WorldWideScience

Sample records for early structure formation

  1. Structure Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Miedema, P G

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the perturbations in the energy density and the particle number density in a flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe in the radiation-dominated era and in the epoch after decoupling of matter and radiation is studied. For large-scale perturbations the outcome is in accordance with treatments in the literature. For small-scale perturbations the differences are conspicuous. Firstly, in the radiation-dominated era small-scale perturbations grew proportional to the square root of time. Secondly, perturbations in the Cold Dark Matter particle number density were, due to gravitation, coupled to perturbations in the total energy density. This implies that structure formation has commenced successfully only after decoupling of matter and radiation. Finally, after decoupling density perturbations evolved diabatically, i.e., they exchanged heat with their environment. This heat exchange may have enhanced the growth rate of its mass sufficiently to explain structure formation in the early univ...

  2. Hydrodynamics of structure formation in the early Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, C.H.; Nieuwenhuizen, T.M.; Schild, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Theory and observations reveal fatal flaws in the standard LambdaCDM model. The cold dark matter hierarchical clustering paradigm predicts a gradual bottom-up growth of gravitational structures assuming linear, collisionless, ideal flows and unrealistic CDM condensations and mergers. Collisional fluid mechanics with viscosity, turbulence, and diffusion predicts a turbulent big bang and top-down viscous-gravitational fragmentation from supercluster to galaxy scales in the plasma epoch, as obse...

  3. Hydrodynamics of structure formation in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H; Schild, R E

    2008-01-01

    Theory and observations reveal fatal flaws in the standard LambdaCDM model. The cold dark matter hierarchical clustering paradigm predicts a gradual bottom-up growth of gravitational structures assuming linear, collisionless, ideal flows and unrealistic CDM condensations and mergers. Collisional fluid mechanics with viscosity, turbulence, and diffusion predicts a turbulent big bang and top-down viscous-gravitational fragmentation from supercluster to galaxy scales in the plasma epoch, as observed from 0.3 Gpc void sizes, 1.5 Gpc spins and Kolmogorov-fingerprint-turbulence-signatures in the CMB. Turbulence produced at expanding gravitational void boundaries causes a linear morphology of 3 Kpc fragmenting plasma-protogalaxies along vortex lines, as observed in deep HST images. After decoupling, gas-protogalaxies fragment into primordial-density, million-solar-mass clumps of earth-mass planets forming 0.3 Mpc galactic-dark-matter. White-dwarf-heated planet-atmospheres give dimmed SNe Ia events and false gamma-ra...

  4. Cosmic Ray Production of $^6$Li by Structure Formation Shocks in the Early Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Inoue, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeru Ken

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the production of the element $^6$Li in the early Galaxy by cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks, driven by the hierarchical merging of sub-Galactic halos during Galaxy formation. The salient features of this scenario are discussed and compared with observations of $^6$Li in metal-poor halo stars, including a recent Subaru HDS result on the star HD140283. Some unique predictions of the model are clearly testable by future observations and may also provide important insight into how the Galaxy formed.

  5. Radiative feedback on early molecular gas and implications for primordial structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Petkova, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    We present results from self-consistent simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multi-frequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H_2, H_2+, D, D+, HD, HeH+, performed by using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static density field around a central radiative source; cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation; cosmological simulations of early structure formation with radiative feedback. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. The contributions from the detailed chemical network affect at a ~10% level the determination of the Stroemgren radius of an ionized bubble, and additional processes from the different species considered allows the gas to recombine slightly later, with respect to the H-only approximation. Moreover, we find that radiative effects from the cosmic microwave background are negl...

  6. Early Structure Formation from Primordial Density Fluctuations with a Blue, Tilted Power Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Zhu, Nick; Yoshida, Naoki; Spergel, David; Yorke, Harold W.

    2015-11-01

    While observations of large-scale structure and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide strong constraints on the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) on scales larger than 10 Mpc, the amplitude of the power spectrum on sub-galactic length scales is much more poorly constrained. We study early structure formation in a cosmological model with a blue-tilted PPS. We assume that the standard scale-invariant PPS is modified at small length scales as P(k)∼ {k}{m{{s}}} with ms > 1. We run a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to examine the dependence of the formation epoch and the characteristic mass of primordial stars on the tilt of the PPS. In models with ms > 1, star-forming gas clouds are formed at z > 100 when the formation of hydrogen molecules is inefficient because the intense CMB radiation destroys chemical intermediates. Without efficient coolant, the gas clouds gravitationally contract while retaining a high temperature. The protostars formed in such “hot” clouds grow very rapidly through accretion to become extremely massive stars that may leave massive black holes with a few hundred solar masses at z > 100. The shape of the PPS critically affects the properties and the formation epoch of the first generation of stars. Future experiments on CMB polarization and spectrum distortion may provide important information on the nature of the first stars and their formation epoch, and hence on the shape of the small-scale power spectrum.

  7. Early structure formation with cold plus hot dark matter a success of strings plus inflation model

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, R A; Weller, J; Battye, Richard A.; Magueijo, Joao; Weller, Jochen

    1999-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations created during inflation can account for the observed matter distribution in the linear regime if the universe has two components of dark matter, one which is cold and collisionless, and the other which is hot and free streams on small scales. However, this free streaming property of the hot component prevents early structure formation, and since objects, such as damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ systems, have been observed at high redshift, it is necessary to produce more power on small scales. Here, we show that the situation can be improved substantially in models where cosmic strings are formed at the end of inflation, and in which both inflation and strings participate in the generation of structure.

  8. Early structure formation from primordial density fluctuations with a blue-tilted power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Spergel, David; Yorke, Harold W

    2015-01-01

    While observations of large-scale structure and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide strong constraints on the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) on scales larger than 10 Mpc, the amplitude of the power spectrum on sub-galactic length scales is much more poorly constrained. We study early structure formation in a cosmological model with a blue-tilted PPS. We assume that the standard scale-invariant PPS is modified at small length scales as $P(k) \\sim k^{m_{\\rm s}}$ with $m_{\\rm s} > 1$. We run a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to examine the dependence of the formation epoch and the characteristic mass of primordial stars on the tilt of the PPS. In models with $m_{\\rm s} > 1$, star-forming gas clouds are formed at $z > 100$, when formation of hydrogen molecules is inefficient because the intense CMB radiation destroys chemical intermediates. Without efficient coolant, the gas clouds gravitationally contract while keeping a high temperature. The protostars formed in such ...

  9. Early Structure Formation and Reionization in a Warm Dark Matter Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, N; Hernquist, L; Springel, V; Yoshida, Naoki; Sokasian, Aaron; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker

    2003-01-01

    We study first structure formation in Lambda-dominated universes using large cosmological N-body/SPH simulations. We consider a standard LCDM model and a LWDM model in which the mass of the dark matter particles is taken to be m_X=10 keV. The linear power spectrum for the LWDM model has a characteristic cut-off at a wavenumber k=200 /Mpc, suppressing the formation of low mass (< 10^6 Msun) nonlinear objects early on. The absence of low mass halos in the WDM model makes the formation of primordial gas clouds with molecular hydrogen very inefficient at high redshifts. The first star-forming gas clouds form at z~21 in the WDM model, considerably later than in the CDM counterpart, and the abundance of these gas clouds differs by an order of magnitude between the two models. We carry out radiative transfer calculations by embedding massive Population III stars in the gas clouds. We show that the volume fraction of ionized gas rises up close to 100% by z=18 in the CDM case, whereas that of the WDM model remains ...

  10. Early Adhesion of Structural Inequality in the Formation of Collaborative Knowledge, Wikipedia

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    We perform an in-depth analysis on the inequality in 863 Wikimedia projects. We take the complete editing history of 267,304,095 Wikimedia items until 2016, which not only covers every language edition of Wikipedia, but also embraces the complete versions of Wiktionary, Wikisource, Wikivoyage, etc. Our findings of common growth pattern described by the interrelation between four characteristic growth yardsticks suggest a universal law of the communal data formation. In this encyclopedic data set, we observe the interplay between the number of edits and the degree of inequality. In particular, the rapid increasing of the Gini coefficient suggests that this entrenched inequality stems from the nature of such open-editing communal data sets, namely abiogenesis of supereditors' cartel. We show that these groups are created at the early stage of these open-editing media and still alive. Furthermore, our model taking both short-term and long-term memories into account successfully elucidates the underlying mechanis...

  11. The effect of early radiation in N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Julian; Brandbyge, Jacob; Fidler, Christian; Hannestad, Steen; Rampf, Cornelius; Tram, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background expansion. This approximation can be relaxed and we discuss three different approaches that are accurate to leading order in GR. For simulations that start at redshift less than about 100, we find that the presence of early radiation typically leads to per cent-level effects on the numerical power spectra at large scales. Our numerical results agree across the three methods, and we conclude that all of the three methods are suitable for simulations in a standard cosmology. Two of the methods modify the N-body evolution directly, while the third method can be applied as a post-processing prescription.

  12. Isocurvature fluctuations induce early star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiyama, N; Zaroubi, S; Silk, J

    2004-01-01

    The early reionization of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarization results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star for

  13. Isocurvature fluctuations induce early star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiyama, N; Zaroubi, S; Silk, J

    2004-01-01

    The early reionization of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarization results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star

  14. The effect of early radiation in N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamek, Julian; Brandbyge, Jacob; Fidler, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background...

  15. Black Holes From the Dark Ages: Exploring the Reionization Era and Early Structure Formation With Quasars and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G

    2004-01-01

    The cosmic reionization era, which includes formation of the first stars, galaxies, and AGN, is now one of the most active frontiers of cosmological research. We review briefly our current understanding of the early structure formation, and use the ideas about a joint formation of massive black holes (which power the early QSOs) and their host galaxies to employ high-redshift QSOs as probes of the early galaxy formation and primordial large-scale structure. There is a growing evidence for a strong biasing in the formation of the first luminous sources, which would lead to a clumpy reionization. Absorption spectroscopy of QSOs at z > 6 indicates the end of the reionization era at z ~ 6; yet measurements from the WMAP satellite suggest and early reionization at z ~ 10 - 20. The first generation of massive stars, perhaps aided by the early mini-quasars, may have reionized the universe at such high redshifts, but their feedback may have disrupted the subsequent star and galaxy formation, leading to an extended an...

  16. Interconnection of salt-induced hydrophobic compaction and secondary structure formation depends on solution conditions: revisiting early events of protein folding at single molecule resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-03-30

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea.

  17. Protostar formation in the early universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-08-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass 1% that of the Sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star.

  18. Protostar Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Naoki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the Universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass of just one percent that of the sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star.

  19. Cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, Edumund

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the prevailing paradigm for how galaxies and larger structures formed in the universe: gravitational instability. Basic observational facts are summarized to motivate the standard cosmological framework underlying most detailed investigations of structure formation. The observed univers approaches spatial uniformity on scales larger than about 10(exp 26) cm. On these scales gravitational dynamics is almost linear and therefore relatively easy to relate to observations of large-scale structure. On smaller scales cosmic structure is complicated not only by nonlinear gravitational clustering but also by nonlinear nongravitational gas dynamical processes. The complexity of these phenomena makes galaxy formation one of the grand challenge problems of the physical sciences. No fully satisfactory theory can presently account in detail for the observed cosmic structure. However, as this article summarizes, significant progress has been made during the last few years.

  20. Formative Assessment: Guidance for Early Childhood Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Ayers, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This policy report provides a guide and framework to early childhood policymakers considering formative assessment. The report defines formative assessment and outlines its process and application in the context of early childhood. The substance of this document is the issues for consideration in the implementation of the formative assessment…

  1. The impact of primordial supersonic flows on early structure formation, reionization and the lowest-mass dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, Umberto; Ciardi, Benedetta

    2010-01-01

    Tseliakhovich & Hirata recently discovered that higher-order corrections to the cosmological linear-perturbation theory lead to supersonic coherent baryonic flows just after recombination (i.e.\\ $z \\approx 1020$), with rms velocities of $\\sim$30 km/s relative to the underlying dark-matter distribution, on comoving scales of $\\la 3$ Mpc\\,$h^{-1}$. To study the impact of these coherent flows we performed high-resolution N-body plus SPH simulations in boxes of 5.0 and 0.7 Mpc\\,$h^{-1}$, for bulk-flow velocities of 0 (as reference), 30 and 60 km/s. The simulations follow the evolution of cosmic structures by taking into account detailed, primordial, non-equilibrium gas chemistry (i.e.\\ H, He, H$_2$, HD, HeH, etc.), cooling, star formation, and feedback effects from stellar evolution. We find that these bulk flows suppress star formation in low-mass haloes (i.e.\\ $M_{\\rm vir} \\la 10^8$M$_{\\odot}$ until $z\\sim 13$), lower the abundance of the first objects by $\\sim 1%-20%$, and, as consequence, delay cosmic sta...

  2. Simulating Cosmic Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, David H.; Katz, Neal; Hernquist, Lars

    1997-01-01

    We describe cosmological simulation techniques and their application to studies of cosmic structure formation, with particular attention to recent hydrodynamic simulations of structure in the high redshift universe. Collisionless N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions produce a pattern of sheets, filaments, tunnels, and voids that resembles the observed large scale galaxy distribution. Simulations that incorporate gas dynamics and dissipation form dense clumps of cold gas with sizes and masses similar to the luminous parts of galaxies. Models based on inflation and cold dark matter predict a healthy population of high redshift galaxies, including systems with star formation rates of 20 M_{\\sun}/year at z=6. At z~3, most of the baryons in these models reside in the low density intergalactic medium, which produces fluctuating Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectra of background quasars. The physical description of this ``Lyman-alpha forest'' is particularly simple if the absorption spectrum is viewe...

  3. Measuring early plaque formation clinically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliska, Alessandra N; Weidlich, Patricia; Gomes, Sabrina C; Oppermann, Rui V

    2006-01-01

    To test a system of measuring early plaque formation (EPF) and its subgingival extension as related to the presence or absence of a plaque free zone (PFZ). EPF was measured by three independent examiners following two consecutive 72-hour periods of undisturbed plaque build-up. One of the examiners further measured EPF following a 96-hour period in the presence of chlorhexidine or placebo. The classification system was composed of criterion 0 (plaque-free dental surface), criterion 1 (presence of plaque and PFZ) and criterion 2 (absence of PFZ, subgingival extension of plaque). Intra- and inter-examiner reliability were evaluated by means of the percentage of absolute agreement (c), Kappa (k) and Kendall (kd) coefficients. The third experiment consisted of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial. Plaque build-up in the presence of 0.12% chlorhexidine was assessed by employing the classification system described. The percentage of absolute intra- and inter-examiner agreement ranged from 85.43% to 75.63% and from 77.31% to 75.35% respectively. Chlorhexidine and placebo rinses showed similar percentages of criterion 1 surfaces, 62.6% and 51.5% respectively (p = 0.343). Of the surfaces, 44.3% showed criterion 2 after the use of placebo, while 3.4% of surfaces showed this criterion with the chlorhexidine (p = 0.007). The events associated with EPF can be appropriately scored with this classification system. Chlorhexidine rinses inhibit both the plaque colonization of the dental surfaces as well as its subgingival extension.

  4. Cosmological Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Primack, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    LCDM is remarkably successful in predicting the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure, and LCDM parameters have been determined with only mild tensions between different types of observations. Hydrodynamical simulations starting from cosmological initial conditions are increasingly able to capture the complex interactions between dark matter and baryonic matter in galaxy formation. Simulations with relatively low resolution now succeed in describing the overall galaxy population. For example, the EAGLE simulation in volumes up to 100 cubic Mpc reproduces the observed local galaxy mass function nearly as well as semi-analytic models. It once seemed that galaxies are pretty smooth, that they generally grow in size as they evolve, and that they are a combination of disks and spheroids. But recent HST observations combined with high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations are showing that most star-forming galaxies are very clumpy; that galaxies often undergo compaction which reduces their radius and ...

  5. Fertilization and early seed formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Christian; Rogowsky, Peter

    2008-10-01

    The double fertilization of flowering plants is a complex process, encompassing multiple steps. From its discovery more than a century ago, many useful descriptive approaches have been employed to better unveil specific steps/mechanisms. More recently, the development of an in vitro assay developed in our laboratory, has allowed a better understanding of this phenomenon. However, in vitro methods may show some limitations. The search for complementary strategies, especially with the search of mutants affected in the fertilization step allowed one to elucidate this critical and unique phenomenon in living organisms. Genes involved in pollen tube guidance or pollen discharge in synergids have been identified, as well as genes exhibiting differential expression in sperm, egg and central cells before and after fertilization. A calcium wave proved to correspond to the first cellular event seen after cytoplasmic fusion in the fertilized egg cell or zygote, which develops into a multi-cellular organism with an elaborate body plan. The development of the fertilized central cell into a nourishing tissue (endosperm) starts with the formation of the coenocyte, a multinuclear single cell unique in the plant kingdom, cellularization occurring later on. The balance of the paternal and maternal genomes, which is under the control of the FIS polycomb group complex, was found to be of the utmost importance for the successful development of the seed.

  6. 3-cm Fine Structure Masers: A Unique Signature of Supermassive Black Hole Formation via Direct Collapse in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, Mark; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario describes the isothermal collapse of a pristine gas cloud directly into a massive, M_BH=10^4-10^6 M_sun black hole. In this paper we show that large HI column densities of primordial gas at T~10^4 K with low molecular abundance - which represent key aspects of the DCBH scenario - provide optimal conditions for pumping of the 2p-level of atomic hydrogen by trapped Lyman alpha (Lya) photons. This Lya pumping mechanism gives rise to inverted level population of the 2s_1/2-2p_3/2 transition, and therefore to stimulated fine structure emission at 3.04 cm (rest-frame). We show that simplified models of the DCBH scenario amplify the CMB by up to a factor of 10^5, above which the maser saturates. Hyperfine splitting of the 3-cm transition gives rise to a characteristic broad (FWHM ~ tens of MHz in the observers frame) asymmetric line profile. This signal subtends an angular scale of ~ 1-10 mas, which translates to a flux of ~ 0.3-3 microJy, which is detectable with ultra...

  7. 3-cm Fine Structure Masers: A Unique Signature of Supermassive Black Hole Formation via Direct Collapse in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Sethi, Shiv; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    The direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario describes the isothermal collapse of a pristine gas cloud directly into a massive, {M}{BH} = 104-106{M}⊙ black hole. In this paper we show that large H i column densities of primordial gas at T˜ {10}4 K with low molecular abundance—which represent key aspects of the DCBH scenario—provide optimal conditions for the pumping of the 2p-level of atomic hydrogen by trapped Lyα photons. This Lyα pumping mechanism gives rise to an inverted level population of the 2{s}1/2-2{p}3/2 transition, and therefore also gives rise to stimulated fine structure emission at λ =3.04 {cm} (rest-frame). We show that simplified models of the DCBH scenario amplify the CMB by up to a factor of ˜ {10}5, above which the maser saturates. Hyperfine splitting of the 3 cm transition gives rise to a characteristic broad (FWHM ˜ tens of MHz in the observers frame) asymmetric line profile. This signal subtends an angular scale of ˜1-10 mas, which translates to a flux of ˜0.3-3 μJy, which is detectable with ultra-deep surveys being planned with SKA1-MID. While challenging, as the signal is visible for a fraction of the collapse time of the cloud, the matching required physical conditions imply that a detection of the redshifted 3-cm emission line could provide direct evidence for the DCBH scenario.

  8. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. III. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND CONSTRAINTS ON FORMATION SCENARIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Boselli, A.; Boissier, S. [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Peletier, R. F. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Emsellem, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lisker, T. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Van de Ven, G. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Simon, J. D.; Adams, J. J.; Benson, A. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Den Brok, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Gorgas, J. [Departamento de Astrofísica y Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Hensler, G. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Janz, J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H. [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Paudel, S., E-mail: toloba@ucolick.org [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λ{sub Re} and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3° (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disk-like structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo Cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between λ{sub Re} and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram-pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.

  9. Early events in the generation of autophagosomes are required for the formation of membrane structures involved in hepatitis C virus genome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Bartlett, Christopher; Mankouri, Jamel; Harris, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been shown to induce autophagy but the mechanisms underpinning this process remain to be elucidated. Induction of autophagy requires the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Vps34, which produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. This recruits proteins with PI3P binding domains such as the double-FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1). DFCP1 generates cup-shaped protrusions from the ER membrane, termed omegasomes, which provide a platform for the production of autophagosomes. Here we present data demonstrating that both Vps34 and DFCP1 are required for HCV genome replication, in the context of both a subgenomic replicon and virus infection, but did not affect virus entry or initial translation. Using live cell fluorescence microscopy we demonstrated that early during HCV infection the nascent viral genome replication complexes (identified by using non-structural protein NS5A as a marker) transiently colocalize with DFCP1-positive punctae (omegasomes), before the two structures move apart from each other. This observation is reminiscent of the transient association of LC3 and DFCP1 during omegasome formation, and therefore we propose that omegasomes are utilized by HCV to generate the double-membrane vesicles which are the hallmark of HCV replication complexes.

  10. Giant Planet Formation, Evolution, and Internal Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Podolak, Morris; Boley, Aaron; Meru, Farzana; Nayakshin, Sergei; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mayer, Lucio; Alibert, Yann; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    The large number of detected giant exoplanets offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the formation mechanism, evolution, and interior structure of gas giant planets. The two main models for giant planet formation are core accretion and disk instability. There are substantial differences between these formation models, including formation timescale, favorable formation location, ideal disk properties for planetary formation, early evolution, planetary composition, etc. First, we summarize the two models including their substantial differences, advantages, and disadvantages, and suggest how theoretical models should be connected to available (and future) data. We next summarize current knowledge of the internal structures of solar- and extrasolar- giant planets. Finally, we suggest the next steps to be taken in giant planet exploration.

  11. Star formation and structure formation in galaxy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    A number of theoretical and simulation results on star and structure formation in galaxy interactions and mergers is reviewed, and recent hydrodynamic simulations are presented. The role of gravity torques and ISM turbulence in galaxy interactions, in addition to the tidal field, is highlighted. Interactions can drive gas inflows towards the central kpc and trigger a central starburst, the intensity and statistical properties of which are discussed. A kinematically decoupled core and a supermassive central black hole can be fueled. Outside of the central kpc, many structures can form inside tidal tails, collisional ring, bridges, including super star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. The formation of super star clusters in galaxy mergers can now be directly resolved in hydrodynamic simulations. Their formation mechanisms and long-term evolution are reviewed, and the connection with present-day early-type galaxies is discussed.

  12. Testing Models for Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    1993-01-01

    I review a number of tests of theories for structure formation. Large-scale flows and IRAS galaxies indicate a high density parameter $\\Omega \\simeq 1$, in accord with inflationary predictions, but it is not clear how this meshes with the uniformly low values obtained from virial analysis on scales $\\sim$ 1Mpc. Gravitational distortion of faint galaxies behind clusters allows one to construct maps of the mass surface density, and this should shed some light on the large vs small-scale $\\Omega$ discrepancy. Power spectrum analysis reveals too red a spectrum (compared to standard CDM) on scales $\\lambda \\sim 10-100$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, but the gaussian fluctuation hypothesis appears to be in good shape. These results suggest that the problem for CDM lies not in the very early universe --- the inflationary predictions of $\\Omega = 1$ and gaussianity both seem to be OK; furthermore, the COBE result severely restricts modifications such as tilting the primordial spectrum --- but in the assumed matter content. The power s...

  13. Structure formation in active networks

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation and constant reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton are key requirements for the function of living cells. Here we show that a minimal reconstituted system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular-motor filaments exhibits a generic mechanism of structure formation, characterized by a broad distribution of cluster sizes. We demonstrate that the growth of the structures depends on the intricate balance between crosslinker-induced stabilization and simultaneous destabilization by molecular motors, a mechanism analogous to nucleation and growth in passive systems. We also show that the intricate interplay between force generation, coarsening and connectivity is responsible for the highly dynamic process of structure formation in this heterogeneous active gel, and that these competing mechanisms result in anomalous transport, reminiscent of intracellular dynamics.

  14. Early formation of evolved asteroidal crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M D; Ash, Richard D; Liu, Yang; Bellucci, Jeremy J; Rumble, Douglas; McDonough, William F; Walker, Richard J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2009-01-08

    Mechanisms for the formation of crust on planetary bodies remain poorly understood. It is generally accepted that Earth's andesitic continental crust is the product of plate tectonics, whereas the Moon acquired its feldspar-rich crust by way of plagioclase flotation in a magma ocean. Basaltic meteorites provide evidence that, like the terrestrial planets, some asteroids generated crust and underwent large-scale differentiation processes. Until now, however, no evolved felsic asteroidal crust has been sampled or observed. Here we report age and compositional data for the newly discovered, paired and differentiated meteorites Graves Nunatak (GRA) 06128 and GRA 06129. These meteorites are feldspar-rich, with andesite bulk compositions. Their age of 4.52 +/- 0.06 Gyr demonstrates formation early in Solar System history. The isotopic and elemental compositions, degree of metamorphic re-equilibration and sulphide-rich nature of the meteorites are most consistent with an origin as partial melts from a volatile-rich, oxidized asteroid. GRA 06128 and 06129 are the result of a newly recognized style of evolved crust formation, bearing witness to incomplete differentiation of their parent asteroid and to previously unrecognized diversity of early-formed materials in the Solar System.

  15. Black hole formation in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  16. Singularities formation, structure, and propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J

    2015-01-01

    Many key phenomena in physics and engineering are described as singularities in the solutions to the differential equations describing them. Examples covered thoroughly in this book include the formation of drops and bubbles, the propagation of a crack and the formation of a shock in a gas. Aimed at a broad audience, this book provides the mathematical tools for understanding singularities and explains the many common features in their mathematical structure. Part I introduces the main concepts and techniques, using the most elementary mathematics possible so that it can be followed by readers with only a general background in differential equations. Parts II and III require more specialised methods of partial differential equations, complex analysis and asymptotic techniques. The book may be used for advanced fluid mechanics courses and as a complement to a general course on applied partial differential equations.

  17. Morphological and structural studies of early mineral formation in enamel of rat incisors by electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) and electron spectroscopic diffraction (ESD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, U; Höhling, H J

    1994-07-01

    Morphological and structural analysis of the earliest stage of crystal formation in enamel of rat incisors, by use of energy filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), has shown needlelike crystallites with a dotlike substructure. We conclude that these dots (nanometer-sized particles) have developed at nucleating, active sites along the non-collagenous matrix proteins in enamel. Calcium and phosphate groups are bound at such "active sites" and develop to nuclei, which grow to these stable dots (nanometer-sized particles). The dots coalesce rapidly in longitudinal direction, along the matrix proteins, with neighbouring dots to form parallel arranged "needlelike" crystallites. These needles grow and coalesce in lateral directions to ribbon-platelike crystallites. In enamel most of the organic substance becomes decomposed and transported to the ameloblasts. Consequently, the ribbon-platelike crystallites can coalesce to form much thicker (hydroxy)-apatite crystals than in dentine. Already in the earliest stage of crystal formation the mineral chains of dots (nanometer-sized particles) and the needlelike crystallites show a parallel orientation in the direction of the c-axis of hydroxyapatite. This is supported by the texture of the 002 reflections in the corresponding electron spectroscopic diffraction patterns (ESD), which appear as the first Bragg reflections.

  18. Concept formation: a supportive process for early career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Tracey; West, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    Individuals come to understand abstract constructs such as that of the 'expert' through the formation of concepts. Time and repeated opportunity for observation to support the generalisation and abstraction of the developing concept are essential if the concept is to form successfully. Development of an effective concept of the 'expert nurse' is critical for early career nurses who are attempting to integrate theory, values and beliefs as they develop their clinical practice. This study explores the use of a concept development framework in a grounded theory study of the 'expert nurse'. Qualitative. Using grounded theory methods for data collection and analysis, semi-structured interviews were conducted with registered nurses. The participants were asked to describe their concept of the 'expert nurse' and to discuss their experience of developing this. Participants reported forming their concept of the 'expert nurse', after multiple opportunities to engage with nurses identified as 'expert'. This identification did not necessarily relate to the designated position of the 'expert nurse' or assigned mentors. When the early career nurse does not successfully form a concept of the 'expert nurse', difficulties in personal and professional development including skill/knowledge development may arise. To underpin development of their clinical practice effectively, early career nurses need to be provided with opportunities that facilitate the purposive formation of their own concept of the 'expert nurse'. Formation of this concept is not well supported by the common practice of assigning mentors. Early career nurses must be provided with the time and the opportunity to individually develop and refine their concept of the 'expert nurse'. To achieve this, strategies including providing opportunities to engage with expert nurses and discussion of the process of concept formation and its place in underpinning personal judgments may be of assistance. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing

  19. The formation of matter structures in the Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶必修

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the formation of matter structures in the Universe, and show that spheri cal Higgs bosonic membraneswere possibly produced homogeneously in the early Universe and expanded rapidly. After a period of evolution, thecomposition of the membranes began to change, the massive particles replaced the imaginary Higgs bosons through theHiggs mechanism, while the energy came from the Universe expansion. After that, the membranes reduced their speedand broke into pieces, which became the seeds of matter structures. It is proven that microscopic principles may affectthe formation of large-scale structures, and the formation of structures such as cosmic foam is also possible.

  20. Tectonic repetitions of the Early Cretaceous Agrio Formation in the Chos Malal fold-and-thrust belt, Neuquén Basin, Argentina: Geometry, kinematics and structural implications for Andean building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turienzo, M.; Sánchez, N.; Dimieri, L.; Lebinson, F.; Araujo, V.

    2014-08-01

    The Neuquén Basin, developed in a retroarc setting in the central-west of Argentina, contains more than 6000 m of Mesozoic marine and continental sedimentary rocks. These rocks were deformed during the Andean orogeny leading to several thick and thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts. The Early Cretaceous Agrio Formation is composed by a thick marine succession predominantly of black shales in which highlights a thin fluvial-aeolian sandy interval named Avilé Member. The Avilé Member, one of the most important hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Neuquén Basin, constitutes an excellent structural marker. At the Chos Malal fold-and-thrust belt, the strong mechanical anisotropy given by the contrasting lithology of the Avilé Member within the Agrio Formation favored the location of detachments along the shales and ramps affecting the sandstones during the Andean compression. Detailed field mapping at the Chacay Melehue area allowed us to recognize tectonic repetitions of the Avilé Member, which form imbrications in the simplest case whereas in other places constitute a more complex combination of imbrications, including fault-bend folding that duplicates stratigraphic sequences and fault-propagation folding that deforms more intensely the duplicated units. Along three structural cross-sections we illustrate the geometry of these tectonic repetitions of the Agrio Formation, which in the northern area have an eastward-vergence and in the central and southern regions show a clear westward-vergence. A tear fault along the arroyo Chacay Melehue could explain this vergence change. Forward modeling of the structures at the central cross-section, where a backthrust system produced imbrication, duplication and folding of the Agrio Formation, allows us to propose a balanced kinematic reconstruction of this complex structure and to compare the features produced at different stages of the deformation sequence with field observations. Our kinematic interpretation shows that the

  1. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Margot E; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-12-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mechanisms interact to generate local auxin accumulation in the early embryo. New auxin-dependent reporters help identifying these sites, while atomic structures of transcriptional response mediators help explain the diverse outputs of auxin signaling. Key auxin outputs are control of cell identity and cell division orientation, and progress has been made towards understanding the cellular basis of each. Importantly, a number of studies have combined computational modeling and experiments to analyze the developmental role, genetic circuitry and molecular mechanisms of auxin-dependent cell division control.

  2. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  3. Unravelling lignin formation and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, N.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    During this study, we established that the Fagaceae exclusively accumulate Z-monolignois/glucosides, and not the E-isomers. Evidence for the presence of a novel E{yields}Z isomerse has been obtained. Our pioneering work in lignin biosynthesis and structure in situ has also progressed smoothly. We established the bonding environments of a woody angiosperm, Leucanea leucocephala, as well as wheat (T. aestivum) and tobacco (N. tabacum). A cell culture system from Pinus taeda was developed which seems ideal for investigating the early stages of lignification. These cultures excrete peroxidase isozymes, considered to be specifically involved in lignin deposition. We also studied the effect of the putative lignin-degrading enzyme, lignin peroxidase, on monolignols and dehydropolymerisates therefrom. In all cases, polymerization was observed, and not degradation; these polymers are identical to that obtained with horseradish peroxidases/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It seems inconceivable that these enzymes can be considered as being primarily responsible for lignin biodegradation.

  4. Galaxy Formation and Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, R

    1999-01-01

    Galaxies represent the visible fabric of the Universe and there has been considerable progress recently in both observational and theoretical studies. The underlying goal is to understand the present-day diversity of galaxy forms, masses and luminosities in the context of theories for the growth of structure. Popular models predict the bulk of the galaxy population assembled recently, in apparent agreement with optical and near-infrared observations. However, detailed conclusions rely crucially on the choice of the cosmological parameters. Although the star formation history has been sketched to early times, uncertainties remain, particularly in connecting to the underlying mass assembly rate. I discuss the expected progress in determining the cosmological parameters and address the question of which observations would most accurately check contemporary models for the origin of the Hubble sequence. The new generation of ground-based and future space-based large telescopes, equipped with instrumentation approp...

  5. Magnetic fields in early protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    González-Casanova, Diego F; Lazarian, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe". In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M$_\\odot$ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, "reconnection diffusion", removes the magnetic flux from the disk, the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the a...

  6. Simulating Stellar Cluster Formation and Early Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Joshua; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ibañez-Mejia, Juan; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pellegrino, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our current development of a model of stellar cluster formation and evolution in the presence of stellar feedback. We have integrated the MHD code Flash into the Astrophysical Multi-Use Software Environment (AMUSE) and coupled the gas dynamics to an N-body code using a Fujii gravity bridge. Further we have integrated feedback from radiation using the FERVENT module for Flash, supernovae by thermal and kinetic energy injection, and winds by kinetic energy injection. Finally we have developed a method of implementing star formation using the Jeans criterion of the gas. We present initial results from our cluster formation model in a cloud using self-consistent boundary conditions drawn from a model of supernova-driven interstellar turbulence.

  7. Compact stellar object: the formation and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The formation of compact objects is viewed at the final stages of stellar evolution. The supernova explosion events are then focalized to explain the formation of pulsars, hybrid neutron star and the limit case of the latter, the quark stars. We discuss the stability and structure of these objects in connection with the properties of the hadron and quark-gluon plasma equation of state. The hadron-quark phase transition in deep interior of these objects is discussed taking into account the implications on the density distribution of matter along the radial direction. The role of neutrinos confinement in the ultradense stellar medium in the early stages of pulsar formation is another interesting aspect to be mentioned in this presentation. Recent results for maximum mass of compact stellar objects for different forms of equations of state will be shown, presenting some theoretical predictions for maximum mass of neutron stars allowed by different equations of state assigned to dense stellar medium. Although a density greater than few times the nuclear equilibrium density appears in deep interior of the core, at the crust the density decreases by several orders of magnitude where a variety of hadronic states appears, the 'pasta'-states of hadrons. More externally, a lattice of nuclei can be formed permeated not only by electrons but also by a large amount of free neutrons and protons. These are possible structure of neutron star crust to have the density and pressures with null values at the neutron star surface. The ultimate goal of this talk is to give a short view of the compact star area for students and those who are introducing in this subject. (author)

  8. Temporal expression of agrB, cidA, and alsS in the early development of Staphylococcus aureus UAMS-1 biofilm formation and the structural role of extracellular DNA and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Rossella; Nistico, Laura; Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Longwell, Mark; Iannitelli, Antonio; Cellini, Luigina; Di Stefano, Antonio; Hall Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important component of the extracellular polymeric substance matrix and is important in the establishment and persistence of Staphylococcus aureus UAMS-1 biofilms. The aim of the study was to determine the temporal expression of genes involved in early biofilm formation and eDNA production. We used qPCR to investigate expression of agrB, which is associated with secreted virulence factors and biofilm dispersal, cidA, which is associated with biofilm adherence and genomic DNA release, and alsS, which is associated with cell lysis, eDNA release and acid tolerance. The contribution of eDNA to the stability of the biofilm matrix was assessed by digesting with DNase I (Pulmozyme) and quantifying structure by confocal microscopy and comstat image analysis. AgrB expression initially increased at 24 h but then dramatically decreased at 72 h in an inverse relationship to biomass, supporting its role in regulating biofilm dispersal. cidA and alsS expression steadily increased over 72 h, suggesting that eDNA was an important component of early biofilm development. DNase I had no effect on biomass, but did cause the biofilms to become more heterogeneous. Carbohydrates in the matrix appeared to play an important role in structural stability.

  9. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN EARLY PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Santos-Lima, Reinaldo, E-mail: casanova@astro.wisc.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, R. do Matão, 1226, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian and Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M{sub ⊙} protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  10. Monitoring early zeolite formation via in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabants, G; Lieben, S; Breynaert, E; Reichel, E K; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Jakoby, B; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-01

    Hitherto zeolite formation has not been fully understood. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has proven to be a versatile tool for characterizing ionic solutions, it was never used for monitoring zeolite growth. We show here that EIS can quantitatively monitor zeolite formation, especially during crucial early steps where other methods fall short.

  11. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. III - The Structure and Formation of Early-type Galaxies and their Evolution since z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmans, L V E; Burles, S; Moustakas, L A; Treu, T

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a joint gravitational lensing and stellar dynamical analysis of fifteen massive field early-type galaxies, selected from the Sloan Lens (SLACS) Survey. The following numerical results are found: (i) A joint-likelihood gives an average logarithmic density slope for the total mass density of 2.01 (+0.02/-0.03) (68 perecnt C.L). inside the Einstein radius. (ii) The average position-angle difference between the light distribution and the total mass distribution is found to be 0+-3 degrees, setting an upper limit of <= 0.035 on the average external shear. (iii) The average projected dark-matter mass fraction is inferred to be 0.25+-0.06 inside R_E, using the stellar mass-to-light ratios derived from the Fundamental Plane as priors. (iv) Combined with results from the LSD Survey, we find no significant evolution of the total density slope inside one effective radius: a linear fit gives d\\gamma'/dz = 0.23+-0.16 (1-sigma) for the range z=0.08-1.01. The small scatter and absence of significant...

  12. Analyses of the early stages of star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintott, Christopher John

    This thesis presents a study of the physical and chemical properties of star forming regions, both in the Milky Way and in the distant Universe, building on the existing astrochem- ical models developed by the group at UCL. Observations of the nearby star-forming region, L134A, which were carried out with the James Clark Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawai'i are compared to the predictions of a model of star formation from gas rich in atomic (rather than molecular) hydrogen. A similar model is used to investigate the effect of non-equilibrium chemistry on the derivation of the cosmic-ray ionization rate, an important parameter in controlling both the chemistry and the physics of star forming clumps. A collapse faster than free-fall is proposed as an explanation for differences be tween the distribution of CS and N2H+ in such regions. Moving beyond the Milky Way, JCMT observations of sulphur-bearing species in the nearby starburst galaxy, M82, are presented and compared with existing molecular observations of similar systems. M82 is a local anlogue for star forming systems in the early Universe, many of which have star formation rates several thousand times that of the Milky Way. A model which treats the molecular gas in such systems as an assembly of 'hot cores' (protostellar cores which have a distinctive chemical signature) has been developed, and is used to predict the abundance of many species. An application of this model is used to explain the observed deviation in the early Universe from the otherwise tight relation between infrared and HCN luminosity via relatively recent star formation from near-primordial gas. Many of the stars formed in the early Universe must now be in massive elliptical systems, and work on the structure of these systems is presented. Data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is analysed to show that such galaxies have cores dominated by baryons rather than dark matter, and the dark matter profile is constrained by adiabatic contraction.

  13. FEATURES OF FORMATION OF REGIONAL CLUSTER STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Andreyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In article is considered features of formation of cluster structures for increase of efficiency of economic entities and growth of investment and innovative appeal of the region. Cluster structures are described as a specialized product oriented commands, which were created for common decision making about production, nancial and organizational questions.

  14. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Margot E.; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mec

  15. On Early Age Crack Formation in FRC Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The problem of early age crack formation in FRC slabs due to restrained temperature and shrinkage deformations, is given an analytical treatment. A model taking into account the ageing properties of the tensile softening curve and the continued development in the temperature and shrinkage...... deformations after crack initiation, is presented. Based on this model a design strategy for FRC slabs is outlined....

  16. Digging for Formational Clues in the Halos of Early-type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Romanowsky, Aaron J

    2010-01-01

    Many of the fundamental properties of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars) can only be accessed by venturing beyond their oft-studied centers into their large-radius halo regions. Advances in observations of kinematical tracers allow early-type halos to be increasingly well probed. This review focuses on recent findings on angular momentum and dark matter content, and discusses some possible implications for galaxy structure and formation.

  17. Peculiar early-type galaxies with central star formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Ge; Qiu-Sheng Gu

    2012-01-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are very important for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies.Recent observations suggest that ETGs are not simply old stellar spheroids as we previously thought.Widespread recent star formation,cool gas and dust have been detected in a substantial fraction of ETGs.We make use of the radial profiles of g - r color and the concentration index from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database to pick out 31 peculiar ETGs with central blue cores.By analyzing the photometric and spectroscopic data,we suggest that the blue cores are caused by star formation activities rather than the central weak active galactic nucleus.From the results of stellar population synthesis,we find that the stellar population of the blue cores is relatively young,spreading from several Myr to less than one Gyr.In 14 galaxies with H I observations,we find that the average gas fraction of these galaxies is about 0.55.The bluer galaxies show a higher gas fraction,and the total star formation rate (SFR) correlates very well with the H l gas mass.The star formation history of these ETGs is affected by the environment,e.g.in the denser environment the H 1 gas is less and the total SFR is lower.We also discuss the origin of the central star formation of these early-type galaxies.

  18. Was core formation violent enough to homogenize the early mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, S. A.; Kaula, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of iron, its thermal state and its phase in the accreting Earth probably played a major role in the Earth's early thermal evolution. Plausible impact thermal histories make it possible that pure iron was molten in the accreting Earth after it was about 10% grown. Hence, iron eutectic alloys (FeS, FeO) certainly were. Additionally, the initial temperature of the core is an important constraint on the secular cooling of the early Earth and on the strength of the early geodynamo. Whether iron is solid or molten would influence geochemical equilibria in the upper and lower mantle; the mode of core formation, by spherical or near-spherical blobs, stalk-like instabilities, or something more catastrophic would influence the partitioning of siderophiles between silicate and iron phases. Early descent of iron (during accretion) favors partitioning according to low-pressure phase equilibria, whereas late descent favors higher pressure. The later core formation occurs, the greater the heat pulse, due to the strong dependence of gravitational potential energy on planetary radius. The heat may homogenize the mantle if core formation is global; otherwise, heterogeneity of iron differentiation may leave some of the pre-archean mantle unaffected. The larger the chunks of proto-core (and hence smaller surface/volume ratios) the greater the heterogeneity.

  19. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  20. Understanding cochleate formation: insights into structural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsekar, Kalpa; Ashtikar, Mukul; Steiniger, Frank; Thamm, Jana; Schacher, Felix; Fahr, Alfred

    2016-04-20

    Understanding the structure and the self-assembly process of cochleates has become increasingly necessary considering the advances of this drug delivery system towards the pharmaceutical industry. It is well known that the addition of cations like calcium to a dispersion of anionic lipids such as phosphatidylserines results in stable, multilamellar cochleates through a spontaneous assembly. In the current investigation we have studied the intermediate structures generated during this self-assembly of cochleates. To achieve this, we have varied the process temperature for altering the rate of cochleate formation. Our findings from electron microscopy studies showed the formation of ribbonlike structures, which with proceeding interaction associate to form lipid stacks, networks and eventually cochleates. We also observed that the variation in lipid acyl chains did not make a remarkable difference to the type of structure evolved during the formation of cochleates. More generally, our observations provide a new insight into the self-assembly process of cochleates based on which we have proposed a pathway for cochleate formation from phosphatidylserine and calcium. This knowledge could be employed in using cochleates for a variety of possible biomedical applications in the future.

  1. On the Formation of the Early Territorial Statein Ancient Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at a reinterpretation of the formation of the earlyterritorial state in ancient Egypt from a multi-perspective. In the light ofthe recent studies on the available written material and new excavations,the author seeks to prove that the emergence of the early territorial statewas the result of the interaction of various elements. In the author'sopinion, the strong political ambition of the Upper Egyptian ruling elitesplayed a decisive role in the process of unification.

  2. The paredon, Mexico, obsidian source and early formative exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, T H; Grove, D C; Hopke, P K

    1978-09-01

    In 1975, archeological surface surveys of trade routes located again a pre-Hispanic obsidian source in central Mexico first reported in 1902. Initial trace element studies of the Paredón source through an analysis by neutron activation have been compared with similar studies of the obsidian found at Chalcatzingo 150 kilometers from the source. These comparisons indicate that obsidian from Paredón, rather than Otumba, was of primary importance during the Early Formative in central Mexico.

  3. Paleosol formation during the Early Triassic Biotic Crisis in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Jochen; Müller, Axel; Zwingmann, Horst; Fredin, Ola; Brönner, Marco; Viola, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Fractured and kaolinite weathered basement rocks have been discovered in various wells off the Norwegian coast and inferences on timing, source to sink relationships, and environmental implications have been widely discussed. The reason for the kaolitinization has often been related to intensive chemical weathering during late Triassic to early Jurassic times. Chronological control has primarily been inferred from the overlying late Jurassic/early Cretaceous marine transgression and poorly constrained K-Ar datings from weathered basement onshore as well as climate conditions favourable for kaolinite formation. In this study, we present evidence that the deeply weathered basement off the mid-Norwegian coast represent a complete paleosol profile. Quartz geochemical fingerprinting indicate that transgressional marine inorganic sediments of late Jurassic age are derived from the paleosols. Whole-rock XRD analysis suggests characteristic mineral alteration zones topped with a kaolinite-Fe-oxyhyroxide zones composed of >80% kaolinite. Potassium feldspar is practically absent in the uppermost kaolinitic zones. Mass-balance changes show significant depletion-enrichment trends. Applying potassium/argon (K/Ar) geochronology on authigenic illite clay that grew in-situ at the time of paleosol formation reveals a early Triassic age (~250 Ma). The age corroborates with the Early Triassic biotic crisis and suggest a causal relationship between intense chemical weathering, high atmospheric CO2 concentration, extreme ocean warming, increased riverine flux of nutrients and widespread anoxia/euxinia on adjacent epicontinental seas.

  4. Macrofauna associations and formation of shell concentrations in the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinius, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The invertebrate macrofauna (mainly molluscs) of the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain) is reported and classified in seven biofacies associations, representing ecologically related groups of macro-invertebrates of shallow marine fan-delta environments ranging in depth from inter

  5. Macrofauna associations and formation of shell concentrations in the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinius, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The invertebrate macrofauna (mainly molluscs) of the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain) is reported and classified in seven biofacies associations, representing ecologically related groups of macro-invertebrates of shallow marine fan-delta environments ranging in depth from

  6. 空间激光干涉引力波探测与早期宇宙结构形成%Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detection in Space and Structure Formation in the Early Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚雪飞; 高伟; 黄双林; 李玉龙; 刘影; 罗子人; 邵明学; 孙宝三; 唐文林; 于品; 徐鹏; 徐生年; 臧云龙; 张海鹏; 刘润球; 袁业飞; 白姗; 边星; 曹周键; 陈葛锐; 董鹏; 高天舒

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on the feasibility study of gravitational wave detection in space commissioned by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. We consider the relative merits between scientific significance and viability in technologies of a few representative mission options. The primary science driver is targeted at the detection of mergers of intermediate to super massive binary black holes in the structure assembly history as well as in dense stellar environments within our local Universe. By striking a balance between science and techno-logical feasibility, a preliminary mission design is put forward for future Chinese gravitational wave detection mission alternative to eLISA. Our study indicates that, with suitable design of baseline parameters of a mission, gravitational wave detection in space holds the promise of being a new observation window to the structure formation stage at early Universe and shed light on certain outstanding issues, among which are the evolution of PopIII stars after the dark age, the co-evolution of galaxies and their central black holes, etc.%空间引力波探测是研究宇宙早期恒星演化和星系形成、黑洞和星系的共同成长等天文学和宇宙学重大问题的一条重要可能途径。经过两期科学院先导科技专项空间科学预研究课题的开展,通过权衡技术的可行性与科学的前瞻性,选择以高红移开始的中至大质量双黑洞并合系统、星团等稠密动力学环境中涉及中等质量黑洞的双黑洞引力波波源为主要科学目标,给出了我国毫赫兹至赫兹频段空间引力波探测任务计划的初步设计。以该任务设计建议为依据,简要介绍空间引力波探测及其作为一种新的天文观测手段的科学内涵,以及我国空间引力波探测任务设计的科学目标和探测潜力。

  7. Magnetic fields during high redshift structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Schober, Jennifer; Schmidt, Wolfram; Bovino, Stefano; Federrath, Christoph; Niemeyer, Jens; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    We explore the amplification of magnetic fields in the high-redshift Universe. For this purpose, we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations following the formation of primordial halos with \\sim10^7 M_solar, revealing the presence of turbulent structures and complex morphologies at resolutions of at least 32 cells per Jeans length. Employing a turbulence subgrid-scale model, we quantify the amount of unresolved turbulence and show that the resulting turbulent viscosity has a significant impact on the gas morphology, suppressing the formation of low-mass clumps. We further demonstrate that such turbulence implies the efficient amplification of magnetic fields via the small-scale dynamo. We discuss the properties of the dynamo in the kinematic and non-linear regime, and explore the resulting magnetic field amplification during primordial star formation. We show that field strengths of \\sim10^{-5} G can be expected at number densities of \\sim5 cm^{-3}.

  8. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  9. The Formation and Early Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven N; Bastian, Nate; Bally, John; Rathborne, Jill; Testi, Leonardo; Stolte, Andrea; Dale, James; Bressert, Eli; Alves, Joao

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and early evolution of the most massive and dense young stellar clusters, focusing on the role they can play in our understanding of star and planet formation as a whole. Young massive cluster (YMC) progenitor clouds in the Galactic Center can accumulate to a high enough density without forming stars that the initial protostellar densities are close to the final stellar density. For this to hold in the disk, the time scale to accumulate the gas to such high densities must be much shorter than the star formation timescale. Otherwise the gas begins forming stars while it is being accumulated to high density. The distinction between the formation regimes in the two environments is consistent with the predictions of environmentally-dependent density thresholds for star formation. This implies that stars in YMCs of similar total mass and radius can have formed at widely different initial protostellar densities. The fact that no systematic variations in fundamental properties are observed be...

  10. Structural neurodegeneration correlates with early diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Hansen, Rasmus Søgaard; Peto, Tunde

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine differences in structural and functional neurodegenerative measurements between patients with no and early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we examined 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 7-field fundus photographs acquired with Top...

  11. Phyllotactic pattern formation in early stages of cactus ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta M. Gola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Representatives of the family Cactaceae are characterized by a wide range of phyllotaxis. To assess the origin of this diversity, early stages of phyllotactic pattern formation were examined in seedlings. The analysis of the sequence of areole initiation revealed intertribal differences. In seedlings from the Trichocereeae (Gymnocalycium, Rebutia and Notocacteae (Parodia tribes, two opposite cotyledonal areoles developed as the first elements of a pattern. Usually, next pair of areoles was initiated perpendicularly to cotyledonal areoles, starting the decussate pattern. This pattern was subsequently transformed into bijugate or into simple spiral phyllotaxis. In seedlings from the Cacteae tribe (Mammillaria and Thelocactus, cotyledonal areoles were never observed and the first areoles always appeared in the space between cotyledons. It was either areole pair (mainly in Mammillaria, starting a decussate pattern, or a single areole (mainly in Thelocactus quickly followed by areoles spirally arranged, usually in accordance with the main Fibonacci phyllotaxis. Differences in the initial stages of pattern formation do not fully explain the phyllotaxis diversity in mature cacti. Only two, the most common phyllotactic patterns occurred in the early development of studied seedlings, i.e. the main Fibonacci and the decussate pattern. Discrepancy in the range of phyllotactic spectra in seedlings and in mature plants suggests that phyllotaxis diversity emerges during further plant growth. Initial phyllotactic transformations, occurring already in the very early stages, indicate great plasticity of cactus growth and seem to support the hypothesis of the ontogenetic increase of phyllotaxis diversity due to transformations.

  12. Black Hole Mergers as Probes of Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from massive black hole (MBH) mergers can provide us with important clues about the era of structure formation in the early universe. Previous research in this field has been limited to calculating merger rates of MBHs using different models where many assumptions are made about the specific values of physical parameters of the mergers, resulting in merger rate estimates that span 5 to 6 orders of magnitude. We develop a semi-analytical, phenomenological model that includes plausible combinations of several physical parameters involved in the mergers. which we then turn around to determine how well LISA observations will be able to enhance our understanding of the universe during the critical z approximately equal to 5-30 structure formation era. We do this by generating synthetic LISA observable data (masses, redshifts, merger rates), which are then analyzed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This allows us to constrain the physical parameters of the mergers.

  13. Formation of Early Water Oceans on Rocky Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial planets, with silicate mantles and metallic cores, are likely to obtain water and carbon compounds during accretion. Here I examine the conditions that allow early formation of a surface water ocean (simultaneous with cooling to clement surface conditions), and the timeline of degassing the planetary interior into the atmosphere. The greatest fraction of a planet's initial volatile budget is degassed into the atmosphere during the end of magma ocean solidification, leaving only a small fraction of the original volatiles to be released into the atmosphere through later volcanism. Rocky planets that accrete with water in their bulk mantle have two mechanisms for producing an early water ocean: First, if they accrete with at least 1 to 3 mass% of water in their bulk composition, liquid water may be extruded onto the planetary surface at the end of magma ocean solidification. Second, at initial water contents as low as 0.01 mass% or lower, during solidification a massive supercritical fluid and steam ...

  14. Simulating Structure Formation of the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Heß, Steffen; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present cosmological N-body simulations of the Local Universe with initial conditions constrained by the Two-Micron Redshift Survey (2MRS) within a cubic volume of 180 Mpc/h side-length centred at the Local Group. We use a self-consistent Bayesian based approach to explore the joint parameter space of primordial density fluctuations and peculiar velocity fields, which are compatible with the 2MRS galaxy distribution after cosmic evolution. This method (the KIGEN-code) includes the novel ALPT (Augmented Lagrangian Perturbation Theory) structure formation model which combines second order LPT (2LPT) on large scales with the spherical collapse model on small scales. Furthermore we describe coherent flows with 2LPT and include a dispersion term to model fingers-of-god (fogs) arising from virialised structures. These implementations are crucial to avoid artificial filamentary structures, which appear when using a structure formation model with 2LPT and data with compressed fogs. We assume LCDM cosm...

  15. Alisitos Formation, calcareous facies: Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-07-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of the peninsula of Baja California bounding the Peninsular Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic-breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during the tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic reef barrier, behind an island arc. Such conditions existed south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based upon field observations and petrological analysis of the Alisitos limestone, an attempt is made to recreate the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  16. Early Hierarchical Formation of Massive Galaxies Triggered By Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Poli, F; Vittorini, V

    2004-01-01

    To address the problem concerning the early formation of stars in massive galaxies, we present the results of a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation which includes a physical description of starbursts triggered by galaxy interactions. These originate from the destabilization of cold galactic gas occurring in galaxy encounters, which in part feeds the accretion onto black holes powering quasars, and in part drives circumnuclear starsbursts at redshifts $z\\approx 2-4$, preferentially in massive objects. This speeds up the formation of stars in massive galaxies at high redshifts without altering it in low mass galactic halos. Thus, at intermediate $z\\approx 1.5-2$ we find that a considerable fraction of the stellar content of massive galaxies is already in place, at variance with the predictions of previous hierarchical models. The resulting high-$z$ star formation rate and B-band luminosity functions, and the luminosity and redshift distribution of galaxies in K-band at $z\\lesssim 2$ are all in good agreemen...

  17. Stochastic structure formation in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyatskin, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic structure formation in random media is considered using examples of elementary dynamical systems related to the two-dimensional geophysical fluid dynamics (Gaussian random fields) and to stochastically excited dynamical systems described by partial differential equations (lognormal random fields). In the latter case, spatial structures (clusters) may form with a probability of one in almost every system realization due to rare events happening with vanishing probability. Problems involving stochastic parametric excitation occur in fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, plasma physics, astrophysics, and radiophysics. A more complicated stochastic problem dealing with anomalous structures on the sea surface (rogue waves) is also considered, where the random Gaussian generation of sea surface roughness is accompanied by parametric excitation.

  18. Minerogenic System of Magnesian Nonmetallic Deposits in Early Proterozoic Mg-rich Carbonate Formations in Eastern Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the early Proterozoic the Liryu Formation and Dashiqiao Formation of eastern Liaoning province, China, there are distributed Mg-rich carbonate rock formations, in which large to superlarge deposits of boron, magnesite, talc, Xiuyan jade etc. occur. The formation of these magnesian nonmetallic deposits was related to early Proterozoic evaporates; then these deposits underwent reworking of regional metamorphism and hydrothermal metasomatism during the Lüliang orogeny and tectono-magmatism during the Indosinian-Yanshanian. Among other things, the Mg-rich carbonates formations, minerogenetic structures and ore-forming fluids played a controlling role in the formation of the mineral deposits. The refore, it can be concluded that the mineral deposits are products of combined processes of the coupling of ore source field, fluid field, thermal field (energy field) and stress field under certain time-space conditions in the early Proterozoic and the late-stage superimposed reworking of tectono-magmatism.

  19. Modulated structure formation in demixing paraffin blends

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, E P

    2002-01-01

    Small angle scattering (SANS and SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry have been measured from C sub 2 sub 8 :C sub 3 sub 6 normal paraffin mixtures of varying composition quenched from the melt. Satellite peaks are observed in the SAXS whose offset in Q, relative to Bragg diffraction peaks associated with the average structure, are composition dependent. The offset is close to the position of the most intense peak observed in SANS. Scattering from the quenched structures is consistent with a correlated displacement and substitutional disorder model yielding modulations that are incommensurate with the average lattice. DSC shows an additional endotherm in the mixtures that is not present in the pure components and is associated with this superstructure formation. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of the Particle Formation Process of Structured Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, Alberto; Boraey, Mohammed A; Nobes, David S; Vehring, Reinhard

    2015-08-03

    The particle formation process for microparticles of cellulose acetate butyrate dried from an acetone solution was investigated experimentally and theoretically. A monodisperse droplet chain was used to produce solution microdroplets in a size range of 55-70 μm with solution concentrations of 0.37 and 10 mg/mL. As the droplets dried in a laminar air flow with a temperature of 30, 40, or 55 °C, the particle formation process was recorded by two independent optical methods. Dried particles in a size range of 10-30 μm were collected for morphology analysis, showing hollow, elongated particles whose structure was dependent on the drying gas temperature and initial solution concentration. The setup allowed comprehensive measurements of the particle formation process to be made, including the period after initial shell formation. The early particle formation process for this system was controlled by the diffusion of cellulose acetate butyrate in the liquid phase, whereas later stages of the process were dominated by shell buckling and folding.

  1. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2001-01-01

    In order to derive information on the star formation history in the early universe we observed 6 high-redshift (z=3.4) quasars in the near-infrared to measure the relative iron and \\mgii emission strengths. A detailed comparison of the resulting spectra with those of low-redshift quasars show essentially the same FeII/MgII emission ratios and very similar continuum and line spectral properties, indicating a lack of evolution of the relative iron to magnesium abundance of the gas since z=3.4 in bright quasars. On the basis of current chemical evolution scenarios of galaxies, where magnesium is produced in massive stars ending in type II SNe, while iron is formed predominantly in SNe of type Ia with a delay of ~1 Gyr and assuming as cosmological parameters H_o = 72 km/s Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7$, we conclude that major star formation activity in the host galaxies of our z=3.4 quasars must have started already at an epoch corresponding to z_f ~= 10, when the age of the universe was less than 0....

  2. Circumnuclear Regions of Star Formation in Early Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, Angeles I; Hagele, Guillermo F; Castellanos, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Circumnuclear star forming regions, also called hotspots, are often found in the inner regions of some spiral galaxies where intense processes of star formation are taking place. In the UV, massive stars dominate the observed circumnuclear emission even in the presence of an active nucleus, contributing between 30 and 50% to the H$\\beta$ total emission of the nuclear zone. Spectrophotometric data of moderate resolution (3000 < R < 11000) are presented from which the physical properties of the ionized gas: electron density, oxygen abundances, ionization structure etc. have been derived.

  3. Microwave Anisotropies from Texture Seeded Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Zhou, Z H

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave anisotropies in a scenario of large scale structure formation with cold dark matter and texture are discussed and compared with recent observational results of the COBE satellite. A couple of important statistical parameters are determined. The fluctuations are slightly non gaussian. The quadrupole anisotropy is $1.5\\pm 1.2\\times 10^{-5}$ and the fluctuations on a angular scale of 10 degrees are $ (3.8\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-5}$. The COBE are within about one standard deviation of the typical texture + CDM model discussed in this paper. Furthermore, we calculate fluctuations on intermediate scales (about 2 degrees) with the result $\\De T/T(\\theta \\sim 2^o) = 3.9\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-5}$. Collapsing textures are modeled by spherically symmetric field configurations. This leads to uncertainties of about a factor of~2.

  4. Structure Formation with Scalar Field Dark Matter: The Fluid Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, Abril

    2011-01-01

    The properties of nearby galaxies that can be observed in great detail suggest that a better theory rather than Cold Dark Matter would describe in a better way a mechanism by which matter is more rapidly gathered into Large Scale Structure such as galaxies and groups of galaxies. In this work we develope and simulate a hydrodynamical approach for the early formation of structure in the Universe, this approach is also based on the fact that Dark Matter is on the form of some kind of Scalar Field with a potencial that goes as $1/2m^2\\Phi^2+1/4\\lambda\\Phi^4$, the fluctuations on the SF will then give us some information about the matter distribution we observe these days.

  5. Star formation history and chemical enrichment in the early Universe: clues from the rest-optical and rest-UV spectra of z~2-3 star-forming galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Allison L.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation (z~2-3) exhibit significantly higher star formation rates and gas fractions at fixed stellar mass than nearby galaxies. These z~2-3 galaxies are also distinct in terms of their nebular spectra, reflecting important differences not only in the physical conditions of their interstellar medium (e.g., electron density and gas-phase metallicity), but also in the details of their massive stellar populations, especially their ionizing radiation fields. Jointly observing galaxies' HII regions, at rest-UV and rest-optical wavelengths, and massive stars, at rest-UV wavelengths, is central to constructing a framework for understanding the differences between z~2-3 and z~0 star-forming galaxies and for self-consistently explaining the trends observed in the high-redshift population. My thesis is based on data from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), which uniquely combines observations of individual galaxies in these two bandpasses. In total, the near-infrared component of the KBSS includes spectra of >700 z~2-3 galaxies obtained with Keck/MOSFIRE. I will present these results along with a detailed analysis of the full rest-optical (3600-7000 Ang) nebular spectra of ~400 galaxies, showing that high-redshift galaxies exhibit uniformly high degrees of ionization and excitation with respect to most z~0 galaxies. Combined with observations of the same galaxies' rest-UV spectra (obtained with Keck/LRIS) and photoionization model predictions, these results suggest that the disparity arises from differences in the shape of the ionizing radiation field at fixed gas-phase oxygen abundance, most likely due to the effects of Fe-poor massive binary stars. My comprehensive spectroscopic study of an unprecedentedly large sample of z~2-3 galaxies offers compelling evidence that the distinct chemical abundance patterns observed in these galaxies are the result of systematic differences in their star formation histories.

  6. Extended, regular HI structures around early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Oosterloo, T; Sadler, E M; Van der Hulst, J M; Serra, P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the morphology and kinematics of the HI of a sample of 30 southern gas-rich early-type galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This is the largest collection of high-resolution HI data of a homogeneously selected sample. Given the sensitivity of HIPASS, these galaxies represent the most HI-rich early-type galaxies. In two-thirds of the galaxies, we find the HI to be in a large, regular disk- or ring-like structure that in some cases is strongly warped. In the remaining cases we find the HI distributed in irregular tails or clouds offset from the galaxy. The giant, regular HI structures can be up to ~200 kpc in diameter and contain up to 10^10 M_sun of HI. The incidence of irregular HI structures appears to be somewhat higher in elliptical galaxies, but the large, regular structures are observed in both elliptical and S0 galaxies and are not strictly connected to the presence of a stellar disk. If these two types of galaxies are the result of different formation paths, this is ...

  7. Magnetically self-regulated formation of early protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The formation of protoplanetary discs during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disc radius, $ r \\simeq 18 \\, {\\rm AU} \\, \\left({\\eta_{\\rm AD} / 0.1 \\, {\\rm s}} \\right)^{2/9} \\left({B_z / 0.1\\, {\\rm G}} \\right) ^{-4/9} \\left({M / 0.1 \\msol} \\right) ^{1/3},$ where $M$ is the total disc plus protostar mass, $\\eta_\\mathrm{AD}$ is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and $B_z$ is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is about significantly smaller than the discs that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variation...

  8. Structure formation in the DGP cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The DGP brane-world model provides an alternative to the standard LCDM cosmology, in which the late universe accelerates due to a modification of gravity rather than vacuum energy. The cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ in LCDM is replaced by a single parameter, the crossover scale $r_c$, in DGP. The Supernova redshift observations can be fitted by both models, with $\\Lambda\\sim H_0^2$ and $r_c \\sim H_0^{-1}$. This degeneracy is broken by structure formation, which is suppressed in different ways in the two models. There is some confusion in the literature about how the standard linear growth factor is modified in DGP. While the luminosity distance can be computed purely from the modified 4-dimensional Friedman equation, the evolution of density perturbations requires an analysis of the 5-dimensional gravitational field. We show that if the 5-dimensional effects are inappropriately neglected, then the 4-dimensional Bianchi identities are violated and the computed growth factor is incorrect. By using the 5-dimens...

  9. Formation of disorientations in dislocation structures during plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, W.

    2002-01-01

    Disorientations developing during plastic deformation in dislocation structures are investigated. Based on expected mechanisms for the formation of different types of dislocation boundaries (statistical trapping of dislocations or differently activated slip systems) the formation of the disorient...

  10. Black Hole Mergers as Probes of Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, E.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2008-01-01

    Intense structure formation and reionization occur at high redshift, yet there is currently little observational information about this very important epoch. Observations of gravitational waves from massive black hole (MBH) mergers can provide us with important clues about the formation of structures in the early universe. Past efforts have been limited to calculating merger rates using different models in which many assumptions are made about the specific values of physical parameters of the mergers, resulting in merger rate estimates that span a very wide range (0.1 - 104 mergers/year). Here we develop a semi-analytical, phenomenological model of MBH mergers that includes plausible combinations of several physical parameters, which we then turn around to determine how well observations with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be able to enhance our understanding of the universe during the critical z 5 - 30 structure formation era. We do this by generating synthetic LISA observable data (total BH mass, BH mass ratio, redshift, merger rates), which are then analyzed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. This allows us to constrain the physical parameters of the mergers. We find that our methodology works well at estimating merger parameters, consistently giving results within 1- of the input parameter values. We also discover that the number of merger events is a key discriminant among models. This helps our method be robust against observational uncertainties. Our approach, which at this stage constitutes a proof of principle, can be readily extended to physical models and to more general problems in cosmology and gravitational wave astrophysics.

  11. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  12. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits: the Hardeberga Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Pedersen, Gunver K.

    2017-09-01

    During the early Cambrian, the Danish island Bornholm was situated on the northern edge of the continent Baltica with palaeolatitudes of about 35°S. An early Cambrian (Terreneuvian) transgression inundated large areas of Baltica including Bornholm creating shallow marine and coastline environments. During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well-preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal structures (medusoids) are present in the quarry, but due to the relative poor preservation of their fine-scale structures it is difficult to determine if the discoids represent true medusae imprints or inorganic structures. The preservation of the shallow-water bedforms as well as the possible medusae imprints is related to either the formation of thin mud layers, formed during a period of calm water when winds blew offshore for a longer period, or to the growth of bacterial mats. The orientation of the wave-formed bedforms indicates a local palaeoshoreline trending NE-SW and facing a large ocean to the north.

  13. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits: the Hardeberga Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Pedersen, Gunver K.

    2016-09-01

    During the early Cambrian, the Danish island Bornholm was situated on the northern edge of the continent Baltica with palaeolatitudes of about 35°S. An early Cambrian (Terreneuvian) transgression inundated large areas of Baltica including Bornholm creating shallow marine and coastline environments. During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well-preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal structures (medusoids) are present in the quarry, but due to the relative poor preservation of their fine-scale structures it is difficult to determine if the discoids represent true medusae imprints or inorganic structures. The preservation of the shallow-water bedforms as well as the possible medusae imprints is related to either the formation of thin mud layers, formed during a period of calm water when winds blew offshore for a longer period, or to the growth of bacterial mats. The orientation of the wave-formed bedforms indicates a local palaeoshoreline trending NE-SW and facing a large ocean to the north.

  14. Magnetically Self-regulated Formation of Early Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The formation of protoplanetary disks during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disk radius, r≃ 18 {au} {({η }{AD}/0.1{{s}})}2/9{({B}z/0.1{{G}})}-4/9{(M/0.1{M}⊙ )}1/3, where M is the total disk plus protostar mass, {η }{AD} is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, and B z is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is significantly smaller than the disks that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variations of a factor 100 in core mass, a factor 10 in the level of turbulence, a factor 5 in rotation, and magnetic mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratios 2 and 5. The disk radius estimates are found to agree with the numerical simulations within less than a factor 2. A striking prediction of our analysis is the weak dependence of circumstellar disk radii upon the various relevant quantities, suggesting weak variations among class-0 disk sizes. In some cases, we note the onset of large spiral arms beyond this radius.

  15. Dual Halos and Formation of Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Hong Soo

    2013-01-01

    We present a determination of the two-dimensional shape parameters of the blue and red globular cluster systems (GCSs) in a large number of elliptical galaxies and lenticular galaxies (early-type galaxies, called ETGs). We use a homogeneous data set of the globular clusters in 23 ETGs obtained from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. The position angles of both blue and red GCSs show a correlation with those of the stellar light distribution, showing that the major axes of the GCSs are well aligned with those of their host galaxies. However, the shapes of the red GCSs show a tight correlation with the stellar light distribution as well as with the rotation property of their host galaxies, while the shapes of the blue GCSs do much less. These provide clear geometric evidence that the origins of the blue and red globular clusters are distinct and that ETGs may have dual halos: a blue (metal-poor) halo and a red (metal-rich) halo. These two halos show significant differences in metallicity, structure, and kinemati...

  16. Nanoparticles from the gasphase formation, structure, properties

    CERN Document Server

    Lorke, Axel; Schmechel, Roland; Schulz, Christof

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a broad overview of the complete production and value chain from nanoparticle formation to integration in products and devices, and offers deep insight into the fabrication, characterization and application of nanoparticles from the gasphase.

  17. Structural-Acoustic Simulations in Early Airframe Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The structural design during the early development of an aircraft focuses on strength, fatigue, corrosion, maintenance, inspection, and manufacturing. Usually the...

  18. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of large-scale structure formation from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos are described. The linear power spectrum in this model resembles the cold-dark-matter power spectrum. Galaxy formation begins early, and the final distribution consists of isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, leading to a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. The distribution of clustered matter has a filamentary appearance with large voids.

  19. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-07-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  20. Living Arrangements and Family Formation Attitudes in Early Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinn, William G.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the impact of nonfamily living arrangements and cohabitation on changes in family formation attitudes at the individual level. Results indicate that both the experience and duration of cohabiting arrangements have significant effects on family formation attitudes but fail to show significant consequences of premarital, nonfamily living…

  1. Mid- to Far-IR Emission and Star Formation in Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, L M; Lucero, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Many early-type galaxies have been detected at wavelengths of 24 to 160 micron, but the emission is usually dominated by heating from an AGN or from the evolved stellar population. Here we present Spitzer MIPS observations of a sample of elliptical and lenticular galaxies that are rich in cold molecular gas, and we investigate whether the MIR to FIR emission could be associated with star formation activity. The 24 micron images show a rich variety of structures, including nuclear point sources, rings, disks, and smooth extended emission. Comparisons to matched-resolution CO and radio continuum images suggest that the bulk of the 24 micron emission can be traced to star formation with some notable exceptions. The 24 micron luminosities of the CO-rich galaxies are typically a factor of 15 larger than what would be expected from the dust associated with their evolved stars. In addition, FIR/radio flux density ratios are consistent with star formation. We conclude that the star formation rates in z=0 elliptical a...

  2. Three Dimensional Structure of Relativistic Jet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Using high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations in 3D, we investigate the formation of relativistic jets from rotating magnetospheres. Here, we focus on the development of non-axisymmetric modes due to internal and external perturbations to the jet. These originate either from injection of perturbations with the flow or from a clumpy external medium. In the helical field geometry of the accelerating jet, the m=1 to m=5 modes are analyzed and found to saturate at a height of \\sim 20 inner disk radii. We also discuss a means to control artificial amplification of m = 4 noise in the cartesian simulation geometry. Strong perturbations due to an in-homogeneous ambient medium lead to flow configurations with increased magnetic pitch and thus indicate a self-stabilization of the jet formation mechanism.

  3. On the importance of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel; Proctor, Jeff R; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2013-11-01

    The expression of genes, both coding and noncoding, can be significantly influenced by RNA structural features of their corresponding transcripts. There is by now mounting experimental and some theoretical evidence that structure formation in vivo starts during transcription and that this cotranscriptional folding determines the functional RNA structural features that are being formed. Several decades of research in bioinformatics have resulted in a wide range of computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Almost all state-of-the-art methods in terms of prediction accuracy, however, completely ignore the process of structure formation and focus exclusively on the final RNA structure. This review hopes to bridge this gap. We summarize the existing evidence for cotranscriptional folding and then review the different, currently used strategies for RNA secondary-structure prediction. Finally, we propose a range of ideas on how state-of-the-art methods could be potentially improved by explicitly capturing the process of cotranscriptional structure formation.

  4. Metamorphic sole formation, emplacement and blueschist overprint: early obduction dynamics witnessed by W. Turkey ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunder, Alexis; Agard, Philippe; Chopin, Christian; Soret, Mathieu; Okay, Aral; Whitechurch, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Western Turkey, with a >200 km long-belt of unmetamorphosed ophiolite overlying continental lithosphere is one or even the largest obducted ophiolite on Earth and therefore a key example to study obduction and early subduction dynamics. All Western Turkish ophiolite fragments are considered as part of the same Neotethyan branch resulting of a long-lived continental subduction (or underthrusting). Synchronous (ca. ~ 93 Ma) metamorphic sole formation and preservation at the base of most of the Turkish ophiolite fragments support this single event and place a strong constraint on the age of subduction initiation. Metamorphic soles are indeed generally considered to have formed during the early and hot subduction zone at 25 ± 10 km depths and welded to the overriding oceanic lithosphere. In Western Turkey however (as for most places worldwide) a systematic study of the pressure-temperature conditions with modern thermobarometric tools is generally lacking, and fundamental mechanisms of formation or accretion to the upper plate are poorly (if at all) constrained. We herein reappraise Western Turkish metamorphic soles focusing on the following points and issues: (i) detailed structures of metamorphic sole and other subduction derived units, petrological evolution and refined pressure-temperature conditions; peak pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole were estimated using garnet, clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase as the peak paragenesis at 10.5 ± 2 kbar and 800 ± 50°C based on pseudosections using the Theriak/Domino package (ii) the rather unique (and enigmatic) blueschist facies overprint found in places was investigated in terms of structural position and pressure-temperature conditions. Conditions of overprint were estimated around 12 kbar and 425 °C from the presence of glaucophane, lawsonite, jadeite and garnet overgrowing the amphibolite-facies assemblage. This field-based study provides clues to mechanisms of metamorphic sole underplating

  5. Life Structure of Early Adulthood Period in Levinson's Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Aktu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Early adulthood is one of the important defining periods considered within life-long development in the relevant literature. Early adulthood period consists of psychologically the most satisfying as well as turbulent years of ones life. Universality of theories explaining early adulthood has long been discussed. One of these theories is the Levinsons theory of individual life structure that emphasis on early adult years. In this study life structures of individuals in the early adulthood period was examined in terms of structure-building and structure-changing development tasks, regarding Levinsons theory of individual life structure. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 162-177

  6. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  7. Halo formation and evolution: unifying physical properties with structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    The assembly of matter in the universe proliferates a variety of structures with diverse properties. For example, massive halos of clusters of galaxies have temperatures often an order of magnitude or more higher than the individual galaxy halos within the cluster, or the temperatures of isolated galaxy halos. Giant spiral galaxies contain large quantities of both dark matter and hot gas while other structures like globular clusters appear to have little or no dark matter or gas. Still others, like the dwarf spheroidal galaxies have low gravity and little hot gas, but ironically contain some of the largest fractions of dark matter in the universe. Star forming rates (SFRs) also vary: compare for example the SFRs of giant elliptical galaxies, globular clusters, spiral and starburst galaxies. Furthermore there is evidence that the various structure types have existed over a large fraction of cosmic history. How can this array of variation in properties be reconciled with galaxy halo formation and evolution?We propose a model of halo formation [1] and evolution [2] that is consistent with both primordial nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the isotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The model uses two simple parameters, the total mass and size of a structure, to (1) explain why galaxies have the fractions of dark matter that they do (including why dwarf spheroidals are so dark matter dominated despite their weak gravity), (2) enable an understanding of the black hole-bulge/black hole-dark halo relations, (3) explain how fully formed massive galaxies can occur so early in cosmic history, (4) understand the connection between spiral and elliptical galaxies (5) unify the nature of globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and bulges and (6) predict the temperatures of hot gas halos and understand how cool galaxy halos can remain stable in the hot environments of cluster-galaxy halos.[1] Ernest, A. D., 2012, in Prof. Ion Cotaescu (Ed) Advances in Quantum Theory, pp

  8. Braneworld model of dark matter: structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.; Magaña, Juan A.; Matos, Tonatiuh

    2012-03-01

    Following a previous work (García-Aspeitia in Gen Rel Grav 43:315-329, 2011), we further study the behavior of a real scalar field in a hidden brane in a configuration of two branes embedded in a five dimensional bulk. We find an expression for the equation of state for this scalar field in the visible brane in terms of the fields of the hidden one. Additionally, we investigated the perturbations produced by this scalar field in the visible brane with the aim to study their dynamical properties. Our results show that if the kinetic energy of the scalar field dominates during the early universe the perturbed scalar field could mimic the observed dynamics for the dark matter in the standard paradigm. Thus, the scalar field dark matter hypothesis in the context of braneworld theory could be an interesting alternative to the nature of dark matter in the Universe.

  9. Structure and Mechanism of a Pentameric Formate Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waight, A.; Love, J; Wang, D

    2010-01-01

    Formate transport across the inner membrane is a critical step in anaerobic bacterial respiration. Members of the formate/nitrite transport protein family function to shuttle substrate across the cytoplasmic membrane. In bacterial pathogens, the nitrite transport protein is involved in protecting bacteria from peroxynitrite released by host macrophages. We have determined the 2.13-{angstrom} structure of the formate channel FocA from Vibrio cholerae, which reveals a pentamer in which each monomer possesses its own substrate translocation pore. Unexpectedly, the fold of the FocA monomer resembles that found in water and glycerol channels. The selectivity filter in FocA consists of a cytoplasmic slit and a central constriction ring. A 2.5-{angstrom} high-formate structure shows two formate ions bound to the cytoplasmic slit via both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions, providing a structural basis for the substrate selectivity of the channel.

  10. Do AGN suppress star formation in early-type galaxies?

    OpenAIRE

    Schawinski, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The observation that AGN host galaxies preferentially inhabit the "green valley" between the blue cloud and the red sequence has significant consequences for our understanding of the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes via accretion events. I discuss the interpretation of green valley AGN host galaxy colours with particular focus on early-type galaxies.

  11. Semiconductor structure and recess formation etch technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bin; Sun, Min; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2017-02-14

    A semiconductor structure has a first layer that includes a first semiconductor material and a second layer that includes a second semiconductor material. The first semiconductor material is selectively etchable over the second semiconductor material using a first etching process. The first layer is disposed over the second layer. A recess is disposed at least in the first layer. Also described is a method of forming a semiconductor structure that includes a recess. The method includes etching a region in a first layer using a first etching process. The first layer includes a first semiconductor material. The first etching process stops at a second layer beneath the first layer. The second layer includes a second semiconductor material.

  12. Primmorphs from seven marine sponges : formation and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Wielink, van R.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.; Tramper, J.; Osinga, R.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Primmorphs were obtained from seven different marine sponges: Stylissa massa, Suberites domuncula, Pseudosuberites aff. andrewsi, Geodia cydonium, Axinella polypoides, Halichondria panicea and Haliclona oculata. The formation process and the ultra structure of primmorphs were studied. A positive

  13. Primmorphs from seven marine sponges : formation and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Wielink, van R.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.; Tramper, J.; Osinga, R.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Primmorphs were obtained from seven different marine sponges: Stylissa massa, Suberites domuncula, Pseudosuberites aff. andrewsi, Geodia cydonium, Axinella polypoides, Halichondria panicea and Haliclona oculata. The formation process and the ultra structure of primmorphs were studied. A positive cor

  14. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  15. Social Class, Family Formation, and Delinquency in Early Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhl, Danielle C.; Chavez, Jorge M.; Swisher, Raymond R.; Wilczak, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests increasing heterogeneity in the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. This study considers how this heterogeneity may influence delinquency between these two developmental periods. We focus on the role of family transitions, educational attainment, and employment in predicting risk of nonviolent delinquency and substance use, as well as disparities in transitions across socioeconomic status subgroups. Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolesce...

  16. Using Black Hole Mergers to Explore Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, E.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers will open a new window into the era of structure formation in the early universe. Past efforts have concentrated on calculating merger rates using different physical assumptions, resulting in merger rate estimates that span a wide range (0.1 - 10(exp 4) mergers/year). We develop a semi-analytical, phenomenological model of massive black hole mergers that includes plausible combinations of several physical parameters, which we then turn around to determine how well observations with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be able to enhance our understanding of the universe during the critical z approximately equal to 5-30 epoch. Our approach involves generating synthetic LISA observable data (total BH masses, BH mass ratios, redshifts, merger rates), which are then analyzed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, thus finding constraints for the physical parameters of the mergers. We find that our method works well at estimating merger parameters and that the number of merger events is a key discriminant among models, therefore making our method robust against observational uncertainties. Our approach can also be extended to more physically-driven models and more general problems in cosmology. This work is supported in part by the Cooperative Education Program at NASA/GSFC.

  17. Structure and cluster formation in granular media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Luding

    2005-06-01

    The two most important phenomena at the basis of granular media are excluded volume and dissipation. The former is captured by the hard sphere model and is responsible for, e.g., crystallization, the latter leads to interesting structures like clusters in non-equilibrium dynamical, freely cooling states. The freely cooling system is examined concerning the energy decay and the cluster evolution in time. Corrections for crystallization and multi-particle contacts are provided, which become more and more important with increasing density.

  18. The impact of ionizing radiation on the formation of a supermassive star in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Sunmyon

    2016-01-01

    A massive primordial halo near an intensely star forming galaxy may collapse into a supermassive star (SMS) and leave a massive black hole seed of about $10^5~M_{sun}$. To investigate the impact of ionizing radiation on the formation of an SMS from a nearby galaxy, we perform three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations by selecting a pair of massive dark matter halos forming at $z >10$. We find that rich structures such as clumps and filaments around the source galaxy shield the cloud from ionizing radiation. In fact, in some cases cloud collapse is accelerated under ionizing radiation. This fact suggests that the ionization of the cloud's surroundings helps its collapse. Only strong radiation at the early stage of structure formation can halt the cloud collapse, but this is much stronger than observationally allowed value. We also explored the effect of ionizing radiation on a sample of 68 halos by employing an analytical model and found that increase in the mean density of the gas between the SMS...

  19. Competing stability modes in vortex structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Stephen; Gostelow, J. Paul; Rona, Aldo; McMullan, W. Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Nose cones and turbine blades have rotating components and represent very practical geometries for which the behavior of vortex structures is not completely understood. These two different physical cases demonstrate a common theme of competition between mode and vortex types. The literature concerning boundary-layer transition over rotating cones presents clear evidence of an alternative instability mode leading to counter-rotating vortex pairs, consistent with a centrifugal instability. This is in contrast to co-rotating vortices present over rotating disks that arise from crossflow effects. It is demonstrated analytically that this mode competes with the crossflow mode and is dominant only over slender cones. Predictions are aligned with experimental measurements over slender cones. Concurrent experimental work on the flow over swept cylinders shows that organized fine-scale streamwise vorticity occurs more frequently on convex surfaces than is appreciated. The conventional view of purely two-dimensional laminar boundary layers following blunt leading edges is not realistic and such boundary layers need to be treated three-dimensionally, particularly when sweep is present. The vortical structures are counter-rotating for normal cylinders and co-rotating under high sweep conditions. Crossflow instabilities may have a major role to play in the transition process but the streamline curvature mode is still present, and seemingly unchanged, when the boundary layer becomes turbulent.

  20. Formation of hydrogen bonds precedes the rate-limiting formation of persistent structure in the folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J;

    2000-01-01

    A burst phase in the early folding of the four-helix two-state folder protein acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) has been detected using quenched-flow in combination with site-specific NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. Several of the burst phase structures coincide with a structure consisting...... of eight conserved hydrophobic residues at the interface between the two N and C-terminal helices. Previous mutation studies have shown that the formation of this structure is rate limiting for the final folding of ACBP. The burst phase structures observed in ACBP are different from the previously reported...... collapsed types of burst phase intermediates observed in the folding of other proteins....

  1. Early Archaean crustal collapse structures and sedimentary basin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, W.; de Vries, S. T.

    2003-04-01

    Observations in the Lower Archaean (>3.3 Ga) of the Pilbara and Kaapvaal Cratons point to a direct genetic relationship between the thickness and facies distribution of volcano-sedimentary basin fills and non-linear patterns of extensional faults in early Earth. The basin fills consist of mafic volcanic products, largely pillow basalts, with distinct phases of intermediate to felsic volcanism and concentration of silica, either primary or secondary, in sediments deposited near base-level. The extensional structures are listric growth-faults, arranged in superposed arrays, that migrated upwards with the growth of the Early Archaean stratigraphical column. The faults linked intermittently occurring shallow-level felsic intrusions via porphyry pipes, veins and hydrothermal circulations with the surficial sedimentary basin fill of cherty sediments, concurrent mineralisation and alteration products. The non-linear pattern of the fault systems is recorded by their restored facing directions over large areas and corresponds best with over 100 km-wide (semi)circular crustal collapse structures. Crustal collapse, and therefore basin formation, did not represent a reaction to compression and crustal thickening. It also had no relationship with the present-day distribution of granitoid domes and greenstone belts. Collapse followed crustal uplift recorded by shallowing of the basin fill from a general subaqueous level of deposition of pillow basalts towards zero water level for the sediments and low-relief emersion. Maxima of extension coincide with the appearance of intermediate or felsic volcanic rocks in the overall mafic environment. The geodynamical setting is most appropriately explained by crustal delamination and related plume activity. Although individual features may be compared to Phanerozoic and Recent geological phenomena, like calderas, for the collapse structures as a whole such younger counterparts cannot be found. Rather they have their equivalents in collapse

  2. Structure Formation with Generalized Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W

    1998-01-01

    The next generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, galaxy surveys, and high-redshift observations can potentially determine the nature of the dark matter observationally. With this in mind, we introduce a phenomenological model for a generalized dark matter (GDM) component and discuss its effect on large-scale structure and CMB anisotropies. Specifying the gravitational influence of the otherwise non-interacting GDM requires not merely a model for its equation of state but one for its full stress tensor. From consideration of symmetries, conservation laws, and gauge invariance, we construct a simple but powerful 3 component parameterization of these stresses that exposes the new phenomena produced by GDM. Limiting cases include: a particle component (e.g. WIMPS, radiation or massive neutrinos), a cosmological constant, and a scalar field component. Intermediate cases illustrate how the clustering properties of the dark matter can be specified independently of its equation of state. This fre...

  3. Late Tharsis formation and implications for early Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Sylvain; Baratoux, David; Matsuyama, Isamu; Forget, Francois; Séjourné, Antoine; Turbet, Martin; Costard, Francois

    2016-03-17

    The Tharsis region is the largest volcanic complex on Mars and in the Solar System. Young lava flows cover its surface (from the Amazonian period, less than 3 billion years ago) but its growth started during the Noachian era (more than 3.7 billion years ago). Its position has induced a reorientation of the planet with respect to its spin axis (true polar wander, TPW), which is responsible for the present equatorial position of the volcanic province. It has been suggested that the Tharsis load on the lithosphere influenced the orientation of the Noachian/Early Hesperian (more than 3.5 billion years ago) valley networks and therefore that most of the topography of Tharsis was completed before fluvial incision. Here we calculate the rotational figure of Mars (that is, its equilibrium shape) and its surface topography before Tharsis formed, when the spin axis of the planet was controlled by the difference in elevation between the northern and southern hemispheres (hemispheric dichotomy). We show that the observed directions of valley networks are also consistent with topographic gradients in this configuration and thus do not require the presence of the Tharsis load. Furthermore, the distribution of the valleys along a small circle tilted with respect to the equator is found to correspond to a southern-hemisphere latitudinal band in the pre-TPW geographical frame. Preferential accumulation of ice or water in a south tropical band is predicted by climate model simulations of early Mars applied to the pre-TPW topography. A late growth of Tharsis, contemporaneous with valley incision, has several implications for the early geological history of Mars, including the existence of glacial environments near the locations of the pre-TPW poles of rotation, and a possible link between volcanic outgassing from Tharsis and the stability of liquid water at the surface of Mars.

  4. Late Tharsis Formation and New Perspesctives for Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Sylvain; Baratoux, David; Matsuyama, Isamu; Forget, Francois; Séjourné, Antoine; Turbet, Martin; Costard, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The Tharsis bulge is the largest volcanic complex on Mars and the associated excess of Mars has likely driven a True Polar Wander which has moved the province close to the present equator [1,2]. It has been suggested that the Tharsis load on the lithosphere influenced the orientation of the Noachian/Early Hesperian (>3.5 Ga) valley networks and therefore that most of its topography was completed before their incision during the Noachian era (> 3.7 Ga) [3]. We calculated the rotational figure of Mars and its surface topography before Tharsis, when the spin-axis of the planet was controlled by the hemispheric dichotomy. We show that the observed directions of valley networks are consistent with topographic gradients in this configuration and thus do not require the presence of the Tharsis load. Furthermore, their distribution along a small circle tilted with respect to the equator is found to correspond to a regular south tropical band in the pre-TPW geographic frame. Preferential accumulation of ice or water in a south tropical band is predicted by Early Mars climate model simulations applied to the pre-TPW topography [2,4]. This study implies a major overhaul of the relative chronology of the main events affecting the Mars geological and climatic history during the Noachian and Hesperian periods. A late rise of Tharsis, contemporaneous with fluvial activity, argues for a causal link between volcanic outgassing and the stability of superficial liquid water. The revised chronology, the topography and planet's configuration before Tharsis offers new perspectives to examine the surface conditions with respect to Early Mars habitability. References: [1] Matsuyama, I. & Manga (2010), JGR Planets, 115, 12020. [2] Bouley et al., accepted for publication In Nature. [3] Phillips, R.J. et al. (2001), Science, 291, 2587-2591. [4] Wordsworth et al. (2015), JGR Planets, 120, 1201-1219.

  5. Enhancing Research and Practice in Early Childhood through Formative and Design Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Barbara A.; Reinking, David

    2011-01-01

    This article describes formative and design experiments and how they can advance research and instructional practices in early childhood education. We argue that this relatively new approach to education research closes the gap between research and practice, and it addresses limitations that have been identified in early childhood research. We…

  6. Bomber: The Formation and Early Years of Strategic Air Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    18 Mitchell, Winged Defense, 215. 19 Two days after the Navy’s airship Shenandoah went down in a storm on 3 September 1925, Mitchell called a press...of crucial impor- tance. Most early aircraft engineers simply did not understand the principles of aerodynamics , which is why most aircraft designed...structure—which would be 14 Maurer, Aviation in the U.S. Army, 246–53, 323–25. 15 The US-based GHQ Air Force consisted of 38 airplane plus two airship

  7. USANS investigation of early stages of metal foam formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bellmann, D; Banhart, J

    2002-01-01

    Metallic foams are on the verge of being used in industrial applications. However, the mechanism of foam creation, especially the early stages, are still unexplored. Ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS), performed with the double-crystal diffractometer (DCD) at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF), is a promising method for obtaining a three-dimensional average of a pore size distribution in a wide size range from about 100 nm to about 20 mu m. Analysis of the neutron scattering curves yielded pore size distributions which conformed with the results obtained by microscopy. (orig.)

  8. Biogenicity of an Early Quaternary iron formation, Milos Island, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, E; Ivarsson, M; Kilias, S P; Frings, P J; Hemmingsson, C; Broman, C; Bengtson, S; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2015-05-01

    A ~2.0-million-year-old shallow-submarine sedimentary deposit on Milos Island, Greece, harbours an unmetamorphosed fossiliferous iron formation (IF) comparable to Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). This Milos IF holds the potential to provide clues to the origin of Precambrian BIFs, relative to biotic and abiotic processes. Here, we combine field stratigraphic observations, stable isotopes of C, S and Si, rock petrography and microfossil evidence from a ~5-m-thick outcrop to track potential biogeochemical processes that may have contributed to the formation of the BIF-type rocks and the abrupt transition to an overlying conglomerate-hosted IF (CIF). Bulk δ(13) C isotopic compositions lower than -25‰ provide evidence for biological contribution by the Calvin and reductive acetyl-CoA carbon fixation cycles to the origin of both the BIF-type and CIF strata. Low S levels of ~0.04 wt.% combined with δ(34) S estimates of up to ~18‰ point to a non-sulphidic depository. Positive δ(30) Si records of up to +0.53‰ in the finely laminated BIF-type rocks indicate chemical deposition on the seafloor during weak periods of arc magmatism. Negative δ(30) Si data are consistent with geological observations suggesting a sudden change to intense arc volcanism potentially terminated the deposition of the BIF-type layer. The typical Precambrian rhythmic rocks of alternating Fe- and Si-rich bands are associated with abundant and spatially distinct microbial fossil assemblages. Together with previously proposed anoxygenic photoferrotrophic iron cycling and low sedimentary N and C potentially connected to diagenetic denitrification, the Milos IF is a biogenic submarine volcano-sedimentary IF showing depositional conditions analogous to Archaean Algoma-type BIFs.

  9. Establishment of an Early Vascular Network Promotes the Formation of Ectopic Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eman, Rhandy M.; Meijer, Henriette A W; Öner, F. Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization is crucial for the induction of bone formation. In this study, we investigated the application of two subtypes of peripheral blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to stimulate vessel formation in ectopic bone constructs. Early and late outgrowth EPCs (E-EPC and L-EPC, res

  10. Assessment of activated porous granules on implant fixation and early bone formation in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ding

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, despite nice bone formation and implant fixation in all groups, bioreactor activated graft material did not convincingly induce early implant fixation similar to allograft, and neither bioreactor nor by adding BMA credited additional benefit for bone formation in this model.

  11. Formation of multiple winding topological defects in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, T; Okabe, Takahiro; Nagasawa, Michiyasu

    1999-01-01

    The formation probability of multiple winding topological defects is calculated by phase and flux distribution analysis based on the Kibble mechanism. The core size of defects is taken into account so that when it is much larger than the correlation length of the Higgs field, high winding configuration can be realized. For example, if the self coupling constant of the Higgs field is smaller than $4\\times10^{-4}$, the topological inflation may occur at the grand unification energy scale by the multiple winding string produced during the GUT phase transition.

  12. Nonlinear structure formation in Nonlocal Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Barreira, Alexandre; Hellwing, Wojciech A; Baugh, Carlton M; Pascoli, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    We study the nonlinear growth of structure in nonlocal gravity models with the aid of N-body simulation and the spherical collapse and halo models. We focus on a model in which the inverse-squared of the d'Alembertian operator acts on the Ricci scalar in the action. For fixed cosmological parameters, this model differs from $\\Lambda{\\rm CDM}$ by having a lower late-time expansion rate and an enhanced and time-dependent gravitational strength ($\\sim 6\\%$ larger today). Compared to $\\Lambda{\\rm CDM}$ today, in the nonlocal model, massive haloes are slightly more abundant (by $\\sim 10\\%$ at $M \\sim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}/h$) and concentrated ($\\approx 8\\%$ enhancement over a range of mass scales), but their linear bias remains almost unchanged. We find that the Sheth-Tormen formalism describes the mass function and halo bias very well, with little need for recalibration of free parameters. The fitting of the halo concentrations is however essential to ensure the good performance of the halo model on small scales. For...

  13. Structure Formation with Generalized Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wayne

    1998-10-01

    The next generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, galaxy surveys, and high-redshift observations can potentially determine the nature of the dark matter observationally. With this in mind, we introduce a phenomenological model for a generalized dark matter (GDM) component and discuss its effect on large-scale structure and CMB anisotropies. Specifying the gravitational influence of the otherwise noninteracting GDM requires not merely a model for its equation of state but one for its full stress tensor. From consideration of symmetries, conservation laws, and gauge invariance, we construct a simple but powerful three-component parameterization of these stresses that exposes the new phenomena produced by GDM. Limiting cases include: a particle component (e.g., weakly interacting massive particles, radiation, or massive neutrinos), a cosmological constant, and a scalar field component. Intermediate cases illustrate how the clustering properties of the dark matter can be specified independently of its equation of state. This freedom allows one to alter the amplitude and features in the matter-power spectrum relative to those of the CMB anisotropies while leaving the background cosmology fixed. Conversely, observational constraints on such phenomena can help determine the nature of the dark matter.

  14. THE VLA VIEW OF THE HL TAU DISK: DISK MASS, GRAIN EVOLUTION, AND EARLY PLANET FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Henning, Thomas; Linz, Hendrik; Birnstiel, Til; Boekel, Roy van; Klahr, Hubert [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, Laura [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Anglada, Guillem; Macias, Enrique; Osorio, Mayra [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Flock, Mario [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Menten, Karl [Jansky Fellow of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (United States); Testi, Leonardo [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC-IEEC) and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB-IEEC), Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: c.carrasco@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: r.galvan@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: henning@mpia.de, E-mail: linz@mpia.de [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    The first long-baseline ALMA campaign resolved the disk around the young star HL Tau into a number of axisymmetric bright and dark rings. Despite the very young age of HL Tau, these structures have been interpreted as signatures for the presence of (proto)planets. The ALMA images triggered numerous theoretical studies based on disk–planet interactions, magnetically driven disk structures, and grain evolution. Of special interest are the inner parts of disks, where terrestrial planets are expected to form. However, the emission from these regions in HL Tau turned out to be optically thick at all ALMA wavelengths, preventing the derivation of surface density profiles and grain-size distributions. Here, we present the most sensitive images of HL Tau obtained to date with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at 7.0 mm wavelength with a spatial resolution comparable to the ALMA images. At this long wavelength, the dust emission from HL Tau is optically thin, allowing a comprehensive study of the inner disk. We obtain a total disk dust mass of (1–3) × 10{sup −3} M {sub ⊙}, depending on the assumed opacity and disk temperature. Our optically thin data also indicate fast grain growth, fragmentation, and formation of dense clumps in the inner densest parts of the disk. Our results suggest that the HL Tau disk may be actually in a very early stage of planetary formation, with planets not already formed in the gaps but in the process of future formation in the bright rings.

  15. The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto's history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Stern, S. A.; Moore, J. M.; Young, L. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Ennico, K.; Grundy, W. M.; Linscott, I. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Olkin, C. B.; Reitsema, H. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Schenk, P.; Showalter, M. R.; Spencer, J. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Weaver, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto's Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would naturally have accumulated there. Then, provided that the basin was a positive gravity anomaly (with or without the ocean), true polar wander could have moved the feature towards the Pluto-Charon tidal axis, on the far side of Pluto from Charon. Here we report modelling that shows that ice quickly accumulates on Pluto near latitudes of 30 degrees north and south, even in the absence of a basin, because, averaged over its orbital period, those are Pluto's coldest regions. Within a million years of Charon's formation, ice deposits on Pluto concentrate into a single cap centred near a latitude of 30 degrees, owing to the runaway albedo effect. This accumulation of ice causes a positive gravity signature that locks, as Pluto's rotation slows, to a longitude directly opposite Charon. Once locked, Charon raises a permanent tidal bulge on Pluto, which greatly enhances the gravity signature of the ice cap. Meanwhile, the weight of the ice in Sputnik Planitia causes the crust under it to slump, creating its own basin (as has happened on Earth in Greenland). Even if the feature is now a modest negative gravity anomaly, it remains locked in place because of the permanent tidal bulge raised by Charon. Any movement of the feature away from 30 degrees latitude is countered by the preferential recondensation of ices near the coldest extremities of the cap. Therefore, our modelling suggests that Sputnik Planitia formed shortly after Charon did and has been stable, albeit gradually losing

  16. The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto's history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P; Stern, S A; Moore, J M; Young, L A

    2016-11-30

    Pluto's Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would naturally have accumulated there. Then, provided that the basin was a positive gravity anomaly (with or without the ocean), true polar wander could have moved the feature towards the Pluto-Charon tidal axis, on the far side of Pluto from Charon. Here we report modelling that shows that ice quickly accumulates on Pluto near latitudes of 30 degrees north and south, even in the absence of a basin, because, averaged over its orbital period, those are Pluto's coldest regions. Within a million years of Charon's formation, ice deposits on Pluto concentrate into a single cap centred near a latitude of 30 degrees, owing to the runaway albedo effect. This accumulation of ice causes a positive gravity signature that locks, as Pluto's rotation slows, to a longitude directly opposite Charon. Once locked, Charon raises a permanent tidal bulge on Pluto, which greatly enhances the gravity signature of the ice cap. Meanwhile, the weight of the ice in Sputnik Planitia causes the crust under it to slump, creating its own basin (as has happened on Earth in Greenland). Even if the feature is now a modest negative gravity anomaly, it remains locked in place because of the permanent tidal bulge raised by Charon. Any movement of the feature away from 30 degrees latitude is countered by the preferential recondensation of ices near the coldest extremities of the cap. Therefore, our modelling suggests that Sputnik Planitia formed shortly after Charon did and has been stable, albeit gradually losing

  17. Modified Streaming Format for Direct Access Triangular Data Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We define in this paper an extended solution to improve an Out-of-Core data structure which is the streaming format, by adding new information allowing to reduce file access cost, reducing the neighborhood access delay to constant time. The original streaming format is conceived to manipulate huge triangular meshes. It assumes that the whole mesh cannot be loaded entirely into the main memory. That's why the authors did not include the neighborhood in the file structure. However, almost all of the applications need the neighborhood information in the triangular structures. Using the original streaming format does not allow us to extract the neighborhood information easily. By adding the neighbor indices to the file in the same way as the original format, we can benefit from the streaming format, and at the same time, guarantee a constant time access to the neighborhood. We have adapted our new structure so that it can allow us to apply our direct access algorithm to different parts of the structure without having to go through the entire file.

  18. Formation and early evolution of massive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero

    2007-04-01

    I review scenarios for the assembly of massive black holes (MBHs) at the center of galaxies that trace their hierarchical build-up far up in the dark halo merger tree. The first active galactic nuclei likely formed 150 Myr after the big bang in 1e6 Msun minihaloes. X-ray photons from such miniquasars may have permeated the universe more uniformly than EUV radiation, made the low-density diffuse intergalactic medium shine at 21-cm prior to the epoch of reionization, and changed the chemistry of primordial gas. I'll discuss the conditions under which massive black holes become incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, form a binary system, and eventually coalesce. The spin distribution of MBHs is determined by gas accretion, and is predicted to be heavily skewed towards fast-rotating Kerr holes, already in place at early epochs, and not to change significantly below redshift 5. Decaying MBH binaries may shape the innermost central regions of galaxies and should be detected in significant numbers by LISA.

  19. Fossil Microorganisms and Formation of Early Precambrian Weathering Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, A. Yu; Astafieva, M. M.; Vrevsky, A. B.; Alfimova, N. A.; Matrenichev, V. A.; Hoover, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Weathering crusts are the only reliable evidences of the existence of continental conditions. Often they are the only source of information about exogenous processes and subsequently about conditions under which the development of the biosphere occurred. A complex of diverse fossil microorganisms was discovered as a result of Scanning Electron Microscope investigations. The chemical composition of the discovered fossils is identical to that of the host rocks and is represented by Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg. Probably, the microorganisms fixed in rocks played the role of catalyst. The decomposition of minerals comprising the rocks and their transformation into clayey (argillaceous) minerals, most likely occurred under the influence of microorganisms. And may be unique weathering crusts of Early Precambrian were formed due to interaction between specific composition of microorganism assemblage and conditions of hypergene transformations. So it is possible to speak about colonization of land by microbes already at that time and about existence of single raw from weathering crusts (Primitive soils) to real soils.

  20. Evaluation of the dentogingival area during early plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, P; Lopes de Souza, M A; Oppermann, R V

    2001-07-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate the pattern of supragingival plaque formation in the dentogingival area within 96 hours after abstinence from mechanical plaque control and to clinically analyze the gingival inflammatory response observed. Six male volunteers, 20 to 23 years of age, had their upper incisors and cuspids polished. Four independent periods of no mechanical plaque control--24, 48, 72, and 96 hours--were instituted. In each period, plaque was disclosed and standardized individual photographs were taken. Impressions were taken and replicas were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected at baseline and 96 hours. The height of the gingival papilla was measured at baseline, 24, and 96 hours. Results showed the presence of a plaque-free zone (PFZ) along the gingival margin up to 72 hours. After 96 hours, there was a significant reduction in the presence of PFZ in the proximal thirds of the buccal surface when compared to the other experimental periods. At the end of the study, there was a significant increase in the GCF flow as well as edema of the interdental papilla, when compared to baseline values. The PFZ observed during the initial phase was less apparent at the 96-hour period. At this time, there was an increase in the gingival inflammatory response, represented clinically by increased GCF flow and edema.

  1. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  2. Early diagenetic quartz formation at a deep iron oxidation front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Chapligin, Bernhard; Picard, Aude; Meyer, Hanno; Fischer, Cornelius; Rettenwander, Daniel; Amthauer, Georg; Vogt, Christoph; Aiello, Ivano

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of early diagenetic quartz formation under low-temperature conditions are still poorly understood. We studied lithified cherts consisting of microcrystalline quartz recovered from ODP Site 1226 in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific. The cherts occur near the base of a 420-m-thick Miocene-Holocene sequence within unlithified nannofossil and diatom ooze. Palaeo-temperatures reconstructed from δ18O values in the cherts are near to present porewater temperatures and a sharp depletion in dissolved silica occurs around 385 mbsf indicating that silica precipitation is still ongoing. Also a deep iron oxidation front occurs at the same depth, which is caused by upward diffusing nitrate from an oxic seawater aquifer in the underlying basaltic crust. Sequential iron extraction and analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that iron in the cherts predominantly occurs as illite and amorphous iron oxide, whereas iron in the nannofossil and diatom ooze occurs mainly as smectites. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the illite iron in the cherts is largely oxidized. A possible mechanisms that may be operative is quartz precipitation initiated by adsorption of silica to freshly precipitated iron oxides. The decrease in porewater silica concentration below opal-A and opal-CT saturation then allows for the precipitation of the thermodynamically more stable phase: quartz. We suggest that the formation of early-diagenetic chert at iron oxidation fronts is an important process in suboxic zones of silica-rich sediments. The largest iron oxidation front ever occurred during the great oxidation event ca. 2.5 Ga ago, when large amounts of iron and chert beds were deposited.

  3. Early stages of spindle formation and independence of chromosome and microtubule cycles in Haemanthus endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, E A; Bajer, A S

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed transformation of the interphase microtubular cytoskeleton into the prophase spindle and followed the pattern of spindle axis determination. Microtubules in endosperm of the higher plant Haemanthus (Scadoxus) were stained by the immunogold and immunogold silver-enhanced methods. Basic structural units involved in spindle morphogenesis were "microtubule converging centers." We emphasized the importance of relative independence of chromosomal and microtubular cycles, and the influence of these cycles on the progress of mitosis. Cells with moderately desynchronized cycles were functional, but extreme desynchronization led to aberrant mitosis. There were three distinct phases of spindle development. The first one comprised interphase and early to mid-prophase. During this phase, the interphase microtubule meshwork radiating from the nuclear surface into the cytoplasm rearranged and formed a dense microtubule cage around the nucleus. The second phase comprised mid to late prophase, and resulted in the formation of normal (bipolar) or transitory aberrant (apolar or multipolar) prophase spindles. The third phase comprised late prophase with prometaphase. The onset of prometaphase was accompanied by a rapid association of microtubule converging centers with kinetochores. In this stage aberrant spindles transformed invariably into bipolar ones. Lateral association of a few bipolar kinetochore fibers at early prometaphase established the core of the bipolar spindle and its alignment. We concluded that (1) spindle formation is a largely independent microtubular process modified by the chromosomal/kinetochore cycle; and (2) the initial polarity of the spindle is established by microtubule converging centers, which are a functional substitute of the centrosome/MTOC. We believe that the dynamics of microtubule converging centers is an expression of microtubule self-organization driven by motor proteins as proposed by Mitchison [1992: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B

  4. Continental crust formation on early Earth controlled by intrusive magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozel, A. B.; Golabek, G. J.; Jain, C.; Tackley, P. J.; Gerya, T.

    2017-05-01

    The global geodynamic regime of early Earth, which operated before the onset of plate tectonics, remains contentious. As geological and geochemical data suggest hotter Archean mantle temperature and more intense juvenile magmatism than in the present-day Earth, two crust-mantle interaction modes differing in melt eruption efficiency have been proposed: the Io-like heat-pipe tectonics regime dominated by volcanism and the “Plutonic squishy lid” tectonics regime governed by intrusive magmatism, which is thought to apply to the dynamics of Venus. Both tectonics regimes are capable of producing primordial tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) continental crust but lithospheric geotherms and crust production rates as well as proportions of various TTG compositions differ greatly, which implies that the heat-pipe and Plutonic squishy lid hypotheses can be tested using natural data. Here we investigate the creation of primordial TTG-like continental crust using self-consistent numerical models of global thermochemical convection associated with magmatic processes. We show that the volcanism-dominated heat-pipe tectonics model results in cold crustal geotherms and is not able to produce Earth-like primordial continental crust. In contrast, the Plutonic squishy lid tectonics regime dominated by intrusive magmatism results in hotter crustal geotherms and is capable of reproducing the observed proportions of various TTG rocks. Using a systematic parameter study, we show that the typical modern eruption efficiency of less than 40 per cent leads to the production of the expected amounts of the three main primordial crustal compositions previously reported from field data (low-, medium- and high-pressure TTG). Our study thus suggests that the pre-plate-tectonics Archean Earth operated globally in the Plutonic squishy lid regime rather than in an Io-like heat-pipe regime.

  5. Continental crust formation on early Earth controlled by intrusive magmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozel, A B; Golabek, G J; Jain, C; Tackley, P J; Gerya, T

    2017-05-18

    The global geodynamic regime of early Earth, which operated before the onset of plate tectonics, remains contentious. As geological and geochemical data suggest hotter Archean mantle temperature and more intense juvenile magmatism than in the present-day Earth, two crust-mantle interaction modes differing in melt eruption efficiency have been proposed: the Io-like heat-pipe tectonics regime dominated by volcanism and the "Plutonic squishy lid" tectonics regime governed by intrusive magmatism, which is thought to apply to the dynamics of Venus. Both tectonics regimes are capable of producing primordial tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) continental crust but lithospheric geotherms and crust production rates as well as proportions of various TTG compositions differ greatly, which implies that the heat-pipe and Plutonic squishy lid hypotheses can be tested using natural data. Here we investigate the creation of primordial TTG-like continental crust using self-consistent numerical models of global thermochemical convection associated with magmatic processes. We show that the volcanism-dominated heat-pipe tectonics model results in cold crustal geotherms and is not able to produce Earth-like primordial continental crust. In contrast, the Plutonic squishy lid tectonics regime dominated by intrusive magmatism results in hotter crustal geotherms and is capable of reproducing the observed proportions of various TTG rocks. Using a systematic parameter study, we show that the typical modern eruption efficiency of less than 40 per cent leads to the production of the expected amounts of the three main primordial crustal compositions previously reported from field data (low-, medium- and high-pressure TTG). Our study thus suggests that the pre-plate-tectonics Archean Earth operated globally in the Plutonic squishy lid regime rather than in an Io-like heat-pipe regime.

  6. Formation of coherent structures in 3D laminar mixing flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speetjens, Michel; Clercx, Herman

    2009-11-01

    Mixing under laminar flow conditions is key to a wide variety of industrial systems of size extending from microns to meters. Examples range from the traditional (and still very relevant) mixing of viscous fluids via compact processing equipment down to emerging micro-fluidics applications. Profound insight into laminar mixing mechanisms is imperative for further advancement of mixing technology (particularly for complex micro-fluidics systems) yet remains limited to date. The present study concentrates on a fundamental transport phenomenon of potential relevance to laminar mixing: the formation of coherent structures in the web of 3D fluid trajectories due to fluid inertia. Such coherent structures geometrically determine the transport properties of the flow and better understanding of their formation and characteristics may offer ways to control and manipulate the mixing properties of laminar flows. The formation of coherent structures and its impact upon 3D transport properties is demonstrated by way of examples.

  7. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF COLLOIDS IN NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.I.Lev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the behaviour of colloidal particles suspended in nematic liquid crystals. These colloidal particles interact through elastic deformation of the nematic director field which can result in nontrivial collective behavior, leading to the formation of spatially modulated structures. In this paper, the formation of lattice structures is described both by computer simulations and by analytical theory. Effective interactions of the pairs of spherical macroparticles suspended in nematic liquid crystals have been suggested by many authors. Using these pairwise interactions, spatial structures are obtained by means of dynamic simulations. We have suggested a number of possible structures, which may be formed in multi-macroparticle systems. Regions of temperatures and concentrations are determined in which such a structure might appear.

  8. Structure formation in the universe from texture induced fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Ruth Durrer; Zhi-hong Zhou

    1995-01-01

    The topic of this letter is structure formation with topological defects. We first present a partially new, fully local and gauge invariant system of perturbation equations to treat microwave background and dark matter fluctuations induced by topological defects (or any other type of seeds). We show that this treatment is extremly well suited for linear numerical analysis of structure formation by applying it to the texture scenario. Our numerical results cover a larger dynamical range than previous investigations and are complementary since we use substantially different methods.

  9. Structure formation and the origin of dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, Golam Mortuza

    2007-01-01

    Cosmological constant a.k.a. dark energy problem is considered to be one major challenge in modern cosmology. Here we present a model where large scale structure formation causes spatially-flat FRW universe to fragment into numerous `FRW islands' surrounded by vacuum. We show that this mechanism can explain the origin of dark energy as well as the late time cosmic acceleration. This explanation of dark energy does not require any exotic matter source nor an extremely fine-tuned cosmological constant. This explanation is given within classical general relativity and relies on the fact that our universe has been undergoing structure formation since its recent past.

  10. Coffee melanoidins: structures, mechanisms of formation and potential health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana S P; Nunes, Fernando M; Domingues, M Rosário; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2012-09-01

    During the roasting process, coffee bean components undergo structural changes leading to the formation of melanoidins, which are defined as high molecular weight nitrogenous and brown-colored compounds. As coffee brew is one of the main sources of melanoidins in the human diet, their health implications are of great interest. In fact, several biological activities, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticariogenic, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, and antiglycative activities, have been attributed to coffee melanoidins. To understand the potential of coffee melanoidin health benefits, it is essential to know their chemical structures. The studies undertaken to date dealing with the structural characterization of coffee melanoidins have shown that polysaccharides, proteins, and chlorogenic acids are involved in coffee melanoidin formation. However, exact structures of coffee melanoidins and mechanisms involved in their formation are far to be elucidated. This paper systematizes the available information and provides a critical overview of the knowledge obtained so far about the structure of coffee melanoidins, mechanisms of their formation, and their potential health implications.

  11. Palaeogeography and palaeoecology of early Floian (Early Ordovician cephalopods from the Upper Fezouata Formation, Anti-Atlas, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kröger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the central Anti-Atlas (Morocco, the Early Ordovician succession consists of about 1000 m of fossiliferous argillites and siltstones. The Upper Fezouata Formation (Floian contains a comparatively rich and abundant cephalopod association. A small collection of these cephalopods is described herein for the first time. The cephalopods are interpreted as autochthonous or parautochthonous, representing a fauna, which originally lived nektobenthically in the open water above the sediments or related to the sea bottom. The cephalopod associations of the Upper Fezouata Formation are similar to other contemporaneous assemblages known from higher palaeolatitudes and associated with deeper depositional settings and in siliciclastically dominated deposits. They are composed almost exclusively of slender orthocones, in this case predominantly of Destombesiceras zagorense n. gen., n. sp., which is interpreted as an early discosorid. Bathmoceras australe Teichert, 1939 and Bathmoceras taichoutense n. sp. from the Upper Fezouata Formation are at present the earliest unambiguous occurrences of bathmocerid cephalopods. Epizoans on the shell of a specimen of Rioceras are the earliest evidence of bryozoans growing as potential hitchhikers on cephalopod shells, indicating an early exploitation of a pseudoplanktonic lifestyle in this phylum. doi:10.1002/mmng.201200004

  12. Molecular Component Structures Mediated Formation of Self-assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular recognition directed self-assemblies from complementary molecular components, melamine and barbituric acid derivatives were studied by means of NMR, fluorescence, and TEM. It was found that both the process of the self-assembly and the morphologies of the result ed self-assemblies could be mediated by modifying the structures of the molecular components used. The effect of the structures of the molecular components on the formation of the self-as semblies was discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions.

  13. Bifurcation of learning and structure formation in neuronal maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschler, Christian; Faust-Ellsässer, Carmen; Starke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Most learning processes in neuronal networks happen on a much longer time scale than that of the underlying neuronal dynamics. It is therefore useful to analyze slowly varying macroscopic order parameters to explore a network's learning ability. We study the synaptic learning process giving rise...... to map formation in the laminar nucleus of the barn owl's auditory system. Using equation-free methods, we perform a bifurcation analysis of spatio-temporal structure formation in the associated synaptic-weight matrix. This enables us to analyze learning as a bifurcation process and follow the unstable...... states as well. A simple time translation of the learning window function shifts the bifurcation point of structure formation and goes along with traveling waves in the map, without changing the animal's sound localization performance....

  14. Band gap formation and control in coupled periodic ferromagnetic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskaya, A. Yu.; Sadovnikov, A. V.; Grishin, S. V.; Romanenko, D. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the formation of additional bandgaps in the spectrum of spin waves in coupled magnonic crystals. We present the analytical model, which reveals the mechanism of bandgaps formation in coupled structures. In particular, the formation of one, two, or three bandgaps in the region of the first Bragg resonance is demonstrated and control of its characteristics by the variation of the complex coupling coefficient between magnonic crystals is shown. The spatially-resolved Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and microwave measurements demonstrate the bandgap splitting in the spin-wave spectrum. The main advantage of proposed coupled structure, as compared to the conventional magnonic crystal, is the tunability of multiple bandgaps in the spin-wave spectrum, which enables potential applications in the frequency selective magnonic devices.

  15. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Annabel K; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user's regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User's also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user's understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered.

  16. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel K Clancy

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user's regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11 and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User's also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user's understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered.

  17. Distributed formation stabilization for mobile agents using virtual tensegrity structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Qingkai; Cao, Ming; Fang, Hao; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the distributed formation control problem for a group of mobile Euler-Lagrange agents to achieve global stabilization by using virtual tensegrity structures. Firstly, a systematic approach to design tensegrity frameworks is elaborately explained to confine the interaction rel

  18. Formation shape and orientation control using projected collinear tensegrity structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pais, Darren; Cao, Ming; Leonard, Naomi Ehrich

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to stabilize the shape and orientation of formations of N identical and fully actuated agents, each governed by double-integrator dynamics. Using stability and rigidity properties inherent to tensegrity structures, we first design a tensegrity-based, globally exponentially s

  19. Formation, structure and rheological properties of soy protein gels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, J.M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords: soy protein isolate, glycinin,β-conglycinin, heat denaturation, gelation, network structure, rheology, permeability measurements, microscopy, pH, ionic strength, emulsified oil dropletsThis study was performed to understand the factors determining heat-induced formation an

  20. Lattice Modeling of Early-Age Behavior of Structural Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yaming; Prado, Armando; Porras, Rocío; Hafez, Omar M.; Bolander, John E.

    2017-01-01

    The susceptibility of structural concrete to early-age cracking depends on material composition, methods of processing, structural boundary conditions, and a variety of environmental factors. Computational modeling offers a means for identifying primary factors and strategies for reducing cracking potential. Herein, lattice models are shown to be adept at simulating the thermal-hygral-mechanical phenomena that influence early-age cracking. In particular, this paper presents a lattice-based approach that utilizes a model of cementitious materials hydration to control the development of concrete properties, including stiffness, strength, and creep resistance. The approach is validated and used to simulate early-age cracking in concrete bridge decks. Structural configuration plays a key role in determining the magnitude and distribution of stresses caused by volume instabilities of the concrete material. Under restrained conditions, both thermal and hygral effects are found to be primary contributors to cracking potential. PMID:28772590

  1. Sponge fossil assemblage from the Early Cambrian Hetang Formation in southern Anhui

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe; HU Jie; ZHOU Chuanming; XIAO Shuhai; YUAN Xunlai

    2004-01-01

    Abundant well-preserved large articulated sponge fossils and isolated spicules have been reported from the Early Cambrian Hetang Formation, southern Anhui Province. This unique epifaunal fossil assemblage dominated by articulated sponge fossils is called the Xidi Sponge Fauna.The sponge fauna lived in a quiet oxygenic environment below the storm wave base. Bloom of phytoplankton and rapid sedimentation rate resulted in the deposition of the black shales. Sufficient food supply, lack of other competitors,abundant ecological niches, and demand for oxygen during early Cambrian were in favor of the diversification and evolution of large sponges in the Early Cambrian.

  2. Early Black Hole Formation by Accretion of Gas and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken; Tsuruta, Sachiko; Sasaki, Mei; Ohkubo, Takuya

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model in which intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with mass of ~10000 Msun are formed in early dark matter halos. We carry out detailed stellar evolution calculations for accreting primordial stars including annihilation energy of dark matter particles. We follow the stellar core evolution consistently up to gravitational collapse. We show that very massive stars, as massive as 10000 Msun, can be formed in an early dark matter halo. Such stars are extremely bright with Log L/Lsun > 8.2. They gravitationally collapse to form IMBHs. These black holes could have seeded the formation of early super-massive blackholes.

  3. Molecular Hydrogen Formation in the Early Universe: New Implications From Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Kreckel, H.; Bruhns, H.; Savin, D. W.; Urbain, X.; Čížek, M.; Glover, S. C. O.

    2011-05-01

    We have performed the first energy-resolved measurement of the associative detachment (AD) reaction H\\oline + H → H2 + e\\oline: This reaction is the dominant formation pathway for H2 during the epoch of first star formation in the early universe. Despite being the most fundamental anion-neutral chemical reaction, experiment and theory have failed to converge in both magnitude and energy dependence. The uncertainty in this rate coefficient severely limits our under- standing of the formation of the first stars and protogalaxies.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL INTELLIGENCE DURING PERSONALITY FORMATION IN EARLY ADOLESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga PLATON

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results of experimental-formative study regarding the social intelligence development during early adolescence, which was performed to understand the human behavior in terms of adaptability and functionality, in the context of contemporary. Within the formative experiment, we intend to develop the level of social intelligence that determines the appropriateness understanding of the ability of behavioral and communicative knowledge in the process of formation and establishment of adolescent personality, which will consequently facilitate adolescents’ adaptation to the new conditions and requirements of interrelation and efficient operation during its maturity.

  5. Late Archaic–Early Formative period microbotanical evidence for potato at Jiskairumoko in the Titicaca Basin of southern Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rumold, Claudia Ursula; Aldenderfer, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    ...) within its botanical locus of origin in the high south-central Andes. The data derive from Jiskairumoko, an early village site in the western Titicaca Basin dating to the Late Archaic to Early Formative periods...

  6. Effect of Formative and Ability Test Results on Early Learning of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Abdul; Ardi, Muhammad; Nurhayati, B.; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of formative tests to early learning ability of students in the science learning style. This research used an experimental method with a 2 x 2 factorial design. The participants comprised all the students in class VII of the Islamic Junior High School State of Kolaka, a total of 343…

  7. Parents' Marital Distress, Divorce, and Remarriage: Links with Daughters' Early Family Formation Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Paul R.; Kane, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used data from the Add Health study to estimate the effects of parents' marital status and relationship distress on daughters' early family formation transitions. Outcomes included traditional transitions (marriage and marital births) and nontraditional transitions (cohabitation and nonmarital births). Relationship distress among…

  8. Early Pubertal Timing and the Union Formation Behaviors of Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Shannon E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether the transition into adolescence, proxied by pubertal timing, shaped the transition into adulthood, proxied by union formation behaviors, among contemporary American women. In a sample drawn from Add Health (n = 7,523), early maturing girls reported an accelerated transition to marriage and cohabitation in young…

  9. Formation of solid particles in synoptic-scale Arctic PSCs in early winter 2002/2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Larsen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC have been observed in early winter (December 2002 during the SOLVE II/Vintresol campaign, both from balloons carrying comprehensive instrumentation for measurements of chemical composition, size distributions, and optical properties of the particles, as well as from individual backscatter soundings from Esrange and Sodankylä. The observations are unique in the sense that the PSC particles seem to have formed in the early winter under synoptic temperature conditions and not being influenced by mountain lee waves. A sequence of measurements during a 5-days period shows a gradual change between liquid and solid type PSCs with the development of a well-known sandwich structure. It appears that all PSC observations show the presence of a background population of solid particles, occasionally mixed in with more dominating liquid particles. The measurements have been compared with results from a detailed microphysical and optical simulation of the formation processes. Calculated extinction(indices are in good agreement with SAGE-III measurements from the same period. Apparently the solid particles are controlled by the synoptic temperature history while the presence of liquid particles is controlled by the local temperatures at the time of observation. The temperature histories indicate that the solid particles are nucleated above the ice frost point, and a surface freezing mechanism for this is included in the model. Reducing the calculated freezing rates by a factor 10–20, the model is able to simulate the observed particle size distributions and reproduce observed HNO3 gas phase concentrations.

  10. Formation of solid particles in synoptic-scale Arctic PSCs in early winter 2002/2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Larsen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC have been observed in early winter (December 2002 during the SOLVE II/Vintersol campaign, both from balloons carrying comprehensive instrumentation for measurements of chemical composition, size distributions, and optical properties of the particles, as well as from individual backscatter soundings from Esrange and Sodankylä. The observations are unique in the sense that the PSC particles seem to have formed in the early winter under synoptic temperature conditions and not being influenced by mountain lee waves. A sequence of measurements during a 5-days period shows a gradual change between liquid and solid type PSCs with the development of a well-known sandwich structure. It appears that all PSC observations show the presence of a background population of solid particles, occasionally mixed in with more optically dominating liquid particles. The measurements have been compared with results from a detailed microphysical and optical simulation of the formation processes. Calculated extinctions are in good agreement with SAGE-III measurements from the same period. Apparently the solid particles are controlled by the synoptic temperature history while the presence of liquid particles is controlled by the local temperatures at the time of observation. The temperature histories indicate that the solid particles are nucleated above the ice frost point, and a surface freezing mechanism for this is included in the model. Reducing the calculated freezing rates by a factor 10-20, the model is able to simulate the observed particle size distributions and reproduce observed HNO3 gas phase concentrations.

  11. The Bok globule BHR 160: structure and star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikala, L. K.; Reipurth, B.

    2017-01-01

    Context. BHR 160 is a virtually unstudied cometary globule within the Sco OB4 association in Scorpius at a distance of 1600 pc. It is part of a system of cometary clouds which face the luminous O star HD 155806. BHR 160 is special because it has an intense bright rim. Aims: We attempt to derive physical parameters for BHR 160 and to understand its structure and the origin of its peculiar bright rim. Methods: BHR 160 was mapped in the , and C18O(2-1) and (1-0) and CS (3-2) and (2-1) lines. These data, augmented with stellar photometry derived from the ESO VVV survey, were used to derive the mass and distribution of molecular material in BHR 160 and its surroundings. Archival mid-infrared data from the WISE satellite was used to find IR excess stars in the globule and its neighbourhood. Results: An elongated 1' by 0.´6 core lies adjacent to the globule bright rim. emission covers the whole globule, but the , C18Oand CS emission is more concentrated to the core. The line profiles indicate the presence of outflowing material near the core, but the spatial resolution of the mm data is not sufficient for a detailed spatial analysis. The BHR 160 mass estimated from the C18Omapping is100 ± 50 M⊙ (d/1.6 kpc)2 where d is the distance to the globule. Approximately 70% of the mass lies in the dense core. The total mass of molecular gas in the direction of BHR 160 is 210 ± 80 (d/1.6 kpc)2 M⊙ when estimated from the more extended VVV near-infrared photometry. We argue that the bright rim of BHR 160 is produced by a close-by early B-type star, HD 319648, that was likely recently born in the globule. This star is likely to have triggered the formation of a source, IRS 1, that is embedded within the core of the globule and detected only in Ks and by WISE and IRAS. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories.Reduced molecular line spectra (The SEST spectra as FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  12. Issues of structure formation of multi-component construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenko Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing volumes of construction result in the rising demand for high-quality wall materials and products, growing relevance of availability of resource and raw-material base of natural and industrial products for the construction industry. Structural, physical and mechanical qualities of these products can be improved through systematical selection of compositions based on natural and raw materials, including nano-scale products. The goal of this paper is to provide rationale for structure formation mechanisms of multicomponent materials (silica-lime, silicate, cement materials, with the possibility of using nano-scale products in their production. The primary mechanism of directed structure formation at the interface boundaries of binders are nano- and ultra-disperse particles with high absorption and adhesion properties, which are primarily intended to strengthen the contact area (one of the key structural units of multicomponent binders. The knowledge of genesis, chemical, mineralogical, and phase compositions, as well as specific features of formation of nano-technological raw materials, enables optimization of construction product properties. Using the small-angle neutron scattering method, we identified granulometric and surface properties of a series of nano-technological products (binary and sludge and materials where such products are used, which enabled us to design optimal mixture compositions and parameters of pressing operations.

  13. New Eoenantiornithid Bird from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Western Liaoning, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Enantionithine birds are the most blooming branch of early birds and have distinct diversities. A large number of enantionithine birds have been reported from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation in western Liaoning, China. Recently, we discovered a new eoenantiornithid bird from the Jiufotang Formation in Dapingfang Town, western Liaoning. A new eoenantiornithid bird,Dapingfangornis sentisorhinus gen. et sp. nov., is erected based on this complete skeleton with a skull.The new bird is distinguished from other known Mesozoic birds in a medium to small size, a distinct thorn-like process on the nasals, a sternum with a long and a short lateral processes. The thorn-like process on the nasal has not been discovered among known fossil birds, thus the discovery also provides new materials on the diversities of early birds.

  14. Star Formation in Nearby Early-Type Galaxies: The Radio Continuum Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Nyland, Kristina; Wrobel, Joan M; Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Alatalo, Katherine; Morganti, Raffaella; Duc, Pierre-Alain; de Zeeuw, P T; McDermid, Richard M; Crocker, Alison F; Oosterloo, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We present a 1.4 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) study of a sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the volume- and magnitude-limited ATLAS-3D survey. The radio morphologies of these ETGs at a resolution of 5" are diverse and include sources that are compact on sub-kpc scales, resolved structures similar to those seen in star-forming spiral galaxies, and kpc-scale radio jets/lobes associated with active nuclei. We compare the 1.4 GHz, molecular gas, and infrared (IR) properties of these ETGs. The most CO-rich ATLAS-3D ETGs have radio luminosities consistent with extrapolations from H_2-mass-derived star formation rates from studies of late-type galaxies. These ETGs also follow the radio-IR correlation. However, ETGs with lower molecular gas masses tend to have less radio emission relative to their CO and IR emission compared to spirals. The fraction of galaxies in our sample with high IR-radio ratios is much higher than in previous studies, and cannot be explained by a systematic underestimation o...

  15. Formation of early and advanced Maillard reaction products correlates to the ripening of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanneberg, Robert; Salzwedel, Grit; Glomb, Marcus A

    2012-01-18

    The present study deals with the characterization of the ripening of cheese. A traditional German acid curd cheese was ripened under defined conditions at elevated temperature, and protein and amino acid modifications were investigated. Degree of proteolysis and analysis of early [Amadori compound furosine (6)] and advanced [N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (4), N(ε)-carboxyethyllysine (5)] Maillard reaction products confirmed the maturation to proceed from the rind to the core of the cheese. Whereas 6 was decreased, 4 and 5 increased over time. Deeper insight into the Maillard reaction during the ripening of cheese was achieved by the determination of selected α-dicarbonyl compounds. Especially methylglyoxal (2) showed a characteristic behavior during storage of the acid curd cheese. Decrease of this reactive structure was directly correlated to the formation of 5. To extend the results of experimental ripening to commercial cheeses, different aged Gouda types were investigated. Maturation times of the samples ranged from 6 to 8 weeks (young) to more than 1 year (aged). Again, increase of 5 and decrease of 2 were able to describe the ripening of this rennet coagulated cheese. Therefore, both chemical parameters are potent markers to characterize the degree of maturation, independent of coagulation.

  16. An Early Cretaceous heterodontosaurid dinosaur with filamentous integumentary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Ting; You, Hai-Lu; Xu, Xing; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2009-03-19

    Ornithischia is one of the two major groups of dinosaurs, with heterodontosauridae as one of its major clades. Heterodontosauridae is characterized by small, gracile bodies and a problematic phylogenetic position. Recent phylogenetic work indicates that it represents the most basal group of all well-known ornithischians. Previous heterodontosaurid records are mainly from the Early Jurassic period (205-190 million years ago) of Africa. Here we report a new heterodontosaurid, Tianyulong confuciusi gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous period (144-99 million years ago) of western Liaoning Province, China. Tianyulong extends the geographical distribution of heterodontosaurids to Asia and confirms the clade's previously questionable temporal range extension into the Early Cretaceous period. More surprisingly, Tianyulong bears long, singular and unbranched filamentous integumentary (outer skin) structures. This represents the first confirmed report, to our knowledge, of filamentous integumentary structures in an ornithischian dinosaur.

  17. Topological Defects and Structures in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong

    1997-08-01

    This thesis discusses the topological defects generated in the early universe and their contributions to cosmic structure formation. First, we investigate non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations generated by the evolution of Goldstone modes during inflation. If a global symmetry is broken before inflation, the resulting Goldstone modes are disordered during inflation in a precise and predictable way. After inflation these Goldstone modes order themselves in a self-similar way, much as Goldstone modes in field ordering scenarios based on the Kibble mechanism. For (Hi2/Mpl2)~10- 6, through their gravitational interaction these Goldstone modes generate density perturbations of approximately the right magnitude to explain the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and seed the structure seen in the universe today. In such a model non-Gaussian perturbations result because to lowest order density perturbations are sourced by products of Gaussian fields. We explore the issue of phase dispersion and conclude that this non-Gaussian model predicts Doppler peaks in the CMB anisotropy. Topological defects generated from quantum fluctuations during inflation are studied in chapter four. We present a calculation of the power spectrum generated in a classically symmetry-breaking O(N) scalar field through inflationary quantum fluctuations, using the large-N limit. The effective potential of the theory in de Sitter space is obtained from a gap equation which is exact at large N. Quantum fluctuations restore the O(N) symmetry in de Sitter space, but for the finite values of N of interest, there is symmetry breaking and phase ordering after inflation, described by the classical nonlinear sigma model. The scalar field power spectrum is obtained as a function of the scalar field self-coupling. In the second part of the thesis, we investigate non-Abelian topological worm-holes, obtained when winding number one texture field is coupled to Einstein gravity with a conserved global

  18. Strain phase separation: Formation of ferroelastic domain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Li, Yongjun; Gu, Yijia; Zhang, Jinxing; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Phase decomposition is a well-known process leading to the formation of two-phase mixtures. Here we show that a strain imposed on a ferroelastic crystal promotes the formation of mixed phases and domains, i.e., strain phase separation with local strains determined by a common tangent construction on the free energy versus strain curves. It is demonstrated that a domain structure can be understood using the concepts of domain/phase rule, lever rule, and coherent and incoherent strain phase separation, in a complete analogy to phase decomposition. The proposed strain phase separation model is validated using phase-field simulations and experimental observations of PbTi O3 and BiFe O3 thin films as examples. The proposed model provides a simple tool to guide and design domain structures of ferroelastic systems.

  19. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K

    2006-01-01

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  20. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

  1. Nonlinear Structure Formation with the Environmentally Dependent Dilaton

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Phil; Davis, Anne-C; Li, Baojiu; Shaw, Douglas J

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear structure formation of the environmentally dependent dilaton model using $N$-body simulations. We find that the mechanism of suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions works very well. Within the parameter space allowed by the solar system tests, the dilaton model predicts small deviations of the matter power spectrum and the mass function from their $\\Lambda$CDM counterparts. The importance of taking full account of the nonlinearity of the model is also emphasized.

  2. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, Rafael C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of a continuous particles creation processes on the linear and nonlinear matter clustering, and its consequences on the weak lensing effect induced by structure formation. We study the line of sight behavior of the contribution to the bispectrum signal at a given angular multipole $l$, showing that the scale where the nonlinear growth overcomes the linear effect depends strongly of particles creation rate.

  3. Structure formation with strings plus inflation a new paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Hindmarsh, M B; Magueijo, Joao; Contaldi, Carlo; Hindmarsh, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments in inflation model building, based on supersymmetry, have produced compelling models in which strings are produced at the end of inflation. In such models the cosmological perturbations are seeded both by the defects and by the quantum fluctuations. We show that such models produce qualitatively new and desirable predictions for CMB anisotropies and the CDM power spectrum. This remark should put an end to the long term animosity between defect and inflationary scenarios of structure formation.

  4. Structure formation in the Lemaitre-Tolman model I

    CERN Document Server

    Krasinski, A; Krasinski, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Structure formation within the Lemaitre-Tolman model is investigated in a general manner. We seek models such that the initial density perturbation within a homogeneous background has a smaller mass than the structure into which it will develop, and the perturbation then accretes more mass during evolution. This is a generalisation of the approach taken by Bonnor in 1956. It is proved that any two spherically symmetric density profiles specified on any two constant time slices can be joined by a Lemaitre-Tolman evolution, and exact implicit formulae for the arbitrary functions that determine the resulting L-T model are obtained. Examples of the process are investigated numerically.

  5. Early Stage of Origin of Earth (interval after Emergence of Sun, Formation of Liquid Core, Formation of Solid Core)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Sergeev, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational collapse of interstellar molecular cloud fragment has led to the formation of the Sun and its surrounding protoplanetary disk, consisting of 5 × 10^5 dust and gas. The collapse continued (1 years. Age of solar system (about 4.57×10^9 years) determine by age calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI) which are present at samples of some meteorites (chondrites). Subsidence of dust to the central plane of a protoplanetary disk has led to formation of a dust subdisk which as a result of gravitational instability has broken up to condensations. In the process of collisional evolution they turned into dense planetesimals from which the planets formed. The accounting of a role of large bodies in evolution of a protoplanetary swarm in the field of terrestrial planets has allowed to define times of formation of the massive bodies permitting their early differentiation at the expense of short-lived isotopes heating and impacts to the melting temperature of the depths. The total time of Earth's growth is estimated about 10^8 years. Hf geochronometer showed that the core of the Earth has existed for Using W about 3×10^7 Hf geohronometer years since the formation of the CAI. Thus data W point to the formation of the Earth's core during its accretion. The paleomagnetic data indicate the existence of Earth's magnetic field past 3.5×10^9 years. But the age of the solid core, estimated by heat flow at the core-mantle boundary is 1.7×10^9 (0.5 years). Measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron under the conditions that exist in the Earth's core, indicate the absence of the need for a solid core of existence to support the work geodynamo, although electrical resistivity measurements yield the opposite result.

  6. Structure formation of surfactant membranes under shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hayato; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Shear-flow-induced structure formation in surfactant-water mixtures is investigated numerically using a meshless-membrane model in combination with a particle-based hydrodynamics simulation approach for the solvent. At low shear rates, uni-lamellar vesicles and planar lamellae structures are formed at small and large membrane volume fractions, respectively. At high shear rates, lamellar states exhibit an undulation instability, leading to rolled or cylindrical membrane shapes oriented in the flow direction. The spatial symmetry and structure factor of this rolled state agree with those of intermediate states during lamellar-to-onion transition measured by time-resolved scatting experiments. Structural evolution in time exhibits a moderate dependence on the initial condition.

  7. Cosmological Structure Formation in Decaying Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Dalong; Tang, Jiayu

    2015-01-01

    The standard cold dark matter (CDM) model predicts too many and too dense small structures. We consider an alternative model that the dark matter undergoes two-body decays with cosmological lifetime $\\tau$ into only one type of massive daughters with non-relativistic recoil velocity $V_k$. This decaying dark matter model (DDM) can suppress the structure formation below its free-streaming scale at time scale comparable to $\\tau$. Comparing with warm dark matter (WDM), DDM can better reduce the small structures while being consistent with high redshfit observations. We study the cosmological structure formation in DDM by performing self-consistent N-body simulations and point out that cosmological simulations are necessary to understand the DDM structures especially on non-linear scales. We propose empirical fitting functions for the DDM suppression of the mass function and the mass-concentration relation, which depend on the decay parameters lifetime $\\tau$ and recoil velocity $V_k$, and redshift. The fitting ...

  8. Coupling protoplanetary disk formation with early protostellar evolution: influence on planet traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Kevin; Piau, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Protoplanetary disk structures are known to be shaped by various thermal and compositional effects such as (though not limited to) shadowed regions, sublimation lines, density bumps... The resulting irregularities in the surface mass density and temperature profiles are key elements to determine the location where planetary embryos can be trapped. These traps provide hints of which planets are most likely to survive, at what distance from the star, and potentially with what composition (Baillié, Charnoz, Pantin, 2015, A&A 577, A65; Baillié, Charnoz, Pantin, 2016, A&A 590, A60). These structures are determined by the viscous spreading of the disk, that is initially formed by the collapse of the molecular cloud.Starting from the numerical hydrodynamical model detailed in Baillié & Charnoz., 2014, ApJ 786, 35 which couples the disk thermodynamics, its photosphere geometry, its dynamics and its dust composition in order to follow its long-term evolution, we now consider the early stages of the central star. We model the joint formation of the disk and the star: their mass are directly derived from the collapse of the molecular cloud while the star temperature, radius and brightness are interpolated over pre-calculated stellar evolutions. Therefore, our simulations no longer depend on the initial profile of the "Minimum Mass Solar Nebula", and allow us to model the influence of the forming star on the protoplanetary disk. In particular, we will present the resulting distribution of the sublimation lines of the main dust species, as well as the locations of the planet traps at various disk ages. In the longer term, we intend to investigate the influence of the star properties on the selection of the surviving planets.

  9. ALFALFA HI Content and Star Formation in Virgo Cluster Early-Type Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A; Haynes, M P; Brosch, N

    2009-01-01

    The ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) blind survey is providing a census of HI in galaxies of all types in a range of environments. Here we report on ALFALFA results for Virgo Cluster early-type dwarfs between declinations of 4 and 16 degrees. Less than 2% of the Virgo early-type dwarf population is detected, compared to 70-80% of the Im/BCD dwarf population. Most of the dwarfs detected in HI show evidence for ongoing or recent star formation. Early-type galaxies with HI tend to be located in the outer regions of the cluster and to be brighter. Early-type dwarfs with HI may be undergoing morphological transition due to cluster environmental effects.

  10. Television Format As a Site of Cultural Negotiation: Studying the Structures, Agencies and Practices of Format Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Keinonen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing number of publications on television formats, specific theorisations regarding formats and format adaptation, in particular, are still rare. In this article, I introduce a synthesizing approach for studying format appropriation. Drawing on format study, media industry research and structuration theory, I suggest that television formats should be understood and studied as a process of cultural negotiation in which global influences and local elements amalgamate on various levels of television culture (i.e., production, text, and reception; every level includes several sites of symbolic or actual negotiation. These sites emerge in the duality of structure and human agency.

  11. The effects of expectancy violations on early attention to race in an impression-formation paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickter, Cheryl; Gyurovski, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that early attentional components of the event-related potential (ERP) reflect differential attention to race during person perception. There is also evidence that inconsistency between stereotypic information following impression formation leads to greater neural processing in later ERP components. However, research has not examined how expectancy violations following impression formation affect the early attentional processing of race. The current study examined this issue by leading White participants to form impressions of targets based on positive or negative behaviors associated with stereotypes about Blacks or Whites, with the purpose of creating an expectation of Black or White targets. Following each impression formation trial, a target face whose race either violated or confirmed this expectancy was displayed. Participants indicated whether this target could have performed the previous behavior. Results demonstrated that reaction times and early attentional components of the ERP varied as a function of the match between expectancy and the race of target faces, with stereotypic expectancy violating trials yielding longer reaction times and greater N1 and N2 amplitudes than expectancy-confirming trials. Implications for impression formation and person perception are discussed.

  12. In vitro prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation with antibiotics used in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Maiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    The ability of antibiotics used in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation was studied using a biofilm microtitre assay with 57 non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates (44 first colonisers and 13 recovered during the initial intermittent colonisation stage) obtained from 35 CF patients. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (BICs) of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, ceftazidime, tobramycin, colistin and azithromycin were determined by placing a peg lid with a formed biofilm onto microplates containing antibiotics. A modification of this protocol consisting of antibiotic challenge during biofilm formation was implemented in order to determine the biofilm prevention concentration (BPC), i.e. the minimum concentration able to prevent biofilm formation. The lowest BPCs were for fluoroquinolones, tobramycin and colistin and the highest for ceftazidime and imipenem. The former antibiotics had BPCs identical to or only slightly higher than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution and were also active on formed biofilms as reflected by their low BIC values. In contrast, ceftazidime and imipenem were less effective for prevention of biofilm formation and on formed biofilms. In conclusion, the new BPC parameter determined in non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates recovered during early colonisation stages in CF patients supports early aggressive antimicrobial treatment guidelines in first P. aeruginosa-colonised CF patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  14. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  15. Developing an ancient epithelial appendage: FGF signalling regulates early tail denticle formation in sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rory L; Martin, Kyle J; Rasch, Liam J; Fraser, Gareth J

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate epithelial appendages constitute a diverse group of organs that includes integumentary structures such as reptilian scales, avian feathers and mammalian hair. Recent studies have provided new evidence for the homology of integumentary organ development throughout amniotes, despite their disparate final morphologies. These structures develop from conserved molecular signalling centres, known as epithelial placodes. It is not yet certain whether this homology extends beyond the integumentary organs of amniotes, as there is a lack of knowledge regarding their development in basal vertebrates. As the ancient sister lineage of bony vertebrates, extant chondrichthyans are well suited to testing the phylogenetic depth of this homology. Elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays) possess hard, mineralised epithelial appendages called odontodes, which include teeth and dermal denticles (placoid scales). Odontodes constitute some of the oldest known vertebrate integumentary appendages, predating the origin of gnathostomes. Here, we used an emerging model shark (Scyliorhinus canicula) to test the hypothesis that denticles are homologous to other placode-derived amniote integumentary organs. To examine the conservation of putative gene regulatory network (GRN) member function, we undertook small molecule inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling during caudal denticle formation. We show that during early caudal denticle morphogenesis, the shark expresses homologues of conserved developmental gene families, known to comprise a core GRN for early placode morphogenesis in amniotes. This includes conserved expression of FGFs, sonic hedgehog (shh) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (bmp4). Additionally, we reveal that denticle placodes possess columnar epithelial cells with a reduced rate of proliferation, a conserved characteristic of amniote skin appendage development. Small molecule inhibition of FGF signalling revealed placode development is FGF dependent

  16. Coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures: early interactions in the Drosophila leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    cedric esoler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the musculoskeletal system is a remarkable example of tissue assembly. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, precise connectivity between muscles and skeleton (or exoskeleton via tendons or equivalent structures is fundamental for movement and stability of the body. The molecular and cellular processes underpinning muscle formation are well established and significant advances have been made in understanding tendon development. However, the mechanisms contributing to proper connection between these two tissues have received less attention. Observations of coordinated development of tendons and muscles suggest these tissues may interact during the different steps in their development. There is growing evidence that, depending on animal model and muscle type, these interactions can take place from progenitor induction to the final step of the formation of the musculoskeletal system. Here we briefly review and compare the mechanisms behind muscle and tendon interaction throughout the development of vertebrates and Drosophila before going on to discuss our recent findings on the coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures in Drosophila leg. By altering apodeme formation (the functional Drosophila equivalent of tendons in vertebrates during the early steps of leg development, we affect the spatial localisation of subsequent myoblasts. These findings provide the first evidence of the developmental impact of early interactions between muscle and tendon-like precursors, and confirm the appendicular Drosophila muscle system as a valuable model for studying these processes.

  17. Chinese lexical networks: The structure, function and formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyu; Zhou, Jie; Luo, Xiaoyue; Yang, Zhanxin

    2012-11-01

    In this paper Chinese phrases are modeled using complex networks theory. We analyze statistical properties of the networks and find that phrase networks display some important features: not only small world and the power-law distribution, but also hierarchical structure and disassortative mixing. These statistical traits display the global organization of Chinese phrases. The origin and formation of such traits are analyzed from a macroscopic Chinese culture and philosophy perspective. It is interesting to find that Chinese culture and philosophy may shape the formation and structure of Chinese phrases. To uncover the structural design principles of networks, network motif patterns are studied. It is shown that they serve as basic building blocks to form the whole phrase networks, especially triad 38 (feed forward loop) plays a more important role in forming most of the phrases and other motifs. The distinct structure may not only keep the networks stable and robust, but also be helpful for information processing. The results of the paper can give some insight into Chinese language learning and language acquisition. It strengthens the idea that learning the phrases helps to understand Chinese culture. On the other side, understanding Chinese culture and philosophy does help to learn Chinese phrases. The hub nodes in the networks show the close relationship with Chinese culture and philosophy. Learning or teaching the hub characters, hub-linking phrases and phrases which are meaning related based on motif feature should be very useful and important for Chinese learning and acquisition.

  18. The geographic and phylogenetic position of sauropod dinosaurs from the Kota formation (Early Jurassic) of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, David D.

    2003-03-01

    The earliest sauropods are the Late Triassic Isanosaurus from Thailand, the Early Jurassic Barapasaurus and Kotasaurus from the Kota Formation of the Pranhita-Godavari Basin of India and Vulcanodon from Zimbabwe, and a variety of Middle Jurassic genera from many localities in Gondwana and Laurasia except North America. These early sauropod genera are related, but their phylogenetic positions remain unresolved. Sauropods originated in Laurasia (Thailand and vicinity) or Pangea (broadly, Thailand, China, India), with at least three additional steps involving expansion and diversification through the Middle Jurassic.

  19. Transcriptional inhibition of the bacteriophage T7 early promoter region by oligonucleotide triple helix formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C; Samuel, M; Broitman, S L

    1992-12-30

    We have identified a purine-rich triplex binding sequence overlapping a -35 transcriptional early promoter region of the bacteriophage T7. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide designed to bind this target was annealed to T7 templates and introduced into in vitro transcription systems under conditions favoring specific initiation from this promoter. These templates demonstrated significant transcriptional inhibition relative to naked genomic templates and templates mixed with non-triplex-forming oligonucleotide. It is suggested that triplex formation along this target interferes with transcriptional initiation, and this mechanism may hold potential to disrupt bacteriophage T7 early transcription in vivo.

  20. Vermicular fossils in the Early Cambrian Xidashan Formation in the Quruqtagh region of Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ruidong; ZHANG Chuanlin; SONG Guoqi; LUO Xinrong

    2006-01-01

    Large amounts of vermicular fossils and a minor amount of sponge animal fossils have been found in the Early Cambrian Xidashan Formation in the region of Quruqtagh, Xinjiang. Vermicular fossils are generally more than 50 mm long and 0.3-1.4 mm wide; their wrinkled lamellae are microfine with 3-10 pieces within the length of every each millimeter. The fossils are considered to be Sabellidites cambriensis Sokolov (1965). The Xidashan Formation is the highest stratum in which Sabellidites occur, as has been so far reported.

  1. COMPOSITIONAL AND SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE OF THE MEDICAL DOCUMENT: FORMATION STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romashova Olga Vladimirovna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the compositional and substantial structure of the ambulatory medical record, or "case history", which has being formed for a long time. The author allocates the three main periods in the formation of this medical document: the first period (the beginning of the 19th century – 1920s is connected with the origin and formation; the second period (1920-1980s is marked by emergence of the normative legal acts regulating registration and maintaining; the third period (1980s – up to the present is associated with the cancellation of regulations and the introduction of the new order of the Ministry of Health of the USSR that changed the document's form and name. It is determined that the composition of the case history consists of the title page and the main part. The following processes take place in the course of ambulatory medical record's formation: strengthening formalization, increase in the number of pattern text fragments, increase in the text's volume, and the implementation of bigger number of functions. The author reveals the main (informative and cumulative, accounting and additional (scientific, controlling, legal, financial functions of the document. The implementation of these functions is reflected in the compositional and substantial structure of the document text and is conditioned by a number of extralinguistic factors.

  2. Vesicles and vesicle gels - structure and dynamics of formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gradzielski, M

    2003-01-01

    Vesicles constitute an interesting morphology formed by self-aggregating amphiphilic molecules. They exhibit a rich structural variety and are of interest both from a fundamental point of view (for studying closed bilayer systems) and from a practical point of view (whenever one is interested in the encapsulation of active molecules). In many circumstances vesicular structures have to be formed by external forces, but of great interest are amphiphilic systems, where they form spontaneously. Here the question arises of whether this means that they are also thermodynamically stable structures, which at least in some systems appears to be the case. If such vesicles are well defined in size, it is possible to pack them densely and thereby form vesicle gels that possess highly elastic properties even for relatively low volume fractions of amphiphile. Conditions for the formation and the microstructure of such vesicle gels have been studied in some detail for the case of unilamellar vesicles. Another important and ...

  3. Cosmological structure formation shocks and cosmic rays in hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pfrommer, C; Ensslin, T A; Jubelgas, M; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Ensslin, Torsten A.; Jubelgas, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Cosmological shock waves during structure formation not only play a decisive role for the thermalization of gas in virializing structures but also for the acceleration of relativistic cosmic rays (CRs) through diffusive shock acceleration. We discuss a novel numerical treatment of the physics of cosmic rays in combination with a formalism for identifying and measuring the shock strength on-the-fly during a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation. In our methodology, the non-thermal CR population is treated self-consistently in order to assess its dynamical impact on the thermal gas as well as other implications on cosmological observables. Using this formalism, we study the history of the thermalization process in high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of the Lambda cold dark matter model. Collapsed cosmological structures are surrounded by shocks with high Mach numbers up to 1000, but they play only a minor role in the energy balance of thermalization. However, this finding has important consequences fo...

  4. Cultural and Chronological Horizons and the Problem of the Early Sarmatian Culture Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yablonsky Leonid Teodorovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On the materials of Eurasian early nomads’ archaeology we highlight the South Ural cultural and historical area (UCHA. Geographically it includes steppe regions of West Kazakhstan, Chelyabinsk and Orenburg regions, steppe and forest steppe zones of the Republic of Bashkortostan. There were similar cultural processes that led to the Early Sarmatian archaeological culture formation in the Early Iron Age. Under the cultural and chronological horizon we understand the geographic region that is significantly larger than UCHA. Practically it has no geographic boundaries. Specificity of the horizon is that at a certain chronological stage (phase artifacts and their complexes, signs of spiritual culture are widely distributed that will mark the horizon – the horizon markers such as well known Scythian triad. Global chronological scheme of the Southern Trans-Urals cultural and historical area can be represented as follows: “Sauromatian” cultural and chronological horizon – the second half of the 6th – the end of the 4th (3rd centuries B.C. – Phase “A” – the second half of the 6th – the middle of the 5th centuries B.C. – Phase “B” – the second half of the 5th – the third quarter of the 4th centuries B.C. – Phase “C” – the third quarter of the 4th – the 3rd century B.C. Typologically the burial grounds like Filippovka I and Perevolochan can be attributed to the Early-Sarmatian archaeological culture, i.e. to the time of the ethnic consciousness formation of suspected archaeological Early Sarmatians. In this period ordinary mounds and graves appear along with the elite ones. It is advisable to consider the sites of the “Sauromatian” and Early-Sarmatian cultures of the South Urals of the end of the 5th-3rd centuries B.C. as a single culture of the early nomads.

  5. Loss of vascular early response gene reduces edema formation after experimental stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Fudong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vascular Early Response Gene (Verge is an immediate early gene (IEG that is up-regulated in endothelial cells in response to a number of stressors, including ischemic stroke. Endothelial cell lines that stably express Verge show enhanced permeability. Increased Verge expression has also been associated with blood brain barrier breakdown. In this study we investigated the role of Verge in ischemic injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in both Verge knockout (KO and wild type (WT mice. Verge KO mice had significantly less cerebral edema formation after MCAO compared to WT mice. However, stroke outcome (infarct size and neurological deficit scores evaluated at either 24 or 72 hours after stroke showed no differences between the two genotypes. Verge deletion leads to decreased edema formation after ischemia; however acute stroke outcomes were unchanged.

  6. The formation and early evolution of stars from dust to stars and planets

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Norbert S

    2012-01-01

    Starburst regions in nearby and distant galaxies have a profound impact on our understanding of the early universe. This new, substantially updated and extended edition of Norbert Schulz’s unique book "From Dust to Stars" describes complex physical processes involved in the creation and early evolution of stars. It illustrates how these processes reveal themselves from radio wavelengths to high energy X-rays and gamma–rays, with special reference towards high energy signatures. Several sections devoted to key analysis techniques demonstrate how modern research in this field is pursued and new chapters are introduced on massive star formation, proto-planetary disks and observations of young exoplanets. Recent advances and contemporary research on the theory of star formation are explained, as are new observations, specifically from the three great observatories of the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory which all now operate at the same time and make high r...

  7. Formation of structure in a universe with unstable neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Khlopov, M.Yu. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Prikladnoj Matematiki)

    1984-11-15

    Possible influence of the instability of massive neutrinos relative to decays ..nu..sub(H)..--> nu..sub(L)+..mu..(f) with ..mu..(f) majoron (familon) on the processes of the formation of the structure of the Universe is discussed. It is shown that, for the parameters of such decays compatible with the predictions of modern particle physics, it is possible to decrease the density of neutrino 'pancakes' by 10-20 times as compared to the standard model. It makes possible: (1) the stopping of the process of decay of the structure and thus makes compatible formation of first objects at z approx.= 4.5 with the existence of evolved structure at z approx.= 0, (2) compatibility of the predicted and observed value of the density of the hidden mass, and (3) better compatibility of the predicted and the observed correlation function. It is possible in some models to decrease by 5-10 times the predicted value of the amplitude of large-scale thermal background fluctuations.

  8. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales: The Expanded Format as an Alternative to the Likert Scale Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format,…

  9. Early archosauromorph remains from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of north-eastern Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín D. Ezcurra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is crucial to understand the impact of the Permo-Triassic mass extinction on the early evolution of the group and its subsequent dominance in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems. However, the Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is still very poor in most continents and hampers the identification of global macroevolutionary patterns. Here we describe cranial and postcranial bones from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of northeastern Uruguay that contribute to increase the meagre early archosauromorph record from South America. A basioccipital fused to both partial exoccipitals and three cervical vertebrae are assigned to Archosauromorpha based on apomorphies or a unique combination of characters. The archosauromorph remains of the Buena Vista Formation probably represent a multi-taxonomic assemblage composed of non-archosauriform archosauromorphs and a ‘proterosuchid-grade’ animal. This assemblage does not contribute in the discussion of a Late Permian or Early Triassic age for the Buena Vista Formation, but reinforces the broad palaeobiogeographic distribution of ‘proterosuchid grade’ diapsids in Permo-Triassic beds worldwide.

  10. Early archosauromorph remains from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of north-eastern Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Martín D; Velozo, Pablo; Meneghel, Melitta; Piñeiro, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    The Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is crucial to understand the impact of the Permo-Triassic mass extinction on the early evolution of the group and its subsequent dominance in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems. However, the Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is still very poor in most continents and hampers the identification of global macroevolutionary patterns. Here we describe cranial and postcranial bones from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of northeastern Uruguay that contribute to increase the meagre early archosauromorph record from South America. A basioccipital fused to both partial exoccipitals and three cervical vertebrae are assigned to Archosauromorpha based on apomorphies or a unique combination of characters. The archosauromorph remains of the Buena Vista Formation probably represent a multi-taxonomic assemblage composed of non-archosauriform archosauromorphs and a 'proterosuchid-grade' animal. This assemblage does not contribute in the discussion of a Late Permian or Early Triassic age for the Buena Vista Formation, but reinforces the broad palaeobiogeographic distribution of 'proterosuchid grade' diapsids in Permo-Triassic beds worldwide.

  11. Early Heparin Administration Reduces Risk for Left Atrial Thrombus Formation during Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures

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    Stefan Asbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite the use of anticoagulation during left atrial (LA ablation procedures, ischemic cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs are recognized as a serious complication. Heparin is usually given after safe transseptal access has been obtained, resulting in a short unprotected dwell time of catheters within the LA, which may account for CVAs. We investigated the frequency of CVAs and LA thrombus formation as detected by intracardiac ultrasound (ICE depending on the timing of heparin administration. Methods and Results. Sixty LA ablation procedures with the use of ICE were performed in 55 patients. Patients were grouped by heparin administration after (Group I, =13 and before (Group II, =47 transseptal access. Group I patients were younger (56.6±13.7 versus 65.9±9.9 years, =.01; other clinical and echocardiographic characteristics did not differ between groups. Early thrombus formation was observed in 2 (15.4% of group I patients as compared to 0% of group II patients (=.04. One CVA (2.1% occurred in one group II patient without prior thrombus detection, and none occurred in group I patients (=ns. Conclusion. Early administration of heparin reduces the risk of early intracardiac thrombus formation during LA ablation procedures. This did not result in reduced rate of CVAs.

  12. Early Paleozoic subduction initiation volcanism of the Iwatsubodani Formation, Hida Gaien belt, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Koshi; Gantumur, Onon; Nuramkhaan, Manchuk

    2017-01-01

    In placing Japanese tectonics in an Asian context, variation in the Paleozoic geological environment is a significant issue. This paper investigates the geochemistry of the lower Paleozoic basalt formation (Iwatsubodani Formation) in the Hida Gaien belt, Japan, to consider its tectonic setting. This formation includes the following two types of rock in ascending order: basalt A with sub-ophitic texture and basalt B with porphyritic texture. Basalt A has a high and uniform FeO*/MgO ratio, moderate TiO2, high V, and low Ti/V. The HFSE and REE are nearly the same as those in MORB, and all the data points to basalt A being the "MORB-like fore-arc tholeiitic basalt (FAB)" reported, for example, from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. By contrast, basalt B has a low FeO*/MgO ratio, low TiO2, and low V and Ti/V. It has an LREE-enriched trend and a distinct negative Nb anomaly in the MORB-normalized multi-element pattern and a moderately high LREE/HREE. All these factors suggest that basalt B is calc-alkaline basalt. It is known that FAB is erupted at the earliest stage of arc formation—namely, subduction initiation—and that boninitic/tholeiitic/calc-alkaline volcanism follows at the supra-subduction zone (SSZ). Thus, the occurrence of basalts A (FAB) and B (calc-alkaline rock) is strong evidence of early Paleozoic arc-formation initiation at an SSZ. Evidence for an early Paleozoic SSZ arc is also recognized from the Oeyama, Hayachine-Miyamori, and Sergeevka ophiolites. Hence, both these ophiolites and the Iwatsubodani Formation probably coexisted in a primitive SSZ system in the early Paleozoic.

  13. Molecular evolution of Cide family proteins: Novel domain formation in early vertebrates and the subsequent divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cide family proteins including Cidea, Cideb and Cidec/Fsp27, contain an N-terminal CIDE-N domain that shares sequence similarity to the N-terminal CAD domain (NCD of DNA fragmentation factors Dffa/Dff45/ICAD and Dffb/Dff40/CAD, and a unique C-terminal CIDE-C domain. We have previously shown that Cide proteins are newly emerged regulators closely associated with the development of metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and liver steatosis. They modulate many metabolic processes such as lipolysis, thermogenesis and TAG storage in brown adipose tissue (BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT, as well as fatty acid oxidation and lipogenesis in the liver. Results To understand the evolutionary process of Cide proteins and provide insight into the role of Cide proteins as potential metabolic regulators in various species, we searched various databases and performed comparative genomic analysis to study the sequence conservation, genomic structure, and phylogenetic tree of the CIDE-N and CIDE-C domains of Cide proteins. As a result, we identified signature sequences for the N-terminal region of Dffa, Dffb and Cide proteins and CIDE-C domain of Cide proteins, and observed that sequences homologous to CIDE-N domain displays a wide phylogenetic distribution in species ranging from lower organisms such as hydra (Hydra vulgaris and sea anemone (Nematostella vectensis to mammals, whereas the CIDE-C domain exists only in vertebrates. Further analysis of their genomic structures showed that although evolution of the ancestral CIDE-N domain had undergone different intron insertions to various positions in the domain among invertebrates, the genomic structure of Cide family in vertebrates is stable with conserved intron phase. Conclusion Based on our analysis, we speculate that in early vertebrates CIDE-N domain was evolved from the duplication of NCD of Dffa. The CIDE-N domain somehow acquired the CIDE-C domain that was formed around the

  14. Analysis on structure of igneous formation with fractal dimension of logs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting the structure of igneous formation by calculating fractal dimension of logs, the fractal dimension of pyroclastic is larger than lava. Structure of pyroclastic is more complicated than that of lava, so reflecting the structure of igneous formation's complexity with fractal dimension is feasible. It is feasible to refleet the structure of igneous formation's complexity with fractal dimension.

  15. Formation and Evolution of Structure in Loop Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, M; Kagan, M; Singh, P; Skirzewski, A; Bojowald, Martin; Hernandez, Hector; Kagan, Mikhail; Singh, Parampreet; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2006-01-01

    Inhomogeneous cosmological perturbation equations are derived in loop quantum gravity, taking into account corrections in particular in gravitational parts. This provides a framework for calculating the evolution of modes in structure formation scenarios related to inflationary or bouncing models. Applications here are corrections to the Newton potential and to the evolution of large scale modes which imply non-conservation of curvature perturbations possibly noticeable in a running spectral index. These effects are sensitive to quantization procedures and test the characteristic behavior of correction terms derived from quantum gravity.

  16. Magnetic fields during the early stages of massive star formation I: Accretion and disk evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D; Klessen, R S; Duffin, D; Pudritz, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present simulations of collapsing 100 M_\\sun mass cores in the context of massive star formation. The effect of variable initial rotational and magnetic energies on the formation of massive stars is studied in detail. We focus on accretion rates and on the question under which conditions massive Keplerian disks can form in the very early evolutionary stage of massive protostars. For this purpose, we perform 12 simulations with different initial conditions extending over a wide range in parameter space. The equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are solved under the assumption of ideal MHD. We find that the formation of Keplerian disks in the very early stages is suppressed for a mass-to-flux ratio normalised to the critical value \\mu below 10, in agreement with a series of low-mass star formation simulations. This is caused by very efficient magnetic braking resulting in a nearly instantaneous removal of angular momentum from the disk. For weak magnetic fields, corresponding to \\mu > 10, large-scale, cent...

  17. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-07

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  18. Early diagenetic quartz formation at a deep iron oxidation front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific - A modern analogue for banded iron/chert formations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick; Chapligin, Bernhard; Picard, Aude; Meyer, Hanno; Fischer, Cornelius; Rettenwander, Daniel; Amthauer, Georg; Vogt, Christoph; Aiello, Ivano W.

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms of early diagenetic quartz formation under low-temperature conditions are still poorly understood. In this study we investigated lithified cherts consisting of microcrystalline quartz recovered near the base of a 420 m thick Miocene-Holocene sequence of nannofossil and diatom ooze at a drill site in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1226). Precipitation seems still ongoing based on a sharp depletion in dissolved silica at the depth of the cherts. Also, palaeo-temperatures reconstructed from δ18O values in the cherts are in the range of adjacent porewater temperatures. Opal-A dissolution appears to control silica concentration throughout the sequence, while the solution remains oversaturated with respect to quartz. However, at the depth of the sharp depletion in dissolved silica, quartz is still saturated while the more soluble silica phases are strongly undersaturated. Hence, precipitation of quartz was initiated by an auxiliary process. A process, previously observed to assist in the nucleation of quartz is the adsorption of silica on freshly precipitated iron oxides. Indeed, a deep iron oxidation front is present at 400 m below seafloor, which is caused by upward diffusing nitrate from an oxic seawater aquifer in the underlying oceanic crust. Sequential iron extraction showed a higher content of the adsorbed iron hydroxide fraction in the chert than in the adjacent nannofossil and diatom ooze. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that iron in the cherts predominantly occurs in illite and amorphous iron oxide, whereas iron in the nannofossil and diatom ooze occurs mainly in smectite. Mössbauer spectroscopy also indicated the presence of illite that is to 97% oxidized. Two possible mechanisms may be operative during early diagenetic chert formation at iron oxidation fronts: (1) silica precipitation is catalysed by adsorption to freshly precipitated iron oxide surfaces, and (2) porewater silica

  19. Early Triassic wrinkle structures on land: stressed environments and oases for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Daoliang; Tong, Jinnan; Song, Haijun; Benton, Michael J.; Bottjer, David J.; Song, Huyue; Tian, Li

    2015-06-01

    Wrinkle structures in rocks younger than the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) extinction have been reported repeatedly in marine strata, but rarely mentioned in rocks recording land. Here, three newly studied terrestrial P-Tr boundary rock succession in North China have yielded diverse wrinkle structures. All of these wrinkles are preserved in barely bioturbated shore-shallow lacustrine siliciclastic deposits of the Liujiagou Formation. Conversely, both the lacustrine siliciclastic deposits of the underlying Sunjiagou Formation and the overlying Heshanggou Formation show rich bioturbation, but no wrinkle structures or other microbial-related structures. The occurrence of terrestrial wrinkle structures in the studied sections reflects abnormal hydrochemical and physical environments, presumably associated with the extinction of terrestrial organisms. Only very rare trace fossils occurred in the aftermath of the P-Tr extinction, but most of them were preserved together with the microbial mats. This suggests that microbial mats acted as potential oases for the surviving aquatic animals, as a source of food and oxygen. The new finds suggests that extreme environmental stresses were prevalent both in the sea and on land through most of the Early Triassic.

  20. Large-scale structure from quantum fluctuations in the early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Turner

    2000-05-25

    A better understanding of the formation of large-scale structure in the Universe is arguably the most pressing question in cosmology. The most compelling and promising theoretical paradigm, Inflation + Cold Dark Matter, holds that the density inhomogeneities that seeded the formation of structure in the Universe originated from quantum fluctuations arising during inflation and that the bulk of the dark matter exists as slowing moving elementary particles (cold dark matter) left over from the earliest, fiery moments. Large redshift surveys (such as the SDSS and 2dF) and high-resolution measurements of CBR anisotropy (to be made by the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites) have the potential to decisively test Inflation + Cold Dark Matter and to open a window to the very early Universe and fundamental physics.

  1. Studying Structure Formation with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H

    2002-01-01

    I review recent SDSS results related to galaxies and large scale structure, including: (1) discovery of coherent, unbound structures in the stellar halo, (2) demonstration that Pal 5 has tidal tails and Draco doesn't, (3) precise measurement of the galaxy luminosity function and its variation with surface brightness, color, and morphology, (4) detailed examination of the Fundamental Plane of 9000 early type galaxies, (5) measurement, via galaxy-galaxy lensing, of the extended dark matter distributions around galaxies and their variation with luminosity, morphology, and environment, (6) measurement of galaxy angular clustering, spatial clustering and velocity dispersion as a function of luminosity and color. I then discuss what we can hope to learn in the long run from galaxy clustering in the SDSS and the 2dFGRS. Galaxy clustering depends on the dark halo population and on the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD), which specifies the way that galaxies populate the halos. SPH simulations and semi-analytic models...

  2. Formation of three-dimensional Parylene C structures via thermoforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. J.; Chen, B.; Gupta, M.; Meng, E.

    2014-06-01

    The thermoplastic nature of Parylene C is leveraged to enable the formation of three-dimensional structures using a thermal forming (thermoforming) technique. Thermoforming involves the heating of Parylene films above its glass transition temperature while they are physically confined in the final desired conformation. Micro and macro scale three-dimensional structures composed of Parylene thin films were developed using the thermoforming process, and the resulting chemical and mechanical changes to the films were characterized. No large changes to the surface and bulk chemistries of the polymer were observed following the thermoforming process conducted in vacuum. Heat treated structures exhibited increased stiffness by a maximum of 37% depending on the treatment temperature, due to an increase in crystallinity of the Parylene polymer. This study revealed important property changes resulting from the process, namely (1) the development of high strains in thermoformed areas of small radii of curvature (30-90 µm) and (2) ˜1.5% bulk material shrinkage in thermoformed multilayered Parylene-Parylene and Parylene-metal-Parylene films. Thermoforming is a simple process whereby three-dimensional structures can be achieved from Parylene C-based thin film structures with tunable mechanical properties as a function of treatment temperature.

  3. Quantifying Star Formation in Early-Type Galaxies using Spatially-Resolved UV-Optical Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, Sugata

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of star formation in nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) has evolved rapidly in recent years, due to new UV data from GALEX and HST. Contrary to the classical notion of them being old, passively-evolving systems, recent work has demonstrated widespread late-epoch star formation in ETGs, which builds ~20% of their stellar mass after 1, via minor mergers between ETGs and gas-rich dwarfs. While survey data from GALEX has indicated the average properties of star formation in the ETG population as a whole, I demonstrate how spatially-resolved UV studies can offer detailed insights into the star formation histories of individual galaxies, using an HST-WFC3 case study of NGC 4150. Using a pixel-by-pixel analysis in 5 WFC3 filters, spanning UV to i-band, reveals a central 0.9 Gyr old young stellar population, with a median metallicity of 0.5 solar, that contributes around 3% of the stellar mass and coincides spatially with a small, kinematically-decoupled core (indicating a recent minor merger). Assuming that the metallicity of the young stars traces the gas-phase metallicity of the satellite that fuels the star formation, we use the mass-metallicity relation to estimate the mass ratio of the merger to be ~1:20. An WFC3 study of globular clusters reveals a substantial population of young star clusters coincident with the central region of star formation and indicates that the bulk of the stellar mass in this galaxy probably formed 6-8 Gyrs in the past. This study demonstrates the utility of high-resolution imaging from future instruments such as the extremely large telescopes. (Based on Early Release Science observations by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program.)

  4. Depositional Architecture of Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician Siliciclastic Barik Formation; Al Huqf Area, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Iftikhar Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Early Paleozoic siliciclastics sediments of the Haima Supergroup are subdivided into a number of formations and members based on lithological characteristics of various rock sequences. One of the distinct sandstone sequence, the Barik Formation (Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician) of the Andam Group is a major deep gas reservoir in central Oman. The sandstone bodies are prospective reservoir rocks while thick shale and clay interbeds act as effective seal. Part of the Barik Formation (lower and middle part) is exposed in isolated outcrops in Al Huqf area as interbedded multistoried sandstone, and green and red shale. The sandstone bodies are up to 2 meters thick and can be traced laterally for 300 m to over 1 km. Most of sandstone bodies show both lateral and vertical stacking. Two types of sandstone lithofacies are identified on the basis of field characteristics; a plane-bedded sandstone lithofacies capping thick red and green color shale beds, and a cross-bedded sandstone lithofacies overlying the plane-bedded sandstone defining coarsening upward sequences. The plane-bedded sandstone at places contains Cruziana ichnofacies and bivalve fragments indicating deposition by shoreface processes. Thick cross-bedded sandstone is interpreted to be deposited by the fluvial dominated deltaic processes. Load-casts, climbing ripples and flaser-bedding in siltstone and red shale indicate influence of tidal processes at times during the deposition of the formation. This paper summarizes results of a study carried out in Al Huqf area outcrops to analyze the characteristics of the sandstone-body geometry, internal architecture, provenance and diagenetic changes in the lower and middle part of the formation. The study shows build-up of a delta complex and its progradation over a broad, low-angle shelf where fluvial processes operate beside shoreface processes in a vegetation free setting. Keywords: Andam Group, Barik Formation, Ordovician sandstone, Al Huqf, Central Oman,

  5. The gamma ray background from large scale structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S; Gabici, Stefano; Blasi, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering of dark matter halos is thought to describe well the large scale structure of the universe. The baryonic component of the halos is shock heated to the virial temperature while a small fraction of the energy flux through the shocks may be energized through the first order Fermi process to relativistic energy per particle. It has been proposed that the electrons accelerated in this way may upscatter the photons of the universal microwave background to gamma ray energies and indeed generate a diffuse background of gamma rays that compares well to the observations. In this paper we calculate the spectra of the particles accelerated at the merger shocks and re-evaluate the contribution of structure formation to the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background (EDGRB), concluding that this contribution adds up to at most 10% of the observed EDGRB.

  6. Dynamically Multivalued Self-Organisation and Probabilistic Structure Formation Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilyuk, A P

    2004-01-01

    The unreduced, universally nonperturbative analysis of arbitrary many-body interaction process reveals the irreducible, purely dynamic source of randomness. It leads to the universal definition of real system complexity (physics/9806002), where the internally chaotic self-organisation emerges as a limiting case of complex interaction dynamics (physics/0211071). It extends also the concept of "self-organised criticality" and corresponds to formation of distinct enough (but always internally chaotic) structures occurring if the system is far from characteristic frequency resonances. Transition to the opposite limiting regime of multivalued interaction dynamics, that of uniform (global) chaos, takes place around the main frequency resonance(s), which provides the absolutely universal criterion of global chaos onset, applicable to any kind of system, as well as the new, extended interpretation of the phenomenon of resonance itself. As a result, one obtains the causally complete description of world structure emer...

  7. A Mechanism for E xB0 Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Patrick; Gurcan, Ozgur; Hahm, T. S.; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem

    2012-10-01

    A novel mechanism for E xB0 staircase formation is proposed. Staircases are quasi-regular patterns of strong, localized shear layers and profile corrugations interspersed with regions of avalanching. The critical question is how do such quasi-regular patterns self-consistently form. We propose a simple model based on a.) symmetry constraints on the form of the flux, b.) the existence of a fluctuation amplitude dependent time delay between the profile perturbation and the flux. The time delay leads to the development of quasi-periodic jams or clusters in the transport flux. These in turn nucleate profile corrugations and a shear layer staircase. The implication for avalanche structure will be discussed. The aim of this work is a self-consistent treatment of the spatio-temporal structure of transport and flows.

  8. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  9. Giant planet formation in radially structured protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, Gavin A L

    2016-01-01

    Our recent N-body simulations of planetary system formation, incorporating models for the main physical processes thought to be important during the building of planets (i.e. gas disc evolution, migration, planetesimal/boulder accretion, gas accretion onto cores, etc.), have been successful in reproducing some of the broad features of the observed exoplanet population (e.g. compact systems of low mass planets, hot Jupiters), but fail completely to form any surviving cold Jupiters. The primary reason for this failure is rapid inward migration of growing protoplanets during the gas accretion phase, resulting in the delivery of these bodies onto orbits close to the star. Here, we present the results of simulations that examine the formation of gas giant planets in protoplanetary discs that are radially structured due to spatial and temporal variations in the effective viscous stresses, and show that such a model results in the formation of a population of cold gas giants. Furthermore, when combined with models f...

  10. Giant planet formation in radially structured protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gavin A. L.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2016-08-01

    Our recent N-body simulations of planetary system formation, incorporating models for the main physical processes thought to be important during the building of planets (i.e. gas disc evolution, migration, planetesimal/boulder accretion, gas accretion on to cores, etc.), have been successful in reproducing some of the broad features of the observed exoplanet population (e.g. compact systems of low-mass planets, hot Jupiters), but fail completely to form any surviving cold Jupiters. The primary reason for this failure is rapid inward migration of growing protoplanets during the gas accretion phase, resulting in the delivery of these bodies on to orbits close to the star. Here, we present the results of simulations that examine the formation of gas giant planets in protoplanetary discs that are radially structured due to spatial and temporal variations in the effective viscous stresses, and show that such a model results in the formation of a population of cold gas giants. Furthermore, when combined with models for disc photoevaporation and a central magnetospheric cavity, the simulations reproduce the well-known hot-Jupiter/cold-Jupiter dichotomy in the observed period distribution of giant exoplanets, with a period valley between 10 and 100 d.

  11. Star formation along the Hubble sequence: Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, R M González; Pérez, E; García-Benito, R; Fernández, R López; Lacerda, E A D; Cortijo-Ferrero, C; de Amorim, A L; Asari, N Vale; Sánchez, S F; Walcher, C J; Wisotzki, L; Mast, D; Alves, J; Ascasibar, Y; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Galbany, L; Kennicutt, R C; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Mollá, M; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Vílchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with IFS, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to obtain radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past, and the local sSFR. To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF) we stack the individual radial profiles in bins of galaxy morphology and stellar masses. Our main results are: a) The intensity of SFR shows declining profiles that exhibit very little differences between spirals. The dispersion between the profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals. This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant intensity of SFR b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outwards, wi...

  12. Development of children’s early understanding of numeric structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyeva, Marina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the base-10 structure of multi-digit numbers is one of the critical aspects in early mathematics learning. It has been documented that children from different countries vary in their use of base-10 representations. Questions concerning potential sources of this variability have been debated for decades. One commonly posited explanation is that some languages provide explicit cues about the structure of multi-digit numbers, facilitating the development of base-10 representations. In the present study, we tested this view against an alternative view, positing that variability in children’s learning of numeric structure may reflect differences in their experiences with numbers. The study examined kindergartners and first-graders from four countries: Taiwan, South Korea, the USA, and Russia. Results showed that the use of base-10 representations by American first-graders increased dramatically over the last decades, following changes in curricular guidelines. First-graders across the four countries showed some differences in performance (however, not consistent with the language account, whereas kindergartners performed comparably despite the differences in their languages. The results suggest that the nature of early math instruction may be critical for children’s developing understanding of numeric structure.

  13. Star formation in nearby early-type galaxies: the radio continuum perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M.; Wrobel, Joan M.; Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Alatalo, Katherine; Morganti, Raffaella; Duc, Pierre-Alain; de Zeeuw, P. T.; McDermid, Richard M.; Crocker, Alison F.; Oosterloo, Tom

    2017-01-01

    We present a 1.4 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) study of a sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS3D survey. The radio morphologies of these ETGs at a resolution of θFWHM ≈ 5 arcsec include sources that are compact on sub-kpc scales, resolved structures similar to those seen i

  14. Structural and Maturational Covariance in Early Childhood Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiujuan; Li, Gang; Lu, Zhaohua; Gao, Wei; Wang, Li; Shen, Dinggang; Zhu, Hongtu; Gilmore, John H

    2017-03-01

    Brain structural covariance networks (SCNs) composed of regions with correlated variation are altered in neuropsychiatric disease and change with age. Little is known about the development of SCNs in early childhood, a period of rapid cortical growth. We investigated the development of structural and maturational covariance networks, including default, dorsal attention, primary visual and sensorimotor networks in a longitudinal population of 118 children after birth to 2 years old and compared them with intrinsic functional connectivity networks. We found that structural covariance of all networks exhibit strong correlations mostly limited to their seed regions. By Age 2, default and dorsal attention structural networks are much less distributed compared with their functional maps. The maturational covariance maps, however, revealed significant couplings in rates of change between distributed regions, which partially recapitulate their functional networks. The structural and maturational covariance of the primary visual and sensorimotor networks shows similar patterns to the corresponding functional networks. Results indicate that functional networks are in place prior to structural networks, that correlated structural patterns in adult may arise in part from coordinated cortical maturation, and that regional co-activation in functional networks may guide and refine the maturation of SCNs over childhood development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Structural formation of huntingtin-like aggregates probed by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Perevozchikova, Tatiana [ORNL; Berthelier-Jung, Valerie M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington s disease (HD), aspects concerning the earliest of protein structures that form along the aggregation pathway have increasingly gained attention since these particular species are likely to be neurotoxic. We used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to probe in solution these transient structures formed by peptides having the N-terminal sequence context of mutant huntingtin (Htt) exon 1. We obtained snapshots of the formed aggregates as the kinetic reaction ensued to yield quantitative information on their size and mass. At the early stage, small precursor species with an initial radius of gyration (Rg) of 16.1 5.9 and average mass of a dimer to trimer were monitored. Structural growth was treated as two modes with a transition from three-dimensional early aggregate formation to two-dimensional fibril growth and association. Our SANS results on the internal structure of the mature fibrils demonstrate loose packing with about 1 peptide per 4.75 -sheet repeat distance, which is shown to be quantitatively consistent with a -helix model. This research provides new insights into the structures forming along the pathway of Htt exon 1 aggregation and should assist in determining the role that precursors play in neuronal toxicity.

  16. Structural and scaling properties of galaxy clusters: probing the physics of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, M; Pratt, G W

    2003-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton studies of the total mass, gas density, temperature and entropy profiles in nearby hot and cool clusters, together with follow-up observations of distant clusters from the SHARC Survey. The observed structural and scaling properties are compared with the predictions of the self-similar model of cluster formation. These data indicate that clusters do form a self-similar population down to low mass and up to high redshift, and give support to the standard picture of structure formation for the dark matter component. However, deviations from the standard scaling laws confirm that the specific physics of the gas component is still insufficiently understood.

  17. The density structure and star formation rate of non-isothermal polytropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is governed by supersonic turbulence, which likely controls the star formation rate (SFR) and initial mass function (IMF) of stars. Turbulence also plays an important role during structure formation in the early Universe. Despite its ubiquity and importance, we have yet to understand the statistics of turbulence. ISM turbulence is non-universal, with a wide range of Mach numbers, magnetic fields strengths, and is driven by various stellar feedback and galactic processes. Although some of these parameters were explored, the bulk of previous work assumed that the gas is isothermal. However, cold molecular clouds form out of the warm atomic medium, with the gas passing through various chemical and thermodynamic phases that are not isothermal. Here we determine the role of temperature variations by modelling non-isothermal hydrodynamic turbulence with a polytropic equation of state (EOS), P~rho^Gamma. We use grid resolutions of 2048^3 cells and compare polytropic exponents Gamm...

  18. Maternal Mga is required for Wnt signaling and organizer formation in the early Xenopus embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Gu; Huijuan Shi; Li Gao; Haiyan Zhang; Qinghua Tao

    2012-01-01

    Maternal Wnt11 is both necessary and sufficient for the formation of Spemann organizer in Xenopus embryo.Xnr3 and Siamois have been identified as the direct target genes of maternal Wnt11/β-catenin during organizer induction.The depletion of maternal XTcf3 resulted in the ectopic expression of Xnr3 and Siamois,suggesting the activity of β-catenin/XTcf3 is strictly regulated in the early Xenopus embryos.Here,we show that Xenopus mga (Xmga) is a maternal gene required for dorsal axis formation.Overexpression experiments indicate that mouse Mga potentiates the activity of β-catenin in the induction of organizer-specific genes.Depletion of maternal Xmga results in the dramatic decrease of the expression of organizer genes and ventralization phenotype,indicating that Xmga is required for β-catenin function and organizer formation.Depletion of XTcf3 cannot rescue organizer gene expression and axis formation in Xmga-depleted embryos,suggesting Xmga is downstream of XTcf3 during organizer induction.We conclude that maternal Xmga is critical for the function of β-catenin during organizer formation and dorsal development of Xenopus embryo.To our knowledge,this is a report for the first time to implicate Mga in regulating Wnt signaling.

  19. Early Acheulean technology in the Rietputs Formation, South Africa, dated with cosmogenic nuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Ryan J; Granger, Darryl E; Kuman, Kathleen; Partridge, Timothy C

    2009-02-01

    An absolute dating technique based on the build-up and decay of (26)Al and (10)Be in the mineral quartz provides crucial evidence regarding early Acheulean hominid distribution in South Africa. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of an ancient alluvial deposit of the Vaal River (Rietputs Formation) in the western interior of South Africa shows that coarse gravel and sand aggradation there occurred ca 1.57+/-0.22Ma, with individual ages of samples ranging from 1.89+/-0.19 to 1.34+/-0.22Ma. This was followed by aggradation of laminated and cross-bedded fine alluvium at ca 1.26+/-0.10Ma. The Rietputs Formation provides an ideal situation for the use of the cosmogenic nuclide burial dating method, as samples could be obtained from deep mining pits at depths ranging from 7 to 16 meters. Individual dates provide only a minimum age for the stone tool technology preserved within the deposits. Each assemblage represents a time averaged collection. Bifacial tools distributed throughout the coarse gravel and sand unit can be assigned to an early phase of the Acheulean. This is the first absolute radiometric dated evidence for early Acheulean artefacts in South Africa that have been found outside of the early hominid sites of the Gauteng Province. These absolute dates also indicate that handaxe-using hominids inhabited southern Africa as early as their counterparts in East Africa. The simultaneous appearance of the Acheulean in different parts of the continent implies relatively rapid technology development and the widespread use of large cutting tools in the African continent by ca 1.6Ma.

  20. Early detection of ovarian cancer: background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, P. E.; Chambers, J. T.; Taylor, K. J.; Pellerito, J.; Hammers, L.; Cole, L. A.; Yang-Feng, T. L.; Smith, P.; Mayne, S. T.; Makuch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has received national attention as a highly virulent disease. Its lack of early warning symptoms and the failure to develop highly sensitive screening tests have led some physicians to recommend prophylactic oophorectomies to women with relatives who have had ovarian cancer. Others have recommended routine screening of otherwise normal women for CA 125, a circulating tumor marker, and ultrasound examinations. Each of these techniques is associated with substantial false-positive rates that could lead to unnecessary surgery. A review of epidemiologic data suggests that familial ovarian cancer kindreds are rare, but women with first-degree relatives who have had ovarian cancer have a significant risk themselves for developing ovarian cancer. In addition, women with a great number of ovulatory cycles are at an increased risk for the disease. Circulating tumor markers are frequently elevated in women with advanced ovarian cancer, but their value in early detection of ovarian cancer has yet to be established. Advances in endovaginal ultrasound and color Doppler flow technology have significantly improved our ability to assess pelvic organs. This article presents the background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program for ovarian cancer, whose goals are to identify the best techniques for diagnosing ovarian cancer in an early stage, to determine the frequency with which such tests should be employed, to assess false-positive results, and to identify women who might benefit from prophylactic oophorectomies. PMID:1810100

  1. Macrophages are essential for the early wound healing response and the formation of a fibrovascular scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lizhi; Marneros, Alexander G

    2013-06-01

    After wounding, multiple cell types interact to form a fibrovascular scar; the formation and cellular origins of these scars are incompletely understood. We used a laser-injury wound model of choroidal neovascularization in the eye to determine the spatiotemporal cellular events that lead to formation of a fibrovascular scar. After laser injury, F4/80(+) myeloid cells infiltrate the wound site and induce smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression in adjacent retinal pigment epithelial cells, with subsequent formation of a SMA(+)NG2(+) myofibroblastic scaffold, into which endothelial cells then infiltrate to form a fibrovascular lesion. Cells of the fibrovascular scaffold express the proangiogenic factor IL-1β strongly, whereas retinal pigment epithelial cells are the main source of VEGF-A. Subsequent choroidal neovascularization is limited to the area demarcated by this myofibroblastic scaffold and occurs independently of epithelial- or myeloid-derived VEGF-A. The SMA(+)NG2(+) myofibroblastic cells, F4/80(+) macrophages, and adjacent epithelial cells actively proliferate in the early phase of the wound healing response. Cell-lineage tracing experiments suggest that the SMA(+)NG2(+) myofibroblastic scaffold originates from choroidal pericyte-like cells. Targeted ablation of macrophages inhibits the formation of this fibrovascular scaffold, and expression analysis reveals that these macrophages are Arg1(+)YM1(+)F4/80(+) alternatively activated M2-like macrophages, which do not require IL-4/STAT6 or IL-10 signaling for their activation. Thus, macrophages are essential for the early wound healing response and the formation of a fibrovascular scar.

  2. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  3. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then "large" carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  4. Hystricognath rodents from the Pinturas Formation, Early Middle Miocene of Patagonia, biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarz, Alejandro G.; Bellosi, Eduardo S.

    2005-01-01

    The Pinturas Formation is a continental succession, characterized by eolian sediments (mainly tuffaceous) and paleosols, originated in an upland setting of west central Patagonia. The main intraformational erosive surfaces and lithological changes define three sequences. The Formation bears a rich mammalian association (Florentino Ameghino's Astrapothericulan fauna), whose age in relation to the Santacrucian SALMA (middle Miocene) is still controversial. Recent collections from the Pinturas Formation, performed with stratigraphic control, allow differentiation of two distinct hystricognath rodent associations. The lower and middle sequences bear a particular combination of Colhuehuapian (early Miocene) and Santacrucian genera, mostly represented by species exclusively known to the Pinturas Formation ('Pinturan' association). The upper sequence bears typical Santacrucian species, more derived than its Pinturan counterparts. According to the rodent record, the lower and middle sequences of the Pinturas Formation are older than the base of the Santa Cruz Formation exposed at Monte Observación and Monte León, and the upper sequence may be correlated with the lowermost levels of the Santa Cruz Formation and deposits exposed at Karaiken that bear Ameghino's 'Notohippidian' fauna. These correlations agree with more recent radiometric dates and other biostratigraphic evidence, supporting Ameghino's original hypothesis. The Pinturan rodent assemblage of the lower and middle sequences suggests the presence of humid forests, in accordance with other faunal components and palynological data. Sedimentologic, paleopedologic, and ichnologic evidence, however, suggest environments dominated by herbaceous vegetation. This seeming contradiction is interpreted as the result of a marked environmental gradient due to the paleotopography and/or climatic fluctuations. The mammal record corresponds to the more humid intervals, which have less representation in the sedimentary record

  5. Some special features of formation of manyfunctional powders steels structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    It has been studied connection between composition, structure and properties of powder steels using technology of their own. Nitrogen containing powders were obtained by mechanical allowing (MA) of Fe-Cr and Fe Cr Ni-C mixtures in a high-energy planetary mill in the gaseous nitrogen environment. The contents of nitrogen after MA was 0. 7 % in Fe-Cr-N and 2.1% in Fe-Cr-Ni-C-N mixes. Phase composition after the mechanical alloying was: in system Fe-Cr-N - solid solution of chrome in iron and α - Fe, in system Fe-Cr-Ni-C-N-40% γ-phase (vol. fraction) , α - Fe and solid solution Cr-Fe.There are investigated physical-mechanical, tribo-technical and specify properties of the nitrous steels,are fixed the base dependences between parameters of process of MA and structure of steels. Introduction of nitrogen by rather new method of MA, as against saturation of melts, allows to run phase composition - to generate structure with more dispersible and uniform nitrides or with the nitrous austenite (depending on purpose of steel).It is demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction and method of Raman spectrum analysis, that in a sintering process of powder steels, obtained by introduction of carbon in the form of cast-iron powder, a formation of metallofullerite phase Fex C60 at determined conditions. The possibility of fullerenes conception in powder carbon steels, diffusion of iron atoms at fullerite lattice and formation of metallofullerites during contact interaction of fullerene with iron is confirmed experimentally.Dependence of synthesis activity of fullerences from temperature of sintering, type and quantity of alloy elements is determined.

  6. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Local Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bureau, M; Alatalo, K; Crocker, A F; Blitz, L; Young, L M; Combes, F; Bois, M; Bournaud, F; Cappellari, M; Davies, R L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, P -A; Emsellem, E; Khochfar, S; Krajnovic, D; Kuntschner, H; Lablanche, P -Y; McDermid, R M; Morganti, R; Naab, T; Oosterloo, T; Sarzi, M; Scott, N; Serra, P; Weijmans, A

    2011-01-01

    The molecular gas content of local early-type galaxies is constrained and discussed in relation to their evolution. First, as part of the Atlas3D survey, we present the first complete, large (260 objects), volume-limited single-dish survey of CO in normal local early-type galaxies. We find a surprisingly high detection rate of 22%, independent of luminosity and at best weakly dependent on environment. Second, the extent of the molecular gas is constrained with CO synthesis imaging, and a variety of morphologies is revealed. The kinematics of the molecular gas and stars are often misaligned, implying an external gas origin in over a third of the systems, although this behaviour is drastically diffferent between field and cluster environments. Third, many objects appear to be in the process of forming regular kpc-size decoupled disks, and a star formation sequence can be sketched by piecing together multi-wavelength information on the molecular gas, current star formation, and young stars. Last, early-type gala...

  8. Constraints on Feedback Processes during the Formation of Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, M.; Ferreras, I.; de La Rosa, I. G.; La Barbera, F.; de Carvalho, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this Letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.025, covering a stellar mass interval from 109 to 3 × 1011 M ⊙. Our sample features the characteristic "knee" in the surface brightness versus mass distribution at M sstarf ~ 3 × 1010 M ⊙ . We find a clear difference between the age and metallicity distributions of the stellar populations above and beyond this knee, which suggests a sudden transition from a constant, highly efficient mode of star formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing toward the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content at early times in comparison to the general population of galaxies, with half of the stars already in place by redshift z ~ 2 for all masses. The metallicity-age trend in low-mass galaxies is not compatible with infall of metal-poor gas, suggesting instead an outflow-driven relation.

  9. CONSTRAINTS ON FEEDBACK PROCESSES DURING THE FORMATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevisan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo/IAG, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferreras, I. [MSSL, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); De La Rosa, I. G. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); La Barbera, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); De Carvalho, R. R., E-mail: trevisan@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/MCT, S. J. dos Campos (Brazil)

    2012-06-20

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this Letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.025, covering a stellar mass interval from 10{sup 9} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Our sample features the characteristic 'knee' in the surface brightness versus mass distribution at M{sub *} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} . We find a clear difference between the age and metallicity distributions of the stellar populations above and beyond this knee, which suggests a sudden transition from a constant, highly efficient mode of star formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing toward the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content at early times in comparison to the general population of galaxies, with half of the stars already in place by redshift z {approx} 2 for all masses. The metallicity-age trend in low-mass galaxies is not compatible with infall of metal-poor gas, suggesting instead an outflow-driven relation.

  10. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramanarao Parasa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  11. Cosmological Simulations of Early Blackhole Formation: Halo Mergers, Tidal Disruption, and the Conditions for Direct Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Sunmyon; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is thought to be a promising path for the formation of supermassive blackholes in the early universe. We study conditions for the so-called direct collapse (DC) blackhole formation in a fully cosmological context. We combine a semi-analytic model of early galaxy formation with halo merger trees constructed from dark matter $N$-body simulations. We locate a total of 68 possible DC sites in a volume of $20\\;h^{-1}\\;\\mathrm{Mpc}$ on a side. We then perform hydrodynamics simulations for 42 selected halos to study in detail the evolution of the massive clouds within them. We find only two successful cases where the gas clouds rapidly collapse to form stars. In the other cases, gravitational collapse is prevented by the tidal force exerted by a nearby massive halo, which otherwise should serve as a radiation source necessary for DC. Ram pressure stripping disturbs the cloud approaching the source. In many cases, a DC halo and its nearby light source halo merg...

  12. Gastrointestinal migrating motor complex during early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ling; Bai Wenyuan; Ma Yongzhi; Gu Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the changes of gastrointestinal migrating motor complex (MMC) during the early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation. Methods: Totally 45 healthy adult guinea pigs were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups, that is, normal control, group B (1% cholesterol diet for 2 weeks) and group C (1% cholesterol diet for 4 weeks). Three pairs of silver electrodes were inserted into the gastric antrum, duodenum and jejunum of every animal respectively. Record of gastrointestinal MMC of these guinea pigs were recorded and analyzed.Gallbladder bile was taken to detect the formation of cholesterol gallstone. Results: There were only 29 guineapigs living. The MMC cycle time and the duration of phase Ⅱ were prolonged significantly and gradually compared with the control group (P<0.01), but the duration of phase Ⅲ became significantly and gradually shorter. Conclusion:During the early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation, the MMC cycle time and the duration of phase Ⅱ are prolonged and the duration of phase Ⅲ is shortened

  13. Metamorphic sole formation and early plate interface rheology: Insights from Griggs apparatus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Hirth, Greg; Yamato, Philippe; Ildefonse, Benoît; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500 m thick highly strained metamorphic rock units found beneath mylonitic banded peridotites at the base of large-scale ophiolites, as exemplified in Oman. Metamorphic soles are mainly composed of metabasalts deriving from the downgoing oceanic lithosphere and metamorphosed up to granulite-facies conditions by heat transfer from the mantle wedge. Pressure-temperature peak conditions are usually estimated at 1.0±0.2 GPa and 800±100°C. The absence of HP-LT metamorphism overprint implies that metamorphic soles have been formed and exhumed during subduction infancy. In this view, metamorphic soles were strongly deformed during their accretion to the mantle wedge (corresponding, now, to the base of the ophiolite). Therefore, metamorphic soles and banded peridotites are direct witnesses of the dynamics of early subduction zones, in terms of thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology evolution across the nascent slab interface. Based on fieldwork and EBSD analyses, we present a detailed (micro-) structural study performed on samples coming from the Sumeini window, the better-preserved cross-section of the metamorphic sole of Oman. Large differences are found in the deformation (CPO, grain size, aspect ratio) of clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase, related to mineralogical changes linked with the distance to the peridotite contact (e.g., hardening due to the appearance of garnet and clinopyroxene). To model the incipient slab interface in laboratory, we carried out 5 hydrostatic annealing and simple-shear experiments on Griggs solid-medium apparatus. Deformation experiments were conducted at axial strain rates of 10-6 s-1. Fine-grained amphibolite was synthetized by adding 1 wt.% water to a (Mid-Ocean Ridge) basalt powder as a proxy for the metamorphic sole (amphibole + plagioclase + clinopyroxene ± garnet assemblage). To synthetize garnet, 2 experiments were carried out in hydrostatic conditions and with deformation at

  14. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  15. A model for the evolution of the Earth's mantle structure since the Early Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Zhong, Shijie; Leng, Wei; Li, Zheng-Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Seismic tomography studies indicate that the Earth's mantle structure is characterized by African and Pacific seismically slow velocity anomalies (i.e., superplumes) and circum-Pacific seismically fast anomalies (i.e., a globally spherical harmonic degree 2 structure). However, the cause for and time evolution of the African and Pacific superplumes and the degree 2 mantle structure remain poorly understood with two competing proposals. First, the African and Pacific superplumes have remained largely unchanged for at least the last 300 Myr and possibly much longer. Second, the African superplume is formed sometime after the formation of Pangea (i.e., at 330 Ma) and the mantle in the African hemisphere is predominated by cold downwelling structures before and during the assembly of Pangea, while the Pacific superplume has been stable for the Pangea supercontinent cycle (i.e., globally a degree 1 structure before the Pangea formation). Here, we construct a proxy model of plate motions for the African hemisphere for the last 450 Myr since the Early Paleozoic using the paleogeographic reconstruction of continents constrained by paleomagnetic and geological observations. Coupled with assumed oceanic plate motions for the Pacific hemisphere, this proxy model for the plate motion history is used as time-dependent surface boundary condition in three-dimensional spherical models of thermochemical mantle convection to study the evolution of mantle structure, particularly the African mantle structure, since the Early Paleozoic. Our model calculations reproduce well the present-day mantle structure including the African and Pacific superplumes and generally support the second proposal with a dynamic cause for the superplume structure. Our results suggest that while the mantle in the African hemisphere before the assembly of Pangea is predominated by the cold downwelling structure resulting from plate convergence between Gondwana and Laurussia, it is unlikely that the bulk of

  16. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakravarty

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U and bound (B forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA, secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69% of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered residues in the U form which are observed (ordered in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  17. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in composite structure design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The gains in structural efficiency are investigated that can be achieved by aligning the fibers in some or all of the layers in a laminate with the principal stress directions in those layers. The name curvilinear fiber format is given to this idea. The problem studied is a plate with a central circular hole subjected to a uniaxial tensile load. An iteration scheme is used to find the fiber directions at each point in the laminate. Two failure criteria are used to evaluate the tensile load capacity of the plates with a curvilinear format, and for comparison, counterpart plates with a conventional straightline fiber format. The curvilinear designs for improved tensile capacity are then checked for buckling resistance. It is concluded that gains in efficiency can be realized with the curvilinear format.

  18. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  19. CdiGMP signaling at early stages of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Xian, Wujing; Utada, Andrew; Wong, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm communities on surfaces constitute an important physiological state of bacteria. CdiGMP is a secondary messenger that has recently emerged as a master regulator of biofilm behavior. It has been shown that cdiGMP can affect bacterial adhesion, motility and exopolysaccharides production, which are important in regulating biofilm formation. However, at a single cell level, the details of how cdiGMP regulate bacterial behavior are largely unknown. Here we examine the dynamics of intracellular cdiGMP levels at early stages of biofilm in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, by using cell tracking techniques. We show that cells with different cdiGMP levels play different roles in the microcolony development at early stages of biofilm. The correlation between Psl and cdiGMP levels is also investigated.

  20. Sponge spicules in phosphorites of the Early Cambrian Gezhongwu Formation, Zhijin, Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ruidong; QIAN Yi; ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Weihua; JIANG Lijun; GAO Hui

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorites occurring at the bottom of the Cambrian system contain abundant small shelly fossils, which are the product of the first episode of life explosion in the Cambrian. It was previously reported that the small shelly fossils are dominated by hyolithids, olivooids, zhijinitids, conodontomorphs, yubelichitids, camenitids and algae, with minor amounts of sponge fossils. Large amounts of sponge spicules, diverse in form, have been found for the first time in the Gezhongwu Formation phosphorites at Shixing, Zhijin County, Guizhou Province, of which such spicules as diaxon-triactins, diaxon-tetractins, pentaxon-pentactins and hexon-hexactins account for 30%. These spicules constitute the sponge clastic phosphorites made up of sponge clastics. Meanwhile, it is also expected that the radiation and diversity of sponge animals started as early as in the earliest Early Cambrian. Habit and burying environment of sponge animal are discussed in the paper.

  1. Influence of Interleukin-1 Beta on Platelet-Poor Plasma Clot Formation: A Potential Impact on Early Bone Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Hematoma quality (especially the fibrin matrix plays an important role in the bone healing process. Here, we investigated the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β on fibrin clot formation from platelet-poor plasma (PPP.Five-milliliter of rat whole-blood samples were collected from the hepatic portal vein. All blood samples were firstly standardized via a thrombelastograph (TEG, blood cell count, and the measurement of fibrinogen concentration. PPP was prepared by collecting the top two-fifths of the plasma after centrifugation under 400 × g for 10 min at 20°C. The effects of IL-1β cytokines on artificial fibrin clot formation from PPP solutions were determined by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, confocal microscopy (CM, turbidity, and clot lysis assays.The lag time for protofibril formation was markedly shortened in the IL-1β treatment groups (243.8 ± 76.85 in the 50 pg/mL of IL-1β and 97.5 ± 19.36 in the 500 pg/mL of IL-1β compared to the control group without IL-1β (543.8 ± 205.8. Maximal turbidity was observed in the control group. IL-1β (500 pg/mL treatment significantly decreased fiber diameters resulting in smaller pore sizes and increased density of the fibrin clot structure formed from PPP (P < 0.05. The clot lysis assay revealed that 500 pg/mL IL-1β induced a lower susceptibility to dissolution due to the formation of thinner and denser fibers.IL-1β can significantly influence PPP fibrin clot structure, which may affect the early bone healing process.

  2. Formation and Structure of Low Density Exo-Neptunes

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Leslie A; Lissauer, Jack J; Seager, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Kepler has found hundreds of Neptune-size (2-6 R_Earth) planet candidates within 0.5 AU of their stars. The nature of the vast majority of these planets is not known because their masses have not been measured. Using theoretical models of planet formation, evolution and structure, we explore the range of minimum plausible masses for low-density exo-Neptunes. We focus on highly irradiated planets with T_eq>=500K. We consider two separate formation pathways for low-mass planets with voluminous atmospheres of light gases: core nucleated accretion and outgassing of hydrogen from dissociated ices. We show that Neptune-size planets at T_eq=500K with masses as small as a few times that of Earth can plausibly be formed core nucleated accretion coupled with subsequent inward migration. We also derive a limiting low-density mass-radius relation for rocky planets with outgassed hydrogen envelopes but no surface water. Rocky planets with outgassed hydrogen envelopes typically have computed radii well below 3 R_Earth. For...

  3. Nano-sized Adsorbate Structure Formation in Anisotropic Multilayer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Yanovsky, Vladimir V.

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we study dynamics of adsorbate island formation in a model plasma-condensate system numerically. We derive the generalized reaction-diffusion model for adsorptive multilayer system by taking into account anisotropy in transfer of adatoms between neighbor layers induced by electric field. It will be found that with an increase in the electric field strength, a structural transformation from nano-holes inside adsorbate matrix toward separated nano-sized adsorbate islands on a substrate is realized. Dynamics of adsorbate island sizes and corresponding distributions are analyzed in detail. This study provides an insight into details of self-organization of adatoms into nano-sized adsorbate islands in anisotropic multilayer plasma-condensate systems.

  4. Cosmological constraints on the radiation released during structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena, David; Marra, Valerio

    2016-11-01

    During the process of structure formation in the universe matter is converted into radiation through a variety of processes such as light from stars, infrared radiation from cosmic dust, and gravitational waves from binary black holes/neutron stars and supernova explosions. The production of this astrophysical radiation background (ARB) could affect the expansion rate of the universe and the growth of perturbations. Here, we aim at understanding to which level one can constraint the ARB using future cosmological observations. We model the energy transfer from matter to radiation through an effective interaction between matter and astrophysical radiation. Using future supernova data from large synoptic survey telescope and growth-rate data from Euclid we find that the ARB density parameter is constrained, at the 95% confidence level, to be Ω_{ar_0}exotic or not-well understood sources of radiation.

  5. Cosmological constraints on the radiation released during structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, David Camarena

    2016-01-01

    During the process of structure formation in the universe matter is converted into radiation through a variety of processes such as light from stars, infrared radiation from cosmic dust and gravitational waves from binary black holes/neutron stars and supernova explosions. The production of this astrophysical radiation background (ARB) could affect the expansion rate of the universe and the growth of perturbations. Here, we aim at understanding to which level one can constraint the ARB using future cosmological observations. We model the energy transfer from matter to radiation through an effective interaction between matter and astrophysical radiation. Using future supernova data from LSST and growth-rate data from Euclid we find that the ARB density parameter is constrained, at the 95% confidence level, to be $\\Omega_{ar_0}<0.008$. Estimates of the energy density produced by well-known astrophysical processes give roughly $\\Omega_{ar_0}\\sim 10^{-6}$. Therefore, we conclude that cosmological observations ...

  6. Structural modification in the formation of starch – silver nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal, E-mail: perumal.ramasamy@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science and Technology, A.C.Tech. Campus, Anna University, Chennai – 600 025 (India); Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polymer based nanocomposites have gained wide applications in field of battery technology. Starch is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with sustainable properties such as biodegradable, non toxic, excellent film forming capacity and it also act as reducing agent for the metal nanoparticles. In our research various concentration of silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) was added to the starch solution and films were obtained using solution casting method. Surface electron microscope (SEM) of the films shows modifications depending upon the concentration of AgNO{sub 3}. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that addition of silver nitrate modifies the starch to disc like structures and with increasing the AgNO{sub 3} concentration leads to the formation of fractals. This research could benefit battery technology where solid polymer membranes using starch is used.

  7. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  8. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Feldbrugge, Job; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zeldovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  9. Structural modification in the formation of starch - silver nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Aswal, V. K.; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2016-05-01

    Polymer based nanocomposites have gained wide applications in field of battery technology. Starch is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with sustainable properties such as biodegradable, non toxic, excellent film forming capacity and it also act as reducing agent for the metal nanoparticles. In our research various concentration of silver nitrate (AgNO3) was added to the starch solution and films were obtained using solution casting method. Surface electron microscope (SEM) of the films shows modifications depending upon the concentration of AgNO3. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that addition of silver nitrate modifies the starch to disc like structures and with increasing the AgNO3 concentration leads to the formation of fractals. This research could benefit battery technology where solid polymer membranes using starch is used.

  10. Cosmological parameter dependence in local string theories of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Copeland, E J; Steer, D A; Magueijo, Joao

    2000-01-01

    We perform the most accurate study to date of the dependence on cosmological parameters of structure formation with local cosmic strings. The crucial new ingredients are the inclusion of the effects of gravitational backreaction on the evolution of the network, and the accurate evolution of the network through the radiation to matter transition. Our work re-iterates the fact that expanding Universe numerical simulations only probe a transient regime, and we incorporate our results into the unequal time correlators recently measured. We then compute the CMB and CDM fluctuations' power spectra for various values of the Hubble constant $H_0$ and baryon fraction $\\Omega_b$. We find that, whereas the dependence on $\\Omega_b$ is negligible, there is still a strong dependence on $H_0$.

  11. Structure formation in a $\\Lambda$ $viscous$ CDM universe

    CERN Document Server

    Velten, Hermano; Fabris, Júlio C; Casarini, Luciano; Batista, Ronaldo C

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of dark matter being a dissipative component represents an option for the standard view where cold dark matter (CDM) particles behave on large scales as an ideal fluid. By including a physical mechanism to the dark matter description like viscosity we construct a more realistic model for the universe. Also, the known small scale pathologies of the standard CDM model either disappear or become less severe. We study clustering properties of a $\\Lambda$CDM-like model in which dark matter is described as a bulk viscous fluid. The linear power spectrum, the nonlinear spherical "top hat" collapse and the mass functions are presented. We use the analysis with such structure formation tools in order to place an upper bound on the magnitude of the dark matter's viscosity.

  12. Halo formation and evolution: unification of structure and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Allan D.; Collins, Matthew P.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of matter in the universe proliferates a wide variety of halo structures, often with enigmatic consequences. Giant spiral galaxies, for example, contain both dark matter and hot gas, while dwarf spheroidal galaxies, with weaker gravity, contain much larger fractions of dark matter, but little gas. Globular clusters, superficially resembling these dwarf spheroidals, have little or no dark matter. Halo temperatures are also puzzling: hot cluster halos contain cooler galaxy halos; dwarf galaxies have no hot gas at all despite their similar internal processes. Another mystery is the origin of the gas that galaxies require to maintain their measured star formation rates (SFRs). We outline how gravitational quantum theory solves these problems, and enables baryons to function as weakly-interacting-massive-particles (WIMPs) in Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory. Significantly, these dark-baryon ensembles may also be consistent with primordial nucleosynthesis (BBN) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies.

  13. Suppression of star formation in early-type galaxies by feedback from supermassive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kaviraj, Sugata; Yi, Sukyoung K; Boselli, Alessandro; Barlow, Tom; Conrow, Tim; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Chris; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Tim; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, Alex

    2006-08-24

    Detailed high-resolution observations of the innermost regions of nearby galaxies have revealed the presence of supermassive black holes. These black holes may interact with their host galaxies by means of 'feedback' in the form of energy and material jets; this feedback affects the evolution of the host and gives rise to observed relations between the black hole and the host. Here we report observations of the ultraviolet emissions of massive early-type galaxies. We derive an empirical relation for a critical black-hole mass (as a function of velocity dispersion) above which the outflows from these black holes suppress star formation in their hosts by heating and expelling all available cold gas. Supermassive black holes are negligible in mass compared to their hosts but nevertheless seem to play a critical role in the star formation history of galaxies.

  14. Berkeley Prize: Mapping the Fuel for Star Formation in Early Universe Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas, which is relatively rare in galaxies like the Milky Way, which form only a few new stars per year. Massive galaxies in the distant universe formed stars much more rapidly. Was star formation more efficient in the past, and/or were early galaxies richer in molecular gas? The answer was elusive when our instruments could probe molecules only in the most luminous and rare objects such as mergers and quasars. But a new survey of molecular gas in typical massive star-forming galaxies at redshifts from about 1.2 to 2.3 (corresponding to when the universe was 24% to 40% of its current age) reveals that distant star-forming galaxies were indeed molecular-gas rich and that the star-formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch.

  15. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, S; Ciotti, L

    2015-01-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae and the thermalization of stellar motions. High resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. In a recent numerical investigation we found that subsequent generations of stars are formed in this cold disc; this process consumes most of the cold gas, leaving at the present epoch cold masses comparable to those observed. Most of the new stellar mass formed a few Gyrs ago, and resides in a disc.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Transport and Structural Formation in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1999-06-01

    The book under review is one of a series of monographs on plasma physics published by the Institute of Physics under the editorship of Peter Stott and Hans Wilhelmsson. It is nicely produced and is aimed at research workers and advanced students of both laboratory (i.e. tokamak plasmas) and astrophysical plasma physics. The authors are prolific contributors to the subject of plasma turbulence and transport with a well-defined message: ``The authors' view is that the plasma structure, fluctuations and turbulent transport are continually regulating each other and, in addition, that the structural formation and structural transition of plasmas are typical of the physics of far from equilibrium systems. The book presents and explains why the plasma inhomogeneity is the ordering parameter governing transport and how self-sustained fluctuations can be driven through subcritical excitation even beyond linear instability''. This point of view is expounded in 24 chapters, including topics such as transport phenomena in toroidal plasmas (Chapters 2-4), low frequency modes and instabilities of confined systems (Chapters 5-7), renormalization (Chapter 8), self-sustained turbulence due to the current diffusive mode and resistive effects (Chapters 9-11), subcritical turbulence and numerical simulations (Chapters 12-14), scale invariance arguments (Chapter 15), electric field effects (Chapters 17-21) and self-organized dynamics (Chapter 22). The material is essentially drawn from the authors' many and varied original contributions to the plasma turbulence and transport literature. Whatever view one might have about the merits of this work, there is little doubt in this reviewer's mind that it is indeed thought-provoking and presents a worthy intellectual challenge to plasma theorists and experimentalists alike. The authors take a consistent stance and discuss the issues from their own standpoint. They observe that the plasmas one encounters in practice (for definiteness, the

  17. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C. [CASA, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cyganowski, C. J., E-mail: kendrew@mpia.de [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ∼10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ∼10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  18. Cyclic architecture of a carbonate sequence, early Aptian Shuaiba formation, Al Huwaisah field, Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetsch, J. (Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    1993-09-01

    Sequence stratigraphy of carbonates is a topic of ongoing controversy. In particular, small-scale shallowing-upward cycles can provide some key information needed for interpretation of carbonate sequences and/or third-order sea level changes. The early Aptian Shuaiba Formation in the Al Huwaisah field consists of about 90 m of shallow-water limestones. Throughout the formation, an overall decreasing influx of fine detritus is notable toward the top. The sequence can be subdivided into a basal unit and an overlying unit. Both units are composed of meter-scale shallowing-upward cycles of different composition, which can be recognized in core and well logs. Fourier analysis of the first principle component of a set of well logs (GR, FDC, CNL, Sonic) revealed an abrupt change in spectral behavior between the two units. Toward the top, the spectra are [open quotes]cleaning upward[close quotes] with an increasing pronunciation of a peak grouping of 1: 2: 5, suggesting a better preservation of orbital variations in the upper unit. Preservation of orbital forcing in shallowing-upward cycles requires rapid rates of sedimentation. In addition, increased shallow-water carbonate production on the platform is indicated by the appearance of reefal organisms. Hence, a higher rate of sedimentation and therefore a faster aggradation of the platform is inferred for the upper unit, which could have resulted from an increased rate of relative sea level rise. The sudden facies differentiation on the broad Arabian shelf in the upper part of the early Aptian reflects the development of an intrashelf basin. Changes in rate of relative sea level rise on the Arabian shelf might explain the repeated alternation from an easily correlatable ramp-type sedimentation, with slightly higher input of fine terrigenous sediment (e.g., lower unit of Shuaiba Formation) and a differentiation into platform and intrashelf basin facies due to faster aggradation (e.g., upper unit of Shuaiba Formation).

  19. Cosmological Structure Formation Shocks and Cosmic Rays in Hydrodynamical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrommer, C.; Springel, V.; Enβlin, T. A.; Jubelgas, M.

    Cosmological shock waves during structure formation not only play a decisive role for the thermalization of gas in virializing structures but also for the acceleration of relativistic cosmic rays (CRs) through diffusive shock acceleration. We discuss a novel numerical treatment of the physics of cosmic rays in combination with a formalism for identifying and measuring the shock strength on-the-fly during a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation. In our methodology, the non-thermal CR population is treated self-consistently in order to assess its dynamical impact on the thermal gas as well as other implications on cosmological observables. Using this formalism, we study the history of the thermalization process in high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of the Lambda cold dark matter model. Collapsed cosmological structures are surrounded by shocks with high Mach numbers up to 1000, but they play only a minor role in the energy balance of thermalization. However, this finding has important consequences for our understanding of the spatial distribution of CRs in the large-scale structure. In high resolution simulations of galaxy clusters, we find a low contribution of the averaged CR pressure, due to the small acceleration efficiency of lower Mach numbers of flow shocks inside halos and the softer adiabatic index of CRs. These effects disfavour CRs when a composite of thermal gas and CRs is adiabatically compressed. However, within cool core regions, the CR pressure reaches equipartition with the thermal pressure leading, to a lower effective adiabatic index and thus to an enhanced compressibility of the central intracluster medium. This effect increases the central density and pressure of the cluster, and thus the resulting X-ray emission and the central Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux decrement. The integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, however, is only slightly changed.

  20. The Formation and Early Evolution of a CME and the Associated Shock on 2014 January 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Linfeng; Cheng, Xin; Shi, Tong; Su, Wei; Ding, Mingde

    2017-08-01

    We study the formation and early evolution of a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) and its associated shock wave that occurred on 2014 January 8. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by AIA on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} disclose that the CME first appears as a bubble-like structure. Subsequently, its expansion forms the CME and causes a quasi-circular EUV wave. Both the CME and the wave front are clearly visible at all of the AIA EUV passbands. Through a detailed kinematical analysis, it is found that the expansion of the CME undergoes two phases: a first phase with a strong but transient lateral over-expansion followed by a second phase with a self-similar expansion. The temporal evolution of the expansion velocity coincides very well with the variation of the 25--50 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux of the associated flare, which indicates that magnetic reconnection most likely plays an important role in driving the expansion. Moreover, we find that, when the velocity of the CME reaches $\\sim$600 km s$^{-1}$, the EUV wave starts to evolve into a shock wave, which is evidenced by the appearance of a type II radio burst. Interestingly, we also notice an unusual solar radio signal at $\\sim$4 GHz that is similar to the pattern of a type II radio burst but drifts to higher frequencies at a rate of $\\sim$0.3 MHz per second during about 7 minutes. Its derived density is $\\sim$5$\\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ and increases slowly with time. Joint imaging observations of HXR and EUV help to locate the loop-top region and calculate its thermal proprieties, including slowly increasing densities ($\\sim$5$\\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$) and temperatures ($\\sim$14 MK). The similar results obtained from two different ways above imply the possibility of this scenario: plasma blobs that are ejected along the current sheet via magnetic reconnection collide with underlying flare loops that are undergoing chromospheric evaporation. Finally, we also study the thermal

  1. Cosmological Structure Formation with Augmented Lagrangian Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu

    2012-01-01

    We present a new fast and efficient approach to model structure formation with aug- mented Lagrangian perturbation theory (ALPT). Our method is based on splitting the dis- placement field into a long and a short range component. The long range component is computed by second order LPT (2LPT). This approximation contains a tidal nonlocal and nonlinear term. Unfortunately, 2LPT fails on small scales due to severe shell crossing and a crude quadratic behaviour in the low density regime. The spherical collapse (SC) approximation has been recently reported to correct for both effects by adding an ideal collapse truncation. However, this approach fails to reproduce the structures on large scales where it is significantly less correlated with the N-body result than 2LPT or linear LPT (the Zeldovich approximation). We propose to combine both approximations using for the short range displacement field the SC solution. A Gaussian filter with a smoothing radius r_S is used to separate between both regimes. We use the re...

  2. K-mouflage Cosmology: Formation of Large-Scale Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We study structure formation in K-mouflage cosmology whose main feature is the absence of screening effect on quasi-linear scales. We show that the growth of structure at the linear level is both affected by a new time dependent Newton constant and a friction term which depend on the background evolution. These combine with the modified background evolution to change the growth rate by up to ten percent since $z\\sim 2$. At the one loop level, we find that the non-linearities of the K-mouflage models are mostly due to the matter dynamics and that the scalar perturbations can be treated at tree level. We also study the spherical collapse in K-mouflage models and show that the critical density contrast deviates from its $\\Lambda$-CDM value and that, as a result, the halo mass function is modified for large masses by an order one factor. Finally we consider the deviation of the matter spectrum from $\\Lambda$-CDM on non-linear scales where a halo model is utilised. We find that the discrepancy peaks around $1\\ h{\\...

  3. Family structure and the transition to early parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferth, Sandra L; Goldscheider, Frances

    2010-05-01

    With the rise in out-of-wedlock childbearing and divorce in the last quarter of the twentieth century, an increasing proportion of children have been exposed to a variety of new family forms. Little research has focused on the consequences of childhood family structure for men's transition to fatherhood or on the family processes that account for the effects of family structure on the likelihood that young women and men become first-time unmarried parents, what we now call "fragile families." The data come from the linked Children and Young Adult samples of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), which provide information on the children of the women of the NLSY79 from birth until they enter young adulthood. Females growing up with a single parent and males experiencing an unstable family transition to parenthood early, particularly to nonresidential fatherhood for males. For males, the effects are strongly mediated by parenting processes and adolescent behaviors and are shaped by economic circumstances. Having experienced multiple transitions as a child is associated with a reduced likelihood that males father their first child within marriage and an increased likelihood that they become fathers within cohabitation, demonstrating how changes in family structure alter family structure patterns over time and generations.

  4. The educative prevention of the early stage of educationist’s formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Alfonso Nazco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a characterization of the educative prevention stage at the early professional formation process of educacionist in Sancti Spìritus province. The study is done by the indication analysis of assistant, learning, permanence and behavior at youths who course pedagogical carrers, and haven’t expressed a desire stage yet. The main shown results dealt with the assumption of the searching variables and its indicators, the construction of instruments and the definition of aspects concerning the educative prevention at the early stage of educationist’s formation in the selected choosing. Theoretical, empirical and statistical- math, methods were used which were helped by the constructed instruments and the triangulations among them thus arriving to generalizations for the caracterization. The results have better the work at the area project of the educative prevention in adolescents and youths in the territory, witch mainly concern the desing and implementation of actions withing the pedagogical process, foccuse in the integration of institutions, socializer and educative agents functioning to eductive prevention.

  5. Constraints on feedback processes during the formation of early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, Marina; de la Rosa, Ignacio; La Barbera, Francesco; de Carvalho, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and the high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from SDSS-DR7 over the redshift range 0.01formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing towards the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content...

  6. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-02-12

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation.

  7. Nucleobase and amino acid formation through impacts of meteorites on the early ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks on the prebiotic Earth was the first crucial step for the origins of life. Extraterrestrial delivery of intact amino acids and nucleobases is the prevailing hypothesis for their availability on prebiotic Earth because of the difficulties associated with the production of these organics from terrestrial carbon and nitrogen sources under plausible prebiotic conditions. However, the variety and amounts of these intact organics delivered by meteorites would have been limited. Previous shock-recovery experiments have demonstrated that meteorite impact reactions could have generated organics on the prebiotic Earth. Here, we report on the simultaneous formation of nucleobases (cytosine and uracil) found in DNA and/or RNA, various proteinogenic amino acids (glycine, alanine, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, valine, leucine, isoleucine, and proline), non-proteinogenic amino acids, and aliphatic amines in experiments simulating reactions induced by extraterrestrial objects impacting on the early oceans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the formation of nucleobases from inorganic materials by shock conditions. In these experiments, bicarbonate was used as the carbon source. Bicarbonate, which is a common dissolved carbon species in CO2-rich atmospheric conditions, was presumably the most abundant carbon species in the early oceans and in post-impact plumes. Thus, the present results expand the possibility that impact-induced reactions generated various building blocks for life on prebiotic Earth in large quantities through the use of terrestrial carbon reservoirs.

  8. Resonance Raman spectroscopic measurements delineate the structural changes that occur during tau fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Milán-Garcés, Erix A; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2014-10-21

    The aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein, tau, into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases such as the tauopathies and Alzheimer's disease. Since monomeric tau is an intrinsically disordered protein and the polymeric fibrils possess an ordered cross-β core, the aggregation process is known to involve substantial conformational conversion besides growth. The aggregation mechanism of tau in the presence of inducers such as heparin, deciphered using probes such as thioflavin T/S fluorescence, light scattering, and electron microscopy assays, has been shown to conform to ligand-induced nucleation-dependent polymerization. These probes do not, however, distinguish between the processes of conformational conversion and fibril growth. In this study, UV resonance Raman spectroscopy is employed to look directly at signatures of changes in secondary structure and side-chain packing during fibril formation by the four repeat functional domain of tau in the presence of the inducer heparin, at pH 7 and at 37 °C. Changes in the positions and intensities of the amide Raman bands are shown to occur in two distinct stages during the fibril formation process. The first stage of UVRR spectral changes corresponds to the transformation of monomer into early fibrillar aggregates. The second stage corresponds to the transformation of these early fibrillar aggregates into the final, ordered, mature fibrils and during this stage; the processes of conformational conversion and the consolidation of the fibril core occur simultaneously. Delineation of these secondary structural changes accompanying the formation of tau fibrils holds significance for the understanding of generic and tau-specific principles of amyloid assembly.

  9. Star formation associated with neutral hydrogen in the outskirts of early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yldz, Mustafa K.; Serra, Paolo; Peletier, Reynier F.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2016-09-01

    About 20 percent of all nearby early-type galaxies (M⋆ ≳ ~6~ × 109~M⊙) outside the Virgo cluster are surrounded by a disc or ring of low-column-density neutral hydrogen (H I) gas with typical radii of tens of kpc, much larger than the stellar body. In order to understand the impact of these gas reservoirs on the host galaxies, we analyse the distribution of star formation out to large radii as a function of H I properties using GALEX UV and SDSS optical images. Our sample consists of 18 H I-rich galaxies as well as 55 control galaxies where no H I has been detected. In half of the H I-rich galaxies the radial UV profile changes slope at the position of the H I radial profile peak. To study the stellar populations, we calculate the FUV-NUV and UV-optical colours in two apertures, 1-3 and 3-10 Reff. We find that H I-rich galaxies are on average 0.5 and 0.8 mag bluer than the H I-poor ones, respectively. This indicates that a significant fraction of the UV emission traces recent star formation and is associated with the H I gas. Using FUV emission as a proxy for star formation, we estimate the integrated star formation rate in the outer regions (R > 1Reff) to be on average ˜ 6× 10-3 M⊙~yr-1 for the H I-rich galaxies. This rate is too low to build a substantial stellar disc and, therefore, change the morphology of the host. We find that the star formation efficiency and the gas depletion time are similar to those at the outskirts of spirals.

  10. A large parasitengonid mite (Acari, Erythraeoidea from the Early Cretaceous Crato Formation of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Dunlop

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A new large, fossil mite (Arachnida: Acari, Pararainbowia martilli n. gen. n. sp., is described from the Early Cretaceous (Aptian Crato Formation from Ceará State, Brazil. It is assigned to the Cohort Parasitengona and the superfamily Erythraeoidea, some extant members of which can reach up to seven millimetres in body length. Given that doubts have been raised about the identity of putative Crato feather mite eggs, this new fossil represents the first unequivocal record of Acari from the Crato Formation, the first non-amber record of an erythraeoid mite and the oldest named example of this superfamily. Fossil erythraeoids from Mesozoic and Tertiary ambers are briefly reviewed – including a widely overlooked Late Cretaceous species – with comments on Mesozoic mites in general. Thirteen Baltic amber erythraeoids have been formally described, but much unstudied material from various amber sources remains. Ein neues großes Milbenfossil (Arachnida: Acari, Pararainbowia martilli n. gen. n. sp., wird aus der Crato Formation (Unterkreide, Aptium des Ceará Gebietes in Brasilien beschrieben. Es wird der Kohorte Parasitengona und der Überfamilie Erythraeoidea zugeordnet; die modernen Vertreter erreichen eine Körperlänge bis zu sieben mm. Weil die Identität von Federmilbeneiern aus der Crato Formation in Frage gestellt wurde, ist dieser Neufund der erste klare Hinweis von Acari aus der Crato Formation. Es ist die erste erythraeoide Milbe, die nicht aus dem Bernstein stammt sowie das älteste genannte Beispiel dieser Überfamilie. Fossile erythraeoide Milben aus dem Bernstein des Mesozoikum und des Tertiärs werden kurz zusammengefasst – u. a. eine weitgehend übersehene Art aus der Oberkreide – mit allgemeinen Anmerkungen zu den mesozoischen Milben. Dreizehn erythraeoide Milbenarten sind aus dem baltischen Bernstein genannt und beschrieben worden, aber weiteres unbearbeitetes Material von verschiedenen Bernstein-Fundpunkten liegt noch vor

  11. Alveolar Ridge Conservation by Early Bone Formation After Tooth Extraction in Rabbits. A Histomorphological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantín, Mario; Olate, Sergio; Fuentes, Ramón; Vásquez, Bélgica

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Alveolar ridge volume loss is an irreversible process. To prevent this physiological event, which typically result in significant local anatomical changes in both the horizontal and the vertical dimension, some strategies are indicated to minimize the loss of ridge volume that typically follows tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if three different bone grafts could promote new bone formation in the alveolar socket following tooth extraction for the alveolar ridge conservation. First mandibular molars of male adults rabbits were extracted and the extraction sockets were randomly treated with three different bone grafts, one xenograft and two alloplastic grafts, and a group that received no treatment (blood clot). The extraction sockets of selected rabbits from each group were evaluated at 4, 6, or 8-week post-extraction. The results indicated that the extraction sockets treated with alloplastic graft (biphasic calcium phosphate) exhibited lamellar bone formation (6.5%) as early as four weeks after the extraction was performed. Moreover, the degree of new bone formation was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the extraction sockets treated with biphasic calcium phosphate at 8-week post-extraction than that in the other study groups. In this study, we demonstrated that the proposed animal model is useful to evaluate the bone formation after tooth extraction and the alveolar ridge conservation is feasible. The new bone formation and alveolar ridge preservation with bone graft after extraction of molar teeth, could result in the maintenance of sufficient bone volume to place an implant in an ideal restorative position without the need for ancillary implant site development procedures. PMID:27840551

  12. Star formation associated with neutral hydrogen in the outskirts of early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Mustafa K.; Serra, Paolo; Peletier, Reynier F.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    About 20 per cent of all nearby early-type galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 6 × 109 M⊙) outside the Virgo cluster are surrounded by a disc or ring of low-column-density neutral hydrogen (H I) gas with typical radii of tens of kpc, much larger than the stellar body. In order to understand the impact of these gas reservoirs on the host galaxies, we analyse the distribution of star formation out to large radii as a function of H I properties using GALEX UV and SDSS optical images. Our sample consists of 18 H I-rich galaxies as well as 55 control galaxies where no H I has been detected. In half of the H I-rich galaxies, the radial UV profile changes slope at the position of the H I radial profile peak. To study the stellar populations, we calculate the FUV-NUV and UV-optical colours in two apertures, 1-3 and 3-10 Reff. We find that H I-rich galaxies are on average 0.5 and 0.8 mag bluer than the H I-poor ones, respectively. This indicates that a significant fraction of the UV emission traces recent star formation and is associated with the H I gas. Using FUV emission as a proxy for star formation, we estimate the integrated star formation rate in the outer regions (R > 1Reff) to be on average ˜6 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 for the H I-rich galaxies. This rate is too low to build a substantial stellar disc and, therefore, change the morphology of the host. We find that the star formation efficiency and the gas depletion time are similar to those at the outskirts of spirals.

  13. Dolomitization in Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Platform Carbonates (Berdiga Formation), Ayralaksa Yayla (Trabzon), NE Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Merve; Ziya Kırmacı, Mehmet; Kandemir, Raif

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Pontides constitute an E-W trending orogenic mountain belt that extends about 1100 km along the northern side of Turkey from the immediate east of Istanbul to the Georgian border at the east. Tectono-stratigraphically, the Pontides are divided into three different parts: Eastern, Central, and Western Pontides. The Eastern Pontides, including the studied area, comprise an area of 500 km in length and 100 km in width, extending along the southeast coast of the Black Sea from the Kizilirmak and Yesilirmak Rivers in the vicinity of Samsun to the Little Caucasus. This area is bordered by the Eastern Black Sea basin to the north and the Ankara-Erzincan Neotethyan suture zone to the south. The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous platform carbonates are widely exposed in E-W direction in the Eastern Pontides (NE Turkey). The Platform carbonates shows varying lithofacies changing from supratidal to platform margin reef laterally and vertically, and was buried until the end of Late Cretaceous. The studied Ayralaksa Yayla (Trabzon, NE Turkey) area comprises one of the best typical exposures of formation in northern zone of Eastern Pontides. In this area, the lower parts of the formation are pervasively dolomitized by fabric-destructive and fabric-preserving replacement dolomite which are Ca-rich and nonstoichiometric (Ca56-66Mg34-44). Replacement dolomites (Rd) are represented by D18O values of -19.0 to -4.2 (VPDB), D13C values of 4.4 to 2.1 \\permil (VPDB) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70889 to 0.70636. Petrographic and geochemical data indicate that Rd dolomites are formed prior to compaction at shallow-moderate burial depths from Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous seawater and/or partly modified seawater as a result of water/rock interaction and they were recrystallized at elevated temperatures during subsequent burial. In the subsequent diagenetic process during the Late Cretaceous when the region became a magmatic arc, as a result of interaction with Early Jurassic volcanic

  14. New discoveries of early Paleocene (Torrejonian) primates from the Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silcox, Mary T; Williamson, Thomas E

    2012-12-01

    Primates underwent a period of diversification following the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs. Although the Order first appeared near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, it is not until the Torrejonian (the second North American Land Mammal Age of the Paleocene) that a diversity of families began to emerge. One of the lithological units critical to understanding this first primate adaptive radiation is the early Paleocene Nacimiento Formation of the San Juan Basin (SJB; New Mexico). Primates previously described from this formation comprise six species of palaechthonid and paromomyid plesiadapiforms, all known from very limited material. Collecting has increased the sample of primate specimens more than fivefold. Included in the new sample is the first specimen of a picrodontid plesiadapiform from the Torrejonian of the SJB, referable to Picrodus calgariensis, and the first paromomyid specimen complete enough to allow for a species level taxonomic assignment, representing a new species of Paromomys. With respect to the 'Palaechthonidae', the current report describes large collections of Torrejonia wilsoni and Palaechthon woodi, and the first new specimens attributed to Plesiolestes nacimienti and Anasazia williamsoni since 1972 and 1994, respectively. These collections demonstrate previously unknown morphological variants, including the presence of a metaconid on the p4 of some specimens of T. wilsoni, a discovery that supports previous inferences about a close relationship between Torrejonia and Plesiolestes problematicus. This new sample considerably improves our knowledge of the poorly understood 'Palaechthonidae', and about the biostratigraphy, biogeography, and early evolution of North American primates. In particular, the rarity of paromomyids, the continuing absence of plesiadapid and carpolestid plesiadapiforms, and the presence of a number of endemic palaechthonid species in the SJB contrast with plesiadapiform samples from contemporaneous deposits to the

  15. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two when the time delay between the sulphuric acid and particle number concentration is taken into account. From the time delay the growth rates of freshly nucleated particles from 1 nm to 3 nm were determined. The mean growth rate was 1.2 nm/h and it was clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration. We tested two nucleation mechanisms – recently proposed cluster activation and kinetic type nucleation – as possible candidates to explain the observed dependences, and determined experimental nucleation coefficients. We found that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are the same order of magnitude as chemical reaction coefficients in the gas phase and they correlate with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation.

  16. Leveraging Somali Basin Magnetic Anomalies to Constrain Gondwana Breakup and Early Indian Ocean Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. K.; Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Somali Basin, found between the Horn of Africa and Madagascar was formed during the rifting of East and West Gondwana. Understanding the evolution of the basin has historically been hindered by enigmatic seafloor fabric and an apparent paucity of magnetic anomaly data. Recent iterations of satellite gravity data have revealed nearly complete fracture zones as well as a distinct extinct spreading ridge within the basin. Through a thorough compilation of available Somali Basin shiptrack profiles, we have been able to successfully model and interpret magnetic anomalies with exceptional detail. This complication is unrivaled in completeness and provides unprecedented insight into basin formation. Using this high quality data, we have interpreted magnetic anomalies M0r (120.8 Ma) to M24Bn (152.43 Ma) about the extinct ridge. The interpreted Somali Basin spreading rate and spreading direction, through anomaly M15n (135.76 Ma), are similar to those observed in the neighboring coeval Mozambique Basin. This similarity suggests that East Gondwana separated from West Gondwana as a cohesive unit, and that the internal rifting of East Gondwana began later around 135 Ma. Our magnetic anomaly interpretations have been combined with additional magnetic interpretations from around the Indian Ocean to build a regionally consistent plate model of Gondwana breakup and early Indian Ocean formation. This plate model will be crucial for future efforts unraveling a precise history of East Gondwana fragmentation and constraining the formation of the Enderby Basin offshore East Antarctica and Bay of Bengal offshore East India.

  17. AGN-driven quenching of star formation: morphological and dynamical implications for early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Silk, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms at work during the formation of massive early-type galaxies, we performed six zoomed hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of halos in the mass range 4.3 10^12 < M_vir < 8.0 10^13 M_sun at z=0, using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement code RAMSES. These simulations explore the role of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), through jets powered by the accretion onto supermassive black holes on the formation of massive elliptical galaxies. In the absence of AGN feedback, large amounts of stars accumulate in the central galaxies to form overly massive, blue, compact and rotation-dominated galaxies. Powerful AGN jets transform the central galaxies into red extended and dispersion-dominated galaxies. This morphological transformation of disc galaxies into elliptical galaxies is driven by the efficient quenching of the in situ star formation due to AGN feedback, which transform these galaxies into systems built up by accretion. For galaxies mainly formed by accretion, the pro...

  18. Early stage massive star formation near the Galactic Center: Sgr C

    CERN Document Server

    Kendrew, Sarah; Johnston, Katharine; Beuther, Henrik; Bally, John; Cyagnowski, Claudia J; Battersby, Cara

    2013-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved HII region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object measuring ~10" in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C HII region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H2 and Brackett gamma emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ~10^3 Msun, with column densities of 1-2 x 10^24 cm-2. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ~10^5 Msun of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favourable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star f...

  19. SURVIVAL OF INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES TO PRESTELLAR DENSE CORE COLLAPSE AND EARLY PHASES OF DISK FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hincelin, U. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S. [University of Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Commerçon, B., E-mail: ugo.hincelin@virginia.edu [Laboratoire de radioastronomie, LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Supérieure (UMR 8112 CNRS), 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-09-20

    An outstanding question of astrobiology is the link between the chemical composition of planets, comets, and other solar system bodies and the molecules formed in the interstellar medium. Understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the matter leading to the formation of protoplanetary disks is an important step for this. We provide some new clues to this long-standing problem using three-dimensional chemical simulations of the early phases of disk formation: we interfaced the full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic model RAMSES, for different configurations and intensities of the magnetic field. Our results show that the chemical content (gas and ices) is globally conserved during the collapsing process, from the parent molecular cloud to the young disk surrounding the first Larson core. A qualitative comparison with cometary composition suggests that comets are constituted of different phases, some molecules being direct tracers of interstellar chemistry, while others, including complex molecules, seem to have been formed in disks, where higher densities and temperatures allow for an active grain surface chemistry. The latter phase, and its connection with the formation of the first Larson core, remains to be modeled.

  20. Structural brain network characteristics can differentiate CIS from early RRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraman eMuthuraman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Focal demyelinated lesions, diffuse white matter (WM damage and grey matter (GM atrophy influence directly the disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify specific characteristics of GM and WM structural networks in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS in comparison to patients with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS.Twenty patients with CIS, thirty three with RRMS and forty healthy subjects were investigated using 3 T-MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied, together with probabilistic tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA maps for WM and cortical thickness correlation analysis for GM, to determine the structural connectivity patterns. A network topology analysis with the aid of graph theoretical approaches was used to characterize the network at different community levels (modularity, clustering coefficient, global and local efficiencies. Finally, we applied support vector machines (SVM to automatically discriminate the two groups. .In comparison to CIS subjects, patients with RRMS were found to have increased modular connectivity and higher local clustering, highlighting increased local processing in both GM and WM. Both groups presented increased modularity and clustering coefficients in comparison to healthy controls. SVM algorithms achieved 97% accuracy using the clustering coefficient as classifier derived from GM and 65% using WM from probabilistic tractography and 67 % from modularity of FA maps to differentiate between CIS and RRMS patients. We demonstrate a clear increase of modular and local connectivity in patients with early RRMS in comparison to CIS and healthy subjects. Based only on a single anatomic scan and without a priori information, we developed an automated and investigator-independent paradigm that can accurately discriminate between patients with these clinically similar disease entities, and could thus complement the current

  1. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) method for modeling the formation of metal surface structures induced by femtosecond laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Lamrous, O., E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Mitiche, M.D. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Itina, T.E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516/Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue de Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Zemirli, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2013-09-01

    The particle in cell (PIC) method coupled to the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to model the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of smooth metal surface. The theoretical results were analyzed and compared with experimental data taken from the literature. It was shown that the optical properties of the target are not homogeneous and the ejection of electrons is such that ripples in the electron density were obtained. The Coulomb explosion mechanism was proposed to explain the ripples formation under the considered conditions.

  2. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) method for modeling the formation of metal surface structures induced by femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouder, M.; Lamrous, O.; Mitiche, M. D.; Itina, T. E.; Zemirli, M.

    2013-09-01

    The particle in cell (PIC) method coupled to the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to model the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of smooth metal surface. The theoretical results were analyzed and compared with experimental data taken from the literature. It was shown that the optical properties of the target are not homogeneous and the ejection of electrons is such that ripples in the electron density were obtained. The Coulomb explosion mechanism was proposed to explain the ripples formation under the considered conditions.

  3. The Role of Microbial Iron Reduction in the Formation of Proterozoic Molar Tooth Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgskiss, M. S. W.; Kunzmann, M.; Halverson, G. P.; Poirier, A.

    2016-12-01

    Molar tooth structures are poorly understood early diagenetic, microspar-filled voids in clay-rich carbonate sediments. They are a common structure in sedimentary successions dating from 2600-720 Ma, but do not occur in rocks older or younger. Despite being volumetrically significant in carbonate rocks of this age, their formation and disappearance are poorly understood. Here, we present iron isotope data, supported by carbon and oxygen isotopes, major and minor element concentrations, and total organic carbon and pyrite contents for samples from ten regions spanning 1870-635 Ma. The iron isotopic composition of molar tooth structures is almost always lighter (modal depletion of 2‰) than the carbonate or siliciclastic components in the host sediment, whereas carbon isotopes are indistinguishable. We interpret the isotopically light iron in molar tooth structures to have been produced by microbial iron reduction utilising Fe-oxyhydroxides and smectites. The microbial conversion of smectite to illite results in a volume reduction of clay minerals ( 30%), while locally increasing pore water alkalinity. Therefore, this biogeochemical process is a viable mechanism to produce voids and subsequently precipitate carbonate minerals. The disappearance of molar tooth structures is likely linked to a combination of a decrease in smectite abundance, a decline in the marine DIC reservoir, and increase in the concentration of O2 in shallow seawater in the mid-Neoproterozoic.

  4. Effect of O3 on the atmospheric temperature structure of early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Godolt, M; Grenfell, J L; Stracke, B; Rauer, H

    2015-01-01

    Ozone is an important radiative trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere. The presence of ozone can significantly influence the thermal structure of an atmosphere, and by this e.g. cloud formation. Photochemical studies suggest that ozone can form in carbon dioxide-rich atmospheres. We investigate the effect of ozone on the temperature structure of simulated early Martian atmospheres. With a 1D radiative-convective model, we calculate temperature-pressure profiles for a 1 bar carbon dioxide atmosphere. Ozone profiles are fixed, parameterized profiles. We vary the location of the ozone layer maximum and the concentration at this maximum. The maximum is placed at different pressure levels in the upper and middle atmosphere (1-10 mbar). Results suggest that the impact of ozone on surface temperatures is relatively small. However, the planetary albedo significantly decreases at large ozone concentrations. Throughout the middle and upper atmospheres, temperatures increase upon introducing ozone due to strong UV absorpt...

  5. Unc45b is essential for early myofibrillogenesis and costamere formation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, J Layne; Hills, Jordan A; Jean, Francesca; Pilgrim, Dave B

    2014-06-01

    Despite the prevalence of developmental myopathies resulting from muscle fiber defects, the earliest stages of myogenesis remain poorly understood. Unc45b is a molecular chaperone that mediates the folding of thick-filament myosin during sarcomere formation; however, Unc45b may also mediate specific functions of non-muscle myosins (NMMs). unc45b Mutants have specific defects in striated muscle development, which include myocyte detachment indicative of dysfunctional adhesion complex formation. Given the necessity for non-muscle myosin function in the formation of adhesion complexes and premyofibril templates, we tested the hypothesis that the unc45b mutant phenotype is not mediated solely by interaction with muscle myosin heavy chain (mMHC). We used the advantages of a transparent zebrafish embryo to determine the temporal and spatial patterns of expression for unc45b, non-muscle myosins and mMHC in developing somites. We also examined the formation of myocyte attachment complexes (costameres) in wild-type and unc45b mutant embryos. Our results demonstrate co-expression and co-regulation of Unc45b and NMM in myogenic tissue several hours before any muscle myosin heavy chain is expressed. We also note deficiencies in the localization of costamere components and NMM in unc45b mutants that is consistent with an NMM-mediated role for Unc45b during early myogenesis. This represents a novel role for Unc45b in the earliest stages of muscle development that is independent of muscle mMHC folding.

  6. Plasma suppression of large scale structure formation in the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pisin; Lai, Kwang-Chang

    2007-12-07

    We point out that during the reionization epoch of the cosmic history, the plasma collective effect among the ordinary matter would suppress the large scale structure formation. The imperfect Debye shielding at finite temperature would induce an electrostatic pressure which, working together with the thermal pressure, would counter the gravitational collapse. As a result, the effective Jeans length, lambda[over ]_{J} is increased by a factor lambda[over ]_{J}/lambda_{J}=sqrt[8/5], relative to the conventional one. For scales smaller than the effective Jeans scale the plasma would oscillate at the ion-acoustic frequency. The modes that would be influenced by this effect lie roughly in the range 0.5h Mpc;{-1}

  7. Cosmological constraints on the radiation released during structure formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarena, David; Marra, Valerio [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    During the process of structure formation in the universe matter is converted into radiation through a variety of processes such as light from stars, infrared radiation from cosmic dust, and gravitational waves from binary black holes/neutron stars and supernova explosions. The production of this astrophysical radiation background (ARB) could affect the expansion rate of the universe and the growth of perturbations. Here, we aim at understanding to which level one can constraint the ARB using future cosmological observations. We model the energy transfer from matter to radiation through an effective interaction between matter and astrophysical radiation. Using future supernova data from large synoptic survey telescope and growth-rate data from Euclid we find that the ARB density parameter is constrained, at the 95% confidence level, to be Ω{sub ar{sub 0}} < 0.008. Estimates of the energy density produced by well-known astrophysical processes give roughly Ω{sub ar{sub 0}} ∝ 10{sup -5}. Therefore, we conclude that cosmological observations will only be able to constrain exotic or not-well understood sources of radiation. (orig.)

  8. Cooling-induced structure formation and evolution in collapsars

    CERN Document Server

    Batta, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The collapse of massive rotating stellar cores and the associated accretion onto the newborn compact object is thought to power long gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The physical scale and dynamics of the accretion disk are initially set by the angular momentum distribution in the progenitor, and the physical conditions make neutrino emission the main cooling agent in the flow. The formation and evolution of structure in these disks is potentially very relevant for the energy release and its time variability, which ultimately imprint on the observed GRB properties. To begin to characterize these, taking into account the three dimensional nature of the problem, we have carried out an initial set of calculations of the collapse of rotating polytropic cores in three dimensions, making use of a pseudo-relativistic potential and a simplified cooling prescription. We focus on the effects of self gravity and cooling on the overall morphology and evolution of the flow for a given rotation rate in the context of the collapsar...

  9. Formation of nanoscale tungsten oxide structures and colouration characteristics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay Bhooshan Kumar; Dambarudhar Mohanta

    2011-06-01

    In this work, pH dependent evolution of tungsten oxide (WO3) nanostructures is being reported along with physical characteristics. The synthesis was carried out via an inexpensive solvothermal cum chemical reduction route, with sodium tungstate (Na2WO4) and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (C19H42NBr) as main reactants. The X-ray diffraction, together with transmission electron microscopic studies have revealed formation of regular polyhedral nanocrystalline structures and fractals as one goes from higher pH (= 5.5) to lower pH (= 2) values. The average crystallite size, as calculated throughWilliamson–Hall plots, was varied within 2.8–6.8 nm for different pH samples. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals in-plane bending vibration (W–OH), observable at ∼1630 cm-1 and strong stretching (W–O–W) located at ∼814 cm-1. Raman spectroscopy has divulged WO3 Raman active optical phonon modes positioned at ∼717 and 805 cm-1. The thermochromic and photochromic properties of the nanoscale WO3 sample prepared at pH = 5.5, are also highlighted.

  10. Generation of Hierarchically Ordered Structures on a Polymer Film by Electrohydrodynamic Structure Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hongmiao; Shao, Jinyou; Hu, Hong; Wang, Li; Ding, Yucheng

    2016-06-29

    The extensive applications of hierarchical structures in optoelectronics, micro/nanofluidics, energy conservation, etc., have led to the development of a variety of approaches for their fabrication, which can be categorized as bottom-up or top-down strategies. Current bottom-up and top-down strategies bear a complementary relationship to each other due to their processing characteristics, i.e., the advantages of one method correspond to the disadvantages of the other, and vice versa. Here we propose a novel method based on electrohydrodynamic structure formation, aimed at combining the main advantages of the two strategies. The method allows the fabrication of a hierarchically ordered structure with well-defined geometry and high mechanical durability on a polymer film, through a simple and low-cost process also suitable for mass-production. In this approach, upon application of an electric field between a template and a substrate sandwiching an air gap and a polymer film, the polymer is pulled toward the template and further flows into the template cavities, resulting in a hierarchical structure with primary and secondary patterns determined by electrohydrodynamic instability and by the template features, respectively. In this work, the fabrication of a hierarchical structure by electrohydrodynamic structure formation is studied using numerical simulations and experimental tests. The proposed method is then employed for the one-step fabrication of a hierarchical structure exhibiting a gradual transition in the periodicity of the primary structure using a slant template and a flat polymer film, which presents an excellent performance on controllable wettability.

  11. Early-middle Eocene birds from the Lillebaelt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2009-01-01

    The marine Lillebaelt Clay Formation of central Denmark is of early-middle Eocene age (late Ypresian - middle Lutetian; microfossil zones NP 13-NP 15). Over 20 bird fossils collected by amateur palaeontologists have been acquired through the Danish national ‘Danekrae' fossil treasure trove...... legislation. The fossils are preserved in clay ironstone concretions and almost two-thirds are isolated skulls preserved three-dimensionally. Bird fossils of this age and degree of preservation are rare in an international context. The fossils indicate a very diverse assemblage consisting of both marine...... and terrestrial forms. These include at least one pelagornithid or 'pseudo-toothed bird'; two or three taxa with charadriiform affinities (shorebirds and allies); a massive, narrow-beaked psittaciform (parrots and allies); a large rallid (rail) and one lithornithid (extinct, volant palaeognaths). The Lillebaelt...

  12. Conifer woods from the Salamanca Formation (early Paleocene), Central Patagonia, Argentina: Paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Daniela P.; Brea, Mariana; Raigemborn, M. Sol; Matheos, Sergio D.

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of the present work is to describe the first conifer assemblage of a mixed forest from the Danian Salamanca Formation at the Estancia Las Violetas locality (San Jorge Basin, Central Patagonia, Argentina), based on detailed descriptions of secondary xylem. Also, sedimentological description of the Estancia Las Violetas outcrops are made in order to understand the paleoenvironmental conditions under which paleocommunities developed. Six conifer woods are described and assigned to one Podocarpoxylon Gothan and three Cupressinoxylon Göppert species (including a new species). This is the first record of Patagonia forest where the conifer assemblage is dominated by Cupressinoxylon, associated with Podocarpaceae and palms (recorded as fruits), conforming a mixed forest with a floristic composition similar to present-day New Caledonia forests. Las Violetas fossil forest represent a parautochtonous community developed in a forested coastal setting, a tide-dominated estuary, at ∼51-50° S paleolatitudes of South America during the early-middle Danian.

  13. Preterm birth and structural brain alterations in early adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Nosarti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cortical development and impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes have been described following very preterm (VPT birth in childhood and adolescence, but only a few studies to date have investigated grey matter (GM and white matter (WM maturation in VPT samples in early adult life. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM we studied regional GM and WM volumes in 68 VPT-born individuals (mean gestational age 30 weeks and 43 term-born controls aged 19–20 years, and their association with cognitive outcomes (Hayling Sentence Completion Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Visual Reproduction test of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and gestational age. Structural MRI data were obtained with a 1.5 Tesla system and analysed using the VBM8 toolbox in SPM8 with a customized study-specific template. Similarly to results obtained at adolescent assessment, VPT young adults compared to controls demonstrated reduced GM volume in temporal, frontal, insular and occipital areas, thalamus, caudate nucleus and putamen. Increases in GM volume were noted in medial/anterior frontal gyrus. Smaller subcortical WM volume in the VPT group was observed in temporal, parietal and frontal regions, and in a cluster centred on posterior corpus callosum/thalamus/fornix. Larger subcortical WM volume was found predominantly in posterior brain regions, in areas beneath the parahippocampal and occipital gyri and in cerebellum. Gestational age was associated with GM and WM volumes in areas where VPT individuals demonstrated GM and WM volumetric alterations, especially in temporal, parietal and occipital regions. VPT participants scored lower than controls on measures of IQ, executive function and non-verbal memory. When investigating GM and WM alterations and cognitive outcome scores, subcortical WM volume in an area beneath the left inferior frontal gyrus accounted for 14% of the variance of full-scale IQ (F = 12.9, p < 0.0001. WM volume in posterior corpus

  14. Early stages of particle formation in precipitation reactions-quinacridone and boehmite as generic examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, H; Franke, D; Frechen, Th; Goesele, W; Rieger, J

    2003-03-01

    For many products, such as nanoparticulate systems, particle formation by precipitation is an essential procedural step. To learn more about the processes involved in precipitation, we investigated particle formation during precipitation reactions by means of online and offline methods. As model systems we chose the catalyst boehmite and the organic pigment quinacridone. The reactants were mixed in a mixing device and led into a reaction tube. At the end of the tube, a free jet of the suspension was produced. By varying the length of the reaction tube the time between mixing the reactants and the moment of observation was varied. Thus a time resolution down to 10 ms from the beginning of the reaction was obtained. Small-angle X-ray scattering on the free jet yielded online information about the structural inhomogeneities within the reacting systems. Transmission electron microscopy patterns obtained from quenched samples, which were taken by shooting copper grids through the free jet into liquid nitrogen, provided complementary information about structural features. Immediately after mixture an emulsion-like structure develops indicating that classical nucleation theory does not apply in the present systems. This finding can be explained by assuming instantaneous reaction at the interfaces of the two reactants that meet in the mixing device. From this preliminary state primary particles form with a size in the nanometer range. The observations can be rationalized by considering the underlying hydrodynamics of turbulent mixing of the reactants.

  15. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based on the mean gas temperature and the concentration of CO, O 2, NO, and HC at the flame early region of reaction. The investigation covered the influence of the nozzle cone angle, the jet exit velocity and the jet equivalence ratio. The stability results show that the flames with cone are more stable than those without cone. For conical stabilized flames, the stability results exhibit three different sensitivity regions between the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The inflame measurements prove that the flame stability could be attributed to the triple flame structure at the flame leading edge. The data show that the triple flame structure is influenced by cone angle, the jet velocity and the equivalence ratio. The flame is believed to be controlled by the recirculation flow inside the cone. Increasing the cone angle induced higher air entrainment to the reaction zone as depicted by a higher O 2 concentration within the flame leading edge. Increasing the jet velocity to a certain limit enhances the intensity of combustion at the flame leading edge, while excessive increase in jet velocity reduces this intensity. At a fixed jet velocity the higher the equivalence ratio, the higher the amount of fuel diffused and engulfed to the reaction zone, the more delay of the combustion completion and the higher the emission concentrations of the flame. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Innovative design of composite structures: Use of curvilinear fiber format to improve structural efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    To increase the effectiveness and efficiency of fiber-reinforced materials, the use of fibers in a curvilinear rather than the traditional straightline format is explored. The capacity of a laminated square plate with a central circular hole loaded in tension is investigated. The orientation of the fibers is chosen so that the fibers in a particular layer are aligned with the principle stress directions in that layer. Finite elements and an iteration scheme are used to find the fiber orientation. A noninteracting maximum strain criterion is used to predict load capacity. The load capacities of several plates with different curvilinear fibers format are compared with the capacities of more conventional straightline format designs. It is found that the most practical curvilinear design sandwiches a group of fibers in a curvilinear format between a pair of +/-45 degree layers. This design has a 60% greater load capacity than a conventional quasi-isotropic design with the same number of layers. The +/-45 degree layers are necessary to prevent matrix cracking in the curvilinear layers due to stresses perpendicular to the fibers in those layers. Greater efficiencies are achievable with composite structures than now realized.

  17. Effect of strontium ions on the early formation of biomimetic apatite on single crystalline rutile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Carl; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Single crystalline rutile is a good model to investigate the growth mechanism of hydroxyapatite on bioactive Ti surfaces. Previous studies have shown the difference on different crystalline rutile faces in the early stage and during the growth of HAp crystals from simulated body fluids. It is known that the biological apatite crystal is an ion-substituted apatite. Ion substitution will influence the HAp crystal growth and morphology. In the present study, the effect of strontium ions on the adsorption of Ca and phosphate ions on three different faces of single crystalline rutile substrates has been investigated. The ion adsorption is the crucial step in the nucleation of HAp crystals on specific surfaces. Single crystalline rutile surfaces ((1 1 0), (1 0 0) and (0 0 1)) were soaked in phosphate buffer solutions containing calcium and strontium ions for different time periods. The results showed that the adsorption of Sr, Ca and P is faster on the (1 1 0) surface than on the (1 0 0) and (0 0 1) surfaces. Almost same amount of Sr ion was adsorbed on the surfaces compared to the adsorption of Ca ion. Strontium ion influenced the biological apatite formation in the early stage in this study.

  18. The impact of mechanical AGN feedback on the formation of massive early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Ena; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Moster, Benjamin P

    2014-01-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies with present-day stellar masses of $M_{stel} > 8.9 \\times 10^{10} M_{sun}$. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with a pressure-entropy formulation that allows an improved treatment of contact discontinuities and fluid mixing, we run three sets of simulations of 20 halos with different AGN feedback models: (1) no feedback, (2) thermal feedback, and (3) mechanical and radiation feedback. We assume that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centre of emerging dark matter halos and trace their mass growth via gas accretion and mergers with other black holes. Both feedback models successfully recover the observed M_BH - sigma relation and black hole-to-stellar mass ratio for simulated central early-type galaxies. The baryonic conversion efficiencies are reduced by a factor of two compared to models without any AGN feedback at all halo masses. However,...

  19. Green Peas emit X-rays: Extreme Star Formation in Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Luminous compact galaxies (LCGs), Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs), and Lyman Break Analog galaxies (LBAs) are all used as proxies for star-forming galaxies in the early Universe (z ≥ 6). The X-ray emission from such galaxies has been found to be elevated compared to other star-forming galaxies in our local Universe. It has been suggested that this may be due to the lower metallicity seen in these proxies to high-redshift galaxies and the elevated X-ray emission may affect the heating and Reionization evolution of the early Universe. Our previous studies have suggested the existence of an LX-SFR-metallicity plane for all star-forming galaxies. We present these results in the context of our newest Joint Chandra/HST study containing the first X-ray detection of the Green Pea galaxies, a population of compact starburst galaxies discovered by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Project (Cardamone+2009). The galaxies were given the name Green Peas due to their compact size and green appearance in the gri composite images from SDSS. The green color is caused by a strong [OIII]λ5007Å emission line, an indicator of recent star formation. We observed a few of the most promising candidates with joint Chandra/HST observation and discuss our findings here.

  20. Merger histories in warm dark matter structure formation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebe, Alexander; Devriendt, Julien E. G.; Mahmood, Asim; Silk, Joseph

    2002-02-01

    Observations on galactic scales seem to be in contradiction with recent high-resolution N-body simulations. This so-called cold dark matter (CDM) crisis has been addressed in several ways, ranging from a change in fundamental physics by introducing self-interacting cold dark matter particles to a tuning of complex astrophysical processes such as global and/or local feedback. All these efforts attempt to soften density profiles and reduce the abundance of satellites in simulated galaxy haloes. In this paper, we explore a different approach that consists of filtering the dark matter power spectrum on small scales, thereby altering the formation history of low-mass objects. The physical motivation for damping these fluctuations lies in the possibility that the dark matter particles have a different nature, i.e. are warm (WDM) rather than cold. We show that this leads to some interesting new results in terms of the merger history and large-scale distribution of low-mass haloes, compared with the standard CDM scenario. However, WDM does not appear to be the ultimate solution, in the sense that it is not able to fully solve the CDM crisis, even though one of the main drawbacks, namely the abundance of satellites, can be remedied. Indeed, the cuspiness of the halo profiles still persists, at all redshifts, and for all haloes and sub-haloes that we investigated. Despite the persistence of the cuspiness problem of DM haloes, WDM seems to be still worth taking seriously, as it alleviates the problems of over-abundant sub-structures in galactic haloes and possibly the lack of angular momentum of simulated disc galaxies. WDM also lessens the need to invoke strong feedback to solve these problems, and may provide a natural explanation of the clustering properties and ages of dwarfs.

  1. Nanocomposites with thermosetting matrix: structure formation at the interphase boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composites with thermosetting matrix are often characterized by elevated values of operational properties – flexural and compressive strength, resistance to aggressive environments, etc. At the same time the cost of most thermosets (particularly – epoxy resins is quite high. Because of this the area of application of polymer composites in construction is limited. One of such application is the creation of multifunctional coatings. The high cost of resin dictates the need to improve the operational properties to ensure economic efficiency. So far, the known way to improve the operational properties is to produce nanoscale interfacial layer between fine filler and matrix in block. This way proved to be effective, but mechanism of the improvement is still uncertain. There areat least two different theories – so-called «adhesion theory» and «theory of deformable layer». The investigation is complicated by the variety of oligomers, hardeners (crosslinking agents and precursors of nanomodifiers. It is becoming more common lately to use adducts of aliphatic amines and epoxy oligomers as hardeners. As precursors of nanomodifiers the organosilicon compounds with siloxane bond in the main chain can be successfully used. In this paper we present results of investigation of a model system comprised of oligomer, crosslinking agent and precursor. The analysis of structure is carried out by means of Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that at gelation point modifier has no significant effect on the chemical composition of the curing products; nevertheless, the admixture of modifier reduces the regularity of the emerging three-dimensional spatial net of thermoset. After completion of curing process the irregular spatial grid is still present. This indicates that in composites admixture of organosilicon precursors may lead to the formation of transition layer with reduced modulus of elasticity. Such layer, in turn, causes stress

  2. Methanol masers Reliable tracers of the early stages of high-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P

    2006-01-01

    The GLIMPSE and MSX surveys have been used to examine the mid-infrared properties of a statistically complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The GLIMPSE point sources associated with methanol masers are clearly distinguished from the majority, typically having extremely red mid-infrared colors, similar to those expected of low-mass class 0 young stellar objects. The intensity of the GLIMPSE sources associated with methanol masers is typically 4 magnitudes brighter at 8.0 micron than at 3.6 micron. Targeted searches towards GLIMPSE point sources with [3.6]-[4.5] > 1.3 and an 8.0 micron magnitude less than 10 will detect more than 80% of class II methanol masers. Many of the methanol masers are associated with sources within infrared dark clouds (IRDC) which are believed to mark regions where high-mass star formation is in its very early stages. The presence of class II methanol masers in a significant fraction of IRDC suggests that high-mass star formation is common in these regions. Different maser specie...

  3. The formation and deformation of protein structures with viscoelastic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van L.E.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the formation of a gluten substitute.   Chapter 1 describes the properties that are necessary to obtain a gluten substitute.   Chapter 2 describes the formation and properties of protein particle suspensions. Two proteins with different intrinsic properties, gelati

  4. Oxygen reactivity and formate structure in X zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M.; Rep, M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Lercher, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The i.r. absorption spectra of surface formate and gas phase decomposition products resulting from different surface reactions over basic FAU(X) zeolites have been compared. Based on these results a bridging surface formate species is proposed, which can account for the observed i.r. absorption data

  5. Oxygen reactivity and formate structure in X zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M.; Ommen, van J.G.; Lefferts, L.; Lercher, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The i.r. absorption spectra of surface formate and gas phase decomposition products resulting from different surface reactions over basic FAU(X) zeolites have been compared. Based on these results a bridging surface formate species is proposed, which can account for the observed i.r. absorption data

  6. Changing nuclear landscape and unique PML structures during early epigenetic transitions of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John T; Hall, Lisa L; Smith, Kelly P; Lawrence, Jeanne B

    2009-07-01

    The complex nuclear structure of somatic cells is important to epigenomic regulation, yet little is known about nuclear organization of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Here we surveyed several nuclear structures in pluripotent and transitioning hESC. Observations of centromeres, telomeres, SC35 speckles, Cajal Bodies, lamin A/C and emerin, nuclear shape and size demonstrate a very different "nuclear landscape" in hESC. This landscape is remodeled during a brief transitional window, concomitant with or just prior to differentiation onset. Notably, hESC initially contain abundant signal for spliceosome assembly factor, SC35, but lack discrete SC35 domains; these form as cells begin to specialize, likely reflecting cell-type specific genomic organization. Concomitantly, nuclear size increases and shape changes as lamin A/C and emerin incorporate into the lamina. During this brief window, hESC exhibit dramatically different PML-defined structures, which in somatic cells are linked to gene regulation and cancer. Unlike the numerous, spherical somatic PML bodies, hES cells often display approximately 1-3 large PML structures of two morphological types: long linear "rods" or elaborate "rosettes", which lack substantial SUMO-1, Daxx, and Sp100. These occur primarily between Day 0-2 of differentiation and become rare thereafter. PML rods may be "taut" between other structures, such as centromeres, but clearly show some relationship with the lamina, where PML often abuts or fills a "gap" in early lamin A/C staining. Findings demonstrate that pluripotent hES cells have a markedly different overall nuclear architecture, remodeling of which is linked to early epigenomic programming and involves formation of unique PML-defined structures.

  7. The Tendaguru Formation (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, southern Tanzania: definition, palaeoenvironments, and sequence stratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bussert

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-known Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Tendaguru Beds of southern Tanzania have yielded fossil plant remains, invertebrates and vertebrates, notably dinosaurs, of exceptional scientific importance. Based on data of the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000 and previous studies, and in accordance with the international stratigraphic guide, we raise the Tendaguru Beds to formational rank and recognise six members (from bottom to top: Lower Dinosaur Member, Nerinella Member, Middle Dinosaur Member, Indotrigonia africana Member, Upper Dinosaur Member, and Rutitrigonia bornhardti-schwarzi Member. We characterise and discuss each member in detail in terms of derivation of name, definition of a type section, distribution, thickness, lithofacies, boundaries, palaeontology, and age. The age of the whole formation apparently ranges at least from the middle Oxfordian to the Valanginian through Hauterivian or possibly Aptian. The Tendaguru Formation constitutes a cyclic sedimentary succession, consisting of three marginal marine, sandstone-dominated depositional units and three predominantly coastal to tidal plain, fine-grained depositional units with dinosaur remains. It represents four third-order sequences, which are composed of transgressive and highstand systems tracts. Sequence boundaries are represented by transgressive ravinement surfaces and maximum flooding surfaces. In a more simple way, the depositional sequences can be subdivided into transgressive and regressive sequences/systems tracts. Whereas the transgressive systems tracts are mainly represented by shallow marine shoreface, tidal channel and sand bar sandstones, the regressive systems tracts predominantly consist of shallow tidal channel, tidal flat, and marginal lagoonal to supratidal deposits. doi:10.1002/mmng.200900004

  8. Early Cretaceous vegetation and climate change at high latitude: palynological evidence from Isachsen Formation, Arctic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jennifer M.; Tullius, Dylan N.; Evenchick, Carol A.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Hadlari, Thomas; Embry, Ashton

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the behaviour of global climate during relatively warm periods in Earth's history, such as the Cretaceous Period, advances our overall understanding of the climate system and provides insight on drivers of climate change over geologic time. While it has been suggested that the Valanginian Age represents the first episode of Cretaceous greenhouse climate conditions with relatively equable warm temperatures, mounting evidence suggests that this time was relatively cool. A paucity of paleoclimate data currently exists for polar regions compared to mid- and low-latitudes and this is particularly true for the Canadian Arctic. There is also a lack of information about the terrestrial realm as most paleoclimate studies have been based on marine material. Here we present quantitative pollen and spore data obtained from the marginal marine and deltaic-fluvial Isachsen Formation of the Sverdrup Basin, Canadian Arctic, to better understand the long-term vegetation and climate history of polar regions during the warm but variable Early Cretaceous (Valanginian to Early Aptian). Detrended correspondence analysis of main pollen and spore taxa is used to derive three ecological groupings influenced by moisture and disturbance based on the botanical affinities of palynomorphs: 1) a mixed coniferous assemblage containing both lowland and upland components; 2) a conifer-filicopsid community that likely grew in dynamic lowland habitats; and, 3) a mature dry lowland community composed of Cheirolepidaceans. Stratigraphic changes in the relative abundance of pollen and spore taxa reflect climate variability in this polar region during the ~20 Mya history of the Isachsen Formation. The late Valanginian was relatively cool and moist and promoted lowland conifer-filicopsid communities. Warming in the Hauterivian resulted in the expansion coniferous communities in well-drained or arid hinterlands. A return to relatively cool and moist conditions in the Barremian resulted in the

  9. Early diagenesis and authigenic mineral formation in mobile muds of the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Yao, Peng; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Hui; Mi, Tiezhu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Jiwen; Yu, Zhigang

    2017-08-01

    Large-river delta-front estuaries (LDEs) and their adjacent shelf margins are sites of dynamic diagenetic processes that play a significant role in coastal biogeochemical cycling. In this study, we used dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), redox sensitive elements (Fe2 + and Mn2 +), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, and NO2-), major cations and anions (K+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +, SO42 -, and Cl-) in bottom-water and sediment pore-waters, to investigate the early chemical diagenesis and authigenic mineral formation in mobile-mud deposits of the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS). Vertical profiles of DIC and NH4+ in pore-waters had similar trends at most sites, showing a significant increase with depth near the Changjiang Estuary and being relatively constant at offshore sites. Higher pore-water DIC and NH4+ concentrations were observed in nearshore sites in winter, which were likely attributed to exposure of deeper deposits by winter coastal erosion. Nitrification was observed at most sites, and AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) played a leading role in ammonia oxidation in the study areas. The nitrification-denitrification was likely important in contributing to the loss of DIN in offshore sites during summer. Large inputs of organic carbon (OC) and terrestrial materials from Changjiang River resulted in intense sulfate reduction and Fe and Mn reduction in nearshore sites. Lower C/N and C/S ratios coupled with an apparent decrease in pore-water Ca2 + and Mg2+ concentrations with depth near the Changjiang Estuary, which indicated that authigenic carbonate formation occurs in these sediments. Decreases in K+ and Mg2 + with depth reflected that reverse weathering was an important process of authigenic mineral formation in these sediments. We conclude that adsorption process, seasonal erosion-redeposition, and summer hypoxic conditions of bottom-waters may play an important role in early diagenesis processes and

  10. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Early Eocene Wind River Formation in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, E.; Fan, M.; Sheldon, N. D.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial basin systems provide important information on paleoclimatic, paleoecological, and paleoenvironmental factors and how they control and respond to global changes and spatio-temporal heterogeneity. Examining these dynamics is crucial for times of major global change like the broad-scale climatic trends (warm/wet/high-CO2 conditions) of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). As most climatic records of such events are derived from global marine datasets, regional terrestrial studies such as these provide a better model for understanding ecological responses and the localized effects of events like the EECO. The formation of the Wind River Basin (northwestern Wyoming) has been studied for decades, but its regional climatic, environmental, and ecological dynamics have been largely overlooked. Recent work in other contemporaneous sites in the Green River Basin has suggested that the dynamics and rapidity of climate change in terrestrial interiors during the EECO may have been significantly different than what is indicated by the marine record, so to address these issues on a more regional scale we examined paleosols preserved in the fluvial, basin-margin Wind River Formation preserved near Dubois, Wyoming. Field identification of the paleosols indicated a suite that includes primarily Inceptisols and Alfisols; most exhibited significant redoximorphic features and Bg horizons that indicate a ponded floodplain paleoenvironment, while others contained deep Bk horizons (>100 cm) consistent with more well-drained, but still sub-humid to humid conditions. Based on the identification of these well-developed soil features, along with distinct horizonation and root development, paleosols were robustly correlated and sampled throughout the Formation, and environmental descriptors were assigned. To further examine the question of regional terrestrial climate/environmental change, whole rock geochemistry (XRF) samples from paleosol depth profiles were analyzed for use

  11. Introducing CoDa (Cosmic Dawn): Radiation-Hydrodynamics of Galaxy Formation in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Gillet, Nicolas; Shapiro, Paul; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian; Romain, Teyssier; Yepes, Gustavo; Choi, Jun-hwan; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottloeber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    CoDa (Cosmic Dawn) is the largest fully coupled radiation hydrodynamics simulation of the reionization of the local Universe to date. It was performed using RAMSES-CUDATON running on 8192 nodes (i.e. 8192 GPUs) on the titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate a 64 h-1Mpc side box down to z=4.23. In this simulation, reionization proceeds self-consistently, driven by stellar radiation. We compare the simulation's reionization history, ionizing flux density, the cosmic star formation history and the CMB Thompson scattering optical depth with their observational values. Luminosity functions are also in rather good agreement with high redshift observations, although very bright objects (MAB1600 gas filaments present a sheathed structure, with a hot envelope surrounding a cooler core. They are however not able to self-shield, while regions denser than 10^-4.5 H atoms per comoving h^-3cm^3 are. Haloes below M ˜ 3.10^9 M⊙ are severely affected by the expanding, rising UV background: their ISM is quickly photo-heated to temperatures above our star formation threshold and therefore stop forming stars after local reionization has occured. Overall, the haloes between 10^(10-11) M⊙ dominate the star formation budget of the box for most of the Epoch of Reionization. Several additional studies will follow, looking for instance at environmental effects on galaxy properties, and the regimes of accretion.

  12. The maternal-effect gene cellular island encodes aurora B kinase and is essential for furrow formation in the early zebrafish embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taijiro Yabe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Females homozygous for a mutation in cellular island (cei produce embryos with defects in cytokinesis during early development. Analysis of the cytoskeletal events associated with furrow formation reveal that these defects include a general delay in furrow initiation as well as a complete failure to form furrow-associated structures in distal regions of the blastodisc. A linkage mapping-based candidate gene approach, including transgenic rescue, shows that cei encodes the zebrafish Aurora B kinase homologue. Genetic complementation analysis between the cei mutation and aurB zygotic lethal mutations corroborate gene assignment and reveal a complex nature of the maternal-effect cei allele, which appears to preferentially affect a function important for cytokinesis in the early blastomeres. Surprisingly, in cei mutant embryos a short yet otherwise normal furrow forms in the center of the blastodisc. Furrow formation is absent throughout the width of the blastodisc in cei mutant embryos additionally mutant for futile cycle, which lack a spindle apparatus, showing that the residual furrow signal present in cei mutants is derived from the mitotic spindle. Our analysis suggests that partially redundant signals derived from the spindle and astral apparatus mediate furrow formation in medial and distal regions of the early embryonic blastomeres, respectively, possibly as a spatial specialization to achieve furrow formation in these large cells. In addition, our data also suggest a role for Cei/AurB function in the reorganization of the furrow-associated microtubules in both early cleavage- and somite-stage embryos. In accordance with the requirement for cei/aurB in furrow induction in the early cleavage embryo, germ plasm recruitment to the forming furrow is also affected in embryos lacking normal cei/aurB function.

  13. Biosignatures of early life in >3.8Ga Banded Iron Formations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Matthew; Papineau, Dominic

    2015-04-01

    Almost all Eoarchean sedimentary rocks have undergone high grade metamorphism. However, small enclaves of Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) from the south-west margin of the Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt (NSB-Canada) are now the first candidate Eoarchean BIFs metamorphosed to only around the greenschist facies. Ellipsoidal ribbons of microcrystalline hematite in 1-4 micron chert and chert-hematite rosettes are preserved and largely undeformed, which point to diagenetic structures metamorphosed at low grade facies. Stilpnomelane is common as a prograde mineral in these rocks, which suggests the upper limits of metamorphic conditions where 430-500˚C at 5-6 Kbars; this is reinforced by the presence of ripidolite which is not seen in BIFs subjected to above 500˚C (Miyano & Klein, 1989). The exceptional low metamorphic grade of these Eoarchean rocks has enabled the preservation of diagenetic structures and mineral associations of disordered organic carbon with pyrite, apatite, carbonate and phyllosilicates, thus providing excellent opportunities to search for possible remains of some of the most primitive life. Noteworthy mineral assemblages include microscopic apatite and carbon inclusions in phyllosilicate and layered-pyritiferous, ring structures that contain disordered organic carbon. Raman spectra display broad D and G peaks and lack 2nd-order carbon peaks, which are indicative of disordered carbon, also raman peaks around 1440 cm-1 represent stretching of C-H bonds in the carbonaceous material. Focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscope analysis of the milled foils reveals the structure and chemistries of these potential biosignatures down to the nanoscale and details the diverse relations of organic carbon in Earth's oldest sedimentary rocks. References Miyano, T. & Klein, C., 1989. Phase equilibria in the system K20 - FeO - MgO - AIzO3 - SiO2 - H20 - CO2 and the stability limit of stilpnomelane in metamorphosed Precambrian iron-formations

  14. Topics in cosmology: Structure formation, dark energy and recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar

    The field of theoretical cosmology consists of numerous, inter-related branches, whose ambitious goal is to uncover the history of the universe from its beginning to its future. Achieving this, no doubt, requires a deep understanding of many areas of physics. In this thesis I touch upon a few of these areas in which I worked during my PhD studies. Chapter (2) describes our work in finding the accretion and merger history of dark matter halos. Dark matter halos are the collapsed dark matter structures in the late time evolution of the universe, whose existence is vital for the formation of galaxies in the Universe as they act as the potential wells where normal matter (collectively called Baryons) can accumulate, cool, and form stars. It is then no surprise that the properties of galaxies depends on the properties of the dark matter halo in which it resides, including its merger history, i.e. the number of times it merged with other halos. Even though these merger rates can be calculated theoretically for infinitesimal time steps, in order to find the merger history over an extended period of time one had to use either Monte-Carlo simulations to build up the total rates of merging and accreting from the infinitesimal rates or use N-body simulations. In chapter (2) we show how we used random walk formalism to write down an analytical (integral) equation for the merger history of halos. We have solved this equation numerically and find very good agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations. This work can be used in theories of galaxy formation and evolution. We then switch from the overdense regions of the Universe, halos, to the underdense ones, voids. These structures have not attracted as much attention from cosmologists as their overdense counterparts in probing the cosmological models. We show here that the shapes of voids as a probe can be of use for future surveys to pin down the equation of state of the dark energy, i.e. the ratio of its pressure to its energy

  15. Flexible Virtual Structure Consideration in Dynamic Modeling of Mobile Robots Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kamel, A. Essghaier; Beji, L.; Lerbet, J.; Abichou, A.

    2009-03-01

    In cooperative mobile robotics, we look for formation keeping and maintenance of a geometric configuration during movement. As a solution to these problems, the concept of a virtual structure is considered. Based on this idea, we have developed an efficient flexible virtual structure, describing the dynamic model of n vehicles in formation and where the whole formation is kept dependant. Notes that, for 2D and 3D space navigation, only a rigid virtual structure was proposed in the literature. Further, the problem was limited to a kinematic behavior of the structure. Hence, the flexible virtual structure in dynamic modeling of mobile robots formation presented in this paper, gives more capabilities to the formation to avoid obstacles in hostile environment while keeping formation and avoiding inter-agent collision.

  16. Network statistics on early English Syntax: Structural criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat

    2007-01-01

    This paper includes a reflection on the role of networks in the study of English language acquisition, as well as a collection of practical criteria to annotate free-speech corpora from children utterances. At the theoretical level, the main claim of this paper is that syntactic networks should be interpreted as the outcome of the use of the syntactic machinery. Thus, the intrinsic features of such machinery are not accessible directly from (known) network properties. Rather, what one can see are the global patterns of its use and, thus, a global view of the power and organization of the underlying grammar. Taking a look into more practical issues, the paper examines how to build a net from the projection of syntactic relations. Recall that, as opposed to adult grammars, early-child language has not a well-defined concept of structure. To overcome such difficulty, we develop a set of systematic criteria assuming constituency hierarchy and a grammar based on lexico-thematic relations. At the end, what we obtai...

  17. Early events in xenograft development from the human embryonic stem cell line HS181--resemblance with an initial multiple epiblast formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertow, Karin; Cedervall, Jessica; Jamil, Seema; Ali, Rouknuddin; Imreh, Marta P; Gulyas, Miklos; Sandstedt, Bengt; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Xenografting is widely used for assessing in vivo pluripotency of human stem cell populations. Here, we report on early to late events in the development of mature experimental teratoma from a well-characterized human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line, HS181. The results show an embryonic process, increasingly chaotic. Active proliferation of the stem cell derived cellular progeny was detected already at day 5, and characterized by the appearance of multiple sites of engraftment, with structures of single or pseudostratified columnar epithelium surrounding small cavities. The striking histological resemblance to developing embryonic ectoderm, and the formation of epiblast-like structures was supported by the expression of the markers OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-4 and KLF4, but a lack of REX1. The early neural marker NESTIN was uniformly expressed, while markers linked to gastrulation, such as BMP-4, NODAL or BRACHYURY were not detected. Thus, observations on day 5 indicated differentiation comparable to the most early transient cell populations in human post implantation development. Confirming and expanding on previous findings from HS181 xenografts, these early events were followed by an increasingly chaotic development, incorporated in the formation of a benign teratoma with complex embryonic components. In the mature HS181 teratomas not all types of organs/tissues were detected, indicating a restricted differentiation, and a lack of adequate spatial developmental cues during the further teratoma formation. Uniquely, a kinetic alignment of rare complex structures was made to human embryos at diagnosed gestation stages, showing minor kinetic deviations between HS181 teratoma and the human counterpart.

  18. Phase behavior and structure formation of hairy-rod supramolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subbotin, A; Stepanyan, R; Knaapila, M; Ikkala, O; ten Brinke, G

    2003-01-01

    Phase behavior and microstructure formation of rod and coil molecules, which can associate to form hairy-rod polymeric supramolecules, are addressed theoretically. Association induces considerable compatibility enhancement between the rod and coil molecules and various microscopically ordered struct

  19. Early stages of carbonate mineralization revealed from molecular simulations: Implications for biomineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A. F.; DeYoreo, J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The carbonate mineral constituents of many biomineralized products, formed both in and ex vivo, grow by a multi-stage crystallization process that involves the nucleation and structural reorganization of transient amorphous phases. The existence of transient phases and cluster species has significant implications for carbonate nucleation and growth in natural and engineered environments, both modern and ancient. The structure of these intermediate phases remains elusive, as does the nature of the disorder to order transition, however, these process details may strongly influence the interpretation of elemental and isotopic climate proxy data obtained from authigenic and biogenic carbonates. While molecular simulations have been applied to certain aspects of crystal growth, studies of metal carbonate nucleation are strongly inhibited by the presence of kinetic traps that prevent adequate sampling of the potential landscape upon which the growing clusters reside within timescales accessible by simulation. This research addresses this challenge by marrying the recent Kawska-Zahn (KZ) approach to simulation of crystal nucleation and growth from solution with replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) techniques. REMD has been used previously to enhance sampling of protein conformations that occupy energy wells that are separated by sizable thermodynamic and kinetic barriers, and is used here to probe the initial formation and onset of order within hydrated calcium and iron carbonate cluster species during nucleation. Results to date suggest that growing clusters initiate as short linear ion chains that evolve into two- and three-dimensional structures with continued growth. The planar structures exhibit an obvious 2d lattice, while establishment of a 3d lattice is hindered by incomplete ion desolvation. The formation of a dehydrated core consisting of a single carbonate ion is observed when the clusters are ~0.75 nm. At the same size a distorted, but discernible

  20. The Relation Between Item Format and the Structure of the Eysenck Personality Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Stevenson, John F.

    1978-01-01

    A Likert seven-choice response format for personality inventories allows finer distinctions by subjects than the traditional two-choice format. The Eysenck Personality Inventory was employed in the present study to test the hypothesis that use of the expanded format would result in a clearer and more accurate indication of test structure.…

  1. Boys' Cognitive Skill Formation and Physical Growth: Long-term Experimental Evidence on Critical Ages for Early Childhood Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Barham, Tania; Macours, Karen; John A Maluccio

    2013-01-01

    The effects of early life circumstances on cognitive skill formation are important for later human capital development, labor market outcomes and well-being. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the first 1,000 days are the critical window for both cognitive skill formation and physical development by exploiting a randomized conditional cash transfer (CCT) program in Nicaragua. We find that boys exposed in utero and during the first 2 years of life, have better cognitive, but not physic...

  2. Chirality as a physical aspect of structure formation in biological macromolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshko, E. V.; Tverdislov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    A novel regularity of hierarchical structures is found in the formation of chiral biological macromolecular systems. The formation of structures with alternating chirality (helical structures) serves as an instrument of stratification. The ability of a carbon atom to form chiral compounds is an important factor that determined the carbon basis of living systems on the Earth as well as their development through a series of chiral bifurcations. In the course of biological evolution, the helical structures became basic elements of the molecular machines in the cell. The discreteness of structural levels allowed the mechanical degrees of freedom formation in the molecular machines in the cell.

  3. Early and late stages of working-memory maintenance contribute differentially to long-term memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Heiko C; Kiemeneij, Anne; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P C

    2013-06-01

    The present paper investigated the role of early and late stages of working-memory maintenance, which have been suggested to differentially contribute to long-term memory formation. In experiment 1, we administered a delayed-match-to-sample task, requiring participants to remember line drawings of non-sense three-dimensional stimuli. In the delay phase, participants were either presented with a fixation cross (for 2 or 9s) or with one of two different interference tasks, varying in visual overlap with the target. The interference task was presented 1.5, 4.5 or 7.5s after target offset. Early interfering and early probing disproportionately affected performance on an unexpected subsequent recognition-memory task compared to later interference or probing. This was not modulated by the type of interference task. In Experiment 2, we examined whether the formation of a holistic internal code of the target may be a gradual process. An analogous delayed-match-to-sample task was administered, with interference after 0.5, 2.5 or 4.5s after target offset. The early and middle interference condition similarly disproportionately affected performance compared to later interference. Hence, the present results support the view of a functional dissociation between early and late stages of working-memory maintenance and that early working-memory processes contribute particularly to long-term memory formation.

  4. Statistical characteristics of formation and evolution of structure in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, M

    1999-01-01

    An approximate statistical description of the formation and evolution of structure of the universe based on the Zel'dovich theory of gravitational instability is proposed. It is found that the evolution of DM structure shows features of self-similarity and the main structure characteristics can be expressed through the parameters of initial power spectrum and cosmological model. For the CDM-like power spectrum and suitable parameters of the cosmological model the effective matter compression reaches the observed scales $R_{wall}\\sim $20 -- 25$h^{-1}$Mpc with the typical mean separation of wall-like elements $D_{SLSS}\\sim $50 -- 70$h^{-1}$Mpc. This description can be directly applied to the deep pencil beam galactic surveys and absorption spectra of quasars. For larger 3D catalogs and simulations it can be applied to results obtained with the core-sampling analysis. It is shown that the interaction of large and small scale perturbations modulates the creation rate of early Zel'dovich pancakes and generates bia...

  5. Inoculation density and nutrient level determine the formation of mushroom-shaped structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Azadeh; Dehghany, Jaber; Schwebs, Timo; Müsken, Mathias; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa often colonises immunocompromised patients and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. It exhibits resistance to many antibiotics by forming biofilms, which makes it hard to eliminate. P. aeruginosa biofilms form mushroom-shaped structures under certain circumstances. Bacterial motility and the environment affect the eventual mushroom morphology. This study provides an agent-based model for the bacterial dynamics and interactions influencing bacterial biofilm shape. Cell motility in the model relies on recently published experimental data. Our simulations show colony formation by immotile cells. Motile cells escape from a single colony by nutrient chemotaxis and hence no mushroom shape develops. A high number density of non-motile colonies leads to migration of motile cells onto the top of the colonies and formation of mushroom-shaped structures. This model proposes that the formation of mushroom-shaped structures can be predicted by parameters at the time of bacteria inoculation. Depending on nutrient levels and the initial number density of stalks, mushroom-shaped structures only form in a restricted regime. This opens the possibility of early manipulation of spatial pattern formation in bacterial colonies, using environmental factors.

  6. Characteristics and formation mechanism of composite flower structures in the Shuntuo area, Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X.; Tang, L.; Cao, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The Shuntuo area, located in the north part of the northern slope of Tazhong Uplift, is one of the key areas of Tarim Basin with great exploration potentials. Based on detailed 3D seismic interpretations of the Shuntuo area, the characteristics and formation mechanisms of the strike-slip faults were investigated. The research results show that a series of sinistral strike-slip faults, which cut through the basement strata and straight up to the Middle Devonian strata, developed in the study area. On the 3D seismic profiles, the strike-slip fault shows complex geometric features that consists of a lower convex strata deformation (positive flower structure) and an upper concave-shaped strata deformation (negative flower structure) that bounded by the Late Ordovician strata. Systematic research on the distribution, geometry and kinematics of the composite flower structures suggests that they are completely different fault systems formed in different time and controlled by different factors. According to fault open horizon and fault throw changes, the development history of the strike-slip faults may be divided into two stages including the Middle Caledonian and the Early Hercynian. On the seismic coherency maps, the lower strike-slip faults show NE linear extension. In the Middle Caledonian, the Tazhong Uplift experienced a strong compression from Ancient Kunlun ocean subducting in NE direction and Arkin ocean subducting in NW direction, which resulted in the formation of NE-trending strike-slip faults. The upper strike-slip faults are NW trending and present right-order en-echelon arrangements. During Early Hercynian, with the termination of the Kunlun Caledonian collision orogeny, the Tazhong Uplift was in the stress relaxation stage. The stress condition of the Shuntuo area transformed from compression to extension. Based on the lower strike-slip faults, the upper strike-slip faults were developed under the control of previous basement weak zones. Since the strike

  7. Structural Characteristics and Formation Mechanism in the Micangshan Foreland,South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaming; LIU Shu; QU Guosheng; LI Yanfeng; SUN Gang; LIU Kang

    2009-01-01

    Lying at the junction of the Dabashan,Longmenshan and Qinling mountains,the Micangshan Orogenic Belt coupled with a basin is a duplex structure and back-thrust triangular belt with little horizontal displacement,small thrust faults and continuous sedimentary cover.On the basis of 3D seismic data,and through sedimentary and structural research,the Micangshan foreland can be divided into five subbelts.which from north to south are:basement thrust,frontal thrust,foreland Along the direction of strike from west to east, the arcuate structural belt of Micangshan can be divided into west,middle and east segments.During the collision between the Qinling and Yangtze plates,the Micangshan Orogenic Belt was subjected to the interaction of three rigid terranes:Bikou, Foping,and Fenghuangshan(a.k.a.Ziyang)terranes.The collision processes of rigid terranes controlled the structural development of the Micangshan foreland,which are:(a)the former collision between the Micangshan.Hannan and Bikou terranes forming the earlier rudiments of the structure; and(b)the later collision forming the main body of the structural belt.The formation processes of the Micangshan Orogenic Belt call be divided into four stages:(1)in the early stage of the Indosinian movement,the Micangshan.Hannan Rigid Terrane was jointed to the Qinling Plate by the clockwise subduction of the Yangtze Plate toward the Qinling Plate;(2)since the late Triassic,the earlier rudiments of the Tongnanba and Jiulongshan anticlines and corresponding syncline were formed by compression from different directions of the Bikou.Foping and Micangshan-Hannan terranes;(3)in the early stage of the Himalayan movement,the Micangshan-Hannan Terrane formed the Micangshan Nappe torwards the foreland basin and the compression stresses were mainly concentrated along both its flanks,whereas the Micangshan-Hannan Terrane wedged into the Qinling Orogenic Belt with force;(4)in the late stage of the Himalayan movement,the main collision of the

  8. Cold Accretion in Early Galaxy Formation and Its Lyα Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Li, Yuexing; Zhu, Qirong; Abel, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Lyα emission has played an important role in detecting high-redshift galaxies, including recently distant ones at redshifts z\\gt 7. It may also contain important information concerning the origin of these galaxies. Here, we investigate the formation of a typical L* galaxy and its observational signatures at the earliest stage by combining a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation with three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) calculations using the newly improved AR{{T}2} code. Our cosmological simulation uses the Aquila initial condition, which zooms in on a Milky-Way-like halo with high resolutions, and our RT couples multi-wavelength continuum, Lyα line, and ionization of hydrogen. We find that the modeled galaxy starts to form at redshift z ∼ 24 through the efficient accretion of cold gas, which produces a strong Lyα line with a luminosity of {{L}Lyα }∼ {{10}42} erg {{s}-1} as early as z ∼ 14. The Lyα emission appears to trace the cold, dense gas. The lines exhibit asymmetric, single-peak profiles, and are shifted to the blue wing, a characteristic feature of gas inflow. Moreover, the contribution to the total Lyα luminosity from excitation cooling increases with redshift and becomes dominant at z ≳ 6. We predict that L* galaxies such as the modeled one may be detected at z ≲ 8 by the James Webb Space Telescope and Atacama Large Millimeter Array with a reasonable integration time. Beyond redshift 12, however, the Lyα line may only be observable by spectroscopic surveys. Our results suggest that the Lyα line is one of the most powerful tools to detect the first generation of galaxies and decipher their formation mechanism.

  9. Star formation and nuclear activity in the blue early-type galaxy NGC 5373

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Alfvin, Erik; Martinkus, Charlotte; Molter, Edward

    2015-01-01

    We present new optical and X-ray observations of NGC 5373, an isolated star-forming elliptical that has a stellar mass of 7e10 solar and lies at a distance of 175 Mpc. Our B and R band Magellan IMACS imaging substantially improves on SDSS resolution and sensitivity, enabling accurate modeling of the galaxy surface brightness profile. As expected from its mass, NGC 5373 is a core galaxy with a best-fit Sersic profile of n~3.8; no prominent tidal tails or shells are found, although there are slight residual asymmetries. The H-alpha emission in the SDSS spectrum is narrow, and the line ratios confirm a star-forming classification in the BPT diagram, near the transition/composite line. The star formation rate is about 6 solar masses per year, making NGC 5373 an extreme outlier relative to typical local early-type galaxies of similar mass. Our 50 ks Chandra ACIS-S exposure provides a clear detection of a central X-ray source, with a hardness ratio consistent with a power-law photon index of 2.0+/-0.5. The unabsorbed luminosity is Lx = 2e40 erg/s over 0.3-8 keV. Comparison with a MARX simulated point spread function suggests the central source may be extended, for example due to contributions from one or more unresolved high-mass X-ray binaries, as might be present given the high star formation rate. For a black hole of 1.6e8 solar masses as predicted from scaling relations, Lx/Ledd is then around 1e-6 (or potentially lower).

  10. BMP-2 induced early bone formation in spine fusion using rat ovariectomy osteoporosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Bae; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Na-Hyung; Chung, Chun Kee

    2013-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) enhance bone formation. Numerous animal studies have established that BMPs can augment spinal fusion. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of BMP-2 on spinal fusion in the osteoporotic spine. To investigate whether recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) enhances spine fusion in an ovariectomized rat model. In vivo animal study. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were ovariectomized or sham operated and randomized into three groups: Sham (sham operated+fusion), ovariectomy (OVX) (OVX+fusion), and BMP (OVX+fusion+BMP-2). Six weeks after ovariectomy, unilateral lumbar spine fusion was performed using autologous iliac bone with/without rhBMP-2 delivered on a collagen matrix. For each group, gene expression and histology were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks after fusion, and bone parameters were measured by microcomputed tomography at 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction at 3 weeks showed markedly increased expression of osteoblast-related markers (namely alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, Runx2, Smad1, and Smad5) in the BMP group compared with the other groups (p=.0005, .0005, .003, .009 and .012, respectively). Although the Sham and OVX groups showed both sparse and compacted bones between transverse processes at 6 weeks, the BMP group had a significantly larger bone mass within the fusion bed at 3 weeks and later. All rats in the BMP group had bridging bone at 3 weeks; at 12 weeks, bridging bones in the Sham and OVX groups were about 50% and 25%, respectively, of that in the BMP group. Recombinant human BMP-2 enhances spinal fusion in OVX rats and acts during early bone formation. Therapeutic BMP-2 may therefore improve the outcome of spinal fusion in the osteoporotic patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Depletion of BIRC6 leads to retarded bovine early embryonic development and blastocyst formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Hölker, Micheal; Rings, Franca; Phatsara, Chirawath; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, Abdollah; Tholen, Ernst; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2010-01-01

    Baculoviral inhibitors of apoptosis repeat-containing 6 (BIRC6) is believed to inhibit apoptosis by targeting key cell-death proteins. To understand its involvement during bovine preimplantation embryo development, two consecutive experiments were conducted by targeted knockdown of its mRNA and protein using RNA interference. In Experiment 1, the effect of BIRC6 knockdown during the early stages of preimplantation embryo development was assessed by injecting zygotes with long double-stranded RNA (ldsRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against BIRC6 mRNA followed by in vitro culturing until 96 h post insemination (hpi). The results showed that in RNA-injected zygote groups, reduced levels of BIRC6 mRNA and protein were accompanied by an increase (P < 0.05) in the proportion of 2- and 4-cell and uncleaved embryos and a corresponding decrease (P < 0.05) in the number of 8-cell embryos. In Experiment 2, the effect of BIRC6 knockdown on blastocyst formation, blastocyst total cell number and the extent of apoptosis was investigated. Consequently, zygotes injected with ldsRNA and shRNA resulted in lower (P < 0.05) blastocyst formation and total blastocyst cell number. Moreover, the apoptotic cell ratio, CASPASE 3 and 7 activity, BAX to BCL-2 ratio and levels of SMAC and CASPASE 9 were higher in blastocysts derived from the ldsRNA and shRNA groups, suggesting increased apoptosis in those blastocysts. The results of this study reveal the importance of BIRC6 expression for embryo survival during bovine preimplantation embryo development. However, whether BIRC6 is essential for implantation and fetal development during bovine pregnancy needs further research.

  12. Alkali element depletion by core formation and vaporization on the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The depletion of Na, K, Rb, and Cs in the Earth's upper mantle and crust relative to their abundances in chondrites is a long standing problem in geochemistry. Here we consider two commonly invoked mechanisms, namely core formation, and vaporization, for producing the observed depletions. Our models predict that a significant percentage of the Earth's bulk alkali element inventory is in the core (30 percent for Na, 52 percent for K, 74 percent for Rb, and 92 percent for Cs). These predictions agree with independent estimates from nebular volatility trends and (for K) from terrestrial heat flow data. Our models also predict that vaporization and thermal escape during planetary accretion are unlikely to produce the observed alkali element depletion pattern. However, loss during the putative giant impact which formed the Moon cannot be ruled out. Experimental, observational, and theoretical tests of our predictions are also described. Alkali element partitioning into the Earth's core was modeled by assuming that alkali element partitioning during core formation on the aubrite parent body (APB) is analogous to that on the early Earth. The analogy is reasonable for three reasons. First, the enstatite meteorites are the only known meteorites with the same oxygen isotope systematics as the Earth-Moon system. Second, the large core size of the Earth and the V depletion in the mantle requires accretion from planetesimals as reduced as the enstatite chondrites. Third, experimental studies of K partitioning between silicate and metal plus sulfide show that more K goes into the metal plus sulfide at higher pressures than at one atmosphere pressure. Thus partitioning in the relatively low pressure natural laboratory of the APB is a good guide to alkali elemental partitioning during the growth of the Earth.

  13. Formate incorporation in the structure of Ca-deficient apatite: Rietveld structure refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. M.; Elliott, J. C.; Dowker, S. E. P.

    2003-08-01

    Two sets of non-stoichiometric apatites (Ca-deficient apatites) were prepared from calcium phosphate solutions by homogeneous precipitation through the hydrolysis of formamide at 95°C. One set of products contained monetite (CaHPO 4) and apatite, whilst the second, with more formamide, contained only apatite. Rietveld whole pattern fitting structure refinements were undertaken on all samples, and chemical analyses, IR and NMR spectroscopy, on the second set of samples. The Ca/P mol ratio was 1.596. Rietveld analysis gave lattice parameters a=9.4729(20) and c=6.8855(9) Å and showed that Ca 2+ ions were lost exclusively from Ca2 sites, and that the PO 4 tetrahedron volume and P-O bonds were 4.4% and 1.4% smaller, respectively, than in hydroxyapatite (OHAp). Formate, HCO 2-, was clearly visible in the IR and NMR spectra, but the diffraction studies showed it was not present as a separate crystalline phase. Chemical analysis gave 5.8 wt % formate. We propose that the enlarged a-axis compared with OHAp ( a=9.4243(55) Å) and reduced PO 4 dimensions and P occupancy are, respectively, caused by the partial replacement of OH - and PO 43- ions in the structure by HCO 2- ions. These substitutions would parallel the similar known substitutions of CO 32- ions in precipitated carbonate apatites.

  14. Memory formation: from network structure to neural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Sarah; Wang, Jane X; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Berke, Joshua D; Zochowski, Michal

    2010-05-13

    Understanding the neural correlates of brain function is an extremely challenging task, since any cognitive process is distributed over a complex and evolving network of neurons that comprise the brain. In order to quantify observed changes in neuronal dynamics during hippocampal memory formation, we present metrics designed to detect directional interactions and the formation of functional neuronal ensembles. We apply these metrics to both experimental and model-derived data in an attempt to link anatomical network changes with observed changes in neuronal dynamics during hippocampal memory formation processes. We show that the developed model provides a consistent explanation of the anatomical network modifications that underlie the activity changes observed in the experimental data.

  15. Possible solutions to the problem of channel formation on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    A warm climate on early Mars would provide a natural, although not unique, explanation for the presence of fluvial networks on the ancient, heavily cratered terrains. Explaining how the climate could have been kept warm, however, is not easy. The idea that the global average surface temperature, T(sub s), could have been kept warm by a dense, CO2 atmosphere supplied by volcanism or impacts is no longer viable. It was shown that CO2 cloud formation should have kept T(sub s) well below freezing until approximately 2 b.y. ago, when the Sun had brightened to at least 86 percent of its present value. Warm equatorial regions on an otherwise cold planet seem unlikely because atmospheric CO2 would probably condense out at the poles. Warming by impact-produced dust in the atmosphere seems unlikely because the amount of warming expected for silicate dust particles is relatively small. Greenhouse warming by high altitude CO2 ice clouds seems unlikely because such are poor absorbers of infrared radiation at most wavelengths. Warming by atmospheric NH3 seems unlikely because NH3 is readily photodissociated and because N may have been in short supply as consequence of impact erosion and the high solubility of NH3. A brighter, mass-losing young Sun seems unlikely because stellar winds of the required strength were not observed on other solar-type stars. In short, most of the explanations for a warm Martian paleoclimate that were proposed in the past seem unlikely. One possibility that seems feasible from radiative/photochemical standpoint is that CH4 and associated hydrocarbon gases and particles contributed substantially to the greenhouse effect on early Mars. Methane is photochemically more stable than NH3 and the gases and particles that can be formed from it are all good absorbers of infrared radiation. The idea of a CH4-rich Martian paleoatmosphere was suggested a long time ago but has fallen out of favor because of perceived difficulties in maintaining a CH4-rich atmosphere

  16. [CII] At 1 Star Formation in the Early Universe with Zeus (1 and 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T.; Parshley, S.; Stacey, G.; Benford, D.; staguhn, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of the [CII] 158 micron fine structure line from six submillimeter galaxies with redshifts between 1.12 and 1.73. This more than doubles the total number of [CII] 158 micron detections reported from high redshift sources. These observations were made with the Redshift(z) and Early Universe Spectrometer(ZEUS) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii between December 2006 and March 2009. ZEUS is a background limited submm echelle grating spectrometer (Hailey-Dunsheath 2009). Currently we are constructing ZEUS-2. This new instrument will utilize the same grating but will feature a two dimensional transition-edge sensed bolometer array with SQUID multiplexing readout system enabling simultaneous background limited observations in the 200, 340,450 and 650 micron telluric windows. ZEUS-2 will allow for long slit imaging spectroscopy in nearby galaxies and a [CII] survey from z 0.25 to 2.5.

  17. Efficacy of a triclosan formula in controlling early subgingival biofilm formation: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ernesto; Weidlich, Patricia; Angst, Patrícia Daniela Melchiors; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of rinses with slurries of a dentifrice containing triclosan (TCS), as compared with rinses with slurries from a control dentifrice, in controlling early subgingival biofilm formation. A double-blind, randomized and cross-over clinical trial was designed, and 26 dental students were included. In the first period, participants were randomized to rinse with a TCS slurry or a control slurry, in a 12 h interval, and to refrain from mechanical cleaning. A Plaque Free Zone Index was assessed at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h. After a washout period of 10 days, the second experimental period was conducted, following the same protocol as the first period, except that the slurry groups were switched. Use of the TCS slurry resulted in a significantly higher percentage of plaque-free surfaces, both at 24 h and at 72 h (p < 0.01). In the of 48-72 h interval, the triclosan slurry showed a lower percentage of sites converted to a score of 2 (38.1% for the test versus 40% for the control product, p = 0.015). In conclusion, rinsing with slurries of dentifrice containing TCS retards the down growth of bacterial biofilms from the supra- to the subgingival environment.

  18. Muscularis mucosae in desmoplastic stroma formation of early invasive rectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinichi Ban; Michio Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    The origin of myofibroblasts or myofibroblastic cells in the desmoplastic stroma associated with carcinoma invasion has been controversial. In the early invasive area of a rectal adenocarcinoma reported here, an obvious transition between the muscularis mucosa and the bundles of eosinophilic stromal cells observed in the carcinomatous stroma was demonstrated both in morphology and in their cytoskeletal phenotype, which conceivably suggests that the smooth muscle cells of the muscularis mucosa could convert to the eosinophilic stromal cells, namely myofibroblasts.Moreover, type Ⅰ procollagen was demonstrated in both protein and mRNA levels in the areas of eosinophilic stromal cells with a lesser degree of differentiated smooth muscle phenotype that showed a transition from the muscularis mucosa, implying that the myofibroblastic cells converted from smooth muscle cells of the muscularis mucosa could be responsible for type Ⅰ collagen production. These findings suggest that the muscularis mucosae may not be a passive barrier through which colorectal carcinomas infiltrate into the submucosa, but may play an active role in the formation and remodeling of tumor stroma.

  19. Efficacy of a triclosan formula in controlling early subgingival biofilm formation: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto ANDRADE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of rinses with slurries of a dentifrice containing triclosan (TCS, as compared with rinses with slurries from a control dentifrice, in controlling early subgingival biofilm formation. A double-blind, randomized and cross-over clinical trial was designed, and 26 dental students were included. In the first period, participants were randomized to rinse with a TCS slurry or a control slurry, in a 12 h interval, and to refrain from mechanical cleaning. A Plaque Free Zone Index was assessed at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h. After a washout period of 10 days, the second experimental period was conducted, following the same protocol as the first period, except that the slurry groups were switched. Use of the TCS slurry resulted in a significantly higher percentage of plaque-free surfaces, both at 24 h and at 72 h (p < 0.01. In the of 48-72 h interval, the triclosan slurry showed a lower percentage of sites converted to a score of 2 (38.1% for the testversus 40% for the control product, p = 0.015. In conclusion, rinsing with slurries of dentifrice containing TCS retards the down growth of bacterial biofilms from the supra- to the subgingival environment.

  20. A Basal Tapejarine (Pterosauria; Pterodactyloidea; Tapejaridae) from the Crato Formation, Early Cretaceous of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Maria Eduarda de Castro; Kellner, Alexander Wilhelm Armin

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional and almost complete pterosaur mandible from the Crato Formation (Early Cretaceous of Northeastern Brazil), Araripe Basin, is described as a new species of a tapejarine tapejarid. Tapejarines are a particular group of toothless pterosaurs, characterized by well-developed cranial crests, downturned rostra, and have been proposed to represent frugivorous flying reptiles. Though comparatively well represented and distributed, the evolutionary history of the group is still poorly known, and the internal relationships of its members are not well understood. The new species here reported, named Aymberedactylus cearensis gen. et sp. nov., adds new data concerning the evolution of the group, concerning their morphology and geographical origin. It differs from known tapejarids due to its unusually elongate retroarticular process and a shallow fossa on the splenial exhibiting distinctive rugose texture. Furthermore, it exhibits a suite of basal and derived conditions within the Tapejaridae, demonstrating how their morphological traits probably evolved and that these forms were even more diverse than already acknowledged. The discovery of Aymberedactylus cearensis sheds new light on the evolutionary history of the Tapejarinae. PMID:27655346

  1. Lateral cavity wall thickening as an early radiographic sign of mycetoma formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansom, H.E.; Baque-Juston, M.; Wells, A.U.; Hansell, D.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The sensitivity of chest radiography for the early detection of mycetoma formation within fibrotic cavities is poor. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of the secondary sign of lateral cavity wall thickening for the detection of a radiographically occult mycetoma. The chest radiographs and CT scans of 70 patients who had a total of 109 fibrotic cavities on CT were reviewed by two observers. Dimensions of the cavity, mycetoma, and cavity wall thickness on chest radiography and CT scans were recorded. Mycetomas were visible in 41 of 99 cavities on chest radiographs and in 61 of 109 cavities on CT. Using CT as the gold standard for detecting the presence of mycetomas, the sensitivity of chest radiography for the presence of a mycetoma was 62 % and the specificity 94 %, and the positive and negative predictive values were 93 and 66 %, respectively. On logistic regression analysis, lateral wall thickness on chest radiography was predictive of the presence of a mycetoma (p < 0.0005) independent of other radiographic features. In patients with chronic fibrocavitary disease on chest radiography, the presence of lateral wall thickening is highly suggestive of an underlying mycetoma. (orig.)

  2. New Material of Pterosaur Sinopterus (Reptilia: Pterosauria) from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation, Western Liaoning, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Junchang; LIU Jinyuan; WANG Xuri; GAO Chunling; MENG Qingjin; JI Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Based on a new nearly complete postcranial skeleton of an adult specimen of Sinopterus from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of western Liaoning, China, the diagnosis of Sinopterus is amended. The revised diagnosis of Sinopterus includes skull relatively elongate with weakly developed cranial crest; ratio of the length of Ph2d4 to that of Ph1d4 is approximately 0.73; ratio of the length of wing metacarpal to that of metatarsal 3 is 4.5; ratio of the length of mt3 to that of tibia is approximately 0.21, and wing phalanges 1 and 2 are straight. Comparison between the ratios of the limb bones between non-adult and adult individuals of Sinopterus indicates that during the ontogenetic process,some ratios between bones are constant, such as the first wing phalanx to the second wing phalanx, the wing metacarpal to the metatarsal 3, metatarsal 3 to the tibia, but others are not, such as humerus to wing metacarpal and femur to tibia, in which the former grows faster than the latter.

  3. Star formation associated with neutral hydrogen in the outskirts of early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yıldız, Mustafa K; Peletier, Reynier F; Oosterloo, Tom A; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2016-01-01

    About 20 percent of all nearby early-type galaxies ($M_{\\star} \\gtrsim 6 \\times 10^{9}$ M$_{\\odot}$) outside the Virgo cluster are surrounded by a disc or ring of low-column-density neutral hydrogen (HI) gas with typical radii of tens of kpc, much larger than the stellar body. In order to understand the impact of these gas reservoirs on the host galaxies, we analyse the distribution of star formation out to large radii as a function of HI properties using GALEX UV and SDSS optical images. Our sample consists of 18 HI-rich galaxies as well as 55 control galaxies where no HI has been detected. In half of the HI-rich galaxies the radial UV profile changes slope at the position of the HI radial profile peak. To study the stellar populations, we calculate the FUV-NUV and UV-optical colours in two apertures, 1-3 and 3-10 R$_{eff}$ . We find that HI -rich galaxies are on average 0.5 and 0.8 mag bluer than the HI-poor ones, respectively. This indicates that a significant fraction of the UV emission traces recent star...

  4. Evidence for the rapid formation of low mass early-type galaxies in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yiqing; Blakeslee, John; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Puzia, Thomas H; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    We explore the environmental dependence of star formation timescales in low mass galaxies using the [$\\alpha$/Fe] abundance ratio as an evolutionary clock. We present integrated [$\\alpha$/Fe] measurements for 11 low mass ($M_\\star \\sim 10^9~M_\\odot$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) with a large range of cluster-centric distance in the Virgo Cluster. We find a gradient in [$\\alpha$/Fe], where the galaxies closest to the cluster center (the cD galaxy, M87) have the highest values. This trend is driven by galaxies within a projected radius of 0.4~Mpc (0.26 times the virial radius of Virgo~A), all of which have super-solar [$\\alpha$/Fe]. Galaxies in this mass range exhibit a large scatter in the [$\\alpha$/Fe]--$\\sigma$ diagram, and do not obviously lie on an extension of the relation defined by massive ETGs. In addition, we find a correlation between [$\\alpha$/Fe] and globular cluster specific frequency ($S_N$), suggesting that low-mass ETGs that formed their stars over a short period of time, were also efficient at f...

  5. Function and dynamics of slam in furrow formation in early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sreemukta; Laupsien, Philip; Wenzl, Christian; Yan, Shuling; Großhans, Jörg

    2014-02-15

    The Drosophila embryo undergoes a developmental transition in the blastoderm stage switching from syncytial to cellular development. The cleavage furrow, which encloses nuclei into cells, is a prominent morphological feature of this transition. It is not clear how the pattern of the furrow array is defined and how zygotic genes trigger the formation and invagination of interphase furrows. A key to these questions is provided by the gene slam, which has been previously implicated in controlling furrow invagination. Here we investigate the null phenotype of slam, the dynamics of Slam protein, and its control by the recycling endosome. We find that slam is essential for furrow invagination during cellularisation and together with nullo, for specification of the furrow. During cellularisation, Slam marks first the furrow, which is derived from the metaphase furrow of the previous mitosis. Slightly later, Slam accumulates at new furrows between daughter cells early in interphase. Slam is stably associated with the furrow canal except for the onset of cellularisation as revealed by FRAP experiments. Restriction of Slam to the furrow canal and Slam mobility during cellularisation is controlled by the recycling endosome and centrosomes. We propose a three step model. The retracting metaphase furrow leaves an initial mark. This mark and the border between corresponding daughter nuclei are refined by vesicular transport away from pericentrosomal recycling endosome towards the margins of the somatic buds. Following the onset of zygotic gene expression, Slam and Nullo together stabilise this mark and Slam triggers invagination of the cleavage furrow.

  6. Exercise maintains blood-brain barrier integrity during early stages of brain metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Gretchen; Davidson, Sarah J; Wrobel, Jagoda K; Toborek, Michal

    2015-08-07

    Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier, which is a highly protected microvascular environment fortified with tight junction (TJ) proteins. TJ integrity can be regulated under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. There is evidence that exercise can modulate oxidation status within the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell extravasation and metastasis formation. In order to study these events, mature male mice were given access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel (exercise) or access to a locked wheel (sedentary) for five weeks. The average running distance was 9.0 ± 0.2 km/day. Highly metastatic tumor cells (murine Lewis lung carcinoma) were then infused into the brain microvasculature through the internal carotid artery. Analyses were performed at early stage (48 h) and late stage (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed fewer isolated tumor cells extravasating into the brain at both 48 h and 3 weeks post surgery in exercised mice. Occludin protein levels were reduced in the sedentary tumor group, but maintained in the exercised tumor group at 48 h post tumor cell infusion. These results indicate that voluntary exercise may participate in modulating blood-brain barrier integrity thereby protecting the brain during metastatic progression.

  7. The history of star formation and mass assembly in early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Clemens, M S; Nikolic, B; Rampazzo, R

    2008-01-01

    We define a volume limited sample of over 14,000 early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from data release six of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The density of environment of each galaxy is robustly measured. By comparing narrow band spectral line indices with recent models of simple stellar populations (SSPs) we investigate trends in the star formation history as a function of galaxy mass (velocity dispersion), density of environment and galactic radius. We find that age, metallicity and alpha-enhancement all increase with galaxy mass and that field ETGs are younger than their cluster counterparts by ~2 Gyr. We find negative radial metallicity gradients for all masses and environments, and positive radial age gradients for ETGs with velocity dispersion over 180 km/s. Our results are qualitatively consistent with a relatively simple picture for ETG evolution in which the low-mass halos accreted by a proto-ETG contained not only gas but also a stellar population. This fossil population is preferentially found at la...

  8. Primordial black hole formation in the early universe: critical behaviour and self-similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Musco, Ilia

    2012-01-01

    Following on after three previous papers discussing the formation of primordial black holes during the radiation-dominated era of the early universe, we present here a further investigation of the critical nature of the collapse. In particular, we focus on the long-lived intermediate state, which appears in collapses of perturbations close to the critical limit, and examine the extent to which this follows a similarity solution, as seen for critical collapse under more idealized circumstances (rather than within the context of an expanding universe, as studied here). We find that a similarity solution is indeed realised, to good approximation, for a region contained within the past light-cone of the forming black hole (and eventual singularity). The self-similarity is not exact, however, and this is explained by the presence within the light-cone of some outer matter still coupled to the expanding universe, which does not participate in the self-similarity. Our main interest, from a cosmological point of view...

  9. Early Dust Formation and a Massive Progenitor for SN 2011ja?

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, J E; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Montiel, E; Wesson, R; Sugerman, Ben E K; Barlow, M J; Matsuura, M; Drass, H

    2015-01-01

    SN 2011ja was a bright (I = -18.3) Type II supernova occurring in the nearby edge on spiral galaxy NGC 4945. Flat-topped and multi-peaked H-alpha and H-beta spectral emission lines appear between 64 - 84 days post-explosion, indicating interaction with a disc-like circumstellar medium inclined 30-45 degrees from edge-on. After day 84 an increase in the H- and K-band flux along with heavy attenuation of the red wing of the emission lines are strong indications of early dust formation, likely located in the cool dense shell created between the forward shock of the SN ejecta and the reverse shock created as the ejecta plows into the existing CSM. Radiative transfer modeling reveals both ~1.5 x 10^-4 Msun of pre-existing dust located ~ 10^16.7 cm away and ~ 5 x 10^-5 Msun of newly formed dust. Spectral observations after 1.5 years reveal the possibility that the fading SN is located within a young (3-6 Myr) massive stellar cluster, which when combined with tentative 56Ni mass estimates of 0.2 Msun may indicate a ...

  10. Mediating Dynamic Supply Chain Formation by Collaborative Single Machine Earliness/Tardiness Agents in Supply Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a trend of forming dynamic supply chains with different trading partners over different e-marketplaces has emerged. These supply chains, which are called “supply mesh,” generally refer to heterogeneous electronic marketplaces in which dynamic supply chains, as per project (often make-to-order, are formed across different parties. Conceptually, in a supply mesh a dynamic supply chain is formed vertically, mediating several companies for a project. Companies that are on the same level horizontally are either competitors or cohorts. A complex scenario such as this makes it challenging to find the right group of members for a dynamic supply chain. Earlier on, a multiagent model called the collaborative single machine earliness/tardiness (CSET model was proposed for the optimal formation of make-to-order supply chains. This paper contributes the particular agent designs, for enabling the mediation of CSET in a supply mesh, and the possibilities are discussed. It is demonstrated via a computer simulation, based on samples from the U.S. textile industry, that by using intelligent agents under the CSET model it is possible to automatically find an ideal group of trading partners from a supply mesh.

  11. Formation and evolution of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster I. Internal kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Toloba, E; Cenarro, A J; Peletier, R F; Gorgas, J; de Paz, A Gil; Munoz-Mateos, J C

    2010-01-01

    We present new medium resolution kinematic data for a sample of 21 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) mainly in the Virgo cluster, obtained with the WHT and INT telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain). These data are used to study the origin of the dwarf elliptical galaxy population inhabiting clusters. We confirm that dEs are not dark matter dominated galaxies, at least up to the half-light radius. We also find that the observed galaxies in the outer parts of the cluster are mostly rotationally supported systems with disky morphological shapes. Rotationally supported dEs have rotation curves similar to those of star forming galaxies of similar luminosity and follow the Tully-Fisher relation. This is expected if dE galaxies are the descendant of low luminosity star forming systems which recently entered the cluster environment and lost their gas due to a ram pressure stripping event, quenching their star formation activity and transforming into quiescent systems, but conserving the...

  12. Targeting Young Stars with Kepler: Planet Formation, Migration Mechanisms and the Early History of Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, James P; Mamajek, Eric; Spiegel, David S; Covey, Kevin R; Shkolnik, Evgenya L; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Chavez, Miguel; Bertone, Emanuele; Aguilar, Jose Manuel Olmedo

    2013-01-01

    This white paper discusses a repurposed mission for the Kepler spacecraft that focusses on solving outstanding problems in planet formation and evolution by targeting the study of the hot Jupiter population of young stars. This mission can solve the question of the mode of migration of hot Jupiters, address the problem of whether Jupiters form by hot-start (gravitational instability) or cold-start (core accretion) mechanisms, and provide a wealth of data on the early stages of planetary system evolution during the active phases of stars which impact planetary habitability. In one year of observations of three weeks dwell time per field, Kepler would increase by more than an order of magnitude the number of known hot Jupiters, which can be followed up with fast cadence observations to to search for transit timing variations and to perform asteroseismological characterization of the host stars. This mission scenario continues to operate Kepler in the photometric monitoring mode for which it was designed, and is...

  13. Impact-induced shock and the formation of natural quasicrystals in the early solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Lincoln S; Bindi, Luca; Yao, Nan; Poirier, Gerald R; Andronicos, Christopher L; MacPherson, Glenn J; Lin, Chaney; Distler, Vadim V; Eddy, Michael P; Kostin, Alexander; Kryachko, Valery; Steinhardt, William M; Yudovskaya, Marina; Eiler, John M; Guan, Yunbin; Clarke, Jamil J; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2014-06-13

    The discovery of a natural quasicrystal, icosahedrite (Al63Cu24Fe13), accompanied by khatyrkite (CuAl2) and cupalite (CuAl) in the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Khatyrka has posed a mystery as to what extraterrestrial processes led to the formation and preservation of these metal alloys. Here we present a range of evidence, including the discovery of high-pressure phases never observed before in a CV3 chondrite, indicating that an impact shock generated a heterogeneous distribution of pressures and temperatures in which some portions reached at least 5 GPa and 1,200 °C. The conditions were sufficient to melt Al-Cu-bearing minerals, which then rapidly solidified into icosahedrite and other Al-Cu metal phases. The meteorite also contains heretofore unobserved phases of iron-nickel and iron sulphide with substantial amounts of Al and Cu. The presence of these phases in Khatyrka provides further proof that the Al-Cu alloys are natural products of unusual processes that occurred in the early solar system.

  14. Pattern Formation and Quasicrystal Structure in Azobenzene Polymer Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ze-Da; CAI Zhi-Gang; ZHANG Ling-Zhi; LIU Yan-Fa; YANG Jie; SHE Wei-Long; ZHOU Jian-Ying

    2000-01-01

    Pattern formation in azobenzene polymer film by degenerate four-wave mixing is reported. Island arrays with specific patterns are analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and polarizing optical microscopy. It is demonstrated that the control of photo-induced nanostructure sized micropattern in the nonlinear organic film is possible by using properly polarized writing beams with the total incident power exceeding a certain threshold.

  15. Structural control of void formation in dual phase steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma, Masafumi

    measurements, tensile tests and hole-expansion tests. The initial microstructure and the deformed microstructure were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In situ tensile tests in a SEM were applied for direct observation of the void formation...

  16. Competition and Diversity among Radio Formats: Legal and Structural Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Theodore L.

    That competition in broadcasting may not bring about sufficiently heterogeneous programing has long been the subject of debate among policymakers, and nowhere has that debate been more acrimonious than in its application to the diversification of radio formats. While the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) prefers to leave questions of…

  17. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gasse

    Full Text Available Amelotin (AMTN is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2% exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at

  18. Sedimentology and Stratigraphic architecture of the early Cretaceous Alpian-Aptian succession of the Kiklah Formation, Jabal Nafusah, NW Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlal, Osama

    2016-04-01

    Kiklah Formation is presents on the Jabal Nafusah escarpment for almost 400 km from the Tunisian border to the east of Gharyan. Kiklah Formation overlies the Early Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic sediments of Jabal Nafusah with marked unconformity. On the other hand, it is unconformably overlain by the Sidi as Sid Formation. This contact with overlying units is angular unconformity as it is evident only in the central Gharyan area. The Kiklah Formation consists mainly of continental deposits such as conglomeratic sandstone, pebble sandstone, and mudstone with minor lacustrine interbeds of reddish yellow to greenish claystone. In addition, these rocks were formed by a braided river system carrying heavy sediment loads, with frequent shifting of the principal channels. SEM studies show pitting and breakage features on the sand grains which are diagnostic of Fluvial depositional environment. In the Nafusah region the Kiklah Formation varies in thickness westward from absence near Gharyan to over 610 m in Tunisian subsurface.

  19. Early Eocene rodents (Mammalia) from the Subathu Formation of type area (Himachal Pradesh), NW sub-Himalaya, India: Palaeobiogeographic implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smita Gupta; Kishor Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Based on isolated upper cheek teeth, two new early Eocene rodents (Subathumys solanorius gen. et sp. nov. and Subathumys globulus gen. et sp. nov.) and three others (Birbalomys cf. sondaari, Birbalomys sp., cf. Chapattimys sp.) are recorded from the lower–middle part of the Subathu Formation of the type area in Himachal Pradesh, northwestern sub-Himalaya (India). The new rodents exhibit morphological features most similar to the unified ctenodactyloid family Chapattimyidae (including Yuomyidae), which is also represented in the assemblage from the upper part (middle Eocene) of the Subathu Formation. The associated lower cheek teeth are provisionally described as three indeterminate chapattimyid taxa. The new Subathu rodents are somewhat younger than the previously documented early Eocene assemblages from the Indian subcontinent, and are chronologically intermediate between the early Eocene ailuravines from Gujarat in the western peninsular India and the middle Eocene chapattimyids from northwestern India and Pakistan. They suggest that chapattimyids originated in the sub-Himalayan region during the Ypresian, which is earlier than previously believed. The absence of ailuravines in this as well as younger rodent assemblages from the subcontinent seems to suggest that ailuravines (Ischyromyidae), within a relatively short time after their appearance in the peninsular India in the early Eocene, may have been replaced by the indigenous chapattimyids. The co-occurrence in the early Eocene Subathu assemblage of three or more chapattimyids indicates their early radiation and dominance during the early and middle Eocene. This record of rodents opens the possibility of recovery of other small mammal remains in older levels of the Subathu Formation, which will be important for understanding linkage with early Eocene faunas from peninsular India, Europe and North America.

  20. Formation of Valley Networks in a Cold and Icy Early Mars Climate: Predictions for Erosion Rates and Channel Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, J. P.; Head, J. W.

    2017-10-01

    Climate models suggest early Mars was cold and icy. To test this prediction we assess the influence of cold conditions and the presence of an ice-cemented substrate on the formation of the valley networks and compare results to morphometric data.

  1. The SAURON project - XV. Modes of star formation in early-type galaxies and the evolution of the red sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, Kristen L.; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; van de Ven, Glenn; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Sarzi, Marc; Bacon, Roland; Bolatto, Alberto; Cappellari, Michele; Croton, Darren; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Fakhouri, Onsi; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van der Wolk, Guido

    2010-01-01

    We combine SAURON integral field data of a representative sample of local early-type, red sequence galaxies with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera imaging in order to investigate the presence of trace star formation in these systems. With the Spitzer data, we identify galaxies hosting low-level star for

  2. The SAURON project : XV. Modes of star formation in early-type galaxies and the evolution of the red sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, Kristen L.; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; van de Ven, Glenn; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Sarzi, Marc; Bacon, Roland; Bolatto, Alberto; Cappellari, Michele; Croton, Darren; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Fakhouri, Onsi; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van der Wolk, Guido

    2010-01-01

    We combine SAURON integral field data of a representative sample of local early-type, red sequence galaxies with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera imaging in order to investigate the presence of trace star formation in these systems. With the Spitzer data, we identify galaxies hosting low-level star for

  3. Early and late stages of working-memory maintenance contribute differentially to long-term memory formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, H.C.; Kiemeneij, A.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper investigated the role of early and late stages of working-memory maintenance, which have been suggested to differentially contribute to long-term memory formation. In experiment 1, we administered a delayed-match-to-sample task, requiring participants to remember line drawings of n

  4. The effect of surface adsorption on tertiary structure formation in helical polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Bachmann, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The formation of tertiary structures made up of helical polymer segments is influenced by the introduction of an attractive substrate onto which the polymer can adsorb. We perform replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations to study the formation of helical structures in the vicinity of an attractive generic substrate by means of a coarse-grained hybrid model and compare the structural phase space for both adsorbed and free helical polymers. We introduce suitable structural order parameters to understand the features of distinct structural phases. Hyperphase diagrams, parameterized by the torsional energy scale and temperature, enable the investigation of structural properties of entire classes of helical polymers.

  5. The Formation and Early Evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection and its Associated Shock Wave on 2014 January 8

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Linfeng; Shi, Tong; Su, Wei; Ding, M D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the formation and early evolution of a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) and its associated shock wave that occurred on 2014 January 8. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} disclose that the CME first appears as a bubble-like structure. Subsequently, its expansion forms the CME and causes a quasi-circular EUV wave. Interestingly, both the CME and the wave front are clearly visible at all of the AIA EUV passbands. Through a detailed kinematical analysis, it is found that the expansion of the CME undergoes two phases: a first phase with a strong but transient lateral over-expansion followed by a second phase with a self-similar expansion. The temporal evolution of the expansion velocity coincides very well with the variation of the 25--50 keV hard X-ray flux of the associated flare, which indicates that magnetic reconnection most likely plays an important role in driving the expansion. Moreover...

  6. Phosphatized multicellular algae in the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, China, and the early evolution of florideophyte red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuhai; Knoll, Andrew H; Yuan, Xunlai; Pueschel, Curt M

    2004-02-01

    Phosphatic sediments of the Late Neoproterozoic (ca. 600 million years old [Myr]) Doushantuo Formation at Weng'an, South China, contain fossils of multicellular algae preserved in anatomical detail. As revealed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, these fossils include both simple pseudoparenchymatous thalli with apical growth but no cortex-medulla differentiation and more complex thalli characterized by cortex-medulla differentiation and structures interpretable as carposporophytes, suggesting a multiphasic life cycle. Simple pseudoparenchymatous thalli, represented by Wengania, Gremiphyca, and Thallophycoides, are interpreted as stem group florideophytes. In contrast, complex pseudoparenchymatous thalli, such as Thallophyca and Paramecia, compare more closely to fossil and living corallinaleans than to other florideophyte orders, although they also differ in some important aspects (e.g., lack of biocalcification). These more complex thalli are interpreted as early stem group corallinaleans that diverged before Paleozoic stem groups such as Arenigiphyllum, Petrophyton, Graticula, and Archaeolithophyllum. This phylogenetic interpretation implies that (1) the phylogenetic divergence between the Florideophyceae and its sister group, the Bangiales, must have taken place before Doushantuo time-an inference supported by the occurrence of bangialean fossils in Mesoproterozoic rocks; (2) the initial diversification of the florideophytes occurred no later than the Doushantuo time; and (3) the corallinalean clade had a "soft" (uncalcified) evolutionary history in the Neoproterozoic before evolving biocalcification in the Paleozoic and undergoing crown group diversification in the Mesozoic.

  7. Towards an Effective THeory Of Structure formation (ETHOS)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Although there is substantial gravitational evidence for the existence of dark matter, its particle nature remains one of the biggest mysteries in modern physics. The favourite theoretical model, Cold Dark Matter (CDM), assumes that non-gravitational dark matter interactions are irrelevant for galaxy formation and evolution. Surprisingly, current astronomical observations allow significant departures from the CDM hypothesis that have a relevant impact on our understanding of how galaxies form and evolve. Moreover, the observed properties of the smallest galaxies have been a consistent challenge for the CDM model. In this talk, I will argue that to explain galaxy formation and evolution in the broadest sense, an effective dark matter theory must contain a wider range of dark matter particle physics. I will describe the first steps we have taken towards developing ETHOS and present some of its applications.

  8. Turbulence and Vorticity in Galaxy Clusters Generated by Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Vazza, F; Brüggen, M; Brunetti, G; Gheller, C; Porter, D; Ryu, D

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is a key ingredient for the evolution of the intracluster medium, whose properties can be predicted with high resolution numerical simulations. We present initial results on the generation of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in the intracluster medium during the formation of a small-size cluster using highly resolved, non-radiative cosmological simulations, with a refined monitoring in time. In this first of a series of papers, we closely look at one simulated cluster whose formation was distinguished by a merger around $z \\sim 0.3$. We separate laminar gas motions, turbulence and shocks with dedicated filtering strategies and distinguish the solenoidal and compressive components of the gas flows using Hodge-Helmholtz decomposition. Solenoidal turbulence dominates the dissipation of turbulent motions ($\\sim 95\\%$) in the central cluster volume at all epochs. The dissipation via compressive modes is found to be more important ($\\sim 30 \\%$ of the total) only at large radii ($\\geq 0.5 ~r_{\\rm vi...

  9. Disorientations in dislocation structures: Formation and spatial correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, W.

    2002-01-01

    During plastic deformation, dislocation boundaries are formed and orientation differences across them arise. Two different causes lead to the formation of two kinds of deformation-induced boundaries: a statistical trapping of dislocations in incidental dislocation boundaries and a difference...... agreement with experimental observations. The theoretically obtained distribution functions for the disorientation angles describe the experimental findings well and explain their scaling behavior. The model also predicts correlations between disorientations in neighboring boundaries, and evidence...

  10. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Serene W; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-04-21

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species.

  11. FORMATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND ECONOMIC INTEGRATED STRUCTURES IN THE ALUMINUM INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Kazbekova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the theoretical foundations of economic efficiency of production and integrated structures formation. Their advantages are demonstrated by the example of the formation of vertically integrated structures in the aluminium industry in the framework created by smelting aluminium cluster inKazakhstan. Also examines the valuable experience gained in the organization of such structures in theRussian Federationin recent years

  12. Linking the Structural Properties of Galaxies and their Star Formation Histories with STAGES

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Gray, Meghan E; Wolf, Christian; Maltby, David T; Bell, Eric F; Böhm, Asmus; Jogee, Shardha

    2015-01-01

    We study the links between star formation history and structure for a large mass-selected galaxy sample at 0.05 < z_phot < 0.30. The galaxies inhabit a very broad range of environments, from cluster cores to the field. Using HST images, we quantify their structure following Hoyos et al. (2012), and divide them into disturbed and undisturbed. We also visually identify mergers. Additionally, we provide a quantitative measure of the degree of disturbance for each galaxy ("roughness"). The majority of elliptical and lenticular galaxies have relaxed structure, showing no signs of ongoing star formation. Structurally-disturbed galaxies, which tend to avoid the lowest-density regions, have higher star-formation activity and younger stellar populations than undisturbed systems. Cluster spirals with reduced/quenched star formation have somewhat less disturbed morphologies than spirals with "normal" star-formation activity, suggesting that these "passive" spirals have started their morphological transformation in...

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Early Star-Formation History - GRBs and z>4 Star-Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, R.; Petitjean, P.; Robertson, B.; Trenti, M.; Vangioni, E.

    2016-10-01

    We review the uncertainties in high-z star-formation rate (SFR) measures and the constraints that one obtains from high-z gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates on them. We show that at the present time, the GRB rates per unit star-formation at z>3 are higher than at lower redshift. There could be a multitude of reasons for this: a stellar metallicity bias for GRB production, a top-heavy initial mass function (IMF) and/or missing a significant fraction of star-formation in field galaxy surveys due to incompleteness, surface brightness limitations and cosmic variance. We also compare metallicity predictions made using a hierarchical model of cosmic chemical evolution based on two recently proposed SFRs, one based on the observed galaxy luminosity function at high redshift and one based on the GRB rate and find that within the considerable scatter in metal abundance measures, they both are consistent with the data. Analyzing the ensemble of different measurements together, we conclude that despite metallicity biases, GRBs may be a less biased probe of star-formation at z>3 than at z 25 M_{⊙} which are likely GRB progenitors. We also find that to reconcile these measurements with the Thomson scattering cross section of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons measured by Planck, the escape fraction of Lyman-continuum photons from galaxies must be low, about ˜15 % or less and that the clumping factor of the IGM is likely to be small, ˜3. Finally, we demonstrate that GRBs are unique probes of metallicity evolution in low-mass galaxy samples and that GRB hosts likely lost a significant fraction of metals to the intergalactic medium (IGM) due to feedback processes such as stellar winds and supernovae.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Early Star-Formation History. GRBs and z>4 Star-Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, R.; Petitjean, P.; Robertson, B.; Trenti, M.; Vangioni, E.

    2016-12-01

    We review the uncertainties in high-z star-formation rate (SFR) measures and the constraints that one obtains from high-z gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates on them. We show that at the present time, the GRB rates per unit star-formation at z>3 are higher than at lower redshift. There could be a multitude of reasons for this: a stellar metallicity bias for GRB production, a top-heavy initial mass function (IMF) and/or missing a significant fraction of star-formation in field galaxy surveys due to incompleteness, surface brightness limitations and cosmic variance. We also compare metallicity predictions made using a hierarchical model of cosmic chemical evolution based on two recently proposed SFRs, one based on the observed galaxy luminosity function at high redshift and one based on the GRB rate and find that within the considerable scatter in metal abundance measures, they both are consistent with the data. Analyzing the ensemble of different measurements together, we conclude that despite metallicity biases, GRBs may be a less biased probe of star-formation at z>3 than at z}25 M_{⊙} which are likely GRB progenitors. We also find that to reconcile these measurements with the Thomson scattering cross section of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons measured by Planck, the escape fraction of Lyman-continuum photons from galaxies must be low, about ˜15 % or less and that the clumping factor of the IGM is likely to be small, ˜3. Finally, we demonstrate that GRBs are unique probes of metallicity evolution in low-mass galaxy samples and that GRB hosts likely lost a significant fraction of metals to the intergalactic medium (IGM) due to feedback processes such as stellar winds and supernovae.

  15. Formation of a stalled early intermediate of pseudouridine synthesis monitored by real-time FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengesbach, Martin; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Hofmann, Benjamin; Helm, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Pseudouridine is the most abundant of more than 100 chemically distinct natural ribonucleotide modifications. Its synthesis consists of an isomerization reaction of a uridine residue in the RNA chain and is catalyzed by pseudouridine synthases. The unusual reaction mechanism has become the object of renewed research effort, frequently involving replacement of the substrate uridines with 5-fluorouracil (f(5)U). f(5)U is known to be a potent inhibitor of pseudouridine synthase activity, but the effect varies among the target pseudouridine synthases. Derivatives of f(5)U have previously been detected, which are thought to be either hydrolysis products of covalent enzyme-RNA adducts, or isomerization intermediates. Here we describe the interaction of pseudouridine synthase 1 (Pus1p) with f(5)U-containing tRNA. The interaction described is specific to Pus1p and position 27 in the tRNA anticodon stem, but the enzyme neither forms a covalent adduct nor stalls at a previously identified reaction intermediate of f(5)U. The f(5)U27 residue, as analyzed by a DNAzyme-based assay using TLC and mass spectrometry, displayed physicochemical properties unaltered by the reversible interaction with Pus1p. Thus, Pus1p binds an f(5)U-containing substrate, but, in contrast to other pseudouridine synthases, leaves the chemical structure of f(5)U unchanged. The specific, but nonproductive, interaction demonstrated here thus constitutes an intermediate of Pus turnover, stalled by the presence of f(5)U in an early state of catalysis. Observation of the interaction of Pus1p with fluorescence-labeled tRNA by a real-time readout of fluorescence anisotropy and FRET revealed significant structural distortion of f(5)U-tRNA structure in the stalled intermediate state of pseudouridine catalysis.

  16. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  17. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Mh, Mohammed; Gandhi, Hemang; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, 'FASTR', for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. 'FASTR' - the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant 'fastr' string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the 'FASTR' methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  18. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tungadri Bose; Anirban Dutta; Mohammed Mh; Hemang Gandhi; Sharmila S Mande

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, `FASTR’, for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. `FASTR’ – the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant `fastr’ string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the `FASTR’ methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  19. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs.

  20. The SAURON project - XV. Modes of star formation in early-type galaxies and the evolution of the red sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, K L; van de Ven, G; de Zeeuw, P T; Sarzi, M; Bacon, R; Bolatto, A; Cappellari, M; Croton, D; Davies, R L; Emsellem, E; Fakhouri, O; Krajnovic, D; Kuntschner, H; McDermid, R M; Peletier, R F; Bosch, R C E van den; van der Wolk, G

    2009-01-01

    We combine SAURON integral field data of a representative sample of local early-type, red sequence galaxies with Spitzer/IRAC imaging in order to investigate the presence of trace star formation in these systems. With the Spitzer data, we identify galaxies hosting low-level star formation, as traced by PAH emission, with measured star formation rates that compare well to those estimated from other tracers. This star formation proceeds according to established scaling relations with molecular gas content, in surface density regimes characteristic of disk galaxies and circumnuclear starbursts. We find that star formation in early-type galaxies happens exclusively in fast-rotating systems and occurs in two distinct modes. In the first, star formation is a diffuse process, corresponding to widespread young stellar populations and high molecular gas content. The equal presence of co- and counter-rotating components in these systems strongly implies an external origin for the star-forming gas, and we argue that the...

  1. Testing Structure Formation in the Universe via Coupled Matter Fluids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kagoyire

    Kenya. 2The Astrophysics ... matter density that mimics recently published results from halo theory of N-body ... understanding the way in which structures such as galaxies form, still ... observational data with a minimum number of free parameters.

  2. A rapid, membrane-dependent pathway directs furrow formation through RalA in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Ryan M; Mavor, Lauren M; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Blankenship, J Todd

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane furrow formation is crucial in cell division and cytokinesis. Furrow formation in early syncytial Drosophila embryos is exceptionally rapid, with furrows forming in as little as 3.75 min. Here, we use 4D imaging to identify furrow formation, stabilization, and regression periods, and identify a rapid, membrane-dependent pathway that is essential for plasma membrane furrow formation in vivo. Myosin II function is thought to provide the ingression force for cytokinetic furrows, but the role of membrane trafficking pathways in guiding furrow formation is less clear. We demonstrate that a membrane trafficking pathway centered on Ras-like protein A (RalA) is required for fast furrow ingression in the early fly embryo. RalA function is absolutely required for furrow formation and initiation. In the absence of RalA and furrow function, chromosomal segregation is aberrant and polyploid nuclei are observed. RalA localizes to syncytial furrows, and mediates the movement of exocytic vesicles to the plasma membrane. Sec5, which is an exocyst complex subunit and localizes to ingressing furrows in wild-type embryos, becomes punctate and loses its cortical association in the absence of RalA function. Rab8 also fails to traffic to the plasma membrane and accumulates aberrantly in the cytoplasm in RalA disrupted embryos. RalA localization precedes F-actin recruitment to the furrow tip, suggesting that membrane trafficking might function upstream of cytoskeletal remodeling. These studies identify a pathway, which stretches from Rab8 to RalA and the exocyst complex, that mediates rapid furrow formation in early Drosophila embryos.

  3. Formation and Characterization of CdS Hollow Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Peng; YU Haihu; DENG Jinyang; JIANG Desheng

    2008-01-01

    CdS hollow structures were built up by using the one pot method and using carbon disulfide (CS2) and ethylenediamine as starting materials. CS2 is insoluble in water and could form metastable oil droplets in the water at a moderate temperature. The oil droplets formed chains in the circumvolving water. CdS crystals grew and mineralized on the surfaces of the CS2 droplet chains, forming CdS shells around the unreacted CS2 cores. After the surrounding temperature was raised above the boiling point of CS2, the unreacted CS2 cores vaporized, leaving the CdS shelled hollow structures. The CdS hollow structures were characterized by using a transmission electron microscope, an X-ray diffractometer, a UV-Visible spectrophotometer and a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The CdS hollow structures were mainly tubes with closed ends. The exterior diameter and the interior diameter of tubes were about 50nm and about 15nm, respectively. Compared with the absorption onset wavelength of the bulk CdS, the CdS hollow structures exhibited a blue shift of about 57nm. While excited at 213nm. the CdS hollow structures emitted greenish blue light centered at 470nm.

  4. Evaluating Different Scenarios for the Formation and Early Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, David P.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2014-11-01

    The asteroid belt is dynamically excited, depleted in mass relative to the surface mass density of the rest of the Solar System, and contains numerous diverse taxonomic classes of asteroids that are partly, but not completely, radially mixed. In the 'classical' scenario of Solar System formation, the excitation, depletion and radial mixing of the asteroid belt is best explained by the effect of planetary embryos that are initially present in the primordial asteroid belt region [1-3]. In the more recent 'Grand Tack' scenario proposed by Walsh et al. [4], the early inward-then-outward migration of Jupiter in the gas disk initially depletes, then repopulates the asteroid belt with material scattered from both interior and exterior to Jupiter. Here we will examine in detail the model asteroid distributions resulting from these two scenarios for a range of parameters, and compare them to observational constraints on the current distribution of asteroids in the Solar System. We will also address the possible effects that late-stage planetesimal-driven migration and resonance-crossing of Jupiter and Saturn in the Nice Model [eg. 5,6] may have on the final asteroid distribution.[1] G.W. Wetherill, Icarus 100, 307-325 (1992)[2] J.-M. Petit et al., Icarus 153, 338-347 (2001)[3] D.P. O'Brien t al., Icarus 191, 434-452 (2007)[4] K.J. Walsh et al., Nature 475, 206-209 (2011)[5] K. Tsiganis et al., Nature 435, 459-461 (2005)[6] A. Morbidelli et al., AJ 140, 1391-1401 (2010)

  5. Early staphylococcal biofilm formation on solid orthopaedic implant materials: in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Koseki

    Full Text Available Biofilms forming on the surface of biomaterials can cause intractable implant-related infections. Bacterial adherence and early biofilm formation are influenced by the type of biomaterial used and the physical characteristics of implant surface. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis, the main pathogen in implant-related infections, to form biofilms on the surface of the solid orthopaedic biomaterials, oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy, cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy (Co-Cr-Mo, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V, commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti and stainless steel. A bacterial suspension of Staphylococcus epidermidis strain RP62A (ATCC35984 was added to the surface of specimens and incubated. The stained biofilms were imaged with a digital optical microscope and the biofilm coverage rate (BCR was calculated. The total amount of biofilm was determined with the crystal violet assay and the number of viable cells in the biofilm was counted using the plate count method. The BCR of all the biomaterials rose in proportion to culture duration. After culturing for 2-4 hours, the BCR was similar for all materials. However, after culturing for 6 hours, the BCR for Co-Cr-Mo alloy was significantly lower than for Ti-6Al-4V, cp-Ti and stainless steel (P0.05. These results suggest that surface properties, such as hydrophobicity or the low surface free energy of Co-Cr-Mo, may have some influence in inhibiting or delaying the two-dimensional expansion of biofilm on surfaces with a similar degree of smoothness.

  6. Effect of a xenograft on early bone formation in extraction sockets: an experimental study in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, M; Linder, E; Lindhe, J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the effect on early bone formation resulting from the placement of a xenograft in the fresh extraction socket in dogs. Five beagle dogs were used. The distal roots of the third and fourth mandibular premolars were removed. In one quadrant, a graft consisting of Bio-Oss Collagen was placed in the fresh extraction wound, while the corresponding premolar sites in the contra-lateral jaw quadrant were left non-grafted. After 2 weeks of healing, the dogs were perfused with a fixative, the mandibles removed, the experimental sites dissected, demineralized, sectioned in the mesio-distal plane and stained in hematoxyline-eosine. The central portion of the non-grafted sockets was occupied by a provisional matrix comprised of densely packed connective tissue fibers and mesenchymal cells. Apical and lateral to the provisional matrix, newly formed woven bone was found to occupy most of the sockets. In the apical part of the grafted sockets, no particles of the xenograft could be observed but newly formed bone was present in this portion of the experimental site. In addition, limited numbers of woven bone trabeculae occurred along the lateral socket walls. The central and marginal segments of the grafted sockets, however, were occupied by a non-mineralized connective tissue that enclosed Bio-Oss particles that frequently were coated by multinucleated cells. The placement of Bio-Oss Collagen in the fresh extraction wound obviously delayed socket healing. Thus, after 2 weeks of tissue repair, only minute amounts of newly formed bone occurred in the apical and lateral borders of the grafted sockets, while large amounts of woven bone had formed in most parts of the non-grafted sites.

  7. Lipid Microdomains: Structural Correlations, Fluctuations, and Formation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-03-01

    Compositional lipid microdomains (“lipid rafts”) in mammalian plasma membranes are believed to facilitate many important cellular processes. While several physically distinct scenarios predicting the presence of finite-sized microdomains in vivo have been proposed in the past, direct experimental verification or falsification of model predictions has remained elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the combination of the spatial correlation and temporal fluctuation spectra of the lipid domains can be employed to unambiguously differentiate between the existing theoretical scenarios. Furthermore, the differentiation of the raft formation mechanisms using this methodology can be achieved by collecting data at physiologically relevant conditions without the need to tune control parameters.

  8. The formation and evolution of dark matter halos early in cosmic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Alllan David; Collins, Matthew P.

    2015-08-01

    Observational evidence points to the formation of super-massive black holes, heavy elements and halo structure much earlier in cosmic history than expected [1], and this is challenging for Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) theory. However, if photon scattering cross sections were less than expected it becomes possible for halos to form at earlier times and relax the tensions that exist with LCDM theory. This may indeed be the case: it has recently been shown [2,3] that photon-particle scattering cross sections vary significantly with the eigenspectral distribution of the scattering particle in deep gravity wells, an effect that depends on the degree of localization of the particle wavefunction and the proximity of the halo to thermal equilibrium. Cross sections tend to be lower the larger and deeper the gravitational well. This purely quantum effect means that accepted cross sections, as measured on Earth and used to determine the rate and timing of halo formation, may not be applicable to deep gravity wells, not only at the present epoch but throughout cosmic history.By combining reduced photon scattering cross sections with Carr’s primordial black hole mass spectrum formulation[4] calculated at the last phase transition (t = 1 s), it is possible to provide a scenario of halo formation that enables galaxies and halos to form much earlier in cosmic history, yet maintain consistency with cosmic microwave background observations and primordial nucleosynthesis. In addition this scenario provides a unified model relating globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and bulges, enables an understanding of the black hole-bulge/black hole-dark halo relations, and enables prediction of dark to visible matter, based on the physical parameters of a halo. This scenario will be presented and discussed.[1] Xue-Bing Wu et al, 2015, Nature, 518,512-515 doi: 10.1038/nature14241[2] Ernest A. D., 2009, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 115207, 115208[3] Ernest A. D, 2012, in Advances in

  9. Structure formation in warm dark matter cosmologies: Top-Bottom Upside-Down

    CERN Document Server

    Paduroiu, Sinziana; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The damping on the fluctuation spectrum and the presence of thermal velocities as properties of warm dark matter particles like sterile neutrinos imprint a distinct signature found from the structure formation mechanisms to the internal structures of halos. Using warm dark matter simulations we explore these effects on the structure formation for different particle energies and we find that the formation of structure is more complex than originally assumed, a combination of top-down collapse and hierarchical (bottom-up) clustering on multiple scales. The degree on which one scenario is more prominent with respect to the other depends globally on the energy of the particle and locally on the morphology and architecture of the analyzed region. The presence of shells and caustics in warm dark matter haloes is another important effect seen in simulations. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of thermal velocities on the structure formation from theoretical considerations as well as from the analysis of the simulati...

  10. How chemistry influences cloud structure, star formation, and the IMF

    CERN Document Server

    Hocuk, S; Spaans, M; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01

    In the earliest phases of star-forming clouds, stable molecular species, such as CO, are important coolants in the gas phase. Depletion of these molecules on dust surfaces affects the thermal balance of molecular clouds and with that their whole evolution. For the first time, we study the effect of grain surface chemistry (GSC) on star formation and its impact on the initial mass function (IMF). We follow a contracting translucent cloud in which we treat the gas-grain chemical interplay in detail, including the process of freeze-out. We perform 3d hydrodynamical simulations under three different conditions, a pure gas-phase model, a freeze-out model, and a complete chemistry model. The models display different thermal evolution during cloud collapse. The equation of state (EOS) of the gas becomes softer with CO freeze-out and the results show that at the onset of star formation, the cloud retains its evolution history such that the number of formed stars differ (by 7%) between the three models. While the stel...

  11. The ATLAS3D project - XXII. Low-efficiency star formation in early-type galaxies: hydrodynamic models and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Martig, Marie; Bournaud, Frederic; Emsellem, Eric; Gabor, Jared M; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; Dekel, Avishai; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; McDermid, Richard M; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Griffin, Kristen Shapiro; Teyssier, Romain; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    We study the global efficiency of star formation in high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of gas discs embedded in isolated early-type and spiral galaxies. Despite using a universal local law to form stars in the simulations, we find that the early-type galaxies are offset from the spirals on the large-scale Kennicutt relation, and form stars 2 to 5 times less efficiently. This offset is in agreement with previous results on morphological quenching: gas discs are more stable against star formation when embedded in early-type galaxies due to the lower disc self-gravity and increased shear. As a result, these gas discs do not fragment into dense clumps and do not reach as high densities as in the spiral galaxies. Even if some molecular gas is present, the fraction of very dense gas (above 10^4 cm-3) is significantly reduced, which explains the overall lower star formation efficiency. We also analyse a sample of local early-type and spiral galaxies, measuring their CO and HI surface densities and their star...

  12. The role of the river Rhine in the formation of spatial structure of the economy of European countries (1st century BC — 19th century AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazhdankin Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the main historical stages of formation of spatial economic structure of the European countries, parts of whose territories lie within the Rhine basin. The analysis covers a protracted chronological interval from the Roman colonization until the beginning of the 20th century. The author emphasizes the role of the River Rhine in the course of territorial structure formation. This study aims to retrace the historical sequence of the formation of territorial structure of economies of the Rhine basin countries. The research and practical significance of the work lies in the identification of the periods of increased activity in the formation of spatial structural communications of the states mentioned. The author applies the historical-descriptive approach and cartographical-geographical modelling to identify the main stages of this process. The author arrives at the following conclusions. The beginning of the formation of spatial structure of economies of the Rhine basin countries dates back to the Roman period of the history of European states rather than the industrial revolution. Similarly, it is possible to assume that primitive integration processes started to develop in the region in the same period. Throughout history, the River Rhine has served as the central axis for economic structure development. The practical significance of the article lies in identifying the early — previously insufficiently studied — stages of formation of territorial economic structure in the historical and geographical context.

  13. The role of the river Rhine in the formation of spatial structure of the economy of European countries (1st century BC — 19th century AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazhdankin A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the main historical stages of formation of spatial economic structure of the European countries, parts of whose territories lie within the Rhine basin. The analysis covers a protracted chronological interval from the Roman colonization until the beginning of the 20th century. The author emphasizes the role of the River Rhine in the course of territorial structure formation. This study aims to retrace the historical sequence of the formation of territorial structure of economies of the Rhine basin countries. The research and practical significance of the work lies in the identification of the periods of increased activity in the formation of spatial structural communications of the states mentioned. The author applies the historical-descriptive approach and cartographical-geographical modelling to identify the main stages of this process. The author arrives at the following conclusions. The beginning of the formation of spatial structure of economies of the Rhine basin countries dates back to the Roman period of the history of European states rather than the industrial revolution. Similarly, it is possible to assume that primitive integration processes started to develop in the region in the same period. Throughout history, the River Rhine has served as the central axis for economic structure development. The practical significance of the article lies in identifying the early — previously insufficiently studied — stages of formation of territorial economic structure in the historical and geographical context.

  14. Star Formation History of Early-Type Galaxies in Low Density Environments; 5, Blue line-strength indices for the nuclear region

    CERN Document Server

    Longhetti, M; Chiosi, C; Rampazzo, R

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the star formation properties of a sample of 21 shell galaxies and 30 early-type galaxies members of interacting pairs, located in low density environments (Longhetti et al 1998a, 1998b). The study is based on new models developed to interpret the information coming from `blue' H$\\delta$/FeI, H+K(CaII) and \\D4000 line-strength indices proposed by Rose (1984; 1985) and Hamilton (1985). We find that the last star forming event that occurred in the nuclear region of shell galaxies is statistically old (from 0.1 up to several Gyr) with respect to the corresponding one in the sub-sample of pair galaxies (<0.1 Gyr or even ongoing star formation). If the stellar activity is somehow related to the formation of shells, as predicted by several dynamical models of galaxy interaction, shells have to be considered long lasting structures. Since pair members show evidence of very recent star formation, we suggest that either large reservoirs of gas have to be present to maintain active star formation, if thes...

  15. Electric Field Structures in Thin Films: Formation and Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, Andrew; Plekan, Oksana; Balog, Richard

    2014-01-01

    by combining layers of different spontelectric materials. This is demonstrated using the spontelectric materials nitrous oxide, toluene, isoprene, isopentane, and CF2Cl2. These yield a variety of tailored electric field structures, with individual layers harboring fields between 107 and 108 V/m. Fields may......A newly discovered class of molecular materials, so-called “spontelectrics”, display spontaneous electric fields. Here we show that the novel properties of spontelectrics can be used to create composite spontelectrics, illustrating how electric fields in solid films may be structured on the nanoscale...

  16. Formation of titanium carbide coating with micro-porous structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Ge, Shirong; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2010-03-01

    Micro-porous titanium carbide coating was successfully synthesized in a vacuum gas carburizing furnace by using a sequential diffusion technology. The composition and structure of the as-synthesized TiC were examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All of the XRD, XPS and GDMS analysis results indicate that carbon atoms effectively diffused into the titanium alloys and formed a uniform acicular TiC coating with micro-porous structure.

  17. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  18. Formation and Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies. III Star formation history as a function of mass and over-density

    CERN Document Server

    Merlin, Emiliano; Piovan, Lorenzo; Grassi, Tommaso; Buonomo, Umberto; La Barbera, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the initial proto-galaxies over-densities and masses on their evolution, to understand whether the internal properties of the proto-galactic haloes are sufficient to account for the varied properties of the galactic populations. By means of fully hydrodynamical N-body simulations performed with the code EvoL we produce twelve self-similar models of early-type galaxies of different initial masses and over-densities, following their evolution from z \\geq 20 down to z \\leq 1. The simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, stellar energy feedback, a reionizing photoheating background, and chemical enrichment of the ISM. We find a strong correlation between the initial properties of the proto-haloes and their star formation histories. Massive (10^13M\\odot) haloes experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates \\geq 10^3M\\odot/yr) at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a less pronounced dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate m...

  19. Structure and Formation of Comets: Updates from Post-Rosetta Solid Fraction Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Bentley, M. S.; Kofman, W. W.; Brouet, Y.; Ciarletti, V.; Hadamcik, E.; Herique, A.; Lasue, J.; Mannel, T.; Schmied, R.

    2016-12-01

    The combination of investigations of 67P/C-G by Rosetta, theoretical and experimental studies, and remote observations allowed unprecedented insight into the structure and formation of comets. Rosetta mission has provided ground-truth for the low-density and high porosity of the nucleus, without heterogeneities larger than a few meters in its small lobe [1,2]. Further studies related to CONSERT experiment now suggest that the porosity increases inside the nucleus [3,4]. Rosetta has also provided ground-truth for the aggregated structure of dust particles within a wide range of sizes in the inner coma [e.g. 5-7]. Such discoveries confirm previous interpretations of remote observations of solar light scattered by dust in cometary comae. Differences in structure between the two parts of the nucleus, strongly suspected from previous high-resolution images of the surface [8] and possibly suggested from some remote observations in fragmenting sub-nuclei [9], might be pointed out from data obtained shortly before Rosetta controlled descent in September 2016. Further analyses by MIDAS of dust particles morphology at submicron-sizes [7,10], as well as compilations of remote observations of solar light scattered by 67P/C-G [11], are presently taking place. We will discuss how such results could lead to a better understanding of dust growth processes during the formation, specifically of 67P/C-G, and more generally, thanks to the link now provided between structural properties of dust and remote polarimetric observations, of comet's nuclei in the early Solar System. References. 1 Kofman et al. Science 2015. 2 Pätzold et al. Nature 2016. 3 Ciarletti et al. A&A 2015. 4 Brouet et al. MNRAS 2016 (under revision). 5. Rotundi et al. Science 2015. 6 Langevin et al. Icarus 2016. 7 Bentley et al. Nature 2016. 8 Massironi et al. Nature 2016. 9 Hadamcik et al. A&A 2016. 10. Mannel et al. Leiden symposium 2016. 11 Hadamcik et al. Leiden symposium 2016.

  20. Segregation of Central Ventricular Conduction System Lineages in Early SMA+ Cardiomyocytes Occurs Prior to Heart Tube Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Choquet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac conduction system (CCS transmits electrical activity from the atria to the ventricles to coordinate heartbeats. Atrioventricular conduction diseases are often associated with defects in the central ventricular conduction system comprising the atrioventricular bundle (AVB and right and left branches (BBs. Conducting and contractile working myocytes share common cardiomyogenic progenitors, however the time at which the CCS lineage becomes specified is unclear. In order to study the fate and the contribution to the CCS of cardiomyocytes during early heart tube formation, we performed a genetic lineage analysis using a Sma-CreERT2 mouse line. Lineage tracing experiments reveal a sequential contribution of early Sma expressing cardiomyocytes to different cardiac compartments, labeling at embryonic day (E 7.5 giving rise to the interventricular septum and apical left ventricular myocardium. Early Sma expressing cardiomyocytes contribute to the AVB, BBs and left ventricular Purkinje fibers. Clonal analysis using the R26-confetti reporter mouse crossed with Sma-CreERT2 demonstrates that early Sma expressing cardiomyocytes include cells exclusively fated to give rise to the AVB. In contrast, lineage segregation is still ongoing for the BBs at E7.5. Overall this study highlights the early segregation of the central ventricular conduction system lineage within cardiomyocytes at the onset of heart tube formation.

  1. Hierarchical structure formation in supramolecular comb-shaped block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Anton; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Loos, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymers are known to spontaneously form ordered structures at the nano-to mesoscale. Although the number of different morphologies is rather limited in diblock copolymer systems, their phase behavior becomes increasingly more complex with each additional building block. Synthesis of such al

  2. The Structure and Development of Dispositional Compassion in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Hans; Söderström, Micael; Terjestam, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Compassion may be directed at a broad range of targets. The present study investigated interrelations among other-directed compassion, self-compassion, and environmental compassion in early adolescence (age = 12-14; n = 256) and examined how the different manifestations of compassion related to age and sex during this age period. Dispositional…

  3. Tidal Tails in Interacting Galaxies: Formation of Compact Stellar Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, B; Konstantopoulos, I S; Bastian, N; Chandar, R; Durrell, P R; Elmegreen, D; English, J; Gallagher, S C; Gronwall, C; Hibbard, J E; Hunsberger, S; Johnson, K E; Kepley, A; Knierman, K; Koribalski, B; Lee, K H; Maybhate, A; Palma, C; Vacca, W D

    2009-01-01

    We have used V- and I- band images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to identify compact stellar clusters within the tidal tails of twelve different interacting galaxies. The seventeen tails within our sample span a physical parameter space of HI/stellar masses, tail pressure and density through their diversity of tail lengths, optical brightnesses, mass ratios, HI column densities, stage on the Toomre sequence, and tail kinematics. Our preliminary findings in this study indicate that star cluster demographics of the tidal tail environment are compatible with the current understanding of star cluster formation in quiescent systems, possibly only needing changes in certain parameters or normalization of the Schechter cluster initial mass function (CIMF) to replicate what we observe in color-magnitude diagrams and a brightest absolute magnitude -- log N plot.

  4. Beyond the Chandrasekhar limit: Structure and formation of compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Bhattacharya

    2011-07-01

    The concept of limiting mass, introduced by Chandrasekhar in case of white dwarfs, plays an important role in the formation and stability of compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Like white dwarfs, neutron stars have their own mass limit, and a compact configuration would progress from one family to the next, more dense one once a mass limit is crossed. The mass limit of neutron stars depends on the nature of nuclear forces at very high density, which has so far not been determined conclusively. This article reviews how observational determinations of the properties of neutron stars are starting to impose significant constraints on the state of matter at high density

  5. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyet, Jessica; Naylor, Claire E; Savva, Christos G; Gibert, Maryse; Popoff, Michel R; Basak, Ajit K

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF) revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB) cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  6. Microstructure of polycrystalline PBTTT films: domain mapping and structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettfort, Torben; Watts, Benjamin; Thomsen, Lars; Lee, Mijung; Sirringhaus, Henning; McNeill, Christopher R

    2012-02-28

    We utilize near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to study the microstructure and domain structure of polycrystalline films of the semiconducting polymer poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT). Total electron yield NEXAFS spectroscopy is used to examine the surface structure of the first 1-2 molecular layers, while bulk-sensitive STXM is used to produce maps of domain orientation and order sampled through the entire film thickness. We study different phases of PBTTT including as-cast, terraced and nanoribbon morphologies produced via spin-coating as well as aligned films of as-cast and nanoribbon morphologies produced by zone-casting. For the terraced morphology, domains are observed that are larger than the size of the terraced surface features, and the calculated degree of order is reduced compared to the nanoribbon morphology. For zone-cast films, we find that, although little optical anisotropy is observed in the bulk of as-cast films, a high degree of surface structural anisotropy is observed with NEXAFS spectroscopy, similar to what is observed in annealed nanoribbon films. This observation indicates that the aligned surface structure in unannealed zone-cast films templates the bulk ordering of the aligned nanoribbon phase. STXM domain mapping of aligned nanoribbon films reveals elongated, micrometer-wide domains with each domain misoriented with respect to its neighbor by up to 45°, but with broad domain boundaries. Within each nanoribbon domain, a high degree of X-ray dichroism is observed, indicating correlated ordering throughout the bulk of the film.

  7. 3D perfusion bioreactor-activated porous granules on implant fixation and early bone formation in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Snoek Henriksen, Susan; Martinetti, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Early fixation of total joint arthroplasties is crucial for ensuring implant survival. An alternative bone graft material in revision surgery is needed to replace the current gold standard, allograft, seeing that the latter is associated with several disadvantages. The incubation of such a constr......, bone formation was observed in all groups, while the bioreactor-activated graft material did not reveal additional effects on early implant fixation comparable to allograft in this model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016....

  8. Unconstrained Structure Formation in Coarse-Grained Protein Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan

    The ability of proteins to fold into well-defined structures forms the basis of a wide variety of biochemical functions in and out of the cell membrane. Many of these processes, however, operate at time- and length-scales that are currently unattainable by all-atom computer simulations. To cope with this difficulty, increasingly more accurate and sophisticated coarse-grained models are currently being developed. In the present thesis, we introduce a solvent-free coarse-grained model for proteins. Proteins are modeled by four beads per amino acid, providing enough backbone resolution to allow for accurate sampling of local conformations. It relies on simple interactions that emphasize structure, such as hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity. Realistic alpha/beta content is achieved by including an effective nearest-neighbor dipolar interaction. Parameters are tuned to reproduce both local conformations and tertiary structures. By studying both helical and extended conformations we make sure the force field is not biased towards any particular secondary structure. Without any further adjustments or bias a realistic oligopeptide aggregation scenario is observed. The model is subsequently applied to various biophysical problems: (i) kinetics of folding of two model peptides, (ii) large-scale amyloid-beta oligomerization, and (iii) protein folding cooperativity. The last topic---defined by the nature of the finite-size thermodynamic transition exhibited upon folding---was investigated from a microcanonical perspective: the accurate evaluation of the density of states can unambiguously characterize the nature of the transition, unlike its corresponding canonical analysis. Extending the results of lattice simulations and theoretical models, we find that it is the interplay between secondary structure and the loss of non-native tertiary contacts which determines the nature of the transition. Finally, we combine the peptide model with a high-resolution, solvent-free, lipid

  9. The equilibrium structure of cosmological halos and the effects of feedback on cosmological structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Ilian Tzankov

    The postcollapse structure of objects which form by gravitational condensation out of the expanding cosmological background universe is a key element in the theory of galaxy formation. Towards this end, we present an analytical model for the postcollapse equilibrium structure of virialized objects which condense out of a cosmological background universe, either matter-dominated or flat with a cosmological constant. The model is based upon the assumption that cosmological halos form from the collapse and virialization of "top-hat" density perturbations and are spherical, isotropic, and isothermal. This leads to the prediction of a unique nonsingular truncated isothermal sphere (TIS), a particular solution of the Lane-Emden equation (suitably modified when Λ ≠ 0). The size and virial temperature are unique functions of the mass and redshift of formation of the object for a given background universe. The core density is roughly proportional to the critical density of the universe at the epoch of collapse. The rotation curves of dark-matter-dominated galaxies probe the mass profile of the underlying galactic halo. This TIS model is in excellent agreement with observations of the mass profiles of dark-matter-dominated galaxies and yields the mass and collapse epoch of an observed halo from the parameters of its rotation curve. This allows us to predict correlations amongst rotation curve parameters, such as the maximum velocity and the radius at which it occurs, for different mass halos collapsing at different epochs. We thereby derive the observed vmax-r max relation analytically. In addition, this allows us to impose constraints on the background cosmology favoring the flat ΛCDM model. On the scale of galaxy clusters, which are also dark-matter-dominated, the TIS model predicts the relationship between virial temperature and mass observed for X-ray clusters. The model also agrees well with the cluster density profiles inferred from strong gravitational lensing

  10. The formation of filamentary structures in radiative cluster winds

    CERN Document Server

    Rodr'iguez-Gonz'alez, A; Raga, A C; Cant'o, J

    2008-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of a ``cluster wind'' flow in the regime in which the shocks resulting from the interaction of winds from nearby stars are radiative. We first show that for a cluster with T Tauri stars and/or Herbig Ae/Be stars, the wind interactions are indeed likely to be radiative. We then compute a set of four, three dimensional, radiative simulations of a cluster of 75 young stars, exploring the effects of varying the wind parameters and the density of the initial ISM that permeates the volume of the cluster. These simulations show that the ISM is compressed by the action of the winds into a structure of dense knots and filaments. The structures that are produced resemble in a qualitative way the observations of the IRAS 18511+0146 of Vig et al. (2007).

  11. Chitinoidellids from the Early Tithonian-Early Valanginian Vaca Muerta Formation in the Northern Neuquén Basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzmann, Diego A.

    2017-07-01

    As part of microfacies studies carried out on the Tithonian - Valanginian carbonate ramp of the Neuquén Basin, two stratigraphic sections of the Vaca Muerta Formation (Arroyo Loncoche and Río Seco de la Cara Cura) were chosen in order to analyze the chitinoidellid content and distribution. Calpionellids in the studied sections are relatively poorly preserved; hyaline calcite walls are often recrystallized making the systematic determination difficult. However, microgranular calcite walls seem to have resisted better the incipient neomorphism presented by the limestones of the Vaca Muerta Formation. Seven known species of Chitinoidellidae and four known species of Calpionellidae are recognized. The distribution of calpionellid species allows recognizing the Chitinoidella and Crassicollaria Zones in the Neuquén Basin. The Chitinoidella Zone correlates with the Virgatosphinctes mendozanus-Windhauseniceras internispinosum Andean ammonite Zones, and can be divided into two subzones. The lower one is poorly defined, while the upper one can be assigned to the Boneti Subzone. The Crassicollaria Zone in the Neuquén basin needs a detailed revision, but data provided in this work enable its correlation at least with the Corongoceras alternans ammonite Zone. Similar associations were reported in Mexico and Cuba, showing good consistency between these regions. However, in the Neuquén Basin unlike the Tethys, chitinoidellids persist until the lower Berriasian.

  12. Structural contours of the Hauterivian Qezeltash formation of northern Afghanistan (qezeldpafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains polylines that describe structural contours (subsea elevation) of the Hauterivian Qezeltash formation in northern Afghanistan. Hauterivian...

  13. Structural contours of the Upper Campanian through Paleocene Ghory formation of northern Afghanistan (ghorydpafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains polylines that describe structural contours of subsea elevation of the top of the Upper Campanian through Paleocene Ghory formation in...

  14. Formation and erosion of biogeomorphological structures: A model study on the tube-building polychaete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, B.W.; Bouma, T.J.; Rabaut, M.; Herman, P.M.J.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Borsje, B.W.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We study how organism traits and population densities of ecosystem engineering species, in combination withenvironmental factors, affect the formation and erosion rates of biogeomorphological structures, and focus on thewidely distributed marine tube-building polychaete Lanice conchilega, which live

  15. THE FORMATION OF THE MODIFIED CONCRETE STRUCTURE FOR PIPE COLLECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Pylypenko

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article main points of developed technology of vibroimpact-pulse compaction of concrete mix for producing the pipes of sewage collectors are stated. It is shown that using the offered technology ensures the intensive growth of concrete strength at an initial period of hardening, the reduction of duration of heat treatment or its absolute avoidance, the manufacture of products with the stability and longevity of structures.

  16. Liquid Metal-Organic Frameworks: Formation Mechanism, Structure and Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillac, Romain; Pullumbi, Pluton; Beyer, Kevin A.; Chapman, Karena W.; Keen, David A.; Bennett, Thomas D.; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Metal--organic frameworks are a novel family of chemically diverse materials, with applications in a wide field covering engineering, physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. Research so far has focused almost entirely on crystalline structures, yet a clear trend has emerged shifting the emphasis onto disordered states of MOFs, including "defective by design" crystals, as well as amorphous phases such as glasses and gels. Here we introduce a MOF liquid, a strongly associated liquid obtained ...

  17. Structure formation upon barocryodeformation of a steel of austenitic class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoshina, I. A.; Khaymovich, P. A.; Chernyaeva, E. V.; Shulgin, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    Data are given concerning the opportunity of applying barocryodeformation (plastic deformation under the conditions of severe uniform compression at cryogenic temperatures) to produce ultrafine-disperse martensitic structure in Kh18N10T steel (≤0.08 C, 18 Cr, 10 Ni, treatment. Experiments are described that make it possible to explain the high (in spite of the presence of large forces of uniform compression) rate of completion of the martensitic transition upon the deformation of the steel under such conditions.

  18. Structure formation in a nonlocally modified gravity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sohyun; Dodelson, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We study a nonlocally modified gravity model proposed by Deser and Woodard which gives an explanation for current cosmic acceleration. By deriving and solving the equations governing the evolution of the structure in the Universe, we show that this model predicts a pattern of growth that differs from standard general relativity (+dark energy) at the 10-30% level. These differences will be easily probed by the next generation of galaxy surveys, so the model should be tested shortly.

  19. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  20. Structural ensembles of the north belt of Venus deformations and possible mechanisms of their formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses structural formations in the northern deformation belt of Venus, studied according to the data of the radar pictures obtained with the Venera 15 and 16 probes. He shows that it consists of regions of compression with submeridional orientation, regions of displacement, extending in the sublatitudinal direction and individual slightly deformed blocks. He puts forward the hypothesis that the formation of these structures is related with horizontal movements in the mantle in the sublatitudinal direction.

  1. Structures in the fundamental plane of early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental plane of early-type galaxies is a rather tight three-parameter correlation discovered more than twenty years ago. It has resisted a both global and precise physical interpretation despite a consequent number of works, observational, theoretical or using numerical simulations. It appears that its precise properties depend on the population of galaxies in study. Instead of selecting a priori these populations, we propose to objectively construct homologous populations from multivariate analyses. We have undertaken multivariate cluster and cladistic analyses of a sample of 56 low-redshift galaxy clusters containing 699 early-type galaxies, using four parameters: effective radius, velocity dispersion, surface brightness averaged over effective radius, and Mg2 index. All our analyses are consistent with seven groups that define separate regions on the global fundamental plane, not across its thickness. In fact, each group shows its own fundamental plane, which is more loosely defined for less diver...

  2. A new avian fauna from the early-middle Eocene Lillebælt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    A number of hitherto undescribed fossil bird remains have been recovered from the Lillebælt Clay Formation of central Denmark, which is early-middle Eocene in age (~50 to 43 mya). The core of the material consists of fossils acquired through the Danish ‘Danekræ' fossil treasure trove legislation....... Almost two-thirds of the fossils are isolated skulls preserved three-dimensionally in clay ironstone concretions; bird fossils of this age and degree of preservation are extremely rare in an international context. A preliminary investigation has revealed the presence of at least one odontopterygid......, a member of the extinct 'pseudo-toothed birds' and the first representative of this group known from Denmark. Other taxa present include remains of Lithornithidae and a new taxon possessing a massive, psittacid-like beak. The Lillebælt Clay Formation birds are temporally placed just after the Early Eocene...

  3. Metal Cooling in Simulations of Cosmic Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Britton D; Abel, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The addition of metals to any gas can significantly alter its evolution by increasing the rate of radiative cooling. In star-forming environments, enhanced cooling can potentially lead to fragmentation and the formation of low-mass stars, where metal-free gas-clouds have been shown not to fragment. Adding metal cooling to numerical simulations has traditionally required a choice between speed and accuracy. We introduce a method that uses the sophisticated chemical network of the photoionization software, CLOUDY, to include radiative cooling from a complete set of metals up to atomic number 30 (Zn) that can be used with large-scale three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Our method is valid over an extremely large temperature range (50 K 10^-4 Zsun, regions of density and temperature exist where gas is both thermally unstable and has a cooling time less than its dynamical time. We identify these doubly unstable regions as the most inducive to fragmentation. At high redshifts, the cosmic microwave backgrou...

  4. Merger Histories in Warm Dark Matter Structure Formation Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Knebe, A; Mahmood, A; Silk, J; Knebe, Alexander; Devriendt, Julien; Mahmood, Asim; Silk, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Observations on galactic scales seem to be in contradiction with recent high resolution N-body simulations. This so-called cold dark matter (CDM) crisis has been addressed in several ways, ranging from a change in fundamental physics by introducing self-interacting cold dark matter particles to a tuning of complex astrophysical processes such as global and/or local feedback. All these efforts attempt to soften density profiles and reduce the abundance of satellites in simulated galaxy halos. In this paper, we explore a somewhat different approach which consists of filtering the dark matter power spectrum on small scales, thereby altering the formation history of low mass objects. The physical motivation for damping these fluctuations lies in the possibility that the dark matter particles have a different nature i.e. are warm (WDM) rather than cold. We show that this leads to some interesting new results in terms of the merger history and large-scale distribution of low mass halos, as compared to the standard ...

  5. Kinematic structure at the early flight position in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodičar, Janez; Coh, Milan; Jošt, Bojan

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our research was to establish the variability of correlation between the length of the jumps and selected multi-item kinematic variables (n=9) in the early flight phase technique of ski jumping. This study was conducted on a sample of elite Slovenian ski jumpers (N=29) who participated in the experiment on a jumping hill in Hinterzarten, Germany (HS95m) on the 20(th) of August, 2008. The highest and most significant correlations (p=0.01) with the length of the ski jump were found in the multi-item variable height of flying, which was also expressed with the highest level of stability of the explained total variance (TV) on the first factor (TV=69.13%). The most important characteristic of the aerodynamic aspect of early flight was the variable angle between the body chord and the horizontal axis with significantly high correlations (pski and left leg (TV=50.13%), had an explained common variance on the first factor greater than 50% of total variance. The results indicated that some kinematic parameters of ski jumping early flight technique were more important for success considering the length of the jump.

  6. Maternal Hypothyroidism in Early Pregnancy and Infant Structural Congenital Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Källén

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The question is debated on whether maternal hypothyroidism or use of thyroxin in early pregnancy affects the risk for infant congenital malformations. Objectives. To expand the previously published study on maternal thyroxin use in early pregnancy and the risk for congenital malformations. Methods. Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register were used for the years 1996–2011 and infant malformations were identified from national health registers. Women with preexisting diabetes or reporting the use of thyreostatics, anticonvulsants, or antihypertensives were excluded from analysis. Risk estimates were made as odds ratios (ORs or risk ratios (RRs after adjustment for year of delivery, maternal age, parity, smoking, and body mass index. Results. Among 23 259 infants whose mothers in early pregnancy used thyroxin, 730 had a major malformation; among all 1 567 736 infants, 48012 had such malformations. The adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI 0.98–1.14. For anal atresia the RR was 1.85 (95% CI 1.00–1.85 and for choanal atresia 3.14 (95% CI 1.26–6.47. The risk of some other malformations was also increased but statistical significance was not reached. Conclusions. Treated maternal hypothyroidism may be a weak risk factor for infant congenital malformations but an association with a few rare conditions is possible.

  7. Delay in liver bud development during early embryogenesis leads to violation of epicardium formation and its epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation, but do not affect coronary endothelium formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pototskaya O. Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation of heart embryogenesis the origin of coronary endothelium is still under debate. Existence of close interrelation between proepicardium, liver bud, sinus venosus and early coronary vessels is obvious, but the nature of this interconnection is unclear as well as exact source of endothelial cells. Thus, the purpose of our research was to investigate the effect of inhibition of liver bud development on formation of coronary vessels. To inhibit the liver bud we injected aminoguanidine sulfate into the yolk sack of chick embryos on 14 stage of development by HH (first group - to prevent contact between proepicardium and liver, and on 16 stage (second group to allow contact between proepicardium and liver during a short period of time. In the first group it was observed the violation of epicardium formation and early death during first 3 days of incubation. At embryos it was revealed thinning of myocardium and atrio-ventricular cushions, abnormal looping – presumably due to the absence of epicardium. The death was caused by heart insufficiency. In the second group it was observed the beginning of epicardium formation, but the heart defects were the same as in the first group – presumably due to the absence of epicardium-derived cells. At embryos of this group, who survived till 26 stage of development (4.5 day of incubation, despite absence of cellular component in subepicardial space and almost completely absence of liver, we observed formation of coronary vessels. They were concentrated on the dorsal surface of atrio-vetricular channel and were presented by continuation of endothelium of the sinus venosus.

  8. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  9. A unified model for AGN feedback in cosmological simulations of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sijacki, Debora; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Hernquist, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We discuss a numerical model for black hole growth and its associated feedback processes that for the first time allows cosmological simulations of structure formation to simultaneously follow the build up of the cosmic population of galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Our model assumes that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centres of forming halos. We then track their growth from gas accretion and mergers with other black holes in the course of cosmic time. For black holes that are active, we distinguish between two distinct modes of feedback, depending on the black hole accretion rate itself. Black holes that accrete at high rates are assumed to be in a `quasar regime', where we model their feedback by thermally coupling a small fraction of their bolometric luminosity to the surrounding gas. For black holes with low accretion rates, we conjecture that most of their feedback occurs in mechanical form, where AGN-driven bubbles are injected into a gaseous environment. Using our new m...

  10. Formation and subdivision of deformation structures during plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B.; Poulsen, H.F.; Lienert, U.;

    2006-01-01

    During plastic deformation of metals and alloys, dislocations arrange in ordered patterns. How and when these self-organization processes take place have remained elusive, because in situ observations have not been feasible. We present an x-ray diffraction method that provided data on the dynamics...... of individual, deeply embedded dislocation structures. During tensile deformation of pure copper, dislocation-free regions were identified. They showed an unexpected intermittent dynamics, for example, appearing and disappearing with proceeding deformation and even displaying transient splitting behavior....... Insight into these processes is relevant for an understanding of the strength and work-hardening of deformed materials....

  11. Transcriptome analysis on the exoskeleton formation in early developmetal stages and reconstruction scenario in growth-moulting in Litopenaeus vannamei

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yi; Wei, Jiankai; Yuan, Jianbo; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2017-01-01

    Exoskeleton construction is an important issue in shrimp. To better understand the molecular mechanism of exoskeleton formation, development and reconstruction, the transcriptome of the entire developmental process in Litopenaeus vannamei, including nine early developmental stages and eight adult-moulting stages, was sequenced and analysed using Illumina RNA-seq technology. A total of 117,539 unigenes were obtained, with 41.2% unigenes predicting the full-length coding sequence. Gene Ontology...

  12. Modelling the structural controls of primary kaolinite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, R. L.; Glass, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    An abundance of kaolinite was formed within the St. Austell outcrop of the Cornubian batholith in Cornwall, southwest England, by the hydrous dissolution of feldspar crystals. The permeability of Cornish granites is low and alteration acts pervasively from discontinuity features, with montmorillonite recognised as an intermediate assemblage in partially kaolinised material. Structural features allowed fluids to channel through the impermeable granite and pervade deep into the rock. Areas of high structural control are hypothesised to link well with areas of advanced alteration. As kaolinisation results in a loss of competence, we present a method of utilising discontinuity orientations from nearby unaltered granites alongside the local tectonic history to calculate strain rates and delineate a discrete fracture network. Simulation of the discrete fracture network is demonstrated through a case study at Higher Moor, where kaolinite is actively extracted from a pit. Reconciliation of fracture connectivity and permeability against measured subsurface data show that higher values of modelled properties match with advanced kaolinisation observed in the field. This suggests that the technique may be applicable across various industries and disciplines.

  13. Coupled and Extended Quintessence: theoretical differences and structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pettorino, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    The case of a coupling between dark energy and matter (Coupled Quintessence) or gravity (Extended Quintessence) has recently attracted a deep interest and has been widely investigated both in the Einstein and in the Jordan frames (EF, JF), within scalar tensor theories. Focusing on the simplest models proposed so far, in this paper we study the relation existing between the two scenarios, isolating the Weyl scaling which allows to express them in the EF and JF. Moreover, we perform a comparative study of the behavior of linear perturbations in both scenarios, which turn out to behave in a markedly different way. In particular, while the clustering is enhanced in the considered CQ models with respect to the corresponding Quintessence ones where the coupling is absent and to the ordinary cosmologies with a Cosmological Constant and Cold Dark Matter (LCDM), structures in EQ models may grow slower. This is likely to have direct consequences on the inner properties of non-linear structures, like cluster concentrat...

  14. Dietary factors during early life program bone formation in female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional status during intrauterine and early postnatal life impacts the risk of chronic diseases; however, evidence for an association between early life dietary factors and bone health in adults is limited. Soy protein isolate (SPI) may be one such dietary factor that promotes bone accretion du...

  15. Early memory formation disrupted by atypical PKC inhibitor ZIP in the medial prefrontal cortex but not hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evuarherhe, Obaro; Barker, Gareth R I; Savalli, Giorgia; Warburton, Elizabeth C; Brown, Malcolm W

    2014-08-01

    Atypical isoforms of protein kinase C (aPKCs; particularly protein kinase M zeta: PKMζ) have been hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for the maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long term memory by maintaining postsynaptic AMPA receptors via the GluA2 subunit. A myristoylated PKMζ pseudosubstrate peptide (ZIP) blocks PKMζ activity. We examined the actions of ZIP in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus in associative recognition memory in rats during early memory formation and memory maintenance. ZIP infusion in either hippocampus or mPFC impaired memory maintenance. However, early memory formation was impaired by ZIP in mPFC but not hippocampus; and blocking GluA2-dependent removal of AMPA receptors did not affect this impairment caused by ZIP in the mPFC. The findings indicate: (i) a difference in the actions of ZIP in hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, and (ii) a GluA2-independent target of ZIP (possibly PKCλ) in the mPFC during early memory formation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Early detection of ovarian cancer: background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, P. E.; Chambers, J. T.; Taylor, K. J.; Pellerito, J.; Hammers, L.; Cole, L. A.; Yang-Feng, T L; Smith, P; Mayne, S T; Makuch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has received national attention as a highly virulent disease. Its lack of early warning symptoms and the failure to develop highly sensitive screening tests have led some physicians to recommend prophylactic oophorectomies to women with relatives who have had ovarian cancer. Others have recommended routine screening of otherwise normal women for CA 125, a circulating tumor marker, and ultrasound examinations. Each of these techniques is associated with substantial false-positiv...

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FORMATION OF FILTER PAPER USING THE BARTLETT SPECTRUM OF THE FIBER STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lehmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation index of filter paper is one of the most important characteristics used in industrial quality control. Its estimation is often based on subjective comparison chart rating or, even more objective, on the power spectrum of the paper structure observed on a transmission light table. It is shown that paper formation can be modeled as Gaussian random fields with a well defined class of correlation functions, and a formation index can be derived from the density of the Bartlett spectrum estimated from image data. More precisely, the formation index is the mean of the Bessel transform of the correlation taken for wave lengths between 2 and 5 mm.

  18. Wave propagation and shock formation in different magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, Rebecca; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2008-01-01

    Velocity oscillations "measured" simultaneously at the photosphere and the chromosphere -from time series of spectropolarimetric data in the 10830 A region- of different solar magnetic features allow us to study the properties of wave propagation as a function of the magnetic flux of the structure (i.e. two different-sized sunspots, a tiny pore and a facular region). While photospheric oscillations have similar characteristics everywhere, oscillations measured at chromospheric heights show different amplitudes, frequencies and stages of shock development depending on the observed magnetic feature. The analysis of the power and the phase spectra, together with simple theoretical modeling, lead to a series of results concerning wave propagation within the range of heights of this study. We find that, while the atmospheric cut-off frequency and the propagation properties of the different oscillating modes depend on the magnetic feature, in all the cases the power that reaches the high chromosphere above the atmo...

  19. Structure and decomposition of the silver formate Ag(HCO2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzan, Anna N.; Baumer, Vyacheslav N.; Mateychenko, Pavel V.

    2017-02-01

    Crystal structure of the silver formate Ag(HCO2) has been determined (orthorhombic, sp.gr. Pccn, a=7.1199(5), b=10.3737(4), c=6.4701(3)Å, V=477.88(4) Å3, Z=8). The structure contains isolated formate ions and the pairs Ag22+ which form the layers in (001) planes (the shortest Ag-Ag distances is 2.919 in the pair and 3.421 and 3.716 Å between the nearest Ag atoms of adjacent pairs). Silver formate is unstable compound which decompose spontaneously vs time. Decomposition was studied using Rietveld analysis of the powder diffraction patterns. It was concluded that the diffusion of Ag atoms leads to the formation of plate-like metal particles as nuclei in the (100) planes which settle parallel to (001) planes of the silver formate matrix.

  20. Structural characteristics of green tea catechins for formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Kaku, Maiko; Kusaka, Koji; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Aihara, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Takumi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Kan, Toshiyuki; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-07-15

    Catechins are polyphenolic antioxidants found in green tea leaves. Recent studies have reported that various polyphenolic compounds, including catechins, cause protein carbonyl formation in proteins via their pro-oxidant actions. In this study, we evaluate the formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin (HSA) by tea catechins and investigate the relationship between catechin chemical structure and its pro-oxidant property. To assess the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA, HSA was incubated with four individual catechins under physiological conditions to generate biotin-LC-hydrazide labeled protein carbonyls. Comparison of catechins using Western blotting revealed that the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA was higher for pyrogallol-type catechins than the corresponding catechol-type catechins. In addition, the formation of protein carbonyl was also found to be higher for the catechins having a galloyl group than the corresponding catechins lacking a galloyl group. The importance of the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring and the galloyl group was confirmed using methylated catechins and phenolic acids. These results indicate that the most important structural element contributing to the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA by tea catechins is the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring, followed by the galloyl group. The oxidation stability and binding affinity of tea catechins with proteins are responsible for the formation of protein carbonyl, and consequently the difference in these properties of each catechin may contribute to the magnitude of their biological activities.

  1. Structural characterization of a karstified limestone formation using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB) at Rustrel - Pays d'Apt, France, is an Inter-disciplinary Underground Science and Technology Laboratory buried in a karstified limestone formation. A multidisciplinary program focused on water circulation monitoring is presently performed inside the tunnels. This program comprises the investigation of faults, fractures, karstification and stratigraphy ofthe limestone massif using GPR. We present the main results obtained from these data. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity which results in generally very low attenuation of electro-magnetic waves. 90% of the tunnels floor are made of concrete whereas other are made of bare limestone. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The whole 3km long tunnel has been investigated using single offset shielded 250 MHz antennas in May 2009. Processing includes : DC and very low frequency removal, amplitude compensation preserving lateral variations, migration and time to depth conversion. When necessary predictive deconvolution has been applied to remove ringing effects. These data sets are characterized by good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration down to 18 meters. These data allow us to accurately map the stratigraphy of the surrounding rocks across the concrete walls of the tunnel. Some 20 m deep vertical wells have been drilled inside the tunnel through observed reflectors. This is a strong validation of the GPR images. The estimated resolution is centimetric to decimetric and matches the required geologic accuracy. The GPR data set allows to extend previous geological results in depth, particularly in the concrete coated parts of the tunnel where conventional geological surveying is impossible. Thanks to the processing which preserves lateral amplitude variations, GPR sections exhibit prominent

  2. [Regional early mortality in relation to social and hospital structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, M

    1985-01-01

    Detailed analysis of governmental mortality statistics yields information on regional differences in the care for preterm infants in West Germany. 68% of newborn infants dying within the first 7 days of life are of low birth weight. In the 11 states, highest/lowest early neonatal mortality fell from 11.6/6.0 to 6.2/3.1 during the years 1978 to 1982. In the 31 administrative districts, a small negative correlation (r = -0.37) exists for neonatal mortality and tax revenue. Increased regional mortality indicates diminished regionalization of perinatal care for preterm infants.

  3. The Atlas3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McDermid, Richard M; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the Atlas3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star-formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation timescales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically-determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (M_JAM, Sigma_e, R_maj), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star-formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass obje...

  4. Documenting the conversion from traditional to Studio Physics formats at the Colorado School of Mines: Process and early results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Patrick B.; Kuo, H. Vincent; Ruskell, Todd G.

    2008-10-01

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) has taught its first-semester introductory physics course using a hybrid lecture/Studio Physics format for several years. Over the past year we have converted the second semester of our calculus-based introductory physics course (Physics II) to a Studio Physics format, starting from a traditional lecture-based format. In this paper, we document the early stages of this conversion in order to better understand which features succeed and which do not, and in order to develop a model for switching to Studio that keeps the time and resource investment manageable. We describe the recent history of the Physics II course and of Studio at Mines, discuss the PER-based improvements that we are implementing, and characterize our progress via several metrics, including pre/post Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) scores, Colorado Learning About Science Survey scores (CLASS), solicited student comments, failure rates, and exam scores.

  5. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  6. Programming of hippocampal structure and function by early-life stress: Opportunities for nutritional intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naninck, E.F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life is a critical developmental phase during which brain structure and function are shaped 'for life'. When early-life is disturbed by stress-exposure, this lastingly programs our brains and is associated with impaired cognition and predisposition to psychopathology in adulthood.

  7. Zooming in on star formation in the brightest galaxies of the early Universe discovered with the Planck and Herschel satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canameras, Raoul

    2016-09-01

    Strongly gravitationally lensed galaxies offer an outstanding opportunity to characterize the most intensely star-forming galaxies in the high-redshift universe. In the most extreme cases, one can probe the mechanisms that underlie the intense star formation on the scales of individual star-forming regions. This requires very fortuitous gravitational lensing configurations offering magnification factors >>10, which are particularly rare toward the high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies. The Planck's Dusty GEMS (Gravitationally Enhanced subMillimeter Sources) sample contains eleven of the brightest high-redshift galaxies discovered with the Planck submillimeter all-sky survey, with flux densities between 300 and 1000 mJy at 350 microns, factors of a few brighter than the majority of lensed sources previously discovered with other surveys. Six of them are above the 90% completeness limit of the Planck Catalog of Compact Sources (PCCS), suggesting that they are among the brightest high-redshift sources on the sky selected by their active star formation. This thesis comes within the framework of the extensive multi-wavelength follow-up programme designed to determine the overall properties of the high-redshift sources and to probe the lensing configurations. Firstly, to characterize the intervening lensing structures and calculate lensing models, I use optical and near/mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy. I deduce that our eleven GEMS are aligned with intervening matter overdensities at intermediate redshift, either massive isolated galaxies or galaxy groups and clusters. The foreground sources exhibit evolved stellar populations of a few giga years, characteristic of early-type galaxies. Moreover, the first detailed models of the light deflection toward the GEMS suggest magnification factors systematically >10, and >20 for some lines-of-sight. Secondly, we observe the GEMS in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter domains in order to characterize the background

  8. Early-Type galaxies at z ~ 1.3. III. On the dependence of Formation Epochs and Star Formation Histories on Stellar Mass and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Rettura, Alessandro; Stanford, S A; Raichoor, A; Moran, S; Holden, B; Rosati, P; Ellis, R; Nakata, F; Nonino, M; Treu1, T; Blakeslee1, J P; Demarco, R; Eisenhardt, P; Ford, H C; Fosbury, R A E; Illingworth, G; Huertas-Company, M; Jee, M J; Kodama, T; Postman, M; Tanaka, M; White, R L

    2011-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of stellar population properties at z ~ 1.3. We derive galaxy properties (stellar masses, ages and star formation histories) for samples of massive, red, passive early-type galaxies in two high-redshift clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453 (with redshifts of z = 1.26 and 1.27, respectively), and compare them with those measured for the RDCS1252.9-2927 cluster at z=1.24 and with those measured for a similarly mass-selected sample of field contemporaries drawn from the GOODS-South Field. Robust estimates of the aforementioned parameters have been obtained by comparing a large grid of composite stellar population models with extensive 8-10 band photometric coverage, from the rest-frame far-ultraviolet to the infrared. We find no variations of the overall stellar population properties among the different samples of cluster early-type galaxies. However, when comparing cluster versus field stellar population properties we find that, even if the (star formation weighted) ages...

  9. The internal structure of Early Cambrian fossil embryo Olivooides revealed in the light of Synchrotron X-ray Tomographic Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; DONG XiPing

    2008-01-01

    Countless fossil embryo Olivooides and the hatched larvae, juveniles and adults (the latter two kinds are Punctatus) are recovered by means of acid maceration from the fine-crystalline to medium-crystalline phosphatic limestone and phosphatic micrite of Early Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation at the Shizhonggou section, near Kuanchuanpu Village, Ningqiang County, Shaanxi Province, China. Using the technique of Synchrotron X-ray Tomographic Microscopy, the 3D internal structure of Olivooides and Punctatus is reconstructed. The morphological and statistic analyses are also given to the stellae structure of Olivooides and Punctatus, which indicates that this structure is a result of adaptive evolution to a lifestyle of fast-attaching after hatching, probably with the function of mucilage secretion. The internal structure of Punctatus is described and discussed. The ovum-like structure, a common internal feature of Punctatus, is considered as the taphonomic structure, rather than eggs or other biological structure. This structure is thought to be formed after the burial of the animal and before or during the mineralization. The original internal structure of Punctatus is assumed to be tabulae-filled, with soft body grown on them.

  10. Atomic-scale models of early-stage alkali depletion and SiO2-rich gel formation in bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+)/H(+)-exchanged 45S5 Bioglass® models reveal that a large fraction of the hydroxyl groups introduced into the proton-exchanged, hydrated glass structure do not initially form covalent bonds with Si and P network formers but remain free and stabilised by the modifier metal cations, whereas substantial Si-OH and P-OH bonding is observed only at higher Na(+)/H(+) exchange levels. The strong affinity between free OH groups and modifier cations in the highly fragmented 45S5 glass structure appears to represent the main driving force for this effect. This suggests an alternative direct route for the formation of a repolymerised silica-rich gel in the early stages of the bioactive mechanism, not considered before, which does not require sequential repeated breakings of Si-O-Si bonds and silanol condensations.

  11. Nonlinear structure formation in the Cubic Galileon gravity model

    CERN Document Server

    Barreira, Alexandre; Hellwing, Wojciech A; Baugh, Carlton M; Pascoli, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    We model the linear and nonlinear growth of large scale structure in the Cubic Galileon gravity model, by running a suite of N-body cosmological simulations using the {\\tt ECOSMOG} code. Our simulations include the Vainshtein screening effect, which reconciles the Cubic Galileon model with local tests of gravity. In the linear regime, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum increases by $\\sim 25%$ with respect to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model today. The modified expansion rate accounts for $\\sim 20%$ of this enhancement, while the fifth force is responsible for only $\\sim 5%$. This is because the effective unscreened gravitational strength deviates from standard gravity only at late times, even though it can be twice as large today. In the nonlinear regime ($k \\gtrsim 0.1 h\\rm{Mpc}^{-1}$), the fifth force leads to only a modest increase ($\\lesssim 8%$) in the clustering power on all scales due to the very efficient operation of the Vainshtein mechanism. Such a strong effect is typically not seen in other...

  12. Food structure: Its formation and relationships with other properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joardder, Mohammad U H; Kumar, Chandan; Karim, M A

    2017-04-13

    Food materials are complex in nature as it has heterogeneous, amorphous, hygroscopic and porous properties. During processing, microstructure of food materials changes which significantly affects other properties of food. An appropriate understanding of the microstructure of the raw food material and its evolution during processing is critical in order to understand and accurately describe dehydration processes and quality anticipation. This review critically assesses the factors that influence the modification of microstructure in the course of drying of fruits and vegetables. The effect of simultaneous heat and mass transfer on microstructure in various drying methods is investigated. Effects of changes in microstructure on other functional properties of dried foods are discussed. After an extensive review of the literature, it is found that development of food structure significantly depends on fresh food properties and process parameters. Also, modification of microstructure influences the other properties of final product. An enhanced understanding of the relationships between food microstructure, drying process parameters and final product quality will facilitate the energy efficient optimum design of the food processor in order to achieve high-quality food.

  13. Dynamics and structure formation in thin polymer melt films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Herminghaus, Stephan [Max-Planck-Institut for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Neto, Chiara [Department of Applied Mathematics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Schlagowski, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Podzimek, Daniel [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Konrad, Renate [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Mantz, Hubert [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Jacobs, Karin [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2005-03-09

    The stability of thin liquid coatings plays a fundamental role in everyday life. We studied the stability conditions of thin (3 to 300 nm) liquid polymer films on various substrates. The key role is played by the effective interface potential {phi} of the system air/film/substrate, which determines the dewetting scenario in case the film is not stable. We describe in this study how to distinguish a spinodal dewetting scenario from heterogeneous and homogeneous dewetting by analysing the emerging structures of the film surface by e.g. Minkowski measures. We also include line tension studies of tiny droplets, showing that the long-range part of {phi} does affect the drop profile, but only very close to the three phase boundary line. The dynamic properties of the films are characterized via various experimental methods: the form of the dewetting front, for example, was recorded by scanning probe microscopy and gives insight into the boundary condition between the liquid and the substrate. We further report experiments probing the viscosity and the glass transition temperature of nm-thick films using e.g. ellipsometry. Here we find that even short-chained polymer melts exhibit a significant reduction of the glass transition temperature as the film thickness is reduced below 100 nm.

  14. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...... and PVP decreased the growth rate by 30% and 39% at concentrations of 0.004 wt % (0.005 mM) and 0.1 wt % (0.1 mM), respectively. Considering the low concentration of Tenebrio molitor ISP used, these results indicate that ISP from Tenebrio molitor is the most effective hydrate inhibitor among those...

  15. Simulations of structure formation in interacting dark energy cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The evidence in favor of a dark energy component dominating the Universe, and driving its presently accelerated expansion, has progressively grown during the last decade of cosmological observations. If this dark energy is given by a dynamic scalar field, it may also have a direct interaction with other matter fields in the Universe, in particular with cold dark matter. Such interaction would imprint new features on the cosmological background evolution as well as on the growth of cosmic structure, like an additional long-range fifth-force between massive particles, or a variation in time of the dark matter particle mass. We review here the implementation of these new physical effects in the N-body code GADGET-2, and we discuss the outcomes of a series of high-resolution N-body simulations for a selected family of interacting dark energy models, as already presented in Baldi et al. [20]. We interestingly find, in contrast with previous claims, that the inner overdensity of dark matter halos decreases in these...

  16. The Bok Globule BHR 160: structure and star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Haikala, Lauri K

    2016-01-01

    BHR 160 is a virtually unstudied cometary globule within the Sco OB4 association in Scorpius at a distance of 1600pc. It is part of a system of cometary clouds which face the luminous O star HD155806. BHR 160 is special because it has an intense bright rim. We attempt to derive physical parameters for BHR 160 and to understand its structure and the origin of its peculiar bright rim. BHR 160 was mapped in the $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (2-1) and (1-0) and CS (3-2) and (2-1) lines. These data, augmented with stellar photometry derived from the ESO VVV survey, were used to derive the mass and distribution of molecular material in BHR 160 and its surroundings. Archival mid-infrared data from the WISE satellite was used to find IR excess stars in the globule and its neighbourhood. An elongated 1' by 0.6' core lies adjacent to the globule bright rim. $^{12}$CO emission covers the whole globule, but the $^{13}$CO, C$^{18}$CO and CS emission is more concentrated to the core. The $^{12}$CO line profiles indica...

  17. Star formation, structure, and formation mechanism of cometary globules: NIR observations of CG 1 and CG 2

    CERN Document Server

    Mäkelä, M M

    2012-01-01

    Cometary globule (CG) 1 and CG 2 are "classic" CGs in the Gum Nebula. They have compact heads and long dusty tails that point away from the centre of the Gum Nebula. We study the structure of CG 1 and CG 2 and the star formation in them to find clues to the CG formation mechanism. The two possible mechanisms, radiation-driven implosion (RDI) and a supernova (SN) blast wave, produce a characteristic mass distribution where the major part of the mass is situated in either the head (RDI) or the tail (SN). CG 1 and CG 2 were imaged in the near infrared (NIR) JsHKs bands. NIR photometry was used to locate NIR excess objects and to create extinction maps of the CGs. The A_V maps allow us to analyse the large-scale structure of CG 1 and CG 2. Archival images from the WISE and Spitzer satellites and HIRES-processed IRAS images were used to study the small-scale structure. In addition to the previously known CG 1 IRS 1 we discovered three new NIR-excess objects, two in CG 1 and one in CG 2. CG 2 IRS 1 is the first det...

  18. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  19. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A. J.; Meinhardt, H.

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns? Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of Drosophila and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  20. Preons, Dark Matter and the Production of Early Cosmological Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Burdyuzha, V; Ponomarev, Yu; Vereshkov, G M; Ponomarev, Yu.

    1999-01-01

    If the preon structure of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons will be proved then in the Universe during relativistic phase transition the production of nonperturbative preon condensates has been occured collective excitations of which are perceived as pseudogoldstone bosons. Dark matter consisting of pseudogoldstone bosons of familon type contains a "hot" component from massless particles and a "cold" (nonrelativistic) component from massive particles. It is shown that such dark matter was undergone to two relativistic phase transitions temperatures of which were different. In the result of these phase transitions the structurization of dark matter and therefore the baryon subsystem has taken place. Besides, the role of particle generations in the Universe become more evident. For the possibility of structurization of matter as minimum three generations of particles are necessary.

  1. Mrar formation of western Libya - evolution of an early Carboniferous delta system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitbread, T. (Univ. of Keele, England); Kelling, G.

    1982-08-01

    The Lower Carboniferous Mrar Formation is exposed extensively along the southern margin of the Ghadames basin in northwest Libya. The basal part of the Mrar forms the cap rock and possible hydrocarbon source for many of the producing reservoirs in the underlying Tahara sandstones. Furthermore, the Mrar itself is known to contain significant gas shows southwest of the outcrop, associated with some oil potential. The Mrar formation was deposited in a deltaic environment which developed on the northern part of the stable Saharan platform. The history of the Mrar formation's deposition is discussed. (JMT)

  2. Paleomagnetism of the early Paleoproterozoic, volcanic Hekpoort Formation (Transvaal Supergroup) of the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, F.; Sonnette, L.; de Kock, M. O.; Robion, P.; Horng, C. S.; Cousture, A.; Wabo, H.

    2017-02-01

    The Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) was the host of several major magmatic events during the Paleoproterozoic, including the volcanic Hekpoort and Ongeluk formations. Their possible comagmatic origin is the subject of a long debate. We performed a paleomagnetic study of the Hekpoort Formation to get a primary pole can be compared with the available paleopole of the Ongeluk Formation, but also to contribute to the apparent pole wander path of the Kaapvaal craton. Characterization of magnetic mineralogy by 3-axis thermal demagnetization of IRM and magnetic susceptibility vs temperature points out magnetite as the main remanence carrier in most samples.

  3. LATE JURASSIC AND EARLY CRETACEOUS AMMONITES FROM THE WEIMEI FORMATION IN GYANGZE, SOUTHERN TIBET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASAHIKO TAKEI

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Weimei Formation in southern Tibet is a shallow marine sequence accumulated in the northern margin of the Indian subcontinent. It has been dated as Tithonian based on ammonites such as Haplophylloceras strigile (Blanford, Berriasella sp. and Himalayites sp. Six ammonite specimens were found in the type locality of the Weimei Formation. They include Spiticeras (Spiticeras spitiense (Blanford, Berriasella sp. and Phylloceras sp. The occurrence of S. spitiense indicates that the ammonite-bearing portion is assignable to the Berriasian stage. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary possibly exists within the Weimei Formation.

  4. Family Structure and the Transition to Early Parenthood

    OpenAIRE

    Hofferth, Sandra L.; Goldscheider, Frances

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in out-of-wedlock childbearing and divorce in the last quarter of the twentieth century, an increasing proportion of children have been exposed to a variety of new family forms. Little research has focused on the consequences of childhood family structure for men’s transition to fatherhood or on the family processes that account for the effects of family structure on the likelihood that young women and men become first-time unmarried parents, what we now call “fragile families.”...

  5. Controlling Agglomeration of Protein Aggregates for Structure Formation in Liquid Oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, De Auke; Lopez Gomez, Yuly; Jansen, Bas; Linden, van der Erik; Scholten, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are known to be effective building blocks when it comes to structure formation in aqueous environments. Recently, we have shown that submicron colloidal protein particles can also be used to provide structure to liquid oil and form so-called oleogels (de Vries, A. J. Colloid Interface

  6. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, William Frans Christian; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    , delusional disorder or other non-organic psychosis), aged 10-18 to those of 29 matched controls, using optimized voxel-based morphometry. RESULTS: Psychotic patients had frontal white matter abnormalities, but expected (regional) gray matter reductions were not observed. Post hoc analyses revealed...... that schizophrenia patients (n = 15) had significantly larger lateral ventricles as compared to controls. Duration and dose of antipsychotics correlated negatively with global gray matter volume in minimally medicated patients (n = 18). CONCLUSION: Findings of white matter changes and enlarged lateral ventricles...... already at illness onset in young schizophrenia spectrum patients, suggests aberrant neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Gray matter volume changes, however, appear not to be a key feature in early onset first-episode psychosis....

  7. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P. V., E-mail: kpv@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Vlasov, I. V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  8. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-10-01

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  9. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-02-05

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  10. Early stage beneficial effects of cathodic protection in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Stoop, B.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete structures suffering from chloride induced reinforcement corrosion has shown to be successful and durable. CP current causes steel polarisation, electrochemical reactions and ion transport in the concrete. CP systems are designe

  11. Structural mapping: how to study the genetic architecture of a phenotypic trait through its formation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chunfa; Shen, Lianying; Lv, Yafei; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Xiaoling; Feng, Sisi; Li, Xin; Sui, Yihan; Pang, Xiaoming; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for genetic mapping are to simply associate the genotypes of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the phenotypic variation of a complex trait. A more mechanistic strategy has emerged to dissect the trait phenotype into its structural components and map specific QTLs that control the mechanistic and structural formation of a complex trait. We describe and assess such a strategy, called structural mapping, by integrating the internal structural basis of trait formation into a QTL mapping framework. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been instrumental for describing the structural components of a phenotypic trait and their interactions. By building robust mathematical models on circuit EIS data and embedding these models within a mixture model-based likelihood for QTL mapping, structural mapping implements the EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of QTL genotype-specific EIS parameters. The uniqueness of structural mapping is to make it possible to test a number of hypotheses about the pattern of the genetic control of structural components. We validated structural mapping by analyzing an EIS data collected for QTL mapping of frost hardiness in a controlled cross of jujube trees. The statistical properties of parameter estimates were examined by simulation studies. Structural mapping can be a powerful alternative for genetic mapping of complex traits by taking account into the biological and physical mechanisms underlying their formation.

  12. Cell surface attachment structures contribute to biofilm formation and xylem colonization by Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczan, Jessica M; Lenneman, Bryan R; McGrath, Molly J; Sundin, George W

    2011-10-01

    Biofilm formation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Erwinia amylovora and the systemic invasion of plant hosts. The functional role of the exopolysaccharides amylovoran and levan in pathogenesis and biofilm formation has been evaluated. However, the role of biofilm formation, independent of exopolysaccharide production, in pathogenesis and movement within plants has not been studied previously. Evaluation of the role of attachment in E. amylovora biofilm formation and virulence was examined through the analysis of deletion mutants lacking genes encoding structures postulated to function in attachment to surfaces or in cellular aggregation. The genes and gene clusters studied were selected based on in silico analyses. Microscopic analyses and quantitative assays demonstrated that attachment structures such as fimbriae and pili are involved in the attachment of E. amylovora to surfaces and are necessary for the production of mature biofilms. A time course assay indicated that type I fimbriae function earlier in attachment, while type IV pilus structures appear to function later in attachment. Our results indicate that multiple attachment structures are needed for mature biofilm formation and full virulence and that biofilm formation facilitates entry and is necessary for the buildup of large populations of E. amylovora cells in xylem tissue.

  13. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L

    2015-01-01

    : All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20...... for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients' fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. RESULTS...... alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved...

  14. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  15. Statistical characteristics of formation and evolution of structure in the universe

    OpenAIRE

    Demianski, M.; Doroshkevich, A.

    1999-01-01

    An approximate statistical description of the formation and evolution of structure of the universe based on the Zel'dovich theory of gravitational instability is proposed. It is found that the evolution of DM structure shows features of self-similarity and the main structure characteristics can be expressed through the parameters of initial power spectrum and cosmological model. For the CDM-like power spectrum and suitable parameters of the cosmological model the effective matter compression ...

  16. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in structural design of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charette, R. F.; Hyer, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    The influence is investigated of a curvilinear fiber format on load carrying capacity of a layered fiber reinforced plate with a centrally located hole. A curvilinear fiber format is descriptive of layers in a laminate having fibers which are aligned with the principal stress directions in those layers. Laminates of five curvilinear fiber format designs and four straightline fiber format designs are considered. A quasi-isotropic laminate having a straightline fiber format is used to define a baseline design for comparison with the other laminate designs. Four different plate geometries are considered and differentiated by two values of hole diameter/plate width equal to 1/6 and 1/3, and two values of plate length/plate width equal to 2 and 1. With the plates under uniaxial tensile loading on two opposing edges, alignment of fibers in the curvilinear layers with the principal stress directions is determined analytically by an iteration procedure. In-plane tensile load capacity is computed for all of the laminate designs using a finite element analysis method. A maximum strain failure criterion and the Tsai-Wu failure criterion are applied to determine failure loads and failure modes. Resistance to buckling of the laminate designs to uniaxial compressive loading is analyzed using the commercial code Engineering Analysis Language. Results indicate that the curvilinear fiber format laminates have higher in-plane tensile load capacity and comparable buckling resistance relative to the straightline fiber format laminates.

  17. Cell proliferation is not required for the initiation of early cleft formation in mouse embryonic submandibular epithelium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Y; Morita, T; Nogawa, H

    1987-03-01

    An X-ray irradiation method was employed to analyse the role of cell proliferation in vitro in the cleft formation of mouse embryonic submandibular epithelium at early stages. When the mid 12-day gland was exposed to 200 rad of X-rays, the growth was severely retarded. In contrast, late 12-day and early 13-day glands grew apparently in a normal fashion, as did the control gland, for up to 40 h. In either case, they formed shallow clefts within 10 h of culture. With 1000 rad irradiation, the mid 12-day gland did not grow at all, but formed clefts within 20 h of culture followed by a rapid degeneration. Under the same conditions, the growth of the late 12-day gland, which was at the stage just before branching, was retarded until 10 h of culture, followed by a slight increase in epithelial size, but cleft formation was also observed within 6-10 h, as in the control gland. When exposed to a dose of 1000 rad of X-rays, the early 13-day and the late 12-day glands exhibited similar radiosensitivity; the initial narrow clefts in the epithelium deepened and new clefts began to form within 6-10 h of culture. [3H]thymidine incorporation studies revealed that a dose of 1000 rad reduced DNA synthesis of mid and late 12-day glands by 72 and 65%, respectively. Histological examination of X-irradiated late 12-day gland showed that mitotic figures were rarely seen in the epithelium at 6 h of culture. Aphidicolin, a specific inhibitor of DNA synthesis, could not halt the cleft formation of the late 12-day gland. In this experiment 89% of DNA synthesis was inhibited. Treatment of an X-ray irradiated late 12-day gland with aphidicolin blocked 92% of the DNA synthesis, but did not prevent cleft formation taking place. These results indicate that neither cell division nor DNA synthesis, is required for the initiation process of the cleft formation of the mouse embryonic submandibular epithelium at early morphogenetic stages in vitro.

  18. Stratigraphy and structural setting of Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation, western Centennial Mountains, southwestern Montana and southeastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyman, T.S.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J.; Nichols, D.J.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and palynologic data were used to correlate the Frontier Formation of the western Centennial Mountains with time-equivalent rocks in the Lima Peaks area and other nearby areas in southwestern Montana. The stratigraphic interval studied is in the middle and upper parts (but not uppermost) of the formation based on a comparison of sandstone petrography, palynologic age data, and our interpretation of the structure using a seismic line along the frontal zone of the Centennial Mountains and the adjacent Centennial Valley. The Frontier Formation is comprised of sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, limestone, and silty shale in fluvial and coastal depositional settings. A distinctive characteristic of these strata in the western Centennial Mountains is the absence of conglomerate and conglomeratic sandstone beds. Absence of conglomerate beds may be due to lateral facies changes associated with fluvial systems, a distal fining of grain size, and the absence of both uppermost and lower Frontier rocks in the study area. Palynostratigraphic data indicate a Coniacian age for the Frontier Formation in the western Centennial Mountains. These data are supported by a geochronologic age from the middle part of the Frontier at Lima Peaks indicating a possible late Coniacian-early Santonian age (86.25 ?? 0.38 Ma) for the middle Frontier there. The Frontier Formation in the western Centennial Mountains is comparable in age and thickness to part of the Frontier at Lima Peaks. These rocks represent one of the thickest known sequences of Frontier strata in the Rocky Mountain region. Deposition was from about 95 to 86 Ma (middle Cenomanian to at least early Santonian), during which time, shoreface sandstone of the Telegraph Creek Formation and marine shale of the Cody Shale were deposited to the east in the area now occupied by the Madison Range in southwestern Montana. Frontier strata in the western Centennial Mountains are structurally isolated from other

  19. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David (UCLA); (UWASH); (UL); (Kansas); (Ulm)

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  20. The evolution of galaxies at constant number density: a less biased view of star formation, quenching, and structural formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownsworth, Jamie R.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Mundy, Carl J.; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G.; Duncan, Kenneth; Almaini, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95 per cent from z = 0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the United Kingdom Infra-Red Deep Sky Survey Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology, we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from z = 0-3. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from 3 × 10-4 to 10-5 galaxies Mpc-3 (corresponding to z ˜ 0.5 stellar masses of M* = 1010.95-11.6 M0) have a star-forming blue fraction of ˜50 per cent at z ˜ 2.5, which evolves to a nearly 100 per cent quenched red and dead population by z ˜ 1. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is zform > 3. The structural evolution through size and Sérsic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass-selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at z < 1, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.