated N. gonorrhoeae from opaque and transparent colonies were studied. The results of light microscopy studies showed that the gonococci attached to cells of human origin, including Flow 2000, HeLa 229, and HEp 2. Studies using radiolabeled gonococci gave comparable results. Piliated N. gonorrhoeae usually attached in larger numbers than nonpiliated organisms, and those from opaque colonies attached more often than isogenic variants from transparent colonies. Day-to-day variation in rate of attachment was observed. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the gonococcal attachment to be specific for microvilli of the host cells. It is concluded that more N. gonorrhoeae from opaque colonies, as compared with isogenic variants from transparent colonies, attach to eukaryotic cells grown in tissue culture

  19. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been the focus of intense research towards the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantæ and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity and citotoxicity are also reviewed.

  20. 21 CFR 866.3870 - Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3870 Trypanosoma... consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Trypanosoma spp. in...

  1. Characterization of plasma menbrane polypeptides of trypanosoma from bats

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho,R. T.; Simone,Giovanni de

    1989-01-01

    Cell surface proteins of Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma vespertilionis and Trypanosoma sp. (M238) were radiodinated and their distribution both in the detergent-poor (DPP) and dertergent-enriched phase (DRP) was studied using a phase separation technique in Triton X-114 as well as polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS-PAGE). Significant differences were observed in the proteins present in the DRP when the three species of trypanosoma were compared. Two major ba...

  2. The complete chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oltmannsiellopsis viridis reveals a distinctive quadripartite architecture in the chloroplast genome of early diverging ulvophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Chlorophyta contains the majority of the green algae and is divided into four classes. The basal position of the Prasinophyceae has been well documented, but the divergence order of the Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae is currently debated. The four complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA sequences presently available for representatives of these classes have revealed extensive variability in overall structure, gene content, intron composition and gene order. The chloroplast genome of Pseudendoclonium (Ulvophyceae, in particular, is characterized by an atypical quadripartite architecture that deviates from the ancestral type by a large inverted repeat (IR featuring an inverted rRNA operon and a small single-copy (SSC region containing 14 genes normally found in the large single-copy (LSC region. To gain insights into the nature of the events that led to the reorganization of the chloroplast genome in the Ulvophyceae, we have determined the complete cpDNA sequence of Oltmannsiellopsis viridis, a representative of a distinct, early diverging lineage. Results The 151,933 bp IR-containing genome of Oltmannsiellopsis differs considerably from Pseudendoclonium and other chlorophyte cpDNAs in intron content and gene order, but shares close similarities with its ulvophyte homologue at the levels of quadripartite architecture, gene content and gene density. Oltmannsiellopsis cpDNA encodes 105 genes, contains five group I introns, and features many short dispersed repeats. As in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA, the rRNA genes in the IR are transcribed toward the single copy region featuring the genes typically found in the ancestral LSC region, and the opposite single copy region harbours genes characteristic of both the ancestral SSC and LSC regions. The 52 genes that were transferred from the ancestral LSC to SSC region include 12 of those observed in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA. Surprisingly, the overall gene organization of

  3. Telomeric expression sites are highly conserved in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hertz-Fowler

    Full Text Available Subtelomeric regions are often under-represented in genome sequences of eukaryotes. One of the best known examples of the use of telomere proximity for adaptive purposes are the bloodstream expression sites (BESs of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei. To enhance our understanding of BES structure and function in host adaptation and immune evasion, the BES repertoire from the Lister 427 strain of T. brucei were independently tagged and sequenced. BESs are polymorphic in size and structure but reveal a surprisingly conserved architecture in the context of extensive recombination. Very small BESs do exist and many functioning BESs do not contain the full complement of expression site associated genes (ESAGs. The consequences of duplicated or missing ESAGs, including ESAG9, a newly named ESAG12, and additional variant surface glycoprotein genes (VSGs were evaluated by functional assays after BESs were tagged with a drug-resistance gene. Phylogenetic analysis of constituent ESAG families suggests that BESs are sequence mosaics and that extensive recombination has shaped the evolution of the BES repertoire. This work opens important perspectives in understanding the molecular mechanisms of antigenic variation, a widely used strategy for immune evasion in pathogens, and telomere biology.

  4. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. PMID:21615552

  5. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense stocks isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense was isolated twice from each of 23 patients in Côte d'Ivoire. Genetic characterization using RAPD (Random Primed Amplified Polymorphic DNA) showed additional variability within a given isoenzyme profile (zymodeme), confirming that this fingerprinting method has a higher discriminative ...

  6. Morphologic and molecular data help adopting the insect-pathogenic nephridiophagids (Nephridiophagidae among the early diverging fungal lineages, close to the Chytridiomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Radek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nephridiophagids are poorly known unicellular eukaryotes, previously of uncertain systematic position, that parasitize the Malpighian tubules of insects. Their life cycle includes merogony with multinucleate plasmodia and sporogony leading to small, uninucleate spores. We examined the phylogenetic affiliations of three species of Nephridiophaga, including one new species, Nephridiophaga maderae, from the Madeira cockroach (Leucophaea maderae. In addition to the specific host, the new species differs from those already known by the size of the spores and by the number of spores within the sporogenic plasmodium. The inferred phylogenetic analyses strongly support a placement of the nephridiophagids in the fungal kingdom near its root and with a close, but unresolved, relationship to the chytids (Chytridiomycota. We found evidence for the nephridiophagidean speciation as being strongly coupled to host speciation.

  7. Kinetoplast adaptations in American strains from Trypanosoma vivax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, Gonzalo [Unidad de Biología Molecular, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay); Rodriguez, Matías [Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay); Reyna-Bello, Armando [Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida, Carrera en Ingeniería en Biotecnología, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas (Ecuador); Centro de Estudios Biomédicos y Veterinarios, Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez-IDECYT, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Robello, Carlos [Unidad de Biología Molecular, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay); Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República Uruguay (Uruguay); Alvarez-Valin, Fernando, E-mail: falvarez@fcien.edu.uy [Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • American T. vivax strains exhibit a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation. • T. vivax mitochondrial genes have among the fastest evolutionary rates in eukaryotes. • High rates of kDNA evolution are associated with relaxation of selective constrains. • Relaxed selective pressures are the result of mechanical transmission. • The evolutionary strategy of T. vivax differs from that of T. brucei-species complex. - Abstract: The mitochondrion role changes during the digenetic life cycle of African trypanosomes. Owing to the low abundance of glucose in the insect vector (tsetse flies) the parasites are dependent upon a fully functional mitochondrion, capable of performing oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, inside the mammalian host (bloodstream forms), which is rich in nutrients, parasite proliferation relies on glycolysis, and the mitochondrion is partially redundant. In this work we perform a comparative study of the mitochondrial genome (kinetoplast) in different strains of Trypanosoma vivax. The comparison was conducted between a West African strain that goes through a complete life cycle and two American strains that are mechanically transmitted (by different vectors) and remain as bloodstream forms only. It was found that while the African strain has a complete and apparently fully functional kinetoplast, the American T. vivax strains have undergone a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation, in spite of the recent introduction of these parasites in America. Many of their genes exhibit different types of mutations that are disruptive of function such as major deletions, frameshift causing indels and missense mutations. Moreover, all but three genes (A6-ATPase, RPS12 and MURF2) are not edited in the American strains, whereas editing takes place normally in all (editable) genes from the African strain. Two of these genes, A6-ATPase and RPS12, are known to play an essential function during bloodstream stage

  8. Kinetoplast adaptations in American strains from Trypanosoma vivax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greif, Gonzalo; Rodriguez, Matías; Reyna-Bello, Armando; Robello, Carlos; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • American T. vivax strains exhibit a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation. • T. vivax mitochondrial genes have among the fastest evolutionary rates in eukaryotes. • High rates of kDNA evolution are associated with relaxation of selective constrains. • Relaxed selective pressures are the result of mechanical transmission. • The evolutionary strategy of T. vivax differs from that of T. brucei-species complex. - Abstract: The mitochondrion role changes during the digenetic life cycle of African trypanosomes. Owing to the low abundance of glucose in the insect vector (tsetse flies) the parasites are dependent upon a fully functional mitochondrion, capable of performing oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, inside the mammalian host (bloodstream forms), which is rich in nutrients, parasite proliferation relies on glycolysis, and the mitochondrion is partially redundant. In this work we perform a comparative study of the mitochondrial genome (kinetoplast) in different strains of Trypanosoma vivax. The comparison was conducted between a West African strain that goes through a complete life cycle and two American strains that are mechanically transmitted (by different vectors) and remain as bloodstream forms only. It was found that while the African strain has a complete and apparently fully functional kinetoplast, the American T. vivax strains have undergone a drastic process of mitochondrial genome degradation, in spite of the recent introduction of these parasites in America. Many of their genes exhibit different types of mutations that are disruptive of function such as major deletions, frameshift causing indels and missense mutations. Moreover, all but three genes (A6-ATPase, RPS12 and MURF2) are not edited in the American strains, whereas editing takes place normally in all (editable) genes from the African strain. Two of these genes, A6-ATPase and RPS12, are known to play an essential function during bloodstream stage

  9. The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei: new tricks from an old dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes, i.e. Trypanosoma brucei and related sub-species, are devastating human and animal pathogens that cause significant human mortality and limit sustained economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosoma brucei is a highly motile protozoan parasite and coordinated motility is central to both disease pathogenesis in the mammalian host and parasite development in the tsetse fly vector. Since motility is critical for parasite development and pathogenesis, understanding unique aspects of the T. brucei flagellum may uncover novel targets for therapeutic intervention in African sleeping sickness. Moreover, studies of conserved features of the T. brucei flagellum are directly relevant to understanding fundamental aspects of flagellum and cilium function in other eukaryotes, making T. brucei an important model system. The T. brucei flagellum contains a canonical 9 + 2 axoneme, together with additional features that are unique to kinetoplastids and a few closely-related organisms. Until recently, much of our knowledge of the structure and function of the trypanosome flagellum was based on analogy and inference from other organisms. There has been an explosion in functional studies in T. brucei in recent years, revealing conserved as well as novel and unexpected structural and functional features of the flagellum. Most notably, the flagellum has been found to be an essential organelle, with critical roles in parasite motility, morphogenesis, cell division and immune evasion. This review highlights recent discoveries on the T. brucei flagellum. PMID:18472102

  10. How natural a kind is "eukaryote?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, W Ford

    2014-06-02

    Systematics balances uneasily between realism and nominalism, uncommitted as to whether biological taxa are discoveries or inventions. If the former, they might be taken as natural kinds. I briefly review some philosophers' concepts of natural kinds and then argue that several of these apply well enough to "eukaryote." Although there are some sticky issues around genomic chimerism and when eukaryotes first appeared, if we allow for degrees in the naturalness of kinds, existing eukaryotes rank highly, higher than prokaryotes. Most biologists feel this intuitively: All I attempt to do here is provide some conceptual justification. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense in Glossina fuscipes fuscipes ( Diptera: Glossinidae ) and Stomoxys flies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in southern Sudan.

  12. Arabinogalactan proteins have deep roots in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervé, Cécile; Siméon, Amandine; Jam, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly glycosylated, hydroxyproline-rich proteins found at the cell surface of plants, where they play key roles in developmental processes. Brown algae are marine, multicellular, photosynthetic eukaryotes. They belong to the phylum Stramenopiles, which...

  13. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Vanrell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  14. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen, Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium, or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer.

  15. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  16. Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipidbiosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios

    2006-12-01

    Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes produce diverse molecular structures and are often present in multiple forms encoded by different genes. This work utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for exploring the distribution, structure and evolution of phospholipid biosynthetic genes and pathways in 26 eukaryotic genomes. Although the basic structure of the pathways was formed early in eukaryotic evolution, the emerging picture indicates that individual enzyme families followed unique evolutionary courses. For example, choline and ethanolamine kinases and cytidylyltransferases emerged in ancestral eukaryotes, whereas, multiple forms of the corresponding phosphatidyltransferases evolved mainly in a lineage specific manner. Furthermore, several unicellular eukaryotes maintain bacterial-type enzymes and reactions for the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. Also, base-exchange phosphatidylserine synthases are widespread and ancestral enzymes. The multiplicity of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes has been largely generated by gene expansion in a lineage specific manner. Thus, these observations suggest that phospholipid biosynthesis has been an actively evolving system. Finally, comparative genomic analysis indicates the existence of novel phosphatidyltransferases and provides a candidate for the uncharacterized eukaryotic phosphatidylglycerol phosphate phosphatase.

  17. Communities of microbial eukaryotes in the mammalian gut within the context of environmental eukaryotic diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Walters, William A.; Lauber, Christian L.; Clemente, Jose C.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Teiling, Clotilde; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Brunelle, Julie; Driscoll, Mark; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob

    2014-06-19

    Eukaryotic microbes (protists) residing in the vertebrate gut influence host health and disease, but their diversity and distribution in healthy hosts is poorly understood. Protists found in the gut are typically considered parasites, but many are commensal and some are beneficial. Further, the hygiene hypothesis predicts that association with our co-evolved microbial symbionts may be important to overall health. It is therefore imperative that we understand the normal diversity of our eukaryotic gut microbiota to test for such effects and avoid eliminating commensal organisms. We assembled a dataset of healthy individuals from two populations, one with traditional, agrarian lifestyles and a second with modern, westernized lifestyles, and characterized the human eukaryotic microbiota via high-throughput sequencing. To place the human gut microbiota within a broader context our dataset also includes gut samples from diverse mammals and samples from other aquatic and terrestrial environments. We curated the SILVA ribosomal database to reflect current knowledge of eukaryotic taxonomy and employ it as a phylogenetic framework to compare eukaryotic diversity across environment. We show that adults from the non-western population harbor a diverse community of protists, and diversity in the human gut is comparable to that in other mammals. However, the eukaryotic microbiota of the western population appears depauperate. The distribution of symbionts found in mammals reflects both host phylogeny and diet. Eukaryotic microbiota in the gut are less diverse and more patchily distributed than bacteria. More broadly, we show that eukaryotic communities in the gut are less diverse than in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and few taxa are shared across habitat types, and diversity patterns of eukaryotes are correlated with those observed for bacteria. These results outline the distribution and diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in the mammalian gut and across

  18. Eukaryotes first: how could that be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, Carlos; Doolittle, W Ford

    2015-09-26

    In the half century since the formulation of the prokaryote : eukaryote dichotomy, many authors have proposed that the former evolved from something resembling the latter, in defiance of common (and possibly common sense) views. In such 'eukaryotes first' (EF) scenarios, the last universal common ancestor is imagined to have possessed significantly many of the complex characteristics of contemporary eukaryotes, as relics of an earlier 'progenotic' period or RNA world. Bacteria and Archaea thus must have lost these complex features secondarily, through 'streamlining'. If the canonical three-domain tree in which Archaea and Eukarya are sisters is accepted, EF entails that Bacteria and Archaea are convergently prokaryotic. We ask what this means and how it might be tested. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Reproduction, symbiosis, and the eukaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a conceptual framework for addressing questions about reproduction, individuality, and the units of selection in symbiotic associations, with special attention to the origin of the eukaryotic cell. Three kinds of reproduction are distinguished, and a possible evolutionary sequence giving rise to a mitochondrion-containing eukaryotic cell from an endosymbiotic partnership is analyzed as a series of transitions between each of the three forms of reproduction. The sequence of changes seen in this “egalitarian” evolutionary transition is compared with those that apply in “fraternal” transitions, such as the evolution of multicellularity in animals. PMID:26286983

  20. Iron-associated biology of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, Somsuvro; Horáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1860, č. 2 (2016), s. 363-370 ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) COST Action CM1307; European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200961204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : iron * Fe/S cluster * heme * Trypanosoma * TAO Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.702, year: 2016

  1. Species-specific markers for the differential diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli and polymorphisms detection in Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Keila Adriana Magalhães; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; Baptista, Rodrigo P; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2014-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli are kinetoplastid parasites which are able to infect humans in Central and South America. Misdiagnosis between these trypanosomes can be avoided by targeting barcoding sequences or genes of each organism. This work aims to analyze the feasibility of using species-specific markers for identification of intraspecific polymorphisms and as target for diagnostic methods by PCR. Accordingly, primers which are able to specifically detect T. cruzi or T. rangeli genomic DNA were characterized. The use of intergenic regions, generally divergent in the trypanosomatids, and the serine carboxypeptidase gene were successful. Using T. rangeli genomic sequences for the identification of group-specific polymorphisms and a polymorphic AT(n) dinucleotide repeat permitted the classification of the strains into two groups, which are entirely coincident with T. rangeli main lineages, KP1 (+) and KP1 (-), previously determined by kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) characterization. The sequences analyzed totalize 622 bp (382 bp represent a hypothetical protein sequence, and 240 bp represent an anonymous sequence), and of these, 581 (93.3%) are conserved sites and 41 bp (6.7%) are polymorphic, with 9 transitions (21.9%), 2 transversions (4.9%), and 30 (73.2%) insertion/deletion events. Taken together, the species-specific markers analyzed may be useful for the development of new strategies for the accurate diagnosis of infections. Furthermore, the identification of T. rangeli polymorphisms has a direct impact in the understanding of the population structure of this parasite.

  2. The origin of the eukaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, H.

    1984-01-01

    The endosymbiotic hypothesis for the origin of the eukaryotic cell has been applied to the origin of the mitochondria and chloroplasts. However as has been pointed out by Mereschowsky in 1905, it should also be applied to the nucleus as well. If the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts are endosymbionts, then it is likely that the organism that did the engulfing was not a DNA-based organism. In fact, it is useful to postulate that this organism was a primitive RNA-based organism. This hypothesis would explain the preponderance of RNA viruses found in eukaryotic cells. The centriole and basal body do not have a double membrane or DNA. Like all MTOCs (microtubule organising centres), they have a structural or morphic RNA implicated in their formation. This would argue for their origin in the early RNA-based organism rather than in an endosymbiotic event involving bacteria. Finally, the eukaryotic cell uses RNA in ways quite unlike bacteria, thus pointing to a greater emphasis of RNA in both control and structure in the cell. The origin of the eukaryotic cell may tell us why it rather than its prokaryotic relative evolved into the metazoans who are reading this paper.

  3. Eukaryotic acquisition of a bacterial operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the champions of basic biomedical research due to its compact eukaryotic genome and ease of experimental manipulation. Despite these immense strengths, its impact on understanding the genetic basis of natural phenotypic variation has been limited by strai...

  4. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (pguinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mating compatibility in the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Lori; Ferris, Vanessa; Bailey, Mick; Gibson, Wendy

    2014-02-21

    Genetic exchange has been described in several kinetoplastid parasites, but the most well-studied mating system is that of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of African sleeping sickness. Sexual reproduction takes place in the salivary glands (SG) of the tsetse vector and involves meiosis and production of haploid gametes. Few genetic crosses have been carried out to date and consequently there is little information about the mating compatibility of different trypanosomes. In other single-celled eukaryotes, mating compatibility is typically determined by a system of two or more mating types (MT). Here we investigated the MT system in T. brucei. We analysed a large series of F1, F2 and back crosses by pairwise co-transmission of red and green fluorescent cloned cell lines through experimental tsetse flies. To analyse each cross, trypanosomes were cloned from fly SG containing a mixture of both parents, and genotyped by microsatellites and molecular karyotype. To investigate mating compatibility at the level of individual cells, we directly observed the behaviour of SG-derived gametes in intra- or interclonal mixtures of red and green fluorescent trypanosomes ex vivo. Hybrid progeny were found in all F1 and F2 crosses and most of the back crosses. The success of individual crosses was highly variable as judged by the number of hybrid clones produced, suggesting a range of mating compatibilities among F1 progeny. As well as hybrids, large numbers of recombinant genotypes resulting from intraclonal mating (selfers) were found in some crosses. In ex vivo mixtures, red and green fluorescent trypanosome gametes were observed to pair up and interact via their flagella in both inter- and intraclonal combinations. While yellow hybrid trypanosomes were frequently observed in interclonal mixtures, such evidence of cytoplasmic exchange was rare in the intraclonal mixtures. The outcomes of individual crosses, particularly back crosses, were variable in numbers of both

  7. Heme A synthesis and CcO activity are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Marcelo L; Cirulli, Brenda A; Menéndez-Bravo, Simón M; Cricco, Julia A

    2017-06-27

    Trypanosoma cruzi , the causative agent of Chagas disease, presents a complex life cycle and adapts its metabolism to nutrients' availability. Although T. cruzi is an aerobic organism, it does not produce heme. This cofactor is acquired from the host and is distributed and inserted into different heme-proteins such as respiratory complexes in the parasite's mitochondrion. It has been proposed that T. cruzi's energy metabolism relies on a branched respiratory chain with a cytochrome c oxidase-type aa 3 (C c O) as the main terminal oxidase. Heme A, the cofactor for all eukaryotic C c O, is synthesized via two sequential enzymatic reactions catalyzed by heme O synthase (HOS) and heme A synthase (HAS). Previously, TcCox10 and TcCox15 ( Trypanosoma cruzi Cox10 and Cox15 proteins) were identified in T. cruzi They presented HOS and HAS activity, respectively, when they were expressed in yeast. Here, we present the first characterization of TcCox15 in T. cruzi , confirming its role as HAS. It was differentially detected in the different T. cruzi stages, being more abundant in the replicative forms. This regulation could reflect the necessity of more heme A synthesis, and therefore more C c O activity at the replicative stages. Overexpression of a non-functional mutant caused a reduction in heme A content. Moreover, our results clearly showed that this hindrance in the heme A synthesis provoked a reduction on C c O activity and, in consequence, an impairment on T. cruzi survival, proliferation and infectivity. This evidence supports that T. cruzi depends on the respiratory chain activity along its life cycle, being C c O an essential terminal oxidase. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Classical clinical signs in rats experimemtally infected with Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate clinical signs in Trypanosoma brucei infection in albino rats. Methods: Fourteen rats grouped into 2 with 7 rats in each group were used to determine classical clinical manifestation of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats. Group A rats were uninfected control and Group B rats were infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results: Parasitaemia was recorded in Group B by (3.86±0.34 d and the peak of parasitaemia was observed at Day 5 post infection. Classical signs observed included squint eyes, raised whiskers, lethargy, no weight loss, pyrexia, isolation from the other rats, and starry hair coat. Conclusions: These signs could be diagnostic or aid in diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats.

  9. Role of cytokines in Trypanosoma brucei-induced anaemia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    species Trypanosoma brucei that are transmitted by a tsetse fly (Glossina spp.) ... of autologous immunoglobulin antibodies on the red cell surfaces and also to ... development for the detection and management of anaemia in trypanosomiasis.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sebastien; Mandacaru, Samuel C

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical neglected disease endemic in Latin America and it is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite has four major life stages: epimastigote, metacyclic trypomastigote, bloodstream trypomastigote and amastigote. The differentiation from infective trypomastigo......Chagas disease is a tropical neglected disease endemic in Latin America and it is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite has four major life stages: epimastigote, metacyclic trypomastigote, bloodstream trypomastigote and amastigote. The differentiation from infective...

  11. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  12. Towards New Antifolates Targeting Eukaryotic Opportunistic Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Bolstad, E; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Trimethoprim, an antifolate commonly prescribed in combination with sulfamethoxazole, potently inhibits several prokaryotic species of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). However, several eukaryotic pathogenic organisms are resistant to trimethoprim, preventing its effective use as a therapeutic for those infections. We have been building a program to reengineer trimethoprim to more potently and selectively inhibit eukaryotic species of DHFR as a viable strategy for new drug discovery targeting several opportunistic pathogens. We have developed a series of compounds that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of DHFR from the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma as well as the fungus Candida glabrata. A comparison of the structures of DHFR from the fungal species Candida glabrata and Pneumocystis suggests that the compounds may also potently inhibit Pneumocystis DHFR.

  13. Enzymes from Higher Eukaryotes for Industrial Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The industrial production of fine chemicals, feed and food ingredients, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and their respective intermediates relies on an increasing application of biocatalysis, i.e. on enzyme or whole-cell catalyzed conversions of molecules. Simple procedures for discovery, cloning and over-expression as well as fast growth favour fungi, yeasts and especially bacteria as sources of biocatalysts. Higher eukaryotes also harbour an almost unlimited number of potential biocatalysts, although to date the limited supply of enzymes, the high heterogeneity of enzyme preparations and the hazard of infectious contaminants keep some interesting candidates out of reach for industrial bioprocesses. In the past only a few animal and plant enzymes from agricultural waste materials were employed in food processing. The use of bacterial expression strains or non-conventional yeasts for the heterologous production of efficient eukaryotic enzymes can overcome the bottleneck in enzyme supply and provide sufficient amounts of homogenous enzyme preparations for reliable and economically feasible applications at large scale. Ideal enzymatic processes represent an environmentally friendly, »near-to-completion« conversion of (mostly non-natural substrates to pure products. Recent developments demonstrate the commercial feasibility of large-scale biocatalytic processes employing enzymes from higher eukaryotes (e.g. plants, animals and also their usefulness in some small-scale industrial applications.

  14. Arsenic and Antimony Transporters in Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids, naturally present in the environment and all organisms have developed pathways for their detoxification. The most effective metalloid tolerance systems in eukaryotes include downregulation of metalloid uptake, efflux out of the cell, and complexation with phytochelatin or glutathione followed by sequestration into the vacuole. Understanding of arsenic and antimony transport system is of high importance due to the increasing usage of arsenic-based drugs in the treatment of certain types of cancer and diseases caused by protozoan parasites as well as for the development of bio- and phytoremediation strategies for metalloid polluted areas. However, in contrast to prokaryotes, the knowledge about specific transporters of arsenic and antimony and the mechanisms of metalloid transport in eukaryotes has been very limited for a long time. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding of arsenic and antimony transport pathways in eukaryotes, including a dual role of aquaglyceroporins in uptake and efflux of metalloids, elucidation of arsenic transport mechanism by the yeast Acr3 transporter and its role in arsenic hyperaccumulation in ferns, identification of vacuolar transporters of arsenic-phytochelatin complexes in plants and forms of arsenic substrates recognized by mammalian ABC transporters.

  15. Arsenic and Antimony Transporters in Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Wawrzycka, Donata; Wysocki, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids, naturally present in the environment and all organisms have developed pathways for their detoxification. The most effective metalloid tolerance systems in eukaryotes include downregulation of metalloid uptake, efflux out of the cell, and complexation with phytochelatin or glutathione followed by sequestration into the vacuole. Understanding of arsenic and antimony transport system is of high importance due to the increasing usage of arsenic-based drugs in the treatment of certain types of cancer and diseases caused by protozoan parasites as well as for the development of bio- and phytoremediation strategies for metalloid polluted areas. However, in contrast to prokaryotes, the knowledge about specific transporters of arsenic and antimony and the mechanisms of metalloid transport in eukaryotes has been very limited for a long time. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding of arsenic and antimony transport pathways in eukaryotes, including a dual role of aquaglyceroporins in uptake and efflux of metalloids, elucidation of arsenic transport mechanism by the yeast Acr3 transporter and its role in arsenic hyperaccumulation in ferns, identification of vacuolar transporters of arsenic-phytochelatin complexes in plants and forms of arsenic substrates recognized by mammalian ABC transporters. PMID:22489166

  16. The haemoculture of Trypanosoma minasense chagas, 1908

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Ziccardi

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma minasense was isolated for the first time in blood axenic culture from a naturally infected marmoset, Callithrix penicillata, from Brazil. The parasite grew profusely in an overlay of Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium plus 20% foetal bovine serum, on Novy, McNeal and Nicolle medium (NNN , at 27°C, with a peak around 168 hr. The morphometry of cultural forms of T. minasense, estimates of cell population size and comparative growth in four different media overlays always with NNN, were studied. The infectivity of cultural forms to marmosets (C. penicillata and C. jacchus and transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic-like forms in axenic culture in the presence of chitin derivates (chitosan were evaluated.

  17. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nainita; Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Pallavi, Rani; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Chandran, Syama; Kumar, Rajender; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Yadav, Suresh Chandra; Tatu, Utpal

    2010-03-22

    Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO) prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS). Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more. Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a glimpse into the

  18. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nainita Roy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS.Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more.Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a

  19. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... approach to systematically investigate lateral gene transfer affecting the proteomes of thirteen, mainly parasitic, microbial eukaryotes, representing four of the six eukaryotic super-groups. All of the genomes investigated have been significantly affected by prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers...... indicated that lateral gene transfer does indeed affect eukaryotic genomes. However, the lack of common methodology and criteria in these studies makes it difficult to assess the general importance and influence of lateral gene transfer on eukaryotic genome evolution. RESULTS: We used a phylogenomic...

  20. Prokaryotes versus Eukaryotes: Who is hosting whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eTellez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms represent the largest component of biodiversity in our world. For millions of years, prokaryotic microorganisms have functioned as a major selective force shaping eukaryotic evolution. Microbes that live inside and on animals outnumber the animals’ actual somatic and germ cells by an estimated 10-fold. Collectively, the intestinal microbiome represents a ‘forgotten organ’, functioning as an organ inside another that can execute many physiological responsibilities. The nature of primitive eukaryotes was drastically changed due to the association with symbiotic prokaryotes facilitating mutual coevolution of host and microbe. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. From termites and honey bees to ruminants and mammals, depending on novel biochemistries provided by the prokaryotic microbiome, the association helps to metabolize several nutrients that the host cannot digest and converting these into useful end products (such as short chain fatty acids, a process which has huge impact on the biology and homeostasis of metazoans. More importantly, in a direct and/or indirect way, the intestinal microbiota influences the assembly of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, helps to educate immune system, affects the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, modulates proliferation and differentiation of its epithelial lineages, regulates angiogenesis, and modifies the activity of enteric as well as the central nervous system,. Despite these important effects, the mechanisms by which the gut microbial community influences the host’s biology remains almost entirely unknown. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification between prokaryotes and eukaryotes which encourage us to postulate: Who is

  1. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Sluse, Francis E

    2010-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are members of the mitochondrial anion carrier protein family that are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane and mediate free fatty acid (FFA)-activated, purine nucleotide (PN)-inhibited proton conductance. Since 1999, the presence of UCPs has been demonstrated in some non-photosynthesising unicellular eukaryotes, including amoeboid and parasite protists, as well as in non-fermentative yeast and filamentous fungi. In the mitochondria of these organisms, UCP activity is revealed upon FFA-induced, PN-inhibited stimulation of resting respiration and a decrease in membrane potential, which are accompanied by a decrease in membranous ubiquinone (Q) reduction level. UCPs in unicellular eukaryotes are able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation and thus compete for a proton electrochemical gradient with ATP synthase. Our recent work indicates that membranous Q is a metabolic sensor that might utilise its redox state to release the PN inhibition of UCP-mediated mitochondrial uncoupling under conditions of phosphorylation and resting respiration. The action of reduced Q (QH2) could allow higher or complete activation of UCP. As this regulatory feature was demonstrated for microorganism UCPs (A. castellanii UCP), plant and mammalian UCP1 analogues, and UCP1 in brown adipose tissue, the process could involve all UCPs. Here, we discuss the functional connection and physiological role of UCP and alternative oxidase, two main energy-dissipating systems in the plant-type mitochondrial respiratory chain of unicellular eukaryotes, including the control of cellular energy balance as well as preventive action against the production of reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

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    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  3. Current Perspectives of Telomerase Structure and Function in Eukaryotes with Emerging Views on Telomerase in Human Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Chakrabarti, Kausik

    2018-01-24

    Replicative capacity of a cell is strongly correlated with telomere length regulation. Aberrant lengthening or reduction in the length of telomeres can lead to health anomalies, such as cancer or premature aging. Telomerase is a master regulator for maintaining replicative potential in most eukaryotic cells. It does so by controlling telomere length at chromosome ends. Akin to cancer cells, most single-cell eukaryotic pathogens are highly proliferative and require persistent telomerase activity to maintain constant length of telomere and propagation within their host. Although telomerase is key to unlimited cellular proliferation in both cases, not much was known about the role of telomerase in human parasites (malaria, Trypanosoma , etc.) until recently. Since telomerase regulation is mediated via its own structural components, interactions with catalytic reverse transcriptase and several factors that can recruit and assemble telomerase to telomeres in a cell cycle-dependent manner, we compare and discuss here recent findings in telomerase biology in cancer, aging and parasitic diseases to give a broader perspective of telomerase function in human diseases.

  4. Consistent mutational paths predict eukaryotic thermostability

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    van Noort Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomes of thermophilic prokaryotes have been instrumental in structural biology and successfully exploited in biotechnology, however many proteins required for eukaryotic cell function are absent from bacteria or archaea. With Chaetomium thermophilum, Thielavia terrestris and Thielavia heterothallica three genome sequences of thermophilic eukaryotes have been published. Results Studying the genomes and proteomes of these thermophilic fungi, we found common strategies of thermal adaptation across the different kingdoms of Life, including amino acid biases and a reduced genome size. A phylogenetics-guided comparison of thermophilic proteomes with those of other, mesophilic Sordariomycetes revealed consistent amino acid substitutions associated to thermophily that were also present in an independent lineage of thermophilic fungi. The most consistent pattern is the substitution of lysine by arginine, which we could find in almost all lineages but has not been extensively used in protein stability engineering. By exploiting mutational paths towards the thermophiles, we could predict particular amino acid residues in individual proteins that contribute to thermostability and validated some of them experimentally. By determining the three-dimensional structure of an exemplar protein from C. thermophilum (Arx1, we could also characterise the molecular consequences of some of these mutations. Conclusions The comparative analysis of these three genomes not only enhances our understanding of the evolution of thermophily, but also provides new ways to engineer protein stability.

  5. Strong eukaryotic IRESs have weak secondary structure.

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    Xuhua Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this work was to investigate the hypothesis that eukaryotic Internal Ribosome Entry Sites (IRES lack secondary structure and to examine the generality of the hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IRESs of the yeast and the fruit fly are located in the 5'UTR immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The minimum folding energy (MFE of 60 nt RNA segments immediately upstream of the initiation codons was calculated as a proxy of secondary structure stability. MFE of the reverse complements of these 60 nt segments was also calculated. The relationship between MFE and empirically determined IRES activity was investigated to test the hypothesis that strong IRES activity is associated with weak secondary structure. We show that IRES activity in the yeast and the fruit fly correlates strongly with the structural stability, with highest IRES activity found in RNA segments that exhibit the weakest secondary structure. CONCLUSIONS: We found that a subset of eukaryotic IRESs exhibits very low secondary structure in the 5'-UTR sequences immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The consistency in results between the yeast and the fruit fly suggests a possible shared mechanism of cap-independent translation initiation that relies on an unstructured RNA segment.

  6. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-03-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aspartate transcarbamoylase from the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoba, Kazuaki; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu

    2009-01-01

    Aspartate transcarbamoylase, the second enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine-biosynthetic pathway, from T. cruzi has been purified and crystallized for X-ray structure analysis. Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase), the second enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine-biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the production of carbamoyl aspartate from carbamoyl phosphate and l-aspartate. In contrast to Escherichia coli ATCase and eukaryotic CAD multifunctional fusion enzymes, Trypanosoma cruzi ATCase lacks regulatory subunits and is not part of the multifunctional fusion enzyme. Recombinant T. cruzi ATCase expressed in E. coli was purified and crystallized in a ligand-free form and in a complex with carbamoyl phosphate at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. Ligand-free crystals (space group P1, unit-cell parameters a = 78.42, b = 79.28, c = 92.02 Å, α = 69.56, β = 82.90, γ = 63.25°) diffracted X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution, while those cocrystallized with carbamoyl phosphate (space group P2 1 , unit-cell parameters a = 88.41, b = 158.38, c = 89.00 Å, β = 119.66°) diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution. The presence of two homotrimers in the asymmetric unit (38 kDa × 6) gives V M values of 2.3 and 2.5 Å 3 Da −1 for the P1 and P2 1 crystal forms, respectively

  8. Adenylate Cyclases of Trypanosoma brucei, Environmental Sensors and Controllers of Host Innate Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Didier

    2018-04-25

    Trypanosoma brucei , etiological agent of Sleeping Sickness in Africa, is the prototype of African trypanosomes, protozoan extracellular flagellate parasites transmitted by saliva ( Salivaria ). In these parasites the molecular controls of the cell cycle and environmental sensing are elaborate and concentrated at the flagellum. Genomic analyses suggest that these parasites appear to differ considerably from the host in signaling mechanisms, with the exception of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (AC) that are topologically similar to receptor-type guanylate cyclase (GC) of higher eukaryotes but control a new class of cAMP targets of unknown function, the cAMP response proteins (CARPs), rather than the classical protein kinase A cAMP effector (PKA). T. brucei possesses a large polymorphic family of ACs, mainly associated with the flagellar membrane, and these are involved in inhibition of the innate immune response of the host prior to the massive release of immunomodulatory factors at the first peak of parasitemia. Recent evidence suggests that in T. brucei several insect-specific AC isoforms are involved in social motility, whereas only a few AC isoforms are involved in cytokinesis control of bloodstream forms, attesting that a complex signaling pathway is required for environmental sensing. In this review, after a general update on cAMP signaling pathway and the multiple roles of cAMP, I summarize the existing knowledge of the mechanisms by which pathogenic microorganisms modulate cAMP levels to escape immune defense.

  9. Adenylate Cyclases of Trypanosoma brucei, Environmental Sensors and Controllers of Host Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Salmon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei, etiological agent of Sleeping Sickness in Africa, is the prototype of African trypanosomes, protozoan extracellular flagellate parasites transmitted by saliva (Salivaria. In these parasites the molecular controls of the cell cycle and environmental sensing are elaborate and concentrated at the flagellum. Genomic analyses suggest that these parasites appear to differ considerably from the host in signaling mechanisms, with the exception of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (AC that are topologically similar to receptor-type guanylate cyclase (GC of higher eukaryotes but control a new class of cAMP targets of unknown function, the cAMP response proteins (CARPs, rather than the classical protein kinase A cAMP effector (PKA. T. brucei possesses a large polymorphic family of ACs, mainly associated with the flagellar membrane, and these are involved in inhibition of the innate immune response of the host prior to the massive release of immunomodulatory factors at the first peak of parasitemia. Recent evidence suggests that in T. brucei several insect-specific AC isoforms are involved in social motility, whereas only a few AC isoforms are involved in cytokinesis control of bloodstream forms, attesting that a complex signaling pathway is required for environmental sensing. In this review, after a general update on cAMP signaling pathway and the multiple roles of cAMP, I summarize the existing knowledge of the mechanisms by which pathogenic microorganisms modulate cAMP levels to escape immune defense.

  10. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

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    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  11. Molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomes in Venezuela: evidences of Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma vivax infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Iglesias, J R; Eleizalde, M C; Reyna-Bello, A; Mendoza, M

    2017-06-01

    In South America Trypanosoma evansi has been determined by molecular methods in cattle from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru, reason for which the presence of this parasite is not excluded in Venezuelan livestock. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform parasitological and molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomosis in small livestock units from two regions in this country. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by MHCT and the molecular by PCR using genus-specific ITS1 primers that differentiate T. vivax and T. evansi infections. 47 cattle were evaluated in the "Laguneta de la Montaña" sector, Miranda State, where 3 animals were diagnosed as positive (6.4 %) by MHCT and 14 (30 %) by PCR as Trypanosoma spp., out of which 9 animals resulted positive for T. vivax , 3 for T. evansi and 2 with double infections. Whilst in the "San Casimiro" sector, State of Aragua, out of the 38 cattle evaluated 7 animals were diagnosed as positive (18.4 %) by MHCT and 19 (50 %) by PCR, determining only the presence of T. evansi in this locality. The molecular diagnosis by PCR using ITS1 primers allowed T. evansi detection in cattle field populations, which suggests the possible role of these animals as reservoirs in the epidemiology of the disease caused by T. evansi in Venezuela.

  12. The Genome of Naegleria gruberi Illuminates Early Eukaryotic Versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Ginger, Michael L.; Dacks, Joel; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Field, Mark C.; Kuo, Alan; Paredez, Alex; Chapman, Jarrod; Pham, Jonathan; Shu, Shengqiang; Neupane, Rochak; Cipriano, Michael; Mancuso, Joel; Tu, Hank; Salamov, Asaf; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Cande, W. Zacheus; Fulton, Chandler; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2010-03-01

    Genome sequences of diverse free-living protists are essential for understanding eukaryotic evolution and molecular and cell biology. The free-living amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi belongs to a varied and ubiquitous protist clade (Heterolobosea) that diverged from other eukaryotic lineages over a billion years ago. Analysis of the 15,727 protein-coding genes encoded by Naegleria's 41 Mb nuclear genome indicates a capacity for both aerobic respiration and anaerobic metabolism with concomitant hydrogen production, with fundamental implications for the evolution of organelle metabolism. The Naegleria genome facilitates substantially broader phylogenomic comparisons of free-living eukaryotes than previously possible, allowing us to identify thousands of genes likely present in the pan-eukaryotic ancestor, with 40% likely eukaryotic inventions. Moreover, we construct a comprehensive catalog of amoeboid-motility genes. The Naegleria genome, analyzed in the context of other protists, reveals a remarkably complex ancestral eukaryote with a rich repertoire of cytoskeletal, sexual, signaling, and metabolic modules.

  13. Gastrointestinal parasites and Trypanosoma evansi in buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, R.A.; Chandrawathani, P.; Rosli, M.

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasitism is common in buffalo calves. The effect of helminths on growth was studied by administration of an anthelmintic to buffalo calves following natural infections with gastrointestinal parasites. In studies conducted on calves belonging to an institute and a smallholder farmer, the treated calves showed improved weight gains. Serial parasitic examinations showed these animals had moderate to high faecal counts with Strongyloides, Toxocara vitulorum and Haemonchus eggs and Eimeria oocytes. In another study, there was no live weight advantage in treated over untreated calves. Few animals in this study had evidence of parasites and even those which were infested had low faecal egg counts. Hence, in general, helminths at certain levels of infection do affect the live weight gains of young buffalo calves. The prevalence of Trypanosoma evansi, as assessed parasitologically using the haematocrit centrifugation technique and mice inoculation, was 2.7 and 1%, respectively, in cattle and buffaloes. The serological prevalence using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was 35 and 2% for cattle and buffaloes, respectively. (author). 6 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Cell signaling during Trypanosoma cruzi invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Yukio Maeda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling is an essential requirement for mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi. Depending on the parasite strain and the parasite developmental form, distinct signaling pathways may be induced. In this short review, we focus on the data coming from studies with metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT generated in vitro and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCT, used as counterparts of insect-borne and bloodstream parasites respectively. During invasion of host cells by MT or TCT, intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and host cell lysosomal exocytosis are triggered. Invasion mediated by MT surface molecule gp82 requires the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and protein kinase C (PKC in the host cell, associated with Ca2+-dependent disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. In MT, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK, PI3K, phospholipase C (PLC and PKC appear to be activated. TCT invasion, on the other hand, does not rely on mTOR activation, rather on target cell PI3K, and may involve the host cell autophagy for parasite internalization. Enzymes, such oligopeptidase B and the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase cruzipain, have been shown to generate molecules that induce target cell Ca2+ signal. In addition, TCT may trigger host cell responses mediated by TGF-β receptor or integrin family member. Further investigations are needed for a more complete and detailed picture of T. cruzi invasion.

  15. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

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    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  16. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  17. Studies on the glycosome of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosomes (microbodies) have been purified from bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei by an improved procedure involving freezing and thawing live organisms in 15% glycerol prior to cell disruption. Highly purified organelles of bloodstream form T. brucei contain 11 major proteins of which 8 tentatively identified glycolytic enzymes make up about 90% of the total glycosomal protein. Treatment of these intact isolated organelles with the bisimidoester dimethylsuberimidate (DMSI) resulted in crosslinking of all glycosomal proteins into a large complex suggestive of juxtapositioning of the glycosomal proteins. The crosslinked complex was capable of catalyzing the multienzyme conversion of glucose to glycerol-3-phosphate but did not possess any special kinetic features different from those of the unaggregated enzymes represented by solubilized glycosomes. The multienzyme reaction had a lab phase associated with it and [ 14 C]-glucose label incorporation into sugar phosphate intermediates was effectively competed by unlabeled intermediates. Glycosomes were also purified from culture form T. brucei by several different procedures. Comparison of highly purified organelles from the two different life stages of the organism showed reduced specific activities and contents of the early glycolytic enzymes in organelles from the culture form with a decrease from 87% to 35% of the contribution of glycolytic enzymes to the total glycosomal protein

  18. First record of Trypanosoma chattoni in Brazil and occurrence of other Trypanosoma species in Brazilian frogs (Anura, Leptodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, M; Morais, D H; Carvalho, V T; D'Agosto, M

    2008-02-01

    The present study provides the first record of Trypanosoma chattoni Mathis and Leger, 1911, in a new host, Leptodactylus fuscus Schneider, 1799 (Anura, Leptodactylidae), and the occurrence of Trypanosoma rotatorium-like species in Leptodactylus chaquensis Cei, 1950. The anurans were captured in the State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture, and blood smears were examined for the presence of hemoparasites. The Trypanosoma rotatorium-like species in this study refers to a short-bodied trypomastigote that has a conspicuous undulating membrane but lacks a free flagellum; T. chattoni refers to a monomorphic parasite that has a rounded body, a kinetoplast adjacent to the nucleus, and a short flagellum.

  19. Ultrastructural diversity between centrioles of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akshari; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2018-02-16

    Several decades of centriole research have revealed the beautiful symmetry present in these microtubule-based organelles, which are required to form centrosomes, cilia, and flagella in many eukaryotes. Centriole architecture is largely conserved across most organisms, however, individual centriolar features such as the central cartwheel or microtubule walls exhibit considerable variability when examined with finer resolution. Here, we review the ultrastructural characteristics of centrioles in commonly studied organisms, highlighting the subtle and not-so-subtle differences between specific structural components of these centrioles. Additionally, we survey some non-canonical centriole structures that have been discovered in various species, from the coaxial bicentrioles of protists and lower land plants to the giant irregular centrioles of the fungus gnat Sciara. Finally, we speculate on the functional significance of these differences between centrioles, and the contribution of individual structural elements such as the cartwheel or microtubules towards the stability of centrioles.Centriole structure, cartwheel, triplet microtubules, SAS-6, centrosome.

  20. Protein splicing and its evolution in eukaryotes

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    Starokadomskyy P. L.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inteins, or protein introns, are parts of protein sequences that are post-translationally excised, their flanking regions (exteins being spliced together. This process was called protein splicing. Originally inteins were found in prokaryotic or unicellular eukaryotic organisms. But the general principles of post-translation protein rearrangement are evolving yielding different post-translation modification of proteins in multicellular organisms. For clarity, these non-intein mediated events call either protein rearrangements or protein editing. The most intriguing example of protein editing is proteasome-mediated splicing of antigens in vertebrates that may play important role in antigen presentation. Other examples of protein rearrangements are maturation of Hg-proteins (critical receptors in embryogenesis as well as maturation of several metabolic enzymes. Despite a lack of experimental data we try to analyze some intriguing examples of protein splicing evolution.

  1. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic cytoplasm has long been regarded as a cellular compartment in which the reduced state of protein cysteines is largely favored. Under normal conditions, the cytosolic low-molecular weight redox buffer, comprising primarily of glutathione, is highly reducing and reactive oxygen species...... (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...... organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the combination of genetic and biochemical approaches has brought us furthest in understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular redox regulation. It has been shown in yeast that, in addition to the enzyme glutathione reductase, other mechanisms may exist...

  2. Bacterial proteins pinpoint a single eukaryotic root

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Derelle, R.; Torruella, G.; Klimeš, V.; Brinkmann, H.; Kim, E.; Vlček, Čestmír; Lang, B.F.; Eliáš, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 7 (2015), E693-E699 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24983S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0100; Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Early Career Scientist Program(US) 55007424; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, European Molecular Biology Organization Young Investigator Program(ES) BFU2012-31329; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, "Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa" - European Regional Development Fund(ES) Sev-2012-0208, BES-2013-064004 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : eukaryote phylogeny * phylogenomics * Opimoda * Diphoda * LECA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  3. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (Virginia Tech); (UMC)

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  4. Crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-galactopyranose mutase implicate flexibility of the histidine loop in enzyme activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J

    2012-06-19

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 Å movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k(cat). Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  5. The F1 -ATPase from Trypanosoma brucei is elaborated by three copies of an additional p18-subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahura, Ondřej; Šubrtová, Karolína; Váchová, Hana; Panicucci, Brian; Fearnley, Ian M; Harbour, Michael E; Walker, John E; Zíková, Alena

    2018-02-01

    The F-ATPases (also called the F 1 F o -ATPases or ATP synthases) are multi-subunit membrane-bound molecular machines that produce ATP in bacteria and in eukaryotic mitochondria and chloroplasts. The structures and enzymic mechanisms of their F 1 -catalytic domains are highly conserved in all species investigated hitherto. However, there is evidence that the F-ATPases from the group of protozoa known as Euglenozoa have novel features. Therefore, we have isolated pure and active F 1 -ATPase from the euglenozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, and characterized it. All of the usual eukaryotic subunits (α, β, γ, δ, and ε) were present in the enzyme, and, in addition, two unique features were detected. First, each of the three α-subunits in the F 1 -domain has been cleaved by proteolysis in vivo at two sites eight residues apart, producing two assembled fragments. Second, the T. brucei F 1 -ATPase has an additional subunit, called p18, present in three copies per complex. Suppression of expression of p18 affected in vitro growth of both the insect and infectious mammalian forms of T. brucei. It also reduced the levels of monomeric and multimeric F-ATPase complexes and diminished the in vivo hydrolytic activity of the enzyme significantly. These observations imply that p18 plays a role in the assembly of the F 1 domain. These unique features of the F 1 -ATPase extend the list of special characteristics of the F-ATPase from T. brucei, and also, demonstrate that the architecture of the F 1 -ATPase complex is not strictly conserved in eukaryotes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. The COG database: an updated version includes eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverdlov Alexander V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple, essentially complete genome sequences of prokaryotes and eukaryotes spurred both the demand and the opportunity for the construction of an evolutionary classification of genes from these genomes. Such a classification system based on orthologous relationships between genes appears to be a natural framework for comparative genomics and should facilitate both functional annotation of genomes and large-scale evolutionary studies. Results We describe here a major update of the previously developed system for delineation of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs from the sequenced genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes and the construction of clusters of predicted orthologs for 7 eukaryotic genomes, which we named KOGs after eukaryotic orthologous groups. The COG collection currently consists of 138,458 proteins, which form 4873 COGs and comprise 75% of the 185,505 (predicted proteins encoded in 66 genomes of unicellular organisms. The eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs include proteins from 7 eukaryotic genomes: three animals (the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens, one plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, two fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the intracellular microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi. The current KOG set consists of 4852 clusters of orthologs, which include 59,838 proteins, or ~54% of the analyzed eukaryotic 110,655 gene products. Compared to the coverage of the prokaryotic genomes with COGs, a considerably smaller fraction of eukaryotic genes could be included into the KOGs; addition of new eukaryotic genomes is expected to result in substantial increase in the coverage of eukaryotic genomes with KOGs. Examination of the phyletic patterns of KOGs reveals a conserved core represented in all analyzed species and consisting of ~20% of the KOG set. This conserved portion of the

  7. EPIDEMIOLOGÍA MOLECULAR DE TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas causada por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi es una zoonosis compleja, ampliamente distribuida en el continente americano. La infección puede ser adquirida a través de las heces de insectos triatominos, transfusión de sangre, trasplante de órganos, vía oral, por transmisión congénita y por accidentes de laboratorio. El completo entendimiento de la etiología y epidemiología de la enfermedad de Chagas a través de su distribución geográfica es complejo y permanece bajo intensa investigación hasta la actualidad. Los recientes estudios sobre la variabilidad genética del parásito han dado nuevas luces de los diferentes escenarios de los ciclos de transmisión de la enfermedad y su patogénesis en humanos. El propósito principal para la caracterización molecular de T.cruzi y sus múltiples genotipos está dirigido hacia su asociación con la clínica y la patogenesis de la enfermedad, así como al esclarecimiento de los diferentes escenarios de transmisión y los aspectos coevolutivos relacionados con reservorios e insectos vectores. La caracterización molecular de los diferentes aislamientos a partir de humanos, insectos y reservorios, ha permitido identificar la amplia variabilidad genética del parásito, abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la búsqueda de nuevos blancos terapéuticos y pruebas diagnósticas más específicas que contribuyan a mitigar la enfermedad de Chagas.

  8. DNA to DNA transcription might exist in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gao-De

    2016-01-01

    Till now, in biological sciences, the term, transcription, mainly refers to DNA to RNA transcription. But our recently published experimental findings obtained from Plasmodium falciparum strongly suggest the existence of DNA to DNA transcription in the genome of eukaryotic cells, which could shed some light on the functions of certain noncoding DNA in the human and other eukaryotic genomes.

  9. A tropical tale: how Naja nigricollis venom beats Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings [1]. During the parasite’s extracellular life in the mammalian host,its outer coat, mainly composed of Variable Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs)...

  10. What controls glycolysis in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the experimentally determined kinetic properties of the trypanosomal enzymes, the question is addressed of which step limits the glycolytic flux in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei. There appeared to be no single answer; in the physiological range, control shifted between the

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi: avirulence of the PF strain to Callithrix marmosets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Menezes

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Callithrix jacchus geoffroy marmosets (HumBol. 1812 were injected once subcutaneously with 10.000 parasites/g body weight and followed for a period of six months. The PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. Follow-up was done through blood cultures, xenodiagnosis, serological tests, and ECG. A small number of normaI animais served as control.

  12. Role of sialic acids in the midguts of Trypanosoma congolense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    total sialic acid concentration. The relevance of these findings to the role of sialic acids in the midgut of. T. congolense infected C.p. pipiense mosquitoes is discussed in this paper. Key words: Trypanosoma congolense, Culex pipiense pipiense, sialic acid, midgut. INTRODUCTION. The Culex pipiense pipiense mosquito is ...

  13. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin levels in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of orally administered Scoparia dulcis on Trypanosoma brucei-induced changes in serum total protein, albumin and globulin were investigated in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection resulted in hyperproteinaemia, hyperglobulinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. However ...

  14. DNA content analysis allows discrimination between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucila Langoni; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; da Silva, Raíssa Bernardes; De Vito, Fernanda Bernadelli; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a human protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Currently the species is divided into six taxonomic groups. The genome of the CL Brener clone has been estimated to be 106.4-110.7 Mb, and DNA content analyses revealed that it is a diploid hybrid clone. Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate that has the same reservoirs and vectors as T. cruzi; however, it is non-pathogenic to vertebrate hosts. The haploid genome of T. rangeli was previously estimated to be 24 Mb. The parasitic strains of T. rangeli are divided into KP1(+) and KP1(-). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the DNA content in different strains of T. cruzi and T. rangeli by flow cytometry. All T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains yielded cell cycle profiles with clearly identifiable G1-0 (2n) and G2-M (4n) peaks. T. cruzi and T. rangeli genome sizes were estimated using the clone CL Brener and the Leishmania major CC1 as reference cell lines because their genome sequences have been previously determined. The DNA content of T. cruzi strains ranged from 87,41 to 108,16 Mb, and the DNA content of T. rangeli strains ranged from 63,25 Mb to 68,66 Mb. No differences in DNA content were observed between KP1(+) and KP1(-) T. rangeli strains. Cultures containing mixtures of the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains resulted in cell cycle profiles with distinct G1 peaks for strains of each species. These results demonstrate that DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is a reliable technique for discrimination between T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolated from different hosts.

  15. Channel-forming activities in the glycosomal fraction from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Gualdron-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycosomes are a specialized form of peroxisomes (microbodies present in unicellular eukaryotes that belong to the Kinetoplastea order, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasitic protists causing severe diseases of livestock and humans in subtropical and tropical countries. The organelles harbour most enzymes of the glycolytic pathway that is responsible for substrate-level ATP production in the cell. Glycolysis is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei and enzymes comprising this pathway have been validated as drug targets. Glycosomes are surrounded by a single membrane. How glycolytic metabolites are transported across the glycosomal membrane is unclear. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glycosomal membrane, similarly to membranes of yeast and mammalian peroxisomes, contains channel-forming proteins involved in the selective transfer of metabolites. To verify this prediction, we isolated a glycosomal fraction from bloodstream-form T. brucei and reconstituted solubilized membrane proteins into planar lipid bilayers. The electrophysiological characteristics of the channels were studied using multiple channel recording and single channel analysis. Three main channel-forming activities were detected with current amplitudes 70-80 pA, 20-25 pA, and 8-11 pA, respectively (holding potential +10 mV and 3.0 M KCl as an electrolyte. All channels were in fully open state in a range of voltages ±150 mV and showed no sub-conductance transitions. The channel with current amplitude 20-25 pA is anion-selective (P(K+/P(Cl-∼0.31, while the other two types of channels are slightly selective for cations (P(K+/P(Cl- ratios ∼1.15 and ∼1.27 for the high- and low-conductance channels, respectively. The anion-selective channel showed an intrinsic current rectification that may suggest a functional asymmetry of the channel's pore. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the membrane of glycosomes

  16. Morphological and ecological complexity in early eukaryotic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, E J; Knoll, A H; Walter, M R

    2001-07-05

    Molecular phylogeny and biogeochemistry indicate that eukaryotes differentiated early in Earth history. Sequence comparisons of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes suggest a deep evolutionary divergence of Eukarya and Archaea; C27-C29 steranes (derived from sterols synthesized by eukaryotes) and strong depletion of 13C (a biogeochemical signature of methanogenic Archaea) in 2,700 Myr old kerogens independently place a minimum age on this split. Steranes, large spheroidal microfossils, and rare macrofossils of possible eukaryotic origin occur in Palaeoproterozoic rocks. Until now, however, evidence for morphological and taxonomic diversification within the domain has generally been restricted to very late Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic successions. Here we show that the cytoskeletal and ecological prerequisites for eukaryotic diversification were already established in eukaryotic microorganisms fossilized nearly 1,500 Myr ago in shales of the early Mesoproterozoic Roper Group in northern Australia.

  17. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. ► Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. ► CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. ► ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. ► A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded—and led to—gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  18. Genomic impact of eukaryotic transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipova, Irina R; Batzer, Mark A; Brosius, Juergen; Feschotte, Cédric; Moran, John V; Schmitz, Jürgen; Jurka, Jerzy

    2012-11-21

    The third international conference on the genomic impact of eukaryotic transposable elements (TEs) was held 24 to 28 February 2012 at the Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA, USA. Sponsored in part by the National Institutes of Health grant 5 P41 LM006252, the goal of the conference was to bring together researchers from around the world who study the impact and mechanisms of TEs using multiple computational and experimental approaches. The meeting drew close to 170 attendees and included invited floor presentations on the biology of TEs and their genomic impact, as well as numerous talks contributed by young scientists. The workshop talks were devoted to computational analysis of TEs with additional time for discussion of unresolved issues. Also, there was ample opportunity for poster presentations and informal evening discussions. The success of the meeting reflects the important role of Repbase in comparative genomic studies, and emphasizes the need for close interactions between experimental and computational biologists in the years to come.

  19. Genomic impact of eukaryotic transposable elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipova Irina R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The third international conference on the genomic impact of eukaryotic transposable elements (TEs was held 24 to 28 February 2012 at the Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA, USA. Sponsored in part by the National Institutes of Health grant 5 P41 LM006252, the goal of the conference was to bring together researchers from around the world who study the impact and mechanisms of TEs using multiple computational and experimental approaches. The meeting drew close to 170 attendees and included invited floor presentations on the biology of TEs and their genomic impact, as well as numerous talks contributed by young scientists. The workshop talks were devoted to computational analysis of TEs with additional time for discussion of unresolved issues. Also, there was ample opportunity for poster presentations and informal evening discussions. The success of the meeting reflects the important role of Repbase in comparative genomic studies, and emphasizes the need for close interactions between experimental and computational biologists in the years to come.

  20. Do lipids shape the eukaryotic cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furse, Samuel; Shearman, Gemma C

    2018-01-01

    Successful passage through the cell cycle presents a number of structural challenges to the cell. Inceptive studies carried out in the last five years have produced clear evidence of modulations in the lipid profile (sometimes referred to as the lipidome) of eukaryotes as a function of the cell cycle. This mounting body of evidence indicates that lipids play key roles in the structural transformations seen across the cycle. The accumulation of this evidence coincides with a revolution in our understanding of how lipid composition regulates a plethora of biological processes ranging from protein activity through to cellular signalling and membrane compartmentalisation. In this review, we discuss evidence from biological, chemical and physical studies of the lipid fraction across the cell cycle that demonstrate that lipids are well-developed cellular components at the heart of the biological machinery responsible for managing progress through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanisms by which this careful control is exercised. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Krupovic, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  2. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonin, Eugene V., E-mail: koonin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894 (United States); Dolja, Valerian V., E-mail: doljav@science.oregonstate.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Krupovic, Mart, E-mail: krupovic@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles, Department of Microbiology, Paris 75015 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  3. Genome-reconstruction for eukaryotes from complex natural microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Patrick T; Probst, Alexander J; Grigoriev, Igor V; Thomas, Brian C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2018-04-01

    Microbial eukaryotes are integral components of natural microbial communities, and their inclusion is critical for many ecosystem studies, yet the majority of published metagenome analyses ignore eukaryotes. In order to include eukaryotes in environmental studies, we propose a method to recover eukaryotic genomes from complex metagenomic samples. A key step for genome recovery is separation of eukaryotic and prokaryotic fragments. We developed a k -mer-based strategy, EukRep, for eukaryotic sequence identification and applied it to environmental samples to show that it enables genome recovery, genome completeness evaluation, and prediction of metabolic potential. We used this approach to test the effect of addition of organic carbon on a geyser-associated microbial community and detected a substantial change of the community metabolism, with selection against almost all candidate phyla bacteria and archaea and for eukaryotes. Near complete genomes were reconstructed for three fungi placed within the Eurotiomycetes and an arthropod. While carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation were important functions in the geyser community prior to carbon addition, the organic carbon-impacted community showed enrichment for secreted proteases, secreted lipases, cellulose targeting CAZymes, and methanol oxidation. We demonstrate the broader utility of EukRep by reconstructing and evaluating relatively high-quality fungal, protist, and rotifer genomes from complex environmental samples. This approach opens the way for cultivation-independent analyses of whole microbial communities. © 2018 West et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijffels, René H; Kruse, Olaf; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2013-06-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments. Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms for the production of small molecules that can be secreted such as ethanol, butanol, fatty acids and other organic acids. Eukaryotic microalgae are interesting for products for which cellular storage is important such as proteins, lipids, starch and alkanes. For the development of new and promising lines of production, strains of both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae have to be improved. Transformation systems have been much better developed in cyanobacteria. However, several products would be preferably produced with eukaryotic microalgae. In the case of cyanobacteria a synthetic-systems biology approach has a great potential to exploit cyanobacteria as cell factories. For eukaryotic microalgae transformation systems need to be further developed. A promising strategy is transformation of heterologous (prokaryotic and eukaryotic) genes in established eukaryotic hosts such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Experimental outdoor pilots under containment for the production of genetically modified cyanobacteria and microalgae are in progress. For full scale production risks of release of genetically modified organisms need to be assessed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Cross-species complementation of bacterial- and eukaryotic-type cardiolipin synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Gottier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The glycerophospholipid cardiolipin is a unique constituent of bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. It is involved in forming and stabilizing high molecular mass membrane protein complexes and in maintaining membrane architecture. Absence of cardiolipin leads to reduced efficiency of the electron transport chain, decreased membrane potential, and, ultimately, impaired respiratory metabolism. For the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei cardiolipin synthesis is essential for survival, indicating that the enzymes involved in cardiolipin production represent potential drug targets. T. brucei cardiolipin synthase (TbCLS is unique as it belongs to the family of phospholipases D (PLD, harboring a prokaryotic-type cardiolipin synthase (CLS active site domain. In contrast, most other eukaryotic CLS, including the yeast ortholog ScCrd1, are members of the CDP-alcohol phosphatidyl­ transferase family. To study if these mechanistically distinct CLS enzymes are able to catalyze cardiolipin production in a cell that normally expresses a different type of CLS, we expressed TbCLS and ScCrd1 in CLS-deficient yeast and trypanosome strains, respectively. Our results show that TbCLS complemented cardiolipin production in CRD1 knockout yeast and partly restored wild-type colony forming capability under stress conditions. Remarkably, CL remodeling appeared to be impaired in the transgenic construct, suggesting that CL production and remodeling are tightly coupled processes that may require a clustering of the involved proteins into specific CL-synthesizing domains. In contrast, no complementation was observed by heterologous expression of ScCrd1 in conditional TbCLS knockout trypanosomes, despite proper mitochondrial targeting of the protein.

  6. Functions and structures of eukaryotic recombination proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tomoko

    1994-01-01

    We have found that Rad51 and RecA Proteins form strikingly similar structures together with dsDNA and ATP. Their right handed helical nucleoprotein filaments extend the B-form DNA double helixes to 1.5 times in length and wind the helix. The similarity and uniqueness of their structures must reflect functional homologies between these proteins. Therefore, it is highly probable that similar recombination proteins are present in various organisms of different evolutional states. We have succeeded to clone RAD51 genes from human, mouse, chicken and fission yeast genes, and found that the homologues are widely distributed in eukaryotes. The HsRad51 and MmRad51 or ChRad51 proteins consist of 339 amino acids differing only by 4 or 12 amino acids, respectively, and highly homologous to both yeast proteins, but less so to Dmcl. All of these proteins are homologous to the region from residues 33 to 240 of RecA which was named ''homologous core. The homologous core is likely to be responsible for functions common for all of them, such as the formation of helical nucleoprotein filament that is considered to be involved in homologous pairing in the recombination reaction. The mouse gene is transcribed at a high level in thymus, spleen, testis, and ovary, at lower level in brain and at a further lower level in some other tissues. It is transcribed efficiently in recombination active tissues. A clear functional difference of Rad51 homologues from RecA was suggested by the failure of heterologous genes to complement the deficiency of Scrad51 mutants. This failure seems to reflect the absence of a compatible partner, such as ScRad52 protein in the case of ScRad51 protein, between different species. Thus, these discoveries play a role of the starting point to understand the fundamental gene targeting in mammalian cells and in gene therapy. (J.P.N.)

  7. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  8. AUG is the only initiation codon in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, F; McKnight, G; Stewart, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicates that AUG is the sole codon capable of initiating translation of iso-1-cytochrome c. This result with yeast and the sequence results of numerous eukaryotic genes indicate that AUG is the only initiation codon in eukaryotes; in contrast, results with Escherichia colia and bacteriophages indicate that both AUG and GUG are initiation codons in prokaryotes. The difference can be explained by the lack of the t/sup 6/ A hypermodified nucleoside (N-(9-(..beta..-D-ribofuranosyl)purin-6-ylcarbamoyl)threonine) in prokaryotic initiator tRNA and its presence in eukaryotic initiator tRNA.

  9. David and Goliath: chemical perturbation of eukaryotes by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Louis K; Nodwell, Justin R

    2016-03-01

    Environmental microbes produce biologically active small molecules that have been mined extensively as antibiotics and a smaller number of drugs that act on eukaryotic cells. It is known that there are additional bioactives to be discovered from this source. While the discovery of new antibiotics is challenged by the frequent discovery of known compounds, we contend that the eukaryote-active compounds may be less saturated. Indeed, despite there being far fewer eukaryotic-active natural products these molecules interact with a far richer diversity of molecular and cellular targets.

  10. Single-subunit oligosaccharyltransferases of Trypanosoma brucei display different and predictable peptide acceptor specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnelov, Anders; Ali, Liaqat; Tinti, Michele; Güther, Maria Lucia S; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2017-12-08

    Trypanosoma brucei causes African trypanosomiasis and contains three full-length oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) genes; two of which, Tb STT3A and Tb STT3B, are expressed in the bloodstream form of the parasite. These OSTs have different peptide acceptor and lipid-linked oligosaccharide donor specificities, and trypanosomes do not follow many of the canonical rules developed for other eukaryotic N -glycosylation pathways, raising questions as to the basic architecture and detailed function of trypanosome OSTs. Here, we show by blue-native gel electrophoresis and stable isotope labeling in cell culture proteomics that the Tb STT3A and Tb STT3B proteins associate with each other in large complexes that contain no other detectable protein subunits. We probed the peptide acceptor specificities of the OSTs in vivo using a transgenic glycoprotein reporter system and performed glycoproteomics on endogenous parasite glycoproteins using sequential endoglycosidase H and peptide: N -glycosidase-F digestions. This allowed us to assess the relative occupancies of numerous N -glycosylation sites by endoglycosidase H-resistant N -glycans originating from Man 5 GlcNAc 2 -PP-dolichol transferred by Tb STT3A, and endoglycosidase H-sensitive N -glycans originating from Man 9 GlcNAc 2 -PP-dolichol transferred by Tb STT3B. Using machine learning, we assessed the features that best define Tb STT3A and Tb STT3B substrates in vivo and built an algorithm to predict the types of N -glycan most likely to predominate at all the putative N -glycosylation sites in the parasite proteome. Finally, molecular modeling was used to suggest why Tb STT3A has a distinct preference for sequons containing and/or flanked by acidic amino acid residues. Together, these studies provide insights into how a highly divergent eukaryote has re-wired protein N -glycosylation to provide protein sequence-specific N -glycan modifications. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD007236, PXD007267

  11. Processing of metacaspase 2 from Trypanosoma brucei (TbMCA2) broadens its substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Joyce M; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Ferrari, Débora; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Oliveira, Vitor; Machado, Maurício F M

    2017-04-01

    Metacaspases are members of the cysteine peptidase family and may be implicated in programmed cell death in plants and lower eukaryotes. These proteases exhibit calcium-dependent activity and specificity for arginine residues at P 1 . In contrast to caspases, they do not require processing or dimerization for activity. Indeed, unprocessed metacaspase-2 of Trypanosoma brucei (TbMCA2) is active; however, it has been shown that cleavages at Lys 55 and Lys 268 increase TbMCA2 hydrolytic activity on synthetic substrates. The processed TbMCA2 comprises 3 polypeptide chains that remain attached by non-covalent bonds. Replacement of Lys 55 and Lys 268 with Gly via site-directed mutagenesis results in non-processed but enzymatically active mutant, TbMCA2 K55/268G. To investigate the importance of this processing for the activity and specificity of TbMCA2, we performed activity assays comparing the non-processed mutant (TbMCA2 K55/268G) with the processed TbMCA2 form. Significant differences between TbMCA2 WT (processed form) and TbMCA2 K55/268G (non-processed form) were observed. Specifically, we verified that although non-processed TbMCA2 is active when assayed with small synthetic substrates, the TbMCA2 form does not exhibit hydrolytic activity on large substrates such as azocasein, while processed TbMCA2 is able to readily digest this protein. Such differences can be relevant for understanding the physiological regulation and function of TbMCA2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional characterisation and drug target validation of a mitotic kinesin-13 in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Yoow Chan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitotic kinesins are essential for faithful chromosome segregation and cell proliferation. Therefore, in humans, kinesin motor proteins have been identified as anti-cancer drug targets and small molecule inhibitors are now tested in clinical studies. Phylogenetic analyses have assigned five of the approximately fifty kinesin motor proteins coded by Trypanosoma brucei genome to the Kinesin-13 family. Kinesins of this family have unusual biochemical properties because they do not transport cargo along microtubules but are able to depolymerise microtubules at their ends, therefore contributing to the regulation of microtubule length. In other eukaryotic genomes sequenced to date, only between one and three Kinesin-13s are present. We have used immunolocalisation, RNAi-mediated protein depletion, biochemical in vitro assays and a mouse model of infection to study the single mitotic Kinesin-13 in T. brucei. Subcellular localisation of all five T. brucei Kinesin-13s revealed distinct distributions, indicating that the expansion of this kinesin family in kinetoplastids is accompanied by functional diversification. Only a single kinesin (TbKif13-1 has a nuclear localisation. Using active, recombinant TbKif13-1 in in vitro assays we experimentally confirm the depolymerising properties of this kinesin. We analyse the biological function of TbKif13-1 by RNAi-mediated protein depletion and show its central role in regulating spindle assembly during mitosis. Absence of the protein leads to abnormally long and bent mitotic spindles, causing chromosome mis-segregation and cell death. RNAi-depletion in a mouse model of infection completely prevents infection with the parasite. Given its essential role in mitosis, proliferation and survival of the parasite and the availability of a simple in vitro activity assay, TbKif13-1 has been identified as an excellent potential drug target.

  13. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Michels, Paul A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M r of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M r of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and 35 S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed

  14. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M., E-mail: paul.michels@uclouvain.be [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and {sup 35}S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed.

  15. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Kruse, O.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments. Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms

  16. Conservation and Variability of Meiosis Across the Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loidl, Josef

    2016-11-23

    Comparisons among a variety of eukaryotes have revealed considerable variability in the structures and processes involved in their meiosis. Nevertheless, conventional forms of meiosis occur in all major groups of eukaryotes, including early-branching protists. This finding confirms that meiosis originated in the common ancestor of all eukaryotes and suggests that primordial meiosis may have had many characteristics in common with conventional extant meiosis. However, it is possible that the synaptonemal complex and the delicate crossover control related to its presence were later acquisitions. Later still, modifications to meiotic processes occurred within different groups of eukaryotes. Better knowledge on the spectrum of derived and uncommon forms of meiosis will improve our understanding of many still mysterious aspects of the meiotic process and help to explain the evolutionary basis of functional adaptations to the meiotic program.

  17. DNA mismatch repair and its many roles in eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dekang; Keijzers, Guido; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    in the clinic, and as a biomarker of cancer susceptibility in animal model systems. Prokaryotic MMR is well-characterized at the molecular and mechanistic level; however, MMR is considerably more complex in eukaryotic cells than in prokaryotic cells, and in recent years, it has become evident that MMR plays...... novel roles in eukaryotic cells, several of which are not yet well-defined or understood. Many MMR-deficient human cancer cells lack mutations in known human MMR genes, which strongly suggests that essential eukaryotic MMR components/cofactors remain unidentified and uncharacterized. Furthermore......, the mechanism by which the eukaryotic MMR machinery discriminates between the parental (template) and the daughter (nascent) DNA strand is incompletely understood and how cells choose between the EXO1-dependent and the EXO1–independent subpathways of MMR is not known. This review summarizes recent literature...

  18. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly......, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations....... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...

  19. Structure and Mechanism of a Eukaryotic FMN Adenylyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Carlos; Borek, Dominika; Machius, Mischa; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (FMNAT) catalyzes the formation of the essential flavocoenzyme FAD and plays an important role in flavocoenzyme homeostasis regulation. By sequence comparison, bacterial and eukaryotic FMNAT enzymes belong to two different protein superfamilies and apparently utilize different set of active site residues to accomplish the same chemistry. Here we report the first structural characterization of a eukaryotic FMNAT from a pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata...

  20. Massive expansion of the calpain gene family in unicellular eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Sen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calpains are Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases that participate in a range of crucial cellular processes. Dysfunction of these enzymes may cause, for instance, life-threatening diseases in humans, the loss of sex determination in nematodes and embryo lethality in plants. Although the calpain family is well characterized in animal and plant model organisms, there is a great lack of knowledge about these genes in unicellular eukaryote species (i.e. protists. Here, we study the distribution and evolution of calpain genes in a wide range of eukaryote genomes from major branches in the tree of life. Results Our investigations reveal 24 types of protein domains that are combined with the calpain-specific catalytic domain CysPc. In total we identify 41 different calpain domain architectures, 28 of these domain combinations have not been previously described. Based on our phylogenetic inferences, we propose that at least four calpain variants were established in the early evolution of eukaryotes, most likely before the radiation of all the major supergroups of eukaryotes. Many domains associated with eukaryotic calpain genes can be found among eubacteria or archaebacteria but never in combination with the CysPc domain. Conclusions The analyses presented here show that ancient modules present in prokaryotes, and a few de novo eukaryote domains, have been assembled into many novel domain combinations along the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. Some of the new calpain genes show a narrow distribution in a few branches in the tree of life, likely representing lineage-specific innovations. Hence, the functionally important classical calpain genes found among humans and vertebrates make up only a tiny fraction of the calpain family. In fact, a massive expansion of the calpain family occurred by domain shuffling among unicellular eukaryotes and contributed to a wealth of functionally different genes.

  1. Massive expansion of the calpain gene family in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert; Johansen, Wenche; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran

    2012-09-29

    Calpains are Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases that participate in a range of crucial cellular processes. Dysfunction of these enzymes may cause, for instance, life-threatening diseases in humans, the loss of sex determination in nematodes and embryo lethality in plants. Although the calpain family is well characterized in animal and plant model organisms, there is a great lack of knowledge about these genes in unicellular eukaryote species (i.e. protists). Here, we study the distribution and evolution of calpain genes in a wide range of eukaryote genomes from major branches in the tree of life. Our investigations reveal 24 types of protein domains that are combined with the calpain-specific catalytic domain CysPc. In total we identify 41 different calpain domain architectures, 28 of these domain combinations have not been previously described. Based on our phylogenetic inferences, we propose that at least four calpain variants were established in the early evolution of eukaryotes, most likely before the radiation of all the major supergroups of eukaryotes. Many domains associated with eukaryotic calpain genes can be found among eubacteria or archaebacteria but never in combination with the CysPc domain. The analyses presented here show that ancient modules present in prokaryotes, and a few de novo eukaryote domains, have been assembled into many novel domain combinations along the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. Some of the new calpain genes show a narrow distribution in a few branches in the tree of life, likely representing lineage-specific innovations. Hence, the functionally important classical calpain genes found among humans and vertebrates make up only a tiny fraction of the calpain family. In fact, a massive expansion of the calpain family occurred by domain shuffling among unicellular eukaryotes and contributed to a wealth of functionally different genes.

  2. Repair of DNA DSB in higher eukaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Takeda, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes process within minutes double strand breaks (DSBs) in their genome using a NHEJ apparatus that engages DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, and other as of yet unidentified factors. Although chemical inhibition, or mutation, in any of these factors delays processing, cells ultimately remove the majority of DNA DSBs using an alternative pathway operating with slower kinetics. This alternative pathway is active in mutants deficient in genes of the RAD52 epistasis group. We proposed, therefore, that it reflects an alternative form of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ) to the DNA-PK- dependent (D-NHEJ) pathway, rather than homology directed repair of DSBs. We studied the role of Ku and DNA-PKcs in the coordination of these pathways using as a model end joining of restriction endonuclease linearized plasmid DNA in whole cell extracts. Efficient error-free endjoining observed in such in-vitro reactions is strongly inhibited by anti-Ku antibodies. The inhibition requires DNA-PKcs, despite that fact that Ku efficiently binds DNA ends in the presence of antibodies, or in the absence of DNA-PKcs. Strong inhibition of DNA endjoining is also mediated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, in the presence but not in the absence of Ku, and this inhibition can be rescued by pre-incubating the reaction with double stranded oligonucleotides. The results are compatible with a role of Ku in directing endjoining to a DNA-PK dependent pathway, mediated by efficient end binding and productive interactions with DNA-PKcs. On the other hand, efficient end joining is observed in extracts of cells lacking DNA-PKcs, as well as in Ku-depleted extracts sugggesting the operation of alternative pathways. Extracts depleted of Ku and DNA-PKcs rejoin blunt ends, as well as homologous ends with 3' or 5' protruding single strands with similar efficiency, but addition of Ku suppresses joining of blunt ends and homologous ends with 3' overhangs. We propose that the

  3. Trypanosoma brucei Mitochondrial Respiratome: Composition and Organization in Procyclic Form

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acestor, N.; Zíková, Alena; Dalley, R. A.; Anupama, A.; Panigrahi, A. K.; Stuart, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 9 (2011), s. 1-14 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/09/P563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : SUCCINATE DEHYDROGENASE * EDITED MESSENGER-RNA * COMPLEX-I * TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI * UBIQUINONE OXIDOREDUCTASE * TAP-TAG * PROTEIN INTERACTION * ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE * STATISTICAL-MODEL * MASS-SPECTROMETRY Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.398, year: 2011

  4. Trypanosoma brucei solanesyl-diphosphate synthase localizes to the mitochondrion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lai, D.-H.; Bontempi, E. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 2 (2012), s. 189-192 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * Sleeping sickness * Ubiquinone * Solanesyl-diphosphate synthase * Digitonin permeabilization * In situ tagging Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112000539

  5. On the Diversification of the Translation Apparatus across Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greco Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity is one of the most remarkable features of living organisms. Current assessments of eukaryote biodiversity reaches 1.5 million species, but the true figure could be several times that number. Diversity is ingrained in all stages and echelons of life, namely, the occupancy of ecological niches, behavioral patterns, body plans and organismal complexity, as well as metabolic needs and genetics. In this review, we will discuss that diversity also exists in a key biochemical process, translation, across eukaryotes. Translation is a fundamental process for all forms of life, and the basic components and mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes have been largely established upon the study of traditional, so-called model organisms. By using modern genome-wide, high-throughput technologies, recent studies of many nonmodel eukaryotes have unveiled a surprising diversity in the configuration of the translation apparatus across eukaryotes, showing that this apparatus is far from being evolutionarily static. For some of the components of this machinery, functional differences between different species have also been found. The recent research reviewed in this article highlights the molecular and functional diversification the translational machinery has undergone during eukaryotic evolution. A better understanding of all aspects of organismal diversity is key to a more profound knowledge of life.

  6. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  7. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil W. Blackstone

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real—the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as “non-Darwinian” because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious—all of the major features of eukaryotes were likely present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor thus rendering comparative methods ineffective. In addition to a multi-level theory, the development of rigorous, sequence-based phylogenetic and comparative methods represents the greatest achievement of modern evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, the rapid evolution of major features in the eukaryotic stem group requires the consideration of an alternative framework. Such a framework, based on the contingent nature of these evolutionary events, is developed and illustrated with three examples: the putative intron proliferation leading to the nucleus and the cell cycle; conflict and cooperation in the origin of eukaryotic bioenergetics; and the inter-relationship between aerobic metabolism, sterol synthesis, membranes, and sex. The modern synthesis thus provides sufficient scope to develop an evolutionary framework to understand the origin of eukaryotes.

  8. Compositional patterns in the genomes of unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Maria; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Costantini, Susan; Cammarano, Rosalia; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2013-11-05

    The genomes of multicellular eukaryotes are compartmentalized in mosaics of isochores, large and fairly homogeneous stretches of DNA that belong to a small number of families characterized by different average GC levels, by different gene concentration (that increase with GC), different chromatin structures, different replication timing in the cell cycle, and other different properties. A question raised by these basic results concerns how far back in evolution the compartmentalized organization of the eukaryotic genomes arose. In the present work we approached this problem by studying the compositional organization of the genomes from the unicellular eukaryotes for which full sequences are available, the sample used being representative. The average GC levels of the genomes from unicellular eukaryotes cover an extremely wide range (19%-60% GC) and the compositional patterns of individual genomes are extremely different but all genomes tested show a compositional compartmentalization. The average GC range of the genomes of unicellular eukaryotes is very broad (as broad as that of prokaryotes) and individual compositional patterns cover a very broad range from very narrow to very complex. Both features are not surprising for organisms that are very far from each other both in terms of phylogenetic distances and of environmental life conditions. Most importantly, all genomes tested, a representative sample of all supergroups of unicellular eukaryotes, are compositionally compartmentalized, a major difference with prokaryotes.

  9. [Esophageal motor disorders in asymptomatic subjects with Trypanosoma cruzi infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Aguilera, M; Remes-Troche, J M; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Vázquez-Jiménez, J G; De la Cruz-Patiño, E; Grube-Pagola, P; Ruiz-Juárez, I

    2011-01-01

    The indeterminate chronic or "asymptomatic" phase of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' disease) infection is characterized by the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, and has an estimated duration of 20 to 30 years. However, the intramural denervation that induces dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract is progressive. Recently, epidemiological studies have shown that the seroprevalence for this infection in our area ranges between 2% and 3% of the population. To detect the presence of esophageal motor disorders in asymptomatic individuals chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi using standard esophageal manometry. A cross sectional study in 28 asymptomatic subjects (27 men, age 40.39 ± 10.79) with serological evidence of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi was performed. In all cases demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms and esophageal motility disorders using conventional manometry were analyzed. In this study 54% (n = 15) of asymptomatic subjects had an esophageal motor disorder: 5 (18%) had nutcracker esophagus, 5 (18%) nonspecific esophageal motor disorders, 3 (11%) hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES), 1 (4%) an incomplete relaxation of the LES and 1 (4%) had chagasic achalasia. More than half of patients that course with Chagas' disease in the indeterminate phase and that are apparently asymptomatic have impaired esophageal motility. Presence of hypertensive LES raises the possibility that this alteration represents an early stage in the development of chagasic achalasia.

  10. Spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS - a programmed cell death pathway in Trypanosoma brucei that is induced upon ER stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaeli Shulamit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The parasite cycles between its insect (procyclic form and mammalian hosts (bloodstream form. Trypanosomes lack conventional transcription regulation, and their genes are transcribed in polycistronic units that are processed by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. In trans-splicing, which is essential for processing of each mRNA, an exon, the spliced leader (SL is added to all mRNAs from a small RNA, the SL RNA. Trypanosomes lack the machinery for the unfolded protein response (UPR, which in other eukaryotes is induced under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Trypanosomes respond to such stress by changing the stability of mRNAs, which are essential for coping with the stress. However, under severe ER stress that is induced by blocking translocation of proteins to the ER, treatment of cells with chemicals that induce misfolding in the ER, or extreme pH, trypanosomes elicit the spliced leader silencing (SLS pathway. In SLS, the transcription of the SL RNA gene is extinguished, and tSNAP42, a specific SL RNA transcription factor, fails to bind to its cognate promoter. SLS leads to complete shut-off of trans-splicing. In this review, I discuss the UPR in mammals and compare it to the ER stress response in T. brucei leading to SLS. I summarize the evidence supporting the notion that SLS is a programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is utilized by the parasites to substitute for the apoptosis observed in higher eukaryotes under prolonged ER stress. I present the hypothesis that SLS evolved to expedite the death process, and rapidly remove from the population unfit parasites that, by elimination via SLS, cause minimal damage to the parasite population.

  11. Rational Design of a New Trypanosoma rangeli Trans-Sialidase for Efficient Sialylation of Glycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Michalak, Malwina; Larsen, Dorte Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports rational engineering of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase to develop an effective enzyme for a potentially important type of reactivity: production of sialylated prebiotic glycans. The Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and the homologous T. rangeli sialidase has previously been use...

  12. Melophagus ovinus and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in ovines in the State of Minas Gerais, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, José Oswaldo; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Leite, Antonio César Rios; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Torres, Liléia Diotaiuti

    1983-01-01

    Neste trabalho Melophagus ovinus é identificado pela primeira vez no Estado de Minas Gerais e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium tem sua primeira ocorrência registrada no Brasil.Melophagus ovinus is identified for the first time in Minas Gerais State and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in Brazil.

  13. Cell-cycle synchronisation of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei using Vybrant DyeCycle Violet-based sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabani, Sarah; Waterfall, Martin; Matthews, Keith R

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the cell-cycle of Trypanosoma brucei have revealed several unusual characteristics that differ from the model eukaryotic organisms. However, the inability to isolate homogenous populations of parasites in distinct cell-cycle stages has limited the analysis of trypanosome cell division and complicated the understanding of mutant phenotypes with possible impact on cell-cycle related events. Although hydroxyurea-induced cell-cycle arrest in procyclic and bloodstream forms has been applied recently with success, such block-release protocols can complicate the analysis of cell-cycle regulated events and have the potential to disrupt important cell-cycle checkpoints. An alternative approach based on flow cytometry of parasites stained with Vybrant DyeCycle Orange circumvents this problem, but is restricted to procyclic form parasites. Here, we apply Vybrant Dyecycle Violet staining coupled with flow cytometry to effectively select different cell-cycle stages of bloodstream form trypanosomes. Moreover, the sorted parasites remain viable, although synchrony is rapidly lost. This method enables cell-cycle enrichment of populations of trypanosomes in their mammal infective stage, particularly at the G1 phase.

  14. Archaeal “Dark Matter” and the Origin of Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tom A.; Embley, T. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Current hypotheses about the history of cellular life are mainly based on analyses of cultivated organisms, but these represent only a small fraction of extant biodiversity. The sequencing of new environmental lineages therefore provides an opportunity to test, revise, or reject existing ideas about the tree of life and the origin of eukaryotes. According to the textbook three domains hypothesis, the eukaryotes emerge as the sister group to a monophyletic Archaea. However, recent analyses incorporating better phylogenetic models and an improved sampling of the archaeal domain have generally supported the competing eocyte hypothesis, in which core genes of eukaryotic cells originated from within the Archaea, with important implications for eukaryogenesis. Given this trend, it was surprising that a recent analysis incorporating new genomes from uncultivated Archaea recovered a strongly supported three domains tree. Here, we show that this result was due in part to the use of a poorly fitting phylogenetic model and also to the inclusion by an automated pipeline of genes of putative bacterial origin rather than nucleocytosolic versions for some of the eukaryotes analyzed. When these issues were resolved, analyses including the new archaeal lineages placed core eukaryotic genes within the Archaea. These results are consistent with a number of recent studies in which improved archaeal sampling and better phylogenetic models agree in supporting the eocyte tree over the three domains hypothesis. PMID:24532674

  15. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  16. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  17. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  18. Eukaryotic ribosome display with in situ DNA recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Edwards, Bryan M; Kastelic, Damjana; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome display is a cell-free display technology for in vitro selection and optimisation of proteins from large diversified libraries. It operates through the formation of stable protein-ribosome-mRNA (PRM) complexes and selection of ligand-binding proteins, followed by DNA recovery from the selected genetic information. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome display systems have been developed. In this chapter, we describe the eukaryotic rabbit reticulocyte method in which a distinct in situ single-primer RT-PCR procedure is used to recover DNA from the selected PRM complexes without the need for prior disruption of the ribosome.

  19. Characterization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters usinghidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we utilize hidden Markov models (HMMs) and information theory to analyze prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters. We perform this analysis with special emphasis on the fact that promoters are divided into a number of different classes, depending on which polymerase-associated factors...... that bind to them. We find that HMMs trained on such subclasses of Escherichia coli promoters (specifically, the so-called sigma-70 and sigma-54 classes) give an excellent classification of unknown promoters with respect to sigma-class. HMMs trained on eukaryotic sequences from human genes also model nicely...

  20. Characterization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters using hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, P.; Chauvin, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we utilize hidden Markov models (HMMs) and information theory to analyze prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters. We perform this analysis with special emphasis on the fact that promoters are divided into a number of different classes, depending on which polymerase-associated factors...... that bind to them. We find that HMMs trained on such subclasses of Escherichia coli promoters (specifically, the so-called sigma 70 and sigma 54 classes) give an excellent classification of unknown promoters with respect to sigma-class. HMMs trained on eukaryotic sequences from human genes also model nicely...

  1. Dissecting biochemical peculiarities of the ATPase activity of TcSub2, a component of the mRNA export pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Ize de Aguiar; Serpeloni, Mariana; Hiraiwa, Priscila Mazzochi; de Arruda Campos Brasil de Souza, Tatiana; Ávila, Andréa Rodrigues

    2017-05-01

    The RNA helicase DEAD-box protein Sub2 (yeast)/UAP56 (mammals) is conserved across eukaryotes and is essential for mRNA export in trypanosomes. Despite the high conservation of Sub2 in lower eukaryotes such as Trypanosoma cruzi, the low conservation of other mRNA export factors raises questions regarding whether the mode of action of TcSub2 is similar to that of orthologs from other eukaryotes. Mutation of the conserved K87 residue of TcSub2 abolishes ATPase activity, showing that its ATPase domain is functional. However, the Vmax of TcSub2 was much higher than the Vmax described for the human protein UAP56, which suggests that the TcSub2 enzyme hydrolyzes ATP faster than its human homolog. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNA association is less important to the activity of TcSub2 compared to UAP56. Our results show differences in activity of this protein, even though the structure of TcSub2 is very similar to UAP56. Functional complementation assays indicate that these differences may be common to other trypanosomatids. Distinct features of RNA influence and ATPase efficiency between UAP56 and TcSub2 may reflect distinct structures for functional sites of TcSub2. For this reason, ligand-based or structure-based methodologies can be applied to investigate the potential of TcSub2 as a target for new drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Perspectives on the Trypanosoma cruzi–host cell receptor interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Fernando; Scharfstein, Julio; Ashton, Anthony W.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Guan, Fangxia; Mukherjee, Shankar; Lima, Maria F.; Alvarez, Sandra; Weiss, Louis M.; Huang, Huan; Machado, Fabiana S.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The critical initial event is the interaction of the trypomastigote form of the parasite with host receptors. This review highlights recent observations concerning these interactions. Some of the key receptors considered are those for thromboxane, bradykinin, and for the nerve growth factor TrKA. Other important receptors such as galectin-3, thrombospondin, and laminin are also discussed. Investigation into the molecular biology and cell biology of host receptors for T. cruzi may provide novel therapeutic targets. PMID:19283409

  3. Trypanosoma sp. diversity in Amazonian bats (Chiroptera; Mammalia) from Acre State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco C B; Lisboa, Cristiane V; Xavier, Samanta C C; Dario, Maria A; Verde, Rair de S; Calouro, Armando M; Roque, André Luiz R; Jansen, Ana M

    2017-11-16

    Bats are ancient hosts of Trypanosoma species and their flying ability, longevity and adaptability to distinct environments indicate that they are efficient dispersers of parasites. Bats from Acre state (Amazon Biome) were collected in four expeditions conducted in an urban forest (Parque Zoobotânico) and one relatively more preserved area (Seringal Cahoeira) in Rio Branco and Xapuri municipalities. Trypanosoma sp. infection was detected by hemoculture and fresh blood examination. Isolated parasite species were identified by the similarity of the obtained DNA sequence from 18S rDNA polymerase chain reaction and reference strains. Overall, 367 bats from 23 genera and 32 species were examined. Chiropterofauna composition was specific to each municipality, although Artibeus sp. and Carollia sp. prevailed throughout. Trypanosoma sp. infection was detected in 85 bats (23·2%). The most widely distributed and prevalent genotypes were (in order) Trypanosoma cruzi TcI, T. cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, T. cruzi TcIV and Trypanosoma rangeli. At least one still-undescribed Trypanosoma species was also detected in this study. The detection of T. cruzi TcI and TcIV (the ones associated with Chagas disease in Amazon biome) demonstrates the putative importance of these mammal hosts in the epidemiology of the disease in the Acre State.

  4. Distinct gene number-genome size relationships for eukaryotes and non-eukaryotes: gene content estimation for dinoflagellate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Hou

    Full Text Available The ability to predict gene content is highly desirable for characterization of not-yet sequenced genomes like those of dinoflagellates. Using data from completely sequenced and annotated genomes from phylogenetically diverse lineages, we investigated the relationship between gene content and genome size using regression analyses. Distinct relationships between log(10-transformed protein-coding gene number (Y' versus log(10-transformed genome size (X', genome size in kbp were found for eukaryotes and non-eukaryotes. Eukaryotes best fit a logarithmic model, Y' = ln(-46.200+22.678X', whereas non-eukaryotes a linear model, Y' = 0.045+0.977X', both with high significance (p0.91. Total gene number shows similar trends in both groups to their respective protein coding regressions. The distinct correlations reflect lower and decreasing gene-coding percentages as genome size increases in eukaryotes (82%-1% compared to higher and relatively stable percentages in prokaryotes and viruses (97%-47%. The eukaryotic regression models project that the smallest dinoflagellate genome (3x10(6 kbp contains 38,188 protein-coding (40,086 total genes and the largest (245x10(6 kbp 87,688 protein-coding (92,013 total genes, corresponding to 1.8% and 0.05% gene-coding percentages. These estimates do not likely represent extraordinarily high functional diversity of the encoded proteome but rather highly redundant genomes as evidenced by high gene copy numbers documented for various dinoflagellate species.

  5. Essential Assembly Factor Rpf2 Forms Novel Interactions within the 5S RNP in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Jaremko, Daniel; Christen, Linda; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex and conserved cellular process that is responsible for making ribosomes. During this process, there are several assembly steps that function as regulators to ensure proper ribosome formation. One of these steps is the assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) in the central protuberance of the 60S ribosomal subunit. In eukaryotes, the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, ribosomal proteins L5 and L11, and assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1. Our laboratory previously showed that in Trypanosoma brucei , the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, L5, and trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37. In this study, we characterize an additional component of the 5S RNP, the T. brucei homolog of Rpf2. This is the first study to functionally characterize interactions mediated by Rpf2 in an organism other than fungi. T . brucei Rpf2 (TbRpf2) was identified from tandem affinity purification using extracts prepared from protein A-tobacco etch virus (TEV)-protein C (PTP)-tagged L5, P34, and P37 cell lines, followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We characterized the binding interactions between TbRpf2 and the previously characterized members of the T. brucei 5S RNP. Our studies show that TbRpf2 mediates conserved binding interactions with 5S rRNA and L5 and that TbRpf2 also interacts with trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37. We performed RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of TbRpf2 and showed that this protein is essential for the survival of the parasites and is critical for proper ribosome formation. These studies provide new insights into a critical checkpoint in the ribosome biogenesis pathway in T. brucei . IMPORTANCE Trypanosoma brucei is the parasitic protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness. Ribosome assembly is essential for the survival of this parasite through the different host environments it encounters during its life cycle. The assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) functions as one of

  6. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    species but also from accidental contamination from the genome of eukaryotic host cells. The latter scenario generally occurs in the case of host-associated metagenomes, e.g. microbes living in human gut. In such cases, one needs to identify and remove contaminating host DNA sequences, since the latter sequences will ...

  7. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Kruse, O.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments.Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms for

  8. A Synthetic Biology Framework for Programming Eukaryotic Transcription Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmad S.; Lu, Timothy K.; Bashor, Caleb J.; Ramirez, Cherie L.; Pyenson, Nora C.; Joung, J. Keith; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Eukaryotic transcription factors (TFs) perform complex and combinatorial functions within transcriptional networks. Here, we present a synthetic framework for systematically constructing eukaryotic transcription functions using artificial zinc fingers, modular DNA-binding domains found within many eukaryotic TFs. Utilizing this platform, we construct a library of orthogonal synthetic transcription factors (sTFs) and use these to wire synthetic transcriptional circuits in yeast. We engineer complex functions, such as tunable output strength and transcriptional cooperativity, by rationally adjusting a decomposed set of key component properties, e.g., DNA specificity, affinity, promoter design, protein-protein interactions. We show that subtle perturbations to these properties can transform an individual sTF between distinct roles (activator, cooperative factor, inhibitory factor) within a transcriptional complex, thus drastically altering the signal processing behavior of multi-input systems. This platform provides new genetic components for synthetic biology and enables bottom-up approaches to understanding the design principles of eukaryotic transcriptional complexes and networks. PMID:22863014

  9. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  10. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. Plots depicting the classification accuracy of Eu-Detect with various combinations of. 'cumulative sequence count' (40K, 50K, 60K, 70K, 80K) and 'coverage threshold' (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%,. 80%). While blue bars represent Eu-Detect's average classification accuracy with eukaryotic ...

  11. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi: Transporte de metabolitos esenciales obtenidos del hospedador Trypanosoma cruzi: Transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Pereira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, endémica en Argentina y en toda América Latina. Presenta numerosas características metabólicas diferenciales respecto a sus hospedadores insectos y mamíferos. Algunas de estas diferencias fueron consecuencia de millones de años de adaptación al parasitismo en los cuales estos organismos protozoarios reemplazaron, a lo largo de su evolución, muchas rutas metabólicas de biosíntesis por sistemas de transporte de metabolitos desde el hospedador. En esta revisión se describen los avances en el conocimiento de los sistemas de transporte tanto bioquímicos como también de las moléculas involucradas en dichos procesos. Se aborda con especial énfasis los transportadores de aminoácidos y poliaminas de T. cruzi de la familia AAAP (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases ya que parece ser exclusiva de los tripanosomátidos. Teniendo en cuenta que estas moléculas se encuentran completamente ausentes en mamíferos podrían ser consideradas como potenciales blancos contra el Trypanosoma cruzi.Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latinamerica. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on aminoacid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases, because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  13. Uniting sex and eukaryote origins in an emerging oxygenic world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jeferson; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2010-08-23

    Theories about eukaryote origins (eukaryogenesis) need to provide unified explanations for the emergence of diverse complex features that define this lineage. Models that propose a prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition are gridlocked between the opposing "phagocytosis first" and "mitochondria as seed" paradigms, neither of which fully explain the origins of eukaryote cell complexity. Sex (outcrossing with meiosis) is an example of an elaborate trait not yet satisfactorily addressed in theories about eukaryogenesis. The ancestral nature of meiosis and its dependence on eukaryote cell biology suggest that the emergence of sex and eukaryogenesis were simultaneous and synergic and may be explained by a common selective pressure. We propose that a local rise in oxygen levels, due to cyanobacterial photosynthesis in ancient Archean microenvironments, was highly toxic to the surrounding biota. This selective pressure drove the transformation of an archaeal (archaebacterial) lineage into the first eukaryotes. Key is that oxygen might have acted in synergy with environmental stresses such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and/or desiccation that resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The emergence of eukaryote features such as the endomembrane system and acquisition of the mitochondrion are posited as strategies to cope with a metabolic crisis in the cell plasma membrane and the accumulation of ROS, respectively. Selective pressure for efficient repair of ROS/UV-damaged DNA drove the evolution of sex, which required cell-cell fusions, cytoskeleton-mediated chromosome movement, and emergence of the nuclear envelope. Our model implies that evolution of sex and eukaryogenesis were inseparable processes. Several types of data can be used to test our hypothesis. These include paleontological predictions, simulation of ancient oxygenic microenvironments, and cell biological experiments with Archaea exposed to ROS and UV stresses. Studies of archaeal conjugation

  14. Patterns of intron gain and conservation in eukaryotic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The presence of introns in protein-coding genes is a universal feature of eukaryotic genome organization, and the genes of multicellular eukaryotes, typically, contain multiple introns, a substantial fraction of which share position in distant taxa, such as plants and animals. Depending on the methods and data sets used, researchers have reached opposite conclusions on the causes of the high fraction of shared introns in orthologous genes from distant eukaryotes. Some studies conclude that shared intron positions reflect, almost entirely, a remarkable evolutionary conservation, whereas others attribute it to parallel gain of introns. To resolve these contradictions, it is crucial to analyze the evolution of introns by using a model that minimally relies on arbitrary assumptions. Results: We developed a probabilistic model of evolution that allows for variability of intron gain and loss rates over branches of the phylogenetic tree, individual genes, and individual sites. Applying this model to an extended set of conserved eukaryotic genes, we find that parallel gain, on average, accounts for only ~8% of the shared intron positions. However, the distribution of parallel gains over the phylogenetic tree of eukaryotes is highly non-uniform. There are, practically, no parallel gains in closely related lineages, whereas for distant lineages, such as animals and plants, parallel gains appear to contribute up to 20% of the shared intron positions. In accord with these findings, we estimated that ancestral introns have a high probability to be retained in extant genomes, and conversely, that a substantial fraction of extant introns have retained their positions since the early stages of eukaryotic evolution. In addition, the density of sites that are available for intron insertion is estimated to be, approximately, one in seven basepairs. Conclusion: We obtained robust estimates of the contribution of parallel gain to the observed

  15. Benznidazole induces in vitro anaerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Clare Vinaud

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the biochemical alterations of the energetic metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes in vitro exposed to different concentrations of benzinidazole. Methods: Biochemical analyses were performed at 3, 6 (log phase, 9 and 12 (stationary phase days of culture. Parasites were exposed to five concentrations of benzinidazole. Glycolysis, tricarboxilic acid cycle and fatty acids oxidation pathways were quantified through chromatography. Glucose, urea and creatinine were quantified through spectrophotometric analysis. Results: Anaerobic fermentation and fatty acids oxidation were increased in the stationary phase of the culture. Benzinidazole at high concentrations induced anaerobic metabolism in the log phase of the culture while the parasites exposed to the lower concentrations preferred the citric acid cycle as energy production pathway. Benzinidazole did not influence on the proteins catabolism. Conclusions: It is possible to conclude that there are metabolic differences between evolutive forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and the main drug used for its treatment induces the anaerobic metabolism in the parasite, possibly impairing the mitochondrial pathways.

  16. Complementation of essential yeast GPI mannosyltransferase mutations suggests a novel specificity for certain Trypanosoma and Plasmodium PigB proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie K Cortes

    Full Text Available The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor is an essential glycolipid that tethers certain eukaryotic proteins to the cell surface. The core structure of the GPI anchor is remarkably well conserved across evolution and consists of NH2-CH2-CH2-PO4-6Manα1,2Manα1,6Manα1,4-GlcNα1,6-myo-inositol-PO4-lipid. The glycan portion of this structure may be modified with various side-branching sugars or other compounds that are heterogeneous and differ from organism to organism. One such modification is an α(1,2-linked fourth mannose (Man-IV that is side-branched to the third mannose (Man-III of the trimannosyl core. In fungi and mammals, addition of Man-III and Man-IV occurs by two distinct Family 22 α(1,2-mannosyltransferases, Gpi10/PigB and Smp3/PigZ, respectively. However, in the five protozoan parasite genomes we examined, no genes encoding Smp3/PigZ proteins were observed, despite reports of tetramannosyl-GPI structures (Man4-GPIs being produced by some parasites. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the Gpi10/PigB proteins produced by protozoan parasites have the ability to add both Man-III and Man-IV to GPI precursors. We used yeast genetics to test the in vivo specificity of Gpi10/PigB proteins from several Plasmodium and Trypanosoma species by examining their ability to restore viability to Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring lethal defects in Man-III (gpi10Δ or Man-IV (smp3Δ addition to GPI precursor lipids. We demonstrate that genes encoding PigB enzymes from T. cruzi, T. congolense and P. falciparum are each capable of separately complementing essential gpi10Δ and smp3Δ mutations, while PIGB genes from T. vivax and T. brucei only complement gpi10Δ. Additionally, we show the ability of T. cruzi PIGB to robustly complement a gpi10Δ/smp3Δ double mutant. Our data suggest that certain Plasmodium and Trypanosoma PigB mannosyltransferases can transfer more than one mannose to GPI precursors in vivo, and suggest a novel

  17. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genovesio, A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy...

  18. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucel. The recent finding of pore-forming

  19. Novel molecular mechanism for targeting the parasite Trypanosoma brucei with snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martos Esteban, Andrea; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Carrington, Mark

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protozoan species capable to infecting insect vectors whose bite further produces African sleeping sickness inhuman beings. During parasites’extracellular lives in the mammalian host, its outer coat, mainly composedof Variable surface glycoproteins (VSGs)[2...

  20. Anionic lipids and the maintenance of membrane electrostatics in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-02-01

    A wide range of signaling processes occurs at the cell surface through the reversible association of proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Some low abundant lipids are enriched at the membrane of specific compartments and thereby contribute to the identity of cell organelles by acting as biochemical landmarks. Lipids also influence membrane biophysical properties, which emerge as an important feature in specifying cellular territories. Such parameters are crucial for signal transduction and include lipid packing, membrane curvature and electrostatics. In particular, membrane electrostatics specifies the identity of the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Membrane surface charges are carried by anionic phospholipids, however the exact nature of the lipid(s) that powers the plasma membrane electrostatic field varies among eukaryotes and has been hotly debated during the last decade. Herein, we discuss the role of anionic lipids in setting up plasma membrane electrostatics and we compare similarities and differences that were found in different eukaryotic cells.

  1. Regulated eukaryotic DNA replication origin firing with purified proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; Deegan, Tom D; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2015-03-26

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication.

  2. The MCM Helicase Motor of the Eukaryotic Replisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid Ali, Ferdos; Costa, Alessandro

    2016-05-08

    The MCM motor of the CMG helicase powers ahead of the eukaryotic replication machinery to unwind DNA, in a process that requires ATP hydrolysis. The reconstitution of DNA replication in vitro has established the succession of events that lead to replication origin activation by the MCM and recent studies have started to elucidate the structural basis of duplex DNA unwinding. Despite the exciting progress, how the MCM translocates on DNA remains a matter of debate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Biological Influence of Deuterium on Procariotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Mosin; Ignat Ignatov

    2014-01-01

    Biologic influence of deuterium (D) on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates are investigated at growth on media with heavy water (D2О). The method of step by step adaptation technique of cells to D2О was developed, consisting in plating of cells on 2 % agarose nutrient media containing increasing gradient of concentration of ...

  4. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Neil W. Blackstone

    2016-01-01

    Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real?the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as ?non-Darwinian? because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious?all of the major fea...

  5. Gram-Negative Bacterial Sensors for Eukaryotic Signal Molecules

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    Olivier Lesouhaitier

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence exists showing that eukaryotic signal molecules synthesized and released by the host can activate the virulence of opportunistic pathogens. The sensitivity of prokaryotes to host signal molecules requires the presence of bacterial sensors. These prokaryotic sensors, or receptors, have a double function: stereospecific recognition in a complex environment and transduction of the message in order to initiate bacterial physiological modifications. As messengers are generally unable to freely cross the bacterial membrane, they require either the presence of sensors anchored in the membrane or transporters allowing direct recognition inside the bacterial cytoplasm. Since the discovery of quorum sensing, it was established that the production of virulence factors by bacteria is tightly growth-phase regulated. It is now obvious that expression of bacterial virulence is also controlled by detection of the eukaryotic messengers released in the micro-environment as endocrine or neuro-endocrine modulators. In the presence of host physiological stress many eukaryotic factors are released and detected by Gram-negative bacteria which in return rapidly adapt their physiology. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can bind elements of the host immune system such as interferon-γ and dynorphin and then through quorum sensing circuitry enhance its virulence. Escherichia coli sensitivity to the neurohormones of the catecholamines family appears relayed by a recently identified bacterial adrenergic receptor. In the present review, we will describe the mechanisms by which various eukaryotic signal molecules produced by host may activate Gram-negative bacteria virulence. Particular attention will be paid to Pseudomonas, a genus whose representative species, P. aeruginosa, is a common opportunistic pathogen. The discussion will be particularly focused on the pivotal role played by these new types of pathogen sensors from the sensing to the transduction

  6. Replication and Transcription of Eukaryotic DNA in Esherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, John F.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Chang, Annie C. Y.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Goodman, Howard M.; Helling, Robert B.

    1974-01-01

    Fragments of amplified Xenopus laevis DNA, coding for 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and generated by EcoRI restriction endonuclease, have been linked in vitro to the bacterial plasmid pSC101; and the recombinant molecular species have been introduced into E. coli by transformation. These recombinant plasmids, containing both eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA, replicate stably in E. coli. RNA isolated from E. coli minicells harboring the plasmids hybridizes to amplified X. laevis rDNA. Images PMID:4600264

  7. Extreme Diversity of Diplonemid Eukaryotes in the Ocean

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontova, Olga; Flegontov, Pavel; Malviya, S.; Audic, S.; Wincker, P.; de Vargas, C.; Bowler, C.; Lukeš, Julius; Horák, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 22 (2016), s. 3060-3065 ISSN 0960-9822 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP506/12/P931; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : virus-sized particles * microbial eukaryotes * sea-floor * phytoplankton * communities * euglenozoa * dispersal * ecosystem Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 8.851, year: 2016

  8. How often do they have sex? A comparative analysis of the population structure of seven eukaryotic microbial pathogens.

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    Nicolás Tomasini

    Full Text Available The model of predominant clonal evolution (PCE proposed for micropathogens does not state that genetic exchange is totally absent, but rather, that it is too rare to break the prevalent PCE pattern. However, the actual impact of this "residual" genetic exchange should be evaluated. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST is an excellent tool to explore the problem. Here, we compared online available MLST datasets for seven eukaryotic microbial pathogens: Trypanosoma cruzi, the Fusarium solani complex, Aspergillus fumigatus, Blastocystis subtype 3, the Leishmania donovani complex, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. We first analyzed phylogenetic relationships among genotypes within each dataset. Then, we examined different measures of branch support and incongruence among loci as signs of genetic structure and levels of past recombination. The analyses allow us to identify three types of genetic structure. The first was characterized by trees with well-supported branches and low levels of incongruence suggesting well-structured populations and PCE. This was the case for the T. cruzi and F. solani datasets. The second genetic structure, represented by Blastocystis spp., A. fumigatus and the L. donovani complex datasets, showed trees with weakly-supported branches but low levels of incongruence among loci, whereby genetic structuration was not clearly defined by MLST. Finally, trees showing weakly-supported branches and high levels of incongruence among loci were observed for Candida species, suggesting that genetic exchange has a higher evolutionary impact in these mainly clonal yeast species. Furthermore, simulations showed that MLST may fail to show right clustering in population datasets even in the absence of genetic exchange. In conclusion, these results make it possible to infer variable impacts of genetic exchange in populations of predominantly clonal micro-pathogens. Moreover, our results reveal different problems of MLST to determine the

  9. diArk – a resource for eukaryotic genome research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of completed eukaryotic genome sequences and cDNA projects has increased exponentially in the past few years although most of them have not been published yet. In addition, many microarray analyses yielded thousands of sequenced EST and cDNA clones. For the researcher interested in single gene analyses (from a phylogenetic, a structural biology or other perspective it is therefore important to have up-to-date knowledge about the various resources providing primary data. Description The database is built around 3 central tables: species, sequencing projects and publications. The species table contains commonly and alternatively used scientific names, common names and the complete taxonomic information. For projects the sequence type and links to species project web-sites and species homepages are stored. All publications are linked to projects. The web-interface provides comprehensive search modules with detailed options and three different views of the selected data. We have especially focused on developing an elaborate taxonomic tree search tool that allows the user to instantaneously identify e.g. the closest relative to the organism of interest. Conclusion We have developed a database, called diArk, to store, organize, and present the most relevant information about completed genome projects and EST/cDNA data from eukaryotes. Currently, diArk provides information about 415 eukaryotes, 823 sequencing projects, and 248 publications.

  10. Biotransformation of arsenic by a Yellowstone thermoacidophilic eukaryotic alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Lehr, Corinne R; Yuan, Chungang; Le, X Chris; McDermott, Timothy R; Rosen, Barry P

    2009-03-31

    Arsenic is the most common toxic substance in the environment, ranking first on the Superfund list of hazardous substances. It is introduced primarily from geochemical sources and is acted on biologically, creating an arsenic biogeocycle. Geothermal environments are known for their elevated arsenic content and thus provide an excellent setting in which to study microbial redox transformations of arsenic. To date, most studies of microbial communities in geothermal environments have focused on Bacteria and Archaea, with little attention to eukaryotic microorganisms. Here, we show the potential of an extremophilic eukaryotic alga of the order Cyanidiales to influence arsenic cycling at elevated temperatures. Cyanidioschyzon sp. isolate 5508 oxidized arsenite [As(III)] to arsenate [As(V)], reduced As(V) to As(III), and methylated As(III) to form trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) and dimethylarsenate [DMAs(V)]. Two arsenic methyltransferase genes, CmarsM7 and CmarsM8, were cloned from this organism and demonstrated to confer resistance to As(III) in an arsenite hypersensitive strain of Escherichia coli. The 2 recombinant CmArsMs were purified and shown to transform As(III) into monomethylarsenite, DMAs(V), TMAO, and trimethylarsine gas, with a T(opt) of 60-70 degrees C. These studies illustrate the importance of eukaryotic microorganisms to the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic in geothermal systems, offer a molecular explanation for how these algae tolerate arsenic in their environment, and provide the characterization of algal methyltransferases.

  11. Ubiquitination dynamics in the early-branching eukaryote Giardia intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, Carlos A; Chaparro, Jenny; Soffientini, Paolo; Polo, Simona; Wasserman, Moises

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a highly dynamic and versatile posttranslational modification that regulates protein function, stability, and interactions. To investigate the roles of ubiquitination in a primitive eukaryotic lineage, we utilized the early-branching eukaryote Giardia intestinalis. Using a combination of biochemical, immunofluorescence-based, and proteomics approaches, we assessed the ubiquitination status during the process of differentiation in Giardia. We observed that different types of ubiquitin modifications present specific cellular and temporal distribution throughout the Giardia life cycle from trophozoites to cyst maturation. Ubiquitin signal was detected in the wall of mature cysts, and enzymes implicated in cyst wall biogenesis were identified as substrates for ubiquitination. Interestingly, inhibition of proteasome activity did not affect trophozoite replication and differentiation, while it caused a decrease in cyst viability, arguing for proteasome involvement in cyst wall maturation. Using a proteomics approach, we identified around 200 high-confidence ubiquitinated candidates that vary their ubiquitination status during differentiation. Our results indicate that ubiquitination is critical for several cellular processes in this primitive eukaryote. PMID:23613346

  12. Gene Transfer in Eukaryotic Cells Using Activated Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennig, Jörg

    Gene transfer into eukaryotic cells plays an important role in cell biology. Over the last 30 years a number of transfection methods have been developed to mediate gene transfer into eukaryotic cells. Classical methods include co-precipitation of DNA with calcium phosphate, charge-dependent precipitation of DNA with DEAE-dextran, electroporation of nucleic acids, and formation of transfection complexes between DNA and cationic liposomes. Gene transfer technologies based on activated PAMAM-dendrimers provide another class of transfection reagents. PAMAM-dendrimers are highly branched, spherical molecules. Activation of newly synthesized dendrimers involves hydrolytic removal of some of the branches, and results in a molecule with a higher degree of flexibility. Activated dendrimers assemble DNA into compact structures via charge interactions. Activated dendrimer - DNA complexes bind to the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells, and are transported into the cell by non-specific endocytosis. A structural model of the activated dendrimer - DNA complex and a potential mechanism for its uptake into cells will be discussed.

  13. Enzymes involved in organellar DNA replication in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Takashi; Sato, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Plastids and mitochondria possess their own genomes. Although the replication mechanisms of these organellar genomes remain unclear in photosynthetic eukaryotes, several organelle-localized enzymes related to genome replication, including DNA polymerase, DNA primase, DNA helicase, DNA topoisomerase, single-stranded DNA maintenance protein, DNA ligase, primer removal enzyme, and several DNA recombination-related enzymes, have been identified. In the reference Eudicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the replication-related enzymes of plastids and mitochondria are similar because many of them are dual targeted to both organelles, whereas in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, plastids and mitochondria contain different replication machinery components. The enzymes involved in organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae were derived from different origins, including proteobacterial, cyanobacterial, and eukaryotic lineages. In the present review, we summarize the available data for enzymes related to organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae. In addition, based on the type and distribution of replication enzymes in photosynthetic eukaryotes, we discuss the transitional history of replication enzymes in the organelles of plants.

  14. Mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew W; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2017-04-01

    Cellular DNA replication is initiated through the action of multiprotein complexes that recognize replication start sites in the chromosome (termed origins) and facilitate duplex DNA melting within these regions. In a typical cell cycle, initiation occurs only once per origin and each round of replication is tightly coupled to cell division. To avoid aberrant origin firing and re-replication, eukaryotes tightly regulate two events in the initiation process: loading of the replicative helicase, MCM2-7, onto chromatin by the origin recognition complex (ORC), and subsequent activation of the helicase by its incorporation into a complex known as the CMG. Recent work has begun to reveal the details of an orchestrated and sequential exchange of initiation factors on DNA that give rise to a replication-competent complex, the replisome. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that underpin eukaryotic DNA replication initiation - from selecting replication start sites to replicative helicase loading and activation - and describe how these events are often distinctly regulated across different eukaryotic model organisms.

  15. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

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    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  16. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

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    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  17. Lysophosphatidylcholine: A Novel Modulator of Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Neto, Mário A. C.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Silva-Cardoso, Livia; Atella, Georgia C.

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine is a bioactive lipid that regulates a large number of cellular processes and is especially present during the deposition and infiltration of inflammatory cells and deposition of atheromatous plaque. Such molecule is also present in saliva and feces of the hematophagous organism Rhodnius prolixus, a triatominae bug vector of Chagas disease. We have recently demonstrated that LPC is a modulator of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission. It acts as a powerful chemoattractant for inflammatory cells at the site of the insect bite, which will provide a concentrated population of cells available for parasite infection. Also, LPC increases macrophage intracellular calcium concentrations that ultimately enhance parasite invasion. Finally, LPC inhibits NO production by macrophages stimulated by live T. cruzi, and thus interferes with the immune system of the vertebrate host. In the present paper, we discuss the main signaling mechanisms that are likely used by such molecule and their eventual use as targets to block parasite transmission and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. PMID:22132309

  18. First report of Trypanosoma vegrandis in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Amanda; Austen, Jill; Gillett, Amber; Warren, Kristin; Paparini, Andrea; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2016-08-01

    The present study describes the first report of Trypanosoma vegrandis in koalas using morphology and sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. The prevalence of T. vegrandis in koalas was 13.6% (6/44). It is likely that the small size of T. vegrandis (<10μm in length), coupled with the difficulties in amplifying DNA of this parasite in mixed infections using trypanosome generic primers, are the reason why this organism has not been identified in koalas until now. This study highlights the importance of further research comprising a larger sample size to determine the prevalence of T. vegrandis in koalas as well as its potential impacts upon this marsupial species' health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple evolutionary origins of Trypanosoma evansi in Kenya.

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    Christine M Kamidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi is the parasite causing surra, a form of trypanosomiasis in camels and other livestock, and a serious economic burden in Kenya and many other parts of the world. Trypanosoma evansi transmission can be sustained mechanically by tabanid and Stomoxys biting flies, whereas the closely related African trypanosomes T. brucei brucei and T. b. rhodesiense require cyclical development in tsetse flies (genus Glossina for transmission. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary origins of T. evansi. We used 15 polymorphic microsatellites to quantify levels and patterns of genetic diversity among 41 T. evansi isolates and 66 isolates of T. b. brucei (n = 51 and T. b. rhodesiense (n = 15, including many from Kenya, a region where T. evansi may have evolved from T. brucei. We found that T. evansi strains belong to at least two distinct T. brucei genetic units and contain genetic diversity that is similar to that in T. brucei strains. Results indicated that the 41 T. evansi isolates originated from multiple T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds, implying independent origins of T. evansi from T. brucei strains. This surprising finding further suggested that the acquisition of the ability of T. evansi to be transmitted mechanically, and thus the ability to escape the obligate link with the African tsetse fly vector, has occurred repeatedly. These findings, if confirmed, have epidemiological implications, as T. brucei strains from different genetic backgrounds can become either causative agents of a dangerous, cosmopolitan livestock disease or of a lethal human disease, like for T. b. rhodesiense.

  20. Cationic amino acid uptake constitutes a metabolic regulation mechanism and occurs in the flagellar pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Mariana R Miranda

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases

  1. Trypanosoma brucei TbIF1 inhibits the essential F1-ATPase in the infectious form of the parasite.

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    Brian Panicucci

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial (mt FoF1-ATP synthase of the digenetic parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, generates ATP during the insect procyclic form (PF, but becomes a perpetual consumer of ATP in the mammalian bloodstream form (BF, which lacks a canonical respiratory chain. This unconventional dependence on FoF1-ATPase is required to maintain the essential mt membrane potential (Δψm. Normally, ATP hydrolysis by this rotary molecular motor is restricted to when eukaryotic cells experience sporadic hypoxic conditions, during which this compulsory function quickly depletes the cellular ATP pool. To protect against this cellular treason, the highly conserved inhibitory factor 1 (IF1 binds the enzyme in a manner that solely inhibits the hydrolytic activity. Intriguingly, we were able to identify the IF1 homolog in T. brucei (TbIF1, but determined that its expression in the mitochondrion is tightly regulated throughout the life cycle as it is only detected in PF cells. TbIF1 appears to primarily function as an emergency brake in PF cells, where it prevented the restoration of the Δψm by FoF1-ATPase when respiration was chemically inhibited. In vitro, TbIF1 overexpression specifically inhibits the hydrolytic activity but not the synthetic capability of the FoF1-ATP synthase in PF mitochondria. Furthermore, low μM amounts of recombinant TbIF1 achieve the same inhibition of total mt ATPase activity as the FoF1-ATPase specific inhibitors, azide and oligomycin. Therefore, even minimal ectopic expression of TbIF1 in BF cells proved lethal as the indispensable Δψm collapsed due to inhibited FoF1-ATPase. In summary, we provide evidence that T. brucei harbors a natural and potent unidirectional inhibitor of the vital FoF1-ATPase activity that can be exploited for future structure-based drug design.

  2. Origin of phagotrophic eukaryotes as social cheaters in microbial biofilms

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    Jékely Gáspár

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of eukaryotic cells was one of the most dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. It is generally assumed that eukaryotes evolved later then prokaryotes by the transformation or fusion of prokaryotic lineages. However, as yet there is no consensus regarding the nature of the prokaryotic group(s ancestral to eukaryotes. Regardless of this, a hardly debatable fundamental novel characteristic of the last eukaryotic common ancestor was the ability to exploit prokaryotic biomass by the ingestion of entire cells, i.e. phagocytosis. The recent advances in our understanding of the social life of prokaryotes may help to explain the origin of this form of total exploitation. Presentation of the hypothesis Here I propose that eukaryotic cells originated in a social environment, a differentiated microbial mat or biofilm that was maintained by the cooperative action of its members. Cooperation was costly (e.g. the production of developmental signals or an extracellular matrix but yielded benefits that increased the overall fitness of the social group. I propose that eukaryotes originated as selfish cheaters that enjoyed the benefits of social aggregation but did not contribute to it themselves. The cheaters later evolved into predators that lysed other cells and eventually became professional phagotrophs. During several cycles of social aggregation and dispersal the number of cheaters was contained by a chicken game situation, i.e. reproductive success of cheaters was high when they were in low abundance but was reduced when they were over-represented. Radical changes in cell structure, including the loss of the rigid prokaryotic cell wall and the development of endomembranes, allowed the protoeukaryotes to avoid cheater control and to exploit nutrients more efficiently. Cellular changes were buffered by both the social benefits and the protective physico-chemical milieu of the interior of biofilms. Symbiosis

  3. An advanced system of the mitochondrial processing peptidase and core protein family in Trypanosoma brucei and multiple origins of the core I subunit in eukaryotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mach, J.; Poliak, Pavel; Matušková, Anna; Žárský, V.; Janata, Jiří; Lukeš, Julius; Tachezy, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2013), s. 860-875 ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/1061; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : bc1 complex * evolution * mitochondrial processing peptidase * mitochondrial targeting sequence * trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.532, year: 2013

  4. Semisolid liver infusion tryptose supplemented with human urine allows growth and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli clonal lineages

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    Emanuella Francisco Fajardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION This work shows that 3% (v/v human urine (HU in semisolid Liver Infusion Tryptose (SSL medium favors the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli. METHODS Parasites were plated as individual or mixed strains on SSL medium and on SSL medium with 3% human urine (SSL-HU. Isolate DNA was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS SSL-HU medium improved clone isolation. PCR revealed that T. cruzi strains predominate on mixed-strain plates. PFGE confirmed that isolated parasites share the same molecular karyotype as parental cell lines. CONCLUSIONS SSL-HU medium constitutes a novel tool for obtaining T. cruzi and T. rangeli clonal lineages.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi, cancer and the Cold War Trypanosoma cruzi, câncer e a Guerra Fria

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    Nikolai Krementsov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 1946, the international community of cancer researchers was inspired by the announcement that two Soviet scientists, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin, had discovered anticancer properties in culture extracts made from the South American protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi, and had produced a preparation - named after its discoverers KR - which showed clear therapeutic effects on cancer patients. Research teams from various countries enthusiastically pursued the promising new line of investigation. The story of the rise and fall of interest in the anticancer properties of T. cruzi in different countries suggests that during the second half of the twentieth century, the Cold War competition between the superpowers played an important role in shaping the research agendas of cancer studies.No verão de 1946, a comunidade internacional que desenvolve pesquisas sobre o câncer, inspirou-se no anúncio de que dois cientistas soviéticos, Nina Kliueva e Grigorii Roskin, descobriram propriedades anticancerígenas em cultura extraída do protozoário existente na América Latina, o Trypanosoma cruzi e produziram um preparado que foi denominado com as iniciais KR - em sua homenagem. Grupos de pesquisadores de diversos países buscaram com entusiasmo as promessas dessa nova linha de investigação. A história da ascensão e queda do interesse nas propriedades anticâncer do T. cruzzi em diferentes países sugere que durante a segunda metade do século 20, a Guerra Fria teve um papel importante na definição das agendas de pesquisas sobre o câncer.

  6. Origin and evolution of the self-organizing cytoskeleton in the network of eukaryotic organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jékely, Gáspár

    2014-09-02

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton evolved from prokaryotic cytomotive filaments. Prokaryotic filament systems show bewildering structural and dynamic complexity and, in many aspects, prefigure the self-organizing properties of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Here, the dynamic properties of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytoskeleton are compared, and how these relate to function and evolution of organellar networks is discussed. The evolution of new aspects of filament dynamics in eukaryotes, including severing and branching, and the advent of molecular motors converted the eukaryotic cytoskeleton into a self-organizing "active gel," the dynamics of which can only be described with computational models. Advances in modeling and comparative genomics hold promise of a better understanding of the evolution of the self-organizing cytoskeleton in early eukaryotes, and its role in the evolution of novel eukaryotic functions, such as amoeboid motility, mitosis, and ciliary swimming. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Melophagus ovinus e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium em ovinos no Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil Melophagus ovinus and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium in ovines in the State of Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Oswaldo Costa

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho Melophagus ovinus é identificado pela primeira vez no Estado de Minas Gerais e Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium tem sua primeira ocorrência registrada no Brasil.Melophagus ovinus is identified for the first time in Minas Gerais State and Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum melophagium in Brazil.

  8. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2-7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2-7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2-7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2-7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted.

  9. [Structure and evolution of the eukaryotic FANCJ-like proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhe, Jike; Zefeng, Wu; Sanhong, Fan; Xuguang, Xi

    2015-02-01

    The FANCJ-like protein family is a class of ATP-dependent helicases that can catalytically unwind duplex DNA along the 5'-3' direction. It is involved in the processes of DNA damage repair, homologous recombination and G-quadruplex DNA unwinding, and plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity. In this study, we systemically analyzed FNACJ-like proteins from 47 eukaryotic species and discussed their sequences diversity, origin and evolution, motif organization patterns and spatial structure differences. Four members of FNACJ-like proteins, including XPD, CHL1, RTEL1 and FANCJ, were found in eukaryotes, but some of them were seriously deficient in most fungi and some insects. For example, the Zygomycota fungi lost RTEL1, Basidiomycota and Ascomycota fungi lost RTEL1 and FANCJ, and Diptera insect lost FANCJ. FANCJ-like proteins contain canonical motor domains HD1 and HD2, and the HD1 domain further integrates with three unique domains Fe-S, Arch and Extra-D. Fe-S and Arch domains are relatively conservative in all members of the family, but the Extra-D domain is lost in XPD and differs from one another in rest members. There are 7, 10 and 2 specific motifs found from the three unique domains respectively, while 5 and 12 specific motifs are found from HD1 and HD2 domains except the conserved motifs reported previously. By analyzing the arrangement pattern of these specific motifs, we found that RTEL1 and FANCJ are more closer and share two specific motifs Vb2 and Vc in HD2 domain, which are likely related with their G-quadruplex DNA unwinding activity. The evidence of evolution showed that FACNJ-like proteins were originated from a helicase, which has a HD1 domain inserted by extra Fe-S domain and Arch domain. By three continuous gene duplication events and followed specialization, eukaryotes finally possessed the current four members of FANCJ-like proteins.

  10. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  11. Recognition of extremophilic archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Wu, Linping; Hall, Arnaldur

    2016-01-01

    followed viral uptake, intracellular trafficking and cell viability in human endothelial cells of brain (hCMEC/D3 cells) and umbilical vein (HUVEC) origin. Whereas SMV1 is efficiently internalized into both types of human cells, SSV2 differentiates between HUVECs and hCMEC/D3 cells, thus opening a path......Viruses from the third domain of life, Archaea, exhibit unusual features including extreme stability that allow their survival in harsh environments. In addition, these species have never been reported to integrate into human or any other eukaryotic genomes, and could thus serve for exploration...

  12. Characterization of Trypanosoma brucei brucei S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase and its inhibition by Berenil, pentamidine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitonti, A J; Dumont, J A; McCann, P P

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) decarboxylase was found to be relatively insensitive to activation by putrescine as compared with the mammalian enzyme, being stimulated by only 50% over a 10,000-fold range of putrescine concentrations. The enzyme was not stimulated by up to 10 mM-Mg2+. The Km for AdoMet was 30 microM, similar to that of other eukaryotic AdoMet decarboxylases. T.b. brucei AdoMet decarboxylase activity was apparently irreversibly inhibited in vitro by Berenil and reversibly by pentamidine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone). Berenil also inhibited trypanosomal AdoMet decarboxylase by 70% within 4 h after administration to infected rats and markedly increased the concentration of putrescine in trypanosomes that were exposed to the drug in vivo. Spermidine and spermine blocked the curative effect of Berenil on model mouse T.b. brucei infections. This effect of the polyamines was probably not due to reversal of Berenil's inhibitory effects on the AdoMet decarboxylase. PMID:3800910

  13. In silico ionomics segregates parasitic from free-living eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greganova, Eva; Steinmann, Michael; Mäser, Pascal; Fankhauser, Niklaus

    2013-01-01

    Ion transporters are fundamental to life. Due to their ancient origin and conservation in sequence, ion transporters are also particularly well suited for comparative genomics of distantly related species. Here, we perform genome-wide ion transporter profiling as a basis for comparative genomics of eukaryotes. From a given predicted proteome, we identify all bona fide ion channels, ion porters, and ion pumps. Concentrating on unicellular eukaryotes (n = 37), we demonstrate that clustering of species according to their repertoire of ion transporters segregates obligate endoparasites (n = 23) on the one hand, from free-living species and facultative parasites (n = 14) on the other hand. This surprising finding indicates strong convergent evolution of the parasites regarding the acquisition and homeostasis of inorganic ions. Random forest classification identifies transporters of ammonia, plus transporters of iron and other transition metals, as the most informative for distinguishing the obligate parasites. Thus, in silico ionomics further underscores the importance of iron in infection biology and suggests access to host sources of nitrogen and transition metals to be selective forces in the evolution of parasitism. This finding is in agreement with the phenomenon of iron withholding as a primordial antimicrobial strategy of infected mammals.

  14. Eukaryotic snoRNAs: a paradigm for gene expression flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Giorgio; Preti, Milena; Montanini, Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are one of the most ancient and numerous families of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The main function of snoRNAs - to guide site-specific rRNA modification - is the same in Archaea and all eukaryotic lineages. In contrast, as revealed by recent genomic and RNomic studies, their genomic organization and expression strategies are the most varied. Seemingly snoRNA coding units have adopted, in the course of evolution, all the possible ways of being transcribed, thus providing a unique paradigm of gene expression flexibility. By focusing on representative fungal, plant and animal genomes, we review here all the documented types of snoRNA gene organization and expression, and we provide a comprehensive account of snoRNA expressional freedom by precisely estimating the frequency, in each genome, of each type of genomic organization. We finally discuss the relevance of snoRNA genomic studies for our general understanding of ncRNA family evolution and expression in eukaryotes.

  15. Characterization of an eukaryotic peptide deformylase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracchi-Ricard, V; Nguyen, K T; Zhou, Y; Rajagopalan, P T; Chakrabarti, D; Pei, D

    2001-12-15

    Ribosomal protein synthesis in eubacteria and eukaryotic organelles initiates with an N-formylmethionyl-tRNA(i), resulting in N-terminal formylation of all nascent polypeptides. Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the subsequent removal of the N-terminal formyl group from the majority of bacterial proteins. Until recently, PDF has been thought as an enzyme unique to the bacterial kingdom. Searches of the genomic DNA databases identified several genes that encode proteins of high sequence homology to bacterial PDF from eukaryotic organisms. The cDNA encoding Plasmodium falciparum PDF (PfPDF) has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein is catalytically active in deformylating N-formylated peptides, shares many of the properties of bacterial PDF, and is inhibited by specific PDF inhibitors. Western blot analysis indicated expression of mature PfPDF in trophozoite, schizont, and segmenter stages of intraerythrocytic development. These results provide strong evidence that a functional PDF is present in P. falciparum. In addition, PDF inhibitors inhibited the growth of P. falciparum in the intraerythrocytic culture. (c)2001 Elsevier Science.

  16. Universal Temporal Profile of Replication Origin Activation in Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldar, Arach

    2011-03-01

    The complete and faithful transmission of eukaryotic genome to daughter cells involves the timely duplication of mother cell's DNA. DNA replication starts at multiple chromosomal positions called replication origin. From each activated replication origin two replication forks progress in opposite direction and duplicate the mother cell's DNA. While it is widely accepted that in eukaryotic organisms replication origins are activated in a stochastic manner, little is known on the sources of the observed stochasticity. It is often associated to the population variability to enter S phase. We extract from a growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae population the average rate of origin activation in a single cell by combining single molecule measurements and a numerical deconvolution technique. We show that the temporal profile of the rate of origin activation in a single cell is similar to the one extracted from a replicating cell population. Taking into account this observation we exclude the population variability as the origin of observed stochasticity in origin activation. We confirm that the rate of origin activation increases in the early stage of S phase and decreases at the latter stage. The population average activation rate extracted from single molecule analysis is in prefect accordance with the activation rate extracted from published micro-array data, confirming therefore the homogeneity and genome scale invariance of dynamic of replication process. All these observations point toward a possible role of replication fork to control the rate of origin activation.

  17. Marine biofilm bacteria evade eukaryotic predation by targeted chemical defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Matz

    Full Text Available Many plants and animals are defended from predation or herbivory by inhibitory secondary metabolites, which in the marine environment are very common among sessile organisms. Among bacteria, where there is the greatest metabolic potential, little is known about chemical defenses against bacterivorous consumers. An emerging hypothesis is that sessile bacterial communities organized as biofilms serve as bacterial refuge from predation. By testing growth and survival of two common bacterivorous nanoflagellates, we find evidence that chemically mediated resistance against protozoan predators is common among biofilm populations in a diverse set of marine bacteria. Using bioassay-guided chemical and genetic analysis, we identified one of the most effective antiprotozoal compounds as violacein, an alkaloid that we demonstrate is produced predominately within biofilm cells. Nanomolar concentrations of violacein inhibit protozoan feeding by inducing a conserved eukaryotic cell death program. Such biofilm-specific chemical defenses could contribute to the successful persistence of biofilm bacteria in various environments and provide the ecological and evolutionary context for a number of eukaryote-targeting bacterial metabolites.

  18. Introns Protect Eukaryotic Genomes from Transcription-Associated Genetic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Amandine; Grosso, Ana R; Elkaoutari, Abdessamad; Coleno, Emeline; Presle, Adrien; Sridhara, Sreerama C; Janbon, Guilhem; Géli, Vincent; de Almeida, Sérgio F; Palancade, Benoit

    2017-08-17

    Transcription is a source of genetic instability that can notably result from the formation of genotoxic DNA:RNA hybrids, or R-loops, between the nascent mRNA and its template. Here we report an unexpected function for introns in counteracting R-loop accumulation in eukaryotic genomes. Deletion of endogenous introns increases R-loop formation, while insertion of an intron into an intronless gene suppresses R-loop accumulation and its deleterious impact on transcription and recombination in yeast. Recruitment of the spliceosome onto the mRNA, but not splicing per se, is shown to be critical to attenuate R-loop formation and transcription-associated genetic instability. Genome-wide analyses in a number of distant species differing in their intron content, including human, further revealed that intron-containing genes and the intron-richest genomes are best protected against R-loop accumulation and subsequent genetic instability. Our results thereby provide a possible rationale for the conservation of introns throughout the eukaryotic lineage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural infection of the sand fly Phlebotomus kazeruni by Trypanosoma species in Pakistan

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    Iwata Hiroyuki

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The natural infection of phlebotomine sand flies by Leishmania parasites was surveyed in a desert area of Pakistan where cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic. Out of 220 female sand flies dissected, one sand fly, Phlebotomus kazeruni, was positive for flagellates in the hindgut. Analyses of cytochrome b (cyt b, glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH and small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA gene sequences identified the parasite as a Trypanosoma species of probably a reptile or amphibian. This is the first report of phlebotomine sand flies naturally infected with a Trypanosoma species in Pakistan. The possible infection of sand flies with Trypanosoma species should be taken into consideration in epidemiological studies of vector species in areas where leishmaniasis is endemic.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcIV infects raccoons from Illinois

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    Cailey Vandermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The northern limits of Trypanosoma cruzi across the territory of the United States remain unknown. The known vectors Triatoma sanguisuga and T. lecticularia find their northernmost limits in Illinois; yet, earlier screenings of those insects did not reveal the presence of the pathogen, which has not been reported in vectors or reservoir hosts in this state. OBJECTIVES Five species of medium-sized mammals were screened for the presence of T. cruzi. METHODS Genomic DNA was isolated from heart, spleen and skeletal muscle of bobcats (Lynx rufus, n = 60, raccoons (Procyon lotor, n = 37, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, n = 5, Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n = 3, and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Infections were detected targeting DNA from the kinetoplast DNA minicircle (kDNA and satellite DNA (satDNA. The discrete typing unit (DTU was determined by amplifying two gene regions: the Spliced Leader Intergenic Region (SL, via a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and the 24Sα ribosomal DNA via a heminested reaction. Resulting sequences were used to calculate their genetic distance against reference DTUs. FINDINGS 18.9% of raccoons were positive for strain TcIV; the rest of mammals tested negative. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results confirm for the first time the presence of T. cruzi in wildlife from Illinois, suggesting that a sylvatic life cycle is likely to occur in the region. The analyses of sequences of SL suggest that amplicons resulting from a commonly used multiplex reaction may yield non-homologous fragments.

  1. Polyclonal antibodies for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating antigens.

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    Edith S Málaga-Machaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in clinical samples is considered an important diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. The production and use of polyclonal antibodies may contribute to an increase in the sensitivity of immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease.Polyclonal antibodies were raised in alpacas, rabbits, and hens immunized with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigen, membrane proteins, trypomastigote lysate antigen and recombinant 1F8 to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis was performed to determine specificity of the developed antibodies. An antigen capture ELISA of circulating antigens in serum, plasma and urine samples was developed using IgY polyclonal antibodies against T. cruzi membrane antigens (capture antibody and IgG from alpaca raised against TESA. A total of 33 serum, 23 plasma and 9 urine samples were analyzed using the developed test. Among serum samples, compared to serology, the antigen capture ELISA tested positive in 55% of samples. All plasma samples from serology positive subjects were positive in the antigen capture ELISA. All urine positive samples had corresponding plasma samples that were also positive when tested by the antigen capture ELISA.Polyclonal antibodies are useful for detection of circulating antigens in both the plasma and urine of infected individuals. Detection of antigens is direct evidence of the presence of the parasite, and could be a better surrogate of current infection status.

  2. Trypanosoma avium of raptors (Falconiformes): phylogeny and identification of vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votýpka, J; Oborník, M; Volf, P; Svobodová, M; Lukes, J

    2002-09-01

    Avian trypanosomes are widespread parasites of birds, the transmission of which remains mostly unclear, with various blood-sucking insects mentioned as possible vectors. A search for vectors of trypanosomes of sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), buzzard (Buteo buteo), lesser-spotted eagle (Aquila pomarina) and kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) was performed in Czech and Slovak Republics. Black flies (Eusimulium spp.), hippoboscid flies (Ornithomyia avicularia), mosquitoes (Culex pipiens pipiens) and biting midges (Culicoides spp.), trapped while attempting to feed on raptor nestlings, were found to contain trypanosomatids in their intestine. Trypanosomes from the raptors and blood-sucking insects were isolated, and their 18S rRNA sequences were used for species identification and for the inference of intra- and interspecific relationships. Together with the trypanosome isolated from a black fly, the bird trypanosomes formed a well-supported Trypanosoma avium clade. The isolates derived from hippoboscid flies and mosquitoes are most likely also avian trypanosomes infecting birds other than the studied raptors. Analysis of the kinetoplast, that has features characteristic for the avian trypanosomes (minicircle size; dimensions of the kinetoplast disc), provided further evidence for the identification of vectors. It is suggested that all trypanosomes isolated from raptors included in this study belong to the T. avium complex and are transmitted by the ornithophilic simuliids such as Eusimulium securiforme.

  3. [Trypanosoma cruzi in triatomines from Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Garza, Zinnia Judith; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio; Molina-Garza, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in triatomines from Nuevo León using the standardization of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. From July to September 2005, 52 triatomines were captured in General Terán, a municipality located in Nuevo León. They were analyzed using optical microscopy (OM) and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as standards of reference, to develop a technique for detecting the parasite using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using OM and PCR, 31 triatomines were found to be positive and 21 negative. Using ELISA, 27 samples were identified as positive and 25 negative (specificity 100%, sensitivity 87%, negative predictive value 84%, and positive predictive value 100%). The prevalence of infected triatomines was 59.61% with OM and PCR, and 51.92% with ELISA. Our data confirm that the ELISA assay in triatomines is a fast, reliable and useful tool. Since it was possible to simultaneously analyze a large number of samples with high sensibility and specificity values, the ELISA test proves to be useful for new epidemiologic studies having a high number of vectors. It is also less expensive than PCR. It is therefore recommended for epidemiological and preventive surveillance programs as a first screening test before conducting a confirmatory test using PCR.

  4. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crystal structure of arginine methyltransferase 6 from Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Chongyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Arginine methylation plays vital roles in the cellular functions of the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. The T. brucei arginine methyltransferase 6 (TbPRMT6 is a type I arginine methyltransferase homologous to human PRMT6. In this study, we report the crystal structures of apo-TbPRMT6 and its complex with the reaction product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH. The structure of apo-TbPRMT6 displays several features that are different from those of type I PRMTs that were structurally characterized previously, including four stretches of insertion, the absence of strand β15, and a distinct dimerization arm. The comparison of the apo-TbPRMT6 and SAH-TbPRMT6 structures revealed the fine rearrangements in the active site upon SAH binding. The isothermal titration calorimetry results demonstrated that SAH binding greatly increases the affinity of TbPRMT6 to a substrate peptide derived from bovine histone H4. The western blotting and mass spectrometry results revealed that TbPRMT6 methylates bovine histone H4 tail at arginine 3 but cannot methylate several T. brucei histone tails. In summary, our results highlight the structural differences between TbPRMT6 and other type I PRMTs and reveal that the active site rearrangement upon SAH binding is important for the substrate binding of TbPRMT6.

  6. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Dror Eliaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT, through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo. This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi. Surface antigens of blood and culture forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, N.; Chaplan, S.; Tydings, J.D.; Unkeless, J.; Cohn, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The surface polypeptides of both cultured and blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were iodinated by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Blood-form trypomastigotes (BFT) isolated form infected mice displayed a major 90,000-Mr component. In contrast, both epimastigotes and trypomastigotes obtained form acellular cultures expressed a smaller 75,000-Mr peptide. Both major surface components were presumably glycoproteins in terms of their binding to concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B. Within a 3-h period, both blood and culture forms synthesized their respective surface glycoproteins (90,000 Mr and 75,000 Mr, respectively in vitro. [/sub 35/S]methionine-labeled surface peptides were immunoprecipitated with immune sera of both human and murine origin. A panel of sera form patients with chronic Chagas' disease and hyperimmunized mice recognized similar surface peptides. These immunogens were the same components as the major iodinated species. The major BFT surface peptide was readily removed by trypsin treatment of the parasites, although the procedure did not affect the 75,000-Mr peptide from the culture forms. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the 90,000-Mr peptide found on BFT was an acidic protein of isoelectric point (pI) 5.0, whereas, the 75,000-Mr peptide form culture-form trypomastigotes has a pI of 7.2. The 90,000-Mr component is thought to be responsible for the anti-phagocytic properties of the BFT

  8. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

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    María Laura Chiribao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response, a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members, and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids. These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination.

  9. Cancer in the parasitic protozoans Trypanosoma brucei and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lai, De-Hua; Wen, Yan-Zi; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Shen, Ji-Long; Yang, Ting-Bo; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Hide, Geoff; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    Cancer is a general name for more than 100 malignant diseases. It is postulated that all cancers start from a single abnormal cell that grows out of control. Untreated cancers can cause serious consequences and deaths. Great progress has been made in cancer research that has significantly improved our knowledge and understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the disease, but the origins of cancer are far from being well understood due to the limitations of suitable model systems and to the complexities of the disease. In view of the fact that cancers are found in various species of vertebrates and other metazoa, here, we suggest that cancer also occurs in parasitic protozoans such as Trypanosoma brucei, a blood parasite, and Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular pathogen. Without treatment, these protozoan cancers may cause severe disease and death in mammals, including humans. The simpler genomes of these single-cell organisms, in combination with their complex life cycles and fascinating life cycle differentiation processes, may help us to better understand the origins of cancers and, in particular, leukemias.

  10. Production of amastigotes from metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Víctor T Contreras

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to recreate all the developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro have thus far been met with partial success. It is possible, for instance, to produce trypomastigotes in tissue culture and to obtain metacyclic trypomastigotes in axenic conditions. Even though T. cruzi amastigotes are known to differentiate from trypomastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, it has only been possible to generate amastigotes in vitro from the tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes. The factors and culture conditions required to trigger the transformation of metacyclic trypomastigotes into amastigotes are as yet undetermined. We show here that pre-incubation of metacyclic trypomastigotes in culture (MEMTAU medium at 37°C for 48 h is sufficient to commit the parasites to the transformation process. After 72 h of incubation in fresh MEMTAU medium, 90% of the metacyclic parasites differentiate into forms that are morphologically indistinguishable from normal amastigotes. SDS-PAGE, Western blot and PAABS analyses indicate that the transformation of axenic metacyclic trypomastigotes to amastigotes is associated with protein, glycoprotein and antigenic modifications. These data suggest that (a T. cruzi amastigotes can be obtained axenically in large amounts from metacyclic trypomastigotes, and (b the amastigotes thus obtained are morphological, biological and antigenically similar to intracellular amastigotes. Consequently, this experimental system may facilitate a direct, in vitro assessment of the mechanisms that enable T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes to transform into amastigotes in the cells of mammalian hosts.

  11. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  12. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody detection in eastern Andalusia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Clotilde; Concha-Valdez, Fanny; Cañas, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Chagas disease caused by the protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is no longer found exclusively in Latin America; the disease is occurring in Europe, and Spain is the country with the highest prevalence. Our aim was to detect anti-T. cruzi antibodies in blood donors from southeast Spain, and we performed eight serological diagnostic assays on each of 550 blood samples collected in March-June 2010. Two in-house ELISA methods were used to test against a parasite lysate (ELISA-H) and the semi-purified superoxide dismutase excreted by T. cruzi (ELISA-SODe); we also used the Western blot technique against the same antigen (WB-SODe), indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and four commercial tests. The serological test results showed a range of seroprevalence values, the lowest being 1.1%, determined by IFA and two commercial tests (Ab rapid and Chagascreen); other values were: 1.3% (commercial ELISA [Chagas ELISA IgG+IgM]); 2.1% (immunochromatographic test [Stick Chagas]); 2.7% (ELISA-H); 4.0% (WB-SODe); and 4.2%, the highest value (ELISA-SODe). The excellent specificity of SODe antigen for the detection of antibodies to T. cruzi in donors lead us to affirm that the serological test performed with this biomarker could provide a useful screening and confirmatory test method for cases of Chagas disease.

  14. Effects of azadirachtin on Rhodnius prolixus: immunity and trypanosoma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Azambuja

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of azadirachtin, a tetranortriterpenoid from the neem tree Aradirachta indica J. on both immunity and Trypanosoma cruzi interaction within Rhodniusprolixus and other triatomines, were presented Given through a blood meal, azadirachtin affected the immune reactivity as shown by a significant reduction in numbers of hemocytes and consequently nodule formation follwing challenge with Enterobacter cloacae ß12, reduction in ability to produce antibacterial activities in the hemolymph when injected with bacteria, and decreased ability to destroy the infection caused by inoculation of E. cloacae cells. A single dose of azadirachtin was able to block the development of T. cruzi in R. prolixus if given through the meal at different intervals, together with, before or after parasite infection. Similary, these results were observed with different triatomine species and different strains of T. cruzi. Azadirachtin induced a permanent resistance of the vector against reinfection with T. cruzi. The significance of these data is discussed in relation to the general mode of azadirachtin action in insects.

  15. In vitro effects of citral on Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Cardoso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Citral, the main constituent of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus essential oil, was added to Trypanosoma cruzi cultures grown in TAU3AAG medium to observe the effect on the epimastigote-to-trypomastigote differentiation process (metacyclogenesis. Our results showed that citral (20 μg/mL did not affect epimastigote viability or inhibit the differentiation process. Concentrations higher than 60 μg/mL, however, led to 100% cell death (both epimastigote and trypomastigote forms. Although epimastigotes incubated with 30 μg/mL citral were viable and able to adhere to the substrate, we observed around 50% inhibition in metacyclogenesis, with a calculated concentration that inhibited metacyclogenesis by 50% after 24 h (IC50/24 h of about 31 μg/mL. Treatment with 30 μg/mL citral did not hinder epimastigote multiplication because epimastigote growth resumed when treated cells were transferred to a drug-free liver infusion tryptose culture medium. Metacyclogenesis was almost totally abolished at 40 μg/mL after 24 h of incubation. Furthermore, the metacyclic trypomastigotes obtained in vitro were similarly susceptible to citral, with an IC50/24 h, concentration that killed 50% of the cells after 24 h, of about 24.5 μg/mL. Therefore, citral appears to be a good candidate as an inhibitory drug for further studies analyzing the T. cruzi metacyclogenesis process.

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine: A Novel Modulator of Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário A. C. Silva-Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidylcholine is a bioactive lipid that regulates a large number of cellular processes and is especially present during the deposition and infiltration of inflammatory cells and deposition of atheromatous plaque. Such molecule is also present in saliva and feces of the hematophagous organism Rhodnius prolixus, a triatominae bug vector of Chagas disease. We have recently demonstrated that LPC is a modulator of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission. It acts as a powerful chemoattractant for inflammatory cells at the site of the insect bite, which will provide a concentrated population of cells available for parasite infection. Also, LPC increases macrophage intracellular calcium concentrations that ultimately enhance parasite invasion. Finally, LPC inhibits NO production by macrophages stimulated by live T. cruzi, and thus interferes with the immune system of the vertebrate host. In the present paper, we discuss the main signaling mechanisms that are likely used by such molecule and their eventual use as targets to block parasite transmission and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease.

  17. Seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi in domestic dogs from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Molina-Barrios, Ramón M; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Cedillo-Cobián, Jesús R; Henao-Díaz, Yuly A; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2017-09-05

    Chagas disease is an important health problem in Latin America due to its incapacitating effects and associated mortality. Studies on seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexican dogs have demonstrated a direct correlation between seropositivity in humans and dogs, which can act as sentinels for the disease in this region. The objective of this study was to determine the seropositivity for T.cruzi infection in dogs from Sonora, a northern borderstate of Mexico. Responsible pet owners were selected at random from an urban area of Empalme municipality, Sonora, Mexico, and from there, 180 dog samples were collected. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Reactive ELISA sera were processed by indirect immunofluorescence to confirm the presence of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. For the statistical analysis, chi-square tests were conducted. Dogs' sera showed a seropositivity rate of 4.44%. The rate of seropositivity was not associated with the dogs' age, sex, or socioeconomics pertaining to the geographical area. One sample (1/180, 0.55%) showed the acute state of the disease. The study found a presence of anti-T. cruzi antibodies in dogs in this area, which suggests vector transmission. There is a need for active surveillance programs throughout the state of Sonora and vector control strategies should also be implemented in endemic regions.

  18. Diterpenoids from Azorella compacta (Umbelliferae active on Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araya Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of natural products isolated from Azorella compacta was evaluated, with particular emphasis on their effect against intracellular amastigotes. Five diterpenoids from A. compacta derived from mulinane and azorellane were isolated and identified. Only two products, named azorellanol (Y-2 and mulin-11,3-dien-20-oic acid (Y-5, showed trypanocidal activity against all stages of T. cruzi including intracellular amastigotes. At 10 µM, these compounds displayed a strong lytic activity. It ranged from 88.4 ± 0.6 to 99.0 ± 1 % for all strains and stages evaluate, with an IC50 /18 h values of 20-84 µM and 41-87 µM, respectively. The development of intracellular amastigotes was also inhibited by nearly 60% at 25 µM. The trypanocidal molecules Y-2 and Y-5 did show different degrees of cytotoxicity depending on the cell line tested, with an IC50 /24 h ranging from 33.2 to 161.2 µM. We evaluated the effect of diterpenoids against intracellular T. cruzi forms by immunofluorescent identification of a specific membrane molecular marker (Ssp-4 antigen of the T. cruzi amastigote forms. The accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements were found to be outstanding when examined by confocal microscopy.

  19. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection in southern Brazil

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    Dulce Stauffert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease reactivation has been a defining condition for acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Brazil for individuals coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV since 2004. Although the first coinfection case was reported in the 1980s, its prevalence has not been firmly established. In order to know coinfection prevalence, a cross-sectional study of 200 HIV patients was performed between January and July 2013 in the city of Pelotas, in southern Rio Grande do Sul, an endemic area for Chagas disease. Ten subjects were found positive for T. cruzi infection by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence. The survey showed 5% coinfection prevalence among HIV patients (95% CI: 2.0–8.0, which was 3.8 times as high as that estimated by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. Six individuals had a viral load higher than 100,000 copies per μL, a statistically significant difference for T. cruzi presence. These findings highlight the importance of screening HIV patients from Chagas disease endemic areas.

  20. The activity of aminoglycoside antibiotics against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, N W; Kinyanjui, B; Onyango, J D; Auma, J E; Croj, S

    1998-01-01

    The trypanocidal activity of four aminoglycosides was determined against Trypanosoma brucei in vitro. The drug activity in descending order, was as follows; paromomycin kanamycin>gentamycin > neomycin. Paromomycin bad the highest activity and the concentration that inhibited 50% of trypanosome growth (IC50) was 11.4microM. The effect of paromomycin on the causative agents of the East African form of sleeping sickness - T.b. rhodesiense KETRI 265, 2285, 2545, 2562 and EATRO 110,112, 1152 was subsequently assessed. Variations sensitivities between the trypanosome populations were observed and IC50 values ranging from 13.01 to 43.06 microM recorded. However, when paromomycin was administered intraperitoneally (i.p) at 500 mg/kg, it was not effective in curing mice infected with T. b. rhodesienseKETRI 2545 the most drug-sensitive isolate in vitro. Lack of in vivo activity may be because the trypanosome is an extracellular parasite. The pharmacokinetics of paromomycin in the mouse model need to be determined.

  1. The morphology of ovine Trypanosoma melophagium (zoomastigophorea: kinetoplastida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, G; Friedhoff, K T

    1984-02-01

    Morphologic and biometric data on bloodstream stages of Trypanosoma melophagium are presented. An increasing parasitemia with 111 trypomastigote stages of T. melophagium were found in Giemsa-stained thin blood smears taken from a splenectomized, cortisone-treated sheep recently infested with Melophagus ovinus infected with T. melophagium . The arithmetic mean and standard deviation in micron of the distances between posterior end and kinetoplast were 14.7 and 2.9, from the kinetoplastic to the center of the nucleus 5.1 and 1.1, and from there to the anterior end 19.5 and 1.9. The free flagellum measured 6.0 microns +/- 1.6 microns. The median and the range of the central 70% of values (median +/- 35%) of the nuclear index were 1.1 and 0.9-1.2 and of the kinetoplastic index 3.8 and 3.3-4.9. The same data in microns for the maximal width were 3.1 and 2.1-4.6, and for the width at the level of the nucleus 2.9 and 2.2-4.6. The larger and smaller diameters of the nucleus measured 2.6 (2.2-3.7) micron and 1.7 (1.3-1.7) micron, respectively. The corresponding kinetoplast diameters were 1.1 (0.9-1.3) microns and 0.9 (0.6-0.9) micron, respectively.

  2. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: vertebrate and invertebrate cycles in the same mammal host, the opossum Didelphis marsupialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Deane

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Epimastigotes multiplying extracellularly and metacyclic trypomastigotes, stages that correspond to the cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the intestinal lumen of its insect vector, were consistently found in the lumen of the anal glands of opossums Didelphis marsupialis inoculated subcutaneously with infective feces of triatomid bugs.No gambá (Didelphis marsupialis foi observado um ciclo extracelular do Trypanosoma cruzi: o parasita crescia abundantemente no material de secreção acumulado no lumen das glandulas anais de animais criados em cativeiro e infectados por via subcutanea com fezes de triatomineos.

  4. An Interactive Exercise To Learn Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Organelle Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tomashek, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a cooperative, interactive problem-solving exercise for studying eukaryotic cell structure and function. Highlights the dynamic aspects of movement through the cell. Contains 15 references. (WRM)

  5. [MiRNA system in unicellular eukaryotes and its evolutionary implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Qiong; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2010-02-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) in higher multicellular eukaryotes have been extensively studied in recent years. Great progresses have also been achieved for miRNAs in unicellular eukaryotes. All these studies not only enrich our knowledge about the complex expression regulation system in diverse organisms, but also have evolutionary significance for understanding the origin of this system. In this review, Authors summarize the recent advance in the studies of miRNA in unicellular eukaryotes, including that on the most primitive unicellular eukaryote--Giardia. The origin and evolution of miRNA system is also discussed.

  6. Automatic generation of gene finders for eukaryotic species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Krogh, A.

    2006-01-01

    and quality of reliable gene annotation grows. Results We present a procedure, Agene, that automatically generates a species-specific gene predictor from a set of reliable mRNA sequences and a genome. We apply a Hidden Markov model (HMM) that implements explicit length distribution modelling for all gene......Background The number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes is rapidly increasing. This means that over time it will be hard to keep supplying customised gene finders for each genome. This calls for procedures to automatically generate species-specific gene finders and to re-train them as the quantity...... structure blocks using acyclic discrete phase type distributions. The state structure of the each HMM is generated dynamically from an array of sub-models to include only gene features represented in the training set. Conclusion Acyclic discrete phase type distributions are well suited to model sequence...

  7. Nucleosome mediated crosstalk between transcription factors at eukaryotic enhancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teif, Vladimir B; Rippe, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    A recent study of transcription regulation in Drosophila embryonic development revealed a complex non-monotonic dependence of gene expression on the distance between binding sites of repressor and activator proteins at the corresponding enhancer cis-regulatory modules (Fakhouri et al 2010 Mol. Syst. Biol. 6 341). The repressor efficiency was high at small separations, low around 30 bp, reached a maximum at 50–60 bp, and decreased at larger distances to the activator binding sites. Here, we propose a straightforward explanation for the distance dependence of repressor activity by considering the effect of the presence of a nucleosome. Using a method that considers partial unwrapping of nucleosomal DNA from the histone octamer core, we calculated the dependence of activator binding on the repressor–activator distance and found a quantitative agreement with the distance dependence reported for the Drosophila enhancer element. In addition, the proposed model offers explanations for other distance-dependent effects at eukaryotic enhancers. (communication)

  8. The biology of eukaryotic promoter prediction - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    between functional promoters has been estimated to be in the range of 30-40 kilobases. Although it is conceivable that some of these predicted promoters correspond to cryptic initiation sites that are used in vivo, it is likely that most are false positives. This suggests that it is important to carefully......Computational prediction of eukaryotic promoters from the nucleotide sequence is one of the most attractive problems in sequence analysis today, but it is also a very difficult one. Thus, current methods predict in the order of one promoter per kilobase in human DNA, while the average distance...... reconsider the biological data that forms the basis of current algorithms, and we here present a review of data that may be useful in this regard. The review covers the following topics: (1) basal transcription and core promoters, (2) activated transcription and transcription factor binding sites, (3) Cp...

  9. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  10. Origin and evolution of SINEs in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramerov, D A; Vassetzky, N S

    2011-12-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are one of the two most prolific mobile genomic elements in most of the higher eukaryotes. Although their biology is still not thoroughly understood, unusual life cycle of these simple elements amplified as genomic parasites makes their evolution unique in many ways. In contrast to most genetic elements including other transposons, SINEs emerged de novo many times in evolution from available molecules (for example, tRNA). The involvement of reverse transcription in their amplification cycle, huge number of genomic copies and modular structure allow variation mechanisms in SINEs uncommon or rare in other genetic elements (module exchange between SINE families, dimerization, and so on.). Overall, SINE evolution includes their emergence, progressive optimization and counteraction to the cell's defense against mobile genetic elements.

  11. Cytoplasmic Flow Enhances Organelle Dispersion in Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslover, Elena; Mogre, Saurabh; Chan, Caleb; Theriot, Julie

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is an active environment through which intracellular components move and mix. We explore, using theoretical modeling coupled with microrheological measurements, the efficiency of particle dispersion via different modes of transport within this active environment. In particular, we focus on the role of cytoplasmic flow over different scales in contributing to organelle transport within two different cell types. In motile neutrophil cells, we show that bulk fluid flow associated with rapid cell deformation enhances particle transport to and from the cell periphery. In narrow fungal hyphae, localized flows due to hydrodynamic entrainment are shown to contribute to optimally efficient organelle dispersion. Our results highlight the importance of non-traditional modes of transport associated with flow of the cytoplasmic fluid in the distribution of organelles throughout eukaryotic cells.

  12. Ancient photosynthetic eukaryote biofilms in an Atacama Desert coastal cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azua-Bustos, A.; Gonzalez-Silva, C.; Mancilla, R.A.; Salas, L.; Palma, R.E.; Wynne, J.J.; McKay, C.P.; Vicuna, R.

    2009-01-01

    Caves offer a stable and protected environment from harsh and changing outside prevailing conditions. Hence, they represent an interesting habitat for studying life in extreme environments. Here, we report the presence of a member of the ancient eukaryote red algae Cyanidium group in a coastal cave of the hyperarid Atacama Desert. This microorganism was found to form a seemingly monospecific biofilm growing under extremely low photon flux levels. Our work suggests that this species, Cyanidium sp. Atacama, is a new member of a recently proposed novel monophyletic lineage of mesophilic "cave" Cyanidium sp., distinct from the remaining three other lineages which are all thermo-acidophilic. The cave described in this work may represent an evolutionary island for life in the midst of the Atacama Desert. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009.

  13. Short RNA guides cleavage by eukaryotic RNase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lamontagne

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, short RNAs guide a variety of enzymatic activities that range from RNA editing to translation repression. It is hypothesized that pre-existing proteins evolved to bind and use guide RNA during evolution. However, the capacity of modern proteins to adopt new RNA guides has never been demonstrated. Here we show that Rnt1p, the yeast orthologue of the bacterial dsRNA-specific RNase III, can bind short RNA transcripts and use them as guides for sequence-specific cleavage. Target cleavage occurred at a constant distance from the Rnt1p binding site, leaving the guide RNA intact for subsequent cleavage. Our results indicate that RNase III may trigger sequence-specific RNA degradation independent of the RNAi machinery, and they open the road for a new generation of precise RNA silencing tools that do not trigger a dsRNA-mediated immune response.

  14. Synthesis of eukaryotic lipid biomarkers in the bacterial domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, P. V.; Banta, A. B.; Lee, A. K.; Wei, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Lipid biomarkers are organic molecules preserved in sediments and sedimentary rocks that can function as geological proxies for certain microbial taxa or for specific environmental conditions. These molecular fossils provide a link between organisms and their environments in both modern and ancient settings and have afforded significant insight into ancient climatic events, mass extinctions, and various evolutionary transitions throughout Earth's history. However, the proper interpretation of lipid biomarkers is dependent on a broad understanding of their diagenetic precursors in modern systems. This includes understanding the taphonomic transformations that these molecules undergo, their biosynthetic pathways, and the ecological conditions that affect their cellular production. In this study, we focus on one group of lipid biomarkers - the sterols. These are polycyclic isoprenoidal lipids that have a high preservation potential and play a critical role in the physiology of most eukaryotes. However, the synthesis and function of these lipids in the bacterial domain has not been fully explored. Here we utilize a combination of bioinformatics, microbial genetics, and biochemistry to demonstrate that bacterial sterol producers are more prevalent in environmental metagenomic samples than in the genomic databases of cultured organisms and to identify novel proteins required to synthesize and modify sterols in bacteria. These proteins represent a distinct pathway for sterol synthesis exclusive to bacteria and indicate that sterol synthesis in bacteria may have evolved independently of eukaryotic sterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate how studies in extant bacteria can provide insight into the biological sources and the biosynthetic pathways of specific lipid biomarkers and in turn may allow for more robust interpretation of biomarker signatures.

  15. Characterization of telomeres and telomerase from the single-celled eukaryote Giardia intestinalis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uzlíková, M.; Fulnečková, Jana; Weisz, F.; Sýkorová, Eva; Nohýnková, E.; Tůmová, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 211, JAN 2017 (2017), s. 31-38 ISSN 0166-6851 Grant - others:Grantová agentura ČR - GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1248 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : trypanosoma-brucei * parasitic protozoa * 2 nuclei * lamblia * evolution * rna * organization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2016

  16. RNase MRP and the RNA processing cascade in the eukaryotic ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Michael D; Stadler, Peter F; Penny, David; Collins, Lesley J

    2007-02-08

    Within eukaryotes there is a complex cascade of RNA-based macromolecules that process other RNA molecules, especially mRNA, tRNA and rRNA. An example is RNase MRP processing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome biogenesis. One hypothesis is that this complexity was present early in eukaryotic evolution; an alternative is that an initial simpler network later gained complexity by gene duplication in lineages that led to animals, fungi and plants. Recently there has been a rapid increase in support for the complexity-early theory because the vast majority of these RNA-processing reactions are found throughout eukaryotes, and thus were likely to be present in the last common ancestor of living eukaryotes, herein called the Eukaryotic Ancestor. We present an overview of the RNA processing cascade in the Eukaryotic Ancestor and investigate in particular, RNase MRP which was previously thought to have evolved later in eukaryotes due to its apparent limited distribution in fungi and animals and plants. Recent publications, as well as our own genomic searches, find previously unknown RNase MRP RNAs, indicating that RNase MRP has a wide distribution in eukaryotes. Combining secondary structure and promoter region analysis of RNAs for RNase MRP, along with analysis of the target substrate (rRNA), allows us to discuss this distribution in the light of eukaryotic evolution. We conclude that RNase MRP can now be placed in the RNA-processing cascade of the Eukaryotic Ancestor, highlighting the complexity of RNA-processing in early eukaryotes. Promoter analyses of MRP-RNA suggest that regulation of the critical processes of rRNA cleavage can vary, showing that even these key cellular processes (for which we expect high conservation) show some species-specific variability. We present our consensus MRP-RNA secondary structure as a useful model for further searches.

  17. Active transcription and ultrastructural changes during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila R.P. Ferreira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of proliferating epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi , the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, into the infective and non-proliferating metacyclic forms can be reproduced in the laboratory by incubating the cells in a chemically-defined medium that mimics the urine of the insect vector. Epimastigotes have a spherical nucleus, a flagellum protruding from the middle of the protozoan cell, and a disk-shaped kinetoplast - an organelle that corresponds to the mitochondrial DNA. Metacyclic trypomastigotes have an elongated shape with the flagellum protruding from the posterior portion of the cell and associated with a spherical kinetoplast. Here we describe the morphological events of this transformation and characterize a novel intermediate stage by three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscope serial sections. This new intermediate stage is characterized by a kinetoplast compressing an already elongated nucleus, indicating that metacyclogenesis involves active movements of the flagellar structure relative to the cell body. As transcription occurs more intensely in proliferating epimastigotes than in metacyclics, we also examined the presence of RNA polymerase II and measured transcriptional activity during the differentiation process. Both the presence of the enzyme and transcriptional activity remain unchanged during all steps of metacyclogenesis. RNA polymerase II levels and transcriptional activity only decrease after metacyclics are formed. We suggest that transcription is required during the epimastigote-to-metacyclic trypomastigote differentiation process, until the kinetoplast and flagellum reach the posterior position of the parasites in the infective form.A diferenciação de formas epimastigotas (proliferativas do Trypanosoma cruzi, parasita protozoário causador da doença de Chagas, em formas metacíclicas tripomastigotas (infectivas e não proliferativas, pode ser reproduzida em laborat

  18. Molecular basis of mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Yoshida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, depends on a series of events involving interactions of diverse parasite molecules with host components. Here we focus on the mechanisms of target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT and mammalian tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT. During MT or TCT internalization, signal transduction pathways are activated both in the parasite and the target cell, leading to Ca2+ mobilization. For cell adhesion, MT engage surface glycoproteins, such as gp82 and gp35/50, which are Ca2+ signal-inducing molecules. In T. cruzi isolates that enter host cells in gp82-mediated manner, parasite protein tyrosine kinase as well as phospholipase C are activated, and Ca2+ is released from I P3-sensitive stores, whereas in T. cruzi isolates that attach to target cells mainly through gp35/50, the signaling pathway involving adenylate cyclase appears to be stimulated, with Ca2+ release from acidocalciosomes. In addition, T. cruzi isolate-dependent inhibitory signals, mediated by MT-specific gp90, may be triggered both in the host cell and the parasite. The repertoire of TCT molecules implicated in cell invasion includes surface glycoproteins of gp85 family, with members containing binding sites for laminin and cytokeratin 18, enzymes such as cruzipain, trans-sialidase, and an oligopeptidase B that generates a Ca2+-agonist from a precursor molecule.O estabelecimento da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi, o agente da doença de Chagas, depende de uma série de eventos envolvendo interações de diversas moléculas do parasita com componentes do hospedeiro. Focalizamos aqui os mecanismos de invasão celular por tripomastigotas metacíclicos (TM e por tripomastigotas de cultura de tecido (TCT. Durante a internalização de TM ou TCT, vias de transdução de sinal são ativadas tanto no parasita como na célula alvo, acarretando a mobilização de Ca2+. Para adesão, TM utiliza as glicoprote

  19. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens in Panama Generalidades do Trypanosoma cruzi, do Trypanosoma rangeli e do seu vetor (Rhodnius pallescens no Panamá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria de Vasquez

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6% from palm trees, 27 (2.4% from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0% inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88 were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15 were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures.A epidemiologia da infecção do T. cruzi foi investigada na margem oriental do canal do Panamá, na região central da Republica do Panamá. A informação obtida durante o estudo avaliou fatores de risco da doença de Chagas nesta área. Entre 1999 e 2000, 1110 triatomíneos foram coletados: 1050 triatomíneos (94,6% em palmeiras, 27 (2,4% em habitats periurbanos e 33 (3,0% no interior de casas. Todos os espécimens foram identificados como R. pallescens. Não havia nenhuma evidência de domiciliação do vetor. O exame de glândulas salivares de 380 R. pallescens revelaram taxa de infecção natural por Trypanosoma de 7,6%, mas o conteúdo da ampola rectal de 373 triatomíneos mostrou 45% de positividade. Os perfis de isoenzimas em

  20. Protein 3-nitrotyrosine formation during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

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    M. Naviliat

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (·NO is a diffusible messenger implicated in Trypanosoma cruzi resistance. Excess production of ·NO and oxidants leads to the generation of nitrogen dioxide (·NO2, a strong nitrating agent. Tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification resulting from the addition of a nitro (-NO2 group to the ortho-position of tyrosine residues. Detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine is regarded as a marker of nitro-oxidative stress and is observed in inflammatory processes. The formation and role of nitrating species in the control and myocardiopathy of T. cruzi infection remain to be studied. We investigated the levels of ·NO and protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the plasma of C3H and BALB/c mice and pharmacologically modulated their production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also looked for protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the hearts of infected animals. Our results demonstrated that C3H animals produced higher amounts of ·NO than BALB/c mice, but their generation of peroxynitrite was not proportionally enhanced and they had higher parasitemias. While N G-nitro-arginine methyl ester treatment abolished ·NO production and drastically augmented the parasitism, mercaptoethylguanidine and guanido-ethyl disulfide, at doses that moderately reduced the ·NO and 3-nitrotyrosine levels, paradoxically diminished the parasitemia in both strains. Nitrated proteins were also demonstrated in myocardial cells of infected mice. These data suggest that the control of T. cruzi infection depends not only on the capacity to produce ·NO, but also on its metabolic fate, including the generation of nitrating species that may constitute an important element in parasite resistance and collateral myocardial damage.

  1. Targeted screening strategies to detect Trypanosoma cruzi infection in children.

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    Michael Z Levy

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Anti-trypanosomal drug therapy can cure infected individuals, but treatment efficacy is highest early in infection. Vector control campaigns disrupt transmission of T. cruzi, but without timely diagnosis, children infected prior to vector control often miss the window of opportunity for effective chemotherapy.We performed a serological survey in children 2-18 years old living in a peri-urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and linked the results to entomologic, spatial and census data gathered during a vector control campaign. 23 of 433 (5.3% [95% CI 3.4-7.9] children were confirmed seropositive for T. cruzi infection by two methods. Spatial analysis revealed that households with infected children were very tightly clustered within looser clusters of households with parasite-infected vectors. Bayesian hierarchical mixed models, which controlled for clustering of infection, showed that a child's risk of being seropositive increased by 20% per year of age and 4% per vector captured within the child's house. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC plots of best-fit models suggest that more than 83% of infected children could be identified while testing only 22% of eligible children.We found evidence of spatially-focal vector-borne T. cruzi transmission in peri-urban Arequipa. Ongoing vector control campaigns, in addition to preventing further parasite transmission, facilitate the collection of data essential to identifying children at high risk of T. cruzi infection. Targeted screening strategies could make integration of diagnosis and treatment of children into Chagas disease control programs feasible in lower-resource settings.

  2. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

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    Andrés B Lantos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully

  3. Prevalence of Trypanosoma vivax in cattle in central Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, M.; Babiker, H.I.; Bakheit, M.A.; A Rahman, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The study was conducted to validate an antibody-detection ELISA test (Ab-ELISA) using pre-coated ELISA plates with crude antigen preparation of Trypanosoma vivax and to study the prevalence of T. vivax infection in central Sudan. A total of 704 blood samples were collected from cattle in central Sudan, a known endemic area of T. vivax infection. Additionally, 74 blood samples were collected from northern Sudan (Atbra town), an area presumed to be T. vivax-free. Sera were collected during the period September 1998 to May 1999 during three different seasons (summer, autumn and winter). Under the existing laboratory conditions, the test showed a clear distinction between different controls, i.e. strong positive control (C++), weak positive control (C+), negative control (C-) and the conjugate control (Cc). A percent positivity of 25% was taken as a cut-off value to determine the positivity or negativity of the test. The acceptable optical density range of strong positive control (C++) was 0.65-1.22. Lower and upper percent positivity limits for different controls were also determined. The study showed that T. vivax is endemic in central Sudan with 1.4% prevalence based on parasitological examination and 29.26% on Ab-ELISA. The infection rate was significantly higher during the autumn and winter than in summer. Young cattle showed significantly lower infection rates than adults as indicated by both the parasitological and the Ab-ELISA test. In relation to husbandry practice, migratory cattle showed significantly higher rates of prevalence than resident cattle. There was no significant difference in average packed red cell volume (PCV) values between ELISA positive and ELISA negative animals. Calves of less than one year of age showed significantly lower PCV values when belonging to migratory herds than to resident herds. (author)

  4. Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission in Santa Cruz, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H.; LaFuente, Carlos; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Calderon, Maritza; Pacori, Juan; Abastoflor, Maria del Carmen; Aparicio, Hugo; Brady, Mark F.; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Angulo, Noelia; Marcus, Sarah; Sterling, Charles; Maguire, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We conducted a study of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Our objective was to apply new tools to identify weak points in current screening algorithms, and find ways to improve them. Methods Women presenting for delivery were screened by rapid and conventional serological tests. For infants of infected mothers, blood specimens obtained on days 0, 7, 21, 30, 90, 180, and 270 were concentrated and examined microscopically; serological tests were performed for the day 90, 180, and 270 specimens. Maternal and infant specimens, including umbilical tissue, were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the kinetoplast minicircle and by quantitative PCR. Results Of 530 women, 154 (29%) were seropositive. Ten infants had congenital T. cruzi infection. Only 4 infants had positive results of microscopy evaluation in the first month, and none had positive cord blood microscopy results. PCR results were positive for 6 (67%) of 9 cord blood and 7 (87.5%) of 8 umbilical tissue specimens. PCR-positive women were more likely to transmit T. cruzi than were seropositive women with negative PCR results (P < .05). Parasite loads determined by quantitative PCR were higher for mothers of infected infants than for seropositive mothers of uninfected infants (P < .01). Despite intensive efforts, only 58% of at-risk infants had a month 9 specimen collected. Conclusions On the basis of the low sensitivity of microscopy in cord blood and high rate of loss to follow-up, we estimate that current screening programs miss one-half of all infected infants. Molecular techniques may improve early detection. PMID:19877966

  5. Functional characterization of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Carolina Furtado

    Full Text Available The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1. This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1(-/- (CD138 to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H(2O(2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER.

  6. Cynaropicrin targets the trypanothione redox system in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stefanie; Oufir, Mouhssin; Leroux, Alejandro; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Becker, Katja; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Hamburger, Matthias; Adams, Michael

    2013-11-15

    In mice cynaropicrin (CYN) potently inhibits the proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei-the causative agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis-by a so far unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that CYNs α,β-unsaturated methylene moieties act as Michael acceptors for glutathione (GSH) and trypanothione (T(SH)2), the main low molecular mass thiols essential for unique redox metabolism of these parasites. The analysis of this putative mechanism and the effects of CYN on enzymes of the T(SH)2 redox metabolism including trypanothione reductase, trypanothione synthetase, glutathione-S-transferase, and ornithine decarboxylase are shown. A two step extraction protocol with subsequent UPLC-MS/MS analysis was established to quantify intra-cellular CYN, T(SH)2, GSH, as well as GS-CYN and T(S-CYN)2 adducts in intact T. b. rhodesiense cells. Within minutes of exposure to CYN, the cellular GSH and T(SH)2 pools were entirely depleted, and the parasites entered an apoptotic stage and died. CYN also showed inhibition of the ornithine decarboxylase similar to the positive control eflornithine. Significant interactions with the other enzymes involved in the T(SH)2 redox metabolism were not observed. Alongside many other biological activities sesquiterpene lactones including CYN have shown antitrypanosomal effects, which have been postulated to be linked to formation of Michael adducts with cellular nucleophiles. Here the interaction of CYN with biological thiols in a cellular system in general, and with trypanosomal T(SH)2 redox metabolism in particular, thus offering a molecular explanation for the antitrypanosomal activity is demonstrated. At the same time, the study provides a novel extraction and analysis protocol for components of the trypanosomal thiol metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

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    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  8. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote cell surface proteins by two complementary methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Motta, Flávia N

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, a neglected infectious illness that affects millions of people, mostly in Latin America. Here, the cell surface subproteome of the T. cruzi epimastigote life form was characterized. In order to prepare samples enriched in epimastigote...

  9. Cell surface proteome analysis of human-hosted Trypanosoma cruzi life stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Bastos, Izabela M D

    2014-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a neglected infectious illness, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. It remains a challenging health issue in Latin America, where it is endemic, and so far there is no immunoprophylatic vaccine or satisfactory chemotherapic treatment for its chronic stage. The present work...

  10. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower propo...

  11. The effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on the cell cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, E.; Barrera, P.; Tonn, C.; Nieto, M.; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous natural compounds have been used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Here, we studied the effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on growth and morphology of parasites synchronized with hydroxyurea, at different periods of time after removal of the nucleotide.

  12. Lack of evidence for integration of Trypanosoma cruzi minicircle DNA in South American human genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontova, Olga; Lukeš, Julius; Flegontov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 437-441 ISSN 0020-7519 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma cruzi * Kinetoplast minicircle * Chagas disease * Horizontal gene transfer * Human genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020751912000781

  13. Analysis of the mitochondrial maxicircle of Trypanosoma lewisi, a neglected human pathogen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lin, R.-H.; Lai, D.-H.; Zheng, L.-L.; Wu, J.; Lukeš, Julius; Hide, G.; Lun, Z.-R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, 30 December 2015 (2015), s. 665 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma lewisi * Kinetoplast maxicircle * Mitochondrial DNA * RNA editing * Palindrome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2015

  14. YCF45 protein, usually associated with plastids, is targeted into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Týč, Jiří; Long, Shaojun; Jirků, Milan; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 173, č. 1 (2010), s. 43-47 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * Plastid * Mitochondrion * Targeting * YCF45 * Horizontal gene transfer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.875, year: 2010

  15. AcSDKP is down-regulated in anaemia induced by Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the responses of a tetrapeptide, AcSDKP, and IL-10, and their association with bone marrow nucleated cells in a Trypanosoma brucei brucei GVR35 experimental infection model. Methods Mouse infection was done intraperitoneally with 1 × 103 trypanosomes/mL. Mice were either infected or left uninfected (N ...

  16. Efficacy of some essential oils in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered Cymbopogon citratus, Zingiber officinale and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils (EOs) in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods: Three experiments were conducted with 48 Swiss mice each. The animals were inoculated with 2 x 106 metacyclic ...

  17. Molecular variation of Trypanosoma brucei subspecies as revealed by AFLP fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbo, E.E.C.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Claassen, H.J.H.M.; Pas, te M.F.W.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic analysis of Trypanosoma spp. depends on the detection of variation between strains. We have used the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique to develop a convenient and reliable method for genetic characterization of Trypanosome (sub)species. AFLP accesses multiple

  18. Futile import of tRNAs and proteins into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei evansi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; Hashimi, Hassan; Lun, Sijia; Alfonzo, J. D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 2 (2011), 116-120 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * tRNA * Protein import * Mitochondrion * Kinetoplast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2011

  19. Functions and cellular localization of cysteine desulfurase and selenocysteine lyase in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poliak, Pavel; Van Hoewyk, D.; Oborník, Miroslav; Zíková, Alena; Stuart, K. D.; Tachezy, J.; Pilon, M.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 2 (2010), s. 383-393 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Fe–S cluster * mitochondrion * RNAi * selenoprotein * Trypanosoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.129, year: 2010

  20. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  1. Molecular Confirmation of Trypanosoma evansi and Babesia bigemina in Cattle from Lower Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Elhaig, Abdelfattah Selim, Mohamed M. Mahmoud and Eman K El-Gayar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomosis and babesiosis are economically important vector-borne diseases for animal health and productivity in developing countries. In Egypt, molecular epidemiological surveys on such diseases are scarce. In the present study, we examined 475 healthy and 25 clinically diagnosed cattle from three provinces in Lower Egypt, for Trypanosoma (T. and Babesia (B. infections using an ITS1 PCR assay that confirmed Trypanosoma species presence and an 18S rRNA assay that detected B. bigemina. Results confirmed Trypanosoma spp. and B. bigemina presence in 30.4% and 11% individuals, respectively, with eight animals (1.6% being co-infected with both hemoparasites. Subsequent type-specific PCRs revealed that all Trypanosoma PCR positive samples corresponded to T. evansi and that none of the animals harboured T. brucei gambiense or T. brucei rhodesiense. Nucleotide sequencing of the variable surface glycoprotein revealed the T. evansi cattle strain to be most closely related (99% nucleotide sequence identity to strains previously detected in dromedary camels in Egypt, while the 18S rRNA gene phylogeny confirmed the presence of a unique B. bigemina haplotype closely related to strains from Turkey and Brazil. Statistically significant differences in PCR prevalence were noted with respect to gender, clinical status and locality. These results confirm the presence of high numbers of carrier animals and signal the need for expanded surveillance and control efforts.

  2. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  3. Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei do not use Krebs cycle activity for energy generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelden, van S.W.H.; Fast, B.; Vogt, A.; Meer, van der P.; Saas, J.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Boshart, M.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of a functional Krebs cycle for energy generation in the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated under physiological conditions during logarithmic phase growth of a pleomorphic parasite strain. Wild type procyclic cells and mutants with targeted deletion of the gene

  4. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alkhaldi, A.A.M.; Martínek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, C.; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-34 ISSN 2211-3207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * mitochondrion * FoF1 ATPase * succinate dehydrogenase * phosphonium salt * SDH complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi in the chicken model: Chagas-like heart disease in the absence of parasitism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teixeira, A.R.L.; Gomes, C.; Nitz, N.; Sousa, A.O.; Alvez, R.M.; Guimaro, M.C.; Cordeiro, C.; Bernal, F.M.; Rosa, A.C.; Hejnar, Jiří; Leonardecz, E.; Hecht, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2011), e1000 ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chagas disease * Trypanosoma cruzi * kDNA minicircles * inbred chicken Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  6. What can we infer about the origin of sex in early eukaryotes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijer, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis shows that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was capable of full meiotic sex. The original eukaryotic life cycle can probably be described as clonal, interrupted by episodic sex triggered by external or internal stressors. The cycle could have started in a highly flexible

  7. Sex is a ubiquitous, ancient, and inherent attribute of eukaryotic life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijer, Dave; Lukeš, Julius; Eliáš, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction and clonality in eukaryotes are mostly seen as exclusive, the latter being rather exceptional. This view might be biased by focusing almost exclusively on metazoans. We analyze and discuss reproduction in the context of extant eukaryotic diversity, paying special attention to

  8. Genome-wide Purification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Eukaryotic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik D.; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Tachibana, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are common genetic elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and are reported in other eukaryotes as well. EccDNAs contribute to genetic variation among somatic cells in multicellular organisms and to evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. Sensitive methods for d...

  9. Eelgrass Leaf Surface Microbiomes Are Locally Variable and Highly Correlated with Epibiotic Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M. Bengtsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eelgrass (Zostera marina is a marine foundation species essential for coastal ecosystem services around the northern hemisphere. Like all macroscopic organisms, it possesses a microbiome (here defined as an associated prokaryotic community which may play critical roles in modulating the interaction of eelgrass with its environment. For example, its leaf surface microbiome could inhibit or attract eukaryotic epibionts which may overgrow the eelgrass leading to reduced primary productivity and subsequent eelgrass meadow decline. We used amplicon sequencing of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to assess the leaf surface microbiome (prokaryotes as well as eukaryotic epibionts in- and outside lagoons on the German Baltic Sea coast. Prokaryote microbiomes varied substantially both between sites inside lagoons and between open coastal and lagoon sites. Water depth, leaf area and biofilm chlorophyll a concentration explained a large amount of variation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic community composition. The prokaryotic microbiome and eukaryotic epibiont communities were highly correlated, and network analysis revealed disproportionate co-occurrence between a limited number of eukaryotic taxa and several bacterial taxa. This suggests that eelgrass leaf surfaces are home to a mosaic of microbiomes of several epibiotic eukaryotes, in addition to the microbiome of the eelgrass itself. Our findings thereby underline that eukaryotic diversity should be taken into account in order to explain prokaryotic microbiome assembly and dynamics in aquatic environments.

  10. Use of prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of transcriptional activators from prokaryotic organisms for use in eukaryotic cells, such as yeast as sensors of intracellular and extracellular accumulation of a ligand or metabolite specifically activating this transcriptional activator in a eukaryot...

  11. Genome-wide Purification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Eukaryotic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik D.; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Tachibana, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are common genetic elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and are reported in other eukaryotes as well. EccDNAs contribute to genetic variation among somatic cells in multicellular organisms and to evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. Sensitive methods...

  12. Trypanocidal activity of human plasma on Trypanosoma evansi in mice Atividade tripanocida do plasma humano sobre Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandro Schafer Da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to test an alternative protocol with human plasma to control Trypanosoma evansi infection in mice. Plasma from an apparently 27-year-old healthy male, blood type A+, was used in the study. A concentration of 100 mg.dL-1 apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1 was detected in the plasma. Forty mice were divided into four groups with 10 animals each. Group A comprised uninfected animals. Mice from groups B, C and D were inoculated with a T. evansi isolate. Group B was used as a positive control. At three days post-infection (DPI, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with human plasma. A single dose of 0.2 mL plasma was given to those in group C. The mice from group D were administered five doses of 0.2 mL plasma with a 24 hours interval between the doses. Group B showed high increasing parasitemia that led to their death within 5 DPI. Both treatments eliminated parasites from the blood and increased the longevity of animals. An efficacy of 50 (group C and 80% (group D of human plasma trypanocidal activity was found using PCR. This therapeutic success was likely achieved in the group D due to their higher levels of APOL1 compared with group C.Este estudo teve como objetivo testar um protocolo alternativo com plasma humano para controlar a infecção por Trypanosoma evansi em camundongos. O plasma foi oriundo de um homem aparentemente saudável, com idade entre 27 anos e tipo de sangue A+. Foi detectada uma concentração de 100 mg.dL -1 de apolipoproteína L1 (APOL1 no plasma. Quarenta camundongos foram divididos em quatro grupos, contendo dez animais cada. Grupo A, composto de animais não infectados. Os roedores dos grupos B, C e D foram inoculados intraperitonealmente com um isolado de T. evansi. O Grupo B foi usado como um controle positivo. Três dias pós-infecção (DPI, os camundongos foram tratados com plasma humano. Uma dose única de 0,2 mL de plasma foi administrada nos roedores do grupo C. Os ratos do grupo D receberam cinco

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION BY Trypanosoma vivax IN GOATS INFECÇÃO EXPERIMENTAL EM CAPRINOS COM Trypanosoma vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco David Nascimento Sousa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Four goats were infected intravenously with 1.0 mL of cattle blood containing about 1.25 x 105 Trypanosoma vivax derived from spontaneous outbreak in cattle at Catolé do Rocha city, Paraíba, Brazil. Other four goats were used as controls. Parasitemia and body temperature were determined daily for 40 days. Animals were weighted each 7 days, and blood samples for blood cells counts were collected each 5 days. It was obtained a sample of liquor from each animal before death; cerebrospinal fluid samples were submitted to biochemical and cytological evaluations, density determination and parasite detection. A positive correlation was found between body temperature and parasitemia in infected animals. These animals presented anemia, leukopenia, hypoglycemia, decreased serum levels of total proteins and cholesterol, and nervous symptoms. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid resulted in decrease of glucose levels and increase in lactate dehydrogenase, cell counts and presence of the parasite. At necropsy it was found pale carcass, generalized infartation of lymphonodes, pulmonary edema, and liquid accumulation of pericardium. Histological changes were characterized by interstitial pneumonia, miocarditis, cardiac fibrosis, meningitis, and encephalitis. All observed changes confirm patogenicity of T. vivax.

    KEY WORDS: Experimental infection, trypanosomiasis, patogenicity.

    Quatro caprinos foram infectados experimentalmente por via intravenosa com 1,0 ml de sangue contendo aproximadamente 1,25 x 105 tripanossomas/ml, utilizando-se um isolado de Trypanosoma vivax de bovinos infectados naturalmente no município de Catolé do Rocha, Paraíba. A parasitemia e a temperatura foram determinadas diariamente durante quarenta dias. A cada cinco dias realizaram-se coletas de sangue para hemograma e análise bioquímica sérica. Antes do

  14. On the Archaeal Origins of Eukaryotes and the Challenges of Inferring Phenotype from Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Gautam; Thattai, Mukund; Baum, Buzz

    2016-07-01

    If eukaryotes arose through a merger between archaea and bacteria, what did the first true eukaryotic cell look like? A major step toward an answer came with the discovery of Lokiarchaeum, an archaeon whose genome encodes small GTPases related to those used by eukaryotes to regulate membrane traffic. Although 'Loki' cells have yet to be seen, their existence has prompted the suggestion that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes engulfed the future mitochondrion by phagocytosis. We propose instead that the archaeal ancestor was a relatively simple cell, and that eukaryotic cellular organization arose as the result of a gradual transfer of bacterial genes and membranes driven by an ever-closer symbiotic partnership between a bacterium and an archaeon. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Engineering a palette of eukaryotic chromoproteins for bacterial synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeruhm, Josefine; Funk, Saskia K; Tietscher, Sandra; Edlund, Anders D; Jamal, Sabri; Wistrand-Yuen, Pikkei; Dyrhage, Karl; Gynnå, Arvid; Ivermark, Katarina; Lövgren, Jessica; Törnblom, Viktor; Virtanen, Anders; Lundin, Erik R; Wistrand-Yuen, Erik; Forster, Anthony C

    2018-01-01

    Coral reefs are colored by eukaryotic chromoproteins (CPs) that are homologous to green fluorescent protein. CPs differ from fluorescent proteins (FPs) by intensely absorbing visible light to give strong colors in ambient light. This endows CPs with certain advantages over FPs, such as instrument-free detection uncomplicated by ultra-violet light damage or background fluorescence, efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) quenching, and photoacoustic imaging. Thus, CPs have found utility as genetic markers and in teaching, and are attractive for potential cell biosensor applications in the field. Most near-term applications of CPs require expression in a different domain of life: bacteria. However, it is unclear which of the eukaryotic CP genes might be suitable and how best to assay them. Here, taking advantage of codon optimization programs in 12 cases, we engineered 14 CP sequences (meffRed, eforRed, asPink, spisPink, scOrange, fwYellow, amilGFP, amajLime, cjBlue, meffBlue, aeBlue, amilCP, tsPurple and gfasPurple) into a palette of Escherichia coli BioBrick plasmids. BioBricks comply with synthetic biology's most widely used, simplified, cloning standard. Differences in color intensities, maturation times and fitness costs of expression were compared under the same conditions, and visible readout of gene expression was quantitated. A surprisingly large variation in cellular fitness costs was found, resulting in loss of color in some overnight liquid cultures of certain high-copy-plasmid-borne CPs, and cautioning the use of multiple CPs as markers in competition assays. We solved these two problems by integrating pairs of these genes into the chromosome and by engineering versions of the same CP with very different colors. Availability of 14 engineered CP genes compared in E. coli , together with chromosomal mutants suitable for competition assays, should simplify and expand CP study and applications. There was no single plasmid-borne CP that combined

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of ferlin genes reveals ancient eukaryotic origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lek Monkol

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ferlin gene family possesses a rare and identifying feature consisting of multiple tandem C2 domains and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Much currently remains unknown about the fundamental function of this gene family, however, mutations in its two most well-characterised members, dysferlin and otoferlin, have been implicated in human disease. The availability of genome sequences from a wide range of species makes it possible to explore the evolution of the ferlin family, providing contextual insight into characteristic features that define the ferlin gene family in its present form in humans. Results Ferlin genes were detected from all species of representative phyla, with two ferlin subgroups partitioned within the ferlin phylogenetic tree based on the presence or absence of a DysF domain. Invertebrates generally possessed two ferlin genes (one with DysF and one without, with six ferlin genes in most vertebrates (three DysF, three non-DysF. Expansion of the ferlin gene family is evident between the divergence of lamprey (jawless vertebrates and shark (cartilaginous fish. Common to almost all ferlins is an N-terminal C2-FerI-C2 sandwich, a FerB motif, and two C-terminal C2 domains (C2E and C2F adjacent to the transmembrane domain. Preservation of these structural elements throughout eukaryotic evolution suggests a fundamental role of these motifs for ferlin function. In contrast, DysF, C2DE, and FerA are optional, giving rise to subtle differences in domain topologies of ferlin genes. Despite conservation of multiple C2 domains in all ferlins, the C-terminal C2 domains (C2E and C2F displayed higher sequence conservation and greater conservation of putative calcium binding residues across paralogs and orthologs. Interestingly, the two most studied non-mammalian ferlins (Fer-1 and Misfire in model organisms C. elegans and D. melanogaster, present as outgroups in the phylogenetic analysis, with results suggesting

  17. The Aurora Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei plays distinctive roles in metaphase-anaphase transition and cytokinetic initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyin Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B kinase is an essential regulator of chromosome segregation with the action well characterized in eukaryotes. It is also implicated in cytokinesis, but the detailed mechanism remains less clear, partly due to the difficulty in separating the latter from the former function in a growing cell. A chemical genetic approach with an inhibitor of the enzyme added to a synchronized cell population at different stages of the cell cycle would probably solve this problem. In the deeply branched parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, an Aurora B homolog, TbAUK1, was found to control both chromosome segregation and cytokinetic initiation by evidence from RNAi and dominant negative mutation. To clearly separate these two functions, VX-680, an inhibitor of TbAUK1, was added to a synchronized T. brucei procyclic cell population at different cell cycle stages. The unique trans-localization pattern of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC, consisting of TbAUK1 and two novel proteins TbCPC1 and TbCPC2, was monitored during mitosis and cytokinesis by following the migration of the proteins tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescence protein in live cells with time-lapse video microscopy. Inhibition of TbAUK1 function in S-phase, prophase or metaphase invariably arrests the cells in the metaphase, suggesting an action of TbAUK1 in promoting metaphase-anaphase transition. TbAUK1 inhibition in anaphase does not affect mitotic exit, but prevents trans-localization of the CPC from the spindle midzone to the anterior tip of the new flagellum attachment zone for cytokinetic initiation. The CPC in the midzone is dispersed back to the two segregated nuclei, while cytokinesis is inhibited. In and beyond telophase, TbAUK1 inhibition has no effect on the progression of cytokinesis or the subsequent G1, S and G2 phases until a new metaphase is attained. There are thus two clearly distinct points of TbAUK1 action in T. brucei: the metaphase-anaphase transition and

  18. Relevance of intracellular polarity to accuracy of eukaryotic chemotaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo; Nagamatsu, Akihiro; Akuzawa, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic chemotaxis is usually mediated by intracellular signals that tend to localize at the front or back of the cell. Such intracellular polarities frequently require no extracellular guidance cues, indicating that spontaneous polarization occurs in the signal network. Spontaneous polarization activity is considered relevant to the persistent motions in random cell migrations and chemotaxis. In this study, we propose a theoretical model that connects spontaneous intracellular polarity and motile ability in a chemoattractant solution. We demonstrate that the intracellular polarity can enhance the accuracy of chemotaxis. Chemotactic accuracy should also depend on chemoattractant concentration through the concentration-dependent correlation time in the polarity direction. Both the polarity correlation time and the chemotactic accuracy depend on the degree of responsiveness to the chemical gradient. We show that optimally accurate chemotaxis occurs at an intermediate responsiveness of intracellular polarity. Experimentally, we find that the persistence time of randomly migrating Dictyostelium cells depends on the chemoattractant concentration, as predicted by our theory. At the optimum responsiveness, this ameboid cell can enhance its chemotactic accuracy tenfold. (paper)

  19. Graph theoretic analysis of protein interaction networks of eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, K.-I.; Kahng, B.; Kim, D.

    2005-11-01

    Owing to the recent progress in high-throughput experimental techniques, the datasets of large-scale protein interactions of prototypical multicellular species, the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, have been assayed. The datasets are obtained mainly by using the yeast hybrid method, which contains false-positive and false-negative simultaneously. Accordingly, while it is desirable to test such datasets through further wet experiments, here we invoke recent developed network theory to test such high-throughput datasets in a simple way. Based on the fact that the key biological processes indispensable to maintaining life are conserved across eukaryotic species, and the comparison of structural properties of the protein interaction networks (PINs) of the two species with those of the yeast PIN, we find that while the worm and yeast PIN datasets exhibit similar structural properties, the current fly dataset, though most comprehensively screened ever, does not reflect generic structural properties correctly as it is. The modularity is suppressed and the connectivity correlation is lacking. Addition of interologs to the current fly dataset increases the modularity and enhances the occurrence of triangular motifs as well. The connectivity correlation function of the fly, however, remains distinct under such interolog additions, for which we present a possible scenario through an in silico modeling.

  20. NMR comparison of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytochromes c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, Meihing; Cai, Meng Li; Timkovich, R.

    1990-01-01

    1 H NMR spectroscopy has been used to examine ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429) over the pH range 3.5-10.6 and the temperature range 4-60 degree C. Resonance assignments are proposed for main-chain and side-chain protons. Comparison of results for cytochrome c-551 to recently assigned spectra for horse cytochrome c and mutants of yeast iso-1 cytochrome reveals some unique resonances with unusual chemical shifts in all cytochromes that may serve as markers for the heme region. Results for cytochrome c-551 indicate that in the smaller prokaryotic cytochrome, all benzoid side chains are rapidly flipping on the NMR time scale. In contrast, in eukaryotic cytochromes there are some rings flipping slowly on the NMR time scale. The ferrocytochrome c-551 undergoes a transition linked to pH with a pK around 7. The pH behavior of assigned resonances provides evidence that the site of protonation is the inner or buried 17-propionic acid heme substituent (IUPAC-IUB porphyrin nomenclature). Conformational heterogeneity has been observed for segments near the inner heme propionate substituent

  1. Structural similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic 5S ribosomal RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welfle, H.; Boehm, S.; Damaschun, G.; Fabian, H.; Gast, K.; Misselwitz, R.; Mueller, J.J.; Zirwer, D.; Filimonov, V.V.; Venyaminov, S.Yu.; Zalkova, T.N.

    1986-01-01

    5S RNAs from rat liver and E. coli have been studied by diffuse X-ray and dynamic light scattering and by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Identical structures at a resolution of 1 nm can be deduced from the comparison of the experimental X-ray scattering curves and electron distance distribution functions and from the agreement of the shape parameters. A flat shape model with a compact central region and two protruding arms was derived. Double helical stems are eleven-fold helices with a mean base pair distance of 0.28 nm. The number of base pairs (26 GC, 9 AU for E. coli; 27 GC, 9 AU for rat liver) and the degree of base stacking are the same within the experimental error. A very high regularity in the ribophosphate backbone is indicated for both 5S RNAs. The observed structural similarity and the consensus secondary structure pattern derived from comparative sequence analyses suggest the conclusion that prokaryotic and eukaryotic 5S RNAs are in general very similar with respect to their fundamental structural features. (author)

  2. Biosurfactant gene clusters in eukaryotes: regulation and biotechnological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Ciesielska, Katarzyna; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Soetaert, Wim

    2014-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are a class of secondary metabolites representing a wide variety of structures that can be produced from renewable feedstock by a wide variety of micro-organisms. They have (potential) applications in the medical world, personal care sector, mining processes, food industry, cosmetics, crop protection, pharmaceuticals, bio-remediation, household detergents, paper and pulp industry, textiles, paint industries, etc. Especially glycolipid BSs like sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs), mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) and cellobioselipids (CBLs) have been described to provide significant opportunities to (partially) replace chemical surfactants. The major two factors currently limiting the penetration of BSs into the market are firstly the limited structural variety and secondly the rather high production price linked with the productivity. One of the keys to resolve the above mentioned bottlenecks can be found in the genetic engineering of natural producers. This could not only result in more efficient (economical) recombinant producers, but also in a diversification of the spectrum of available BSs as such resolving both limiting factors at once. Unraveling the genetics behind the biosynthesis of these interesting biological compounds is indispensable for the tinkering, fine tuning and rearrangement of these biological pathways with the aim of obtaining higher yields and a more extensive structural variety. Therefore, this review focuses on recent developments in the investigation of the biosynthesis, genetics and regulation of some important members of the family of the eukaryotic glycolipid BSs (MELs, CBLs and SLs). Moreover, recent biotechnological achievements and the industrial potential of engineered strains are discussed.

  3. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mitali; Singh, Sunita; Pradhan, Satyajit; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2014-01-01

    As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the "MCM paradox." Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology.

  4. The prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy: meanings and mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Drawing on documents both published and archival, this paper explains how the prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy of the 1960s was constructed, the purposes it served, and what it implied in terms of classification and phylogeny. In doing so, I first show how the concept was attributed to Edouard Chatton and the context in which he introduced the terms. Following, I examine the context in which the terms were reintroduced into biology in 1962 by Roger Stanier and C. B. van Niel. I study the discourse over the subsequent decade to understand how the organizational dichotomy took on the form of a natural classification as the kingdom Monera or superkingdom Procaryotae. Stanier and van Niel admitted that, in regard to constructing a natural classification of bacteria, structural characteristics were no more useful than physiological properties. They repeatedly denied that bacterial phylogenetics was possible. I thus examine the great historical irony that the "prokaryote," in both its organizational and phylogenetic senses, was defined (negatively) on the basis of structure. Finally, we see how phylogenetic research based on 16S rRNA led by Carl Woese and his collaborators confronted the prokaryote concept while moving microbiology to the center of evolutionary biology.

  5. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Susceptibilities to DNA Structural Transitions within Eukaryotic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabinskaya, Dina; Benham, Craig; Madden, Sally

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the competitive transitions to alternate secondary DNA structures in a negatively supercoiled DNA molecule of kilobase length and specified base sequence. We use statistical mechanics to calculate the competition among all regions within the sequence that are susceptible to transitions to alternate structures. We use an approximate numerical method since the calculation of an exact partition function is numerically cumbersome for DNA molecules of lengths longer than hundreds of base pairs. This method yields accurate results in reasonable computational times. We implement algorithms that calculate the competition between transitions to denatured states and to Z-form DNA. We analyze these transitions near the transcription start sites (TSS) of a set of eukaryotic genes. We find an enhancement of Z-forming regions upstream of the TSS and a depletion of denatured regions around the start sites. We confirm that these finding are statistically significant by comparing our results to a set of randomized genes with preserved base composition at each position relative to the gene start sites. When we study the correlation of these transitions in orthologous mouse and human genes we find a clear evolutionary conservation of both types of transitions around the TSS.

  7. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  8. Specificity and evolvability in eukaryotic protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beltrao

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in uncovering the protein interaction networks of several species has led to questions of what underlying principles might govern their organization. Few studies have tried to determine the impact of protein interaction network evolution on the observed physiological differences between species. Using comparative genomics and structural information, we show here that eukaryotic species have rewired their interactomes at a fast rate of approximately 10(-5 interactions changed per protein pair, per million years of divergence. For Homo sapiens this corresponds to 10(3 interactions changed per million years. Additionally we find that the specificity of binding strongly determines the interaction turnover and that different biological processes show significantly different link dynamics. In particular, human proteins involved in immune response, transport, and establishment of localization show signs of positive selection for change of interactions. Our analysis suggests that a small degree of molecular divergence can give rise to important changes at the network level. We propose that the power law distribution observed in protein interaction networks could be partly explained by the cell's requirement for different degrees of protein binding specificity.

  9. Classification and Lineage Tracing of SH2 Domains Throughout Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard A

    2017-01-01

    Today there exists a rapidly expanding number of sequenced genomes. Cataloging protein interaction domains such as the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain across these various genomes can be accomplished with ease due to existing algorithms and predictions models. An evolutionary analysis of SH2 domains provides a step towards understanding how SH2 proteins integrated with existing signaling networks to position phosphotyrosine signaling as a crucial driver of robust cellular communication networks in metazoans. However organizing and tracing SH2 domain across organisms and understanding their evolutionary trajectory remains a challenge. This chapter describes several methodologies towards analyzing the evolutionary trajectory of SH2 domains including a global SH2 domain classification system, which facilitates annotation of new SH2 sequences essential for tracing the lineage of SH2 domains throughout eukaryote evolution. This classification utilizes a combination of sequence homology, protein domain architecture and the boundary positions between introns and exons within the SH2 domain or genes encoding these domains. Discrete SH2 families can then be traced across various genomes to provide insight into its origins. Furthermore, additional methods for examining potential mechanisms for divergence of SH2 domains from structural changes to alterations in the protein domain content and genome duplication will be discussed. Therefore a better understanding of SH2 domain evolution may enhance our insight into the emergence of phosphotyrosine signaling and the expansion of protein interaction domains.

  10. Discrepancy variation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUAN GAO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To address whether there are differences of variation among repeat motif types and among taxonomic groups, we present here an analysis of variation and correlation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes. Ten taxonomic groups were compared, those being primates, mammalia (excluding primates and rodentia, rodentia, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, molluscs, plants and fungi, respectively. The data used in the analysis is from the literature published in the Journal of Molecular Ecology Notes. Analysis of variation reveals that there are no significant differences between AC and AG repeat motif types. Moreover, the number of alleles correlates positively with the copy number in both AG and AC repeats. Similar conclusions can be obtained from each taxonomic group. These results strongly suggest that the increase of SSR variation is almost linear with the increase of the copy number of each repeat motif. As well, the results suggest that the variability of SSR in the genomes of low-ranking species seem to be more than that of high-ranking species, excluding primates and fungi.

  11. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    of the genes described from eukaryotic organisms and the deduced amino acid sequence could be aligned with the C-terminal half of animal and plant reductases exhibiting pronounced similarity to other eukaryotic counterparts. Further examination of the 5' flanking region by cDNA analysis and establishment...

  12. Diverse inhibitor chemotypes targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamila S Gunatilleke

    Full Text Available Chagas Disease, a WHO- and NIH-designated neglected tropical disease, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infection in North America and Europe as a result of population moves. Although a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to heart failure, as well as inflicting a heavy economic burden in affected regions, Chagas Disease elicits scant notice from the pharmaceutical industry because of adverse economic incentives. The discovery and development of new routes to chemotherapy for Chagas Disease is a clear priority.The similarity between the membrane sterol requirements of pathogenic fungi and those of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas human cardiopathy, has led to repurposing anti-fungal azole inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 for the treatment of Chagas Disease. To diversify the therapeutic pipeline of anti-Chagasic drug candidates we exploited an approach that included directly probing the T. cruzi CYP51 active site with a library of synthetic small molecules. Target-based high-throughput screening reduced the library of ∼104,000 small molecules to 185 hits with estimated nanomolar K(D values, while cross-validation against T. cruzi-infected skeletal myoblast cells yielded 57 active hits with EC(50 <10 µM. Two pools of hits partially overlapped. The top hit inhibited T. cruzi with EC(50 of 17 nM and was trypanocidal at 40 nM.The hits are structurally diverse, demonstrating that CYP51 is a rather permissive enzyme target for small molecules. Cheminformatic analysis of the hits suggests that CYP51 pharmacology is similar to that of other cytochromes P450 therapeutic targets, including thromboxane synthase (CYP5, fatty acid ω-hydroxylases (CYP4, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17 and aromatase (CYP19. Surprisingly, strong similarity is suggested to glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, which is unrelated to CYP51 by sequence or structure. Lead compounds developed by pharmaceutical

  13. Intraclonal mating occurs during tsetse transmission of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Vanessa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mating in Trypanosoma brucei is a non-obligatory event, triggered by the co-occurrence of different strains in the salivary glands of the vector. Recombinants that result from intra- rather than interclonal mating have been detected, but only in crosses of two different trypanosome strains. This has led to the hypothesis that when trypanosomes recognize a different strain, they release a diffusible factor or pheromone that triggers mating in any cell in the vicinity whether it is of the same or a different strain. This idea assumes that the trypanosome can recognize self and non-self, although there is as yet no evidence for the existence of mating types in T. brucei. Results We investigated intraclonal mating in T. b. brucei by crossing red and green fluorescent lines of a single strain, so that recombinant progeny can be detected in the fly by yellow fluorescence. For strain 1738, seven flies had both red and green trypanosomes in the salivary glands and, in three, yellow trypanosomes were also observed, although they could not be recovered for subsequent analysis. Nonetheless, both red and non-fluorescent clones from these flies had recombinant genotypes as judged by microsatellite and karyotype analyses, and some also had raised DNA contents, suggesting recombination or genome duplication. Strain J10 produced similar results indicative of intraclonal mating. In contrast, trypanosome clones recovered from other flies showed that genotypes can be transmitted with fidelity. When a yellow hybrid clone expressing both red and green fluorescent protein genes was transmitted, the salivary glands contained a mixture of fluorescent-coloured trypanosomes, but only yellow and red clones were recovered. While loss of the GFP gene in the red clones could have resulted from gene conversion, some of these clones showed loss of heterozygosity and raised DNA contents as in the other single strain transmissions. Our observations suggest

  14. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD, a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP, lectin (LP, and alternative (AP. The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion

  15. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10 1 , 10 2 , 10 3 and 10 4 using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between chromosomes are an

  16. Zoonotic trypanosomes in South East Asia : attempts to control Trypanosoma lewisi using human and animal trypanocidal drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Desquesnes, M.; Yangtara, S.; Kunphukhieo, P.; Jittapalapong, S.; Herder, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Beside typical human trypanosomes responsible of sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in Latin America, there is a growing number of reported atypical human infections due to Trypanosoma evansi, a livestock parasite, or Trypanosoma lewisi, a rat parasite, especially in Asia. Drugs available for the treatment of T. brucei ssp. in humans are obviously of choice for the control of T. evansi because it is derived from T. brucei. However, concerning T. lewisi, there is an urgent need to ...

  17. The independent prokaryotic origins of eukaryotic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase and the implications of their origins for the evolution of eukaryotic Calvin cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yong-Hai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Calvin cycle of eubacteria, the dephosphorylations of both fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphate (SBP are catalyzed by the same bifunctional enzyme: fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase/sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (F/SBPase, while in that of eukaryotic chloroplasts by two distinct enzymes: chloroplastic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (SBPase, respectively. It was proposed that these two eukaryotic enzymes arose from the divergence of a common ancestral eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase of mitochondrial origin. However, no specific affinity between SBPase and eubacterial FBPase or F/SBPase can be observed in the previous phylogenetic analyses, and it is hard to explain why SBPase and/or F/SBPase are/is absent from most extant nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes according to this scenario. Results Domain analysis indicated that eubacterial F/SBPase of two different resources contain distinct domains: proteobacterial F/SBPases contain typical FBPase domain, while cyanobacterial F/SBPases possess FBPase_glpX domain. Therefore, like prokaryotic FBPase, eubacterial F/SBPase can also be divided into two evolutionarily distant classes (Class I and II. Phylogenetic analysis based on a much larger taxonomic sampling than previous work revealed that all eukaryotic SBPase cluster together and form a close sister group to the clade of epsilon-proteobacterial Class I FBPase which are gluconeogenesis-specific enzymes, while all eukaryotic chloroplast FBPase group together with eukaryotic cytosolic FBPase and form another distinct clade which then groups with the Class I FBPase of diverse eubacteria. Motif analysis of these enzymes also supports these phylogenetic correlations. Conclusions There are two evolutionarily distant classes of eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase. Eukaryotic FBPase and SBPase do not diverge from either of them but have two independent origins

  18. Beyond Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation: Horizontal Gene Transfer from Bacteria to Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2018-03-03

    Besides the massive gene transfer from organelles to the nuclear genomes, which occurred during the early evolution of eukaryote lineages, the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotes remains controversial. Yet, increasing amounts of genomic data reveal many cases of bacterium-to-eukaryote HGT that likely represent a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. However, DNA transfer involved in genetic transformation of plants by Agrobacterium species has traditionally been considered as the unique example of natural DNA transfer and integration into eukaryotic genomes. Recent discoveries indicate that the repertoire of donor bacterial species and of recipient eukaryotic hosts potentially are much wider than previously thought, including donor bacterial species, such as plant symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (e.g., Rhizobium etli) and animal bacterial pathogens (e.g., Bartonella henselae, Helicobacter pylori), and recipient species from virtually all eukaryotic clades. Here, we review the molecular pathways and potential mechanisms of these trans-kingdom HGT events and discuss their utilization in biotechnology and research.

  19. Quantitative prediction of shrimp disease incidence via the profiles of gut eukaryotic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinbo; Yu, Weina; Dai, Wenfang; Zhang, Jinjie; Qiu, Qiongfen; Ou, Changrong

    2018-04-01

    One common notion is emerging that gut eukaryotes are commensal or beneficial, rather than detrimental. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have been taken to discern the factors that govern the assembly of gut eukaryotes, despite growing interest in the dysbiosis of gut microbiota-disease relationship. Herein, we firstly explored how the gut eukaryotic microbiotas were assembled over shrimp postlarval to adult stages and a disease progression. The gut eukaryotic communities changed markedly as healthy shrimp aged, and converged toward an adult-microbiota configuration. However, the adult-like stability was distorted by disease exacerbation. A null model untangled that the deterministic processes that governed the gut eukaryotic assembly tended to be more important over healthy shrimp development, whereas this trend was inverted as the disease progressed. After ruling out the baseline of gut eukaryotes over shrimp ages, we identified disease-discriminatory taxa (species level afforded the highest accuracy of prediction) that characteristic of shrimp health status. The profiles of these taxa contributed an overall 92.4% accuracy in predicting shrimp health status. Notably, this model can accurately diagnose the onset of shrimp disease. Interspecies interaction analysis depicted how the disease-discriminatory taxa interacted with one another in sustaining shrimp health. Taken together, our findings offer novel insights into the underlying ecological processes that govern the assembly of gut eukaryotes over shrimp postlarval to adult stages and a disease progression. Intriguingly, the established model can quantitatively and accurately predict the incidences of shrimp disease.

  20. Horizontal transfer of a eukaryotic plastid-targeted protein gene to cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal or lateral transfer of genetic material between distantly related prokaryotes has been shown to play a major role in the evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes, but exchange of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is not as well understood. In particular, gene flow from eukaryotes to prokaryotes is rarely documented with strong support, which is unusual since prokaryotic genomes appear to readily accept foreign genes. Results Here, we show that abundant marine cyanobacteria in the related genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus acquired a key Calvin cycle/glycolytic enzyme from a eukaryote. Two non-homologous forms of fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA are characteristic of eukaryotes and prokaryotes respectively. However, a eukaryotic gene has been inserted immediately upstream of the ancestral prokaryotic gene in several strains (ecotypes of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. In one lineage this new gene has replaced the ancestral gene altogether. The eukaryotic gene is most closely related to the plastid-targeted FBA from red algae. This eukaryotic-type FBA once replaced the plastid/cyanobacterial type in photosynthetic eukaryotes, hinting at a possible functional advantage in Calvin cycle reactions. The strains that now possess this eukaryotic FBA are scattered across the tree of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, perhaps because the gene has been transferred multiple times among cyanobacteria, or more likely because it has been selectively retained only in certain lineages. Conclusion A gene for plastid-targeted FBA has been transferred from red algae to cyanobacteria, where it has inserted itself beside its non-homologous, functional analogue. Its current distribution in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus is punctate, suggesting a complex history since its introduction to this group.

  1. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi; Aspectos da resistencia a infecao experimental com Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-07-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10{sup 1}, 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between

  2. Structural and biomechanical basis of mitochondrial movement in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Min Wu,1 Aruna Kalyanasundaram,2 Jie Zhu1 1Laboratory of Biomechanics and Engineering, Institute of Biophysics, College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China; 2College of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Mitochondria serve as energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells. In addition to providing the energy supply for cells, the mitochondria are also involved in other processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, information transfer, and apoptosis, and play an important role in regulation of cell growth and the cell cycle. In order to achieve these functions, the mitochondria need to move to the corresponding location. Therefore, mitochondrial movement has a crucial role in normal physiologic activity, and any mitochondrial movement disorder will cause irreparable damage to the organism. For example, recent studies have shown that abnormal movement of the mitochondria is likely to be the reason for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. So, in the cell, especially in the particular polarized cell, the appropriate distribution of mitochondria is crucial to the function and survival of the cell. Mitochondrial movement is mainly associated with the cytoskeleton and related proteins. However, those components play different roles according to cell type. In this paper, we summarize the structural basis of mitochondrial movement, including microtubules, actin filaments, motor proteins, and adaptin, and review studies of the biomechanical mechanisms of mitochondrial movement in different types of cells. Keywords: mitochondrial movement, microtubules, actin filaments, motor proteins, adaptin

  3. Positive selection for unpreferred codon usage in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan James E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection has traditionally been understood as a force responsible for pushing genes to states of higher translational efficiency, whereas lower translational efficiency has been explained by neutral mutation and genetic drift. We looked for evidence of directional selection resulting in increased unpreferred codon usage (and presumably reduced translational efficiency in three divergent clusters of eukaryotic genomes using a simple optimal-codon-based metric (Kp/Ku. Results Here we show that for some genes natural selection is indeed responsible for causing accelerated unpreferred codon substitution, and document the scope of this selection. In Cryptococcus and to a lesser extent Drosophila, we find many genes showing a statistically significant signal of selection for unpreferred codon usage in one or more lineages. We did not find evidence for this type of selection in Saccharomyces. The signal of positive selection observed from unpreferred synonymous codon substitutions is coincident in Cryptococcus and Drosophila with the distribution of upstream open reading frames (uORFs, another genic feature known to reduce translational efficiency. Functional enrichment analysis of genes exhibiting low Kp/Ku ratios reveals that genes in regulatory roles are particularly subject to this type of selection. Conclusion Through genome-wide scans, we find recent selection for unpreferred codon usage at approximately 1% of genetic loci in a Cryptococcus and several genes in Drosophila. Unpreferred codons can impede translation efficiency, and we find that genes with translation-impeding uORFs are enriched for this selection signal. We find that regulatory genes are particularly likely to be subject to selection for unpreferred codon usage. Given that expression noise can propagate through regulatory cascades, and that low translational efficiency can reduce expression noise, this finding supports the hypothesis that translational

  4. MetWAMer: eukaryotic translation initiation site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendel Volker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translation initiation site (TIS identification is an important aspect of the gene annotation process, requisite for the accurate delineation of protein sequences from transcript data. We have developed the MetWAMer package for TIS prediction in eukaryotic open reading frames of non-viral origin. MetWAMer can be used as a stand-alone, third-party tool for post-processing gene structure annotations generated by external computational programs and/or pipelines, or directly integrated into gene structure prediction software implementations. Results MetWAMer currently implements five distinct methods for TIS prediction, the most accurate of which is a routine that combines weighted, signal-based translation initiation site scores and the contrast in coding potential of sequences flanking TISs using a perceptron. Also, our program implements clustering capabilities through use of the k-medoids algorithm, thereby enabling cluster-specific TIS parameter utilization. In practice, our static weight array matrix-based indexing method for parameter set lookup can be used with good results in data sets exhibiting moderate levels of 5'-complete coverage. Conclusion We demonstrate that improvements in statistically-based models for TIS prediction can be achieved by taking the class of each potential start-methionine into account pending certain testing conditions, and that our perceptron-based model is suitable for the TIS identification task. MetWAMer represents a well-documented, extensible, and freely available software system that can be readily re-trained for differing target applications and/or extended with existing and novel TIS prediction methods, to support further research efforts in this area.

  5. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Lindsay; Zahm, Jacob A.; Ali, Rustam; Kukula, Maciej; Bian, Liangqiao; Patrie, Steven M.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Rosen, Michael K.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    13 C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific 13 C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient 13 C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets

  6. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C [UWASH

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  7. Molecular characterization and interactome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi tryparedoxin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diego G; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A; Robello, Carlos

    2015-04-29

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, possesses two tryparedoxins (TcTXNI and TcTXNII), belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily. TXNs are oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer between trypanothione and peroxiredoxins. This constitutes a difference with the host cells, in which these activities are mediated by thioredoxins. These differences make TXNs an attractive target for drug development. In a previous work we characterized TcTXNI, including the redox interactome. In this work we extend the study to TcTXNII. We demonstrate that TcTXNII is a transmembrane protein anchored to the surface of the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, with a cytoplasmatic orientation of the redox domain. It would be expressed during the metacyclogenesis process. In order to continue with the characterization of the redox interactome of T. cruzi, we designed an active site mutant TcTXNII lacking the resolving cysteine, and through the expression of this mutant protein and incubation with T. cruzi proteins, heterodisulfide complexes were isolated by affinity chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. This allowed us to identify sixteen TcTXNII interacting proteins, which are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, indicating the relevance of TcTXNII, and contributing to our understanding of the redox interactome of T. cruzi. T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, constitutes a major sanitary problem in Latin America. The number of estimated infected persons is ca. 8 million, 28 million people are at risk of infection and ~20,000 deaths occur per year in endemic regions. No vaccines are available at present, and most drugs currently in use were developed decades ago and show variable efficacy with undesirable side effects. The parasite is able to live and prolipherate inside macrophage phagosomes, where it is exposed to cytotoxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, derived from macrophage activation. Therefore, T. cruzi

  8. Characterization of plasma menbrane polypeptides of trypanosoma from bats Caracterização de polipeptídeos de membrana plasmática de tripanosomas de morcegos

    OpenAIRE

    R. T. Pinho; Giovanni de Simone

    1989-01-01

    Cell surface proteins of Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma vespertilionis and Trypanosoma sp. (M238) were radiodinated and their distribution both in the detergent-poor (DPP) and dertergent-enriched phase (DRP) was studied using a phase separation technique in Triton X-114 as well as polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS-PAGE). Significant differences were observed in the proteins present in the DRP when the three species of trypanosoma were compared. Two major ba...

  9. Comprehensive glycoprofiling of the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Kawahara, Rebeca; Viner, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle involving insect and mammalian hosts and distinct developmental stages. During T. cruzi developmental stages, glycoproteins play important role in the host-parasite interaction, such as cellular recognition, host...... the significant T. cruzi stage-specific expression of glycoproteins that can help to better understand the T. cruzi phenotype and response caused by the interaction with different hosts during its complex life cycle. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is a neglected...... disease which affects millions of people especially in Latin America. The absence of efficient drugs and vaccines against Chagas disease stimulates the search for novel targets. Glycoproteins are very attractive therapeutic candidate targets since they mediate key processes in the host...

  10. A case of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type infection and its management in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kimeli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type infection in a 4-year old German shepherd dog weighing 26-kg was presented to the Small Animal Clinic, University of Nairobi, Kenya, with the history of anorexia and difficulty in breathing. The clinical manifestations were fever, pale mucous membrane, dyspnea and wasting. Blood examination revealed the existence of trypanosome parasites, and showed mild anemia. Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS based polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type. Along with supporting therapy, the case was successfully managed using diminazene aceturate injection (dosed at 3.5 mg/kg body weight through intramuscular route. Complete recovery of the case was observed on day 6 of post-treatment.

  11. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and cytotoxic activities of Eugenia uniflora L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karla K A; Matias, Edinardo F F; Tintino, Saulo R; Souza, Celestina E S; Braga, Maria F B M; Guedes, Gláucia M M; Rolón, Miriam; Vega, Celeste; de Arias, Antonieta Rojas; Costa, José G M; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2012-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, being considered a public health problem. An alternative to combat this pathogen is the use of natural products isolated from fruits such as Eugenia uniflora, a plant used by traditional communities as food and medicine due to its antimicrobial and biological activities. Ethanolic extract from E. uniflora was used to evaluate in vitro anti-epimastigote and cytotoxic activity. This is the first record of anti-Trypanosoma activity of E. uniflora, demonstrating that a concentration presenting 50% of activity (EC(50)) was 62.76 μg/mL. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was ≤ 1024 μg/mL. Our results indicate that E. uniflora could be a source of plant-derived natural products with anti-epimastigote activity with low toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The isolation and identification of Trypanosoma cruzi from raccoons in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, B.C.; Bauman, P.M.; Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1958-01-01

    Five raccoons trapped at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, were found to have trypanosomes in the blood which were morphologically indistinguishable from Trypanosoma cruzi on stained smears. The organism grew well in culture. It developed and reproduced in Triatoma protracta, T. infestans, T. phyllosoma, and Rhodnius prolixus. Experimental infections were produced in raccoons, opossums, mice, rats, and monkeys by inoculation of blood, culture, and triatome forms. Typical leishmaniform bodies were found in tissue sections of cardiac muscle fibers from naturally and experimentally infected animals. Cross agglutinations carried out with Iiving cultural forms and rabbit antisera demonstrated a close antigenic relationship between the raccoon trypanosome and T. cruzi (Brazil strain). On the basis of (1) morphology, (2) presence of leishmaniform tissue stages, (3) development in triatomes, (4) infectivity to a variety of mammals, (5) culture characteristics, and (6) cross reactions in serological tests, this parasite is considered conspecific with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909), the causative agent of American human trypanosomiasis.

  13. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, Alvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles

  14. Extracellular DNA amplicon sequencing reveals high levels of benthic eukaryotic diversity in the central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.; Irigoien, Xabier; Carvalho, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to characterize the benthic eukaryotic biodiversity patterns at a coarse taxonomic level in three areas of the central Red Sea (a lagoon, an offshore area in Thuwal and a shallow coastal area near Jeddah) based

  15. Meeting Report: Minutes from EMBO: Ten Years of Comparative Genomics of Eukaryotic Microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Julius; López-García, P.; Louis, E.; Boekhout, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 3 (2016), s. 217-221 ISSN 1434-4610 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : protist * eukaryotic microorganisms * genomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.794, year: 2016

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of P5 P-type ATPases, a eukaryotic lineage of secretory pathway pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Asp, Torben; Holm, Preben Bach

    2008-01-01

    prokaryotic genome. Based on a protein alignment we could group the P5 ATPases into two subfamilies, P5A and P5B that, based on the number of negative charges in conserved trans-membrane segment 4, are likely to have different ion specificities. P5A ATPases are present in all eukaryotic genomes sequenced so......Eukaryotes encompass a remarkable variety of organisms and unresolved lineages. Different phylogenetic analyses have lead to conflicting conclusions as to the origin and associations between lineages and species. In this work, we investigated evolutionary relationship of a family of cation pumps...... exclusive for the secretory pathway of eukaryotes by combining the identification of lineage-specific genes with phylogenetic evolution of common genes. Sequences of P5 ATPases, which are regarded to be cation pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), were identified in all eukaryotic lineages but not in any...

  17. Changes in bacterial and eukaryotic communities during sewage decomposition in Mississippi River water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial decay processes are one of the mechanisms whereby sewage contamination is reduced in the environment. This decomposition process involves a highly complex array of bacterial and eukaryotic communities from both sewage and ambient waters. However, relatively little is kn...

  18. Landscape epidemiology in urban environments: The example of rodent-borne Trypanosoma in Niamey, Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Kadaouré, Ibrahima; Godefroid, Martin; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2017-10-05

    Trypanosomes are protozoan parasites found worldwide, infecting humans and animals. In the past decade, the number of reports on atypical human cases due to Trypanosoma lewisi or T. lewisi-like has increased urging to investigate the multiple factors driving the disease dynamics, particularly in cities where rodents and humans co-exist at high densities. In the present survey, we used a species distribution model, Maxent, to assess the spatial pattern of Trypanosoma-positive rodents in the city of Niamey. The explanatory variables were landscape metrics describing urban landscape composition and physiognomy computed from 8 land-cover classes. We computed the metrics around each data location using a set of circular buffers of increasing radii (20m, 40m, 60m, 80m and 100m). For each spatial resolution, we determined the optimal combination of feature class and regularization multipliers by fitting Maxent with the full dataset. Since our dataset was small (114 occurrences) we expected an important uncertainty associated to data partitioning into calibration and evaluation datasets. We thus performed 350 independent model runs with a training dataset representing a random subset of 80% of the occurrences and the optimal Maxent parameters. Each model yielded a map of habitat suitability over Niamey, which was transformed into a binary map implementing a threshold maximizing the sensitivity and the specificity. The resulting binary maps were combined to display the proportion of models that indicated a good environmental suitability for Trypanosoma-positive rodents. Maxent performed better with landscape metrics derived from buffers of 80m. Habitat suitability for Trypanosoma-positive rodents exhibited large patches linked to urban features such as patch richness and the proportion of landscape covered by concrete or tarred areas. Such inferences could be helpful in assessing areas at risk, setting of monitoring programs, public and medical staff awareness or even

  19. Genetic control of resistance to Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Matyáš; Havelková, Helena; Quan, L.; Svobodová, M.; Jarošíková, T.; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Stassen, A. P. M.; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2011), e1173 ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520606; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Grant - others:NIH-NCI(US) 1R01CA127162-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei brucei * mouse recombinant congenic strains * Tbbr Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  20. Genome and transcriptome studies of the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Giardia intestinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Franzén, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Giardia intestinalis are two human pathogens and protozoan parasites responsible for the diseases Chagas disease and giardiasis, respectively. Both diseases cause su ering and illness in several million individuals. The former disease occurs primarily in South America and Central America, and the latter disease occurs worldwide. Current therapeutics are toxic and lack e cacy, and potential vaccines are far from the market. Increased knowledge about the bio...

  1. Population genetic analysis of Colombian Trypanosoma cruzi isolates revealed by enzyme electrophoretic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Garcia, Manuel; Montilla, Marleny; Nicholls, Sebastian; Alvarez, Diana

    2001-01-01

    Although Colombia presents an enormous biological diversity, few studies have been conducted on the population genetics of Trypanosoma cruzi. This study was carried out with 23 Colombian stocks of this protozoa analyzed for 13 isoenzymatic loci. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the genetic diversity and heterogeneity, the genetic relationships and the possible spatial structure of these 23 Colombian stocks of T. cruzi were estimated. The majority of results obtained are in agreement with a clo...

  2. First Case of Natural Infection in Pigs: Review of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz María Salazar-Schettino

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological research project was performed in the State of Morelos including collection of samples for blood smears and culture, serological tests, and xenodiagnoses from a total of 76 domestic and peridomestic mammals. Two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated by haemocultures; one from a pig (Sus scrofa, the first case of natural infection reported in Mexico, and the other from a dog (Canis familiaris. This study summarizes current information in Mexico concerning confirmed reservoirs of T. cruzi

  3. The import and function of diatom and plant frataxins in the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Long, Shaojun; Vávrová, Zuzana; Lukeš, Julius

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2008), s. 100-104 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960705; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129; GA ČR GA204/06/1558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : frataxin * mitochondrion * Trypanosoma * diatom * evolutionary conservativeness * import Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.951, year: 2008

  4. DEAD-box RNA helicase is dispensable for mitochondrial translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richterová, Lenka; Vávrová, Zuzana; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 1 (2011), 300-303 ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * Mitochondrial translation * RNA helicase * Cytochrome c oxidase * Mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.122, year: 2011

  5. Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis is required for normal mitochondrial morphology and function in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guler, J. L.; Kriegová, Eva; Smith, T. K.; Lukeš, Julius; Englund, P. T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 5 (2008), s. 1125-1142 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/1558; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Grant - others:NIH(US) AI21334; Wellcome Trust(GB) 067441 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * mitochondrion * fatty acid * RNA interference Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.213, year: 2008

  6. Disparate phenotypic effects from the knockdown of various Trypanosoma brucei cytochrome c oxidase subunits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gnipová, Anna; Panicucci, Brian; Paris, Zdeněk; Verner, Zdeněk; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius; Zíková, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 2 (2012), s. 90-98 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960901; GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * RNA interference * Mitochondrion * Respiratory complexes * Cytochrome c oxidase Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112001065#

  7. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  8. Exploring the Trypanosoma brucei Hsp83 potential as a target for structure guided drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Pizarro

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis is a neglected parasitic disease that is fatal if untreated. The current drugs available to eliminate the causative agent Trypanosoma brucei have multiple liabilities, including toxicity, increasing problems due to treatment failure and limited efficacy. There are two approaches to discover novel antimicrobial drugs--whole-cell screening and target-based discovery. In the latter case, there is a need to identify and validate novel drug targets in Trypanosoma parasites. The heat shock proteins (Hsp, while best known as cancer targets with a number of drug candidates in clinical development, are a family of emerging targets for infectious diseases. In this paper, we report the exploration of T. brucei Hsp83--a homolog of human Hsp90--as a drug target using multiple biophysical and biochemical techniques. Our approach included the characterization of the chemical sensitivity of the parasitic chaperone against a library of known Hsp90 inhibitors by means of differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF. Several compounds identified by this screening procedure were further studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and X-ray crystallography, as well as tested in parasite growth inhibitions assays. These experiments led us to the identification of a benzamide derivative compound capable of interacting with TbHsp83 more strongly than with its human homologs and structural rationalization of this selectivity. The results highlight the opportunities created by subtle structural differences to develop new series of compounds to selectively target the Trypanosoma brucei chaperone and effectively kill the sleeping sickness parasite.

  9. Mapping and characterizing N6-methyladenine in eukaryotic genomes using single molecule real-time sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shijia; Beaulaurier, John; Deikus, Gintaras; Wu, Tao; Strahl, Maya; Hao, Ziyang; Luo, Guanzheng; Gregory, James A; Chess, Andrew; He, Chuan; Xiao, Andrew; Sebra, Robert; Schadt, Eric E; Fang, Gang

    2018-05-15

    N6-methyladenine (m6dA) has been discovered as a novel form of DNA methylation prevalent in eukaryotes, however, methods for high resolution mapping of m6dA events are still lacking. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing has enabled the detection of m6dA events at single-nucleotide resolution in prokaryotic genomes, but its application to detecting m6dA in eukaryotic genomes has not been rigorously examined. Herein, we identified unique characteristics of eukaryotic m6dA methylomes that fundamentally differ from those of prokaryotes. Based on these differences, we describe the first approach for mapping m6dA events using SMRT sequencing specifically designed for the study of eukaryotic genomes, and provide appropriate strategies for designing experiments and carrying out sequencing in future studies. We apply the novel approach to study two eukaryotic genomes. For green algae, we construct the first complete genome-wide map of m6dA at single nucleotide and single molecule resolution. For human lymphoblastoid cells (hLCLs), joint analyses of SMRT sequencing and independent sequencing data suggest that putative m6dA events are enriched in the promoters of young, full length LINE-1 elements (L1s). These analyses demonstrate a general method for rigorous mapping and characterization of m6dA events in eukaryotic genomes. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Trypanocidal drugs for chronic asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Juan Carlos; Perez, Juan Guillermo; Cortes, Olga Lucia; Riarte, Adelina; Pepper, Micah; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2014-05-27

    Prevention of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) by treating infected populations with trypanocidal therapy (TT) remains a challenge. Despite a renewed enthusiasm for TT, uncertainty regarding its efficacy, concerns about its safety and limited availability remain barriers for a wider use of conventional drugs. We have updated a previous version of this review. To systematically search, appraise, identify and extract data from eligible studies comparing the outcome of cohorts of seropositive individuals to Trypanosoma cruzi exposed to TT versus placebo or no treatment. We sought eligible studies in electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 1, 2014); MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to January week 5 2014); EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2014 week 6) and LILACS (up to 6 May 2010)) by combining terms related with the disease and the treatment. The search also included a Google search, handsearch for references in review or selected articles, and search of expert files. We applied no language restrictions. Review authors screened the retrieved references for eligibility (those dealing with human participants treated with TT) and then assessed the pre-selected studies in full for inclusion. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies that provided data on either mortality or clinical progression of CCC after at least four years of follow-up. Teams of two review authors independently carried out the study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment, with a referee resolving disagreement within the pairs. Data collection included study design, characteristics of the population and interventions or exposures and outcome measures. We defined categories of outcome data as parasite-related (positive serology, xenodiagnosis or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after TT) and participant-related (including efficacy outcomes such as progression towards CCC, all-cause mortality and side effects of TT). We reported

  11. Molecular basis of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania interaction with their host(s): exploitation of immune and defense mechanisms by the parasite leading to persistence and chronicity, features reminiscent of immune system evasion strategies in cancer diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaissi, Ali; Ouaissi, Mehdi

    2005-01-01

    A number of features occurring during host-parasite interactions in Chagas disease caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmaniasis, caused by a group of kinetoplastid protozoan parasites are reminiscent of those observed in cancer diseases. In fact,although the cancer is not a single disease, and that T.cruzi and Leishmania are sophisticated eukaryotic parasites presenting a high level of genotypic variability the growth of the parasites in their host and that of cancer cells share at least one common feature, that is their mutual capacity for rapid cell division. Surprisingly, the parasitic diseases and cancers share some immune evasion strategies. Consideration of these immunological alterations must be added to the evaluation of the pathogenic processes. The molecular and functional characterization of virulence factors and the study of their effect on the arms of the immune system have greatly improved understanding of the regulation of immune effectors functions. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data related to the regulatory components or processes originating from the parasite that control or interfere with host cell physiology. Attempts are also made to delineate some similarities between the immune evasion strategies that parasites and tumors employ. The elucidation of the mode of action of parasite virulence factors toward the host cell allow not only provide us with a more comprehensive view of the host-parasite relationships but may also represent a step forward in efforts aimed to identify new target molecules for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in the sheep ked Melophagus ovinus from organic farms in Croatia: phylogenetic inferences support restriction to sheep and sheep keds and close relationship with trypanosomes from other ruminant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinković, Franjo; Matanović, Krešimir; Rodrigues, Adriana C; Garcia, Herakles A; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium is a parasite of sheep transmitted by sheep keds, the sheep-restricted ectoparasite Melophagus ovinus (Diptera: Hippoboscidae). Sheep keds were 100% prevalent in sheep from five organic farms in Croatia, Southeastern Europe, whereas trypanosomes morphologically compatible with T. melophagium were 86% prevalent in the guts of the sheep keds. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses using sequences of small subunit rRNA, glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, spliced leader, and internal transcribed spacer 1 of the rDNA distinguished T. melophagium from all allied trypanosomes from other ruminant species and placed the trypanosome in the subgenus Megatrypanum. Trypanosomes from sheep keds from Croatia and Scotland, the only available isolates for comparison, shared identical sequences. All biologic and phylogenetic inferences support the restriction of T. melophagium to sheep and, especially, to the sheep keds. The comparison of trypanosomes from sheep, cattle, and deer from the same country, which was never achieved before this work, strongly supported the host-restricted specificity of trypanosomes of the subgenus Megatrypanum. Our findings indicate that with the expansion of organic farms, both sheep keds and T. melophagium may re-emerge as parasitic infections of sheep. © 2011 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  13. Metabarcoding analysis of eukaryotic microbiota in the gut of HIV-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hamad

    Full Text Available Research on the relationship between changes in the gut microbiota and human disease, including AIDS, is a growing field. However, studies on the eukaryotic component of the intestinal microbiota have just begun and have not yet been conducted in HIV-infected patients. Moreover, eukaryotic community profiling is influenced by the use of different methodologies at each step of culture-independent techniques. Herein, initially, four DNA extraction protocols were compared to test the efficiency of each method in recovering eukaryotic DNA from fecal samples. Our results revealed that recovering eukaryotic components from fecal samples differs significantly among DNA extraction methods. Subsequently, the composition of the intestinal eukaryotic microbiota was evaluated in HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers through clone sequencing, high-throughput sequencing of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers 1 (ITS1 and 2 (ITS2 amplicons and real-time PCRs. Our results revealed that not only richness (Chao-1 index and alpha diversity (Shannon diversity differ between HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers, depending on the molecular strategy used, but also the global eukaryotic community composition, with little overlapping taxa found between techniques. Moreover, our results based on cloning libraries and ITS1/ITS2 metabarcoding sequencing showed significant differences in fungal composition between HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers, but without distinct clusters separating the two groups. Malassezia restricta was significantly more prevalent in fecal samples of HIV-infected patients, according to cloning libraries, whereas operational taxonomic units (OTUs belonging to Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis were significantly more abundant in fecal samples of HIV-infected patients compared to healthy subjects in both ITS subregions. Finally, real-time PCR showed the presence of Microsporidia, Giardia lamblia, Blastocystis

  14. Stomoxys calcitrans as possible vector of Trypanosoma evansi among camels in an affected area of the Canary Islands, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Francisco Rodríguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Trypanosoma evansi was first identified in the Canary Islands in 1997, and is still present in a small area of the Archipelago. To date, the disease has exclusively affected camel herds, and has not been detected in any other animal hosts. However potential vectors of Trypanosoma evansi must be identified. Methods One Nzi trap was placed on a camel farm located in the infected area for a period of one year. Results Two thousand five hundred and five insects were trapped, of which Stomoxys calcitrans was the sole hematophagous vector captured. Conclusions Stomoxys calcitrans could be exclusively responsible for the transmission of Trypanosoma evansi among camels in the surveyed area, as other species do not seem to be infected by S. calcitrans in the presence of camels.

  15. Estudo do papel funcional da cisteína sintase e da cistationina B-sintase na resposta ao estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo em leishmania (viannia) braziliensis, trypanosoma rangeli e trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Calderon, Ibeth Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Tese (doutorado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biotecnologia e Biociências, Florianópolis, 2014 Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Trypanosoma rangeli e o Trypanosoma cruzi são parasitos hemoflagelados pertencentes à Ordem Kinetoplastida, família Trypanosomatidae, capazes de infectar insetos, animais silvestres e domésticos, assim como o homem. Durante seu ciclo de vida, estes parasitos são expostos a uma grande quanti...

  16. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are abundantly expressed by microbial eukaryotes in a high-Arctic fjord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Anna; Laughinghouse, Haywood D; Griffiths, Colin; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Gabrielsen, Tove M

    2018-02-01

    Proton-pumping rhodopsins provide an alternative pathway to photosynthesis by which solar energy can enter the marine food web. Rhodopsin genes are widely found in marine bacteria, also in the Arctic, and were recently reported from several eukaryotic lineages. So far, little is known about rhodopsin expression in Arctic eukaryotes. In this study, we used metatranscriptomics and 18S rDNA tag sequencing to examine the mid-summer function and composition of marine protists (size 0.45-10 µm) in the high-Arctic Billefjorden (Spitsbergen), especially focussing on the expression of microbial proton-pumping rhodopsins. Rhodopsin transcripts were highly abundant, at a level similar to that of genes involved in photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses placed the environmental rhodopsins within disparate eukaryotic lineages, including dinoflagellates, stramenopiles, haptophytes and cryptophytes. Sequence comparison indicated the presence of several functional types, including xanthorhodopsins and a eukaryotic clade of proteorhodopsin. Transcripts belonging to the proteorhodopsin clade were also abundant in published metatranscriptomes from other oceanic regions, suggesting a global distribution. The diversity and abundance of rhodopsins show that these light-driven proton pumps play an important role in Arctic microbial eukaryotes. Understanding this role is imperative to predicting the future of the Arctic marine ecosystem faced by a changing light climate due to diminishing sea-ice. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Diversity patterns of microbial eukaryotes mirror those of bacteria in Antarctic cryoconite holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Pacifica; Darcy, John L; Gendron, Eli M S; Stanish, Lee F; Bagshaw, Elizabeth A; Porazinska, Dorota L; Schmidt, Steven K

    2018-01-01

    Ice-lidded cryoconite holes on glaciers in the Taylor Valley, Antarctica, provide a unique system of natural mesocosms for studying community structure and assembly. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing to characterize both microbial eukaryotic communities and bacterial communities within cryoconite holes across three glaciers to study similarities in their spatial patterns. We expected that the alpha (phylogenetic diversity) and beta (pairwise community dissimilarity) diversity patterns of eukaryotes in cryoconite holes would be related to those of bacteria, and that they would be related to the biogeochemical gradient within the Taylor Valley. We found that eukaryotic alpha and beta diversity were strongly related to those of bacteria across scales ranging from 140 m to 41 km apart. Alpha diversity of both was significantly related to position in the valley and surface area of the cryoconite hole, with pH also significantly correlated with the eukaryotic diversity. Beta diversity for both bacteria and eukaryotes was significantly related to position in the valley, with bacterial beta diversity also related to nitrate. These results are consistent with transport of sediments onto glaciers occurring primarily at local scales relative to the size of the valley, thus creating feedbacks in local chemistry and diversity. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Genetic exchange in eukaryotes through horizontal transfer: connected by the mobilome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallau, Gabriel Luz; Vieira, Cristina; Loreto, Élgion Lúcio Silva

    2018-01-01

    All living species contain genetic information that was once shared by their common ancestor. DNA is being inherited through generations by vertical transmission (VT) from parents to offspring and from ancestor to descendant species. This process was considered the sole pathway by which biological entities exchange inheritable information. However, Horizontal Transfer (HT), the exchange of genetic information by other means than parents to offspring, was discovered in prokaryotes along with strong evidence showing that it is a very important process by which prokaryotes acquire new genes. For some time now, it has been a scientific consensus that HT events were rare and non-relevant for evolution of eukaryotic species, but there is growing evidence supporting that HT is an important and frequent phenomenon in eukaryotes as well. Here, we will discuss the latest findings regarding HT among eukaryotes, mainly HT of transposons (HTT), establishing HTT once and for all as an important phenomenon that should be taken into consideration to fully understand eukaryotes genome evolution. In addition, we will discuss the latest development methods to detect such events in a broader scale and highlight the new approaches which should be pursued by researchers to fill the knowledge gaps regarding HTT among eukaryotes.

  19. Arginine deiminase pathway enzymes: evolutionary history in metamonads and other eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Lukáš; Zubáčová, Zuzana; Karnkowska, Anna; Kolisko, Martin; Hroudová, Miluše; Stairs, Courtney W; Simpson, Alastair G B; Keeling, Patrick J; Roger, Andrew J; Čepička, Ivan; Hampl, Vladimír

    2016-10-06

    Multiple prokaryotic lineages use the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway for anaerobic energy production by arginine degradation. The distribution of this pathway among eukaryotes has been thought to be very limited, with only two specialized groups living in low oxygen environments (Parabasalia and Diplomonadida) known to possess the complete set of all three enzymes. We have performed an extensive survey of available sequence data in order to map the distribution of these enzymes among eukaryotes and to reconstruct their phylogenies. We have found genes for the complete pathway in almost all examined representatives of Metamonada, the anaerobic protist group that includes parabasalids and diplomonads. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the presence of the complete pathway in the last common ancestor of metamonads and heterologous transformation experiments suggest its cytosolic localization in the metamonad ancestor. Outside Metamonada, the complete pathway occurs rarely, nevertheless, it was found in representatives of most major eukaryotic clades. Phylogenetic relationships of complete pathways are consistent with the presence of the Archaea-derived ADI pathway in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, although other evolutionary scenarios remain possible. The presence of the incomplete set of enzymes is relatively common among eukaryotes and it may be related to the fact that these enzymes are involved in other cellular processes, such as the ornithine-urea cycle. Single protein phylogenies suggest that the evolutionary history of all three enzymes has been shaped by frequent gene losses and horizontal transfers, which may sometimes be connected with their diverse roles in cellular metabolism.

  20. Evolution of glutamate dehydrogenase genes: evidence for lateral gene transfer within and between prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Andrew J

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral gene transfer can introduce genes with novel functions into genomes or replace genes with functionally similar orthologs or paralogs. Here we present a study of the occurrence of the latter gene replacement phenomenon in the four gene families encoding different classes of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, to evaluate and compare the patterns and rates of lateral gene transfer (LGT in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Results We extend the taxon sampling of gdh genes with nine new eukaryotic sequences and examine the phylogenetic distribution pattern of the various GDH classes in combination with maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses. The distribution pattern analyses indicate that LGT has played a significant role in the evolution of the four gdh gene families. Indeed, a number of gene transfer events are identified by phylogenetic analyses, including numerous prokaryotic intra-domain transfers, some prokaryotic inter-domain transfers and several inter-domain transfers between prokaryotes and microbial eukaryotes (protists. Conclusion LGT has apparently affected eukaryotes and prokaryotes to a similar extent within the gdh gene families. In the absence of indications that the evolution of the gdh gene families is radically different from other families, these results suggest that gene transfer might be an important evolutionary mechanism in microbial eukaryote genome evolution.

  1. Diversity of Eukaryotic Translational Initiation Factor eIF4E in Protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagus, Rosemary; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Joshi, Bhavesh; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    The greatest diversity of eukaryotic species is within the microbial eukaryotes, the protists, with plants and fungi/metazoa representing just two of the estimated seventy five lineages of eukaryotes. Protists are a diverse group characterized by unusual genome features and a wide range of genome sizes from 8.2 Mb in the apicomplexan parasite Babesia bovis to 112,000-220,050 Mb in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. Protists possess numerous cellular, molecular and biochemical traits not observed in "text-book" model organisms. These features challenge some of the concepts and assumptions about the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Like multicellular eukaryotes, many protists encode multiple eIF4Es, but few functional studies have been undertaken except in parasitic species. An earlier phylogenetic analysis of protist eIF4Es indicated that they cannot be grouped within the three classes that describe eIF4E family members from multicellular organisms. Many more protist sequences are now available from which three clades can be recognized that are distinct from the plant/fungi/metazoan classes. Understanding of the protist eIF4Es will be facilitated as more sequences become available particularly for the under-represented opisthokonts and amoebozoa. Similarly, a better understanding of eIF4Es within each clade will develop as more functional studies of protist eIF4Es are completed.

  2. Variant surface glycoproteins from Venezuelan trypanosome isolates are recognized by sera from animals infected with either Trypanosoma evansi or Trypanosoma vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Rocío; Izquier, Adriana; Uzcanga, Graciela L; Perrone, Trina; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Carrasquel, Liomary; Arias, Laura P; Escalona, José L; Cardozo, Vanessa; Bubis, José

    2015-01-15

    Salivarian trypanosomes sequentially express only one variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) on their cell surface from a large repertoire of VSG genes. Seven cryopreserved animal trypanosome isolates known as TeAp-ElFrio01, TEVA1 (or TeAp-N/D1), TeGu-N/D1, TeAp-Mantecal01, TeGu-TerecayTrino, TeGu-Terecay03 and TeGu-Terecay323, which had been isolated from different hosts identified in several geographical areas of Venezuela were expanded using adult albino rats. Soluble forms of predominant VSGs expressed during the early infection stages were purified and corresponded to concanavalin A-binding proteins with molecular masses of 48-67 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electropohoresis, and pI values between 6.1 and 7.5. The biochemical characterization of all purified soluble VSGs revealed that they were dimers in their native form and represented different gene products. Sequencing of some of these proteins yielded peptides homologous to VSGs from Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei and Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi and established that they most likely are mosaics generated by homologous recombination. Western blot analysis showed that all purified VSGs were cross-reacting antigens that were recognized by sera from animals infected with either T. evansi or Trypanosoma (Dutonella) vivax. The VSG glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol cross-reacting determinant epitope was only partially responsible for the cross-reactivity of the purified proteins, and antibodies appeared to recognize cross-reacting conformational epitopes from the various soluble VSGs. ELISA experiments were performed using infected bovine sera collected from cattle in a Venezuelan trypanosome-endemic area. In particular, soluble VSGs from two trypanosome isolates, TeGu-N/D1 and TeGu-TeracayTrino, were recognized by 93.38% and 73.55% of naturally T. vivax-infected bovine sera, respectively. However, approximately 70% of the sera samples did not recognize all seven purified proteins. Hence, the

  3. Utilización de Lepidium Peruvianum Maca, como medio de cultivo para el crecimiento de Trypanosoma Cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Saldaña C, Charles; Córdova P, Ofelia; Vargas V¹, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Por sus características nutritivas de alto valor, se ensayó la posible utilidad del Lepidium peruvianum maca, como un medio para cultivar Trypanosoma cruzi. Bajo condiciones experimentales se procedió a incubar epimastigotes de T. cruzi en cuatro medios de cultivo bifásicos diferentes, a base de Lepidium peruvianum maca, los cuales fueron comparados con el medio de cultivo BHI como control. La incorporación de maca como medio de cultivo permitió el crecimiento de Trypanosoma cruzi; se determi...

  4. Insights into the diversity of eukaryotes in acid mine drainage biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brett J; Tyson, Gene W; Goosherst, Lindsey; Banfield, Jillian F

    2009-04-01

    Microscopic eukaryotes are known to have important ecosystem functions, but their diversity in most environments remains vastly unexplored. Here we analyzed an 18S rRNA gene library from a subsurface iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microbial community growing in highly acidic (pH morphological characterization. Results revealed that the populations vary significantly with the habitat and no group is ubiquitous. Surprisingly, many of the eukaryotic lineages (with the exception of the APC) are closely related to neutrophiles, suggesting that they recently adapted to this extreme environment. Molecular analyses presented here confirm that the number of eukaryotic species associated with the acid mine drainage (AMD) communities is low. This finding is consistent with previous results showing a limited diversity of archaea, bacteria, and viruses in AMD environments and suggests that the environmental pressures and interplay between the members of these communities limit species diversity at all trophic levels.

  5. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Bjornberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyv...... of the eukaryotic or prokaryotic genes involved in pyrimidine degradation described to date.......Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces......, respectively. The gene products of URC1 and URC4 are highly conserved proteins with so far unknown functions and they are present in a variety of prokaryotes and fungi. In bacteria and in some fungi, URC1 and URC4 are linked on the genome together with the gene for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (URC6). Urc1...

  6. Metabolism in anoxic permeable sediments is dominated by eukaryotic dark fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourke, Michael F.; Marriott, Philip J.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2017-01-01

    Permeable sediments are common across continental shelves and are critical contributors to marine biogeochemical cycling. Organic matter in permeable sediments is dominated by microalgae, which as eukaryotes have different anaerobic metabolic pathways to prokaryotes such as bacteria and archaea....... Here we present analyses of flow-through reactor experiments showing that dissolved inorganic carbon is produced predominantly as a result of anaerobic eukaryotic metabolic activity. In our experiments, anaerobic production of dissolved inorganic carbon was consistently accompanied by large dissolved H....../hydrogenase pathway of fermentative eukaryotic H2 production, suggesting that pathway as the source of H2 and dissolved inorganic carbon production. Metabolomic analysis showed large increases in lipid production at the onset of anoxia, consistent with documented pathways of anoxic dark fermentation in microalgae...

  7. Large-scale analysis of phosphorylation site occupancy in eukaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    in proteins is currently lacking. We have therefore analyzed the occurrence and occupancy of phosphorylated sites (~ 100,281) in a large set of eukaryotic proteins (~ 22,995). Phosphorylation probability was found to be much higher in both the  termini of protein sequences and this is much pronounced...... maximum randomness. An analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that just 40 motifs and a much lower number of associated kinases might account for nearly 50% of the known phosphorylations in eukaryotic proteins. Our results provide a broad picture of the phosphorylation sites in eukaryotic proteins.......Many recent high throughput technologies have enabled large-scale discoveries of new phosphorylation sites and phosphoproteins. Although they have provided a number of insights into protein phosphorylation and the related processes, an inclusive analysis on the nature of phosphorylated sites...

  8. Efecto inmunosupresor de la infección por Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae en la toxoplasmosis experimental Immunosuppressor effect of Trypanosoma musculi (Mastigophora: Trypanosomatidae on experimental toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Piccolo-Johanning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La prevalencia de infecciones por Toxoplasma gondii en el ser humano es de 5-90% según la zona geográfica; en Costa Rica por ejemplo, la seroprevalencia es de un 58%, por lo que es importante comprender algunos procesos inmunológicos, propios en estas afectaciones parasitarias. Con el objeto de determinar si el Trypanosoma musculi ejerce procesos de inmunosupresión sobre Toxoplasma gondii se realizó un experimento en el que se inocularon ratones Swiss con T. musculi cuatro, cinco, seis y siete días previos a la infección con T. gondii, ocurriendo la inmunosupresión cuando la inoculación con T. musculi fue hecha cuatro días antes. Además, la cantidad de tripomastigotos inoculados no influyó en el proceso. Se probaron tres cepas de T. gondii aisladas de las heces de un gato casero (TFC, de un Leopardus pardalis (TLP, de un Leopardus wiedii y de la carne de un Bos taurus (TBT. La cepa TLP resultó ser muy patógena, matando a los animales en un tiempo corto, independientemente de la inoculación con T. musculi; para las otras cepas se mantuvo el patrón de inmunosupresión en los ratones. Se reporta entonces un modelo experimental de inmunosupresión, aspecto muy en boga en este momento, por su relación con enfermedades que inducen esta condición en el ser humano, especialmente a enfermedades como el cáncer y el SIDA. Este modelo es más fácil de aplicar experimentalmente que el correspondiente con T. lewisi previamente descrito, el cual usa ratas blancas de más difícil manejo que los ratones usados en este estudio.The immunosuppression caused by species of the gender Trypanosoma has been widely documented. The influence over experimental infections with Toxoplasma gondii is evident when using Trypanosoma lewisi, a natural parasite of white rats. We decided to test the effect of Trypanosoma musculi from mice, an organism with very similar biological characteristics to T. lewisi, to see if this trypanosomatid could induce a similar

  9. Initiation of translation in bacteria by a structured eukaryotic IRES RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A; Jaafar, Zane A; Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Noller, Harry F; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-05

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA to RNA to protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the translation steps that take place after initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life. We wanted to explore whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by transfer RNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA, but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence and provides an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life.

  10. The reduced kinome of Ostreococcus tauri: core eukaryotic signalling components in a tractable model species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Matthew M; Martin, Sarah F; Noordally, Zeenat B; van Ooijen, Gerben; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Simpson, T Ian; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J

    2014-08-02

    The current knowledge of eukaryote signalling originates from phenotypically diverse organisms. There is a pressing need to identify conserved signalling components among eukaryotes, which will lead to the transfer of knowledge across kingdoms. Two useful properties of a eukaryote model for signalling are (1) reduced signalling complexity, and (2) conservation of signalling components. The alga Ostreococcus tauri is described as the smallest free-living eukaryote. With less than 8,000 genes, it represents a highly constrained genomic palette. Our survey revealed 133 protein kinases and 34 protein phosphatases (1.7% and 0.4% of the proteome). We conducted phosphoproteomic experiments and constructed domain structures and phylogenies for the catalytic protein-kinases. For each of the major kinases families we review the completeness and divergence of O. tauri representatives in comparison to the well-studied kinomes of the laboratory models Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and of Homo sapiens. Many kinase clades in O. tauri were reduced to a single member, in preference to the loss of family diversity, whereas TKL and ABC1 clades were expanded. We also identified kinases that have been lost in A. thaliana but retained in O. tauri. For three, contrasting eukaryotic pathways - TOR, MAPK, and the circadian clock - we established the subset of conserved components and demonstrate conserved sites of substrate phosphorylation and kinase motifs. We conclude that O. tauri satisfies our two central requirements. Several of its kinases are more closely related to H. sapiens orthologs than S. cerevisiae is to H. sapiens. The greatly reduced kinome of O. tauri is therefore a suitable model for signalling in free-living eukaryotes.

  11. Convergent use of RhoGAP toxins by eukaryotic parasites and bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Colinet

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of host Rho GTPases is a widespread strategy employed by bacterial pathogens to manipulate mammalian cellular functions and avoid immune defenses. Some bacterial toxins mimic eukaryotic Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs to inactivate mammalian GTPases, probably as a result of evolutionary convergence. An intriguing question remains whether eukaryotic pathogens or parasites may use endogenous GAPs as immune-suppressive toxins to target the same key genes as bacterial pathogens. Interestingly, a RhoGAP domain-containing protein, LbGAP, was recently characterized from the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi, and shown to protect parasitoid eggs from the immune response of Drosophila host larvae. We demonstrate here that LbGAP has structural characteristics of eukaryotic RhoGAPs but that it acts similarly to bacterial RhoGAP toxins in mammals. First, we show by immunocytochemistry that LbGAP enters Drosophila immune cells, plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, and that morphological changes in lamellocytes are correlated with the quantity of LbGAP they contain. Demonstration that LbGAP displays a GAP activity and specifically interacts with the active, GTP-bound form of the two Drosophila Rho GTPases Rac1 and Rac2, both required for successful encapsulation of Leptopilina eggs, was then achieved using biochemical tests, yeast two-hybrid analysis, and GST pull-down assays. In addition, we show that the overall structure of LbGAP is similar to that of eukaryotic RhoGAP domains, and we identify distinct residues involved in its interaction with Rac GTPases. Altogether, these results show that eukaryotic parasites can use endogenous RhoGAPs as virulence factors and that despite their differences in sequence and structure, eukaryotic and bacterial RhoGAP toxins are similarly used to target the same immune pathways in insects and mammals.

  12. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P Sülsen

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin

  13. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  14. Subcellular localization of glycolytic enzymes and characterization of intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón-Mercado, Rocío; Acosta, Héctor; Cáceres, Ana J; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis

    2017-09-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate protist that infects wild and domestic mammals as well as humans in Central and South America. Although this parasite is not pathogenic for human, it is being studied because it shares with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, biological characteristics, geographic distribution, vectors and vertebrate hosts. Several metabolic studies have been performed with T. cruzi epimastigotes, however little is known about the metabolism of T. rangeli. In this work we present the subcellular distribution of the T. rangeli enzymes responsible for the conversion of glucose to pyruvate, as determined by epifluorescense immunomicroscopy and subcellular fractionation involving either selective membrane permeabilization with digitonin or differential and isopycnic centrifugation. We found that in T. rangeli epimastigotes the first six enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, involved in the conversion of glucose to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate are located within glycosomes, while the last four steps occur in the cytosol. In contrast with T. cruzi, where three isoenzymes (one cytosolic and two glycosomal) of phosphoglycerate kinase are expressed simultaneously, only one enzyme with this activity is detected in T. rangeli epimastigotes, in the cytosol. Consistent with this latter result, we found enzymes involved in auxiliary pathways to glycolysis needed to maintain adenine nucleotide and redox balances within glycosomes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, malate dehydrogenase, fumarate reductase, pyruvate phosphate dikinase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glucokinase, galactokinase and the first enzyme of the pentose-phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were also located inside glycosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that T. rangeli epimastigotes growing in LIT medium only consume glucose and do not excrete ammonium; moreover, they are unable to survive in partially-depleted glucose medium. The

  15. Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi among captive Neotropical primates in a Brazilian zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís Tâmara Castro; Nitz, Nadjar; Knox, Monique Britto; Reis, Filipe; Hagström, Luciana; Cuba, César A Cuba; Hecht, Mariana Machado; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2016-01-26

    Neotropical primates are important sylvatic hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. Infection is often subclinical, but severe disease has been described in both free-ranging and captive primates. Panstrongylus megistus, a major T. cruzi vector, was found infesting a small-primate unit at Brasília zoo (ZooB), Brazil. ZooB lies close to a gallery-forest patch where T. cruzi circulates naturally. Here, we combine parasitological and molecular methods to investigate a focus of T. cruzi infection involving triatomine bugs and Neotropical primates at a zoo located in the Brazilian Savannah. We assessed T. cruzi infection in vectors using optical microscopy (n = 34) and nested PCR (n = 50). We used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to examine blood samples from 26 primates and necropsy samples from two primates that died during the study. We determined parasite lineages in five vectors and two primates by comparing glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6pi) gene sequences. Trypanosoma cruzi was found in 44 vectors and 17 primates (six genera and eight species); one Mico chrysoleucus and one Saguinus niger had high parasitaemias. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in three primates born to qPCR-negative mothers at ZooB and in the two dead specimens. One Callithrix geoffroyi became qPCR-positive over a two-year follow-up. All G6pi sequences matched T. cruzi lineage TcI. Our findings strongly suggest vector-borne T. cruzi transmission within a small-primate unit at ZooB - with vectors, and perhaps also parasites, presumably coming from nearby gallery forest. Periodic checks for vectors and parasites would help eliminate T. cruzi transmission foci in captive-animal facilities. This should be of special importance for captive-breeding programs involving endangered mammals, and would reduce the risk of accidental T. cruzi transmission to keepers and veterinarians.

  16. Revisiting the Relationship between Transposable Elements and the Eukaryotic Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Vivien; Merenciano, Miriam; González, Josefa

    2017-11-01

    A relationship between transposable elements (TEs) and the eukaryotic stress response was suggested in the first publications describing TEs. Since then, it has often been assumed that TEs are activated by stress, and that this activation is often beneficial for the organism. In recent years, the availability of new high-throughput experimental techniques has allowed further interrogation of the relationship between TEs and stress. By reviewing the recent literature, we conclude that although there is evidence for a beneficial effect of TE activation under stress conditions, the relationship between TEs and the eukaryotic stress response is quite complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative radiobiology of genetic loci of eukaryots as the basis of the general theory of mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, I.D.

    1983-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems of modern molecular cellular radiobiology is to reveal general and peculiar processes of the formation of gene mutations and chromosome aberrations in each stage of their formation in the irradiated genome of the higher eukaryots. The solution of the problems depends on the development of research within the framework of comparative radiobiology of genetic loci of the higher eukaryots that makes it possible to study quantitative regularities in the formation of gene (point) mutations and chromosome aberrations in one object and in the same experiment

  18. Once in a lifetime: strategies for preventing re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    DNA replication is an extremely accurate process and cells have evolved intricate control mechanisms to ensure that each region of their genome is replicated only once during S phase. Here, we compare what is known about the processes that prevent re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells...... prokaryotes and eukaryotes are inactivated until the next cell cycle. Furthermore, in both systems the beta-clamp of the replicative polymerase associates with enzymatic activities that contribute to the inactivation of the helicase loaders. Finally, recent studies suggest that the control mechanism...

  19. Signaling mechanisms of apoptosis-like programmed cell death in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemarova, Irina V

    2010-04-01

    In unicellular eukaryotes, apoptosis-like cell death occurs during development, aging and reproduction, and can be induced by environmental stresses and exposure to toxic agents. The essence of the apoptotic machinery in unicellular organisms is similar to that in mammals, but the apoptotic signal network is less complex and of more ancient origin. The review summarizes current data about key apoptotic proteins and mechanisms of the transduction of apoptotic signals by caspase-like proteases and mitochondrial apoptogenic proteins in unicellular eukaryotes. The roles of receptor-dependent and receptor-independent caspase cascades are reviewed. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Eukaryotic RNA polymerase subunit RPB8 is a new relative of the OB family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, S; Kelly, G; Reischl, J; Weinzierl, R O; Matthews, S

    1998-02-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit RPB8 is an essential subunit that is highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution and is present in all three types of nuclear RNA polymerases. We report the first high resolution structural insight into eukaryotic RNA polymerase architecture with the solution structure of RPB8 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It consists of an eight stranded, antiparallel beta-barrel, four short helical regions and a large, unstructured omega-loop. The strands are connected in classic Greek-key fashion. The overall topology is unusual and contains a striking C2 rotational symmetry. Furthermore, it is most likely a novel associate of the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) binding protein class.

  1. Acerca del ciclo evolutivo del Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi Chagas 1909, en sus fases tisular y hematica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Romaña

    1956-06-01

    Full Text Available El autor pasa en revista los trabajos publicados sobre el ciclo evolutivo del Trypanosoma (S. cruzi en el huésped vertebrado, desde el descubrimiento de la enfermedad hasta nuestros días. Luego analiza las ideas de los autores modernos, fundadas en gran parte en las observaciones que ya en 1914 realizaron MAYER y ROCHA LIMA de las cuales participan actualmente ROMAÑA y MEYER, ELKELES y WOOD. Finalmente expressa que a partir de los tripanosomas infectantes los parásitos que penetram en el protoplasma celular pueden seguir dos mecanismos en su evolución hacia cuerpos leishmanioides: 1.º Por "regresión fusiforme" y 2.º por "regresión orbicular"; llegados a la forma leishmanioide los parásitos se multiplican por división binaria, una vez lleno el protoplasma celular, siguen un processo inverso de transformación hacia tripanosoma que puede seguir igualmente dos mecanismos diversos: 1. "progresión fusiforme" y 2.º "progresión orbicular". Estos diversos mecanismos de transformación están esquematizados en la fig. N.º 1 del trabajo.The author reviews published works about the evolutive cycle of the Trypanosoma cruzi in the vertebrate host, from the discovery of the disease to our days. Then, he analyzes the ideas of the modern authors who based themselves on the observations made formerly, in 1914, by MAYER & ROCHA LIMA, ideas that ROMAÑA and MEYER, ELKELES and WOOD agree at the present time. Last, he states that, from the infective trypanosomas, the parasites which enter the cellular protoplasma may follow two systems to perform their evolution up to leishmanioid bodies: 1.] by fusiform regression, 2.º by an orbicular regression. Once the parasites reach the leishmanioid forms, they multiply by binary division. When the celular protoplasm is filled up with the parasites, these follow an inverted transformation up to trypanosoma state, following also two systems; similar to the repression 1.º a fusiform progression, 2.º an

  2. The capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) as a reservoir host for Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, G A; Wells, E A; Angel, D

    1976-10-01

    Discovery of two ill horses and three dogs naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi near an experimental station in the Eastern Plains of Colombia led to a search for reservoir hosts of the parasite. Infection was detected in 8/33 healthy capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), none of the remaining 14 horses, and none of 32 Zebu cattle (Bos indicus), 18 paca (Cuniculus paca) and 20 spiny rats (Proechimys sp.). Contrary to common opinion, the results indicated a carrier state in the capybara. Diagnosis was based on morphology, behaviour in albino rats, and pathogenicity and host range in domestic animals.

  3. Heterogeneities in the Ecoepidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Rural Communities of the Argentinean Chaco

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinal, M. Victoria; Orozco, M. Marcela; Enriquez, Gustavo F.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gaspe, María Sol; Alvarado-Otegui, Julián A.; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey of Trypanosoma cruzi infection of Triatoma infestans as well as dogs and cats in 327 households from a well-defined rural area in northeastern Argentina to test whether the household distribution of infection differed between local ethnic groups (Tobas and Creoles) and identify risk factors for host infection. Overall prevalence of infection of bugs (27.2%; 95% confidence interval = 25.3–29.3%), dogs (26.0%; 95% confidence interval = 23.3–30.1%), and cats...

  4. Sialoglycoconjugates in Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interaction: possible biological model - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alane Beatriz Vermelho

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of glycoconjugates, including glycolipids and glycoproteins, participate in the process of host-cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and one of the most important carbohydrates involved on this interaction is sialic acid. It is known that parasite trans-sialidase participates with sialic acid in a coordinated fashion in the initial stages of invasion. Given the importance of these sialogycoconjugates, this review sets out various possible biological models for the interaction between the parasite and mammalian cells that possess a sialylated receptor/ligand system.

  5. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is lysed by apolipoprotein L-I, a component of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that are also characterized by the presence of haptoglobin-related protein. We report that this process is mediated by a parasite glycoprotein receptor, which...... binds the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex with high affinity for the uptake and incorporation of heme into intracellular hemoproteins. In mice, this receptor was required for optimal parasite growth and the resistance of parasites to the oxidative burst by host macrophages. In humans, the trypanosome...... immunity against the parasite....

  6. Metabolic labeling with (14C)-glucose of bloodstream and cell culture trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederkremer, R.M. de; Groisman, J.F.; Lima, C.; Katzin, A.

    1990-01-01

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi from infected mouse blood and from cell culture were metabolically labeled by incubation with D-( 14 C)-glucose. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of lysates from parasites of two strains (RA and CA 1 ) showed a significantly different pattern. The difference was mainly quantitative when the blood and cell culture trypomastigotes of the RA strain were compared. Analysis of the culture medium by paper electrophoresis showed an anionic exometabolite only in the blood forms of both strains. (Author) [es

  7. Studies on the virulence and attenuation of Trypanosoma cruzi using immunodeficient animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basombrío Miguel Ángel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasion and pathology by Trypanosoma cruzi result from an interaction between parasite virulence and host immunity. Successive in vivo generations of the parasite select populations with increasing ability to invade the host. Conversely, prolonged in vitro selection of the parasite produces attenuated sublines with low infectivity for mammals. One such subline (TCC clone has been extensively used in our laboratory as experimental vaccine and tested in comparative experiments with its virulent ancestor (TUL. The experiments here reviewed aimed at the use of immunodeficient mice for testing the infectivity of TCC parasites. It has not been possible to obtain virulent, revertant sublines by prolonged passaged in such mice.

  8. Marker discovery in Trypanosoma vivax through GSS and comparative analysis. Preliminary data and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, A.M.R.; Guerreiro, L.T.A.; Souza, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Trypanosoma vivax is a haemoparasite affecting the livestock industry in South America and Africa. Despite the high economic relevance of the disease caused by T. vivax, little work has been done on its molecular characterization, in contrast with human trypanosomes, such as T. brucei and T. cruzi. The present study reports the construction of a semi-normalized genomic library and the sequencing of 160 Genome Sequence Survey (GSS) ends of T. vivax. The analyses of this preliminary data show that this simple and rapid approach worked well to generate some potential new markers for this species. (author)

  9. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zingales

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape.

  10. Inositol metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi: potential target for chemotherapy against Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MECIA M. OLIVEIRA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a debilitating and often fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The great majority of surface molecules in trypanosomes are either inositol-containing phospholipids or glycoproteins that are anchored into the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors. The polyalcohol myo-inositol is the precursor for the biosynthesis of these molecules. In this brief review, recent findings on some aspects of the molecular and cellular fate of inositol in T. cruzi life cycle are discussed and identified some points that could be targets for the development of parasite-specific therapeutic agents.

  11. Histopathologic identification of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimath Alyemni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis is an uncommon manifestation of T. cruzi infection, typically seen in immunocompromised patients. Encephalitis results from the reactivation of chronic infection predominately in individuals from endemic areas. Increased awareness of this complication is essential especially with increased migration of patients from endemic areas with concomitant HIV infection. Here we report a case of Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient from Mexico in which there was no evidence of acute serologic, CSF, or blood infection by T. cruzi trypomastigotes.

  12. Presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in tissues of experimentally infected Wistar rats and their fetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Alarcón, Maritza; Lugo de Yarbuh, Ana; Moreno, Elio A; Payares, Gilberto; Araujo, Sonia; Colmenares, Melisa

    2006-01-01

    Este estudio fue realizado con un grupo de ratas juveniles hembras (Rattus norvegicus) cepa Wistar con 20 días de nacidas y 250 grs. de peso. Cada rata fue inoculada inyectándole por vía intraperitoneal 0.1 mL de la suspensión sanguínea con 1x105 tripomastigotes sanguícolas de Trypanosoma cruzi (cepa I/PAS/VE/00/PLANALTO). Los parásitos fueron aislados de Panstrongylus geniculatus, naturalmente infectado y capturado en un área urbana del valle de Caracas, Venezuela y mantenidos en ratones NMR...

  13. Avances en el estudio de la Adenilato Quinasa Nuclear de Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Cámara, María de los Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, el agente etiológico del Mal de Chagas es un eucariota inferior en donde el control de la expresión génica recae mayormente en mecanismos postraduccionales. Durante todo su ciclo de vida se observan fluctuaciones en la expresión génica. En la presente tesis se realizó el estudio de una adenilato quinasa nuclear (TcADKn) que se encuentra involucrada en la biogénesis ribosomal. Las adenilato quinasas nucleares han sido descriptas en muy pocos organismos, se las ha asociado al...

  14. Eukaryotic ribonucleases P/MRP: the crystal structure of the P3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-02-17

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a site-specific endoribonuclease found in all kingdoms of life. Typical RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and a protein moiety. In the eukaryotes, the RNase P lineage has split into two, giving rise to a closely related enzyme, RNase MRP, which has similar components but has evolved to have different specificities. The eukaryotic RNases P/MRP have acquired an essential helix-loop-helix protein-binding RNA domain P3 that has an important function in eukaryotic enzymes and distinguishes them from bacterial and archaeal RNases P. Here, we present a crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP proteins Pop6 and Pop7 solved to 2.7 A. The structure suggests similar structural organization of the P3 RNA domains in RNases P/MRP and possible functions of the P3 domains and proteins bound to them in the stabilization of the holoenzymes' structures as well as in interactions with substrates. It provides the first insight into the structural organization of the eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family.

  15. Mathematical model of reproductive death of irradiated eukaryotic cells, which considers saturation of DNA reparation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyigavko, V.G.; Ponomarenko, N.S.; Meshcheryakova, O.P.; Protasenya, S.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model of the processes determining reproductive death of the exposed cells was built. The model takes into account the phenomenon of saturation of the system of DNA radiation lesion reparation and structural functional peculiarities of chromatin structure in eukaryotes. The problem of assessment of the model parameters using experimental data was discussed.

  16. Avian leukosis virus is a versatile eukaryotic platform for polypeptide display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Pranay D.; Russell, Stephen J.; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Display technology refers to methods of generating libraries of modularly coded biomolecules and screening them for particular properties. Retroviruses are good candidates to be a eukaryotic viral platform for the display of polypeptides synthesized in eukaryotic cells. Here we demonstrate that avian leukosis virus (ALV) provides an ideal platform for display of nonviral polyaeptides expressed in a eukaryotic cell substrate. Different sizes of polypeptides were genetically fused to the extreme N-terminus of the ALV envelope glycoprotein in an ALV infectious clone containing an alkaline phosphatase reporter gene. The chimeric envelope glycoproteins were efficiently incorporated into virions and were stably displayed on the surface of the virions through multiple virus replication cycles. The foreign polypeptides did not interfere with the attachment and entry functions of the underlying ALV envelope glycoproteins. The displayed polypeptides were fully functional and could efficiently mediate attachment of the recombinant viruses to their respective cognate receptors. This study demonstrates that ALV is an ideal display platform for the generation and selection of libraries of polypeptides where there is a need for expression, folding, and posttranslational modification in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells

  17. Distribution and Diversity of Microbial Eukaryotes in Bathypelagic Waters of the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dapeng; Jiao, Nianzhi; Ren, Rui; Warren, Alan

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the biodiversity of microbial eukaryotes in the South China Sea, especially in waters at bathyal depths. Here, we employed SSU rDNA gene sequencing to reveal the diversity and community structure across depth and distance gradients in the South China Sea. Vertically, the highest alpha diversity was found at 75-m depth. The communities of microbial eukaryotes were clustered into shallow-, middle-, and deep-water groups according to the depth from which they were collected, indicating a depth-related diversity and distribution pattern. Rhizaria sequences dominated the microeukaryote community and occurred in all samples except those from less than 50-m deep, being most abundant near the sea floor where they contributed ca. 64-97% and 40-74% of the total sequences and OTUs recovered, respectively. A large portion of rhizarian OTUs has neither a nearest named neighbor nor a nearest neighbor in the GenBank database which indicated the presence of new phylotypes in the South China Sea. Given their overwhelming abundance and richness, further phylogenetic analysis of rhizarians were performed and three new genetic clusters were revealed containing sequences retrieved from the deep waters of the South China Sea. Our results shed light on the diversity and community structure of microbial eukaryotes in this not yet fully explored area. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  18. EuMicroSatdb: A database for microsatellites in the sequenced genomes of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover Atul

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites have immense utility as molecular markers in different fields like genome characterization and mapping, phylogeny and evolutionary biology. Existing microsatellite databases are of limited utility for experimental and computational biologists with regard to their content and information output. EuMicroSatdb (Eukaryotic MicroSatellite database http://ipu.ac.in/usbt/EuMicroSatdb.htm is a web based relational database for easy and efficient positional mining of microsatellites from sequenced eukaryotic genomes. Description A user friendly web interface has been developed for microsatellite data retrieval using Active Server Pages (ASP. The backend database codes for data extraction and assembly have been written using Perl based scripts and C++. Precise need based microsatellites data retrieval is possible using different input parameters like microsatellite type (simple perfect or compound perfect, repeat unit length (mono- to hexa-nucleotide, repeat number, microsatellite length and chromosomal location in the genome. Furthermore, information about clustering of different microsatellites in the genome can also be retrieved. Finally, to facilitate primer designing for PCR amplification of any desired microsatellite locus, 200 bp upstream and downstream sequences are provided. Conclusion The database allows easy systematic retrieval of comprehensive information about simple and compound microsatellites, microsatellite clusters and their locus coordinates in 31 sequenced eukaryotic genomes. The information content of the database is useful in different areas of research like gene tagging, genome mapping, population genetics, germplasm characterization and in understanding microsatellite dynamics in eukaryotic genomes.

  19. Horizontal gene transfer of an entire metabolic pathway between a eukaryotic alga and its DNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Adam; Pagarete, António; de Vargas, Colomban; Allen, Michael J.; Read, Betsy; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between viruses and phytoplankton, the main primary producers in the oceans, affect global biogeochemical cycles and climate. Recent studies are increasingly revealing possible cases of gene transfers between cyanobacteria and phages, which might have played significant roles in the evolution of cyanobacteria/phage systems. However, little has been documented about the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic phytoplankton/virus systems. Here we report phylogenetic evidence for the transfer of seven genes involved in the sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway between the cosmopolitan eukaryotic microalga Emiliania huxleyi and its large DNA virus EhV. PCR assays indicate that these genes are prevalent in E. huxleyi and EhV strains isolated from different geographic locations. Patterns of protein and gene sequence conservation support that these genes are functional in both E. huxleyi and EhV. This is the first clear case of horizontal gene transfer of multiple functionally linked enzymes in a eukaryotic phytoplankton–virus system. We examine arguments for the possible direction of the gene transfer. The virus-to-host direction suggests the existence of ancient viruses that controlled the complex metabolic pathway in order to infect primitive eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the host-to-virus direction suggests that the serial acquisition of genes involved in the same metabolic pathway might have been a strategy for the ancestor of EhVs to stay ahead of their closest relatives in the great evolutionary race for survival. PMID:19451591

  20. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions.

  1. Selfish operons: the evolutionary impact of gene clustering in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J

    1999-12-01

    The Selfish Operon Model postulates that the organization of bacterial genes into operons is beneficial to the constituent genes in that proximity allows horizontal cotransfer of all genes required for a selectable phenotype; eukaryotic operons formed for very different reasons. Horizontal transfer of selfish operons most probably promotes bacterial diversification.

  2. Are maternal mitochondria the selfish entities that are masters of the cells of eukaryotic multicellular organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Peter W; Baldelli, E; Baluška, Frantisek

    2009-01-01

    The Energide concept, as well as the endosymbiotic theory of eukaryotic cell organization and evolution, proposes that present-day cells of eukaryotic organisms are mosaics of specialized and cooperating units, or organelles. Some of these units were originally free-living prokaryotes, which were engulfed during evolutionary time. Mitochondria represent one of these types of previously independent organisms, the Energide, is another type. This new perspective on the organization of the cell has been further expanded to reveal the concept of a public milieu, the cytosol, in which Energides and mitochondria live, each with their own private internal milieu. The present paper discusses how the endosymbiotic theory implicates a new hypothesis about the hierarchical and communicational organization of the integrated prokaryotic components of the eukaryotic cell and provides a new angle from which to consider the theory of evolution and its bearing upon cellular complexity. Thus, it is proposed that the “selfish gene” hypothesis of Dawkins1 is not the only possible perspective for comprehending genomic and cellular evolution. Our proposal is that maternal mitochondria are the selfish “master” entities of the eukaryotic cell with respect not only to their propagation from cell-to-cell and from generation-to-generation but also to their regulation of all other cellular functions. However, it should be recognized that the concept of “master” and “servant” cell components is a metaphor; in present-day living organisms their organellar components are considered to be interdependent and inseparable. PMID:19513277

  3. Neural Network Prediction of Translation Initiation Sites in Eukaryotes: Perspectives for EST and Genome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Nielsen, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Translation in eukaryotes does not always start at the first AUG in an mRNA, implying that context information also plays a role.This makes prediction of translation initiation sites a non-trivial task, especially when analysing EST and genome data where the entire mature mRNA sequence is not known...

  4. Lateral gene transfer between prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes: ongoing and significant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, V.I.D.; Hurst, G.D.D.

    2009-01-01

    The expansion of genome sequencing projects has produced accumulating evidence for lateral transfer of genes between prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. However, it remains controversial whether these genes are of functional importance in their recipient host. Nikoh and Nakabachi, in a recent paper

  5. Identification of prokaryotic and eukaryotic signal peptides and prediction of their cleavage sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the identification of signal peptides and their cleavage based on neural networks trained on separate sets of prokaryotic and eukaryotic sequence. The method performs significantly better than previous prediction schemes and can easily be applied on genome...

  6. Sex is a ubiquitous, ancient, and inherent attribute of eukaryotic life

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Speijer, D.; Lukeš, Julius; Eliáš, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 29 (2015), s. 8827-8834 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12104; GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : reactive oxygen species * evolution * protists * eukaryotes * sex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  7. A versatile selection system for folding competent proteins using genetic complementation in a eukaryotic host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, C.; Kjaerulff, S.; Muller, S.

    2010-01-01

    in vivo selection system for folded proteins. It is based on genetic complementation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe growth marker gene invertase fused C-terminally to a protein library. The fusion proteins are directed to the secretion system, utilizing the ability of the eukaryotic protein quality...

  8. The New Higher Level Classification of Eukaryotes with Emphasis on the Taxonomy of Protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINA M. ADL; ALASTAIR G. B. SIMPSON; MARK A. FARMER; ROBERT A. ANDERSEN; O. ROGER ANDERSON; JOHN R. BARTA; SAMUEL S. BOWSER; GUY BRUGEROLLE; ROBERT A. FENSOME; SUZANNE FREDERICQ; TIMOTHY Y. JAMES; SERGEI KARPOV; PAUL KUGRENS; JOHN KRUG; CHRISTOPHER E. LANE; LOUISE A. LEWIS; JEAN LODGE; DENIS H. LYNN; DAVID G. MANN; RICHARD M. MCCOURT; LEONEL MENDOZA; ØJVIND MOESTRUP; SHARON E. MOZLEY-STANDRIDGE; THOMAS A. NERAD; CAROL A. SHEARER; ALEXEY V. SMIRNOV; FREDERICK W. SPIEGEL; MAX F.J.R. TAYLOR

    2005-01-01

    This revision of the classification of unicellular eukaryotes updates that of Levine et al. (1980) for the protozoa and expands it to include other protists. Whereas the previous revision was primarily to incorporate the results of ultrastructural studies, this revision incorporates results from both ultrastructural research since 1980 and molecular phylogenetic...

  9. The new higher level classification of eukaryotes with emphasis on the taxonomy of protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina M. Adl; Alastair G.B. Simpson; Mark A. Farmer; Robert A. Andersen; O. Roger Anderson; John R. Barta; Samuel S. Bowser; Guy Brugerolle; Robert A. Fensome; Suzanne Fredericq; Timothy Y. James; Sergei Karpov; Paul Kugrens; John Krug; Christopher E. Lane; Louise A. Lewis; Jean Lodge; Denis H. Lynn; David G. Mann; Richard M. McCourt; Leonel Mendoza; Ojvind Moestrup; Sharon E. Mozley-Standridge; Thomas A. Nerad; Carol A. Shearer; Alexey V. Smirnov; Frederick W. Speigel; Max F.J.R. Taylor

    2005-01-01

    This revision of the classification of unicellular eukaryotes updates that of Levine et al. (1980) for the protozoa and expands it to include other protists. Whereas the previous revision was primarily to incorporate the results of ultrastructural studies, this revision incorporates results from both ultrastructural research since 1980 and molecular phylogenetic...

  10. Insight into the exoproteome of the tissue-derived trypomastigote form of trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Ricart, Carlos A O; Machado, Mara O

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, one of the major neglected infectious diseases. It has the potential to infect any nucleated mammalian cell. The secreted/excreted protein repertoire released by T. cruzi trypomastigotes is crucial in host-pathogen interactions...

  11. Rodent-borne Trypanosoma from cities and villages of Niger and Nigeria: A special role for the invasive genus Rattus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatard, C; Garba, M; Gauthier, P; Hima, K; Artige, E; Dossou, D K H J; Gagaré, S; Genson, G; Truc, P; Dobigny, G

    2017-07-01

    Although they are known to sometimes infect humans, atypical trypanosomes are very poorly documented, especially in Africa where one lethal case has yet been described. Here we conducted a survey of rodent-borne Trypanosoma in 19 towns and villages of Niger and Nigeria, with a special emphasis on Niamey, the capital city of Niger. The 1298 rodents that were captured yielded 189 qPCR-positive animals from 14 localities, thus corresponding to a 14.6% overall prevalence. Rats, especially black rats, displayed particularly elevated prevalence (27.4%), with some well sampled sites showing 40-50% and up to 68.8% of Trypanosoma-carrying individuals. Rattus were also characterized by significantly lower Ct values than in the other non-Rattus species. DNA sequences could be obtained for 43 rodent-borne Trypanosoma and corresponded to 41 T. lewisi (all from Rattus) and 2 T. microti (from Cricetomys gambianus). These results, together with data compiled from the available literature, suggest that Rattus may play a particular role for the maintaining and circulation of Trypanosoma, especially T. lewisi, in Africa. Taken into account its strong abilities to invade coastal and inland regions of the continent, we believe that this genus deserves a particular attention in regards to potentially under-looked but emerging atypical trypanosome-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial translation factors of Trypanosoma brucei: elongation factor-Tu has a unique subdomain that is essential for its function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cristodero, M.; Mani, J.; Oeljeklaus, S.; Aeberhard, L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Ramrath, D.J.F.; Lukeš, Julius; Warscheid, B.; Schneider, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial translation * Trypanosoma brucei * EF-Tu Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  13. Adaptations in the glucose metabolism of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei isolates from Tsetse flies and during differentiation of bloodstream forms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grinsven, K.W.A.; van den Abbeele, J.; van den Bossche, P.; van Hellemond, J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei isolated from the midguts of infected tsetse flies, or freshly transformed from a strain that is close to field isolates, do not use a complete Krebs cycle. Furthermore, short stumpy bloodstream forms produce acetate and are apparently metabolically preadapted

  14. Phylogeny and morphological variability of trypanosomes from African pelomedusid turtles with redescription of Trypanosoma mocambicum Pienaar, 1962

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, N.; Čepička, I.; Qablan, M. A.; Gibson, W.; Blažek, Radim; Široký, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 6 (2015), s. 599-608 ISSN 1434-4610 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Trypanosoma * turtle * Pelusios * polymorphism * phylogeny * SSU rRNA gene Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2015

  15. Counterintuitive effect of fall mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, S. E.; Lomas, M. W.; Ward, B. B.; Sigman, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Sargasso Sea is characterized by a short period of deep vertical mixing in the late winter and early spring, followed by strong thermal stratification during the summer. Stratification persists into the fall, impeding the upward flux of nitrate from depth so that recycled forms of nitrogen (N) such as ammonium are thought to support most primary production. We collected particles from surface waters during March, July, October, and December, used flow cytometry to separate the prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton, and analyzed their respective 15N/14N. In all months, the 15N/14N of the prokaryotic genera, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, was low, indicative of reliance on recycled N throughout the year. In July, the 15N/14N of eukaryotic phytoplankton was variable but consistently higher than that of the prokaryotes, reflecting eukaryotic consumption of subsurface nitrate. Two eukaryotic profiles from October and December were similar to those from July. In three other fall profiles, the eukaryotes had a 15N/14N similar to that of the prokaryotes, suggesting a switch toward greater reliance on recycled N. This change in the dominant N source supporting eukaryotic production appears to be driven by the density structure of the upper water column. The very shallow low-density surface "mixed layer" (≤20 m) that develops in early-to-mid summer does not contribute to stratification at the base of the euphotic zone, and subsurface nitrate can mix up into the lower euphotic zone, facilitating continued production. The deepening of the mixed layer into the fall, typically taken as an indication of weaker overall stratification, actually strengthens the isolation of the euphotic zone as a whole, reducing the upward supply of nitrate to the photosynthetically active layer. The same counterintuitive dynamic explains the latitudinal patterns in a set of three October depth profiles. Two northern stations (32°N and 27°N) were characterized by a thick, low

  16. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Andy; Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-07-25

    We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection. IMPORTANCE During infections, pathogenic bacteria can release nucleotides into the cells of their eukaryotic hosts. These nucleotides are recognized as signals that contribute to the initiation of defensive immune responses that help the infected

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: strain selection by diferent schedules of mouse passage of an initially mixed infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Deane

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available From an initial double infection in mice, established by simultaneous and equivalent inocula of bloodstream forms of strains Y and F of Trypanosoma cruzi, two lines were derived by subinoculations: one (W passaged every week, the other (M every month. Through biological and biochemical methods only the Y strain was identified at the end of the 10th and 16th passages of line W and only the F strain at the 2nd and 4th passages of line M. The results illustrate strain selection through laboratory manipulation of initially mixed populations of T. cruzi.De uma infecção inicialmente dupla em camundongo, estabelecida por inóculo simultaneo e equivalente de formas sanguíneas das cepas Y e F de Trypanosoma cruzi, duas linhagens foram originadas por subinoculações: uma (W passada casa semana, a outra (M cada mês. Por métodos biológicos e bioquímicos apenas a cepa Y foi identificada ao fim a 10a. e 16a. passagens da linhagem W e apenas a cepa F na 2a. e 4a.passagens de linhagem M. Os resultados demonstram a seleção de cepas através de manipulação em laboratorio de populações inicialmente mistas de T. cruzi.

  18. Moderate physical exercise protects myenteric metabolically more active neurons in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Neide Martins; de Moraes, Solange Marta Franzói; Dalálio, M M O; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Sant'ana, D M G; de Araújo, Silvana Marques

    2014-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes neuronal myenteric depopulation compromising intestinal function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of moderate physical exercise on NADH diaphorase (NADH-d)-positive neurons in the myenteric plexus and intestinal wall of the colon in mice infected with T. cruzi. Forty 30-day-old male Swiss mice were divided into the following groups: trained infected (TI), sedentary infected (SI), trained control (TC), and sedentary control. The TC and TI groups were subjected to a moderate physical exercise program on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Three days after finishing physical exercise, the TI and SI groups were intraperitoneally inoculated with 1,300 blood trypomastigotes of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Parasitemia was evaluated from days 4 to 61 after inoculation. On day 75 of infection, myenteric neurons in the colon were quantified (NADH-d), and inflammatory foci were counted. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels were evaluated in plasma. The results were compared using analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5 % significance level. Moderate physical exercise reduced the parasite peak on day 8 of infection (p = 0.0132) and total parasitemia (p = 0.0307). It also prevented neuronal depopulation (p  0.05). These results reinforce the therapeutic benefits of moderate physical exercise for T. cruzi infection.

  19. In vivo trypanocidal activity of Nymphaea lotus Linn. methanol extract against Trypanosoma brucei brucei

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    Muhammad Haruna Garba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antitrypanosomal potentials of methanol extract of Nymphaea lotus Linn. (N. lotus with the aim of obtaining a new lead for formulating safe, inexpensive, nontoxic and readily available trypanocidal drugs. Methods: Seventy percent (v/v (methanol/water crude extract of N. lotus was evaluated for antitrypanosomal activity in experimental trypanosomiasis using Trypanosoma brucei bruceiinfected mice. Infected mice in different groups were administered intraperitoneally 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg body weight/day of the crude for two weeks, while a positive control group was treated with standard drug, berenil. Results: The crude extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight/day was more effective than the higher doses in completely clearing parasites from the blood of mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Pre-treatment of healthy mice with the crude extract for 5 days before infection did not prevent the establishment of the infection, indicating that the extract had no prophylactic activity. Subinoculation of the blood and cerebrospinal fluid drawn from the cured mice into healthy mice failed to produce any infection within 50 days post inoculation. Administration of 1 000 mg/kg body weight of the crude extract led to the death of 50% of the experimental animals indicating a high level of toxicity of the extract at higher doses. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potency of the crude extract of N. lotus in treating experimental trypanosomiasis at lower doses.

  20. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood donors at the National Blood Transfusion Services--Guyana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwititi, P T; Browne, J

    2012-09-01

    Blood transfusion is an important transmission route of Trypanosoma cruzi (T cruzi), a major parasitic infection in Central and South America. The limited treatment options are most effective in acute Chagas' infection. At present, there is no current data on the prevalence of T cruzi in the blood donor population of Guyana. This information is necessary to protect the supply of the blood donation programme. This study sought to determine the prevalence of T cruzi in the blood supply at the National Blood Transfusion Services of Guyana with the hope of providing knowledge to the on-going surveillance for Chagas' disease worldwide and therefore address the risk of its spread by blood transfusion. Two commercialized ELISAs utilizing crude or recombinant T cruzi antigens were used to study 2000 blood samples voluntarily donated for the purpose of altruistic or family replacement donation retrospectively. The results showed that approximately 1 in 286 donations tested positive for antibodies to T cruzi. These results indicate that T cruzi continues to be a risk in Guyana and there is a need to continue screening donated blood. Trypanosoma cruzi is a life-long infection and infected persons may be asymptomatic chronic carriers of the disease. Education, housing improvement, and controlled use of insecticides should be introduced to contain Chagas' disease.

  1. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  2. Trans-sialidase inhibition assay detects Trypanosoma cruzi infection in different wild mammal species.

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    Sartor, Paula A; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Orozco, Marcela M; Cardinal, Marta V; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Leguizamón, María S

    2013-08-01

    The detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals is crucial for understanding the eco-epidemiological role of the different species involved in parasite transmission cycles. Xenodiagnosis (XD) and hemoculture (HC) are routinely used to detect T. cruzi in wild mammals. Serological methods are much more limited because they require the use of specific antibodies to immunoglobulins of each mammalian species susceptible to T. cruzi. In this study we detected T. cruzi infection by trans-sialidase (TS) inhibition assay (TIA). TIA is based on the antibody neutralization of a recombinant TS that avoids the use of anti-immunoglobulins. TS activity is not detected in the co-endemic protozoan parasites Leishmania spp and T. rangeli. In the current study, serum samples from 158 individuals of nine wild mammalian species, previously tested by XD, were evaluated by TIA. They were collected from two endemic areas in northern Argentina. The overall TIA versus XD co-reactivity was 98.7% (156/158). All 18 samples from XD-positive mammals were TIA-positive (co-positivity, 100%) and co-negativity was 98.5% (138/140). Two XD-negative samples from a marsupial (Didelphis albiventris) and an edentate (Dasypus novemcinctus) were detected by TIA. TIA could be used as a novel tool for serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in a wide variety of sylvatic reservoir hosts.

  3. Molecular profiles of Venezuelan isolates of Trypanosoma sp. by random amplified polymorphic DNA method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, T M; Gonzatti, M I; Villamizar, G; Escalante, A; Aso, P M

    2009-05-12

    Nine Trypanosoma sp. Venezuelan isolates, initially presumed to be T. evansi, were collected from three different hosts, capybara (Apure state), horse (Apure state) and donkey (Guarico state) and compared by the random amplification polymorphic DNA technique (RAPD). Thirty-one to 46 reproducible fragments were obtained with 12 of the 40 primers that were used. Most of the primers detected molecular profiles with few polymorphisms between the seven horse, capybara and donkey isolates. Quantitative analyses of the RAPD profiles of these isolates revealed a high degree of genetic conservation with similarity coefficients between 85.7% and 98.5%. Ten of the primers generated polymorphic RAPD profiles with two of the three Trypanosoma sp. horse isolates, namely TeAp-N/D1 and TeGu-N/D1. The similarity coefficient between these two isolates and the rest, ranged from 57.9% to 68.4% and the corresponding dendrogram clustered TeAp-N/D1 and Te Gu-N/D1 in a genetically distinct group.

  4. Trypanosoma cf. varani in an imported ball python (Python reginus) from Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Une, Yumi; Watanabe, Haruo; Mukhtar, Maowia M

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral blood from a ball python (Python reginus) imported from Ghana was cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK) medium for Borrelia spp. isolation, resulting in the prominent appearance of free, and clusters of, trypanosomes in a variety of morphological forms. The molecular phylogenetic characterization of these cultured trypanosomes, using the small subunit rDNA, indicated that this python was infected with a species closely related to Trypanosoma varani Wenyon, 1908, originally described in the Nile monitor lizard (Varanus niloticus) from Sudan. Furthermore, nucleotide sequences of glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of both isolates showed few differences. Giemsa-stained blood smears, prepared from the infected python 8 mo after the initial observation of trypanosomes in hemoculture, contained trypomastigotes with a broad body and a short, free flagellum; these most closely resembled the original description of T. varani, or T. voltariae Macfie, 1919 recorded in a black-necked spitting cobra (Naja nigricollis) from Ghana. It is highly possible that lizards and snakes could naturally share an identical trypanosome species. Alternatively, lizards and snakes in the same region might have closely related, but distinct, Trypanosoma species as a result of sympatric speciation. From multiple viewpoints, including molecular phylogenetic analyses, reappraisal of trypanosome species from a wide range of reptiles in Africa is needed to clarify the relationship of recorded species, or to unmask unrecorded species.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi and Triatoma dimidiata in costal Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yim Yan; Sornosa Macias, Karen Jeniffer; Guale Martínez, Doris; Solorzano, Luis F; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In Ecuador, Triatoma dimidiata and Rhodnius ecuadoriensis are the main vector species, responsible for over half of the cases of T. cruzi infection in the country. T. dimidiata is believed to have been introduced in Ecuador during colonial times, and its elimination from the country is thus believed to be feasible. We investigated here the molecular ecology of T. dimidiata and T. cruzi in costal Ecuador to further guide control efforts. Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS-2) of 23 specimens from Progreso, Guayas, unambiguously supported the likely importation of T. dimidiata from Central America to Ecuador. The observation of a very high parasite infection rate (54%) and frequent feeding on humans (3/5) confirmed a continued risk of transmission to humans. All genotyped parasites corresponded to TcI DTU and Trypanosoma rangeli was not detected in T. dimidiata. TcI subgroups corresponded to TcIa (25%), and mixed infections with TcIa and TcId (75%). Further studies should help clarify T. cruzi genetic structure in the country, and the possible impact of the introduction of T. dimidiata on the circulating parasite strains. The elevated risk posed by this species warrants continuing efforts for its control, but its apparent mobility between peridomestic and domestic habitats may favor reinfestation following insecticide spraying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Plants of Brazilian restingas with tripanocide activity against Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Robson Xavier; Souza, André Luis Almeida; Lima, Barbara; Tietbohl, Luis Armando Candido; Fernandes, Caio Pinho; Amaral, Raquel Rodrigues; Ruppelt, Bettina Monika; Santos, Marcelo Guerra; Rocha, Leandro

    2017-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi affecting millions of people, and widespread throughout Latin America. This disease exhibits a problematic chemotherapy. Benznidazole, which is the drug currently used as standard treatment, lamentably evokes several adverse reactions. Among other options, natural products have been tested to discover a novel therapeutic drug for this disease. A lot of plants from the Brazilian flora did not contain studies about their biological effects. Restinga de Jurubatiba from Brazil is a sandbank ecosystem poorly studied in relation to plant biological activity. Thus, three plant species from Restinga de Jurubatiba were tested against in vitro antiprotozoal activity. Among six extracts obtained from leaves and stem parts and 2 essential oils derived from leave parts, only 3 extracts inhibited epimastigote proliferation. Substances present in the extracts with activity were isolated (quercetin, myricetin, and ursolic acid), and evaluated in relation to antiprotozoal activity against epimastigote Y and Dm28 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. All isolated substances were effective to reduce protozoal proliferation. Essentially, quercetin and myricetin did not cause mammalian cell toxicity. In summary, myricetin and quercetin molecule can be used as a scaffold to develop new effective drugs against Chagas's disease.

  7. Molecular detection of eukaryotes in a single human stool sample from Senegal.

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    Ibrahim Hamad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial eukaryotes represent an important component of the human gut microbiome, with different beneficial or harmful roles; some species are commensal or mutualistic, whereas others are opportunistic or parasitic. The diversity of eukaryotes inhabiting humans remains relatively unexplored because of either the low abundance of these organisms in human gut or because they have received limited attention from a whole-community perspective. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, a single fecal sample from a healthy African male was studied using both culture-dependent methods and extended molecular methods targeting the 18S rRNA and ITS sequences. Our results revealed that very few fungi, including Candida spp., Galactomyces spp., and Trichosporon asahii, could be isolated using culture-based methods. In contrast, a relatively a high number of eukaryotic species could be identified in this fecal sample when culture-independent methods based on various primer sets were used. A total of 27 species from one sample were found among the 977 analyzed clones. The clone libraries were dominated by fungi (716 clones/977, 73.3%, corresponding to 16 different species. In addition, 187 sequences out of 977 (19.2% corresponded to 9 different species of plants; 59 sequences (6% belonged to other micro-eukaryotes in the gut, including Entamoeba hartmanni and Blastocystis sp; and only 15 clones/977 (1.5% were related to human 18S rRNA sequences. CONCLUSION: Our results revealed a complex eukaryotic community in the volunteer's gut, with fungi being the most abundant species in the stool sample. Larger investigations are needed to assess the generality of these results and to understand their roles in human health and disease.

  8. Microbial eukaryote plankton communities of high-mountain lakes from three continents exhibit strong biogeographic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filker, Sabine; Sommaruga, Ruben; Vila, Irma; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    Microbial eukaryotes hold a key role in aquatic ecosystem functioning. Yet, their diversity in freshwater lakes, particularly in high-mountain lakes, is relatively unknown compared with the marine environment. Low nutrient availability, low water temperature and high ultraviolet radiation make most high-mountain lakes extremely challenging habitats for life and require specific molecular and physiological adaptations. We therefore expected that these ecosystems support a plankton diversity that differs notably from other freshwater lakes. In addition, we hypothesized that the communities under study exhibit geographic structuring. Our rationale was that geographic dispersal of small-sized eukaryotes in high-mountain lakes over continental distances seems difficult. We analysed hypervariable V4 fragments of the SSU rRNA gene to compare the genetic microbial eukaryote diversity in high-mountain lakes located in the European Alps, the Chilean Altiplano and the Ethiopian Bale Mountains. Microbial eukaryotes were not globally distributed corroborating patterns found for bacteria, multicellular animals and plants. Instead, the plankton community composition emerged as a highly specific fingerprint of a geographic region even on higher taxonomic levels. The intraregional heterogeneity of the investigated lakes was mirrored in shifts in microbial eukaryote community structure, which, however, was much less pronounced compared with interregional beta-diversity. Statistical analyses revealed that on a regional scale, environmental factors are strong predictors for plankton community structures in high-mountain lakes. While on long-distance scales (>10 000 km), isolation by distance is the most plausible scenario, on intermediate scales (up to 6000 km), both contemporary environmental factors and historical contingencies interact to shift plankton community structures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Three distinct modes of intron dynamics in the evolution of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Liran; Wolf, Yuri I; Rogozin, Igor B; Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-07-01

    Several contrasting scenarios have been proposed for the origin and evolution of spliceosomal introns, a hallmark of eukaryotic genes. A comprehensive probabilistic model to obtain a definitive reconstruction of intron evolution was developed and applied to 391 sets of conserved genes from 19 eukaryotic species. It is inferred that a relatively high intron density was reached early, i.e., the last common ancestor of eukaryotes contained >2.15 introns/kilobase, and the last common ancestor of multicellular life forms harbored approximately 3.4 introns/kilobase, a greater intron density than in most of the extant fungi and in some animals. The rates of intron gain and intron loss appear to have been dropping during the last approximately 1.3 billion years, with the decline in the gain rate being much steeper. Eukaryotic lineages exhibit three distinct modes of evolution of the intron-exon structure. The primary, balanced mode, apparently, operates in all lineages. In this mode, intron gain and loss are strongly and positively correlated, in contrast to previous reports on inverse correlation between these processes. The second mode involves an elevated rate of intron loss and is prevalent in several lineages, such as fungi and insects. The third mode, characterized by elevated rate of intron gain, is seen only in deep branches of the tree, indicating that bursts of intron invasion occurred at key points in eukaryotic evolution, such as the origin of animals. Intron dynamics could depend on multiple mechanisms, and in the balanced mode, gain and loss of introns might share common mechanistic features.

  10. Critical analysis of eukaryotic phylogeny: a case study based on the HSP70 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germot, A; Philippe, H

    1999-01-01

    Trichomonads, together with diplomonads and microsporidia, emerge at the base of the eukaryotic tree, on the basis of the small subunit rRNA phylogeny. However, phylogenies based on protein sequences such as tubulin are markedly different with these protists emerging much later. We have investigated 70 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP70), which could be a reliable phylogenetic marker. In eukaryotes, HSP70s are found in cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and organelles (mitochondria and chloroplasts). In Trichomonas vaginalis we identified nine different HSP70-encoding genes and sequenced three nearly complete cDNAs corresponding to cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondrial-type HSP70. Phylogenies of eukaryotes were reconstructed using the classical methods while varying the number of species and characters considered. Almost all the undoubtedly monophyletic groups, defined by ultrastructural characters, were recovered. However, due to the long branch attraction phenomenon, the evolutionary rates were the main factor determining the position of species, even with the use of a close outgroup, which is an important advantage of HSP70 with respect to many other markers. Numerous variable sites are peculiar to Trichomonas and probably generated the artefactual placement of this species at the base of the eukaryotes or as the sister group of fast-evolving species. The inter-phyla relationships were not well supported and were sensitive to the reconstruction method, the number of species; and the quantity of information used. This lack of resolution could be explained by the very rapid diversification of eukaryotes, likely after the mitochondrial endosymbiosis.

  11. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi indicated by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Neamphius huxleyi. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi. PMID:24463735

  12. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected]. indicated by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-27

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected] . at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Neamphius huxleyi [corrected]. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected].

  13. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. indicated by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Lamellomorpha sp.. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp..

  14. Lateral transfer of tetrahymanol-synthesizing genes has allowed multiple diverse eukaryote lineages to independently adapt to environments without oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takishita Kiyotaka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sterols are key components of eukaryotic cellular membranes that are synthesized by multi-enzyme pathways that require molecular oxygen. Because prokaryotes fundamentally lack sterols, it is unclear how the vast diversity of bacterivorous eukaryotes that inhabit hypoxic environments obtain, or synthesize, sterols. Here we show that tetrahymanol, a triterpenoid that does not require molecular oxygen for its biosynthesis, likely functions as a surrogate of sterol in eukaryotes inhabiting oxygen-poor environments. Genes encoding the tetrahymanol synthesizing enzyme squalene-tetrahymanol cyclase were found from several phylogenetically diverged eukaryotes that live in oxygen-poor environments and appear to have been laterally transferred among such eukaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste and Eugene Koonin.

  15. Comparative Genomics of Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. morsitans morsitans to Reveal Gene Orthologs Involved in Infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Rialle, Stéphanie; Parrinello, Hugues; Geiger, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Blood-feeding Glossina palpalis gambiense (Gpg) fly transmits the single-celled eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg), the second Glossina fly African trypanosome pair being Glossina morsitans / T .brucei rhodesiense. Whatever the T. brucei subspecies, whereas the onset of their developmental program in the zoo-anthropophilic blood feeding flies does unfold in the fly midgut, its completion is taking place in the fly salivary gland where does emerge a low size metacyclic trypomastigote population displaying features that account for its establishment in mammals-human individuals included. Considering that the two Glossina - T. brucei pairs introduced above share similarity with respect to the developmental program of this African parasite, we were curious to map on the Glossina morsitans morsitans (Gmm), the Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) we listed in a previous study. Briefly, using the gut samples collected at days 3, 10, and 20 from Gpg that were fed or not at day 0 on Tbg-hosting mice, these DGE lists were obtained from RNA seq-based approaches. Here, post the mapping on the quality controlled DEGs on the Gmm genome, the identified ortholog genes were further annotated, the resulting datasets being compared. Around 50% of the Gpg DEGs were shown to have orthologs in the Gmm genome. Under one of the three Glossina midgut sampling conditions, the number of DEGs was even higher when mapping on the Gmm genome than initially recorded. Many Gmm genes annotated as "Hypothetical" were mapped and annotated on many distinct databases allowing some of them to be properly identified. We identify Glossina fly candidate genes encoding (a) a broad panel of proteases as well as (b) chitin-binding proteins, (c) antimicrobial peptide production-Pro3 protein, transferrin, mucin, atttacin, cecropin, etc-to further select in functional studies, the objectives being to probe and validated fly genome manipulation that prevents the onset of the developmental

  16. An ImmunoSignature test distinguishes Trypanosoma cruzi, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and West Nile virus seropositivity among asymptomatic blood donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rowe

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma (T. cruzi manifests in its highly dynamic genome, multi-host life cycle, progressive morphologies and immune-evasion mechanisms. Accurate determination of infection or Chagas' disease activity and prognosis continues to challenge researchers. We hypothesized that a diagnostic platform with higher ligand complexity than previously employed may hold value.We applied the ImmunoSignature Technology (IST for the detection of T. cruzi-specific antibodies among healthy blood donors. IST is based on capturing the information in an individual's antibody repertoire by exposing their peripheral blood to a library of >100,000 position-addressable, chemically-diverse peptides.Initially, samples from two Chagas cohorts declared positive or negative by bank testing were studied. With the first cohort, library-peptides displaying differential binding signals between T. cruzi sero-states were used to train an algorithm. A classifier was fixed and tested against the training-independent second cohort to determine assay performance. Next, samples from a mixed cohort of donors declared positive for Chagas, hepatitis B, hepatitis C or West Nile virus were assayed on the same library. Signals were used to train a single algorithm that distinguished all four disease states. As a binary test, the accuracy of predicting T. cruzi seropositivity by IST was similar, perhaps modestly reduced, relative to conventional ELISAs. However, the results indicate that information beyond determination of seropositivity may have been captured. These include the identification of cohort subclasses, the simultaneous detection and discerning of other diseases, and the discovery of putative new antigens.The central outcome of this study established IST as a reliable approach for specific determination of T. cruzi seropositivity versus disease-free individuals or those with other diseases. Its potential contribution for monitoring and

  17. Targeted insertion of the neomycin phosphotransferase gene into the tubulin gene cluster of Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Asbroek, A. L.; Ouellette, M.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetoplastids are unicellular eukaryotes that include important parasites of man, such as trypanosomes and leishmanias. The study of these organisms received a recent boost from the development of transient transformation allowing the short-term expression of genes reintroduced into parasites like

  18. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Encephalitozonn cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, Besnoitia darlingi, and Neospora caninum in North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana, from Southern Louisian

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to zoonotic protozoan parasites (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi) and protozoan’s of veterinary importance (Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona and Besnoitia darlingi) in a population of North American opossums (Didelphis...

  19. Trypanosoma teixeirae: A new species belonging to the T. cruzi clade causing trypanosomosis in an Australian little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Amanda D; Mackie, John T; Stenner, Robyn; Gillett, Amber; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2016-06-15

    Little is known about the genetic diversity and pathogenicity of trypanosomes in Australian bats. Recently a novel trypanosome species was identified in an adult female little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus) with clinical and pathological evidence of trypanosomosis. The present study used morphology and molecular methods to demonstrate that this trypanosome is a distinct species and we propose the name Trypanosoma teixeirae sp. n. Morphological comparison showed that its circulating trypomastigotes were significantly different from those of Trypanosoma pteropi and Trypanosoma hipposideri, two species previously described from Australian bats. Genetic information was not available for T. pteropi and T. hipposideri but phylogenetic analyses at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) loci indicated that T. teixeirae sp. n. was genetically distinct and clustered with other bat-derived trypanosome species within the Trypanosoma cruzi clade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Early stages of development of Trypanosoma rotatorium (Mayer, 1843) from peripheral blood and internal organs of Anurans Bufo bufo (Linnaeus) and Rana sp. (Anura)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malysheva, M N

    2014-01-01

    The data on the fauna of trypanosomes of Anura of the Leningrad Province are given. The initial development stages of Trypanosoma rotatorium in peripheral blood and internal organs of the frog are described for the first time.

  1. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.; Nguyen, B. N.; Lee, J. H.; Panigrahi, A. K.; Gunzl, A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite's ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface

  2. On the tissular parasitism of Trypanosoma cruzi y strain in swiss mice Sobre o parasitismo tecidual da cepa Y do Trypanosoma cruzi em camundongos albinos (Swiss-Webster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of the tissular parasitism of Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain in Swiss mice was carried out. This strain parasitized preferentially smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers, with low transitory spleen and liver parasitism, as previously found by some Authors, although differing from other reports. These results can be related to the host genetical constitution and/or the degree of the strain virulence at the time of this study. Furthermore, we discuss that the high macrophagotropism reported for this strain in some instances could be an artificially induced condition resulting from its serial maintenance in mice, either for a longer time and/or by using young animals. The heavy parasitism and inflammation observed in the bladder, pancreas and spermatic duct of some inoculated mice, as well as the testis parasitization, were also noteworthy findings.Através deste trabalho fizemos uma revisão do parasitismo tecidual da cepa Y do Trypanosoma cruzi em camundongos albinos (Swiss-Webster. Esta cepa parasitou preferencialmente as fibras musculares lisas, esqueléticas e cardíacas, sendo baixo e transitório seu parasitismo do baço e fígado, conforme já observado por alguns Autores, embora diferindo de outros achados. Estes resultados podem estar relacionados com o padrão genético do hospedeiro e/ou com o grau de virulência da cepa por ocasião deste estudo. Além do mais, discutimos a possibilidade de que o intenso macrofagotropismo descrito para esta cepa em algumas ocasiões possa ser uma condição artificialmente induzida através de sua manutenção seriada em camundongos por tempo prolongado e/ou pelo uso de animais jovens. Também são dignos de nota, o intenso parasitismo e inflamação da bexiga, pâncreas e canal espermático de alguns animais inoculados, assim como, o encontro de ninhos de amastigotas no testículo.

  3. Effect of experimental single Ancylostoma caninum and mixed infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense on the humoural immune response to anti-rabies vaccination in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effect of Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum and trypanosome parasites on the immune response to vaccination in dogs in endemic environments. Methods: Sixteen dogs for the experiment were grouped into 4 of 4 members each. Group I was the uninfected control one, and GPII was infected with A. caninum; GPIII was infected with A. caninum/Trypanosoma congolense (T. congolense, and GPIV was infected with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei/A. caninum. The dogs were first vaccinated with antirabies vaccine before infecting GPII, GPIII and GPIV with A. caninum which were done 4 weeks after vaccination. By 2-week post-vaccination, trypanosome parasites were superimposed on both GPIII and GPIV. A secondary vaccination was given to GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV by Week 12 of the experiment (4 weeks post treatment. Results: The prepatent period was (3.00 ± 1.40 days, in the conjunct infection of T. brucei/ A. caninum. It was (9.00 ± 1.10 days, in conjunct T. congolense/A. caninum. The prepatent period of A. caninum was (14.0 ± 2.0 days in the single A. caninum group and (13.0 ± 1.0 days in the conjunct trypanosome/A. caninum. At the 1st week after vaccination, the antibody titer in all the vaccinated groups (GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV significantly increased (P < 0.05 and peaked at the 3rd week after vaccination. Following infections, there were marked significant decreases (P < 0.05 in the antibody production against rabies in GPII, GPIII and GPIV. The significant decrease (P < 0.05 in antibody titer was highest in the conjunct groups (GPIII and GPIV compared to the single infection (GPII. Treatment with diminazene aceturate and mebendazole did not significantly improve antibody response in the dogs. A secondary vaccination administered at the 12th week after the primary vaccination significantly increased (P < 0.05 the antibody titer with a peak at the 3rd week after the secondary vaccination. Conclusions: It was therefore concluded

  4. Humoral immune response of horses experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi/ Resposta imune humoral de eqüinos infectados experimentalmente com Trypanosoma evansi

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    Lúcia Padilha Cury Thomaz de Aquino

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Six adult horses were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi (106 parasites. Three other adult horses served as negative control. Serum samples of the experimentally infected horses with T. evansi and non-infected controls horses were obtained before inoculation, and daily thereafter until 14 days post infection (DPI. After that time the serum samples were obtained weekly. Sera of the infected and non-infected control horses was tested by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of antibodies against T. evansi. Both ELISA and IFAT detected trypanosomal antibodies shortly after infection and showed progressive increases in antibodies levels during early stages of infection. The responses started on the eighth and eleventh DPI. Maximum IFAT and ELISA values were reached after four weeks of infection and were maintained at this level until the end of the period of study.Seis eqüinos foram inoculados com 106 tripomastigota sangüícolas de Trypanosoma evansi. Três outros animais foram mantidos como testemunhas. Amostras de soro sangüíneo foram obtidas de todos os animais, antes da inoculação, e diariamente até o 14º dia pós inoculação (DPI; após este período uma vez por semana. Pesquisa de anticorpos anti- T. evansi, foram realizadas através da reação de imunofluorescência indireta (RIFI e do ensaio de imunoabsorção enzimática (ELISA. A resposta imune humoral, detectada através da RIFI e do ELISA, iniciou-se, em média, a partir do oitavo DPI, alcançando títulos máximos após quatro semanas de evolução, e os titulos de anticorpos anti- T. evansi mantiveram-se elevadas até o término das observações.

  5. Estudios sobre Trypanosoma rangeli Tejera, 1920: VIII. Respuesta a las reinfecciones en dos mamíferos Trypanosoma rangeli Tejera, 1920: VIII. Responses to reinfections in 2 mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Añez

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Bajo condiciones experimentales se estudia el curso de la infección primaria y la respuesta a las reinfecciones por Trypanosoma rangeli en ratones albinos y Didelphis marsupialis. Durante el curso de la infección primaria en ratones, se observa una parasitemia relativamente baja y de corta duración. Los mismos muestran durante la primera reinfección una parasitemia escasa de cuatro días de duración, siendo resistentes a las sucesivas reinfecciones con T. rangeli. Los ejemplares de D. marsupialis exhiben una parasitemia de más larga duración, pero con un nivel de parásitos sanguícolas mucho menor que el detectado en el modelo ratón, siendo la respuesta a las reinfecciones similar a la observada en ratones. Se detectan anticuerpos hemaglutinantes en los sueros inmunes de ratones y Didelphis marsupialis, sometidos a la reinfección por T. rangeli. Se especula sobre la posible acción sinérgica de una respuesta inmune en el sitio de deposición en contra de las formas metacíclicas de T. rangeli y la acción de anticuerpos circulantes en contra de las formas sanguícolas, para explicar la resistencia de ambos modelos a las reinfecciones por T. rangeli.Under experimental conditions, the course of the infection and the response to the reinfection by Trypanosoma rangeli in mice and Didelphis marsupialis, are studied. During the initial infection the mice show a relatively low parasitaemia and a short patent period. A scanty parasitaemia level of four days length, was observed following the first reinfection, being the mice resistant to new reinfections by T. rangeli. In opossums a lower parasitaemia and a longer patent period than that detected in mice, were observed during the initial infection. The response to reinfections in this mammal, was similar to that observed in mice. After reinfection with T. rangeli, haemagglutinant antibodies in immune-sera of both mice and opossums, were detected. The possible immune-response at the site of

  6. Infections of Hypostomus spp. by Trypanosoma spp. and leeches: a study of hematology and record of these hirudineans as potential vectors of these hemoflagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln Lima Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract Among Kinetoplastida, the Trypanosoma is the genus with the highest occurrence infecting populations of marine fish and freshwater in the world, with high levels of prevalence, causing influences fish health and consequent economic losses, mainly for fish populations in situation stress. This study investigated infections of Hypostomus spp. by Trypanosoma spp. and leeches, as well as blood parameters of this host in the network of tributaries of the Tapajós River in the state of Pará, in the eastern Amazon region in Brazil. Of the 47 hosts examined, 89.4% were parasitized by Trypanosoma spp. and 55.4% also had leeches attached around the mouth. The intensity of Trypanosoma spp. increased with the size of the host, but the body conditions were not influenced by the parasitism. The number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, total number of leukocytes and thrombocytes showed variations and negative correlation with the intensity of Trypanosoma spp. in the blood of the hosts. The results suggest that the leeches were vectors of Trypanosoma spp. in Hypostomus spp.

  7. Effects of betamethasone on the course of experimentai. Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico G.C. Abath

    1986-09-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, the effect of betamethasone administered in the early post- acute infection of mice by Trypanosoma cruzi was studied. This drug was administered during 30 days after the 42nd day of infection in a dose of 0.15 mg/day. The betamethasone treatment did not cause fresh outbreaks of parasitemia and the histopathological findings in the chronic phase were not different from those in the control group. The higher cumulative mortality after treatment in the experimental group was due to superimposed bacterial infections. Outbred albino mice infected with low numbers ofY strain Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes were not suitable models for Chagas' disease, since after 7 months of observation only mild histological lesions developed in all the animais. Prolonged betamethasone treatment of mice infected with low numbers o/Trypanosoma cruzi of the Y strain, during the post-acute phase did not aggravate the course of infection.Foram estudados os efeitos da betametasona administrada na fase pós-aguda imediata de uma infecção pelo T. cruzi em camundongos. O tratamento consistiu de 30 doses diárias de 0,15 mg de betametasona, a partir de 42° dia de infecção, não havendo aparecimento de novos surtos de parasitemia. No tempo de duração do experimento (7 meses não houve diferença entre as lesões histopatológicas dos animais tratados e dos não tratados. O grupo experimental apresentou uma maior mortalidade acumulada no 75º dia de infecção, o que pode ser atribuído a infecções bacterianas associadas. Por outro lado, camundongos albinos "outbred", infectados com baixo inóculo, não se apresentaram como bom modelo de doença de Chagas, já que não desenvolveram lesões importantes nem na fase aguda nem após 7 meses de infecção. Em conclusão, o tratamento imunosupressivo prolongado, após a fase aguda de uma infecção mínima com a cepa Ydo T. cruzi não tem influência sobre o curso da infecção, pelo menos no que tange

  8. Unraveling the differences of the hydrolytic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase: a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2014-06-05

    Chagas' disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a lethal, chronic disease that currently affects more than 10 million people in Central and South America. The trans-sialidase from Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, TcTS) is a crucial enzyme for the survival of this parasite: sialic acids from the host are transferred to the cell surface glycoproteins of the trypanosome, thereby evading the host's immune system. On the other hand, the sialidase of T. rangeli (TrSA), which shares 70% sequence identity with TcTS, is a strict hydrolase and shows no trans-sialidase activity. Therefore, TcTS and TrSA represent an excellent framework to understand how different catalytic activities can be achieved with extremely similar structures. By means of combined quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM, SCC-DFTB/Amberff99SB) calculations and umbrella sampling simulations, we investigated the hydrolysis mechanisms of TcTS and TrSA and computed the free energy profiles of these reactions. The results, together with our previous computational investigations, are able to explain the catalytic mechanism of sialidases and describe how subtle differences in the active site make TrSA a strict hydrolase and TcTS a more efficient trans-sialidase.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Sequence analysis of RNase MRP RNA reveals its origination from eukaryotic RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanglong; Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Li, Yong

    2006-01-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryote-specific endoribonuclease that generates RNA primers for mitochondrial DNA replication and processes precursor rRNA. RNase P is a ubiquitous endoribonuclease that cleaves precursor tRNA transcripts to produce their mature 5′ termini. We found extensive sequence homology of catalytic domains and specificity domains between their RNA subunits in many organisms. In Candida glabrata, the internal loop of helix P3 is 100% conserved between MRP and P RNAs. The helix P8 of MRP RNA from microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi is identical to that of P RNA. Sequence homology can be widely spread over the whole molecule of MRP RNA and P RNA, such as those from Dictyostelium discoideum. These conserved nucleotides between the MRP and P RNAs strongly support the hypothesis that the MRP RNA is derived from the P RNA molecule in early eukaryote evolution. PMID:16540690

  11. Reassigning stop codons via translation termination: How a few eukaryotes broke the dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalaeva, Elena; Mikhailova, Tatiana

    2017-03-01

    The genetic code determines how amino acids are encoded within mRNA. It is universal among the vast majority of organisms, although several exceptions are known. Variant genetic codes are found in ciliates, mitochondria, and numerous other organisms. All revealed genetic codes (standard and variant) have at least one codon encoding a translation stop signal. However, recently two new genetic codes with a reassignment of all three stop codons were revealed in studies examining the protozoa transcriptomes. Here, we discuss this finding and the recent studies of variant genetic codes in eukaryotes. We consider the possible molecular mechanisms allowing the use of certain codons as sense and stop signals simultaneously. The results obtained by studying these amazing organisms represent a new and exciting insight into the mechanism of stop codon decoding in eukaryotes. Also see the video abstract here. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Three-dimensional structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by electron cryo-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, Khanh Huy; Pigino, Gaia; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Based on the molecular architecture revealed by electron cryo-tomography, the mechanism of the bending motion of eukaryotic flagella/cilia is discussed. Electron cryo-tomography is a potential approach to analyzing the three-dimensional conformation of frozen hydrated biological macromolecules using electron microscopy. Since projections of each individual object illuminated from different orientations are merged, electron tomography is capable of structural analysis of such heterogeneous environments as in vivo or with polymorphism, although radiation damage and the missing wedge are severe problems. Here, recent results on the structure of eukaryotic flagella, which is an ATP-driven bending organelle, from green algae Chlamydomonas are presented. Tomographic analysis reveals asymmetric molecular arrangements, especially that of the dynein motor proteins, in flagella, giving insight into the mechanism of planar asymmetric bending motion. Methodological challenges to obtaining higher-resolution structures from this technique are also discussed

  13. Production of isotopically labeled heterologous proteins in non-E. coli prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of stable isotope-labeled proteins is necessary for the application of a wide variety of NMR methods, to study the structures and dynamics of proteins and protein complexes. The E. coli expression system is generally used for the production of isotope-labeled proteins, because of the advantages of ease of handling, rapid growth, high-level protein production, and low cost for isotope-labeling. However, many eukaryotic proteins are not functionally expressed in E. coli, due to problems related to disulfide bond formation, post-translational modifications, and folding. In such cases, other expression systems are required for producing proteins for biomolecular NMR analyses. In this paper, we review the recent advances in expression systems for isotopically labeled heterologous proteins, utilizing non-E. coli prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  14. Incoherent feedforward control governs adaptation of activated ras in a eukaryotic chemotaxis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kosuke; Shao, Danying; Adler, Micha; Charest, Pascale G; Loomis, William F; Levine, Herbert; Groisman, Alex; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Firtel, Richard A

    2012-01-03

    Adaptation in signaling systems, during which the output returns to a fixed baseline after a change in the input, often involves negative feedback loops and plays a crucial role in eukaryotic chemotaxis. We determined the dynamical response to a uniform change in chemoattractant concentration of a eukaryotic chemotaxis pathway immediately downstream from G protein-coupled receptors. The response of an activated Ras showed near-perfect adaptation, leading us to attempt to fit the results using mathematical models for the two possible simple network topologies that can provide perfect adaptation. Only the incoherent feedforward network accurately described the experimental results. This analysis revealed that adaptation in this Ras pathway is achieved through the proportional activation of upstream components and not through negative feedback loops. Furthermore, these results are consistent with a local excitation, global inhibition mechanism for gradient sensing, possibly with a Ras guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein acting as a global inhibitor.

  15. GFFview: A Web Server for Parsing and Visualizing Annotation Information of Eukaryotic Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feilong; Chen, Shi-Yi; Wu, Zhou-Lin; Hu, Yongsong; Jia, Xianbo; Lai, Song-Jia

    2017-10-01

    Owing to wide application of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology, more and more eukaryotic genomes have been extensively annotated, such as the gene structure, alternative splicing, and noncoding loci. Annotation information of genome is prevalently stored as plain text in General Feature Format (GFF), which could be hundreds or thousands Mb in size. Therefore, it is a challenge for manipulating GFF file for biologists who have no bioinformatic skill. In this study, we provide a web server (GFFview) for parsing the annotation information of eukaryotic genome and then generating statistical description of six indices for visualization. GFFview is very useful for investigating quality and difference of the de novo assembled transcriptome in RNA-seq studies.

  16. Origins of robustness in translational control via eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Farhan; Spurgeon, Sarah; von der Haar, Tobias

    2018-05-14

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is one of the best studied and most widely used means for regulating protein synthesis activity in eukaryotic cells. This pathway regulates protein synthesis in response to stresses, viral infections, and nutrient depletion, among others. We present analyses of an ordinary differential equation-based model of this pathway, which aim to identify its principal robustness-conferring features. Our analyses indicate that robustness is a distributed property, rather than arising from the properties of any one individual pathway species. However, robustness-conferring properties are unevenly distributed between the different species, and we identify a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complex as a species that likely contributes strongly to the robustness of the pathway. Our analyses make further predictions on the dynamic response to different types of kinases that impinge on eIF2. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Big Bang of picorna-like virus evolution antedates the radiation of eukaryotic supergroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V; Wolf, Yuri I; Nagasaki, Keizo; Dolja, Valerian V

    2008-12-01

    The recent discovery of RNA viruses in diverse unicellular eukaryotes and developments in evolutionary genomics have provided the means for addressing the origin of eukaryotic RNA viruses. The phylogenetic analyses of RNA polymerases and helicases presented in this Analysis article reveal close evolutionary relationships between RNA viruses infecting hosts from the Chromalveolate and Excavate supergroups and distinct families of picorna-like viruses of plants and animals. Thus, diversification of picorna-like viruses probably occurred in a 'Big Bang' concomitant with key events of eukaryogenesis. The origins of the conserved genes of picorna-like viruses are traced to likely ancestors including bacterial group II retroelements, the family of HtrA proteases and DNA bacteriophages.

  18. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  19. The Persistent Contributions of RNA to Eukaryotic Gen(om)e Architecture and Cellular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the best scenario for earliest forms of life is based on RNA molecules as they have the proven ability to catalyze enzymatic reactions and harbor genetic information. Evolutionary principles valid today become apparent in such models already. Furthermore, many features of eukaryotic genome architecture might have their origins in an RNA or RNA/protein (RNP) world, including the onset of a further transition, when DNA replaced RNA as the genetic bookkeeper of the cell. Chromosome maintenance, splicing, and regulatory function via RNA may be deeply rooted in the RNA/RNP worlds. Mostly in eukaryotes, conversion from RNA to DNA is still ongoing, which greatly impacts the plasticity of extant genomes. Raw material for novel genes encoding protein or RNA, or parts of genes including regulatory elements that selection can act on, continues to enter the evolutionary lottery. PMID:25081515

  20. The eukaryotic genome is structurally and functionally more like a social insect colony than a book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guo-Hua; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Xintian; Huang, Cuiqin

    2017-11-01

    Traditionally, the genome has been described as the 'book of life'. However, the metaphor of a book may not reflect the dynamic nature of the structure and function of the genome. In the eukaryotic genome, the number of centrally located protein-coding sequences is relatively constant across species, but the amount of noncoding DNA increases considerably with the increase of organismal evolutional complexity. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that the abundant peripheral noncoding DNA protects the genome and the central protein-coding sequences in the eukaryotic genome. Upon comparison with the habitation, sociality and defense mechanisms of a social insect colony, it is found that the genome is similar to a social insect colony in various aspects. A social insect colony may thus be a better metaphor than a book to describe the spatial organization and physical functions of the genome. The potential implications of the metaphor are also discussed.

  1. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.; Berry, Kayla N.; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Takahashi, Masateru; Francis, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  2. Inhibition of Ribosome Recruitment Induces Stress Granule Formation Independently of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Mazroui, Rachid; Sukarieh, Rami; Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Kaufman, Randal J.; Northcote, Peter; Tanaka, Junichi; Gallouzi, Imed; Pelletier, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic aggregates known as stress granules (SGs) arise as a consequence of cellular stress and contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. These foci are thought to serve as sites of mRNA storage or triage during the cell stress response. SG formation has been shown to require induction of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2α phosphorylation. Herein, we investigate the potential role of other initiation factors in this process and demonstrate that interfering with eIF4A activity...

  3. Functional and evolutionary characterization of Ohr proteins in eukaryotes reveals many active homologs among pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Meireles

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ohr and OsmC proteins comprise two subfamilies within a large group of proteins that display Cys-based, thiol dependent peroxidase activity. These proteins were previously thought to be restricted to prokaryotes, but we show here, using iterated sequence searches, that Ohr/OsmC homologs are also present in 217 species of eukaryotes with a massive presence in Fungi (186 species. Many of these eukaryotic Ohr proteins possess an N-terminal extension that is predicted to target them to mitochondria. We obtained recombinant proteins for four eukaryotic members of the Ohr/OsmC family and three of them displayed lipoyl peroxidase activity. Further functional and biochemical characterization of the Ohr homologs from the ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis Mf_1 (MfOhr, the causative agent of Black Sigatoka disease in banana plants, was pursued. Similarly to what has been observed for the bacterial proteins, we found that: (i the peroxidase activity of MfOhr was supported by DTT or dihydrolipoamide (dithiols, but not by β-mercaptoethanol or GSH (monothiols, even in large excess; (ii MfOhr displayed preference for organic hydroperoxides (CuOOH and tBOOH over hydrogen peroxide; (iii MfOhr presented extraordinary reactivity towards linoleic acid hydroperoxides (k=3.18 (±2.13×108 M−1 s−1. Both Cys87 and Cys154 were essential to the peroxidase activity, since single mutants for each Cys residue presented no activity and no formation of intramolecular disulfide bond upon treatment with hydroperoxides. The pKa value of the Cysp residue was determined as 5.7±0.1 by a monobromobimane alkylation method. Therefore, eukaryotic Ohr peroxidases share several biochemical features with prokaryotic orthologues and are preferentially located in mitochondria. Keywords: Ohr/OsmC, Thiol-dependent peroxidases, Phylogeny

  4. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Although fluoride is plentiful in the environment and is commonly used at high concentrations in oral hygiene products, little has been known about how biological systems overcome the toxic effects of this anion. We demonstrate that a protein called FEX in many fungi is essential for cell survival in the presence of high fluoride concentrations. The protein is required for the rapid expulsion of cytoplasmic fluoride, indicating that many eukaryotic species that carry FEX genes likely avoid fl...

  5. Functional and evolutionary characterization of Ohr proteins in eukaryotes reveals many active homologs among pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, D A; Domingos, R M; Gaiarsa, J W; Ragnoni, E G; Bannitz-Fernandes, R; da Silva Neto, J F; de Souza, R F; Netto, L E S

    2017-08-01

    Ohr and OsmC proteins comprise two subfamilies within a large group of proteins that display Cys-based, thiol dependent peroxidase activity. These proteins were previously thought to be restricted to prokaryotes, but we show here, using iterated sequence searches, that Ohr/OsmC homologs are also present in 217 species of eukaryotes with a massive presence in Fungi (186 species). Many of these eukaryotic Ohr proteins possess an N-terminal extension that is predicted to target them to mitochondria. We obtained recombinant proteins for four eukaryotic members of the Ohr/OsmC family and three of them displayed lipoyl peroxidase activity. Further functional and biochemical characterization of the Ohr homologs from the ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis Mf_1 (MfOhr), the causative agent of Black Sigatoka disease in banana plants, was pursued. Similarly to what has been observed for the bacterial proteins, we found that: (i) the peroxidase activity of MfOhr was supported by DTT or dihydrolipoamide (dithiols), but not by β-mercaptoethanol or GSH (monothiols), even in large excess; (ii) MfOhr displayed preference for organic hydroperoxides (CuOOH and tBOOH) over hydrogen peroxide; (iii) MfOhr presented extraordinary reactivity towards linoleic acid hydroperoxides (k=3.18 (±2.13)×10 8 M -1 s -1 ). Both Cys 87 and Cys 154 were essential to the peroxidase activity, since single mutants for each Cys residue presented no activity and no formation of intramolecular disulfide bond upon treatment with hydroperoxides. The pK a value of the Cys p residue was determined as 5.7±0.1 by a monobromobimane alkylation method. Therefore, eukaryotic Ohr peroxidases share several biochemical features with prokaryotic orthologues and are preferentially located in mitochondria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Expression of the lysostaphin gene of Staphylococcus simulans in a eukaryotic system.

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, C M; Bramley, A J; Lax, A J

    1994-01-01

    The lysostaphin gene of Staphylococcus simulans was cloned into Escherichia coli. The 5' end of the gene was modified to include a eukaryotic start codon, the Kozak expression start site consensus sequence, and an enzyme site to facilitate manipulation of the gene. Transcription of the modified gene in vitro yielded an RNA transcript which, when added to a rabbit reticulocyte cell-free translation system, directed the synthesis of several products. The largest product, migrating at approximat...

  7. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Cl− and Water Transport through a Eukaryotic CLC Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Coalson, Rob D.

    2012-01-01

    Early crystal structures of prokaryotic CLC proteins identified three Cl– binding sites: internal (Sint), central (Scen), and external (Sext). A conserved external GLU (GLUex) residue acts as a gate competing for Sext. Recently, the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic transporter, CmCLC, revealed that in this transporter GLUex competes instead for Scen. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cl– transport through CmCLC. The gating and Cl–/H+ transport cycle are inferre...

  8. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  9. New insights into the structural organization of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cytoskeletons using cryo-electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuerner, Julia; Medalia, Ohad; Linaroudis, Alexandros A.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging imaging technology that combines the potential of three-dimensional (3-D) imaging at molecular resolution (<5 nm) with a close-to-life preservation of the specimen. In conjunction with pattern recognition techniques, it enables us to map the molecular landscape inside cells. The application of cryo-ET to intact cells provides novel insights into the structure and the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

  10. Microbial eukaryote diversity in the marine oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Parris, Darren J.; Ganesh, Sangita; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Stewart, Frank J.; DeLong, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Molecular surveys are revealing diverse eukaryotic assemblages in oxygen-limited ocean waters. These communities may play pivotal ecological roles through autotrophy, feeding, and a wide range of symbiotic associations with prokaryotes. We used 18S rRNA gene sequencing to provide the first snapshot of pelagic microeukaryotic community structure in two cellular size fractions (0.2-1.6 µm, >1.6 µm) from seven depths through the anoxic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off northern Chile. Sequencing ...

  11. Six subgroups and extensive recent duplications characterize the evolution of the eukaryotic tubulin protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-08-27

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog-paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Fertility of the Small East African goat following pre-pubertal infection with Trypanosoma congolense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, H.B.; Gombe, S.

    1991-01-01

    Pre-pubertal male and female Small East African goats were infected with Trypanosoma congolense at 4-5 months of age. Changes in body weight and haemogram were monitored weekly. Progesterone and testosterone measurements were made three times weekly until the goats either reached puberty or 18 months of age. Onset of puberty was determined from observation of oestrus behaviour, mating or increase in libidio; this was confirmed by elevation in plasma progesterone or testosterone levels. Trypanosomiasis affected pre-pubertal goats by reducing body weight gain and delaying onset of puberty. Histological examination of the gonads showed pronounced pathological changes. These effects were reversed by treatment with isometamidium chloride (Samorin, May and Baker). It was concluded that early treatment of infected goats before serious gonadal damage could occur allowed full restoration of reproductive function. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  13. A new bianthron glycoside as inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Edangelo M.S. de; Silva, Maria G.V.; Wiggers, Helton J.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Andricopulo, Adriano D.

    2009-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the ethanolic extract of stalks of Senna martiana Benth. (Leguminoseae), native specie of northeast Brazil, resulted in the isolation and spectroscopic characterization of a new bianthrone glycoside, martianine 1 (10,10'-il-chrysophanol-10-oxi- 10,10'-bi-glucosyl). Its identification was established by HRMS, IR and 2D NMR experiments. The evaluation of martianine trypanocidal activity was carried out against gliceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi. Its inhibitory constant (K i ) is in the low micromolar concentration and it was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry to be 27.3 +-2.47 μmol L -1 . The non-competitive mechanism is asserted to be putative of the mode of action martianine displays against T. cruzi GAPDH. Results show that martianine has a great potential to become new lead molecule by inhibiting this key enzyme and for the development of new drugs against Chagas disease. (author)

  14. Selection and optimization of hits from a high-throughput phenotypic screen against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Martine; Alexander, Paul W; Chaplin, Jason H; Abbott, Michael J; Diao, Hugo; Wang, Zhisen; Best, Wayne M; Perez, Catherine J; Cornwall, Scott M J; Keatley, Sarah K; Thompson, R C Andrew; Charman, Susan A; White, Karen L; Ryan, Eileen; Chen, Gong; Ioset, Jean-Robert; von Geldern, Thomas W; Chatelain, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required to diversify the current clinical and preclinical pipelines. Increasing the number and diversity of hits available for assessment at the beginning of the discovery process will help to achieve this aim. We report the evaluation of multiple hits generated from a high-throughput screen to identify inhibitors of T. cruzi and from these studies the discovery of two novel series currently in lead optimization. Lead compounds from these series potently and selectively inhibit growth of T. cruzi in vitro and the most advanced compound is orally active in a subchronic mouse model of T. cruzi infection. High-throughput screening of novel compound collections has an important role to play in diversifying the trypanosomatid drug discovery portfolio. A new T. cruzi inhibitor series with good drug-like properties and promising in vivo efficacy has been identified through this process.

  15. A Highly Sensitive Rapid Diagnostic Test for Chagas Disease That Utilizes a Recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, C. A.; Barney, R. S.; Crudder, C. H.; Wilmoth, J. L.; Stevens, D. S.; Mora-Garcia, S.; Yanovsky, M. J.; Weigl, B. H.; Yanovsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Improved diagnostic tests for Chagas disease are urgently needed. A new lateral flow rapid test for Chagas disease is under development at PATH, in collaboration with Laboratorio Lemos of Argentina, which utilizes a recombinant antigen for detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. To evaluate the performance of this test, 375 earlier characterized serum specimens from a region where Chagas is endemic were tested using a reference test (the Ortho T. cruzi ELISA, Johnson & Johnson), a commercially available rapid test (Chagas STAT-PAK, Chembio), and the PATH–Lemos rapid test. Compared to the composite reference tests, the PATH–Lemos rapid test demonstrated an optimal sensitivity of 99.5% and specificity of 96.8%, while the Chagas STAT-PAK demonstrated a sensitivity of 95.3% and specificity of 99.5%. These results indicate that the PATH–Lemos rapid test shows promise as an improved and reliable tool for screening and diagnosis of Chagas disease. PMID:21342808

  16. Activity of D-carnitine and its derivatives on Trypanosoma infections in rats and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manganaro M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Little progress has been made in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis over the past decades. L-carnitine has a major role in glycolysis-based energy supply of blood trypanosomes for it stimulates constant ATP production. To investigate whether administration of the isomer D-carnitine could exert a competitive inhibition on the metabolic pathway of the L-form, possibily resulting in parasite replication inhibition, several formulations of this compound were tested on Trypanosoma lewisi and T. brucei rhodesiense in rodent models. High oral dosages of D-carnitine inner salt and proprionyl-D-carnitine were not toxic to animals and induced about 50 % parasite growth inhibition in reversible, i.e. competitive, fashion. A putative mechanism could be an interference in pyruvate kinase activity and hence ATP production. Considering both, lack of toxicity and inhibitory activity, D-carnitine may have a role in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis, in association with available trypanocidal drugs.

  17. Genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi natural clones from the state of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barnabé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from the state of Paraíba, Brazil, isolated from man, wild mammals, and triatomine bugs were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random primed amplified polymorphic DNA. Despite the low number of stocks, a notable genetic, genotypic, and phylogenetic diversity was recorded. The presence of the two main phylogenetic subdivisions, T. cruzi I and II, was recorded. The strong linkage disequilibrium observed in the population under survey suggests that T. cruzi undergoes predominant clonal evolution in this area too, although this result should be confirmed by a broader sample. The pattern of clonal variation does not suggests a recent origin by founder effect with a limited number of different genotypes.

  18. Prevalencia de infeccion a Trypanosoma cruzi en donadores de sangre en el Estado de Jalisco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Trujillo Contreras

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Durante el periodo de Octubre de 1991 a Marzo de 1992, se tomaron 3419 muestras de donadores de sangre de 12 localidades rurales y de 8 hospitales urbanos a los que se les realizo un estúdio serológico mediante la reacción de hemaglutinación indirecta encontrándose anticuerpos contra Trypanosoma cruzi en 44 indivíduos 39 masculinosy 5 femininos. El 90,9% de donantes fueron masculinos. De acuerdo a su procedencia, el 73,5% fué del área urbana y el 26,5% del área rural. De acuerdo a los resultados el riesgo de transmisión de T. cruzi por transfusión sanguinea está latente por la creciente urbanización de la enfermedad de Chagas.

  19. Production and expression of inflammation and angiogenic parameters triggered by different genetic population of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Deena

    2014-01-01

    Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas. Núcleo de Pesquisas em Ciências Biológicas, Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa e Pós Graduação, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto. A cardiopatia induzida pela infecção pelo Trypanosoma cruzi aprensenta a inflamação como sua principal característica imunopatológica. Differente células inflamatórias contribuem para a produção de mediatores inflamatorios e regulatórios promotores diretos ou indiretos do processo denominado angiogênese inflamatória. As ...

  20. Genómica del Trypanosoma cruzi. Nuevas oportunidades para tratar el mal de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Huete-Pérez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available LA SECUENCIACIÓN DEL GENOMA HUMANO PUBLICADA EN FEBRERO de 2001 ha sido considerada como el hito científico más importante del siglo XX. La secuenciación, cuatro años más tarde, de tres parásitos tripanosmatidas, entre ellos el Trypanosoma cruzi, podría ser también catalogada como uno de los acontecimientos científicos más importantes para la salud publica del continente americano. Aquí se presenta un panorama general sobre los resultados más significativos del estudio geonómico del T. cruzi, se abordan los trabajos realizados por nuestro laboratorio en la Universidad Centroamericana, finalizando con una discusión sobre las perspectivas del uso de la genómica en Nicaragua.

  1. Effects of water deprivation on renal hydroelectrolytic excretion in chronically Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.T. Rosa

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of an 8 hour-period of water deprivation on fluid and electrolyte renal excretion was investigated in male Wistar rats infected with the strain São Felipe (12SF of Trypanosoma cruzi, in comparison with age and sex matched non-infected controls. The median percent reductions in the urinary flow (-40% v -63% and excretion ofsodium (-57% v-79% were smaller in chagasic than in control rats, respectively. So, chagasic rats excreted more than controls. On the other hand, the median percent decrement in the clearance of creatinine was higher in chagasic (-51% than in controls (-39%. Thus, chagasic rats showed some disturbed renal hydroelectrolytic responses to water deprivation, expressed by smaller conservation, or higher excretion of water and sodium in association with smaller glomerularfiltration rate. This fact denoted an elevation in the fractional excretion of sodium and water.

  2. [Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the rural population of Sucre State, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jordán, Noris; Berrizbeitia, Mariolga; Rodríguez, Jessicca; Concepción, Juan Luis; Cáceres, Ana; Quiñones, Wilfredo

    2017-10-26

    The current study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Sucre State, Venezuela, and its association with epidemiological risk factors. The cluster sampling design allowed selecting 96 villages and 576 dwellings in the State's 15 municipalities. A total of 2,212 serum samples were analyzed by ELISA, HAI, and IFI. Seroprevalence in Sucre State was 3.12%. Risk factors associated with T. cruzi infection were: accumulated garbage, flooring and wall materials, type of dwelling, living in a house with wattle and daub walls and/or straw roofing, living in a house with risky walls and roofing, risky buildings and wattle and daub outbuildings, poultry inside the human dwelling, and presence of firewood. Infection was associated with individual age, and three seropositive cases were found in individuals less than 15 years of age. Sucre State has epidemiological factors that favor the risk of acquiring T. cruzi infection.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges C. Accrombessi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 8.48 micromolar (µM. Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate anti-trypanosomal activity with IC50 values equal to 23.27 µM and 67.17 µM respectively. Benzophenone 2 methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 2 showed no activity up to IC50 = 371.74 µM.

  4. Enhanced succinic acid production in Aspergillus saccharolyticus by heterologous expression of fumarate reductase from Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    production medium as well as the complete medium, but the measured enzyme activities were different depending on the media. Furthermore, a soluble NADH-dependent fumarate reductase gene (frd) from Trypanosoma brucei was inserted and expressed in A. saccharolyticus. The expression of the frd gene led......Aspergillus saccharolyticus exhibits great potential as a cell factory for industrial production of dicarboxylic acids. In the analysis of the organic acid profile, A. saccharolyticus was cultivated in an acid production medium using two different pH conditions. The specific activities...... of the enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarase (FUM), involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) branch, were examined and compared in cells harvested from the acid production medium and a complete medium. The results showed that ambient pH had a significant impact...

  5. Seroprevalence of human Trypanosoma cruzi infection in diferent geografic zones of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazariego-Arana, M A; Monteón, V M; Ballinas-Verdugo, M A; Hernández-Becerril, N; Alejandre-Aguilar, R; Reyes, P A

    2001-01-01

    A serologic survey was carried out in four different geographic zones of Chiapas, Mexico. A total of 1,333 samples were collected from residents of thirteen communities located on the Coast, Central Mountain, Lacandon Forest and a zone called Mesochiapas. One hundred and fifty one seropositive individuals (11.3%) were identified. Human Trypanosoma cruzi infection was influenced by geography. In the Lacandon Forest and Central Mountains there was a higher seroprevalence 32.1 and 13.8% respectively, than on the coast (1.2%). In Mesochiapas there were no seropositive individuals among the 137 persons tested. An active transmission is probably continuing because seropositive cases (13.8%) were detected in children under 10 years of age. The vector recognized on the Coast was Triatoma dimidiata while in the Lacandon Forest it was Rhodnius prolixus.

  6. Population genetic analysis of Colombian Trypanosoma cruzi isolates revealed by enzyme electrophoretic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruiz-Garcia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Colombia presents an enormous biological diversity, few studies have been conducted on the population genetics of Trypanosoma cruzi. This study was carried out with 23 Colombian stocks of this protozoa analyzed for 13 isoenzymatic loci. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the genetic diversity and heterogeneity, the genetic relationships and the possible spatial structure of these 23 Colombian stocks of T. cruzi were estimated. The majority of results obtained are in agreement with a clonal population structure. Nevertheless, two aspects expected in a clonal structure were not discovered in the Colombian T. cruzi stocks. There was an absence of given zymodemes over-represented from a geographical point of view and the presumed temporal stabilizing selective phenomena was not observed either in the Colombian stocks sampled several times through the years of the study. Some hypotheses are discussed in order to explain the results found.

  7. African trypanosomiasis with special reference to Egyptian Trypanosoma evansi: is it a neglected zoonosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M M; Khater, Mai Kh A; Morsy, Tosson A

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosomes (including humans) are blood and sometimes tissue parasites of the order Kinetoplastida, family Trypanosomatidae, genus Trypanosoma, principally transmitted by biting insects where most of them undergo a biological cycle. They are divided into Stercoraria with the posterior station inoculation, including T. cruzi, both an extra- and intracellular parasite that causes Chagas disease, a major human disease affecting 15 million people and threatening 100 million people in Latin America, and the Salivaria with the anterior station inoculation, mainly African livestock pathogenic trypanosomes, including the agents of sleeping sickness, a major human disease affecting around half a million people and threatening 60 million people in Africa. Now, T. evansi was reported in man is it required to investigate its zoonotic potential?

  8. The effect of Bulgarian propolis against Trypanosoma cruzi and during its interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Pires Dantas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Propolis has shown activity against pathogenic microorganisms that cause diseases in humans and animals. The ethanol (Et-Blg and acetone (Ket-Blg extracts from a Bulgarian propolis, with known chemical compositions, presented similar activity against tissue culture-derived amastigotes. The treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected skeletal muscle cells with Et-Blg led to a decrease of infection and of the intracellular proliferation of amastigotes, while damage to the host cell was observed only at concentration 12.5 times higher than those affecting the parasite. Ultrastructural analysis of the effect of both extracts in epimastigotes revealed that the main targets were the mitochondrion and reservosomes. Et-Blg also affected the mitochondrion-kinetoplast complex in trypomastigotes, offering a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. The role of adaptations in two-strain competition for sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher M; Mubayi, Anuj

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a continuous-time model for the sylvatic transmission dynamics of two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi enzootic in North America, in order to study the role that adaptations of each strain to distinct modes of transmission (classical stercorarian transmission on the one hand, and vertical and oral transmission on the other) may play in the competition between the two strains. A deterministic model incorporating contact process saturation predicts competitive exclusion, and reproductive numbers for the infection provide a framework for evaluating the competition in terms of adaptive trade-off between distinct transmission modes. Results highlight the importance of oral transmission in mediating the competition between horizontal (stercorarian) and vertical transmission; its presence as a competing contact process advantages vertical transmission even without adaptation to oral transmission, but such adaptation appears necessary to explain the persistence of (vertically-adapted) T. cruzi IV in raccoons and woodrats in the southeastern United States.

  10. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in rural Ecuador and clustering of seropositivity within households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carla L; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Riner, Diana K; Costales, Jaime A; Lascano, Mauricio S; Arcos-Terán, Laura; Preisser, John S; Seed, J Richard; Grijalva, Mario J

    2009-12-01

    We performed a cross-sectional study of Trypanosoma cruzi seroprevalence in 14 communities in three provinces of Ecuador and estimated the magnitude of the association of seropositive individuals within households. A total of 3,286 subjects from 997 households were included. Seroprevalence was 5.7%, 1.0%, and 3.6% in subjects in the Manabí, Guayas, and Loja provinces, respectively. Seroprevalence increased with increasing age in Manabí and Guayas, whereas in Loja, the highest prevalence occurred in children Loja, the odds of seropositivity were more than two times greater for an individual living in a household with another seropositive person. Our results indicate that transmission of T. cruzi is ongoing in Ecuador, although intensity of transmission and mechanisms of interaction between humans and the insect vectors of disease vary between geographic regions.

  11. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis in Terego county, northern Uganda, 1996: a lot quality assurance sampling survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutin, Yvan J F; Legros, Dominique; Owini, Vincent; Brown, Vincent; Lee, Evan; Mbulamberi, Dawson; Paquet, Christophe

    2004-04-01

    We estimated the pre-intervention prevalence of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg) trypanosomiasis using the lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) methods in 14 parishes of Terego County in northern Uganda. A total of 826 participants were included in the survey sample in 1996. The prevalence of laboratory confirmed Tbg trypanosomiasis adjusted for parish population sizes was 2.2% (95% confidence interval =1.1-3.2). This estimate was consistent with the 1.1% period prevalence calculated on the basis of cases identified through passive and active screening in 1996-1999. Ranking of parishes in four categories according to LQAS analysis of the 1996 survey predicted the prevalences observed during the first round of active screening in the population in 1997-1998 (P LQAS were validated by the results of the population screening, suggesting that these survey methods may be useful in the pre-intervention phase of sleeping sickness control programs.

  13. Deciphering RNA Regulatory Elements Involved in the Developmental and Environmental Gene Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Salavati, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a vector-borne parasite with intricate life cycle that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals. This pathogen relies on fine regulation of gene expression to respond and adapt to variable environments, with implications in transmission and infectivity. However, the involved regulatory elements and their mechanisms of actions are largely unknown. Here, benefiting from a new graph-based approach for finding functional regulatory elements in RNA (GRAFFER), we have predicted 88 new RNA regulatory elements that are potentially involved in the gene regulatory network of T. brucei. We show that many of these newly predicted elements are responsive to both transcriptomic and proteomic changes during the life cycle of the parasite. Moreover, we found that 11 of predicted elements strikingly resemble previously identified regulatory elements for the parasite. Additionally, comparison with previously predicted motifs on T. brucei suggested the superior performance of our approach based on the current limited knowledge of regulatory elements in T. brucei.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi in the anal glands of urban opossums: I- isolation and experimental infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Urdaneta-Morales

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Opossums (Didelphis marsupialis captured in intensely urbanized areas of the city of Caracas, Venezuela, were found infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The developmental cycle of trypomastigote-epimastigote-metacyclic infective trypomastigote, usually occurring in the intestine of the triatomine vector, was taking place in the anal odoriferous glands of the opossums. Material from the glands, inoculated in young, healthy opossums and white mice by different routes, subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, orally, and into the eye, induced T. cruzi infections in all animals. Parasitemia, invasion of cardiac and skeletal muscle, and intracellular multiplication of amastigotes were observed. Inoculation of metacyclics from anal glands, cultured in LIT medium, gave equivalent results. All opossums survived; all mice died. Excreta of opossums may thus transmit Chagas' disease by contamination, even in urban areas where insect vectors are not present.

  15. Aspectos ultra-estruturais da forma epimastigota do Trypanosoma cruzi em meio LIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available E feito um estudo da ultra-estrutura da forma epismastigota do Trypanosoma cruzi mantida em meio de cultivo acelular. O núcleo das formas em divisão apresenta um aspecto homogêneo. Microtúbulos intranucleares são observados durante a divisão. No entanto, a membrana nuclear permanece íntegra. O citoplasma apresenta-se com vacúolos de dimensões e aspectos variados. Com o método do ácido periódico-tiosemicarbazida-proteinato de prata, polissacaríáeos e/ou glicoproteínas foram localizados na membrana celular e na membrana que delimita certos vacúolos citoplasmáticos.

  16. Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Placenta Invasion and Infection: The Use of Human Chorionic Villi Explants

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    Ricardo E. Fretes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, endemic in Latin America, is associated with premature labor and miscarriage. During vertical transmission the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi crosses the placental barrier. However, the exact mechanism of the placental infection remains unclear. We review the congenital transmission of T. cruzi, particularly the role of possible local placental factors that contribute to the vertical transmission of the parasite. Additionally, we analyze the different methods available for studying the congenital transmission of the parasite. In that context, the ex vivo infection with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of human placental chorionic villi constitutes an excellent tool for studying parasite infection strategies as well as possible local antiparasitic mechanisms.

  17. First report of surra (Trypanosoma evansi infection in a Tunisian dog

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    Rjeibi Mohamed Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, the agent of surra, is a salivarian trypanosome, originating from Africa. Surra is a major disease in camels, equines and dogs, in which it can often be fatal in the absence of treatment. Animals exhibit nonspecific clinical signs (anaemia, loss of weight and abortion. In the present survey, a blood sample was collected in Sousse (Central Tunisia from a dog that presented clinical signs of trypanosomiasis. Giemsa-stained blood smears and PCR were performed. ITS1 sequences from blood had 99.8 and 99.5% homology with published T. evansi sequences from cattle and camels, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. evansi in a Tunisian dog.

  18. A study of eukaryotic response mechanisms to atmospheric pressure cold plasma by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae single gene mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hongqing; Wang Ruixue; Sun Peng; Wu Haiyan; Liu Qi; Li Fangting; Fang Jing; Zhang Jue; Zhu Weidong

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of eukaryotic cell response to cold plasma are studied. A series of single gene mutants of eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used to compare their sensitivity to plasma treatment with the wild type. We examined 12 mutants in the oxidative stress pathway and the cell cycle pathway, in which 8 are found to be hypersensitive to plasma processing. The mutated genes' roles in the two pathways are analyzed to understand the biological response mechanisms of plasma treatment. The results demonstrate that genes from both pathways are needed for the eukaryotic cells to survive the complex plasma treatment.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of the core histone doublet and DNA topo II genes of Marseilleviridae: evidence of proto-eukaryotic provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erives, Albert J

    2017-11-28

    While the genomes of eukaryotes and Archaea both encode the histone-fold domain, only eukaryotes encode the core histone paralogs H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. With DNA, these core histones assemble into the nucleosomal octamer underlying eukaryotic chromatin. Importantly, core histones for H2A and H3 are maintained as neofunctionalized paralogs adapted for general bulk chromatin (canonical H2 and H3) or specialized chromatin (H2A.Z enriched at gene promoters and cenH3s enriched at centromeres). In this context, the identification of core histone-like "doublets" in the cytoplasmic replication factories of the Marseilleviridae (MV) is a novel finding with possible relevance to understanding the origin of eukaryotic chromatin. Here, we analyze and compare the core histone doublet genes from all known MV genomes as well as other MV genes relevant to the origin of the eukaryotic replisome. Using different phylogenetic approaches, we show that MV histone domains encode obligate H2B-H2A and H4-H3 dimers of possible proto-eukaryotic origin. MV core histone moieties form sister clades to each of the four eukaryotic clades of canonical and variant core histones. This suggests that MV core histone moieties diverged prior to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations associated with paired linear chromosomes and variant histone octamer assembly. We also show that MV genomes encode a proto-eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II enzyme that forms a sister clade to eukaryotes. This is a relevant finding given that DNA topo II influences histone deposition and chromatin compaction and is the second most abundant nuclear protein after histones. The combined domain architecture and phylogenomic analyses presented here suggest that a primitive origin for MV histone genes is a more parsimonious explanation than horizontal gene transfers + gene fusions + sufficient divergence to eliminate relatedness to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations within the H2A and H3 clades without loss of relatedness to each of

  20. Snapshot of the Eukaryotic Gene Expression in Muskoxen Rumen—A Metatranscriptomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Nicholas; Barboza, Perry S.; Ungerfeld, Emilio; Leigh, Mary Beth; Selinger, L. Brent; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian; McAllister, Tim A.; Forster, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Herbivores rely on digestive tract lignocellulolytic microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi and protozoa, to derive energy and carbon from plant cell wall polysaccharides. Culture independent metagenomic studies have been used to reveal the genetic content of the bacterial species within gut microbiomes. However, the nature of the genes encoded by eukaryotic protozoa and fungi within these environments has not been explored using metagenomic or metatranscriptomic approaches. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a metatranscriptomic approach was used to investigate the functional diversity of the eukaryotic microorganisms within the rumen of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), with a focus on plant cell wall degrading enzymes. Polyadenylated RNA (mRNA) was sequenced on the Illumina Genome Analyzer II system and 2.8 gigabases of sequences were obtained and 59129 contigs assembled. Plant cell wall degrading enzyme modules including glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases and polysaccharide lyases were identified from over 2500 contigs. These included a number of glycoside hydrolase family 6 (GH6), GH48 and swollenin modules, which have rarely been described in previous gut metagenomic studies. Conclusions/Significance The muskoxen rumen metatranscriptome demonstrates a much higher percentage of cellulase enzyme discovery and an 8.7x higher rate of total carbohydrate active enzyme discovery per gigabase of sequence than previous rumen metagenomes. This study provides a snapshot of eukaryotic gene expression in the muskoxen rumen, and identifies a number of candidate genes coding for potentially valuable lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:21655220