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Sample records for early stability pilot

  1. A novel nano-composite multi-layered biomaterial for treatment of osteochondral lesions: technique note and an early stability pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, E; Delcogliano, M; Filardo, G; Pressato, D; Busacca, M; Grigolo, B; Desando, G; Marcacci, M

    2010-07-01

    Osteochondral articular defects are a key concern in orthopaedic surgery. Current surgical techniques to repair osteochondral defects lead to poor subchondral bone regeneration and fibrocartilage formation, which is often associated with joint pain and stiffness. The objective of this pilot clinical study is to evaluate the performance and the intrinsic stability of a newly developed biomimetic osteochondral scaffold and to test the safety and the feasibility of the surgical procedure. A gradient composite osteochondral scaffold based on type I collagen-hydroxyapatite was obtained by nucleating collagen fibrils with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Thirteen patients (15 defect sites) were treated with scaffold implantation from January 2007 to July 2007: four at the medial femoral condyle, two at the lateral femoral condyles, five at the patellas and four at the trochleas. The mean size of the defects was 2.8 cm(2) (range: 1.5-5.9 cm(2)). All patients were followed up prospectively. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to determine "the early postoperative adherence rate" at 4-5 weeks and 25-26 weeks after scaffold implantation. Moreover, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was performed on every MRI. Two second-looks were performed at 6 months; cartilage repair was assessed using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) visual scoring system and histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the two biopsies was carried out. A completely attached graft and repair tissue were found in 13 of 15 lesions (86.7%). A partial detachment was observed in two patients (13.3%). No detached grafts were found. Complete filling of the cartilage defect and congruency of the articular surface were seen in 10 lesions (66.7%) with MRI evaluation at 6 months. The complete integration of the grafted cartilage was detected in eight lesions (53.3%). Subchondral bone changes (oedema or sclerosis) were found in eight

  2. The effect of implant macro-thread design on implant stability in the early post-operative period: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Jeffrey J; Klokkevold, Perry R

    2017-10-01

    Available literature suggests there is a transient drop in implant stability from approximately week 0 to week 3-4 as a result of peri-implant bone remodeling as it transitions from a primary, mechanical stability to a secondary, biological stability. Research investigating the influence of macro-thread design on this process is scant. The specific aim of this study was to evaluate the role of macro-thread design on implant stability in the early post-operative healing period using resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Seven patients, each missing at least two posterior teeth in the same arch, were included in the study. Three patients qualified for four implants resulting in a total of 10 matched pairs. All sites were healed (>6 months), non-grafted sites with sufficient bone to place implants. Each site in a matched pair was randomly assigned to receive either a control (Megagen EZ Plus Internal; EZ) or test (Megagen AnyRidge; AR) implant. The test implant incorporates a novel thread design with a wide thread depth and increased thread pitch. RFA was used to determine implant stability quotient (ISQ) values for each implant at the time of placement and weekly for the first 8 weeks. Implants consistently achieved a relatively high insertion torque (30-45 N/cm) and high initial ISQ value (79.8 ± 1.49). Baseline ISQ values for test (AR; 79.55 ± 1.61) and control (EZ; 80.05 ± 1.37) implants were similar. A general pattern of stability from baseline through all eight follow-up evaluations was observed for the test implants. A pattern of decreasing ISQ values was observed for the control implants across the early follow-up evaluations up to week four, where the value plateaued. There was a statistically significant main effect due to implant type (P macro-thread design appears to play a role in implant stability in the early post-operative healing period as assessed by RFA. These findings may have important implications related to immediate or early loading

  3. Impact of pilots' biodynamic feedthrough on rotorcraft by robust stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Masarati, Pierangelo; Venrooij, Joost

    2013-09-01

    The coupling of rotorcraft dynamics with the dynamics of one of the main systems devoted to its control, the pilot, may lead to several peculiar phenomena, known as Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings (RPCs), all characterized by an abnormal behavior that may jeopardize flight safety. Among these phenomena, there is a special class of couplings which is dominated by the biodynamic behavior of the pilot's limbs that close the loop between the vibrations and the control inceptors in the cockpit. Leveraging robust stability analysis, the inherently uncertain pilot biodynamics can be treated as the uncertain portion of a feedback system, making analytical, numerical or graphical determination of proneness to RPC possible by comparing robust stability margins of helicopter models with experimental Biodynamic Feedthrough (BDFT) data. The application of the proposed approach to collective bounce is exemplified using simple analytical helicopter and pilot models. The approach is also applied to detailed helicopter models and experimental BDFT measurement data.

  4. Analysis of Pilot-Induced-Oscillation and Pilot Vehicle System Stability Using UAS Flight Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay K. Mandal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a Pilot-Induced Oscillation (PIO and human pilot control characterization study performed using flight data collected with a Remotely Controlled (R/C unmanned research aircraft. The study was carried out on the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. Several existing Category 1 and Category 2 PIO criteria developed for manned aircraft are first surveyed and their effectiveness for predicting the PIO susceptibility for the R/C unmanned aircraft is evaluated using several flight experiments. It was found that the Bandwidth/Pitch rate overshoot and open loop onset point (OLOP criteria prediction results matched flight test observations. However, other criteria failed to provide accurate prediction results. To further characterize the human pilot control behavior during these experiments, a quasi-linear pilot model is used. The parameters of the pilot model estimated using data obtained from flight tests are then used to obtain information about the stability of the Pilot Vehicle System (PVS for Category 1 PIOs occurred during straight and level flights. The batch estimation technique used to estimate the parameters of the quasi-linear pilot model failed to completely capture the compatibility nature of the human pilot. The estimation results however provided valuable insights into the frequency characteristics of the human pilot commands. Additionally, stability analysis of the Category 2 PIOs for elevator actuator rate limiting is carried out using simulations and the results are compared with actual flight results.

  5. Doping control container for urine stabilization: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivou, Maria; Giannadaki, Evangelia; Hooghe, Fiona; Roels, Kris; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Garribba, Flaminia; Lyris, Emmanouil; Deventer, Koen; Mazzarino, Monica; Donati, Francesco; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G; Van Eenoo, Peter; Georgakopoulos, Costas G; de la Torre, Xavier; Botrè, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Urine collection containers used in the doping control collection procedure do not provide a protective environment for urine, against degradation by microorganisms and proteolytic enzymes. An in-house chemical stabilization mixture was developed to tackle urine degradation problems encountered in human sport samples, in cases of microbial contamination or proteolytic activity. The mixture consists of antimicrobial substances and protease inhibitors for the simultaneous inactivation of a wide range of proteolytic enzymes. It has already been tested in lab-scale, as part of World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) funded research project, in terms of efficiency against microbial and proteolytic activity. The present work, funded also by WADA, is a follow-up study on the improvement of chemical stabilization mixture composition, application mode and limitation of interferences, using pilot urine collection containers, spray-coated in their internal surface with the chemical stabilization mixture. Urine in plastic stabilized collection containers have been gone through various incubation cycles to test for stabilization efficiency and analytical matrix interferences by three WADA accredited Laboratories (Athens, Ghent, and Rome). The spray-coated chemical stabilization mixture was tested against microorganism elimination and steroid glucuronide degradation, as well as enzymatic breakdown of proteins, such as intact hCG, recombinant erythropoietin and small peptides (GHRPs, ipamorelin), induced by proteolytic enzymes. Potential analytical interferences, observed in the presence of spray-coated chemical stabilization mixture, were recorded using routine screening procedures. The results of the current study support the application of the spray-coated plastic urine container, in the doping control collection procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Influence of Pilot Flame Parameters on the Stability of Turbulent Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Guiberti, Thibault F.

    2016-11-08

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of pilot parameters on flame stability in a turbulent jet flame. The Sydney inhomogeneous piloted burner is employed as the experimental platform with two main fuels, namely, compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas. Various concentrations of five gases are used in the pilot stream, hydrogen, acetylene, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, to enable a sufficient range in exploring the following parameters: pilot heat release, temperature, burnt gas velocity, equivalence ratio, and H/C ratio. The experimental results are mainly presented in the form of blow-off limits and supported by simple calculations, which simulate various conditions of the pilot–mixture interface. It is found that increasing the pilot adiabatic flame temperature benefits the flame stability and has an even greater influence than the heat release, which is also known to enhance the blow-off limits. Conversely, increasing the pilot burnt gas velocity reduces the blow-off velocity, except for the limiting case when the jet is fully non-premixed. The H/C ratio has negligible effects, while resorting to lean pilots significantly increases the stability of globally rich partially premixed and premixed jets. Such findings are consistent with trends obtained from laminar flame calculations for rich fuel/air mixtures issuing against hot combustion products to simulate the pilot stream.

  7. Changes in Trunk and Head Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy after Hippotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Tim L.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Hippotherapy (HPOT) is a therapy that uses horse movement. This pilot investigation objectively evaluated the efficacy of HPOT in improving head/trunk stability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The participants were six children with spastic diplegia and six children without disability. Head and trunk stability was challenged by using a…

  8. [Dental caries and early childhood development: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, F Loreto; Sanz, B Javier; Mejía, L Gloria

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between dental caries and early childhood development in 3-year-olds from Talca, Chile. A pilot study with a convenience sample of 3-year-olds from Talca (n = 39) who attend public healthcare centers. Child development was measured by the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI), a screening tool used nationally among pre-school children to assess language development, fine motor skills and coordination areas. Dental caries prevalence was evaluated by decayed, missing, filled teeth (DFMT) and decayed, missing, filled tooth surfaces (DFMS) ceo-d and ceo-s indexes. The children were divided into two groups according to the PDIscore: those with a score of 40 or more were considered developmentally normal (n = 32), and those with a score below 40 were considered as having impaired development (n = 7). The severity of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with PDI (r = -0.82), and children with the lowest TEPSI score had the highest DFMT values. The average DMFT in children with normal development was 1.31, and 3.57 for those with impaired development. This pilot study indicates that the severity of dental caries is correlated with early childhood development. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. A piloted simulator investigation of static stability and stability/control augmentation effects on helicopter handling qualities for instrument approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Forrest, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A ground simulator experiment was conducted on the Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft at Ames Research Center to investigate the influence of several static stability and stability/control augmentation design parameters on helicopter flying qualities during terminal area operations in instrument conditions. Effects of light turbulence were included. Two levels of static stability in each rotational axis (pitch, roll, yaw) were examined for a hingeless rotor configuration. The variations in pitch and roll were: (1) stable and (2) neutral static stability; in yaw there were two stable levels. Four types of stability/control augmentation were also examined for the lower level of static stability in each axis. This latter investigation covered three helicopter rotor types: hingeless, articulated, and teetering. Four pilots performed a total of 105 evaluations of these parameters for a representative VOR instrument approach task. Pilot rating results indicate the acceptability of neutral static stability longitudinally and laterally and the need for pitch-roll attitude augmentation to achieve a satisfactory system.

  10. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO 3 Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90 degrees C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO 4 ) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated

  11. The Namibia Early Flood Warning System, A CEOS Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Sohlberg, Robert; Handy, Matthew; Grossman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year few years, an international collaboration has developed a pilot project under the auspices of Committee on Earth Observation Satellite (CEOS) Disasters team. The overall team consists of civilian satellite agencies. For this pilot effort, the development team consists of NASA, Canadian Space Agency, Univ. of Maryland, Univ. of Colorado, Univ. of Oklahoma, Ukraine Space Research Institute and Joint Research Center(JRC) for European Commission. This development team collaborates with regional , national and international agencies to deliver end-to-end disaster coverage. In particular, the team in collaborating on this effort with the Namibia Department of Hydrology to begin in Namibia . However, the ultimate goal is to expand the functionality to provide early warning over the South Africa region. The initial collaboration was initiated by United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs and CEOS Working Group for Information Systems and Services (WGISS). The initial driver was to demonstrate international interoperability using various space agency sensors and models along with regional in-situ ground sensors. In 2010, the team created a preliminary semi-manual system to demonstrate moving and combining key data streams and delivering the data to the Namibia Department of Hydrology during their flood season which typically is January through April. In this pilot, a variety of moderate resolution and high resolution satellite flood imagery was rapidly delivered and used in conjunction with flood predictive models in Namibia. This was collected in conjunction with ground measurements and was used to examine how to create a customized flood early warning system. During the first year, the team made use of SensorWeb technology to gather various sensor data which was used to monitor flood waves traveling down basins originating in Angola, but eventually flooding villages in Namibia. The team made use of standardized interfaces such as those articulated

  12. A Pilot Study of Parent Mentors for Early Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron A. Foster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the feasibility of a parent mentor model of intervention for early childhood obesity using positive deviance-based methods to inform the intervention. Methods. In this pilot, randomized clinical trial, parent-child dyads (age: 2–5 with children whose body mass index (BMI was ≥95th percentile were randomized to parent mentor intervention or community health worker comparison. The child’s height and weight were measured at baseline, after the six-month intervention, and six months after the intervention. Feasibility outcomes were recruitment, participation, and retention. The primary clinical outcome was BMI z-score change. Results. Sixty participants were enrolled, and forty-eight completed the six-month intervention. At baseline, the BMI z-score in the parent mentor group was 2.63 (SD = 0.65 and in the community health worker group it was 2.61 (SD = 0.89. For change in BMI z-score over time, there was no difference by randomization group at the end of the intervention: −0.02 (95% CI: −0.26, 0.22. At the end of the intervention, the BMI z-score for the parent mentor group was 2.48 (SD = 0.58 and for the community health worker group it was 2.45 (SD = 0.91, both reduced from baseline, p<0.001. Conclusion. The model of a parent mentor clinical trial is feasible, and both randomized groups experienced small, sustained effects on adiposity in an obese, Hispanic population.

  13. Interpersonal Development, Stability, and Change in Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G. C.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Lenzenweger, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This goal of this research was to explore the development of the interpersonal system mapped by the interpersonal circumplex in early adulthood (Ages 18-22). Method This study uses the Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders sample (N = 250; 53% Female). Participants completed the Revised Interpersonal Adjective Scales (Wiggins, Trapnell, & Phillips, 1988) in their freshman, sophomore, and senior years of college. Estimates of structural, rank-order, mean, individual, and ipsative stability were calculated for the broad interpersonal dimensions of Dominance and Affiliation, and also the lower-order octant scales. Additionally, the interpersonal profile parameters of differentiation and prototypicality were calculated at each wave and explored longitudinally, and also used as predictors of interpersonal stability. Results We found excellent structural and high rank-order and ipsative stability in the interpersonal scales over this time period. Mean increases on the Affiliation axis, but not on the Dominance axis, were found to mask differential rates of change among the octant scales, along with significant individual variation in the rates of change. Interpersonal differentiation and prototypicality were related to higher stability in overall interpersonal style. Conclusions Results point to evidence of both stability and nuanced change, illuminating some of the features of the structural variables that can be derived from interpersonal circumplex profiles. PMID:22224462

  14. Stability of risky driving from late adolescence to early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Suzanne; Smart, Diana; Spiteri, Melinda; Cockfield, Samantha; Harris, Anne; Harrison, Warren

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the stability of risky driving behaviour from late adolescence to early adulthood among 823 young Australian drivers participating in an ongoing longitudinal study. This issue was explored by examining the stability of risky driving between the ages of 19-20 and 23-24 years (1) across the cohort and (2) among individuals. Focusing on cohort-wide trends, a modest reduction in the occurrence of speeding was observed across the sample between 19-20 and 23-24 years. However, drink-driving increased markedly over this period, and driving without a seatbelt or helmet for part of a trip also rose. Rates of other risky driving behaviours remained relatively unchanged. With regard to trends among individuals, while a decrease was evident in the risky driving propensities of many who had been classified as moderate or high risky drivers at age 19-20, 48% of the former group, and 77% of the latter group, still exhibited risky driving tendencies at 23-24 years. Together, these findings suggest a fair degree of stability in risky driving from late adolescence to early adulthood among this sample of Australian youth, highlighting the continuing need for road safety initiatives targeting young drivers beyond their first years of licensure. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based on the mean gas temperature and the concentration of CO, O 2, NO, and HC at the flame early region of reaction. The investigation covered the influence of the nozzle cone angle, the jet exit velocity and the jet equivalence ratio. The stability results show that the flames with cone are more stable than those without cone. For conical stabilized flames, the stability results exhibit three different sensitivity regions between the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The inflame measurements prove that the flame stability could be attributed to the triple flame structure at the flame leading edge. The data show that the triple flame structure is influenced by cone angle, the jet velocity and the equivalence ratio. The flame is believed to be controlled by the recirculation flow inside the cone. Increasing the cone angle induced higher air entrainment to the reaction zone as depicted by a higher O 2 concentration within the flame leading edge. Increasing the jet velocity to a certain limit enhances the intensity of combustion at the flame leading edge, while excessive increase in jet velocity reduces this intensity. At a fixed jet velocity the higher the equivalence ratio, the higher the amount of fuel diffused and engulfed to the reaction zone, the more delay of the combustion completion and the higher the emission concentrations of the flame. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Namibian Flood Early Warning SensorWeb Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Daniel; Policelli, Fritz; Frye, Stuart; Cappelare, Pat; Langenhove, Guido Van; Szarzynski, Joerg; Sohlberg, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The major goal of the Namibia SensorWeb Pilot Project is a scientifically sound, operational trans-boundary flood management decision support system for Southern African region to provide useful flood and waterborne disease forecasting tools for local decision makers. The Pilot Project established under the auspices of: Namibian Ministry of Agriculture Water and Forestry (MAWF), Department of Water Affairs; Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS), Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS); and moderated by the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). The effort consists of identifying and prototyping technology which enables the rapid gathering and dissemination of both space-based and ground sensor data and data products for the purpose of flood disaster management and water-borne disease management.

  17. Landslide Geohazard Monitoring, Early Warning and Stabilization Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a presentation of landslide monitoring, early warning and remediation methods recommended for the Polish Carpathians. Instrumentation included standard and automatic on-line measurements with the real-time transfer of data to an Internet web server. The research was funded through EU Innovative Economy Programme and also by the SOPO Landslide Counteraction Project. The landslides investigated were characterized by relatively low rates of the displacements. These ranged from a few millimetres to several centimetres per year. Colluviums of clayey flysch deposits were of a soil-rock type with a very high plasticity and moisture content. The instrumentation consisted of 23 standard inclinometers set to depths of 5-21 m. The starting point of monitoring measurements was in January 2006. These were performed every 1-2 months over the period of 8 years. The measurements taken detected displacements from several millimetres to 40 cm set at a depth of 1-17 m. The modern, on-line monitoring and early warning system was installed in May 2010. The system is the first of its kind in Poland and only one of several such real-time systems in the world. The installation was working with the Local Road Authority in Gorlice. It contained three automatic field stations for investigation of landslide parameters to depths of 12-16 m and weather station. In-place tilt transducers and innovative 3D continuous inclinometer systems with sensors located every 0.5 m were used. It has the possibility of measuring a much greater range of movements compared to standard systems. The conventional and real-time data obtained provided a better recognition of the triggering parameters and the control of geohazard stabilizations. The monitoring methods chosen supplemented by numerical modelling could lead to more reliable forecasting of such landslides and could thus provide better control and landslide remediation possibilities also to stabilization works which prevent landslides.

  18. Landslide Geohazard Monitoring, Early Warning and Stabilization Control Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarczyk Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a presentation of landslide monitoring, early warning and remediation methods recommended for the Polish Carpathians. Instrumentation included standard and automatic on-line measurements with the real-time transfer of data to an Internet web server. The research was funded through EU Innovative Economy Programme and also by the SOPO Landslide Counteraction Project. The landslides investigated were characterized by relatively low rates of the displacements. These ranged from a few millimetres to several centimetres per year. Colluviums of clayey flysch deposits were of a soil-rock type with a very high plasticity and moisture content. The instrumentation consisted of 23 standard inclinometers set to depths of 5-21 m. The starting point of monitoring measurements was in January 2006. These were performed every 1-2 months over the period of 8 years. The measurements taken detected displacements from several millimetres to 40 cm set at a depth of 1-17 m. The modern, on-line monitoring and early warning system was installed in May 2010. The system is the first of its kind in Poland and only one of several such real-time systems in the world. The installation was working with the Local Road Authority in Gorlice. It contained three automatic field stations for investigation of landslide parameters to depths of 12-16 m and weather station. In-place tilt transducers and innovative 3D continuous inclinometer systems with sensors located every 0.5 m were used. It has the possibility of measuring a much greater range of movements compared to standard systems. The conventional and real-time data obtained provided a better recognition of the triggering parameters and the control of geohazard stabilizations. The monitoring methods chosen supplemented by numerical modelling could lead to more reliable forecasting of such landslides and could thus provide better control and landslide remediation possibilities also to stabilization works which

  19. Pilot-Testing CATCH Early Childhood: A Preschool-Based Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Hedberg, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The literature on theoretically-based programs targeting healthy nutrition and physical activity in preschools is scarce. Purpose: To pilot test CATCH Early Childhood (CEC), a preschool-based nutrition and physical activity program among children ages three to five in Head Start. Methods: The study was conducted in two Head Start…

  20. Engaging Struggling Early Readers to Promote Reading Success: A Pilot Study of Reading by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Linda M. Raffaele; Pelzmann, Catherine A.; Frank, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we piloted a Tier 2 intervention designed to improve reading skills among struggling early readers using an intervention that included SRA Reading Mastery, listening-while-reading activities, strategies to increase motivation and engagement in reading, and parent involvement in reading homework. The study included 6 students in…

  1. Pilot study for early prognosis of Azoospermia in relation to Y-STR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed M. Refaat

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Pilot study for early prognosis of Azoospermia in relation to Y-STR Profiling. Ahmed M. Refaat *. Department of Forensic Biology, College of Forensic Sciences, Naif Arab University for Security Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Received 7 May 2015; accepted 15 June 2015. Available online 6 July 2015.

  2. Stability region of closed-loop pilot-vehicle system for fly-by-wire aircraft with limited actuator rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-hui, Li; Liang, Qu; Hao-jun, Xu; Qi-meng, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The category-II PIO (Pilot Induced Oscillations) caused by actuator rate limitation of fly-by-wire airplanes will badly threaten the flight safety. The stability regions of closed-loop pilot-vehicle (CLPV) system with rate limited actuator were studied in this paper to assess stability of such CLPV system. The augmented state  variables were introduced to segregate the rate limited element from the primary  system in order to build the saturation nonlinear model of CLPV system. To get the max...

  3. Early Maladaptive Schemas in a Sample of Airline Pilots seeking Residential Substance Use Treatment: An Initial Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Brasfield, Hope; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has begun to examine the early maladaptive schemas of substance abusers, as it is believed that targeting these core beliefs in treatment may result in improved substance use outcomes. One special population that has received scant attention in the research literature, despite high levels of substance use, is airline pilots. The current study examined the early maladaptive schemas of a sample of airline pilots ( n = 64) who were seeking residential treatment for alcohol dependence and whether they differed in early maladaptive schemas from non-pilot substance abusers who were also seeking residential treatment for alcohol dependence ( n = 45). Pre-existing medical records from patients of a residential substance abuse treatment facility were reviewed for the current study. Of the 18 early maladaptive schemas, results demonstrated that pilots scored higher than non-pilots on the early maladaptive schema of unrelenting standards (high internalized standards of behavior), whereas non-pilots scored higher on insufficient self-control (low frustration tolerance and self-control). Early maladaptive schemas may be a relevant treatment target for substance abuse treatment seeking pilots and non-pilots.

  4. Stability of Core Language Skill Stability of Core Language Skill from Early Childhood to Adolescence: A Latent Variable Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Putnick, Diane L.; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.

    2014-01-01

    This four-wave prospective longitudinal study evaluated stability of language in 324 children from early childhood to adolescence. Structural equation modeling supported loadings of multiple age-appropriate multi-source measures of child language on single-factor core language skills at 20 months and 4, 10, and 14 years. Large stability coefficients (standardized indirect effect = .46) were obtained between language latent variables from early childhood to adolescence and accounting for child nonverbal intelligence and social competence and maternal verbal intelligence, education, speech, and social desirability. Stability coefficients were similar for girls and boys. Stability of core language skill was stronger from 4 to 10 to 14 years than from 20 months to 4 years, so early intervention to improve lagging language is recommended. PMID:25165797

  5. A Pilot Stability Study of Dehydroepiandrosterone Rapid-dissolving Tablets Prepared by Extemporaneous Compounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Steven D; Vernak, Charlene; Zhao, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation is used to treat a variety of conditions. Rapid-dissolving tablets are a relatively novel choice for compounded dehydroepiandrosterone dosage forms. While rapid-dissolving tablets offer ease of administration, there are uncertainties about the physical and chemical stability of the drug and dosage form during preparation and over long-term storage. This study was designed to evaluate the stability of dehydroepiandrosterone rapid-dissolving tablets just after preparation and over six months of storage. The Professional Compounding Centers of America rapid-dissolving tablet mold and base formula were used to prepare 10-mg strength dehydroepiandrosterone rapid-dissolving tablets. The formulation was heated at 100°C to 110°C for 30 minutes, released from the mold, and cooled at room temperature for 30 minutes. The resulting rapid-dissolving tablets were individually packaged in amber blister packs and stored in a stability chamber maintained at 25°C and 60% relative humidity. The stability samples were pulled at pre-determined time points for evaluation, which included visual inspection, tablet weight check, United States Pharmacopeia disintegration test, and stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography. The freshly prepared dehydroepiandrosterone rapiddissolving tablets exhibited satisfactory chemical and physical stability. Time 0 samples disintegrated within 40 seconds in water kept at 37°C. The high-performance liquid chromatographic results confirmed that the initial potency was 101.9% of label claim and that there was no chemical degradation from the heating procedure. Over six months of storage, there were no significant changes in visual appearance, physical integrity, or disintegration time for any of the stability samples. The high-performance liquid chromatographic results also indicated that dehydroepiandrosterone rapid-dissolving tablets retained >95% label claim with no detectable degradation

  6. Natalizumab stabilizes physical, cognitive, MRI, and OCT markers of disease activity: A prospective, non-randomized pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrick D Talmage

    Full Text Available Natalizumab is an effective therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS. Its effectiveness has been demonstrated in several clinical and imaging studies. The objective of this study was to further demonstrate the efficacy of natalizumab using a comprehensive battery of clinical and imaging markers in the same cohort of patients followed longitudinally, hence capturing the multi-faceted nature of the MS disease process. A prospective, open-label, pilot study of 20 MS patients treated with natalizumab was conducted. High resolution MRI, Symbol-Digit Modalities Test (SDMT, and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT scans were obtained at baseline, 48, and 96 weeks. 15 patients completed the study. Natalizumab treatment decreased Expanded Disability Status Scale score (EDSS and no change in SDMT, Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF, or any of the OCT markers of retinal degeneration was observed. Thalamic and whole brain volume as assessed by Percentage Brain Volume Change (PBVC showed continuous deterioration. Higher baseline T2 lesion load correlated with increased rate of PBVC at 96-weeks (r = 0.566, R2 = 0.320, p = 0.035 and thalamic volume loss (r = -0.586, R2 = 0.344, p = 0.027. Most patients, 93%, achieved no evidence of disease activity (NEDA at 2 years, likely due to early disease duration and lower initial baseline lesion load. This study further demonstrates stabilization of clinical and imaging markers of disease activity during natalizumab treatment.

  7. Clinical Leaders for the Future: Evaluation of the Early Clinical Careers Fellowship Pilot Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Pauline; Machin, Alison; Rae, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate key features (contexts), activities (mechanisms) and outcomes of the Early Clinical Career Fellowships Pilot. In Scotland and across the United Kingdom (UK) the number of nurses likely to retire is set to double between 2005 and 2015 - equivalent to a quarter of all nurses. There is a need to build leadership capacity within the existing workforce in order to maintain the quality of service provision.

  8. The Pilot Valley shoreline: An early record of Lake Bonneville dynamics: Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David; Phelps, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The Pilot Valley shoreline is named for distinctive gravel beaches on the eastern, northern, and western sides of Pilot Valley playa, Utah. The shoreline has been identified across the Bonneville basin where it is characterized by one to three beach crests between ~ 1305 and 1309 m elevation, all overlain by deep-water marl of Lake Bonneville. It thus represents the lowest and earliest recognized shoreline of Lake Bonneville. Features of the shoreline indicate that both high wave energy and high stream sediment discharge contributed to shoreline development. Basin hypsometry did not play a role in the development of the shoreline, which must have been caused by a combination of climatically driven hydrologic and storm factors, such as reduced precipitation that stabilized lake level and increase in storm-driven wave energy. The Pilot Valley shoreline is poorly dated at about 30 ka. If it is somewhat older, correlation with Greenland Interstadial 5.1 at 30.8–30.6 ka could explain the stabilization of lake level.

  9. Early Healing Events around Titanium Implant Devices with Different Surface Microtopography: A Pilot Study in an In Vivo Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Orsini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present pilot study, the authors morphologically investigated sandblasted, acid-etched surfaces (SLA at very early experimental times. The tested devices were titanium plate-like implants with flattened wide lateral sides and jagged narrow sides. Because of these implant shape and placement site, the device gained a firm mechanical stability but the largest portion of the implant surface lacked direct contact with host bone and faced a wide peri-implant space rich in marrow tissue, intentionally created in order to study the interfacial interaction between metal surface and biological microenvironment. The insertion of titanium devices into the proximal tibia elicited a sequence of healing events. Newly formed bone proceeded through an early distance osteogenesis, common to both surfaces, and a delayed contact osteogenesis which seemed to follow different patterns at the two surfaces. In fact, SLA devices showed a more osteoconductive behavior retaining a less dense blood clot, which might be earlier and more easily replaced, and leading to a surface-conditioning layer which promotes osteogenic cell differentiation and appositional new bone deposition at the titanium surface. This model system is expected to provide a starting point for further investigations which clarify the early cellular and biomolecular events occurring at the metal surface.

  10. Digital assessment of occlusal wear patterns on occlusal stabilization splints: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korioth, T W; Bohlig, K G; Anderson, G C

    1998-08-01

    If masticatory load distribution is task-dependent, then the pattern of wear on an acrylic resin occlusal splint over time may affect clinical outcome. This pilot study quantitatively assessed posterior wear after 3 months on the occlusal surfaces of maxillary stabilization splints. Subjects with known history of nocturnal bruxism were given heat-cured full-arch acrylic resin occlusal stabilization splints to be worn nocturnally for 3 months. Splint occlusion was adjusted at appliance delivery and was refined at the baseline session 1 to 2 weeks later. No further adjustment of the splint surface was performed during the 3-month study period. Sequential impressions of the splint occlusal surface provided epoxy resin models that were digitized and analyzed through specialized software. Changes in the digitized splint surface from baseline to 3 months allowed comparison of wear facets between splint sides and among tooth locations. Splint wear was asymmetric between sides and uneven between dental locations. For full coverage occlusal splints, the appliance wear phenomenon can be site specific and, if left undisturbed, may yield two extremes of high wear and a zone of low wear in-between.

  11. The role of mast cell stabilization in treatment of postoperative ileus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, Frans O; Buist, Marrije R; Lei, Aaltje; Bennink, Roelof J; Hofland, Jan; van den Wijngaard, René M; de Jonge, Wouter J; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2009-09-01

    Although postoperative ileus (POI) is considered multifactorial, intestinal inflammation resulting from manipulation-induced mast cell activation is recognized as an important pathophysiological mechanism. Therefore, mast cell stabilization may represent a new therapeutic approach to shortening POI. The aim of this paper was to study the effect of ketotifen, a mast cell stabilizer, on postoperative gastrointestinal transit in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In this pilot study, 60 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery for gynecological malignancy with standardized anesthesia were randomized to treatment with ketotifen (4 or 12 mg) or placebo. Patients were treated for 6 days, starting 3 days before surgery. Gastric emptying of liquids, selected as a primary outcome parameter, was measured 24 h after surgery using scintigraphy. Secondary end points were (scintigraphically assessed) colonic transit, represented as geometrical center of activity (segment 1(cecum) to 7(stool)) and clinical parameters. Gastric retention 1 h after liquid intake was significantly reduced by 12 mg (median 3% (1-7), P=0.01), but not by 4 mg ketotifen (18% (3-45), P=0.6) compared with placebo (16% (5-75)). Twenty-four hour colonic transit in placebo was 0.8 (0.0-1.1) vs. 1.2 (0.2-1.4) colon segments in the 12 mg ketotifen group (P=0.07). Abdominal cramps were significantly relieved in patients treated with 12 mg ketotifen, whereas other clinical parameters were not affected. Ketotifen significantly improves gastric emptying after abdominal surgery and warrants further exploration of mast cell stabilizers as putative therapy for POI.

  12. Assessing stability and performance of a digitally enabled supply chain: Retrospective of a pilot in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sarah Skye; Thakare, Neeraj; Ramanujapuram, Arun; Akkihal, Anup

    2017-04-19

    Immunization supply chains in low resource settings do not always reach children with necessary vaccines. Digital information systems can enable real time visibility of inventory and improve vaccine availability. In 2014, a digital, mobile/web-based information system was implemented in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, India. This retrospective investigates improvements and stabilization of supply chain performance following introduction of the digital information system. All data were collected via the digital information system between March 2014 and September 2015. Data included metadata and transaction logs providing information about users, facilities, and vaccines. Metrics evaluated include adoption (system access, timeliness and completeness), data quality (error rates), and performance (stock availability on immunization session days, replenishment response duration, rate of zero stock events). Stability was defined as the phase in which quality and performance metrics achieved equilibrium rates with minimal volatility. The analysis compared performance across different facilities and vaccines. Adoption appeared sufficiently high from the onset to commence stability measures of data quality and supply chain performance. Data quality stabilized from month 3 onwards, and supply chain performance stabilized from month 13 onwards. For data quality, error rates reduced by two thirds post stabilization. Although vaccine availability remained high throughout the pilot, the three lowest-performing facilities improved from 91.05% pre-stability to 98.70% post-stability (p<0.01; t-test). Average replenishment duration (as a corrective response to stock-out events) decreased 52.3% from 4.93days to 2.35days (p<0.01; t-test). Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine was significantly less likely to be stocked out than any other material. The results suggest that given sufficient adoption, stability is sequentially achieved, beginning with data quality, and then performance

  13. CYCLE pilot: a protocol for a pilot randomised study of early cycle ergometry versus routine physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Michelle E; Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France; Herridge, Margaret S; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Pellizzari, Joseph R; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Mourtzakis, Marina; Karachi, Timothy; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-04-08

    Early exercise with in-bed cycling as part of an intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programme has the potential to improve physical and functional outcomes following critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling adults in a multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial (RCT) of early in-bed cycling versus routine physiotherapy to inform a larger RCT. 60-patient parallel group pilot RCT in 7 Canadian medical-surgical ICUs. We will include all previously ambulatory adult patients within the first 0-4 days of mechanical ventilation, without exclusion criteria. After informed consent, patients will be randomised using a web-based, centralised electronic system, to 30 min of in-bed leg cycling in addition to routine physiotherapy, 5 days per week, for the duration of their ICU stay (28 days maximum) or routine physiotherapy alone. We will measure patients' muscle strength (Medical Research Council Sum Score, quadriceps force) and function (Physical Function in ICU Test (scored), 30 s sit-to-stand, 2 min walk test) at ICU awakening, ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Our 4 feasibility outcomes are: (1) patient accrual of 1-2 patients per month per centre, (2) protocol violation rate 80% at the 3 time points and (4) blinded outcomes ascertainment >80% at hospital discharge. Hospital outcome assessors are blinded to group assignment, whereas participants, ICU physiotherapists, ICU caregivers, research coordinators and ICU outcome assessors are not blinded to group assignment. We will analyse feasibility outcomes with descriptive statistics. Each participating centre will obtain local ethics approval, and results of the study will be published to inform the design and conduct of a future multicentre RCT of in-bed cycling to improve physical outcomes in ICU survivors. NCT02377830; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of a Swirl-Stabilized Pilot Combustor from Conventional to Flameless Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Fooladgar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates flame and flow structure of a swirl-stabilized pilot combustor in conventional, high temperature, and flameless modes by means of a partially stirred reactor combustion model to provide a better insight into designing lean premixed combustion devices with preheating system. Finite rate chemistry combustion model with one step tuned mechanism and large eddy simulation is used to numerically simulate six cases in these modes. Results show that moving towards high temperature mode by increasing the preheating level, the combustor is prone to formation of thermal NOx with higher risks of flashback. In addition, the flame becomes shorter and thinner with higher turbulent kinetic energies. On the other hand, towards the flameless mode, leaning the preheated mixture leads to almost thermal NOx-free combustion with lower risk of flashback and thicker and longer flames. Simulations also show qualitative agreements with available experiments, indicating that the current combustion model with one step tuned mechanisms is capable of capturing main features of the turbulent flame in a wide range of mixture temperature and equivalence ratios.

  15. A robust two-way switching control system for remote piloting and stabilization of low-cost quadrotor UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Resta, Ferruccio; Vivani, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present two control logics and an attitude estimator for UAV stabilization and remote piloting, that are as robust as possible to physical parameters variation and to other external disturbances. Moreover, they need to be implemented on low-cost micro-controllers, in order to be attractive for commercial drones. As an example, possible applications of the two switching control logics could be area surveillance and facial recognition by means of a camera mounted on the drone: the high computational speed logic is used to reach the target, when the high-stability one is activated, in order to complete the recognition tasks.

  16. Neurologic Music Therapy Training for Mobility and Stability Rehabilitation with Parkinson's Disease - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Anna A; Krężałek, Piotr; Mirek, Elżbieta; Bujas, Przemysław; Marchewka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT) sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis, System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance. All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions four times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE) and RAS were used in every 45-min session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait, and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation. The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. In the stability tests with eyes

  17. Amygdala, Hippocampal and Corpus Callosum Size Following Severe Early Institutional Deprivation: The English and Romanian Adoptees Study Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Mitul A.; Golembo, Nicole I.; Nosarti, Chiara; Colvert, Emma; Mota, Ashley; Williams, Steven C. R.; Rutter, Michael; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.

    2009-01-01

    The adoption into the UK of children who have been reared in severely deprived conditions provides an opportunity to study possible association between very early negative experiences and subsequent brain development. This cross-sectional study was a pilot for a planned larger study quantifying the effects of early deprivation on later brain…

  18. A Pilot Study of a Culturally Adapted Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Yang, Jian; Yao, Jing; Chen, Jun; Zhuang, Xiangxiang; Wang, Wenxiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lee, Gabrielle T.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to pilot test the effects of a culturally adapted early intervention influenced by the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) on reduction of autism symptoms and severity categorization for young children with autism spectrum disorders in China. Participants were randomly assigned to either the control or intervention…

  19. Mechanical stability of immediately loaded implants with various surfaces and designs: a pilot study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Jörg; Weinländer, Michael; Lekovic, Vojislav; von Berg, Karl-Heinz Linne; Zoeller, Joachim E

    2009-01-01

    Immediate loading is among the most innovative techniques in implant therapy today. This pilot study investigates the biomechanical outcome of various designs and surfaces that claim to shorten implant treatment. In each quadrant of two mongrel dogs, four different implants were used for immediate loading. The following implants were placed 3 months after tooth extraction: screw with low thread profile and anodic oxidized surface (LPAOS), solid screw with wide thread profile and titanium plasma spray coating (WPTPS), screw with low profile and hybrid design of double-etched and machined surface (LPHES), and screw with two thread profiles and a sandblasted and acid-etched surface (DTSAE). The insertion torque of each implant was above 35 Ncm. Resonance frequency analysis was performed after implant placement and again after sacrifice. Additionally, the removal torque and the amount of embedded titanium particles in the peri-implant bone were measured. All 16 prostheses were functional after a 5-month loading period. The highest mean removal torque values were recorded with WPTPS implants (24.4 Ncm/mm), followed by DTSAE implants (22.3 Ncm/mm) and LPAOS implants (18.7 Ncm/mm); the lowest score was obtained by LPHES (12.0 Ncm/mm). The ISQ values increased between the time of surgery and recall for all systems on average, but a significant positive correlation was found for DTSAE only. Significantly higher amounts of titanium were found in the surrounding bone with WPTPS (0.76%) and LPAOS (0.41%) in comparison with DTSAE (0.10%) and LPHES (0.03%). Immediate loading is possible with various designs and surfaces if high primary stability can be achieved during implant placement.

  20. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: SOIL STABILIZATION PILOT STUDY, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY AND HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is a project plan for a pilot study at the United Chrome NPL site, Corvallis, Oregon and includes the health and safety and quality assurance/quality control plans. The plan reports results of a bench-scale study of the treatment process as iieasured by the ...

  1. Implant Stability Changes during Early Phase of Healing:A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mesgarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the stability changes as a reflection of early healing around roughened-surface implants in human by resonance frequency analysis (RFA.Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty one ITI SLA implants were placed in either maxilla or mandible of 68 patients. Bone type was classified into 4 groups according to Lekholm and Zarb index. RFA was used for direct implant stability measurement on theday of implant placement, and at 14, 30 and 60 days after placement. Student t-test and ANOVA served for statistical analysis.Results: No early failure occurred. The highest and lowest primary stability was measured in type 1 and type 4 bone, respectively. Implant stability increased over time in types 3 and 4 bone but continuously decreased in type 1 bone during the first 60 days of healing.In type 2 a small decrease in stability was observed until 30 days, and after that the stability increased. The difference between implant stability in type 2 and type 4 bone at eachtime point was highly significant (P0.05. The effect of implant length and diameter on stability at different times was tested with mixed model ANOVA, and no significant difference among groups was observed (P>0.05Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the pattern of stability changes was different among various bone types. With regard to primary stability and pattern of stability changes in types 2 and 3 bone, immediate and early loading protocols can be recommended in these two bone types, respectively.

  2. Feasibility and efficacy of cognitive telerehabilitation in early Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelcic N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nela Jelcic,1 Michela Agostini,1 Francesca Meneghello,1 Cinzia Bussè,2 Sara Parise,2 Antonietta Galano,2 Paolo Tonin,1 Mauro Dam,1 Annachiara Cagnin1,2 1Foundation IRCCS San Camillo Hospital, Laboratory of Kinematics and Robotics and Laboratory of Psychology, Neurorehabilitation Department, Venice, Italy; 2Department of Neurosciences: Sciences NPSRR, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Background: This pilot study compared the effects of lexical-semantic stimulation through telecommunication technology (LSS-tele with in-person LSS (LSS-direct and unstructured cognitive treatment (UCS in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease.Methods: Twenty-seven patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the very early stage (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] >26/30 were divided into three groups: seven patients received LSS-tele treatment, ten received standard LSS-direct intervention, and ten participants underwent UCS as control condition. Intervention treatments consisted of two weekly sessions of LSS (through teleconference or face to face depending on group assignment or UCS exercises administered to small groups throughout a 3-month period. The main outcome measures were changes of global cognitive performance, language abilities, and memory function. Secondary outcome measures were changes in attention, working memory, executive functions, and visual-spatial abilities tests.Results: The mean MMSE score improved significantly in LSS-tele and LSS-direct treatments; LSS-tele improved language abilities, both phonemic and semantic, and stabilized delayed verbal episodic memory with respect to an improved performance after the LSS-direct intervention and to a memory decline observed in the control group. Improvement was not achieved in any neuropsychological test score after UCS.Conclusion: Clinical application of telecommunication technology to cognitive rehabilitation of elderly patients with neurodegenerative cognitive impairment is feasible and may

  3. 'ELENA goes mobile': a mobile assisted early foreign language learning pilot for familiarizing children with neighbouring languages

    OpenAIRE

    Rusman, Ellen; Ternier, Stefaan; Sassen, Derk

    2013-01-01

    Rusman, E., Ternier, S., & Sassen, D. (2013, 14-15 November). 'ELENA goes mobile': a mobile assisted early foreign language learning pilot for familiarizing children with neighbouring languages. Presentation (virtual) at the 6th ICT for Language learning Conference, Florence, Italy. (URL of virtual presentation, including audio, will follow).

  4. A pilot study on early home-based intervention through an intelligent baby gym (CareToy) in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Bartalena, Laura; Cecchi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CareToy is an intelligent system, inspired by baby gyms, aimed to provide an intensive, individualized, home-based and family-centred early intervention (EI) program. AIMS: A pilot study was carried out to explore the feasibility of CareToy intervention in preterm infants, aged 3-9 mo...

  5. 'ELENA goes mobile': a mobile assisted early foreign language learning pilot for familiarizing children with neighbouring languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Ternier, Stefaan; Sassen, Derk

    2013-01-01

    Rusman, E., Ternier, S., & Sassen, D. (2013, 14-15 November). 'ELENA goes mobile': a mobile assisted early foreign language learning pilot for familiarizing children with neighbouring languages. Presentation (virtual) at the 6th ICT for Language learning Conference, Florence, Italy. (URL of virtual

  6. Removal of 226Ra from tailings pond effluents and stabilization of uranium mine tailings. Bench and pilot scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtke, N.W.; Averill, D.; Bryant, D.N.; Wilkinson, P.; Schmidt, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    Increased world demand for uranium has resulted in recent expansion of Canadian uranium mining operations. Problems have been identified with the discharge of radionuclides such as 226 Ra from tailings pond effluents and with the stabilization of mine tailings. At Environment Canada's Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC) two projects were undertaken in cooperation with the Canadian Uranium Mining Industry and other federal government agencies to address these problems. The first project reports on the progress of bench and pilot scale process simulations for the development of a data base for the design of a full scale mechanical physical/chemical 226 Ra removal waste treatment system with an effluent target level of 10 pCi 226 Ra total per litre. The second project addresses problems of the leachability of radionuclides and the stabilization of both uranium mine tailings and BaRaSO 4 sediments from the treatment of acid seepages

  7. Evaluation of an oral telomerase activator for early age-related macular degeneration - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Coad Thomas; Harley, Calvin B

    2016-01-01

    Telomere attrition and corresponding cellular senescence of the retinal pigment epithelium contribute to the changes of age-related macular degeneration. Activation of the enzyme telomerase can add telomeric DNA to retinal pigment epithelium chromosomal ends and has been proposed as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration. We report the use of a small molecule, oral telomerase activator (TA)-65 in early macular degeneration. This study, focusing on early macular degeneration, provides a model for the use of TAs in age-related disease. Thirty-eight (38) patients were randomly assigned to a 1-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled interventional study with arms for oral TA-65 or placebo. Macular functions via micro-perimetry were the primary measured outcomes. The macular function in the arm receiving the TA-65 showed significant improvement relative to the placebo control. The improvement was manifest at 6 months and was maintained at 1 year: macular threshold sensitivity (measured as average dB [logarithmic decibel scale of light attenuation]) improved 0.97 dB compared to placebo (P-value 0.02) and percent reduced thresholds lessened 8.2% compared to the placebo arm (P-value 0.04). The oral TA significantly improved the macular function of treatment subjects compared to controls. Although this study was a pilot and a larger study is being planned, it is noteworthy in that it is, to our knowledge, the first randomized placebo-controlled study of a TA supplement.

  8. Stability of Core Language Skill from Early Childhood to Adolescence: A Latent Variable Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Putnick, Diane L.; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.

    2014-01-01

    This four-wave prospective longitudinal study evaluated stability of language in 324 children from early childhood to adolescence. Structural equation modeling supported loadings of multiple age-appropriate multisource measures of child language on single-factor core language skills at 20 months and 4, 10, and 14 years. Large stability…

  9. Two-Year Diagnostic Stability in Early-Onset First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Immaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Graell, Montserrat; Moreno, Dolores; Otero, Soraya; Arango, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Background: Only one study has used a prospective method to analyze the diagnostic stability of first psychotic episodes in children and adolescents. The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) is a 2-year, prospective longitudinal study of early-onset first episodes of psychosis (EO-FEP). Aim: To describe diagnostic stability…

  10. Hydrodynamics of exploding foils: Progress on similarity solution and a stability analysis for early time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    This report addresses two broad aspects of the behaviors of hydrodynamic flows, resulting from laser heated, exploding foils. In Part I, various aspects of the similarity solutions are considered, whereas in Part II the stability of the flows at early times are examined, before the similarity solutions are established. 5 refs., 3 figs

  11. A pilot project using evidence-based clinical pathways and payment reform in China's rural hospitals shows early success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tsung-Mei

    2013-05-01

    Reforming China's public hospitals to curb widespread overtreatment and improve the quality and affordability of care has been the most challenging aspect of that nation's ambitious health reform, which began in 2009. This article describes a pilot project under way in several of China's provinces that combines payment reform with the implementation of evidence-based clinical pathways at a few hospitals serving rural areas. Results to date include reduced length-of-stay and prescription drug use and higher patient and provider satisfaction. These early results suggest that the pilot may be achieving its goals, which may have far-reaching and positive implications for China's ongoing reform.

  12. Modeling naturalistic craving, withdrawal, and affect during early nicotine abstinence: A pilot ecological momentary assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujarski, Spencer; Roche, Daniel J O; Sheets, Erin S; Krull, Jennifer L; Guzman, Iris; Ray, Lara A

    2015-04-01

    Despite the critical role of withdrawal, craving, and positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) in smoking relapse, relatively little is known about the temporal and predictive relationship between these constructs within the first day of abstinence. This pilot study aims to characterize dynamic changes in withdrawal, craving, and affect over the course of early abstinence using ecological momentary assessment. Beginning immediately after smoking, moderate and heavy smoking participants (n = 15 per group) responded to hourly surveys assessing craving, withdrawal, NA, and PA. Univariate and multivariate multilevel random coefficient modeling was used to describe the progression of craving, withdrawal/NA, and PA and to test correlations between these constructs at the subject level over the course of early abstinence. Heavy smokers reported greater craving from 1-4 hr of abstinence and greater withdrawal/NA after 3 or more hours as compared with moderate smokers. Level of withdrawal/NA was strongly positively associated with craving, and PA was negatively correlated with craving; however, the temporal dynamics of these correlations differed substantially. The association between withdrawal/NA and craving decreased over early abstinence, whereas the reverse was observed for PA. These findings can inform experimental studies of nicotine abstinence as well as their clinical applications to smoking cessation efforts. In particular, these results help to elucidate the role of PA in nicotine abstinence by demonstrating its independent association with nicotine craving over and above withdrawal/NA. If supported by future studies, these findings can refine experimental methods and clinical approaches for smoking cessation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. A pilot study of core stability and athletic performance: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, Chris; Cropper, Jarrod; Mostad, Joel; Johnson, Matt; Malone, Terry

    2011-06-01

    Correlation study To objectively evaluate the relationship between core stability and athletic performance measures in male and female collegiate athletes. The relationship between core stability and athletic performance has yet to be quantified in the available literature. The current literature does not demonstrate whether or not core strength relates to functional performance. Questions remain regarding the most important components of core stability, the role of sport specificity, and the measurement of core stability in relation to athletic performance. A sample of 35 volunteer student athletes from Asbury College (NAIA Division II) provided informed consent. Participants performed a series of five tests: double leg lowering (core stability test), the forty yard dash, the T-test, vertical jump, and a medicine ball throw. Participants performed three trials of each test in a randomized order. Correlations between the core stability test and each of the other four performance tests were determined using a General Linear Model. Medicine ball throw negatively correlated to the core stability test (r -0.389, p=0.023). Participants that performed better on the core stability test had a stronger negative correlation to the medicine ball throw (r =-0.527). Gender was the most strongly correlated variable to core strength, males with a mean measurement of double leg lowering of 47.43 degrees compared to females having a mean of 54.75 degrees. There appears to be a link between a core stability test and athletic performance tests; however, more research is needed to provide a definitive answer on the nature of this relationship. Ideally, specific performance tests will be able to better define and to examine relationships to core stability. Future studies should also seek to determine if there are specific sub-categories of core stability which are most important to allow for optimal training and performance for individual sports.

  14. Early individualised manipulative rehabilitation following lumbar open laser microdiscectomy improves early post-operative functional disability: A randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungho J; Ahn, Junghoon; Cho, Heecheol; Kim, Dongyun; Kim, Taeyeong; Yoon, Bumchul

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar open laser microdiscectomy has been shown to be an effective intervention and safe approach for lumbar disc prolapse. However early post-operative physical disability affecting daily activities have been sporadically reported. To evaluate the feasibility of using early individualised manipulative rehabilitation to improve early post-operative functional disability following lumbar discectomy. Randomised controlled pilot trial. Setting at a major metropolitan spine surgery hospital. Twenty-one patients aged 25-69 years who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy were randomised to either the manipulative rehabilitation treatment group or the active control group. Rehabilitation was initiated 2-3 weeks after surgery, twice a week for 4 weeks. Each session was for 30 minutes. Primary outcomes were the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire and the visual analogue pain scale. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Early post-operative physical disability was improved with a 55% reduction by early individualised manipulative rehabilitation, compared to that of control care with a 5% increase. Early post-operative residual leg pain decreased with rehabilitation (55%) and control care (9%). This pilot study supports the feasibility of a future definitive randomised control trial and indicates this type of rehabilitation may be an important option for post-operative management after spinal surgery.

  15. A Low-Intensity Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Mood Symptoms in People with Early Psychosis: Development and Pilot Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Alan Chun Yat; Lin, Jessie Jing Xia; Cheung, Veronica Yuen Ki; Lau, Nicole Ka Man; Chang, Wing Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit Wa; Hui, Christy Lai Ming; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Chen, Eric Yu Hai

    2016-11-01

    Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common in people suffering from early psychosis. Growing evidence shows that mindfulness-based intervention is an effective option in handling depression and anxiety disorders. Current article aims to provide documentation on the development and pilot study, before a RCT of larger scale, evaluating the acceptability and potential effects of a 7-week mindfulness-based intervention programme (MBI-p). MBI-p was developed over nine months in 2014. A total of 14 people with early psychosis were recruited to three pilot trials of MBI-p. Eleven of them completed the programme and were interviewed. Eight of them were measured quantitatively at baseline and post-intervention on clinical symptoms, depression and anxiety levels, quality of life and mindfulness. Mixed qualitative and quantitative results supported MBI-p as an acceptable and feasible intervention. Significant statistical improvements were found in depression levels, mental quality of life, general psychopathology and ability to observe emotions and act with awareness. Qualitative comments suggested that the intervention was safe, enjoyable and had a positive impact on mood symptoms. In summary, these results provide a promising pilot support for a potentially effective and cost-efficient treatment option for people with early psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common in people with early psychosis but long received little attention. A low-intensity mindfulness-based intervention targeting depression and anxiety symptoms among people with early psychosis was developed and pilot tested. It is feasible and acceptable to use mindfulness-based intervention as a complementary treatment for psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Enhancing trunk stability in acute poststroke subjects using physioball exercise and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Hariharasudhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Poststroke, most survivors experience trunk control impairment and instability. Previous works on exercise on an unstable surface to improve trunk stability in nonstroke population had proven effective. Thus, physioball exercises (PBEs in poststroke subjects may be useful in the recovery of trunk stability and thereby reduce disability. We hypothesize that PBE is feasible and effective in enhancing trunk stability. Aims: To test the feasibility and successful implementation of conducting a randomized controlled study to assess the clinical effectiveness of PBE and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF technique to enhance trunk control in poststroke subjects. Methods: This study was conducted in a stroke unit of Global Hospitals and Health City, Chennai, India. Thirty patients with the first onset of stroke within 40 days of stroke duration, lesion to one side, and ability to sit independently with or without arm support for 15 days were recruited. All thirty poststroke subjects were randomized either into PBE group or PNF group, and outcome assessors involved in the trail were blinded to allocation. PBE group performed task-oriented activities on an unstable surface and PNF group were treated with PNF-specific trunk stability exercise program for 4 weeks (30 min/day, 5 times/week. Trunk impairment scale (TIS was used as a main outcome measure. Results: Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and Mann–Whitney U-test for intra- and inter-group comparison. The baseline characteristics between both groups were statistically nonsignificant. Within groups, there were significant improvements between baseline and at 4 weeks in the measure of TIS. In addition, PBE group showed a significant increase in trunk control (mean 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.14-3.52, P = 0.002 than the PNF subject. Conclusion: This pilot randomized controlled trial

  17. Big Five personality stability, change, and codevelopment across adolescence and early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghuis, Jeroen; Denissen, Jaap J A; Oberski, Daniel; Sijtsma, Klaas; Meeus, Wim H J; Branje, Susan; Koot, Hans M; Bleidorn, Wiebke

    2017-10-01

    Using data from 2 large and overlapping cohorts of Dutch adolescents, containing up to 7 waves of longitudinal data each (N = 2,230), the present study examined Big Five personality trait stability, change, and codevelopment in friendship and sibling dyads from age 12 to 22. Four findings stand out. First, the 1-year rank-order stability of personality traits was already substantial at age 12, increased strongly from early through middle adolescence, and remained rather stable during late adolescence and early adulthood. Second, we found linear mean-level increases in girls' conscientiousness, in both genders' agreeableness, and in boys' openness. We also found temporal dips (i.e., U-shaped mean-level change) in boys' conscientiousness and in girls' emotional stability and extraversion. We did not find a mean-level change in boys' emotional stability and extraversion, and we found an increase followed by a decrease in girls' openness. Third, adolescents showed substantial individual differences in the degree and direction of personality trait changes, especially with respect to conscientiousness, extraversion, and emotional stability. Fourth, we found no evidence for personality trait convergence, for correlated change, or for time-lagged partner effects in dyadic friendship and sibling relationships. This lack of evidence for dyadic codevelopment suggests that adolescent friends and siblings tend to change independently from each other and that their shared experiences do not have uniform influences on their personality traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX): Description and Early Pilot Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, G. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Komatsu, E.; Drory, N.; MacQueen, P. J.; Adams, J.; Blanc, G. A.; Koehler, R.; Rafal, M.; Roth, M. M.; Kelz, A.; Gronwall, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Schneider, D. P.

    2008-10-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will outfit the 10 m HET with a new wide field and an array of 150 integral-field spectrographs to survey a 420 deg^2 area in the north Galactic cap. Each fiber-coupled unit spectrograph will cover 350-550 nm, simultaneously. This instrument, called VIRUS, will produce ˜34,000 spectra per exposure, and will open up the emission-line universe to large surveys for the first time. The survey will detect 0.8 million Lyman-alpha emitting (LAE) galaxies with 1.9LAE galaxies in 9 cubic Gpc volume will be used to measure the expansion history at this early epoch using baryonic acoustic oscillations and the shape of the power spectrum. The aim of HETDEX is to provide a direct detection of dark energy at z˜3. The measurement will constrain the evolution of dark energy and will also provide 0.1%-level accuracy on the curvature of the Universe, ten times better than current. The prototype of the VIRUS unit spectrograph (VIRUS-P) is a powerful instrument in its own right. Used on the McDonald 2.7~m, it covers the largest area of any integral field spectrograph, and reaches wavelengths down to 340 nm. VIRUS-P is being used for a pilot survey to better measure the properties of LAE galaxies in support of HETDEX. We report initial results from this survey.

  19. SILS cholecystectomy, early experience of a single institution: pilot study of 21 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffo, G; Barugola, G; Scopelliti, F; Sartori, A; Crippa, S; Partelli, S; Falconi, M

    2012-06-01

    Many surgeons have attempted to reduce the number and the size of ports in laparoscopic cholecystectomy to decrease parietal trauma and pain, and to improve cosmetic results. We report a series of laparoscopic cholecystectomies using a single-port technique (SILS) through an umbilical incision in a pilot group of 21 cases. Our goal was to validate and develop the single-port access as a viable option. All the operations were performed using an umbilical SILS port (Ethicon). Most reported techniques utilize special purpose-made instruments. This article provides a stepwise description of the procedure using all straight instruments. No special reticulating instruments or flexible telescopes were used. We report our early difficulties and concerns about the procedure and propose solutions to the problems. Patients' request for improved cosmesis impels surgeons toward the application of SILS, but the true advantage of the technique should be assessed by more evidences. For this reason, we are planning a single-institution, prospective randomized controlled trial to compare postoperative pain, operating time and cosmetic result between one port and standard laparoscopic surgery.

  20. Hubble's Early Release Observations Student Pilot Project: Implementing Formal and Informal Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.; McCallister, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Early Release Observations (EROs) were revealed to the public on September 9, 2009, and K-12 students and educators in five states across the country were able to join the celebration. To date, students and educators in Maryland, Ohio, New York, California, and Florida have participated in the Hubble Space Telescope's ERO Pilot Project. This is an interdisciplinary project created by the Space Telecope Science Institute's (STScI) Office of Public Outreach in which students use skills from subject areas such as language arts, science, art, and technology to research the four ERO objects and create compositions. In recognition of their participation, the students' compositions are displayed at host institutions in each state (a museum, science center, school, planetarium or library) during a special public event for participating students, their families, and teachers. As part of its evaluation program, STScI's Office of Public Outreach has been conducting an evaluation of the project to determine the viability and potential of conducting large-scale, formal/informal collaborative projects in the future and to share lessons learned. Lessons learned will be applied to a new interdisciplinary project, the James Webb Space Telescope Student Innovation Project.

  1. Pilot system on extreme climate monitoring and early warning for long range forecast in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K.; Park, B. K.; E-hyung, P.; Gong, Y.; Kim, H. K.; Park, S.; Min, S. K.; Yoo, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, extreme weather/climate events such as heat waves, flooding/droughts etc. have been increasing in frequency and intensity under climate change over the world. Also, they can have substantial impacts on ecosystem and human society (agriculture, health, and economy) of the affected regions. According to future projections of climate, extreme weather and climate events in Korea are expected to occure more frequently with stronger intensity over the 21st century. For the better long range forecast, it is also fundamentally ruquired to develop a supporting system in terms of extreme weather and climate events including forequency and trend. In this context, the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) has recently initiated a development of the extreme climate monintoring and early warning system for long range forecast, which consists of three sub-system components; (1) Real-time climate monitoring system, (2) Ensemble prediction system, and (3) Mechanism analysis and display system for climate extremes. As a first step, a pilot system has been designed focusing on temperature extremes such heat waves and cold snaps using daily, monthly and seasonal observations and model prediction output on the global, regional and national levels. In parallel, the skills of the KMA long range prediction system are being evaluated comprehensively for weather and climate extremes, for which varous case studies are conducted to better understand the observed variations of extrem climates and responsible mechanisms and also to assess predictability of the ensemble prediction system for extremes. Details in the KMA extreme climate monitoring and early warning system will be intorduced and some preliminary results will be discussed for heat/cold waves in Korea.

  2. Stability and adaptability of early maturing sugarcane clones by AMMI analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Perez Guerra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stability and adaptability of 14 early maturing sugarcane clones were evaluated at 11 locations in the State ofParaná, in the plant cane and ratoon cycles, by the AMMI method. By AMMI2, 59.44% cumulative variance was explained inplant cane and 54.22% in ratoon cane by the first two principal components of tons of pol per hectare (TPH. For genotypeRB966928 the TPH was medium to high, phenotypic stability high and adaptability general, recommending this early maturingclone with wide adaptability for northern Paraná. The genotype-environment interaction was lowest in Paranavaí andMandaguaçú (most stable locations, where the ranking of genotypes was more reliable than the means of the environmentstested.

  3. Detecting COPD exacerbations early using daily telemonitoring of symptoms and k-means clustering: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Morillo, Daniel; Fernandez-Granero, Miguel Angel; Jiménez, Antonio León

    2015-05-01

    COPD places an enormous burden on the healthcare systems and causes diminished health-related quality of life. The highest proportion of human and economic cost is associated with admissions for acute exacerbation of respiratory symptoms (AECOPD). Since prompt detection and treatment of exacerbations may improve outcomes, early detection of AECOPD is a critical issue. This pilot study was aimed to determine whether a mobile health system could enable early detection of AECOPD on a day-to-day basis. A novel electronic questionnaire for the early detection of COPD exacerbations was evaluated during a 6-months field trial in a group of 16 patients. Pattern recognition techniques were applied. A k-means clustering algorithm was trained and validated, and its accuracy in detecting AECOPD was assessed. Sensitivity and specificity were 74.6 and 89.7 %, respectively, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.84. 31 out of 33 AECOPD were early identified with an average of 4.5 ± 2.1 days prior to the onset of the exacerbation that was considered the day of medical attendance. Based on the findings of this preliminary pilot study, the proposed electronic questionnaire and the applied methodology could help to early detect COPD exacerbations on a day-to-day basis and therefore could provide support to patients and physicians.

  4. Autism in the Faroe Islands: Diagnostic Stability from Childhood to Early Adult Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kočovská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD has been regarded as one of the most stable diagnostic categories applied to young children with psychiatric/developmental disorders. The stability over time of a diagnosis of ASD is theoretically interesting and important for various diagnostic and clinical reasons. We studied the diagnostic stability of ASD from childhood to early adulthood in the Faroe Islands: a total school age population sample (8–17-year-olds was screened and diagnostically assessed for AD in 2002 and 2009. This paper compares both independent clinical diagnosis and Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO algorithm diagnosis at two time points, separated by seven years. The stability of clinical ASD diagnosis was perfect for AD, good for “atypical autism”/PDD-NOS, and less than perfect for Asperger syndrome (AS. Stability of the DISCO algorithm subcategory diagnoses was more variable but still good for AD. Both systems showed excellent stability over the seven-year period for “any ASD” diagnosis, although a number of clear cases had been missed at the original screening in 2002. The findings support the notion that subcategories of ASD should be collapsed into one overarching diagnostic entity with subgrouping achieved on other “non-autism” variables, such as IQ and language levels and overall adaptive functioning.

  5. Estimation of the frequency stability of oscillators by means of Allan's variance with a device piloted by mini-computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, Redouane

    1977-01-01

    For certain scientific applications, especially in Metrology, a means to define the frequency stability of oscillators and sinusoidal generators is indispensable. At the level of the precision required, the random nature of noises overlying the useful signal introduces an uncertainty on the frequency determination which may be reduced by an adequate statistical treatment of the experimental data. The estimator most commonly used by metrology laboratories to estimate the frequency instability is the square root of Allan's variance. This estimator has the essential property of converging for most of the noises encountered in practice. An outline of the essential theory is followed by an account of the experimental methods and the results of stability tests on a generator-synthesizer (piloted by a quartz oscillator), with respect to a frequency standard (rubidium atomic clock). The limits of the Allan's variance method and the experimental problems involved are examined. This work was carried out at the Metrology Laboratory of the Equipment Management Section of the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre Electronics Services. It shows how a programmed measurement device helps to reduce uncertainties in the estimation of a quantity perturbed by noises. (author) [fr

  6. Early-1990 status of performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Swift, P.N.

    1991-07-01

    This paper summarizes the early-1990 status of the performance-assessment work being done to evaluate compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B. This regulation sets environmental standards for radioactive waste disposal (Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes). As required by Subpart B, evaluations of compliance will include probabilistic numerical simulations of repository performance and qualitative judgments. Compliance appears uncertain only in the event of human intrusion into the repository after decommissioning. Issues affecting compliance following intrusion include properties of the plugs used to seal the intruding borehole, permeability and porosity of the waste, and possible pressurization of the repository by gas generated from the organic decomposition and corrosion of the waste and containers. Research is in progress to determine the probability of intrusion and to quantify parameter uncertainties needed to include these factors in simulations of repository performance. The Department of Energy (DOE) is following two strategies to assure compliance. First, passive marker systems will be designed and implemented to reduce the likelihood of intrusion and increase the likelihood that intruders will properly reseal the repository. Second, modifications to the form of the waste and the design of the repository to achieve acceptable performance if the intruding borehole is not adequately sealed will be designed. Goals include reductions in gas generation and waste permeability and porosity. Numerous modifications are technically possible. Work in progress will evaluate proposed modifications and recommend the most promising for further testing. The DOE is confident that compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 191 can be established using a combination of the two strategies

  7. Gender Moderation of the Intergenerational Transmission and Stability of Depressive Symptoms from Early Adolescence to Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelka, Mary B.; Trudeau, Linda; Spoth, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Factors that might exacerbate or mitigate the transmission of depressive symptoms from parents to adolescents and the continuity of depressive symptoms into early adulthood are poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that the intergenerational transmission and stability of depressive symptoms would be stronger for girls than boys over adolescence and into early adulthood, while considering the possibility that the pattern of gender moderation might vary depending on parent gender and developmental timing. The participants were 667 rural Midwestern adolescents (52 % female) and their parents. Survey data on maternal and paternal depressive symptoms (at youth age 11) and on adolescent and young adult depressive symptoms (at youth ages 11, 18, and 21) were analyzed via multiple group structural equation modeling. Maternal depressive symptoms predicted increased late adolescent depressive symptoms for girls but not boys, and adolescent depressive symptoms were more stable in girls. Paternal depressive symptoms predicted increased late adolescent depressive symptoms for all youth. The findings suggest the need for early, tailored interventions. PMID:27055682

  8. NON NEUROLOGICAL OUTCOME COMPARISON OF EARLY AND DELAYED SURGICAL STABILIZATION IN C-SPINE FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. B. Mahadewa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non neurological outcome postsurgical stabilization in C-spine injury has not been reported. Non neurological outcome i.e. the risk of lung infection (pneumonia, systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS, length of postoperative care (LOPOC which can compromise the recovery process and treatment period. This study aims to investigate non neurological outcome comparison after early surgical stabilization (ESS and delayed surgical stabilization (DSS in patients with C-spine fractures. Methods: The author retrospectively reviews 59 of 108 consecutive patients who met the inclusion criteria with C-spine fractures who underwent surgical stabilization at the Sanglah General Hospital, between 2007 and 2010. Consisting of 25 patients underwent ESS and 34 patients were treated by DSS. The last follow up period range was 3-36 months. Non neurological outcome were evaluated and compared; the risk of pneumonia, SIRS and LOPOC. Results: Significant statistically between ESS and DSS in; the risk of pneumonia (ESS: DSS= 1:9 by Chi-square-test (p=0.023; the risk of SIRS (ESS: DSS= 1:11 by Chi-square-test (p=0.008; and the LOPOC (ESS: DSS= 6.84:9.97 by independent t-test (p=0.000. Application of ESS for C-spine fractures could provide early mobilization, prompt treatment and facilitate early rehabilitation thus significantly reduces complications due to prolong immobilization and reduces LOPOC. Conclussion: It can be concluded that the ESS strategy is effective and efficient thus may propose an option of surgical timing in C-spine fractures.

  9. Stability and predictors of psychopathic traits from mid-adolescence through early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphälä, Malin; Kosson, David; Westerman, Johan; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2015-12-01

    High levels of psychopathic traits in youth are associated with multiple negative outcomes including substance misuse, aggressive behavior, and criminality. Evidence regarding stability of psychopathic traits is contradictory. No previous study has examined long-term stability of psychopathic traits assessed with validated clinical measures. The present study examined the stability of psychopathic traits from mid-adolescence to early adulthood and explored adolescent factors that predicted psychopathic traits five years later. The sample included 99 women and 81 men who had consulted a clinic for substance misuse in adolescence. At an average age of 16.8 years, the adolescents were assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV) and five years later using the PCL-Revised (PCL-R). Additionally, extensive clinical assessments of the adolescents and their parents were completed in mid-adolescence. Among both females and males, moderate to high rank-order stability was observed for total PCL and facet scores. Among both females and males, there was a decrease in the mean total PCL score, interpersonal facet score, affective facet score, and lifestyle facet score. However, the great majority of females and males showed no change in psychopathy scores over the five-year period as indicated by the Reliable Change Index. Despite the measures of multiple family and individual factors in adolescence, only aggressive behavior and male sex predicted PCL-R total scores in early adulthood after taking account of PCL:YV scores. Taken together, these results from a sample who engaged in antisocial behavior in adolescence suggest that factors promoting high psychopathy scores act early in life. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. High early failure rate of the Columbus posterior stabilized high-flexion knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woon-Hwa; Jeong, Jae-Heon; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2012-05-01

    Most studies report high survivorship rates for TKAs, however, we observed higher than anticipated rates of dislocation and femoral component loosening after implanting a Columbus posterior stabilized prosthesis. We therefore determined (1) the incidence of dislocation and aseptic loosening that occurred after implantation of posterior stabilized high-flexion prostheses in TKAs, (2) the causative factors of dislocation and aseptic femoral component loosening when comparing two designs of prostheses, and (3) the mechanisms of dislocation. We retrospectively reviewed 319 patients who underwent 384 TKAs from May 2007 to July 2008. These patients had been assigned alternately to receive a Scorpio posterior stabilized knee prosthesis (Group I, 158 patients, 187 knees) or a Columbus posterior stabilized knee prosthesis (Group II, 161 patients, 197 knees). We followed the patients with clinical and radiographic evaluations for a minimum of 24 months (mean, 26 months; range, 24-38 months). Ten retrieved prostheses were examined visually. Ten dislocations (5.1%; 10 of 197 knees) and seven aseptic loosenings of femoral components (3.6%; seven of 197 knees) occurred in Group II at a mean of 10.9 months postoperatively. However, no dislocation or loosening occurred in patients in Group I. Most dislocations were associated with varus flexion or flexion rotation movements during normal daily activities. The cam jump distance at 90º flexion for the Columbus prosthesis was lower than for the Scorpio prosthesis. We observed a high rate of early failure during short-term followup after implantation of a Columbus posterior stabilized prosthesis. It appears that early failures of the Columbus design were related to a different cam-post design attributable to a low jump distance during knee flexion. We no longer recommend using this device. Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Trophic level stability-inducing effects of predaceous early juvenile fish in an estuarine mesocosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Ryan J; Noyon, Margaux; Avery, Trevor S; Froneman, P William

    2013-01-01

    Classically, estuarine planktonic research has focussed largely on the physico-chemical drivers of community assemblages leaving a paucity of information on important biological interactions. Within the context of trophic cascades, various treatments using in situ mesocosms were established in a closed estuary to highlight the importance of predation in stabilizing estuarine plankton abundances. Through either the removal (filtration) or addition of certain planktonic groups, five different trophic systems were established. These treatments contained varied numbers of trophic levels and thus different "predators" at the top of the food chain. The abundances of zooplankton (copepod and polychaete), ciliate, micro-flagellate, nano-flagellate and bacteria were investigated in each treatment, over time. The reference treatment containing apex zooplanktivores (early juvenile mullet) and plankton at natural densities mimicked a natural, stable state of an estuary. Proportional variability (PV) and coefficient of variation (CV) of temporal abundances were calculated for each taxon and showed that apex predators in this experimental ecosystem, when compared to the other systems, induced stability. The presence of these predators therefore had consequences for multiple trophic levels, consistent with trophic cascade theory. PV and CV proved useful indices for comparing stability. Apex predators exerted a stabilizing pressure through feeding on copepods and polychaetes which cascaded through the ciliates, micro-flagellates, nano-flagellates and bacteria. When compared with treatments without apex predators, the role of predation in structuring planktonic communities in closed estuaries was highlighted.

  12. Trophic level stability-inducing effects of predaceous early juvenile fish in an estuarine mesocosm study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Wasserman

    Full Text Available Classically, estuarine planktonic research has focussed largely on the physico-chemical drivers of community assemblages leaving a paucity of information on important biological interactions.Within the context of trophic cascades, various treatments using in situ mesocosms were established in a closed estuary to highlight the importance of predation in stabilizing estuarine plankton abundances. Through either the removal (filtration or addition of certain planktonic groups, five different trophic systems were established. These treatments contained varied numbers of trophic levels and thus different "predators" at the top of the food chain. The abundances of zooplankton (copepod and polychaete, ciliate, micro-flagellate, nano-flagellate and bacteria were investigated in each treatment, over time. The reference treatment containing apex zooplanktivores (early juvenile mullet and plankton at natural densities mimicked a natural, stable state of an estuary. Proportional variability (PV and coefficient of variation (CV of temporal abundances were calculated for each taxon and showed that apex predators in this experimental ecosystem, when compared to the other systems, induced stability. The presence of these predators therefore had consequences for multiple trophic levels, consistent with trophic cascade theory.PV and CV proved useful indices for comparing stability. Apex predators exerted a stabilizing pressure through feeding on copepods and polychaetes which cascaded through the ciliates, micro-flagellates, nano-flagellates and bacteria. When compared with treatments without apex predators, the role of predation in structuring planktonic communities in closed estuaries was highlighted.

  13. Pilot-wave dynamics in a harmonic potential: Quantization and stability of circular orbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labousse, M; Oza, A U; Perrard, S; Bush, J W M

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of the dynamics of a droplet walking on a vibrating fluid bath under the influence of a harmonic potential. The walking droplet's horizontal motion is described by an integro-differential trajectory equation, which is found to admit steady orbital solutions. Predictions for the dependence of the orbital radius and frequency on the strength of the radial harmonic force field agree favorably with experimental data. The orbital quantization is rationalized through an analysis of the orbital solutions. The predicted dependence of the orbital stability on system parameters is compared with experimental data and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  14. Linear stability theory as an early warning sign for transitions in high dimensional complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse in detail a new approach to the monitoring and forecasting of the onset of transitions in high dimensional complex systems by application to the Tangled Nature model of evolutionary ecology and high dimensional replicator systems with a stochastic element. A high dimensional stability matrix is derived in the mean field approximation to the stochastic dynamics. This allows us to determine the stability spectrum about the observed quasi-stable configurations. From overlap of the instantaneous configuration vector of the full stochastic system with the eigenvectors of the unstable directions of the deterministic mean field approximation, we are able to construct a good early-warning indicator of the transitions occurring intermittently. (paper)

  15. Time development in the early history of social networks: link stabilization, group dynamics, and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian G

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the time development of empirical networks usually investigate late stages where lasting connections have already stabilized. Empirical data on early network history are rare but needed for a better understanding of how social network topology develops in real life. Studying students who are beginning their studies at a university with no or few prior connections to each other offers a unique opportunity to investigate the formation and early development of link patterns and community structure in social networks. During a nine week introductory physics course, first year physics students were asked to identify those with whom they communicated about problem solving in physics during the preceding week. We use these students' self reports to produce time dependent student interaction networks. We investigate these networks to elucidate possible effects of different student attributes in early network formation. Changes in the weekly number of links show that while roughly half of all links change from week to week, students also reestablish a growing number of links as they progress through their first weeks of study. Using the Infomap community detection algorithm, we show that the networks exhibit community structure, and we use non-network student attributes, such as gender and end-of-course grade to characterize communities during their formation. Specifically, we develop a segregation measure and show that students structure themselves according to gender and pre-organized sections (in which students engage in problem solving and laboratory work), but not according to end-of-coure grade. Alluvial diagrams of consecutive weeks' communities show that while student movement between groups are erratic in the beginning of their studies, they stabilize somewhat towards the end of the course. Taken together, the analyses imply that student interaction networks stabilize quickly and that students establish collaborations based on who is immediately

  16. Six weeks of core stability training improves landing kinetics among female capoeira athletes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-03-29

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60]), and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]). The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]). The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64]), and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70]) landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6

  17. Using a Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) to analyze the stability of a natural rock slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvini, Riccardo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Mastrorocco, Giovanni; Seddaiu, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the application of a rotary wing RPAS for monitoring the stability of a natural rock slope in the municipality of Vecchiano (Pisa, Italy). The slope under investigation is approximately oriented NNW-SSE and has a length of about 320 m; elevation ranges from about 7 to 80 m a.s.l.. The hill consists of stratified limestone, somewhere densely fractured, with dip direction predominantly oriented in a normal way respect to the slope. Fracture traces are present in variable lengths, from decimetre to metre, and penetrate inward the rock versant with thickness difficult to estimate, often exceeding one meter in depth. The intersection between different fracture systems and the slope surface generates rocky blocks and wedges of variable size that may be subject to phenomena of gravitational instability (with reference to the variation of hydraulic and dynamic conditions). Geometrical and structural info about the rock mass, necessary to perform the analysis of the slope stability, were obtained in this work from geo-referenced 3D point clouds acquired using photogrammetric and laser scanning techniques. In particular, a terrestrial laser scanning was carried out from two different point of view using a Leica Scanstation2. The laser survey created many shadows in the data due to the presence of vegetation in the lower parts of the slope and limiting the feasibility of geo-structural survey. To overcome such a limitation, we utilized a rotary wing Aibotix Aibot X6 RPAS geared with a Nikon D3200 camera. The drone flights were executed in manual modality and the images were acquired, according to the characteristics of the outcrops, under different acquisition angles. Furthermore, photos were captured very close to the versant (a few meters), allowing to produce a dense 3D point cloud (about 80 Ma points) by the image processing. A topographic survey was carried out in order to guarantee the necessary spatial accuracy to the process of images exterior

  18. Validation of deep freezing of pilot samples for checking of time stability of indirect analyses of basic milk composition and for their long shelf-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oto Hanuš

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential part of raw milk component measurement is indirect infraanalyse. The checking of time measurement stability is important there. The preparation of pilot samples was described. Information about deep frozen milk pilot sample stability are sporadic. Aim of this work was to verify the stability of long-term stored and deep frozen pilot samples (FPSs. Pilot samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen bath −196 °C and after that stored at −21 °C for one month (A and more months (B till analyse. The pilot samples were measured by CombiFoss 6000: fat F (%; protein CP (%; lactose L (%; casein C (%; solid non fat SNF (%; urea U (mg/100ml; somatic cell count SCC (ths./ml. In the short-term (A experiment the impact of freezing on pilot milk samples was relatively small, in the framework of acceptable value of repeatability (±0.02 % for components. The stability of values of FPSs was better according to standard deviations for important F evaluation in H (Holstein breed samples. The repeatability of values of FPSs in the time was very good for other components. The repeatability was better for SCC in J (Jersey breed samples (±16.5 thousands/ml. That is why the higher variability (±30.1 thousands/ml in H sample is visible less sceptically. The apparent result trends were not observable in the repeatability development of important milk indicators in FPSs. The mild trend was only in CP, but this trend covered absolutely very small shift (variation range. There are only oscillations, which are similar between J and H samples. It is possible to attribute these oscillations rather to instrument effects than to sample effects. The oscilations were markedly higher in the long-term (B experiment. Between J and H samples the oscilations were very similar in curves F and L. It is also possible to attribute them more to instrumental effects. The repeatability values (standard deviations sd of FPSs were mostly lower than ±0.06 %. It is acceptable for

  19. Pilot Dietary Intervention with Heat-Stabilized Rice Bran Modulates Stool Microbiota and Metabolites in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Sheflin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Heat-stabilized rice bran (SRB has been shown to regulate blood lipids and glucose, modulate gut mucosal immunity and inhibit colorectal cancer in animal and human studies. However, SRB’s effects on gut microbial composition and metabolism and the resulting implications for health remain largely unknown. A pilot, randomized-controlled trial was developed to investigate the effects of eating 30 g/day SRB on the stool microbiome and metabolome. Seven healthy participants consumed a study meal and snack daily for 28 days. The microbiome and metabolome were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS at baseline, two and four weeks post-intervention. Increases in eight operational taxonomic units (OTUs, including three from Bifidobacterium and Ruminococcus genera, were observed after two and four weeks of SRB consumption (p < 0.01. Branched chain fatty acids, secondary bile acids and eleven other putative microbial metabolites were significantly elevated in the SRB group after four weeks. The largest metabolite change was a rice bran component, indole-2-carboxylic acid, which showed a mean 12% increase with SRB consumption. These data support the feasibility of dietary SRB intervention in adults and support that SRB consumption can affect gut microbial metabolism. These findings warrant future investigations of larger cohorts evaluating SRB’s effects on intestinal health.

  20. Duty periods with early start times restrict the amount of sleep obtained by short-haul airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Darwent, David; Dawson, Drew

    2012-03-01

    Most of the research related to human fatigue in the aviation industry has focussed on long-haul pilots, but short-haul pilots also experience elevated levels of fatigue. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of early start times on the amount of sleep obtained prior to duty and on fatigue levels at the start of duty. Seventy short-haul pilots collected data regarding their duty schedule and sleep/wake behaviour for at least two weeks. Data were collected using self-report duty/sleep diaries and wrist activity monitors. Mixed-effects regression analyses were used to examine the effects of duty start time (04:00-10:00 h) on (i) the total amount of sleep obtained in the 12h prior to the start of duty and (ii) self-rated fatigue level at the start of duty. Both analyses indicated significant main effects of duty start time. In particular, the amount of sleep obtained in the 12h prior to duty was lowest for duty periods that commenced between 04:00 and 05:00 h (i.e. 5.4h), and greatest for duty periods that commenced between 09:00 and 10:00 h (i.e. 6.6h). These data indicate that approximately 15 min of sleep is lost for every hour that the start of duty is advanced prior to 09:00 h. In addition, self-rated fatigue at the start of duty was highest for duty periods that commenced between 04:00 and 05:00 h, and lowest for duty periods that commenced between 09:00 and 10:00 h. Airlines should implement a fatigue risk management system (FRMS) for short-haul pilots required to work early-morning shifts. One component of the FRMS should be focussed on the production of 'fatigue-friendly' rosters. A second component of the FRMS should be focussed on training pilots to optimise sleep opportunities, to identify circumstances where the likelihood of fatigue is elevated, and to manage the risks associated with fatigue-related impairment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reconsidering Parenting in Chinese Culture: Subtypes, Stability, and Change of Maternal Parenting Style During Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxin; Wei, Xing; Ji, Linqin; Chen, Liang; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2017-05-01

    Parenting in Chinese culture has been a central topic and there have been debate on whether western-derived parenting style is applicable to Chinese cultures in terms of both behavioral profiles and their relationships with child and adolescent adjustment. This study identified the subtypes of Chinese maternal parenting style and examined their stability and changes over the transition to early adolescence. In an urban Chinese sample (N = 2173, 48% girls), four waves of longitudinal data were collected when the adolescents were in the fifth (M = 11.27 years), sixth, seventh, and eighth grades. Latent profile analysis identified four subtypes of parenting style: authoritative, authoritarian, average-level undifferentiated, and strict-affectionate. Adolescents of authoritative mothers exhibited the best overall adjustment, while adolescents of authoritarian mothers showed the worst adjustment. Adolescents of strict-affectionate mothers generally adjusted as well as those of authoritative mothers, except they showed lower academic achievement. The strict-affectionate parenting represented a culture-specific subtype of parenting style in Chinese culture. Latent transition analysis revealed high stability of parenting styles during early adolescence, but transitions between subtypes were also evident. These findings highlight the importance of revisiting Chinese parenting and examining the developmental course of parenting style.

  2. Trajectories of Behavioral Adjustment Following Early Placement in Foster Care: Predicting Stability and Change over 8 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Laura J.; Skriner, Laura C.; Roesch, Scott; Litrownik, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify trajectories of behavioral adjustment from age 6 through 14 years for youth placed in early foster care, and to examine links between trajectories and early cognitive ability and social competence, caregiver stability, and frequency, timing, and type of maltreatment. Method: Participants were 279 youth from the Southwest…

  3. Stability of Developmental Problems after School Entry of Moderately-Late Preterm and Early Preterm-Born Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornman, Jorijn; de Winter, Andrea F; Kerstjens, Jorien M; Bos, Arend F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the stability of developmental problems in moderately-late preterm-born children compared with early preterm and full term-born children before school entry at age 4 years and 1 year after school entry at age 5 years. STUDY DESIGN: We included 376 early preterm, 688 born

  4. [An attempt of evaluation the impact of smoking on postural stability in patients with diseases of the respiratorv system--a pilot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Grzegorz; Pyskir, Małgorzata; Pyskir, Jerzy; Bannach, Małgorzata; Gołda, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    For many years, the negative effects of cigarette smoking is a major social problem. The influence of smoking on various aspects of human life is intensively investigated, but still it is difficult to find studies on postural stability of smokers and non-smokers. Therefore, this paper attempts to analyse the results of the posturographic measurements in two groups of patients with the respiratory system diseases. Pilot studies indicate that smokers obtain higher values of posturographic parameters than nonsmokers. It may indicate a worse postural stability and greater risk of uncontrolled falls in smokers group.

  5. Adaptability and stability of soybean advanced lines of semi early cycle for rust resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Araújo Santos Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out to verify the adaptability and phenotypic stability of soybean inbred lines of semi early cycle, using rust severity as the selection trait for partial resistance. The strains were evaluated during the growing seasons of 2007/08 and 2008/09, in the locations of Uberlândia and Uberaba, MG, Campo Alegre de Goiás and Senador Canedo, GO, using a randomized complete block design with three replications. Rust severity was evaluated by visual assessment of the leaflets at the medial third of five plants in each plot. By using disease severity, it was estimated: the mean absolute rate of disease progress (r, the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC and the partial resistance factor (PRF. Adaptability and stability of the strains were estimated by the methods proposed by Eberhart and Russell, as well as by the AMMI method. It was found that the strains which were the most resistant to rust, in general, also showed the best adaptability and stability.

  6. Neurologic Music Therapy Training for Mobility and Stability Rehabilitation with Parkinson’s Disease – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Anna A.; Krężałek, Piotr; Mirek, Elżbieta; Bujas, Przemysław; Marchewka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT) sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn and Yahr stages 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis, System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance. All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions four times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP), Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE) and RAS were used in every 45-min session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait, and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation. The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. In the stability tests with eyes

  7. NEUROLOGIC MUSIC THERAPY TRAINING FOR MOBILITY AND STABILITY REHABILITATION WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE – A PILOT STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Bukowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance . All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions 4 times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP, Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE and Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS were used in every 45-minute session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation.The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control

  8. Occlusal stability after Herbst treatment of patients with retrognathic and prognathic facial types : A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Niko C; Gnandt, Erhard; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare occlusal changes induced by Herbst treatment and the stability of these changes in patients with retrognathic and prognathic facial types. The sample comprised 11 retrognathic (SNA ≤76°, SNB ≤72°, ML/NSL ≥36°) and 10 prognathic (SNA ≥83°, SNB ≥80°, ML/NSL ≤32°) patients with Class II molar relationships of ≥0.5 cusp widths bilaterally or ≥1.0 cusp width unilaterally. Both groups involved similar distributions of skeletal maturity before treatment. Study parameters were assessed on casts reflecting the situations before treatment (T0), after Herbst treatment (T1), after multibracket treatment immediately following Herbst treatment (T2), and after a mean of 31.1 months of retention (T3). Sagittal molar relationships improved by 0.8 cusp widths in the retrognathic and by 0.7 cusp widths in the prognathic group during active treatment (T0-T2). Insignificant changes of ≤0,2 cusp widths were seen in both groups during retention (T2-T3). Overjet decreased by 8.6 mm in the retrognathic and by 5.5 mm in the prognathic group during T0-T2, and both groups showed clinically irrelevant amounts of relapse by 0.7 mm during T2-T3. Overbite improved by 1.2 mm in the retrognathic and by 2.5 mm in the prognathic group during T0-T2, reaching mean values of 1.0 mm or 1.4 mm by T2, which was followed by 0.2 mm or 1.1 mm of relapse during T2-T3. Treatment with a Herbst appliance seems to offer stable correction of the sagittal occlusal relationships in Class II patients with retrognathic or prognathic facial types, with the vertical changes being more pronounced in the prognathic cases.

  9. Stability of the Early Mars Atmosphere to Collapse into Permanent Polarcaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, R. M.; Kahre, M. A.; Wordsworth, R.; Forget, F.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a permanent CO2 polar ice cap on Mars has important consequences for the planet's climate system. The heat balance of such a cap, which is determined mainly by atmospheric heat transport, and the downward solar in infrared radiative fluxes, determines its surface temperature, which through the vapor pressure relation sets the mean annual surface pressure. On Mars today, for example, the south residual CO2 cap is present year-round with a mean annual temperature of approximately 145 K which corresponds to a mean annual CO2 vapor pressure of approximately 600 Pa. On early Mars, permanent polar caps are also possible especially since the sun was less luminous 3.5-4.0 Gya. Thus, the existence of permanent polar caps on early Mars is central to understanding the nature of the planets climate system in those ancient times and whether or not the atmosphere might have been capable of sustaining conditions suitable for liquid water flowing over the surface as is indicated in the geological record. Forget et al [1] showed that for present orbital properties atmospheric collapse into permanent polar caps could only be prevented for surface pressures roughly between 500 - 3000 hPa. Though follow-on studies confirm and extend the Forget et al. results [2], the full sensitivity of this "window" of stability has not been explored. There are many factors to consider such the albedo of the caps, dust content of the atmosphere, and the presence of water ice clouds. However, we begin our exploration of the stability of the early Martian atmosphere by focusing on the role of CO2 ice clouds. In some preliminary simulations with the Ames Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) we found that atmospheric collapse depends on assumptions regarding the fate of CO2 ice clouds. If, for example, we assume the clouds immediately fall to the surface, then in some cases collapse is favored. On the other hand if the clouds are allowed to fall and evaporate, collapse can be averted

  10. Evaluation of a pilot police-led suicide early alert surveillance strategy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeechan, Grant James; Richardson, Catherine; Weir, Kevin; Wilson, Lynn; O'Neill, Gillian; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy

    2017-07-19

    Those bereaved by suicide are at increased risk of psychological harm, which can be reduced with the provision of timely support. This paper outlines an evaluation of a pilot police-led suicide strategy, in comparison to a coroner-led suicide strategy looking at the number, and length of time it takes for deaths to be recorded for each strategy. Additionally, the police-led strategy offers timely contact from support services for bereaved individuals. We examined what impact this offer of support had on the capacity of support services. A mixed methods evaluation compared how long it took for suspected suicides to be recorded using both strategies. The number of referrals received by support services during the pilot strategy were compared with those from previous years. A feedback focus group, and interviews, were held with key stakeholders. The coroner strategy was more consistent at identifying suspected suicides; however, reports were filed quicker by the police. Bereaved individuals were willing to share contact details with police officers and consent for referral to support services which lead to increased referrals. The focus group and interviews revealed that the pilot police strategy needs better integration into routine police practice. This strategy has the potential to deliver a real benefit to those bereaved by suicide; however, there are still aspects which could be improved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Stabilizing ER Ca2+ channel function as an early preventative strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreaya Chakroborty

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative condition with no known cure. While current therapies target late-stage amyloid formation and cholinergic tone, to date, these strategies have proven ineffective at preventing disease progression. The reasons for this may be varied, and could reflect late intervention, or, that earlier pathogenic mechanisms have been overlooked and permitted to accelerate the disease process. One such example would include synaptic pathology, the disease component strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Dysregulated Ca(2+ homeostasis may be one of the critical factors driving synaptic dysfunction. One of the earliest pathophysiological indicators in mutant presenilin (PS AD mice is increased intracellular Ca(2+ signaling, predominantly through the ER-localized inositol triphosphate (IP(3 and ryanodine receptors (RyR. In particular, the RyR-mediated Ca(2+ upregulation within synaptic compartments is associated with altered synaptic homeostasis and network depression at early (presymptomatic AD stages. Here, we offer an alternative approach to AD therapeutics by stabilizing early pathogenic mechanisms associated with synaptic abnormalities. We targeted the RyR as a means to prevent disease progression, and sub-chronically treated AD mouse models (4-weeks with a novel formulation of the RyR inhibitor, dantrolene. Using 2-photon Ca(2+ imaging and patch clamp recordings, we demonstrate that dantrolene treatment fully normalizes ER Ca(2+ signaling within somatic and dendritic compartments in early and later-stage AD mice in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the elevated RyR2 levels in AD mice are restored to control levels with dantrolene treatment, as are synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Aβ deposition within the cortex and hippocampus is also reduced in dantrolene-treated AD mice. In this study, we highlight the pivotal role of Ca(2+ aberrations in AD, and propose a novel strategy to

  12. Early definitive stabilization of unstable pelvis and acetabulum fractures reduces morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Heather A; Cureton, Beth Ann; Ekstein, Charles; Oldenburg, F Parke; Wilber, John H

    2010-09-01

    Although the benefits of acute stabilization of long bone fractures are recognized, the role of early fixation of unstable pelvis and acetabular fractures is not well-defined. The purpose of this study was to review complications and hospital course of patients treated surgically for pelvis and acetabulum fractures. We hypothesized that early definitive fixation would reduce morbidity and decrease length of stay. Six hundred forty-five patients were treated surgically at a level I trauma center for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring (n = 251), acetabulum (n = 359), or both (n = 40). Mean age was 40.5 years, and mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 25.6 (range 9-66). They were retrospectively reviewed to determine complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, multiple organ failure (MOF), infections, and reperations. Definitive fixation was within 24 hours of injury in 233 patients (early, mean 13.4 hours) and >24 hours in 412 (late, mean 99.2 hours). Twenty-nine patients (12.4%) had complications after early fixation versus 81 (19.7%) after late, p = 0.006. Length of stay and intensive care unit days were 10.7 days versus 11.6 days (p = 0.26) and 8.1 days versus 9.9 days (p = 0.03) for early and late groups, respectively. With ISS >18 (n = 165 early [ISS 32.7]; n = 253 late [ISS 33.1]), early fixation resulted in fewer pulmonary complications (12.7% versus 25%, p = 0.0002), less ARDS (4.8% versus 12.6%, p = 0.019), and less MOF (1.8% versus 4.3%, p = 0.40). Rates of complications, pulmonary complications, deep vein thrombosis, and MOF were no different for patients with pelvis versus acetabulum fractures. In patients receiving ≥ 10U packed red blood cells (n = 41 early, n = 56 late) early fixation led to fewer pulmonary complications (24% versus 55%, p = 0.002), less ARDS (12% versus 25%, p = 0.09), and MOF (7.3% versus 14%, p = 0.23). Two hundred ten patients had some chest injury (32

  13. Pilot use of the early motor repertoire in infants with inborn errors of metabolism : Outcomes in early and middle childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, J. L. M.; van Spronsen, F. J.; Wijnberg-Williams, B. J.; Bos, A. F.

    Background: Predicting later outcome in neonates presenting with severe inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) is difficult. The assessment of the early motor repertoire is a reliable method of evaluating the integrity of the central nervous system in young infants. This method is based on an

  14. Perspectives of Occupational Therapists on the Challenges of Early Intervention Practice: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Patricia; Moore, Cary C.; Tiongco, Cynthia G.; Tkach, Melanie M.; Thom, Carly

    2017-01-01

    Occupational therapists in the field of early intervention (EI) are challenged with limited opportunities for communication and collaboration with colleagues and other EI team members. One hundred and two occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants with early intervention experience completed a descriptive survey. Questions on the…

  15. Rescripting Early Memories Linked to Negative Images in Social Phobia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Jennifer; Hackmann, Ann; Clark, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Negative self-images are a maintaining factor in social phobia. A retrospective study (Hackmann, A., Clark, D.M., McManus, F. (2000). Recurrent images and early memories in social phobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38, 601-610) suggested that the images may be linked to early memories of unpleasant social experiences. This preliminary study…

  16. 76 FR 70152 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... these studies, iterative device modifications are likely to be made based on clinical experience. Early feasibility studies may be appropriate early in the device development process in a limited number of subjects... advance the development process, making clinical experience necessary. As with all clinical studies, the...

  17. Stability of prototype two-piece zirconia and titanium implants after artificial aging: an in vitro pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf-Joachim; Finke, Hans Christian; Klaus, Gerold

    2009-12-01

    270 and 393 N (mean: 325.1 N), for group 2 between 235 and 321 N (mean: 281.8 N), and between 474 and 765 N (mean: 595.2 N) for the titanium group. The failure mode during the fracture testing in the zirconia implant groups was a fracture of the implant head and a bending/fracture of the abutment screw in the titanium group. Within the limits of this pilot investigation, the biomechanical stability of all tested prototype implant groups seems to be - compared with the possibly exerted occlusal forces - borderline for clinical use. A high number of failures occurred already during the artificial loading in the titanium group at the abutment screw level. The zirconia implant groups showed irreparable implant head fractures at relatively low fracture loads. Therefore, the clinical use of the presented prototype implants has to be questioned.

  18. A pilot study to assess tolerability of early enteral nutrition via esophagostomy tube feeding in dogs with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, C S; James, F E; Steiner, J M; Suchodolski, J S; Robertson, I D; Hosgood, G

    2011-01-01

    The putative role of the gut in amplification of systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis is gaining credence, and intraluminal nutrition has been shown to decrease inflammation in experimental models of pancreatitis. Prepyloric feeding often is used in people with acute pancreatitis, but has not been evaluated in dogs. Early intervention with enteral nutrition (EN) delivered proximal to the pylorus will be well tolerated in dogs with acute pancreatitis and provide justification for further larger trials. Ten dogs with severe acute pancreatitis in an open-label, prospective pilot study. Dogs were treated with plasma transfusion and standard care, and then consecutively assigned to receive either EN via esophagostomy tube feeding or parenteral nutrition (PN). Outcome was used to determine optimal study size for future studies, and complications were compared between the 2 groups. A significantly greater number of vomiting or regurgitating episodes occurred in dogs receiving PN. The dogs receiving EN did not demonstrate any noticeable postprandial pain. There were more catheter-related complications in the PN group. There was no difference in outcome between the 2 treatments, and 43 dogs for each treatment would be required in future studies to determine a difference in outcome. Early EN delivered proximal to the pylorus is well tolerated in dogs with severe pancreatitis and resulted in fewer complications than PN. Prospective trials in a larger cohort are justified to fully establish the potential benefit of early EN, preferably compared with minimal enteral nutrition. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Pilot evaluation of a media literacy program for tobacco prevention targeting early adolescents shows mixed results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestle, Christine E; Chen, Yvonnes; Estabrooks, Paul A; Zoellner, Jamie; Bigby, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the impact of media literacy for tobacco prevention for youth delivered through a community site. A randomized pretest-posttest evaluation design with matched-contact treatment and control conditions. The pilot study was delivered through the YMCA in a lower-income suburban and rural area of Southwest Virginia, a region long tied, both economically and culturally, to the tobacco industry. Children ages 8 to 14 (76% white, 58% female) participated in the study (n = 38). The intervention was an antismoking media literacy program (five 1-hour lessons) compared with a matched-contact creative writing control program. General media literacy, three domains of tobacco-specific media literacy ("authors and audiences," "messages and meanings," and "representation and reality"), tobacco attitudes, and future expectations were assessed. Multiple regression modeling assessed the impact of the intervention, controlling for pretest measures, age, and sex. General media literacy and tobacco-specific "authors and audiences" media literacy improved significantly for treatment compared with control (p media literacy measures and for tobacco attitudes were not significant. Future expectations of smoking increased significantly for treatment participants ages 10 and younger (p media literacy are accompanied by an increase in future expectations to smoke for younger children.

  20. Understanding the early effects of team-based learning on student accountability and engagement using a three session TBL pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anita; Janke, Kristin K; Larson, Andrea; Peter, Wendy St

    2017-09-01

    This study examined the early effects of a team based learning (TBL) pilot, including differences in student engagement with TBL compared to lectures, and student accountability, preferences, and satisfaction with TBL. Three TBL sessions were delivered in the nephrology section of pharmacotherapy and then students completed the team-based learning student assessment instrument (TBL-SAI), which assesses TBL relative to lecture on three subscales (i.e., student accountability, preferences, and satisfaction). Students also completed a modified engagement instrument for a lecture and again for a TBL session. All students (160) participated in the survey (100% response rate). When comparing TBL and lecture engagement, five of eight statements were statistically significantly different. In TBL, students reported the strongest agreement with statements related to contributions (i.e., contributing fair share [mean 3.97], contributing meaningfully [mean 3.96]). Using the TBL-SAI, the mean score for accountability (30.64) was higher than neutral (24) indicating a higher level of accountability with TBL. Student satisfaction with TBL was neutral (mean 26.62, neutral = 27). In a three-session pilot, TBL had positive effects on engagement and accountability. Early positive effects could aid programs in building and maintaining momentum with the TBL approach while working towards outcomes that may take longer to achieve, such as changes in professionalism or teamwork. Duration of exposure and perseverance through the transition to TBL may be important in developing preferences and satisfaction. This study provides insights to programs and instructors about student perceptions and attitudes as TBL is introduced. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Ultrasound to stimulate early bone formation in a distraction gap : a double blind randomised clinical pilot trial in the edentulous mandible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Bronckers, ALLJ; Stegenga, B; Raghoebar, GM; de Bont, LGM

    Objective: In a double blind randomised clinical pilot trial, it was investigated whether tow intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy stimulates early bone formation in a distraction gap created in a severely resorbed mandible. Design: Eight patients underwent a mandibular vertical distraction over an

  2. Impacts of an In-Service Education Program on Promoting Language Development in Young Children: A Pilot Study with Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Nerina; Rose, Tanya; Pee, Jerrine; Webb, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood educators (ECEs) play an important role in fostering language development in young children. In-service education, led by speech-language pathologists (SLPs), has a potential role in educating ECEs about language development. In this pilot study, 42 ECEs attended an in-service education program and completed pre- and…

  3. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  4. Pilot study for early prognosis of Azoospermia in relation to Y-STR Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Refaat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There was a significant correlation of Y-STR Profiling results and the prevalence of Azoospermia condition, which supports the idea of using Y-STR Profiling in early prognosis of Azoospermia.

  5. Early maladaptive schemas in depressed patients: stability and relation with depressive symptoms over the course of treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, F.; Lobbestael, J.; Arntz, A.; Peeters, F.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) are hypothesized to be stable, trait-like, enduring beliefs underlying chronic and recurrent psychological disorders. We studied the relation of EMSs with depressive symptom severity and tested the stability of EMSs over a course of evidence-based

  6. Stability and Change in Executive Function Abilities from Late Adolescence to Early Adulthood: A Longitudinal Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Naomi P.; Miyake, Akira; Altamirano, Lee J.; Corley, Robin P.; Young, Susan E.; Rhea, Sally Ann; Hewitt, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs)--the higher level cognitive abilities that enable us to control our own thoughts and actions--continue to develop into early adulthood, yet no longitudinal study has examined their stability during the important life transition from late adolescence to young adulthood. In this twin study (total N = 840 individuals from…

  7. Stability of Early Identified Aggressive Victim Status in Elementary School and Associations with Later Mental Health Problems and Functional Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Linnea R.; Armstrong, Jeffrey M.; Park, Jong-Hyo; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Klein, Marjorie H.; Essex, Marilyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive victims--children who are both perpetrators and victims of peer aggression--experience greater concurrent mental health problems and impairments than children who are only aggressive or only victimized. The stability of early identified aggressive victim status has not been evaluated due to the fact that most studies of aggressor/victim…

  8. Early education and counselling of patients with acute coronary syndrome. A pilot study for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Lukas; Massarotto, Paola; Hediger, Hannele; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy

    2016-06-01

    At time of discharge, patients with acute coronary syndrome often have a knowledge deficit regarding their disease, further treatment and necessary behavioural changes. It is well known that self-efficacy as a prerequisite for behavioural changes can be influenced by patient education. This study investigated whether an individualized education programme starting early in the cardiac care unit enhanced self-efficacy and rehabilitation programme attendance, and was feasible and satisfying for patients. In a pilot randomized controlled trial, 40 patients with acute coronary syndrome were enrolled. The intervention group received in addition to standard care an early individual needs-oriented educational session in the cardiac care unit and subsequently one on the ward addressing risk factors, medication and self-management as well as referral to a rehabilitation programme by a nurse. Self-efficacy was assessed twice, at attendance in a rehabilitation programme six weeks after discharge. The participants' satisfaction with the intervention was assessed qualitatively. When controlling for anxiety and depression, the intervention group showed significant better self-efficacy scores on the ability to control the symptoms (p=0.034). When controlling additionally for age, no significant differences could be detected. The attendance of a rehabilitation programme was higher in the intervention group. The participants in the intervention group reported high satisfaction with the early education. Early education seems to benefit patients with acute coronary syndrome. In light of increased confidence to control one's symptoms and the higher attendance in rehabilitation programmes, as well as a high satisfaction with the intervention, a full powered study will be pursued. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  9. Stability of peer victimization in early adolescence: effects of timing and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; Malecki, Christine Kerres; Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick

    2011-08-01

    The current study investigated the stability of peer victimization and the impact of the timing and duration of victimization on psychological and academic outcomes for boys and girls on a sample of 863 middle school students. Results demonstrated strong support for the onset hypothesis and concurrent effects of maladjustment in anxiety, depression, self-esteem, poor school attitude, GPA, and attendance. Support for the cessation hypothesis was mixed, depending on the outcome and gender: boys demonstrated recovery from internalizing distress, whereas girls demonstrated residual effects, even after the cessation of victimization. Girls also demonstrated residual effects of victimization on grades, and both boys and girls evidenced residual effects of victimization on attendance. Regarding duration of victimization, there was strong support for the life-events model of stress and coping across almost all outcomes, suggesting that even temporary experiences of victimization could have a negative impact on psychological and academic outcomes. Overall, results demonstrated the importance of considering the timing and duration of victimization in understanding the risks and damaging effects of victimization. The results from this study also highlight both the need and the potential to intervene during early adolescence when peer relationships are taking on increasing importance, as well as the importance of helping students regain social-emotional and academic functioning, even after victimization ceases. Copyright © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services. Keywords: Telerehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, Rural, Early Intervention, Children, Program Evaluation, Cost Analysis

  11. A piloted simulator investigation of side-stick controller/stability and control augmentation system requirements for helicopter visual flight tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, K. H.; Dunford, P. J.; Aiken, E. W.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    A piloted simulator experiment was conducted to assess the effects of side-stick controller characteristics and level of stability and control augmentation on handling qualities for several low-altitude control tasks. Visual flight tasks were simulated using four-window computer-generated imagery depicting either a nap-of-the-earth course or a runway with obstacles positioned to provide a slalom course. Both low speed and forward flight control laws were implemented, and a method for automatically switching control modes was developed. Variations in force-deflection characteristics and the number of axes controlled through an integrated side-stick were investigated. With high levels of stability and control augmentation, a four-axis controller with small-deflection in all four axes achieved satisfactory handling qualities for low-speed tasks.

  12. PILOT STUDIES WITH A PHOTOGRAMMETRIC GLACIER LAKE OUTBURST FLOOD EARLY WARNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Maas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Glacier Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs depict an environmental risk with an increasing damage potential in many regions of the world. GLOFs are often caused by glacier margin lakes, which suddenly find a drainage path underneath the bottom of a glacier, which is destabilized and retreating as a consequence of local or global climate changes. In a typical GLOF event, a glacier margin lake may drain completely in 24 hours, causing a large flood wave in the area downstream the glacier. The paper documents some recent GLOF events in the Northern Patagonian Icefield (Chile and presents a terrestrial photogrammetric glacier margin lake monitoring system. The system is based on a camera taking images at regular time intervals. In these images, variations of the water level can be detected by tracking the water-land interface at pre-defined image spots. Due to the drainage mechanism, which is characterized by progressive erosion and melting at the bottom of the glacier, GLOFs are indicated by a progressive water level drop in the lake. Water level changes may be detected with subpixel accuracy by image sequence processing methods. If a 3D model of the lake bottom topography (or at least one height profile through the lake exists, water level changes in monoscopic image sequences may be transformed into volume loss. The basic idea herein is the intersection of a terrain profile with a water level detected in the image and projected into object space. The camera orientation is determined through a GPS-supported photogrammetric network. Camera orientation changes, which may for instance be induced by wind, can be compensated by tracking some fiducial marks in the image. The system has been used in a pilot study at two glacier margin lakes in the Northern Patagonian Icefield. These lakes have a depth of about 80 - 100 meters. The larger one has a length of 5 km and a maximum volume of about 200,000,000 cubic meters. During the pilot study, several GLOF events

  13. Early Identification of Student Performance and Effort Using an Online Homework System: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdian, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct student groups, in terms of academic performance, were identified early in the semester as either being under-performing students or over-performing students using an online homework system. The students who are identified as under-performing received, on average, lower grades than their fellow students but spent more time completing…

  14. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Marieke J.; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, T.F.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Keegstra, Anne L.; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement,

  15. Computational stability of human knee joint at early stance in Gait: Effects of muscle coactivity and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2017-10-03

    As one of the most complex and vulnerable structures of body, the human knee joint should maintain dynamic equilibrium and stability in occupational and recreational activities. The evaluation of its stability and factors affecting it is vital in performance evaluation/enhancement, injury prevention and treatment managements. Knee stability often manifests itself by pain, hypermobility and giving-way sensations and is usually assessed by the passive joint laxity tests. Mechanical stability of both the human knee joint and the lower extremity at early stance periods of gait (0% and 5%) were quantified here for the first time using a hybrid musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. The roles of muscle coactivity, simulated by setting minimum muscle activation at 0-10% levels and ACL deficiency, simulated by reducing ACL resistance by up to 85%, on the stability margin as well as joint biomechanics (contact/muscle/ligament forces) were investigated. Dynamic stability was analyzed using both linear buckling and perturbation approaches at the final deformed configurations in gait. The knee joint was much more stable at 0% stance than at 5% due to smaller ground reaction and contact forces. Muscle coactivity, when at lower intensities (knee joint at the heel strike. It also markedly diminishes forces in lateral hamstrings (by up to 39%) and contact forces on the lateral plateau (by up to 17%). Current work emphasizes the need for quantification of the lower extremity stability margin in gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Satellite for the Namibia SensorWeb Flood Early Warning Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Handy, Matthew; Policelli, Fritz; Katjizeu, McCloud; Van Langenhove, Guido; Aube, Guy; Saulnier, Jean-Francois; Sohlberg, Rob; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in November 2000 as a one year technology demonstration mission for a variety of space technologies. After the first year, it was used as a pathfinder for the creation of SensorWebs. A SensorWeb is the integration of variety of space, airborne and ground sensors into a loosely coupled collaborative sensor system that automatically provides useful data products. Typically, a SensorWeb is comprised of heterogeneous sensors tied together with a messaging architecture and web services. Disasters are the perfect arena to use SensorWebs. One SensorWeb pilot project that has been active since 2009 is the Namibia Early Flood Warning SensorWeb pilot project. The Pilot Project was established under the auspices of the Namibian Ministry of Agriculture Water and Forestry (MAWF)/Department of Water Affairs, the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS)/Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) and moderated by the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). The effort began by identifying and prototyping technologies which enabled the rapid gathering and dissemination of both space-based and ground sensor data and data products for the purpose of flood disaster management and water-borne disease management. This was followed by an international collaboration to build small portions of the identified system which was prototyped during that past few years during the flood seasons which occurred in the February through May timeframe of 2010 and 2011 with further prototyping to occur in 2012. The SensorWeb system features EO-1 data along with other data sets from such satellites as Radarsat, Terra and Aqua. Finally, the SensorWeb team also began to examine the socioeconomic component to determine the impact of the SensorWeb technology and how best to assist in the infusion of this technology in lesser affluent areas with low levels of basic

  17. Early detection of pulmonary hypertension with heart sounds analysis pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinghan; Chung, Joanne; Wong, Thomas; Fan, Ka Lun; Pun, C O

    2006-01-01

    There are strong evidences to support that the modification of the characteristics of the second heart sound has a high correlation with the pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). It is hence postulated that a specific heart sound spectrum for this disease group could be generated as a decision support system to help healthcare workers for the early detection of pulmonary hypertension. This paper described the design of a case-control study on identifying the heart sound pattern of people with pulmonary hypertension. In the proposed study, the heart sound of patients having pulmonary hypertension will be captured by an electronic stethoscope and processed into digital sound spectra which will be analysed to identify a specific heart sound pattern. In the future, an intelligent device will be developed based on the identified pattern to identify and diagnose early stage of pulmonary hypertension.

  18. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services. PMID:25945160

  19. A pilot telerehabilitation program: delivering early intervention services to rural families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services.

  20. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    OpenAIRE

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/str...

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early cortical dementia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gregor Issac

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The diagnostic accuracy of the currently available tools carries poor sensitivity resulting in significant delay in specific diagnosis of cortical dementias. Considering the properties of default mode networking of the brain it is highly probable that specific changes may be seen in frontotemporal dementias (FTDs and Alzheimer′s disease sufficiently early. Aim: The aim of this study is to look for changes in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS in cortical dementia. Materials and Methods: Evaluated with a single pulse TMS with the figure of eight coil and recorded from right first dorsal interossei (FDI. Resting Motor Threshold (RMT was estimated on the opposite motor cortex (T1. Second site of stimulation was cervical spine at C7-T2. Central motor conduction time (CMCT is equal toT1-T2.Silent Period (SP identified by applying TMS pulse to contracting FDI. Conclusions: RMT was reduced in seven out of eight Alzheimer′s dementias. CMCT was in the upper limit of normal in both patients with FTD. The most consistent observation was that SP was reduced and there were escape discharges noticed during the SP suggesting increased cortical excitability and decreased cortical inhibition. This suggests probable early asymptomatic changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA nergic and cholinergic system is taking place. This if confirmed may give some insight into early diagnosis and therapeutic role of GABA agonists in these disorders.

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early cortical dementia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Chandra, S R; Nagaraju, B C

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of the currently available tools carries poor sensitivity resulting in significant delay in specific diagnosis of cortical dementias. Considering the properties of default mode networking of the brain it is highly probable that specific changes may be seen in frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) and Alzheimer's disease sufficiently early. The aim of this study is to look for changes in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in cortical dementia. Evaluated with a single pulse TMS with the figure of eight coil and recorded from right first dorsal interossei (FDI). Resting Motor Threshold (RMT) was estimated on the opposite motor cortex (T1). Second site of stimulation was cervical spine at C7-T2. Central motor conduction time (CMCT) is equal toT1-T2. Silent Period (SP) identified by applying TMS pulse to contracting FDI. RMT was reduced in seven out of eight Alzheimer's dementias. CMCT was in the upper limit of normal in both patients with FTD. The most consistent observation was that SP was reduced and there were escape discharges noticed during the SP suggesting increased cortical excitability and decreased cortical inhibition. This suggests probable early asymptomatic changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) nergic and cholinergic system is taking place. This if confirmed may give some insight into early diagnosis and therapeutic role of GABA agonists in these disorders.

  3. Tracing early breccia pipe studies, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico: A study of the documentation available and decision-making during the early years of WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, D.W. [HC 12, Anthony, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Breccia pipes in southeastern New Mexico are local dissolution-collapse features that formed over the Capitan reef more than 500,000 years ago. During early site studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the threat to isolation by these features was undetermined. Geophysical techniques, drilling, and field mapping were used beginning in 1976 to study breccia pipes. None were found at the WIPP site, and they are considered unlikely to be a significant threat even if undetected. WIPP documents related to breccia pipe studies were assembled, inspected, and analyzed, partly to present a history of these studies. The main objective is to assess how well the record reflects the purposes, results, and conclusions of the studies from concept to decision-making. The main record source was the Sandia WIPP Central File (SWCF). Early records (about 1975 to 1977) are very limited, however, about details of objectives and plans predating any investigation. Drilling programs from about 1977 were covered by a broadly standardized statement of work, field operations plan, drilling history, and basic data report. Generally standardized procedures for peer, management, and quality assurance review were developed during this time. Agencies such as the USGS conducted projects according to internal standards. Records of detailed actions for individual programs may not be available, though a variety of such records were found in the SWCF. A complete written record cannot be reconstructed. With persistence, a professional geologist can follow individual programs, relate data to objectives (even if implied), and determine how conclusions were used in decision-making. 83 refs.

  4. Tracing early breccia pipe studies, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico: A study of the documentation available and decision-making during the early years of WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Breccia pipes in southeastern New Mexico are local dissolution-collapse features that formed over the Capitan reef more than 500,000 years ago. During early site studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the threat to isolation by these features was undetermined. Geophysical techniques, drilling, and field mapping were used beginning in 1976 to study breccia pipes. None were found at the WIPP site, and they are considered unlikely to be a significant threat even if undetected. WIPP documents related to breccia pipe studies were assembled, inspected, and analyzed, partly to present a history of these studies. The main objective is to assess how well the record reflects the purposes, results, and conclusions of the studies from concept to decision-making. The main record source was the Sandia WIPP Central File (SWCF). Early records (about 1975 to 1977) are very limited, however, about details of objectives and plans predating any investigation. Drilling programs from about 1977 were covered by a broadly standardized statement of work, field operations plan, drilling history, and basic data report. Generally standardized procedures for peer, management, and quality assurance review were developed during this time. Agencies such as the USGS conducted projects according to internal standards. Records of detailed actions for individual programs may not be available, though a variety of such records were found in the SWCF. A complete written record cannot be reconstructed. With persistence, a professional geologist can follow individual programs, relate data to objectives (even if implied), and determine how conclusions were used in decision-making. 83 refs

  5. The Acheulian and Early Middle Paleolithic in Latium (Italy): Stability and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Sylvain; Grün, Rainer; Marra, Fabrizio; Nomade, Sebastien; Pereira, Alison; Boschian, Giovanni; Pollarolo, Luca; Fang, Fang; Bahain, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We present here the results of a technological and typological analysis of the Acheulian and early Middle Paleolithic assemblages from Torre in Pietra (Latium, Italy) together with comparisons with the Acheulian small tools of Castel di Guido. The assemblages were never chronometrically dated before. We have now 40Ar/39Ar dates and ESR-U-series dates, within a geomorphological framework, which support correlations to marine isotope stages. The Acheulian (previously correlated to MIS 9) is now dated to MIS 10 while the Middle Paleolithic is dated to MIS 7. Lithic analyses are preceded by taphonomic evaluations. The Levallois method of the Middle Paleolithic assemblage is an innovation characterized by the production of thin flake blanks without cortex. In contrast, the small tool blanks of the Acheulian were either pebbles or thick flakes with some cortex. They provided a relatively easy manual prehension. The choice of Levallois thin flake blanks in the Middle Paleolithic assemblage suggest that the new technology is most likely related to the emergence of hafting. Accordingly, the oldest direct evidence of hafting technology is from the site of Campitello Quarry in Tuscany (Central Italy) where birch-bark tar, found on the proximal part of two flint flakes, is dated to the end of MIS 7. Nevertheless, a peculiar feature of the Middle Paleolithic at Torre in Pietra is the continuous presence of small tool blanks on pebbles and cores and on thick flake albeit at a much lower frequency than in the older Acheulian industries. The adoption of the new technology is thus characterized by innovation combined with a degree of stability. The persistence of these habits in spite of the introduction of an innovative technique underlies the importance of cultural transmission and conformity in the behavior of Neandertals. PMID:27525705

  6. Early assessment of chronic kidney dysfunction using contrast-enhanced ultrasound: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y; Cao, J; Fan, P; Lin, X

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We performed a prospective study to evaluate the value of contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound in quantitative evaluation of renal cortex perfusion in patients with chronic kidney dysfunction (CKD Stage I–II). Methods: The present study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. The study focused on 41 consecutive patients (males, 32; females, 9; mean age, 55.0 ± 5.0 years) with clinical suspicion of CKD (Stages I–II). For both kidneys, CE ultrasound was performed after intravenous bolus injection of 1.0 ml SonoVue® (Bracco Imaging S.p.A., Milan, Italy). Time–intensity curves (TICs) and quantitative indexes were created with Qlab software (Philips, Bothell, WA). 45 healthy volunteers were included as control group. All statistical analyses were performed with SPSS® v. 15.0 software package (SPSS, Chicago, IL). A difference was considered statistically significant with p 2 and AUC >1300 dB s had high utility in the evaluation of CKD, with 81%, 73% and 78% specificities and 76%, 73% and 77% sensitivities. Conclusion: CE ultrasound might be valuable in the early evaluation of CKD. AUC, A and DPI might be valuable quantitative indexes. Advances in knowledge: Quantitative CE ultrasound analysis can be used for the standardized and early evaluation of renal dysfunction. PMID:25060882

  7. A pilot study on factors involved with work participation in the early stages of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Van der Hiele

    Full Text Available Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation.To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job.Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years.Patients with a paid job (57% reported better physical functioning (p<0.001, better memory functioning (p = 0.01 and a lower physical impact of fatigue (p = 0.018 than patients without a paid job. Physical functioning was the main predictor of employment status in a logistic regression model. In those with a paid job better memory functioning (r = 0.54, p = 0.005 and a lower social impact of fatigue (r =  -0.46, p = 0.029 correlated with an increased number of working hours.Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS.

  8. Children with Severe Early Childhood Caries: Pilot Study Examining Mutans Streptococci Genotypic Strains After Full-Mouth Caries Restorative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Elizabeth A.; Nielsen, Truman; Peirano, Patricia; Nguyen, Anna T.; Vo, Alex; Nguyen, Aivan; Jackson, Stephen; Finlayson, Tyler; Sauerwein, Rebecca; Marsh, Katie; Edwards, Issac; Wilmot, Beth; Engle, John; Peterson, John; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Genotypic strains of mutans streptococci (MS) may vary in important virulence properties, and may be differentially affected by specific components of full-mouth caries restorative therapy. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify MS strains that predominate following caries restorative therapy. Methods Plaque from seven children with severe early childhood caries was collected before and following therapy. MS isolates (N=828) were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and arbitrarily primed-PCR (AP-PCR) for assignment within MS strains. Determining the longitudinal changes in MS strain distribution over time within each patient required the isolation of larger numbers of isolates per patient, but from fewer patients. Results Up to 39 genotypic strains of S. mutans and S. sobrinus, and seven genotypic strains of non-MS streptococci were identified by AP-PCR and 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. The number of MS strains isolated from each patient were 3–7 prior to treatment, diminishing to 1–2 dominant MS strains in most patients 6 months post-therapy. Conclusions Caries restorative therapy resulted in shifts of specific MS and non-MS streptococci strains. The implications are that caries restorative therapy affects the distribution of MS strains, and that well-accepted practices for caries prevention should be more closely examined for efficacy. PMID:22583870

  9. Pilot Study of an Individualised Early Postpartum Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold David McIntyre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal strategies to prevent progression towards overt diabetes in women with recent gestational diabetes remain ill defined. We report a pilot study of a convenient, home based exercise program with telephone support, suited to the early post-partum period. Twenty eight women with recent gestational diabetes were enrolled at six weeks post-partum into a 12 week randomised controlled trial of Usual Care (n=13 versus Supported Care (individualised exercise program with regular telephone support; n=15. Baseline characteristics (Mean ± SD were: Age  33±4  years; Weight 80 ± 20 kg and Body Mass Index (BMI 30.0±9.7 kg/m2. The primary outcome, planned physical activity {Median (Range}, increased by 60 (0–540 mins/week in the SC group versus 0 (0–580 mins/week in the UC group (P=0.234. Walking was the predominant physical activity. Body weight, BMI, waist circumference, % body fat, fasting glucose and insulin did not change significantly over time in either group. This intervention designed to increase physical activity in post-partum women with previous gestational diabetes proved feasible. However, no measurable improvement in metabolic or biometric parameters was observed over a three month period.

  10. A pilot evaluation of a novel First Episode and Rapid Early Intervention service for Eating Disorders (FREED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Jessica; Hodsoll, John; Brown, Amy; Lang, Katie; Boysen, Elena; Flynn, Michaela; Mountford, Victoria A; Glennon, Danielle; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2018-03-01

    This pilot study assesses the impact of FREED (First Episode Rapid Early Intervention for Eating Disorders [ED]), a novel transdiagnostic service for emerging adults with recent ED onset, on clinical outcomes. Data were collected from 56 patients and 19 carers for 12 months following enrolment. FREED patients showed significant improvements in ED and other symptoms across time. Carers also showed psychological improvements. For FREED anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, body mass index (BMI) at initial clinical assessment was similar to that of comparable patients (audit cohort) seen in our service before (16.4 vs 16.1 kg/m 2 ). By start of treatment, because of their shorter wait, FREED-AN had gained weight whereas audit patients had lost (16.7 vs 15.8 kg/m 2 ). This difference continued throughout treatment, and at 12 months, nearly 60% FREED-AN patients returned to a BMI of 18.5 or greater. FREED shows promise as a service model for emerging adults with EDs. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  11. Benefits of Early Active Mobility in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuh, Ogochukwu; Gammon, Harriet; Burmeister, Charlotte; Frega, Donald; Nerenz, David; DiGiovine, Bruno; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2016-08-01

    Pressure ulcer formation continues to be problematic in acute care settings, especially intensive care units (ICUs). Our institution developed a program for early mobility in the ICU using specially trained nursing aides. The goal was to impact hospital-acquired pressure ulcers incidence as well as factors associated with ICU deconditioning by using specially trained personnel to perform the acute early mobility interventions. A 5-point mobility scale was developed and used to establish a patients' highest level of activity achievable during evaluation. A mobility team was created consisting of skin-care prevention/mobility nurses and a new category of worker called a patient mobility assistant. Each level has a corresponding plan of care (intervention) that was followed and adjusted according to the patient's progress and nursing evaluation. Data collection included the type of interventions at each encounter, mobility and skin assessments, new hospital-acquired pressure ulcer, the current mobility level, Braden score, rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia, ICU length of stay, and hospital readmission. Staff was also surveyed about their attitudes toward mobilization and perception of mobility barriers; a prepilot and a postpilot survey were planned. During the 1-year study interval, 3233 patients were enrolled from the medical intensive care unit (MICU). The 2011 preimplementation MICU hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rate was 9.2%. After 1 year of employing the mobility team, there was a statistically significant decrease in the MICU hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rate to 6.1% (P = .0405). Hospital readmission of MICU patients also significantly decreased from 17.1% to 11.5% (P = .0010). The mean MICU length of stay decreased by 1 day. There were no safety issues directly or indirectly associated with these interventions. Use of this mobility program resulted in a 3% decrease in the most recalcitrant patients in the MICU. This corresponds to a decrease of

  12. Early Identification of Student Performance and Effort Using an Online Homework System: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdian, David C.

    2012-10-01

    Two distinct student groups, in terms of academic performance, were identified early in the semester as either being under-performing students or over-performing students using an online homework system. The students who are identified as under-performing received, on average, lower grades than their fellow students but spent more time completing the homework assignments. These students are great candidates for targeted advertisement of student resources such as tutoring services. The students who are identified in the over-performing student population received higher grades than their fellow students, but spent less time completing the homework assignments. These students are great candidates for honors programs, independent research projects, and peer-tutoring programs. Incorporating these evaluation criteria to online homework systems will allow instructors to quickly identify students in these academic student populations.

  13. Modular ankle robotics training in early subacute stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Krywonis, Amanda; Kehs, Glenn; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND. Modular lower extremity robotics may offer a valuable avenue for restoring neuromotor control after hemiparetic stroke. Prior studies show that visually guided and visually evoked practice with an ankle robot (anklebot) improves paretic ankle motor control that translates into improved overground walking. To assess the feasibility and efficacy of daily anklebot training during early subacute hospitalization poststroke. Thirty-four inpatients from a stroke unit were randomly assigned to anklebot (n = 18) or passive manual stretching (n = 16) treatments. All suffered a first stroke with residual hemiparesis (ankle manual muscle test grade 1/5 to 4/5), and at least trace muscle activation in plantar- or dorsiflexion. Anklebot training employed an "assist-as-needed" approach during >200 volitional targeted paretic ankle movements, with difficulty adjusted to active range of motion and success rate. Stretching included >200 daily mobilizations in these same ranges. All sessions lasted 1 hour and assessments were not blinded. Both groups walked faster at discharge; however, the robot group improved more in percentage change of temporal symmetry (P = .032) and also of step length symmetry (P = .038), with longer nonparetic step lengths in the robot (133%) versus stretching (31%) groups. Paretic ankle control improved in the robot group, with increased peak (P ≤ .001) and mean (P ≤ .01) angular speeds, and increased movement smoothness (P ≤ .01). There were no adverse events. Though limited by small sample size and restricted entry criteria, our findings suggest that modular lower extremity robotics during early subacute hospitalization is well tolerated and improves ankle motor control and gait patterning. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Modular Ankle Robotics Training in Early Sub-Acute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Krywonis, Amanda; Kehs, Glenn; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Modular lower extremity (LE) robotics may offer a valuable avenue for restoring neuromotor control after hemiparetic stroke. Prior studies show that visually-guided and visually-evoked practice with an ankle robot (anklebot) improves paretic ankle motor control that translates into improved overground walking. Objective Assess the feasibility and efficacy of daily anklebot training during early sub-acute hospitalization post-stroke. Methods Thirty-four inpatients from a stroke unit were randomly assigned to anklebot (N=18) or passive manual stretching (N=16) treatments. All suffered a first stroke with residual hemiparesis (ankle manual muscle test grade 1/5 to 4/5), and at least trace muscle activation in plantar- or dorsiflexion. Anklebot training employed an “assist-as-needed” approach during > 200 volitional targeted paretic ankle movements, with difficulty adjusted to active range of motion and success rate. Stretching included >200 daily mobilizations in these same ranges. All sessions lasted 1 hour and assessments were not blinded. Results Both groups walked faster at discharge, however the robot group improved more in percent change of temporal symmetry (p=0.032) and also of step length symmetry (p=0.038), with longer nonparetic step lengths in the robot (133%) vs. stretching (31%) groups. Paretic ankle control improved in the robot group, with increased peak (p≤ 0.001) and mean (p≤ 0.01) angular speeds, and increased movement smoothness (p≤ 0.01). There were no adverse events. Conclusion Though limited by small sample size and restricted entry criteria, our findings suggest that modular lower extremity robotics during early sub-acute hospitalization is well tolerated and improves ankle motor control and gait patterning. PMID:24515923

  15. Core stability exercise is as effective as task-oriented motor training in improving motor proficiency in children with developmental coordination disorder: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Mei K; Chan, Wai M; Lee, Lin; Chen, Tracy Mk; Chau, Rosanna Mw; Pang, Marco Yc

    2014-10-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a core stability program with a task-oriented motor training program in improving motor proficiency in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Randomized controlled pilot trial. Outpatient unit in a hospital. Twenty-two children diagnosed with DCD aged 6-9 years were randomly allocated to the core stability program or the task-oriented motor program. Both groups underwent their respective face-to-face training session once per week for eight consecutive weeks. They were also instructed to carry out home exercises on a daily basis during the intervention period. Short Form of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (Second Edition) and Sensory Organization Test at pre- and post-intervention. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no significant between-group difference in the change of motor proficiency standard score (P=0.717), and composite equilibrium score derived from the Sensory Organization Test (P=0.100). Further analysis showed significant improvement in motor proficiency in both the core stability (mean change (SD)=6.3(5.4); p=0.008) and task-oriented training groups (mean change(SD)=5.1(4.0); P=0.007). The composite equilibrium score was significantly increased in the task-oriented training group (mean change (SD)=6.0(5.5); P=0.009), but not in the core stability group (mean change(SD) =0.0(9.6); P=0.812). In the task-oriented training group, compliance with the home program was positively correlated with change in motor proficiency (ρ=0.680, P=0.030) and composite equilibrium score (ρ=0.638, P=0.047). The core stability exercise program is as effective as task-oriented training in improving motor proficiency among children with DCD. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Early endoscopic ultrasonography in acute biliary pancreatitis: A prospective pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderloni, Andrea; Galeazzi, Marianna; Ballarè, Marco; Pagliarulo, Michela; Orsello, Marco; Del Piano, Mario; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical usefulness of early endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in the management of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). METHODS: All consecutive patients entering the emergency department between January 2010 and December 2012 due to acute abdominal pain and showing biochemical and/or radiological findings consistent with possible ABP were prospectively enrolled. Patients were classified as having a low, moderate, or high probability of common bile duct (CBD) stones, according to the established risk stratification. Exclusion criteria were: gastrectomy or patient in whom the cause of biliary obstruction was already identified by ultrasonography. All enrolled patients underwent EUS within 48 h of their admission. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed immediately after EUS only in those cases with proven CBD stones or sludge. The following parameters were investigated: (1) clinical: age, sex, fever; (2) radiological: dilated CBD; and (3) biochemical: bilirubin, AST, ALT, gGT, ALP, amylase, lipasis, PCR. Association between presence of CBD stone at EUS and the individual predictors were assessed by univariate logistic regression. Predictors significantly associated with CBD stones (P < 0.05) were entered in a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients with pancreatitis were admitted to the emergency department between January 2010 and December 2012. After exclusion criteria a total of 71 patients (38 females, 53.5%, mean age 58 ± 20.12 years, range 27-89 years; 33 males, 46.5%, mean age 65 ± 11.86 years, range 41-91 years) were included in the present study. The probability of CBD stones was considered low in 21 cases (29%), moderate in 26 (37%), and high in the remaining 24 (34%). The 71 patients included in the study underwent EUS, which allowed for a complete evaluation of the target sites in all the cases. The procedure was completed in a mean time of 14.7 min (range 9-34 min), without

  17. Disease management of early childhood caries: results of a pilot quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Man Wai; Torresyap, Gay; White, Alex; Melvin, Patrice; Graham, Dionne; Kane, Daniel; Scoville, Richard; Ohiomoba, Henry

    2012-08-01

    The purpose is to report findings of a quality improvement (QI) project implemented at two hospital-based dental clinics that care for children with early childhood caries (ECC). We tested a disease management (DM) approach in children younger than age 60 months with ECC. After 30 months, for the 403 and 234 DM patients at Children's Hospital Boston (CHB) and Saint Joseph Hospital (SJH) who returned for at least two visits, rates of new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the OR were 26.1, 13.4 and 10.9% for CHB and 41.0, 7.3 and 14.9% for SJH. Rates of new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the OR for historical controls were 75.2, 21.7, and 20.9% for CHB and 71.3, 31.3, and 25.0% for SJH. A risk-based DM approach utilizing QI strategies to address ECC can be implemented into practice and has the potential to improve care and health outcomes.

  18. Pilot study of Internet-based early intervention for combat-related mental distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Gollan, Jackie; Fogel, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    This article evaluates an Internet-based early intervention combining online cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with electronic peer-to-peer support intended to promote mental health and well-being among combat veterans. We conducted a phase 1 clinical trial of 50 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans using a pre and post single-arm design. We evaluated feasibility and changes in mental health symptoms (depression and posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]), functional status, and attitudes toward treatment seeking at baseline and weeks 4, 8, and 12. A diverse group of veterans was enrolled (26% ethnic minority, 90% male, 66% with income <$30,000/year, 88% with no prior treatment for depression). Participants completed a mean of 4 of 6 lessons (standard deviation = 2.54). From baseline to week 12, there were significant declines in the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale score (effect size [ES] = 0.41) and PTSD Checklist-Military version score (ES = 0.53). There were significant improvements in willingness to accept diagnosis (ES = 1.08) and perceived social norms and stigma regarding friends (ES = 1.51). Although lack of a control group is a limitation, the Internet-based program combining CBT-based coping skills training and peer-to-peer support demonstrated potential feasibility and evidenced benefit in symptom remediation for depression and PTSD.

  19. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Marieke J; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, Tjitske F; Lunsing, Roelineke J; Keegstra, Anne L; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J; Tijssen, Marina A J; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement, including those for internationally applicable Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) syllable repetition tasks (SARASRT). Three independent paediatric neurologists and a speech therapist scored speech in 52 healthy children (mean age 10y, range 4-16y) and 40 individuals with EOA (mean age 15y, range 5-34y). We compared ataxia speech subscores for the association with age and ataxia scores as well as interobserver reliability. In healthy children, ataxia speech subscores were moderately associated with age (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale [ICARS]: r=-0.515; SARA: r=-0.321; pataxia scores (ICARS: r=0.552; SARA: r=0.336; pataxia scores (ICARS: r=0.735; SARA: r=0.730; pataxia speech subscores are associated with ataxia and also reveal high interobserver agreement, including those internationally applicable to SARASRT. We conclude that SARASRT appears to be applicable for EOA databases. However, before syllable repetition tasks are included, we would advise to wait for the results published by the international Childhood Ataxia and Cerebellar Group. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Association between Infant Feeding and Early Postpartum Infant Body Composition: A Pilot Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Kojo Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Research studies have produced conflicting results of the impact of breastfeeding on overweight/obesity. This study evaluated the impact of infant feeding on infant body composition. There were two groups of mother-infant pairs (exclusive breastfeeding [EBF; n=27] and mixed feeding [MF; n=13] in this study. At baseline, participants were similar in their demographic characteristics except prepregnancy weight, where MF mothers tended to be heavier than their EBF counterparts (67.3 kg versus 59.9 kg; P=.034. Infant birth weight was slightly higher among the MF group than their EBF counterparts (3.5 kg versus 3.4 kg, although the differences were not statistically significant. At 3 months postpartum, mean infant FMI (4.1 kg/m2 versus 3.8 kg/m2 and percent body fat (24.4% versus 23.1% were slightly higher among EBF infants than MF infants. In terms of growth velocity, EBF infants gained weight faster than their MF counterparts, although the differences were not statistically significant. The findings from this study suggest that EBF may promote faster weight gain and increase in both fat mass index (FMI and percent body fat in the early postpartum period in addition to the numerous health benefits enjoyed by the infant and the mother who exclusively breastfeeds her newborn.

  1. Early detection of dementia in people with an intellectual disability - A German pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuske, Bettina; Wolff, Christian; Gövert, Uwe; Müller, Sandra Verena

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the application of a newly developed neuropsychological assessment, the Wolfenbütteler Dementia Test for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (WDTIM) in combination with the Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID). The instruments were evaluated in a prospective 2-year follow-up study. A total of 102 people with an intellectual disability were assessed at 6-month intervals. Data were analysed using qualitative and statistical analyses. Four groups of individuals emerged from the analysis: (1) confirmed suspicion, (2) no suspicion, (3) questionable suspicion and (4) early suspicion. Significant differences were found between groups 1 and 2. The WDTIM could be administered to 90%-100% of all participants exhibiting mild-to-moderate intellectual disability and to 50% with severe intellectual disability . The WDTIM was shown to have good applicability to people with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability and to be appropriate for detecting cognitive changes. Using the two instruments in combination achieved greater accuracy in reinforcing a dementia suspicion than did using the DSQIID alone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Early experience with unsedated ultrathin 4.9 mm transnasal gastroscopy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Justin; Bailey, Robert; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander; McLean, Ross; Fedorak, Richard N; Morse, John; Millan, Mario; Guzowski, Tom; Goodman, Karen J

    2008-11-01

    Unsedated transnasal gastroscopy is a technique with unverified clinical advantages. To evaluate the efficacy and procedure times with transnasal gastroscopy by physicians with no previous experience in transnasal endoscopy. Unsedated transnasal gastroscopy using 4.9 mm ultrathin transnasal gastroscopes with randomization to two different biopsy forceps was prospectively evaluated during a single day in January 2008. The outcomes included patient tolerance (scale: 1, no discomfort; 10, severe discomfort), physician technical assessment (1, excellent; 10, very poor), gastric biopsy quality, adverse events and procedure times. Twenty patients underwent transnasal gastroscopy. Nineteen patients (95%) successfully completed transnasal gastroscopy. The patient-reported mean (+/- SD) overall discomfort level during the procedure was 4.0+/-1.9 compared with a physician-estimated level of 3.2+/-1.7 (P=0.04). Only 10% (n=2) reported they would have preferred sedated over unsedated gastroscopy. Mean total encounter time from anesthesia to discharge was 33.5+/-9.3 min. The time from anesthesia to insertion was 7.0+/-5.3 min and from room exit to discharge 6.2+/-2.9 min. No patients who had gastric biopsies taken (zero of 14) had any of unacceptable quality. The only adverse event was distressing sensations (dyspnea, dizziness) in one patient that started during pre-endoscopy anesthetic application, persisting postendoscopy, but without any abnormalities in vital signs. Assuming the adverse event was a rare reaction, early experience with unsedated ultrathin transnasal gastroscopy was an efficient, effective and well-tolerated procedure for evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Using visual evoked potentials for the early detection of amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Spencer T; Arruda, James E; Andrasik, Frank; Beach, Jameson; Groom, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCIa) is often characterized as an early stage of Alzheimer's dementia (AD). The latency of the P2, an electroencephalographic component of the flash visual evoked potential (FVEP), is significantly longer in those with AD or MCIa when compared with controls. The present investigation examined the diagnostic accuracy of several FVEP-P2 procedures in distinguishing people with MCIa and controls. The latency of the FVEP-P2 was measured in participants exposed to a single flash condition and five double flash conditions. The double flash conditions had different inter-stimulus intervals between the pair of strobe flashes. Significant group differences were observed in the single flash and two of the double flash conditions. One of the double flash conditions (100 ms) displayed a higher predictive accuracy than the single flash condition, suggesting that this novel procedure may have more diagnostic potential. Participants with MCIa displayed similar P2 latencies across conditions, while controls exhibited a consistent pattern of P2 latency differences. These differences demonstrate that the double stimulation procedure resulted in a measurable refractory effect for controls but not for those with MCIa. The pattern of P2 group differences suggests that those with MCIa have compromised cholinergic functioning that results in impaired visual processing. Results from the present investigation lend support to the theory that holds MCIa as an intermediate stage between normal healthy aging and the neuropathology present in AD. Measuring the FVEP-P2 during several double stimulation conditions could provide diagnostically useful information about the health of the cholinergic system. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A randomized controlled study of early headgear treatment on occlusal stability--a 13 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusinskiene, Viktorija; Kiuttu, Päivi; Julku, Johanna; Silvola, Anna-Sofia; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the long-term occlusal stability in a group treated early with headgear (HG) compared with a control group. The total study group comprised 68 children (40 males and 28 females) aged 7.6 years (standard deviation 0.3), randomly divided into two groups of equal size. In the first group, HG treatment was initiated immediately, while in the control group only minor interceptive procedures were performed during the follow-up period. Fixed appliance treatment, if needed, including extraction of permanent teeth due to crowding, was undertaken after the completion of early treatment. The records were available from the start of the early treatment and at follow-up after 2, 4, 8, and 13 years. The US-weighted Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) Index, graded according to the severity of malocclusion, was used to evaluate occlusal stability. Little's Irregularity Index (LII)and intercanine distance in the lower arch were measured at all time periods. The Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) scores was used for evaluation of dental aesthetics at the last follow-up. Parametric tests were applied for statistical analyses, except for the evaluation of aesthetics, where a non-parametric test was used. No significant differences were found when long-term stability between the HG and control groups was evaluated at the 13 year follow-up. Lower PAR scores were observed in patients treated without extraction of teeth. A greater irregularity in lower incisor alignment before treatment was found in subjects later treated with extractions. The findings of this study seem to suggest that treatment timing has only a minor influence on stability.

  5. Core stabilization exercise with real-time feedback for chronic hemiparetic stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eunjung; Lee, Byoung-Hee; Hwang, Sujin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of core stabilization exercise with real-time feedback on balance and gait function in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke. Nineteen stroke subjects were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly divided into the experimental (n = 10) and control groups (n = 9). Subjects in the experimental group performed core stabilization exercise with real-time feedback training for 30 minutes per day during a period of six weeks. Subjects in the control group performed core stabilization exercise during the same period. This study assessed the kinematic parameters using a portable walkway system, and timed up-and-go test. Gait velocity showed significantly greater improvement in the experimental group (7.3 ± 5.0 sec) than in the control group (-0.7 ± 10.6). Stride length showed significantly greater increase in the experimental group (13.2 ± 7.9 on the affected side and 12.6 ± 8.0 on the less affected side) than the control group (3.5 ± 8.7 on the affected side and 3.4 ± 8.5 on the less affected side). After training, change in results on the timed up and go test was significantly greater in the experimental group than in the control group. Core stabilization exercise using real-time feedback produces greater improvement in gait performance in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients than core stabilization exercise only.

  6. Effect of tablets containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus reuteri) on early caries lesions in adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M K; Nøhr Larsen, I; Karlsson, I; Twetman, S

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of tablets containing probiotic lactobacilli on early caries lesions in adolescents with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). 36 healthy adolescents of both sexes (12-17 years of age) were enrolled and randomly allocated to a placebo-controlled trial with two parallel groups. The test group received two tablets daily containing two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289) for a period of three months, while the control group got identical placebo tablets without live bacteria. The primary outcome was QLF-readings (change in fluorescence, ΔF and lesion area, mm2) at baseline and after 3 months, conducted at two buccal sites of each individual, pre-selected with clearly visible clinical signs of enamel demineralisation (white spots). Significantly more premolars were allocated to the placebo group, while the test group had more incisors (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in fluorescence values between the groups, neither at baseline, nor at the follow-up. There was however a significant decrease in fluorescence over time in the test group, but not in the placebo group (P<0.05). No alterations of the lesion area (ΔA) were found in any group. The inter-examiner intra-class correlation coefficient-value for QLF-readings was excellent. No side- or adverse effects were reported during the intervention period. This pilot study found a significant decrease over time in the test group. However, no statistically significant differences in fluorescence values between the groups were found. Hence, the null hypothesis could not be rejected.

  7. Real-time stability in power systems techniques for early detection of the risk of blackout

    CERN Document Server

    Savulescu, Savu

    2014-01-01

    This pioneering volume has been updated and enriched to reflect the state-of-the-art in blackout prediction and prevention. It documents and explains background and algorithmic aspects of the most successful steady-state, transient and voltage stability solutions available today in real-time. It also describes new, cutting-edge stability applications of synchrophasor technology, and captures industry acceptance of metrics and visualization tools that quantify and monitor the distance to instability. Expert contributors review a broad spectrum of additionally available techniques, such as traje

  8. Erratum to: On the Progression and Stability of Adolescent Identity Formation. A Five-Wave Longitudinal Study in Early-to-Middle and Middle-to-Late Adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, Wim; van de Schoot, Rens; Keijsers, Loes; Schwartz, S.J.; Branje, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article corrects: On the Progression and Stability of Adolescent Identity Formation: A Five-Wave Longitudinal Study in Early-to-Middle and Middle-to-Late Adolescence Vol. 81, Issue 5, 1565–1581,

  9. Thermal treatment of stabilized air pollution control residues in a waste incinerator pilot plant. Part 1: Fate of elements and dioxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeldt, Brita; Jay, Klaus; Seifert, Helmuth; Vehlow, Jürgen; Christensen, Thomas H; Baun, Dorthe L; Mogensen, Erhardt P B

    2004-02-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerator plants that are treated by means of the Ferrox process can be more safely disposed of due to reduction of soluble salts and stabilization of heavy metals in an iron oxide matrix. Further stabilization can be obtained by thermal treatment inside a combustion chamber of a municipal solid waste incinerator. The influence of the Ferrox products on the combustion process, the quality of the residues, and the partitioning of heavy metals between the various solids and the gas have been investigated in the Karlsruhe TAM-ARA pilot plant for waste incineration. During the experiments only few parameters were influenced. An increase in the SO2 concentration in the raw gas and slightly lower temperatures in the fuel bed could be observed compared with reference tests. Higher contents of Fe and volatile heavy metals such as Zn, Cd, Pb and partly Hg in the Ferrox products lead to increased concentration of these elements in the solid residues of the co-feeding tests. Neither the burnout nor the PCDD/F formation was altered by the addition of the Ferrox products. Co-feeding of treated APC residues seems to be a feasible approach for obtaining a single solid residue from waste incineration.

  10. Influences of early shift work on the diurnal cortisol rhythm, mood and sleep: within-subject variation in male airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, Sophie; Steptoe, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to investigate how early and late work shifts influenced the diurnal cortisol rhythm using a within-subjects study design. Participants were 30 healthy male non-smoking pilots, mean age 39.4, employed by a short-haul airline. The standard rotating shift pattern consisted of 5 early shifts (starting before 0600 h), followed by 3 rest days, 5 late shifts (starting after 1200 h) and 4 rest days. Pilots sampled saliva and completed subjective mood ratings in a logbook 6 times over the day on two consecutive early shift days, two late days and two rest days. Sampling was scheduled at waking, waking+30 m, waking+2.5 h, waking+8 h, waking+12 h and bedtime. Waking time, sleep duration, sleep quality and working hours were also recorded. Cortisol responses were analysed with repeated measures analysis of variance with shift condition (early, late, rest) and sample time (1-6) as within-subject factors. Early shifts were associated with a higher cortisol increase in response to awakening (CAR(i)), a greater total cortisol output over the day (AUC(G)) and a slower rate of decline over the day than late shifts or rest days. Early shifts were also associated with shorter sleep duration but co-varying for sleep duration did not alter the effects of shift on the cortisol rhythm. Both types of work shift were associated with more stress, tiredness and lower happiness than rest days, but statistical adjustment for mood ratings did not alter the findings. Early shift days were associated with significantly higher levels of circulating cortisol during waking hours than late shifts or rest days. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Big Five personality stability, change, and co-development across adolescence and early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghuis, J.; Denissen, J.J.A.; Oberski, D.L.; Sijtsma, K.; Meeus, W.H.J.; Branje, S; Koot, H.M.; Bleidorn, Wiebke

    2017-01-01

    Using data from 2 large and overlapping cohorts of Dutch adolescents, containing up to 7 waves of longitudinal data each (N = 2,230), the present study examined Big Five personality trait stability, change, and codevelopment in friendship and sibling dyads from age 12 to 22. Four findings stand out.

  12. Big Five Personality Stability, Change, and Co-Development across Adolescence and Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghuis, J.; Denissen, Jaap; Oberski, Daniel; Sijtsma, K.; Meeus, W.H.J.; Branje, S.J.T.; Koot, Hans M.; Bleidorn, W.

    2017-01-01

    Using data from 2 large and overlapping cohorts of Dutch adolescents, containing up to 7 waves of longitudinal data each (N = 2,230), the present study examined Big Five personality trait stability, change, and codevelopment in friendship and sibling dyads from age 12 to 22. Four findings stand out.

  13. Stability of Peer Victimization in Early Adolescence: Effects of Timing and Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; Malecki, Christine Kerres; Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated the stability of peer victimization and the impact of the timing and duration of victimization on psychological and academic outcomes for boys and girls on a sample of 863 middle school students. Results demonstrated strong support for the onset hypothesis and concurrent effects of maladjustment in anxiety,…

  14. Early Adolescents' Social Standing in Peer Groups: Behavioral Correlates of Stability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Jennifer E.; Killeya-Jones, Ley A.; Miller, Shari; Costanzo, Philip R.

    2009-01-01

    Sociometric nominations, social cognitive maps, and self-report questionnaires were completed in consecutive years by 327 students (56% girls) followed longitudinally from grade 7 to grade 8 to examine the stability of social standing in peer groups and correlates of changes in social standing. Social preference, perceived popularity, network…

  15. Maternal Verbal Responsiveness and Directiveness: Consistency, Stability, and Relations to Child Early Linguistic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola-Ruotsalainen, Leila; Lehtosaari, Jaana; Palomäki, Josefina; Tervo, Immi

    2018-01-01

    Maternal responsive and directive speech to children at ages 0;10 and 2;0 was investigated by applying a procedure frst introduced by Flynn and Masur (2007) to a new language community (Finnish). The issues examined were consistency and stability over time, and also the role of responsiveness and directiveness in child linguistic development at…

  16. Comparative evaluation of the stability of two different dental implant designs and surgical protocols-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, David E; Maney, Pooja; Teitelbaum, Austin G; Billiot, Susan; Popat, Lomesh J; Palaiologou, A Archontia

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a parallel wall design implant to a tapered apex design implant when placed in the posterior maxilla using two different surgical protocols. Twenty-seven patients (30 implants) were divided into three groups. All implants were 4 mm wide in diameter and 8 mm long. Group A received 10 tapered implants (OSPTX) (Astra Tech OsseoSpeed TX™) using the soft bone surgical protocol (TXSoft). Group B received 10 tapered implants (OSPTX) (AstraTech OsseoSpeedTX™) using the standard surgical protocol (TXStd). Group C received 10 parallel wall implants (OSP) (AstraTech OsseoSpeed™) using the standard surgical protocol (OStd). All implants were placed in the posterior maxilla in areas with a minimum of 8-mm crestal bone height. Resonance frequency measurements (implant stability quotient (ISQ)) and torque values were recorded to determine initial implant stability. All implants were uncovered 6 weeks after placement and restored with a functionally loaded resin provisional screw-retained crown. Resonance frequency measurements were recorded at the time of implant placement, at 6 weeks and 6 and 12 months. Twelve months after implant placement, the stability of the implants was recorded and the final restorations were placed using custom CAD/CAM fabricated abutments and cement-retained PFM DSIGN porcelain crowns. After implant restoration, bone levels were measured at 6 and 12 months with standardized radiographs. Radiographic mean bone loss was less than 0.5 mm in all groups, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Implant survival rate at 1 year was 93.3%, with 2/30 implants failing to integrate prior to functional loading at 6 weeks. No statistically significant difference was found between ISQ measurements between the three groups at all time intervals measured. Strong positive correlations were found between overall bone loss at 6 months and insertion torque at time of placement. A very weak

  17. Identifying poor adaptation to a new diagnosis of motor neuron disease: A pilot study into the value of an early patient-led interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugel, Heino; Pih, Nicky; Dougan, Charlotte P; Rigby, Sally; Young, Carolyn A

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study explored whether clinicians can identify patients who may not be coping with a diagnosis of MND early in the disease course by using patient-led interviews rather than psychological testing. Consecutive, newly diagnosed MND patients underwent a semi-structured interview six and 18 weeks after diagnosis, and completed SEIQoL-DW, ALSFRS-R, MND Coping Scale, MND Social Withdrawal Scale, SF 36 v2 and HAD. Three physicians independently used a list of factors from the literature associated with coping with a diagnosis of MND, and overall impression to assign patients from interview transcripts to groups of copers and non-copers. Ten of 13 recruited patients were categorized unanimously using the first interview alone. Four patients were categorized as non-copers. These showed significantly higher scores for depression, anxiety and social withdrawal and significantly lower scores for coping and mental composite scores on the SF 36 v2. Our pilot study suggests it is possible for experienced clinicians to identify patients who may struggle to cope with a diagnosis of MND early by patient-led interview alone. This provides some evidence for the therapeutic potential of the early follow-up appointment interview with a senior doctor soon after diagnosis, advocated by current British guidelines.

  18. Assessment of the stability of DNA in specimens collected under conditions for drug testing-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert M; Mitchell, John M; Hart, E Dale; Evans, Amy; Meaders, Meredith; Norsworthy, Sarah E; Hayes, Eugene D; Flegel, Ron; Maha, George C; Shaffer, Megan D; Hall, Erin M; Rogers, Kelley

    2018-02-01

    For forensic biological sample collections, the specimen donor is linked solidly to his or her specimen through a chain of custody (CoC) sometimes referenced as a chain of evidence. Rarely, a donor may deny that a urine or oral fluid (OF) specimen is his or her specimen even with a patent CoC. The goal of this pilot study was to determine the potential effects of short-term storage on the quality and quantity of DNA in both types of specimen under conditions that may be encountered with employment-related drug testing specimens. Fresh urine and freshly collected oral fluid all produced complete STR profiles. For the "pad" type OF collectors, acceptable DNA was extractable both from the buffer/preservative and the pad. Although fresh urine and OF produced complete STR profiles, partial profiles were obtained after storage for most samples. An exception was the DNA in the Quantisal OF collector, from which a complete profile was obtained for both freshly collected OF and stored OF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Design characteristics, primary stability and risk of fracture of orthodontic mini-implants: pilot scan electron microscope and mechanical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, André; Winsauer, Heinz; Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Mojal, Sergi; Puigdollers, Andreu

    2013-09-01

    Orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) are increasingly used in orthodontics but can fail for various reasons. This study investigates the effects of OMI design characteristics on the mechanical properties in artificial bone. Twelve self-drilling OMIs (2 small, 6 medium, 4 large) from 8 manufacturers were tested for their primary stability in simulated medium-high cancellous bone and the risk to fracture in high-density methacrylate blocks. For the assessments of the maximum insertion torque (IT) and torsional fracture (TF) 5 of each OMI were used and for the pull-out strength (POS) 10. The OMIs were inserted with a torque screwdriver (12 sec/360°) until the bottom at 8 mm depth was reached. OMI designs were analyzed with a scan electron microscope (SEM). SEM images revealed a great variation in product refinement. In the whole sample, a cylindrical OMI shape was associated with higher POS (pdesign characteristics well correlated with POS, IT and TF values (ranging from 0.601 to 0.961). Greater thread depth was related to greater POS values (r= 0.628), although OMIs with similar POS values may have different IT values. Thread depth and pitch had some impact on POS. TF depended mainly on the OMI inner (r= 0.961) and outer diameters (r=0.892). A thread depth to outer diameter ratio close to 40% increased TF risk. Although at the same insertion depth the OMI outer and inner diameters are the most important factors for primary stability, other OMI design characteristics (cylindrical vs. conical, thread design) may significantly affect primary stability and torsional fracture. This needs to be considered when selecting the appropriate OMI for the desired orthodontic procedures.

  20. Effects of stretching and warm-up routines on stability and balance during weight-lifting: a pilot investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Adelsberger, Rolf; Tr?ster, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy of warm-up and stretching in weight-lifting remains unknown, especially for the weight-lifter?s stability and balance during lifting. Methods 13 subjects were randomly assigned a 10-minute stretching routine (SR) or a 10-minute warm-up routine (WR) and compared against 5 controls (no stretching or warm-up). Before and after the individually assigned routine, the participants? centre of pressure (CoP) was assessed using plantar-pressure sensors. The subjects were measur...

  1. Effects of stretching and warm-up routines on stability and balance during weight-lifting: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelsberger, Rolf; Tröster, Gerhard

    2014-12-20

    The efficacy of warm-up and stretching in weight-lifting remains unknown, especially for the weight-lifter's stability and balance during lifting. 13 subjects were randomly assigned a 10-minute stretching routine (SR) or a 10-minute warm-up routine (WR) and compared against 5 controls (no stretching or warm-up). Before and after the individually assigned routine, the participants' centre of pressure (CoP) was assessed using plantar-pressure sensors. The subjects were measured during 10 repetitions of air squat (no load, "AS"), front squat (FS; 20 kg/15 kg bar), overhead squat (OHS; m: 20 kg / f: 15 kg bar), and a deadlift lifting exercise ("DL"; 20 kg/15 kg bar). The impact on CoP dynamics of the warm-up and stretching routines were examined with repeated two-factor analysis of variances (ANOVA) of the mean and the coefficient of variance (CV, shown in %), as proxies for stability and balance. After stretching, the SR athletes shifted the mean CoP towards the toes (≈1 cm; p CoP towards the heels (≈1 cm; p CoP towards the heels (between 0.8 cm and 5.7 cm) compared to WR (≈1.9 cm towards the heels in FS, no significant change in OHS (≈1 mm) and DL (≈3 mm)). The controls did not show any change between pre- and post-datasets. After stretching, the CV decreased for the AS and OHS exercises (AS: 10.2% to 7.0%, OHS 9.8% to 7.8%), but increased after WR (AS: 7.1% to 10.1%) or did not change significantly (OHS). Both WR and SR resulted in increased CV values for FS and DL. No change of CV was observed in the controls. SR had a stronger impact on CoP during the assessed exercises than either WR or controls. A reduction in CV after SR exercises (AS, OHS) suggests a clear improvement in stability and balance during weight-lifting. The lack of a significant effect for complex movements (OHS) suggests only a limited effect of a 10-minute warm-up routine on CoP features. 10 minutes stretching might therefore be more efficient for improving stability than a general

  2. Stability and Patterns of Classroom Quality in German Early Childhood Education and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuger, Susanne; Kluczniok, Katharina; Kaplan, David; Rossbach, Hans-Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Many education systems worldwide have dedicated a significant amount of resources to improve quality levels in early childhood education and care. Research can contribute to this goal by providing information about conditions of high-quality education and care and reasons for changes in the quality provided to children. This study therefore…

  3. Plasma Homocysteine and Asymmetrical Dimethyl-l-Arginine (ADMA) and Whole Blood DNA Methylation in Early and Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Antonio; Zinellu, Angelo; Tendas, Donatella; Blasetti, Francesco; Carru, Ciriaco; Castiglia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    To compare the plasma levels of homocysteine and asymmetrical dimethyl-l-arginine (ADMA) and the degree of whole blood DNA methylation in patients with early and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and in controls without maculopathy of any sort. This observational case-control pilot study included 39 early AMD patients, 27 neovascular AMD patients and 132 sex- and age-matched controls without maculopathy. Plasma homocysteine and ADMA concentrations and the degree of whole blood DNA methylation were measured. Quantitative variables were compared by Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney test. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the significance of the association between early or wet AMD and some variables. There were no significant differences in mean plasma homocysteine and ADMA concentrations and in the degree of whole blood DNA methylation between patients with early or neovascular AMD and their controls. Similarly, logistic regression analysis disclosed that plasma homocysteine and ADMA levels were not associated with an increased risk for early or neovascular AMD. We failed to demonstrate an association between early or neovascular AMD and increased plasma homocysteine and/or ADMA. Results also suggest that the degree of whole blood DNA methylation is not a marker of AMD.

  4. Primary stability and osseointegration of dental implants in polylactide modified bone - A pilot study in Goettingen minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Krohn, Sebastian; Thiemann, Charlotte; Schulz, Xenia; Kauffmann, Philipp; Tröltzsch, Markus; Schlottig, Falko; Schliephake, Henning; Gruber, Rudolf Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate primary stability (PS) and osseointegration of dental implants in polylactide [70/30 poly(l-lactide-co-d, l-lactide); (PLDLA)] modified bone in 30 Goettingen minipigs. Each animal received three implants per jaw quadrant. In a split-mouth design, one side of the maxilla and mandible was randomly allocated to the experimental treatment (PLDLA applied into the drill hole before implantation), while the contralateral sides served as intraindividual controls (no PLDLA applied). The required insertion torque and the implant stability quotient (ISQ) were measured during implantation. ISQ, volume density (VD) of new bone formation (NBF), and the bone-implant contact (BIC) were evaluated at the end of the observation period (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively) in six animals each. Across all study groups, the PLDLA treatment resulted in a) a comparable insertion torque, b) an equivalent ISQ, c) a reduced BIC, and d) a reduced VD of NBF, as opposed to the untreated controls. In conclusion, the PLDLA treatment did not affect the PS, but rather led to an impaired osseointegration, which was particularly strong in the compact mandibular bone, and decreased in the spongious maxillary bone. PLDLA induced anchoring in spongious bone should be evaluated in further investigations. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual language profiles of Latino children of immigrants: Stability and change over the early school years

    Science.gov (United States)

    COLLINS, BRIAN A.; O'CONNOR, ERIN E.; SUÁREZ-OROZCO, CAROLA; NIETO-CASTAÑON, ALFONSO; TOPPELBERG, CLAUDIO O.

    2013-01-01

    Dual language children enter school with varying levels of proficiencies in their first and second language. This study of Latino children of immigrants (N = 163) analyzes their dual language profiles at kindergarten and second grade, derived from the direct assessment of Spanish and English proficiencies (Woodcock Language Proficiency Batteries–Revised). Children were grouped based on the similarity of language profiles (competent profiles, such as dual proficient, Spanish proficient, and English proficient; and low-performing profiles, including borderline proficient and limited proficient). At kindergarten, the majority of children (63%) demonstrated a low-performing profile; by second grade, however, the majority of children (64%) had competent profiles. Change and stability of language profiles over time of individual children were then analyzed. Of concern, are children who continued to demonstrate a low-performing, high-risk profile. Factors in the linguistic environments at school and home, as well as other family and child factors associated with dual language profiles and change/stability over time were examined, with a particular focus on the persistently low-performing profile groups. PMID:24825925

  6. Stress responsiveness and anxiety-like behavior: The early social environment differentially shapes stability over time in a small rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangenstedt, Susanne; Jaljuli, Iman; Sachser, Norbert; Kaiser, Sylvia

    2017-04-01

    The early social environment can profoundly affect behavioral and physiological phenotypes. We investigated how male wild cavy offspring, whose mothers had either lived in a stable (SE) or an unstable social environment (UE) during pregnancy and lactation, differed in their anxiety-like behavior and stress responsiveness. At two different time points in life, we tested the offspring's anxiety-like behavior in a dark-light test and their endocrine reaction to challenge in a cortisol reactivity test. Furthermore, we analyzed whether individual traits remained stable over time. There was no effect of the early social environment on anxiety-like behavior and stress responsiveness. However, at an individual level, anxiety-like behavior was stable over time in UE- but not in SE-sons. Stress responsiveness, in turn, was rather inconsistent in UE-sons and temporally stable in SE-sons. Conclusively, we showed for the first time that the early social environment differentially shapes the stability of behavioral and endocrine traits. At first glance, these results may be surprising, but they can be explained by the different functions anxiety-like behavior and stress responsiveness have. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of early biofilm formation by glass-ionomer incorporated with chlorhexidine in vivo: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, X.; Huang, X.; Huang, C.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Yang, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This pilot study investigated the antibiofilm effects of glass-ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) incorporated with chlorhexidine (CHX) in vivo. METHODS: Experimental GICs and RMGICs containing 2% CHX were obtained by mixing CHX with the powder of

  8. School-Based Prevention of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Early Adolescence: A Pilot of a Parent Intervention Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen J.; Freres, Derek R.; Lascher, Marisa; Litzinger, Samantha; Shatte, Andrew; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that school-based cognitive-behavioral interventions can reduce and prevent depressive symptoms in youth. This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program, the Penn Resiliency Program for Children and Adolescents (the PRP-CA), when combined with a parent intervention…

  9. Achieving body confidence for young children: Development and pilot study of a universal teacher-led body image and weight stigma program for early primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Stephanie R; Yager, Zali; McLean, Siân A; Paxton, Susan J

    2018-03-26

    Negative body image attitudes develop in early childhood and there is a need for school-based resources during the early school years, but no teacher-delivered curriculum-based resources exist to mitigate these attitudes in young children. Achieving Body Confidence for Young Children (ABC-4-YC), a universal body dissatisfaction and weight stigma prevention program, was developed and then delivered in a pilot study. Fifty-one 5- to 8-year-old children completed pre- and post-intervention interviews assessing body image attitudes, and seven teachers provided feedback. Significant improvement in body esteem and positive teacher feedback were found. The results provide preliminary support for ABC-4-YC to improve children's body image attitudes, but extensive evaluation is needed.

  10. Body Size Estimation from Early to Middle Childhood: Stability of Underestimation, BMI, and Gender Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Steinsbekk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Individuals who are overweight are more likely to underestimate their body size than those who are normal weight, and overweight underestimators are less likely to engage in weight loss efforts. Underestimation of body size might represent a barrier to prevention and treatment of overweight; thus insight in how underestimation of body size develops and tracks through the childhood years is needed. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine stability in children’s underestimation of body size, exploring predictors of underestimation over time. The prospective path from underestimation to BMI was also tested. In a Norwegian cohort of 6 year olds, followed up at ages 8 and 10 (analysis sample: n = 793 body size estimation was captured by the Children’s Body Image Scale, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Overall, children were more likely to underestimate than overestimate their body size. Individual stability in underestimation was modest, but significant. Higher BMI predicted future underestimation, even when previous underestimation was adjusted for, but there was no evidence for the opposite direction of influence. Boys were more likely than girls to underestimate their body size at ages 8 and 10 (age 8: 38.0% vs. 24.1%; Age 10: 57.9% vs. 30.8% and showed a steeper increase in underestimation with age compared to girls. In conclusion, the majority of 6, 8, and 10-year olds correctly estimate their body size (prevalence ranging from 40 to 70% depending on age and gender, although a substantial portion perceived themselves to be thinner than they actually were. Higher BMI forecasted future underestimation, but underestimation did not increase the risk for excessive weight gain in middle childhood.

  11. Body Size Estimation from Early to Middle Childhood: Stability of Underestimation, BMI, and Gender Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsbekk, Silje; Klöckner, Christian A; Fildes, Alison; Kristoffersen, Pernille; Rognsås, Stine L; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Individuals who are overweight are more likely to underestimate their body size than those who are normal weight, and overweight underestimators are less likely to engage in weight loss efforts. Underestimation of body size might represent a barrier to prevention and treatment of overweight; thus insight in how underestimation of body size develops and tracks through the childhood years is needed. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine stability in children's underestimation of body size, exploring predictors of underestimation over time. The prospective path from underestimation to BMI was also tested. In a Norwegian cohort of 6 year olds, followed up at ages 8 and 10 (analysis sample: n = 793) body size estimation was captured by the Children's Body Image Scale, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Overall, children were more likely to underestimate than overestimate their body size. Individual stability in underestimation was modest, but significant. Higher BMI predicted future underestimation, even when previous underestimation was adjusted for, but there was no evidence for the opposite direction of influence. Boys were more likely than girls to underestimate their body size at ages 8 and 10 (age 8: 38.0% vs. 24.1%; Age 10: 57.9% vs. 30.8%) and showed a steeper increase in underestimation with age compared to girls. In conclusion, the majority of 6, 8, and 10-year olds correctly estimate their body size (prevalence ranging from 40 to 70% depending on age and gender), although a substantial portion perceived themselves to be thinner than they actually were. Higher BMI forecasted future underestimation, but underestimation did not increase the risk for excessive weight gain in middle childhood.

  12. Pilot study assessing the feasibility of applying bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in very early stage Parkinson's disease: study design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, David; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L; Gill, Chandler E; Molinari, Anna L; Bliton, Mark J; Tramontana, Michael G; Salomon, Ronald M; Kao, Chris; Wang, Lily; Hedera, Peter; Phibbs, Fenna T; Neimat, Joseph S; Konrad, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation provides significant symptomatic benefit for people with advanced Parkinson's disease whose symptoms are no longer adequately controlled with medication. Preliminary evidence suggests that subthalamic nucleus stimulation may also be efficacious in early Parkinson's disease, and results of animal studies suggest that it may spare dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We report the methodology and design of a novel Phase I clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease and discuss previous failed attempts at neuroprotection. We recently conducted a prospective, randomized, parallel-group, single-blind pilot clinical trial of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. Subjects were randomized to receive either optimal drug therapy or deep brain stimulation plus optimal drug therapy. Follow-up visits occurred every six months for a period of two years and included week-long therapy washouts. Thirty subjects with Hoehn & Yahr Stage II idiopathic Parkinson's disease were enrolled over a period of 32 months. Twenty-nine subjects completed all follow-up visits; one patient in the optimal drug therapy group withdrew from the study after baseline. Baseline characteristics for all thirty patients were not significantly different. This study demonstrates that it is possible to recruit and retain subjects in a clinical trial testing deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. The results of this trial will be used to support the design of a Phase III, multicenter trial investigating the efficacy of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease.

  13. Effects of early motivational interviewing on post-stroke depressive symptoms: A pilot randomized study of the Good Mood Intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Debra; McCann, Terence; Mackey, Elizabeth; Wijeratne, Tissa

    2018-03-26

    The aim of this pilot randomized study was to investigate the feasibility of early motivational interviewing, for reducing mood after acute stroke. Depression is a frequent consequence of stroke that can adversely affect recovery. DESIGN: Pilot randomized study. Intervention group patients received 3, individual motivational interviewing sessions by nurses or social workers prior to hospital discharge. Adult patients with acute stroke during 2013 to 2014. Research assistant who collected data was blind to group assignment. Data were collected at 3 time points: baseline, 1-month, and 3-month follow-up. Outcome measures (anxiety, depression, quality of life) were analysed by descriptive statistics. Forty-eight patients were enrolled, and 79% retention was achieved at 3 months. Eight participants withdrew (16.7%), and 2 were unable to participate (death: 2.1% and new onset aphasia: 2.1%), leaving 38 participants in the final cohort (Intervention: N = 18, Control: N = 20). Anxiety, depression, and quality of life measures did not alter significantly in the study period. Carefully designed studies are required to investigate the effectiveness of early motivational interviewing for improving mood after stroke. The therapy can be administered by nurses, but significant resources are required in terms of training and fidelity. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Early detection of acute graft-versus-host disease by wireless capsule endoscopy and probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coron, Emmanuel; Laurent, Valerie; Malard, Florent; Le Rhun, Marc; Chevallier, Patrice; Guillaume, Thierry; Mosnier, Jean-François; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Mohty, Mohamad

    2014-06-01

    Acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GI-GVHD) is usually diagnosed using endoscopic examinations and biopsies for conventional histology. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether mini-invasive techniques such as probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) combined with wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) could detect early lesions of GI-GVHD prior to symptoms. Fifteen patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) were prospectively examined with a small bowel WCE, duodenal and colorectal pCLE, and standard biopsies. Per study protocol, all these examinations were scheduled between day 21 and day 28 after allo-HSCT, independently of the presence or absence of digestive symptoms. During follow up, eight patients developed acute GI-GVHD. Sensitivity of WCE, pCLE, and histology were 50, 87.5, and 50%, respectively. Specificity of WCE, pCLE, and histology were 80, 71.5, and 80%, respectively. We showed a positive correlation between the Glücksberg scoring system and WCE (rho = 0.543, p = 0.036) and pCLE (rho = 0.727, p = 0.002) but not with standard histology (rho = 0.481, p = 0.069). The results from this pilot study suggest that novel methods such as pCLE and WCE could be part of a mini-invasive algorithm for early detection of GI-GVHD.

  15. Vacuum stability in the early universe and the backreaction of classical gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Tommi

    2018-03-06

    In the case of a metastable electroweak vacuum, the quantum corrected effective potential plays a crucial role in the potential instability of the standard model. In the early universe, in particular during inflation and reheating, this instability can be triggered leading to catastrophic vacuum decay. We discuss how the large space-time curvature of the early universe can be incorporated in the calculation and in many cases significantly modify the flat space prediction. The two key new elements are the unavoidable generation of the non-minimal coupling between the Higgs field and the scalar curvature of gravity and a curvature induced contribution to the running of the constants. For the minimal set up of the standard model and a decoupled inflation sector we show how a metastable vacuum can lead to very tight bounds for the non-minimal coupling. We also discuss a novel and very much related dark matter generation mechanism.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Higgs cosmology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  16. HIT, hallucination focused integrative treatment as early intervention in psychotic adolescents with auditory hallucinations : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, JA; van de Willige, G

    Objective: Early intervention in psychosis is considered important in relapse prevention. Limited results of monotherapies prompt to development of multimodular programmes. The present study tests feasibility and effectiveness of HIT, an integrative early intervention treatment for auditory

  17. Longitudinal stability of pre-reading skill profiles of kindergarten children: implications for early screening and theories of reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozernov-Palchik, Ola; Norton, Elizabeth S; Sideridis, Georgios; Beach, Sara D; Wolf, Maryanne; Gabrieli, John D E; Gaab, Nadine

    2017-09-01

    Research suggests that early identification of developmental dyslexia is important for mitigating the negative effects of dyslexia, including reduced educational attainment and increased socioemotional difficulties. The strongest pre-literacy predictors of dyslexia are rapid automatized naming (RAN), phonological awareness (PA), letter knowledge, and verbal short-term memory. The relationship among these constructs has been debated, and several theories have emerged to explain the unique role of each in reading ability/disability. Furthermore, the stability of identification of risk based on these measures varies widely across studies, due in part to the different cut-offs employed to designate risk. We applied a latent profile analysis technique with a diverse sample of 1215 kindergarten and pre-kindergarten students from 20 schools, to investigate whether PA, RAN, letter knowledge, and verbal short-term memory measures differentiated between homogenous profiles of performance on these measures. Six profiles of performance emerged from the data: average performers, below average performers, high performers, PA risk, RAN risk, and double-deficit risk (both PA and RAN). A latent class regression model was employed to investigate the longitudinal stability of these groups in a representative subset of children (n = 95) nearly two years later, at the end of 1st grade. Profile membership in the spring semester of pre-kindergarten or fall semester of kindergarten was significantly predictive of later reading performance, with the specific patterns of performance on the different constructs remaining stable across the years. There was a higher frequency of PA and RAN deficits in children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. There was no evidence for the IQ-achievement discrepancy criterion traditionally used to diagnose dyslexia. Our results support the feasibility of early identification of dyslexia risk and point to the heterogeneity of risk profiles

  18. HPA stability for children in foster care: mental health implications and moderation by early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K; Gilliam, Kathryn S; Bruce, Jacqueline; Fisher, Philip A

    2014-09-01

    Research on stress-sensitive biological systems has typically focused on activation at one time, yet recent theories emphasize dynamic, context-specific adaptation. This study tested hypothesized calibration of one such system by examining both mean levels and longitudinal stability of daily cortisol--reflecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation--in children exposed to high-risk versus lower-risk caregiving contexts. Context-specific effects of longitudinal cortisol profiles were addressed via relations with child psychiatric symptoms. Children from regular foster care, foster children participating in a family-based intervention, and community comparison children (n = 96 total) collected saliva samples for cortisol assay at 29 timepoints across 6+ years. High-risk (regular foster care) children showed lower and more variable cortisol levels than their lower-risk (treatment foster care, community comparison) counterparts. For the high-risk children only, higher and more stable cortisol related to elevated anxiety symptoms. Implications for contextual calibration of stress systems and family intervention mechanisms are discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Drilling dimension effects in early stages of osseointegration and implant stability in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baires-Campos, Felipe-Eduardo; Jimbo, Ryo; Fonseca-Oliveira, Maiolino-Thomaz; Moura, Camila; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; Coelho, Paulo-Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Background This study histologically evaluated two implant designs: a classic thread design versus another specifically designed for healing chamber formation placed with two drilling protocols. Material and Methods Forty dental implants (4.1 mm diameter) with two different macrogeometries were inserted in the tibia of 10 Beagle dogs, and maximum insertion torque was recorded. Drilling techniques were: until 3.75 mm (regular-group); and until 4.0 mm diameter (overdrilling-group) for both implant designs. At 2 and 4 weeks, samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis. For torque and BIC (bone-to-implant contact) and BAFO (bone area fraction occupied), a general-linear model was employed including instrumentation technique and time in vivo as independent. Results The insertion torque recorded for each implant design and drilling group significantly decreased as a function of increasing drilling diameter for both implant designs (pimplant designs for each drilling technique (p>0.18). A significant increase in BIC was observed from 2 to 4 weeks for both implants placed with the overdrilling technique (p0.32). Conclusions Despite the differences between implant designs and drilling technique an intramembranous-like healing mode with newly formed woven bone prevailed. Key words: Histomorphometry, biomechanical, in vivo, initial stability, insertion torque, osseointegration. PMID:25858087

  20. Left ventricular function and functional recovery early and late after myocardial infarction: a prospective pilot study comparing two-dimensional strain, conventional echocardiography, and radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasso, Shemy; Agmon, Yoram; Roguin, Ariel; Keidar, Zohar; Israel, Ora; Hammerman, Haim; Lessick, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Visual left ventricular (LV) wall motion scoring is well established for the assessment of LV function, yet it is subjective, circumstantial, and relative and requires long training. Quantification of myocardial shortening (strain) using two-dimensional speckle-tracking is potentially less subjective. In this study, quantifiable LV contraction (two-dimensional strain) was prospectively cross-related with wall motion score (WMS) and radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) score in 20 patients (mean age, 54 ± 9 years) with acute myocardial infarctions, early and late after percutaneous revascularization. Echocardiography and rest MPI were performed 3 to 5 days after acute myocardial infarction. Echocardiography was repeated at 4 months. Peak segmental and global endocardial longitudinal strain (LS) and circumferential strain (CS) were measured, and principal strain was calculated. Volumes, WMS, MPI scores, and strain were assessed independently. Two-dimensional strain, visual WMS, and radionuclide MPI score correlated closely. Strain thresholds for abnormal WMS were 11.7% for early LS, 18.2% for early CS, 13.9% for late LS, and 19.1% for late CS. Late principal strain correlated better with WMS and MPI score than either LS or CS. CS varied minimally over time, while LS improved in most segments. Higher early CS (>15%) was predictive of segmental functional recovery. MPI score correlated better with late rather than early strain, probably because early resting perfusion defects represent permanent damage. In this pilot study, strain correlated with echocardiographic WMS and the extent of ischemia (MPI score) early and late after revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Longitudinal and circumferential strain uncoupling was observed. LS appeared to be more sensitive to acute ischemia, whereas CS correlated better with improvement after revascularization. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  1. Stabilization of early-formed dolomite: a tale of divergence from two Mississippian dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aasm, I. S.; Packard, J. J.

    2000-03-01

    Several large hydrocarbon accumulations in Alberta, Canada are hosted in dolomitized successions of stacked, thin sabkha-capped cycles of Visean age. Porosity is micro-intercrystalline and occurs in dolomitized restricted subtidal and intertidal muds that have their fine primary fabric preserved. Two such fields are here considered, that illustrate divergent and contrasting modes of dolomite stabilization despite initial similarities in facies and textures. The dolomite in the upper Debolt Formation of the Dunvegan Field (NW Alberta) forms planar-e or microsucrosic fabrics with crystals in the 1-20 μm range. The dolomite is non-ferroan, Ca-rich (average of 58 mol% CaCO 3), and poorly ordered. Its stable isotopic signatures range from -0.12 to +3.4‰ VPDB for δ18O (mean=+1.3‰) and +0.9 to +4.3‰ VPDB for δ13C (mean=+2.6‰). The average radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio for this dolomite is 0.7077. Both sets of values are consistent with dolomite precipitation from Mississippian marine or modified marine (evaporated) seawater. These parameters are strongly reminiscent of Holocene protodolomites and hence suggestive of a sabkha dolomitization process (shallow seepage reflux or evaporitive pumping). This dolomite with its high associated porosity (average of 15%, and up to 38%), relatively unaltered mineralogical and chemical signatures, both preserved despite 4 km of burial depth, suggests a very unique set of relatively non-reactive physico-chemical conditions during burial (likely a closed system). In contrast, the dolomite from the Mount Head Formation of the Shell Waterton Field (SW Alberta) has undergone measurable neomorphic alteration in several stages in deeper burial environments (open system). Such alteration has affected its crystal size (range rocks and basinal fluids during burial, and are in this respect representative of the norm for dolostones in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin.

  2. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during sleep has a sleep-stabilizing effect in chronic insomnia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saebipour, Mohammad R; Joghataei, Mohammad T; Yoonessi, Ali; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Khalighinejad, Nima; Khademi, Soroush

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lack of slow-wave activity may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of insomnia. Pharmacological approaches and brain stimulation techniques have recently offered solutions for increasing slow-wave activity during sleep. We used slow (0.75 Hz) oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation during stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleeping insomnia patients for resonating their brain waves to the frequency of sleep slow-wave. Six patients diagnosed with either sleep maintenance or non-restorative sleep insomnia entered the study. After 1 night of adaptation and 1 night of baseline polysomnography, patients randomly received sham or real stimulation on the third and fourth night of the experiment. Our preliminary results show that after termination of stimulations (sham or real), slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation increased the duration of stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 33 ± 26 min (P = 0.026), and decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep duration by 22 ± 17.7 min (P = 0.028), compared with sham. Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep and wake time after sleep-onset durations, together, by 55.4 ± 51 min (P = 0.045). Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation also increased sleep efficiency by 9 ± 7% (P = 0.026), and probability of transition from stage 2 to stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 20 ± 17.8% (P = 0.04). Meanwhile, slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased transitions from stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleep to wake by 12 ± 6.7% (P = 0.007). Our preliminary results suggest a sleep-stabilizing role for the intervention, which may mimic the effect of sleep slow-wave-enhancing drugs. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Stability of the Associations between Early Life Risk Indicators and Adolescent Overweight over the Evolving Obesity Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Lise; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Petersen, Liselotte; Sovio, Ulla; Kaakinen, Marika; Sandbæk, Annelli; Laitinen, Jaana; Taanila, Anja; Pouta, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre- and perinatal factors and preschool body size may help identify children developing overweight, but these factors might have changed during the development of the obesity epidemic. Objective We aimed to assess the associations between early life risk indicators and overweight at the age of 9 and 15 years at different stages of the obesity epidemic. Methods We used two population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohorts including 4111 children born in 1966 (NFBC1966) and 5414 children born in 1985–1986 (NFBC1986). In both cohorts, we used the same a priori defined prenatal factors, maternal body mass index (BMI), birth weight, infant weight (age 5 months and 1 year), and preschool BMI (age 2–5 years). We used internal references in early childhood to define percentiles of body size (90) and generalized linear models to study the association with overweight, according to the International Obesity Taskforce (IOTF) definitions, at the ages of 9 and 15 years. Results The prevalence of overweight at the age of 15 was 9% for children born in 1966 and 16% for children born in 1986. However, medians of infant weight and preschool BMI changed little between the cohorts, and we found similar associations between maternal BMI, infant weight, preschool BMI, and later overweight in the two cohorts. At 5 years, children above the 90th percentile had approximately a 12 times higher risk of being overweight at the age of 15 years compared to children below the 50th percentile in both cohorts. Conclusions The associations between early body size and adolescent overweight showed remarkable stability, despite the increase in prevalence of overweight over the 20 years between the cohorts. Using consequently defined internal percentiles may be a valuable tool in clinical practice. PMID:24748033

  4. Agricultural production and stability of settlement systems in Upper Mesopotamia during the Early Bronze Age (third millennium BCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayci, Tuna

    This study investigates the relationship between rainfall variation and rain-fed agricultural production in Upper Mesopotamia with a specific focus on Early Bronze Age urban settlements. In return, the variation in production is used to explore stability of urban settlement systems. The organization of the flow of agricultural goods is the key to sustaining the total settlement system. The vulnerability of a settlement system increases due to the increased demand for more output from agricultural lands. This demand is the key for the success of urbanization project. However, without estimating how many foodstuffs were available at the end of a production cycle, further discussions on the forces that shaped and sustained urban settlement systems will be lacking. While large scale fluctuations in the flow of agricultural products between settlements are not the only determinants of hierarchical structures, the total available agricultural yield for each urban settlement in a hierarchy must have influenced settlement relations. As for the methodology, first, Early Bronze Age precipitation levels are estimated by using modern day associations between the eastern Mediterranean coastal areas and the inner regions of Upper Mesopotamia. Next, these levels are integrated into a remote-sensing based biological growth model. Also, a CORONA satellite imagery based archaeological survey is conducted in order to map the Early Bronze Age settlement system in its entirety as well as the ancient markers of agricultural intensification. Finally, ancient agricultural production landscapes are modeled in a GIS. The study takes a critical position towards the traditionally held assumption that large urban settlements (cities) in Upper Mesopotamia were in a state of constant demand for food. The results from this study also suggest that when variations in ancient precipitation levels are translated into the variations in production levels, the impact of climatic aridification on ancient

  5. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  6. Effect of early breast milk expression on milk volume and timing of lactogenesis stage II among mothers of very low birth weight infants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L A; Sullivan, S; Krueger, C; Kelechi, T; Mueller, M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this randomized pilot study was to collect preliminary data regarding the feasibility and effects of early initiation of milk expression on the onset of lactogenesis stage II and milk volume in mothers of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Twenty women were randomized to initiate milk expression within 60 min (group 1) or 1 to 6 h (group 2) following delivery. Milk volume and timing of lactogenesis stage II was compared between groups using Wilcoxon's rank sum tests. Group 1 produced statistically significantly more milk than group 2 during the first 7 days (P=0.05) and at week 3 (P=0.01). Group 1 also demonstrated a significantly earlier lactogenesis stage II (P=0.03). Initiation of milk expression within 1 h following delivery increases milk volume and decreases time to lactogenesis stage II in mothers of VLBW infants.

  7. A new computerized cognitive and social cognition training specifically designed for patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder in early stages of illness: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Sol; Turon, Marc; Jodar, Merce; Pousa, Esther; Hernandez Rambla, Carla; García, Rebeca; Palao, Diego

    2015-08-30

    People with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorders at early stages of the illness present cognitive and social cognition deficits that have a great impact in functional outcomes. Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) has demonstrated consistent effect in cognitive performance, symptoms and psychosocial functioning. However, any CRT intervention or social cognition training have been specifically designed for patients in the early stages of psychosis. The aim of this pilot study is to assess the efficacy of a new computerized cognitive and social cognition program for patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder with recent diagnosis. A comprehensive assessment of clinical, social and non-social cognitive and functional measures was carried out in 53 randomized participants before and after the 4-months treatment. Significant results were observed in Spatial Span Forwards, Immediate Logical Memory and Pictures of Facial Affect (POFA) total score. None of these results were explained by medication, premorbid social functioning or psychopathological symptoms. No impact of the intervention was observed in other cognitive and social cognition outcome neither in clinical and functional outcomes. This new computerized intervention may result effective ameliorating visual attention, logical memory and emotional processing in patients in the early stages of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment and Stability of Early Learning Abilities in Preterm and Full-Term Infants across the First Two Years of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Michele A.; Galloway, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Infants born preterm have increased risk for learning disabilities yet we lack assessments to successfully detect these disabilities in early life. We followed 23 full-term and 29 preterm infants from birth through 24 months to assess for differences in and stability of learning abilities across time. Measures included the Bayley-III cognitive…

  9. Clinical significance of early smoking withdrawal effects and their relationships with nicotine metabolism: preliminary results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Peter S; Delucchi, Kevin L; Benowitz, Neal L; Hall, Sharon M

    2014-05-01

    Although the early time course of smoking withdrawal effects has been characterized, the clinical significance of early withdrawal symptoms and their predictors are unknown. This study evaluated the relationships of early smoking withdrawal effects with quit attempt outcomes and the rate of nicotine metabolism. Eleven treatment-seeking smokers abstained from smoking for 4 hr in the laboratory before a quit attempt. Withdrawal measures included heart rate, sustained attention, and self-report. Following baseline assessment, withdrawal measures were administered every 30 min. At the conclusion of the 4-hr early withdrawal session, participants received a brief smoking cessation intervention and then returned 1 week and 12 weeks later for outcome assessments that included biochemically confirmed smoking abstinence, cigarettes smoked in the past 24hr, and self-reported withdrawal symptoms. The rate of nicotine metabolism was estimated at intake with the nicotine metabolite ratio (trans-3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine) measured in saliva. Greater self-reported negative affect and concentration difficulty during early withdrawal, most notably anxiety, were related with poorer quit attempt outcomes. There was some indication that although a faster increase in craving and greater hunger during early withdrawal were associated with more favorable outcomes, a greater decrease in heart rate during this time was associated with poorer outcomes. Faster nicotine metabolism was related to a faster increase in anxiety but a slower increase in craving during early withdrawal. These findings lend support to the clinical significance of early smoking withdrawal effects. The rate of nicotine metabolism may be a useful predictor of early withdrawal symptoms.

  10. Fast neutron breeder reactor Rapsodie - situation of physics, hydraulic, thermal and dynamics studies and studies of stability early in 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Early in 1963, it was necessary to make a choice among the two fuels examined for Rapsodie: the UPuMo alloy with double cladding, Nb and stainless steel, and the UO 2 -PuO 2 mix oxide. This report presents the results of the studies effected with the two types of fuel. We reconsider at first the different models which have been studied and we give a detailed description of the alloy and oxide cores as they are envisaged early in 1963. We give then the most important physics performances of the two cores: neutron flux and spectrum, reactivity of the compensation find safety rods, neutrons balance, specific power, effective fraction of delayed neutrons, lifetime of the prompt neutrons, reactivity coefficient. We describe the hydraulic studies and experiments which have been done concerning the two cores. We discuss the criteria adopted as basis for the flow calculations. We give the results of pressure drop and sub-assembly lifting, force measurements, and vibration and pin flow distribution experiments. We discuss the constants utilized for the thermal calculations and we give the temperatures of sodium and alloy or oxide fuel, the temperature increases due to the hot points, and the limitation of the oxide fuel burn-up, originated by the pressure of the fission gases. We treat the hypotheses having been utilized for the dynamics calculations and we describe the different accidents which have been studied. We give the results of the calculations for every accident and each fuel, and we show fuel melting or sodium boiling can be avoided, even in case of the most pessimistic hypotheses, by modifying reactor characteristics (shim-rod reactivity or power of the reactor with only one cooling circuit). The reactor stability has been evaluated with the hypotheses utilized for the dynamics calculations, except of the Doppler coefficient which was intentionally increased. We show that the alloy and oxide cores are stable for every envisaged reactor power. (authors) [fr

  11. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about ½ of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  12. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about 1/2 of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  13. Promoting father involvement in early home visiting services for vulnerable families: Findings from a pilot study of "Dads matter".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Neil B; Bellamy, Jennifer L; Banman, Aaron

    2018-02-01

    Despite mounting evidence on the importance of fathers in children's development, evidence-based perinatal home visitation programs have largely overlooked fathers in the design and delivery of services. This paper describes the design, development, and pilot testing of the "Dads Matter" enhancement to standard home visiting services. Dads Matter is a manualized intervention package designed to fully incorporate fathers into perinatal home visiting services. Twenty-four families were enrolled in a pilot study to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of the intervention. Using a quasi-experimental time-lagged design, 12 families received standard home visiting services and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Home visitor staff were then trained and supervised to implement the Dads Matter enhancement in addition to standard services. Twelve additional families were then enrolled and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Implementation data indicated that Dads Matter was implemented as planned. Cohen's d scores on outcome measures indicate positive trends associated with Dads Matter in the quality of the mother-father relationship, perceived stress reported by both parents, fathers' involvement with the child, maltreatment indicators, and fathers' verbalizations toward the infant. Effect sizes generally ranged from moderate to large in magnitude and were larger than overall effect sizes of home visitation services alone reported in prior meta-analyses. Dads Matter appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and promising approach to improving fathers' engagement in home visiting services and promoting family and child well-being. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Using tablet-based technology in patient education about systemic therapy options for early-stage breast cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, E R; Laing, K; McCarthy, J; McCrate, F; Seal, M D

    2015-10-01

    Patient education in early-stage breast cancer has been shown to improve patient well-being and quality of life, but it poses a challenge given the increasingly complex regimens and time constraints in clinical practice. Technology-aided teaching in the clinic could help to improve the understanding of adjuvant systemic therapy for patients. In this prospective pilot study, we used a clinician-administered, tablet-based teaching aid to teach patients with early-stage breast cancer about adjuvant systemic therapy. Participation was offered to newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer presenting for their first medical oncology visit at a provincial cancer centre. Participants were shown a tablet-based presentation describing procedures, rationales, risks, and benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy as an adjunct to a discussion with the medical oncologist. After the clinic visit, participants completed a questionnaire measuring satisfaction with the visit and knowledge of the treatment plan discussed. The 25 patients recruited for the study had a mean age of 57 years. An offer of upfront chemotherapy alone was made to 12 participants (48%), chemotherapy with trastuzumab to 4 (16%), and hormonal therapy to 9 (36%). Correct answers to all questions related to treatment knowledge were given by 22 patients (88%). Satisfaction with the clinic visit was high (mean satisfaction score: 4.53 ± 0.1 of a possible 5). We found that a tablet-based presentation about adjuvant systemic therapy was satisfactory to patients with early-stage breast cancer and that knowledge retention after the clinic visit was high. Tablet-based teaching could be a feasible and effective way of educating patients in the breast oncology clinic and warrants further investigation in randomized studies.

  15. A pilot randomized controlled trial of a self-management group intervention for people with early-stage dementia (The SMART study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine; Toms, Gill; Jones, Carys; Brand, Andrew; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Sanders, Fiona; Clare, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Self-management equips people to manage the symptoms and lifestyle changes that occur in long-term health conditions; however, there is limited evidence about its effectiveness for people with early-stage dementia. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) explored the feasibility of a self-management intervention for people with early-stage dementia. The participants were people with early-stage dementia (n = 24) and for each participant a caregiver also took part. Participants were randomly allocated to either an eight-week self-management group intervention or treatment as usual (TAU). Assessments were conducted at baseline, three months and six months post-randomization by a researcher blind to group allocation. The primary outcome measure was self-efficacy score at three months. Thirteen people with dementia were randomized to the intervention and 11 to TAU. Two groups were run, the first consisting of six people with dementia and the second of seven people with dementia. There was a small positive effect on self-efficacy with the intervention group showing gains in self-efficacy compared to the TAU group at three months (d = 0.35), and this was maintained at six months (d = 0.23). In terms of intervention acceptability, attrition was minimal, adherence was good, and satisfaction ratings were high. Feedback from participants was analyzed with content analysis. The findings suggest the positive aspects of the intervention were that it fostered independence and reciprocity, promoted social support, offered information, and provided clinician support. This study has provided preliminary evidence that self-management may be beneficial for people with early-stage dementia.

  16. A pilot randomized trial assessing the effects of autogenic training in early stage cancer patients in relation to psychological status and immune system responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidderley, Margaret; Holt, Martin

    2004-03-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a type of meditation usually used for reducing stress. This pilot study describes how AT was used on a group of early stage cancer patients and the observed effect on stress-related behaviours and immune system responses. This was a randomized trial with 31 early stage breast cancer women, having received a lumpectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. The women were randomized into two groups. Group 1 received a home visit only. Group 2 received a home visit and 2 months' weekly Autogenic training. At the beginning and end of the 2 monthly periods, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and T and B cell markers were measured to give an indication of changes in immune system responses and measurement of anxiety and depression. At the end of the study, HADS scores and T and B cell markers remained similar in the women who did not receive AT. The women receiving AT showed a strong statistical difference for an improvement in their HADS scores and those women observed in a meditative state as opposed to a relaxed state were found to have an increase in their immune responses. This study suggests AT as a powerful self-help therapy.

  17. Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) for poorly responsive early-stage IgA nephropathy: a pilot uncontrolled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Simone; Omer, Bilal; Omer, Talib Noor; Fliser, Danilo

    2010-12-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is a widely accepted approach to treat immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, whereas the role of fish oils as a supplement is controversial. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is considered to be involved in the pathophysiologic process of this disorder. Recent in vitro and clinical observations that wormwood can decrease TNF-α levels has led us to investigate the effect of wormwood as a supplement in patients with IgA nephropathy. Pilot uncontrolled trial. 10 patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy, normal kidney function, and a history of at least 3 months of proteinuria with protein excretion > 500 mg/d and thujone-free wormwood preparation for 6 months without discontinuing their renin-angiotensin system blockade. Proteinuria and blood pressure after intervention compared with baseline values. Monthly assessment of urine protein-creatinine ratio and blood pressure during the observation period. Urine protein-creatinine ratio decreased significantly from 2,340 ± 530 to 315 ± 200 mg/g at the end of the supplementation period (P Thujone-free wormwood with its favorable safety profile can be an alternative supplement to manage proteinuria in patients with IgA nephropathy. Copyright © 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A protective effect of 5-HT3 antagonist against vestibular deficit? Metoclopramide versus ondansetron at the early stage of vestibular neuritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venail, F; Biboulet, R; Mondain, M; Uziel, A

    2012-04-01

    Ondansetron is an antiemetic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with proven efficacy in central balance disorder. A pilot study investigated impact on acute unilateral vestibular neuritis. A randomized clinical trial included 20 vestibular neuritis patients. Subjects received methylprednisolone-valacyclovir, associated to 5 days' metoclopramide (30 mg/d; group M, n=10) or ondansetron (8 mg/d; group O, n=10). Assessment was based on early and 1 month videonystagmography, duration of hospital stay and time to first independent walking. Blinded intention-to-treat analysis used univariate (Student test) and multivariate (linear logistic regression) analysis. Early caloric vestibular deficit was significantly lower in group O than group M (56.53% versus 84.38%; P=0.03). Vestibular preponderance did not differ between groups (8.2°/s in O versus 10.34°/s in M). At 1 month, trends were observed for vestibular deficit (43% in O versus 63.4% in M; P=0.07) and preponderance (1.67°/s in O versus 1.74°/s in M; P=0.4). Hospital stay and time to first independent walking were significantly shorter in O (2.88 versus 4.5 days (P=0.03); and 1.25 versus 2.25 days (P=0.001), respectively). Early treatment with ondansetron associated to corticosteroids and antiviral treatment reduced vestibular deficit in acute-phase vestibular neuritis as compared to reference histamine H1 receptor antagonists. The treatment did not affect central compensation. Benefit includes improved tolerance of vertigo syndrome and reduced hospital stay. These results should be confirmed on a larger series, particularly to determine the mechanism of action of 5-HT3 antagonists on vestibular function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Early Detection of Poor Outcome after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Predictive Factors Using a Multidimensional Approach a Pilot Study

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    Sophie Caplain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI is a common condition within the general population, usually with good clinical outcome. However, in 10–25% of cases, a post-concussive syndrome (PCS occurs. Identifying early prognostic factors for the development of PCS can ensure widespread clinical and economic benefits. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential value of a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation to identify early prognostic factors following MTBI. We performed a multi-center open, prospective, longitudinal study that included 72 MTBI patients and 42 healthy volunteers matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status. MTBI patients were evaluated 8–21 days after injury, and 6 months thereafter, with a full neurological and psychological examination and brain MRI. At 6 months follow-up, MTBI patients were categorized into two subgroups according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV as having either favorable or unfavorable evolution (UE, corresponding to the presence of major or mild neurocognitive disorder due to traumatic brain injury. Univariate and multivariate logistical regression analysis demonstrated the importance of patient complaints, quality of life, and cognition in the outcome of MTBI patients, but only 6/23 UE patients were detected early via the multivariate logistic regression model. Using several variables from each of these three categories of variables, we built a model that assigns a score to each patient presuming the possibility of UE. Statistical analyses showed this last model to be reliable and sensitive, allowing early identification of patients at risk of developing PCS with 95.7% sensitivity and 77.6% specificity.

  20. Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dulin Keita, Akilah; Risica, Patricia M.; Drenner, Kelli L.; Adams, Ingrid; Gorham, Gemma; Gans, Kim M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-...

  1. Early postoperative remodelling following repair of tetralogy of Fallot utilising unsedated cardiac magnetic resonance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLorenzo, Michael P; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Nicolson, Susan C; Fogel, Mark A; Mercer-Rosa, Laura

    2018-05-01

    IntroductionThe right ventricular adaptations early after surgery in infants with tetralogy of Fallot are important to understand the changes that occur later on in life; this physiology has not been fully delineated. We sought to assess early postoperative right ventricular remodelling in patients with tetralogy of Fallot by cardiac MRI.Materials and methodSubjects with tetralogy of Fallot under 1 year of age were recruited following complete surgical repair for tetralogy of Fallot. Protocol-based cardiac MRI to assess anatomy, function, and flows was performed before hospital discharge using the feed and sleep technique, an unsedated imaging technique. MRI was completed in 16 subjects at a median age of 77 days (interquartile range 114). There was normal ventricular ejection fraction and indexed right ventricular end-diastolic volume (48±13 cc/m2), but elevated right ventricular mass (z score 6.2±2.4). Subjects requiring a transannular patch or right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit had moderate pulmonary insufficiency (regurgitant fraction 27±16%).DiscussionEarly right ventricular remodelling after surgical repair for tetralogy of Fallot is characterised by significant pulmonary regurgitation, right ventricular hypertrophy, and lack of dilation. Performing cardiac MRI using the feed and sleep technique is feasible in infants younger than 5 months. These results might open new avenues to study longitudinal right ventricular changes in tetralogy of Fallot and to further explore the utility of unsedated MRI in patients with other types of CHDs.

  2. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without zoledronic acid in early breast cancer--a randomized biomarker pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Matthew C; Wilson, Caroline; Syddall, Stuart P; Cross, Simon S; Evans, Alyson; Ingram, Christine E; Jolley, Ingrid J; Hatton, Matthew Q; Freeman, Jennifer V; Mori, Stefano; Holen, Ingunn; Coleman, Robert E

    2013-05-15

    To investigate the short-term biologic effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy +/- zoledronic acid (ZOL) in invasive breast cancer. Forty patients were randomized to receive a single 4 mg infusion of ZOL 24 hours after the first cycle of FE100C chemotherapy, or chemotherapy alone. Randomization was stratified for tumor stage, ER, HER2, and menopausal status. All patients had repeat breast core biopsy at day 5 (D5) ± day 21 (D21). Effects on apoptotic index, proliferation (Ki67), growth index, surrogate serum markers of angiogenesis (VEGF), and serum reproductive hormones within the TGFβ family (activin-A, TGFβ1, inhibin-A, and follistatin) were evaluated and compared. Baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were well balanced. Cell growth index (increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation) fell at D5 in both groups but recovered more rapidly with chemotherapy + ZOL compared with chemotherapy alone by D21 (P = 0.006). At D5, a greater reduction in serum VEGF occurred with chemotherapy + ZOL compared with chemotherapy: median percentage change -23.8% [interquartile range (IQR): -32.9 to -15.8] versus -8.4% (IQR: -27.3 to +8.9; P = 0.02), but these effects were lost by D21. Postmenopausal women showed a decrease in follistatin levels from baseline in the chemotherapy + ZOL group at D5 and D21, compared with chemotherapy alone (P(interaction) = 0.051). In this pilot study, short-term changes in biomarkers suggest potentially relevant interactions between tumor biology, chemotherapy, modification of the bone microenvironment, and the endocrine status of the host. Larger studies with more frequent dosing of zoledronic acid are needed to assess these complex interactions more thoroughly. ©2013 AACR

  3. Prevention and early intervention of anxiety problems in young children: A pilot evaluation of Cool Little Kids Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are common, debilitating, and begin early in life. Early intervention to prevent anxiety disorders in children who are at risk could have long-term impact. The ‘Cool Little Kids’ parenting group program has previously been shown to be efficacious in preventing anxiety disorders in temperamentally inhibited young children. Wider dissemination of the program could be achieved with an internet-based delivery platform, affording greater accessibility and convenience for parents. The aim of this study was to evaluate ‘Cool Little Kids Online’, a newly developed online version of the existing parenting group program. Fifty-one parents of children aged 3–6 years were recruited to evaluate the online program's acceptability and preliminary efficacy in reducing inhibited young children's anxiety problems. Parents were randomized to receive either a clinician-supported version or an unsupported version of the program. Parents had 10 weeks to access the program and completed questionnaires at baseline and post-intervention. Both groups showed medium-to-large reductions in children's anxiety symptoms, emotional symptoms, number of child anxiety diagnoses, and improvements in life interference from anxiety. The effect of clinician support was inconsistent and difficult to interpret. Parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. These encouraging results indicate that the online version is acceptable and useful for parents with temperamentally inhibited young children. Cool Little Kids Online may be a promising direction for improving access to an evidence-based prevention and early intervention program for child anxiety problems. A large randomized trial is warranted to further evaluate efficacy.

  4. Protein expression during early stages of bone regeneration under hydrophobic and hydrophilic titanium domes. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calciolari, E; Mardas, N; Dereka, X; Anagnostopoulos, A K; Tsangaris, G T; Donos, N

    2018-04-01

    There is significant evidence that, during the early stages of osseointegration, moderately rough hydrophilic (SLActive) surfaces can accelerate osteogenesis and increase bone-to-implant contact in comparison to hydrophobic (SLA) surfaces. However, very little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms behind the influence that surface chemistry modifications to increase hydrophilicity determine on bone healing. The aim of this study was to describe for the first time the proteins and related signalling pathways expressed during early osseous healing stages under SLA and SLActive titanium domes for guided bone regeneration. One SLA and 1 SLActive dome with an internal diameter of 5.0 mm and a height of 3.0 mm were secured to the parietal bones of nine 6-month-old male New Zealand rabbits. Three animals were randomly euthanized at 4, 7 and 14 days and the newly formed tissues retrieved under the domes were analysed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. STRING and KEGG databases were applied for Gene Ontology and pathway analyses. A different modulation of several pathways was detected between the 2 groups at all healing times. The main differences in the osseous healing response associated to the 2 surfaces were related to pathways involved in regulating the inflammatory response, differentiation of osteoblast precursors and skeletogenesis. At day 7, the highest number of proteins and the highest cellular activity were observed in both groups, although a more complex and articulated proteome in terms of cellular metabolism and signal transduction was observed in SLActive samples. This is the first study describing the proteome expressed during early healing stages of guided bone regeneration and osseointegration. A combination of enhanced early osteogenic response and reduced inflammatory response were suggested for the hydrophilic group. Future studies are needed to corroborate these findings and explore the molecular effects of

  5. Genetic Moderation of Stability in Attachment Security from Early Childhood to Age 18 Years: A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, K. Lee; Roisman, Glenn I.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question for attachment theory and research is whether genetically based characteristics of the child influence the development of attachment security and its stability over time. This study attempted to replicate and extend recent findings indicating that the developmental stability of attachment security is moderated by oxytocin…

  6. Brief communication: a pilot study: smooth surface early caries (caries incipiens) detection with KaVo DIAGNODent in historical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Jacek; Komarnitki, Iulian; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2013-03-01

    In many odontological studies concerning archeological material, there is no analysis of early caries lesions (caries incipiens) that manifest as a carious spot. At this stage of caries, the enamel is still hard, and thus, it is impossible to diagnose caries by visual methods. We assessed the usefulness of the DIAGNODent pen (DD laser) in analyzing noncavity lesions on the smooth surface sites of crowns from historical populations. Twenty-seven individuals were examined: 18 from Radom (Poland), and nine from Tell Masaikh and Terqa (Syria). A total of 562 teeth were characterized. The series represented different climatic zones, but were dated from the similar period, 18th to 19th century AD. We used four diagnostic techniques: visual, DD laser, radiographic, and histological as the gold standard. DD laser showed that the mean values of healthy enamel in both series did not exceed 15 units. The mean values of smooth and rough spots in the Syrian population were significantly higher than those from Poland. This study showed that all the noncarious spots from the Radom series did not exceed 30 units. In the Syrian samples, this limit was higher at 44 units. These results were confirmed by histology and radiography. The DD laser provided good results in detecting dentine carious lesions in historical material, but its efficiency in diagnosing early caries (caries incipiens) remains uncertain based on the presented series. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Effect of Topical Iodine and Fluoride Varnish Combination in Preventing Early Childhood Caries: A Pilot Study

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    Zahra Hashemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early Childhood Caries (ECC in the earliest stage is preventable. The studies indicate oral bacteria play an important role in pathogenesis of dental caries. According to high prevalence of ECC, alternative therapies should be explored in order to reduce the occurrence of it. Aim: This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a product containing Povidone Iodine 10% and Sodium Fluoride 0.2% as a supplementary intervention for preventing ECC.Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven children aged 4 to 6 year-old were recruited. Maxillary incisors on each side of the mouth were selected either as a test or control group. Early caries detection examinations were conducted using International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS clinically and photographically. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, a product containing a mixture of  Povidone Iodine 10%  and Sodium Fluoride 0.2%  was applied to the designated incisors of the test group participants. This application was performed every week for a 3-month. The control group participants received a placebo mixture during the same time interval. The caries detection examinations were conducted again after 6 months and the results were compared. The data was analyzed with SPSS V.18, using McNemar test.Results: The incidence of carious lesions increased for the control group while it decreased in the test group (P

  8. Early Intervention May Prevent the Development of PTSD: A Randomized Pilot Civilian Study with Modified Prolonged Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov; Kearns, Megan C.; Price, Matthew; Malcoun, Emily; Davis, Michael; Ressler, Kerry J.; Lang, Delia; Houry, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder is a major public health concern with long term sequelae. There are no accepted interventions delivered in the immediate aftermath of trauma. This study tested an early intervention aimed at modifying the memory to prevent the development of PTSD prior to memory consolidation. Methods Patients (N=137) were randomly assigned to receive 3 sessions of an early intervention beginning in the emergency department (ED) compared to an assessment only control group. Posttraumatic stress reactions (PTSR) were assessed at 4 and 12 weeks post-injury and depression at baseline and week 4. The intervention consisted of modified prolonged exposure including imaginal exposure to the trauma memory, processing of traumatic material, and in vivo and imaginal exposure homework. Results Patients were assessed an average of 11.79 hours post-trauma. Intervention participants reported significantly lower PTSR than the assessment group at 4 weeks post-injury, p rape victims at Week 4 (p=.004) and Week 12 (p=.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that the modified prolonged exposure intervention initiated within hours of the trauma in the ED is successful at reducing PTSR and depression symptoms one and three months after trauma exposure and is safe and feasible. This is the first behavioral intervention delivered immediately post-trauma that has been shown to be effective at reducing PTSR. PMID:22766415

  9. Early intervention may prevent the development of posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized pilot civilian study with modified prolonged exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov; Kearns, Megan C; Price, Matthew; Malcoun, Emily; Davis, Michael; Ressler, Kerry J; Lang, Delia; Houry, Debra

    2012-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major public health concern with long-term sequelae. There are no accepted interventions delivered in the immediate aftermath of trauma. This study tested an early intervention aimed at modifying the memory to prevent the development of PTSD before memory consolidation. Patients (n = 137) were randomly assigned to receive three sessions of an early intervention beginning in the emergency department compared with an assessment only control group. Posttraumatic stress reactions (PTSR) were assessed at 4 and 12 weeks postinjury and depression at baseline and week 4. The intervention consisted of modified prolonged exposure including imaginal exposure to the trauma memory, processing of traumatic material, and in vivo and imaginal exposure homework. Patients were assessed an average of 11.79 hours posttrauma. Intervention participants reported significantly lower PTSR than the assessment group at 4 weeks postinjury, p rape victims at week 4 (p = .004) and week 12 (p = .05). These findings suggest that the modified prolonged exposure intervention initiated within hours of the trauma in the emergency department is successful at reducing PTSR and depression symptoms 1 and 3 months after trauma exposure and is safe and feasible. This is the first behavioral intervention delivered immediately posttrauma that has been shown to be effective at reducing PTSR. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akilah Dulin Keita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children’s health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-up. Results. 39 (78% parent-child pairs completed evaluation data at 4-month follow-up. Vegetable intake among children significantly increased at follow-up (0.54 cups at 4 months compared to 0.28 cups at baseline, P=0.001 and ounces of fruit juice decreased at follow-up (11.9 ounces at 4 months compared to 16.0 ounces at baseline, P=0.036. Sedentary behaviors also improved. Children significantly decreased time spent watching TV on weekdays (P<0.01 and also reduced weekend TV time. In addition, the number of homes with TV sets in the child’s bedroom also decreased (P<0.0013. Conclusions. The findings indicate that a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention is feasible, acceptable and demonstrates short-term effects on dietary and sedentary behaviors of low-income racially/ethnically diverse children.

  11. Socio-behavioural risk factors for early childhood caries (ECC) in Cambodian preschool children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, B; Durward, C; Manton, D; Bach, K; Yos, C

    2016-04-01

    This was to explore the socio-behavioural risk factors for ECC in Cambodia. Early childhood caries (ECC) is a significant health problem in Cambodia. A convenience sample of 362 primary caregiver-child dyads were selected. The children were aged between birth and 6 years old and participated in a structured interview and intra-oral examination. ECC was diagnosed in 244 of 362 (65.6%) children and 178 (50.6%) had severe early childhood caries (sECC). There were significant associations between caries experience and tooth brushing, dietary, and nursing habits. The odds ratio (OR) for sECC in those children who started brushing before the age of 18 months was 0.41 (CI 0.18, 0.93). However, for those children who continued to breast-feed after the age of 2 years the OR was 5.31 (CI 1.50, 18.79). The most prominent risk factors for ECC in the present study were lack of tooth brushing and breast-feeding past the age of 2 years.

  12. Effect of a mouthrinse containing rice peptide CL(14-25) on early dental plaque regrowth: a randomized crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Saori; Kato, Tetsuo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Suzuki, Eiichi; Sugito, Hiroki; Saitoh, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Saito, Atsushi

    2015-10-03

    We aimed to evaluate clinically the effect of mouthrinse containing a rice peptide on early dental plaque regrowth. The study was designed as a double-masked, two-group crossover randomized pilot trial, involving 10 periodontally healthy volunteers. After receiving a professional tooth cleaning at baseline, over the next 3 days each participant refrained from all oral hygiene measures and had two daily rinses with 20 ml of the test mouthrinse containing 0.4 % rice peptide CL(14-25) or placebo rinse. At the end of each experimental period, plaque score was assessed using the modified Volpe's method, and the participants filled out a questionnaire. Each participant underwent a 7-day washout period followed by a second allocation. The plaque score was the primary outcome of the study and participant perception was the secondary outcome. No adverse effects were observed in the participants during the study. Clinically, the mean plaque score of the examined teeth was significantly lower in the test group (2.44 ± 0.74, CI: 1.91-2.96) than the placebo group (2.65 ± 0.63, CI: 2.20-3.10) (P plaque. However, clinical relevance of this efficacy needs to be validated in a future large-scale study. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) R000014000. Date of formal registration: November 1, 2013.

  13. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V; Greve, Helle; Olsen, Dorte Bæk; Cour, Søren La; Glud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2016-10-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions during hospitalization. Nine patients (30%) complied with >75% and nine patients (30%) complied with 50% of the planned exercise sessions. Eleven patients (42%) participated in ⩾75% of the four consultations and six patients (23%) participated in 50% of the psycho-educational programme. Comprehensive phase one rehabilitation combining physical exercise and psycho-education in coronary artery bypass graft patients shows reasonably high inclusion, feasibility and safety. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  14. A pilot study of the early implementation of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in England and Wales: the experience of consultants in old age psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit; Banner, Natalie; Heginbotham, Chris; Fulford, Bill

    2010-07-01

    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) was fully implemented in October 2007 in England and Wales. A pilot qualitative study using thematic analysis examined the experience of consultants in old age psychiatry in the early implementation of the MCA using a questionnaire designed to ascertain the experienced difficulties and the positive experiences of implementing the MCA, and its impact on their workload and associated changes in staffing levels. Fifty-two (27%) of the 196 consultants in old age psychiatry returned usable questionnaires. Eleven categories of difficulties and nine categories of positive experiences in the implementation of the MCA were reported. Two-thirds of respondents reported an increase in their workload, but over 90% reported no associated changes in staffing levels. The factors contributing to the experienced difficulties and positive experiences in the implementation of the MCA require careful identification because strategies to lessen the difficulties and to maintain positive experiences need to be developed. The definitions of restraint and deprivation of liberty used in clinical practice and the overlap between these definitions requires careful study. The workload of clinicians in the context of implementing the MCA requires ongoing monitoring.

  15. Early assesment of radiation response using a novel functional imaging modality-[18F] Fluorocholine PET (FCH-PET): A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Rice, Samuel; Osborne, Joseph; Singh, Prabhsimranjot; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley; Chao, K.S. Clifford

    2013-01-01

    Purpose [18] Fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron-emission tomography/computerized tomography (FDG-PET) is commonly used to assess response to patients treated with radiation (RT) or Chemotherapy and RT (CRT). The intent of this pilot study is to explore whether FCH-PET can serve as an early predictive biomarker for early detection of RT/CRT response. Materials/Methods Fourteen patients have been accrued and analyzed. The lesions were base of tongue, tonsil, nodes, hypopharynx, maxilla, palate, lung, pancreas, brain, uterine and rectal. There were 16 lesions that were considered target lesion and were followed for correlation between change in FCH-PET SUVmax readings and clinical outcome. Median tumor size was 4.4 cm. Median RT dose was 66Gy. The change in SUVmax (Δ SUVmax) of FCH-PET scans performed before and during RT was correlated with clinical outcome at the last follow-up. Results The median FCH-PET SUVmax for the 1st and 2nd scans was 6.15 and 4.65 respectively. Fourteen (87.5%) lesions showed a reduction in SUVmax in either a CR/PR (complete/partial response) and 2 lesions showed an increase in SUVmax both of which were determined to be NR. The median percentage change between the 1st and 2nd scan was −19.5%. Forty-four percent lesions (7/16) had CR, 44% (7/16) had PR and 12% (2/16) had NR (No response). Median follow-up was 12 months. The results showed a difference between NR and PR, between NR and CR, showed a trend towards significance (p=0.06). Conclusion FCH-PET scan demonstrated changes in SUVmax during RT that were predictive of final outcome PMID:22846199

  16. Long-term follow-up of the potential benefits of early nutritional intervention in adults with upper gastrointestinal cancer: a pilot randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, Kate; Silvers, Mary Anne; Savva, June; Huggins, Catherine E; Truby, Helen; Haines, Terry

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the long-term survival of all patients who participated in a pilot randomised trial of an early nutritional intervention for adults with upper gastrointestinal cancer. It also sought to identify factors that predicted patient mortality. All participants (n = 21) who were randomised into the original study were followed for a maximum of 5 years and 2 months (final follow-up April 2016). The primary outcome measure was time from date of recruitment until date of death, ascertained by the Victorian Cancer Registry and/or Monash Health Scanned Medical Records. Secondary analyses were conducted to identify factors that adversely affected survival. At the end of the follow-up period, three patients were alive in the nutrition intervention group whilst only two patients were living from the standard care group. Visual evaluation of the Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated a possible survival benefit from being exposed to the intervention between 6 months and 1.4 years post-recruitment, though this benefit dissipated soon after. The intervention was not associated with increased survival in univariate analyses, but was after adjustment for other factors found to adversely impact on survival (adjusted hazard ratio 0.12 (95% CI 0.02-0.72) p = 0.02). These factors were being a smoker (14.2 (1.43 to 140.67), p = 0.02); low baseline physical functioning (1.11 (1.01 to 1.21), p = 0.03); high baseline fatigue (1.09 (1.02-1.16), p = 0.007); and high baseline dyspnoea (1.08 (1.02-1.13), p = 0.003). Early and intensive nutrition intervention may increase the survival of people with upper gastrointestinal cancer.

  17. Immunophenotyping and efficacy of low dose ATG in non-sensitized kidney recipients undergoing early steroid withdrawal: a randomized pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Grafals

    Full Text Available Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG is commonly used as an induction therapy in renal transplant recipients, but the ideal dosage in tacrolimus-based early steroid withdrawal protocols has not been established. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the immunophenotyping and efficacy of lower dose ATG in low immunological-risk kidney transplant recipients. In this prospective study, 45 patients were randomized (1∶1 to our standard dose ATG (total dose 3.75 mg/kg(sATG vs. lower dose 2.25 mg/kg (lowATG. All patients underwent early steroid withdrawal within 7 days. The primary end point was biopsy-proven acute rejection at 12 months. Prospective immunophenotyping of freshly isolated PBMCs was performed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 months post-transplant. The rate of acute rejection was 17% and 10% in the sATG and lowATG, respectively. Effector memory T cells, Tregs and recent thymic emigrants T cells had similar kinetics post-transplant in both groups. No statistically significant differences were found in graft survival, patient survival or infections between the two groups, though there was a non-significant increase in leukopenia (43%v s. 30%, CMV (8% vs. 0 and BK (4% vs. 0 infections in sATG group vs. lowATG. In sum, in low immunological risk kidney recipients undergoing steroid withdrawal, low dose ATG seems to be efficacious in preventing acute rejection and depleting T cells with potentially lower infectious complications. A larger study is warranted to confirm these findings.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00548405.

  18. An early intervention program for subacute physical disability related to musculoskeletal diseases in the elderly: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasolo, Lydia; Leon, Leticia; Lajas, Cristina; Carmona, Loreto; Serra, Jose Antonio; Reoyo, Agustín; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Jover, Juan Ángel

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a program for subacute physical disability due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the elderly. We carried out a randomized controlled evaluator-blinded intervention study in a health district (October 2005 to April 2008). Subjects older than 64, starting a subacute MSD episode of physical disability-defined as moderate disability or higher in the Rosser classification-and identified by general practitioners, were randomized into standard care or an early specific program. The program was carried out by rheumatologists following detailed proceedings. Efficacy was defined as the difference between groups in the duration of episodes-time from onset until an improvement larger than a point in the Rosser classification). Hazard ratios (HR) to recovery of the program over standard care were obtained from Cox regression analyses. One hundred and twenty-three patients were included, generating 244 episodes of subacute MSD. Mean duration of episodes was 5 months; 14.5 % of them were chronically disabled throughout follow-up. The program was associated with shorter duration of episodes compared with CG analyzing just the ended ones (p = 0.004). The HR to recovery between groups did not achieve statistical differences. Nevertheless, recovery rate at 12 months and HR from those with moderate physical disability at the inclusion period (Rosser disability level 4, n = 84) were superior in the IG (HR 1.9, p = 0.03; HR 1.93; p = 0.03 respectively). An early intervention program for subacute MSD-related disability in elderly has partial efficacy; the program benefited patients with moderate physical disability and after a year of follow-up.

  19. Usability of Videogame-Based Dexterity Training in the Early Rehabilitation Phase of Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Vanbellingen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundApproximately 70–80% of stroke survivors have limited activities of daily living, mainly due to dexterous problems. Videogame-based training (VBT along with virtual reality seems to be beneficial to train upper limb function.ObjectiveTo evaluate the usability of VBT using the Leap Motion Controller (LMC to train fine manual dexterity in the early rehabilitation phase of stroke patients as an add-on to conventional therapy. Additionally, this study aimed to estimate the feasibility and potential efficacy of the VBT.MethodsDuring 3 months, 64 stroke patients were screened for eligibility, 13 stroke patients were included (4 women and 9 men; age range: 24–91 years; mean time post stroke: 28.2 days.InterventionNine sessions of 30 min VBT, three times per week as an add-on to conventional therapy with stroke inpatients.Outcome measuresPrimary outcome was the usability of the system measured with the System Usability Scale. Secondary outcomes concerning feasibility were the compliance rate calculated from the total time spent on the intervention (TT compared to planned time, the opinion of participants via open-end questions, and the level of active participation measured with the Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Participation Scale. Regarding the potential efficacy secondary outcomes were: functional dexterity measured with the Nine Hole Peg Test (NHPT, subjective dexterity measured with the Dexterity Questionnaire 24, grip strength measured with the Jamar dynamometer, and motor impairment of the upper limb measured with the Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity (FM-UE scale.ResultsPrimarily, the usability of the system was good to excellent. The patient’s perception of usability remained stable over a mean period of 3 weeks of VBT. Secondly, the compliance rate was good, and the level of active participation varied between good and very good. The opinion of the participants revealed that despite individual differences, the overall impression

  20. Periodontal Health in Women With Early-Stage Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Newly on Aromatase Inhibitors: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Inglehart, Marita R; Giannobile, William V; Braun, Thomas; Kolenic, Giselle; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Aromatase inhibitor (AI) use results in low estrogen levels, which in turn affect bone mineral density (BMD). Periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, and tooth loss are associated with low BMD. The goal of this study is to assess the prevalence of periodontitis and perceived oral health and evaluate salivary biomarkers in postmenopausal women who are survivors of early-stage (I to IIIA) breast cancer (BCa) and receive adjuvant AI therapy. Participants included 58 postmenopausal women: 29 with BCa on AIs and 29 controls without BCa diagnoses. Baseline periodontal status was assessed with: 1) periodontal probing depth (PD); 2) bleeding on probing (BOP); and 3) attachment loss (AL). Demographic and dental utilization information was gathered by questionnaire. Linear regression modeling was used to analyze the outcomes. No differences were found in mean PD or number of teeth. The AI group had significantly more sites with BOP (27.8 versus 16.7; P = 0.02), higher worst-site AL (5.2 versus 4.0 mm; P tobacco use, dental insurance, and previous radiation and chemotherapy exposure demonstrated that AI use increased AL by >2 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 3.92). Median salivary osteocalcin and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly higher in the AI group than the control group. This first investigation of the periodontal status of women initiating adjuvant AI therapy identifies this population as having an increased risk for periodontitis.

  1. Impact of graft preservation solutions for liver transplantation on early cytokine release and postoperative organ dysfunctions. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, H; Arbelot, C; Monsel, A; Parisot, C; Girard, M; Savier, E; Vezinet, C; Lu, Q; Vaillant, J-C; Golmard, J-L; Gorochov, G; Langeron, O; Rouby, J-J

    2017-10-01

    During liver transplantation, graft ischemia-reperfusion injury leads to a systemic inflammatory response producing postoperative organ dysfunctions. The aim of this observational and prospective study was to compare the impact of Solution de conservation des organes et tissus (SCOT) 15 and University of Wisconsin (UW) preservation solutions on early cytokine release, postreperfusion syndrome and postoperative organ dysfunctions. Thirty-seven liver transplantations were included: 21 in UW Group and 16 in SCOT 15 group. Five cytokines were measured in systemic blood after anesthetic induction, 30minutes after unclamping portal vein and on postoperative day 1. Following unclamping portal vein, cytokines were released in systemic circulation. Systemic cytokine concentrations were higher in UW than in SCOT 15 group: Interleukin-10, Interleukine-6. In SCOT 15 group, significant reduction of postreperfusion syndrome incidence and acute kidney injury were observed. Alanine and aspartate aminotransferase peak concentrations were higher in SCOT 15 group than in UW group. However, from postoperative day 1 to day 10, aminotransferase returned to normal values and did not differ between groups. Compared to UW, SCOT 15 decreases systemic cytokine release resulting from graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and reduces incidence of postreperfusion syndrome and postoperative renal failure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. The pilot evaluation for the National Evaluation System in South Africa – A diagnostic review of early childhood development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Davids

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Policymaking in many instances does not follow proper diagnosis of a problem using evidence to justify why particular decisions have been taken. This article describes findings of a diagnostic review of existing challenges facing early childhood development (ECD in South Africa. The review is part of the government’s attempt to use information to drive policy in strategic areas. It is part of the role that the Presidency is seeking to play in ensuring government programmes are evaluated to ensure that money that is spent is spent on programmes that have an impact and that there is value for money. This article summarises the key findings of the diagnostic review that was conducted of policy, services and coordination.The results reveal that a broader definition of ECD programmes is needed to cover all aspects of children’s development, growth and health, from conception to the foundation phase of schooling. Many elements of comprehensive ECD support and services are already in place and some are performing well. However, there are important gaps. Key ECD strategies for the future are identified. The diagnostic evaluation used a variety of methods, including desktop analysis, interviews and data analysis. Issues emerged around how to link the evaluation with other processes in the involved departments. A particular challenge was how to handle the transition to implementation of the findings, as responsibility shifted from the steering committee to the departments. The process worked well despite past challenges with coordination across government.

  3. Feasibility and acceptability of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention: results from the healthy homes, healthy families pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Akilah Dulin; Risica, Patricia M; Drenner, Kelli L; Adams, Ingrid; Gorham, Gemma; Gans, Kim M

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-up. 39 (78%) parent-child pairs completed evaluation data at 4-month follow-up. Vegetable intake among children significantly increased at follow-up (0.54 cups at 4 months compared to 0.28 cups at baseline, P = 0.001) and ounces of fruit juice decreased at follow-up (11.9 ounces at 4 months compared to 16.0 ounces at baseline, P = 0.036). Sedentary behaviors also improved. Children significantly decreased time spent watching TV on weekdays (P prevention intervention is feasible, acceptable and demonstrates short-term effects on dietary and sedentary behaviors of low-income racially/ethnically diverse children.

  4. Stabilizing Group Treatment for Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Related to Childhood Abuse Based on Psycho-Education and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; van Dyck, Richard; Veltman, Dick J.; Draijer, Nel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study tests a Stabilizing Group Treatment protocol, designed for the management of the long-term sequelae of child abuse, that is, Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD). Evidence-based treatment for this subgroup of PTSD patients is largely lacking. This stabilizing treatment aims at improving Complex PTSD using…

  5. Stabilizing group treatment for Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder related to childhood abuse based on psycho-education and cognitive behavioral therapy: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrepaal, E.; Thomaes, K.; Smit, J.H.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; van Dyck, R.; Veltman, D.J.; Draijer, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study tests a Stabilizing Group Treatment protocol, designed for the management of the long-term sequelae of child abuse, that is, Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD). Evidence-based treatment for this subgroup of PTSD patients is largely lacking. This stabilizing

  6. A piloted simulator investigation of stability and control, display and crew-loading requirements for helicopter instrument approach. Part 1: Technical discussion and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Forrest, R. D.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    A ground-simulation experiment was conducted to investigate the influence and interaction of flight-control system, fight-director display, and crew-loading situation on helicopter flying qualities during terminal area operations in instrument conditions. The experiment was conducted on the Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft at Ames Research Center. Six levels of control complexity, ranging from angular rate damping to velocity augmented longitudinal and vertical axes, were implemented on a representative helicopter model. The six levels of augmentation were examined with display variations consisting of raw elevation and azimuth data only, and of raw data plus one-, two-, and three-cue flight directors. Crew-loading situations simulated for the control-display combinations were dual-pilot operation (representative auxiliary tasks of navigation, communications, and decision-making). Four pilots performed a total of 150 evaluations of combinations of these parameters for a representative microwave landing system (MLS) approach task.

  7. Heterogeneous models for an early discrimination between sepsis and non-infective SIRS in medical ward patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearelli, Filippo; Fiotti, Nicola; Altamura, Nicola; Zanetti, Michela; Fernandes, Giovanni; Burekovic, Ismet; Occhipinti, Alessandro; Orso, Daniele; Giansante, Carlo; Casarsa, Chiara; Biolo, Gianni

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the accuracy of phospholipase A2 group II (PLA2-II), interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and procalcitonin (PCT) plasma levels in early ruling in/out of sepsis among systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients. Biomarker levels were determined in 80 SIRS patients during the first 4 h of admission to the medical ward. The final diagnosis of sepsis or non-infective SIRS was issued according to good clinical practice. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for sepsis diagnosis were assessed. The optimal biomarker combinations with clinical variables were investigated by logistic regression and decision tree (CART). PLA2-II, IP-10 and PCT, but not Ang-2, were significantly higher in septic (n = 60) than in non-infective SIRS (n = 20) patients (P ≤ 0.001, 0.027, and 0.002, respectively). PLA2-II PPV and NPV were 88 and 86%, respectively. The corresponding figures were 100 and 31% for IP-10, and 93 and 35% for PCT. Binary logistic regression model had 100% PPV and NPV, while manual and software-generated CART reached an overall accuracy of 95 and 98%, respectively, both with 100% NPV. PLA2-II and IP-10 associated with clinical variables in regression or decision tree heterogeneous models may be valuable biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis in SIRS patients admitted to medical ward (MW). Further studies are needed to introduce them into clinical practice.

  8. Early insulin resistance in severe trauma without head injury as outcome predictor? A prospective, monocentric pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonizzoli Manuela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia following major trauma is a well know phenomenon related to stress-induced systemic reaction. Reports on glucose level management in patients with head trauma have been published, but the development of insulin resistance in trauma patients without head injury has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the prognostic role of acute insulin-resistance, assessed by the HOMA model, in patients with severe trauma without head injury. Methods All patients consecutively admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a tertiary referral center (Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, IT for major trauma without head injury (Jan-Dec 2010 were enrolled. Patients with a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy or metabolism alteration were excluded from the analysis. Patients were divided into “insulin resistant” and “non-insulin resistant” based on the Homeostasis Model Assessment index (HOMA IR. Results are expressed as medians. Results Out of 175 trauma patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, a total of 54 patients without head trauma were considered for the study, 37 of whom met the inclusion criteria. In total, 23 patients (62.2% resulted insulin resistant, whereas 14 patients (37.8% were non-insulin resistant. Groups were comparable in demographic, clinical/laboratory characteristics, and severity of injury. Insulin resistant patients had a significantly higher BMI (P=0.0416, C-reactive protein (P=0.0265, and leukocytes count (0.0301, compared to non-insulin resistant patients. Also ICU length of stay was longer in insulin resistant patients (P=0.0381. Conclusions Our data suggest that admission insulin resistance might be used as an early outcome predictor.

  9. Reduction of Bacterial Pathogenic Risk during Ex-situ Stabilization of Previously Buried Foot-and-Mouth Disease Carcasses in a Pilot-scale Bio-augmented Aerobic Composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Park, J.; Park, J. K.; Park, S.; Jeon, H.; Kwon, H.

    2017-12-01

    Foot and mouth disease outbreaks globally occur. Although livestock suspected to be infected or actually infected by animal infectious diseases is typically treated with various methods including burial, burning, incineration, rendering, and composting, burial into soil is currently the major treatment method in Korea. However, buried carcasses are often found to remain undecomposed or incompletely decomposed even after the legal burial period (3 years). To reuse the land used for the burial purposes, Korea government is considering a novel approach to conduct in-situ burial treatment and then to move remaining carcasses from the burial sites to other sites designated for further ex-situ stabilization treatment (burial-composting sequential treatment). In this work, the feasibility of the novel approach was evaluated at a pilot scale facility. For the ex-situ stabilization, we tested the validity of use of a bio-augmented aerobic composting with carcass-degrading microorganisms, with emphasis on examining if the novel aerobic composting has reducing effects on potential pathogenic bacteria. As results, the decreased chemical oxygen demand (COD, 160,000 mg/kg to 40,000 mg/kg) and inorganic nitrogen species (total nitrogen, 5,000 mg/kg to 2,000 mg/kg) indicated effective bio-stabilization of carcasses. During the stabilization, bacterial community structure and dynamics determined by bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing were significantly changed. The prediction of potential pathogenic bacteria showed that bacterial pathogenic risk was significantly reduced up to a normal soil level during the ex-situ stabilization. The conclusion was confirmed by the following functional analysis of dominant bacteria using PICRUST. The findings support the microbiological safety of the ex-site use of the novel burial-composting sequential treatment. Acknowledgement : This study is supported by Korea Ministry of Environmental as "The GAIA Project"

  10. Anti-α4 antibody treatment blocks virus traffic to the brain and gut early, and stabilizes CNS injury late in infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Campbell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Four SIV-infected monkeys with high plasma virus and CNS injury were treated with an anti-α4 blocking antibody (natalizumab once a week for three weeks beginning on 28 days post-infection (late. Infection in the brain and gut were quantified, and neuronal injury in the CNS was assessed by MR spectroscopy, and compared to controls with AIDS and SIV encephalitis. Treatment resulted in stabilization of ongoing neuronal injury (NAA/Cr by 1H MRS, and decreased numbers of monocytes/macrophages and productive infection (SIV p28+, RNA+ in brain and gut. Antibody treatment of six SIV infected monkeys at the time of infection (early for 3 weeks blocked monocyte/macrophage traffic and infection in the CNS, and significantly decreased leukocyte traffic and infection in the gut. SIV - RNA and p28 was absent in the CNS and the gut. SIV DNA was undetectable in brains of five of six early treated macaques, but proviral DNA in guts of treated and control animals was equivalent. Early treated animals had low-to-no plasma LPS and sCD163. These results support the notion that monocyte/macrophage traffic late in infection drives neuronal injury and maintains CNS viral reservoirs and lesions. Leukocyte traffic early in infection seeds the CNS with virus and contributes to productive infection in the gut. Leukocyte traffic early contributes to gut pathology, bacterial translocation, and activation of innate immunity.

  11. The effect of adding core stability training to a standard balance exercise program on sit to stand performance in older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Cathy; Lanovaz, Joel; Oates, Alison; Craven, Bruce; Butcher, Scotty

    2015-01-01

    This study compared sit to stand (STS) performance between older adults in a nine-week training program focusing on core stability exercises to enhance balance and postural control (EB) versus standard balance (SB) exercises. Repetitions in 30 s (STSreps) and kinematic performance (vertical and horizontal momentum, and margin of stability) were measured pre and postintervention in 23 older adults with at least one fall risk factor. Although both groups combined improved STSreps (P = .001) and vertical momentum (.008), a significant between-group difference was observed for completers only (MANCOVA of posttest group differences, with pretest scores as covariates; P = .04). EB demonstrated a greater but nonsignificant improvement in vertical momentum (P = .095). In conclusion, core stability training added to SB did not result in STS reps improvement. Compliance may modify these results and future larger sample studies should evaluate the impact of core stability training on STS biomechanics.

  12. Incidence and severity of gingival invaginations associated with early versus late initiation of orthodontic space closure after tooth extraction : A multicenter pilot and randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christoph; Kutschera, Eric; Plötz, Christina; Scharf, Sven; Gölz, Lina; Fimmers, Rolf; Fuhrmann, Christine; Wahl, Gerhard; Braumann, Bert; Jäger, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Gingival invaginations are a common side effect of orthodontic extraction-space closure. The timing of initiating the closure of an extraction space varies greatly in clinical practice. In this multicenter pilot and randomized controlled trial, we prospectively investigated whether initiating space closure in the early stage of wound healing would benefit the incidence and severity of invaginations developing in the extraction sites. A total of 368 patients were screened for indications to extract at least one mandibular premolar. Those recruited were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms: initiation of space closure either 2-4 weeks (arm A) or ≥12 weeks (arm B) after tooth extraction. Clinical data regarding treatment process and periodontal tissue response were recorded during and after space closure and analyzed by a specialized biometrics unit. The study was performed under continuous surveillance by an independent study control center. A total of 74 extraction sites were analyzed. Regarding the incidence of gingival invaginations, there were no significant intergroup differences [p = 0.13; group A comprising 37/44 (84.1%) and group B 29/30 (96.7%) invaginated sites]. The same was true based on either maxillary (p = 0.52) or mandibular (p = 0.21) sites only, and the severity of the invaginations did not differ between the treatment arms. As to the incidence and severity of gingival invaginations, we did not notice any statistically significant differences between the two timeframes. Our data do, however, provide a basis to identify additional confounders and to improve the accuracy of case-load estimations for future trials.

  13. Efficacy of Feedback-Controlled Robotics-Assisted Treadmill Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Fitness Early After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; de Bruin, Eling D; Schindelholz, Matthias; Schuster-Amft, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular fitness is greatly reduced after stroke. Although individuals with mild to moderate impairments benefit from conventional cardiovascular exercise interventions, there is a lack of effective approaches for persons with severely impaired physical function. This randomized controlled pilot trial investigated efficacy and feasibility of feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (FC-RATE) for cardiovascular rehabilitation in persons with severe impairments early after stroke. Twenty individuals (age 61 ± 11 years; 52 ± 31 days poststroke) with severe motor limitations (Functional Ambulation Classification 0-2) were recruited for FC-RATE or conventional robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) (4 weeks, 3 × 30-minute sessions/wk). Outcome measures focused on peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters, training intensity, and feasibility, with examiners blinded to allocation. All 14 allocated participants (70% of recruited) completed the intervention (7/group, withdrawals unrelated to intervention), without serious adverse events occurring. Cardiovascular fitness increased significantly in both groups, with peak oxygen uptake increasing from 14.6 to 17.7 mL · kg · min (+17.8%) after 4 weeks (45.8%-55.7% of predicted maximal aerobic capacity; time effect P = 0.01; no group-time interaction). Training intensity (% heart rate reserve) was significantly higher for FC-RATE (40% ± 3%) than for conventional RATE (14% ± 2%) (P = 0.001). Substantive overall increases in the main cardiopulmonary performance parameters were observed, but there were no significant between-group differences when comparing FC-RATE and conventional RATE. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise significantly increased exercise intensity, but recommended intensity levels for cardiovascular training were not consistently achieved. Future research should focus on appropriate algorithms within advanced robotic systems to promote optimal cardiovascular

  14. Responsiveness of the double limb lowering test and lower abdominal muscle progression to core stabilization exercise programs in healthy adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladay, Douglas E; Miller, Sayers J; Challis, John H; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-07-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent and expensive health care problems in the United States. Studies suggest that stabilization exercise may be effective in the management of people with LBP. To accurately assess the effect of stabilization programs on muscle performance, clinicians need an objective measure that is both valid and reliable. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the double limb lowering test (DLLT) and lower abdominal muscle progression (LAMP) can detect a change in abdominal muscle performance after stabilization exercises. Eleven healthy participants (4 men and 7 women) were randomly assigned to either a specific stabilization exercise (SSE) or general stabilization exercise (GSE) group and were evaluated by the DLLT and LAMP before, during, and at the end of 8 weeks of training. Subjects attended exercise sessions twice per week over 8 weeks. No significant difference in pretest performance existed between the 2 groups. No significant difference was detected with the DLLT for either the SSE or GSE over time or when groups were combined. The LAMP detected a significant difference for the combined groups and GSE but not SSE over time. These data indicate that the LAMP is sensitive to change after a spinal stabilization program, whereas the DLLT does not detect a change after these programs. Furthermore, the GSE was more effective in producing these changes. Additional testing of these assessments is necessary to further validate these tests and to identify specific populations for which these tests may be most appropriate.

  15. An International Study of the Ability and Cost-Effectiveness of Advertising Methods to Facilitate Study Participant Self-Enrolment Into a Pilot Pharmacovigilance Study During Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jonathan Luke; Stephens, Sally; Thomas, Simon Hugh Lynton; Jamry-Dziurla, Anna; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Zetstra-van der Woude, Priscilla; Laursen, Maja; Hliva, Valerie; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Bourke, Alison; Dreyer, Nancy A; Blackburn, Stella Cf

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the fetal effects of maternal medication use in pregnancy is often inadequate and current pregnancy pharmacovigilance (PV) surveillance methods have important limitations. Patient self-reporting may be able to mitigate some of these limitations, providing an adequately sized study sample can be recruited. To compare the ability and cost-effectiveness of several direct-to-participant advertising methods for the recruitment of pregnant participants into a study of self-reported gestational exposures and pregnancy outcomes. The Pharmacoepidemiological Research on Outcomes of Therapeutics by a European Consortium (PROTECT) pregnancy study is a non-interventional, prospective pilot study of self-reported medication use and obstetric outcomes provided by a cohort of pregnant women that was conducted in Denmark, the Netherlands, Poland, and the United Kingdom. Direct-to-participant advertisements were provided via websites, emails, leaflets, television, and social media platforms. Over a 70-week recruitment period direct-to-participant advertisements engaged 43,234 individuals with the study website or telephone system; 4.78% (2065/43,234) of which were successfully enrolled and provided study data. Of these 90.4% (1867/2065) were recruited via paid advertising methods, 23.0% (475/2065) of whom were in the first trimester of pregnancy. The overall costs per active recruited participant were lowest for email (€23.24) and website (€24.41) advertisements and highest for leaflet (€83.14) and television (€100.89). Website adverts were substantially superior in their ability to recruit participants during their first trimester of pregnancy (317/668, 47.5%) in comparison with other advertising methods (Padvertisement methods used and in their ability to recruit participants in early pregnancy. Recruitment of a pregnant cohort using direct-to-participant advertisement methods is feasible, but the total costs incurred are not insubstantial. Future research is

  16. Fly-ash and Green liquor as binder in gravel road stabilization. Pilot study at Iggesund; Flygaska-Groenlutslamstabiliserad skogsbilvaeg. Fallstudie Iggesund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macsik, Josef; Erlandsson, Aasa; Wexell, Bengt-Arne

    2009-03-15

    The quality of gravel roads is of importance for public and the forestry industry. Frost damages lead to the closure of roads due to reduced bearing capacity, settlements and tracks made by wheel. Lately these frost damages have worsened due to milder winter temperatures. The need to improve the quality of these roads and to minimize the periods when the roads are closed is ever increasing. Several Swedish and Finnish projects have shown that rest materials from the paper industry can improve bearing capacity of roads. Both green liquor and fly ash was used successfully in an earlier project as pelletized mineral nutrient in forest soil. In this project fly ash and green liquor from Iggesund Paperboard was used as a binder during stabilization of a gravel road. The aim was to improve bearing capacity of a gravel road, mainly during the thawing period. The target group of the project was local road associations, forestry industry, which have a need to improve road quality, the paper industry which produce suitable rest materials and local environmental agencies. During an initial laboratory investigation proper binder recipe, based on fly ash, green liquor and cement was chosen. The laboratory investigation and earlier studies indicate in order to increase resistance to frost damage cement should be included in the binder. The aim was to stabilize ballast and improve the stabilized road materials shear strength, frost susceptibility. Total elemental content and Leachability was also investigated. Based on the results the local environmental agency was notified. During spring of 2008 two road sections, about 2 km was stabilized. The stabilized road was investigated during autumn 2008 regarding bearing capacity and environmental impact. The stabilization of the road section was estimated to cause minor impact on the recipient. The local environmental agency approved the stabilization of the road section, however increased the follow up effort with more analyses

  17. A comparison of water-based and land-based core stability exercises in patients with lumbar disc herniation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Deniz; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Lambeck, Johan; Yazici, Gokhan; Aykol, Sukru; Demirci, Harun

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the effects of core stability exercise programs performed in two different environments in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) patients. Thirty-one patients who were diagnosed with LDH and were experiencing pain or functional disability for at least 3 months were randomly divided into two groups as land-based exercises or water specific therapy. Also, 15 age-sex-matched healthy individuals were recruited as healthy controls. Both groups underwent an 8-week (3 times/week) core stabilization exercise program. Primary outcomes were pain, trunk muscle static endurance and perceived disability level. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Level of static endurance of trunk muscles was found to be lower in the patients compared to the controls at baseline (p 0.05). After the treatment, static endurance of trunk muscles of the LDH patients became similar to controls (p > 0.05). According to these results, core stabilization exercise training performed on land or in water both could be beneficial in LDH patients and there is no difference between the environments. An 8-week core stabilization program performed in water or on land decrease pain level and improve functional status in LDH patients. Both programs seem beneficial to increase health-related quality of life and static endurance of trunk muscles. Core stability exercises could be performed in water as well, no differences were found between methods due to environment.

  18. Early intervention for adolescents at high risk for the development of bipolar disorder: pilot study of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Tina R; Fersch-Podrat, Rachael; Axelson, David A; Gilbert, Alison; Hlastala, Stefanie A; Birmaher, Boris; Frank, Ellen

    2014-03-01

    Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT) delays bipolar disorder (BP) recurrence in adults by stabilizing daily routines and sleep/wake cycles. Because adolescence is a key developmental stage for illness onset and altered social and sleep patterns, this period may prove optimal for intervention with adolescents at-risk for BP. We describe a treatment development trial of IPSRT for adolescents at-risk for BP by virtue of a positive family history. Adolescents with a first-degree relative with BP were evaluated for Axis I psychopathology via semistructured interview, and relatives' BP diagnoses were confirmed via record review. IPSRT consisted of 12 sessions delivered over 6 months. Outcome variables including sleep, mood symptoms, and functioning were assessed via clinician interview and self-/parent-report at pretreatment, 3 months, and posttreatment (6 months). Thirteen adolescents attended at least one IPSRT session. Half of the sample denied Axis I psychopathology at intake; the remainder met criteria for a range of internalizing and externalizing disorders. Families reported high satisfaction with IPSRT, yet, on average, participants attended about half of scheduled sessions. Missed sessions were primarily associated with parental BP illness severity. Data indicate significant change in select sleep/circadian patterns (i.e., less weekend sleeping in and oversleeping) with treatment. Preliminary data suggest the IPSRT focus on stabilizing daily rhythms and interpersonal relationships may be beneficial for adolescents at-risk for BP. Controlled trials with longitudinal follow-up are needed to examine whether early intervention for at-risk youth helps prevent or delay disorder. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Pilot-scale road subbase made with granular material formulated with MSWI bottom ash and stabilized APC fly ash: environmental impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle-Zermeño, R; Formosa, J; Prieto, M; Nadal, R; Niubó, M; Chimenos, J M

    2014-02-15

    A granular material (GM) to be used as road sub-base was formulated using 80% of weathered bottom ash (WBA) and 20% of mortar. The mortar was prepared separately and consisted in 50% APC and 50% of Portland cement. A pilot-scale study was carried on by constructing three roads in order to environmentally evaluate the performance of GM in a real scenario. By comparing the field results with those of the column experiments, the overestimations observed at laboratory scale can be explained by the potential mechanisms in which water enters into the road body and the pH of the media. An exception was observed in the case of Cu, whose concentration release at the test road was higher. The long-time of exposure at atmospheric conditions might have favoured oxidation of organic matter and therefore the leaching of this element. The results obtained showed that immobilization of all heavy metals and metalloids from APC is achieved by the pozzolanic effect of the cement mortar. This is, to the knowledge of the authors, the only pilot scale study that is considering reutilization of APC as a safe way to disposal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  1. Effect of early use of AbobotulinumtoxinA after stroke on spasticity progression: Protocol for a randomised controlled pilot study in adult subjects with moderate to severe upper limb spasticity (ONTIME pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng He Kong

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: This pilot study will facilitate the design and sample size calculation of further confirmatory studies, and is expected to provide insights into the optimal management of post-stroke patients, including timing of BoNT-A therapy and follow-up duration.

  2. Effects of Early Moderate Loading on Implant Stability: A Retrospective Investigation of 634 Implants with Platform Switching and Morse-Tapered Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Georgios; Grizas, Eleftherios; Laukart, Elena; Nentwig, Georg-Hubertus

    2016-04-01

    This retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate the effect of early moderate loading (EML) on implant stability. Following 6 weeks of conventional healing, 634 dental implants (Ankylos®, Dentsply Implants, Mannheim, Germany) inserted in 247 patients were uncovered. Provisional restorations were placed in infra-occlusion in partially edentulous patients and in full occlusion in edentulous patients. Patients were instructed to consume a soft/liquid diet until final restorations were delivered after approximately 6 weeks. Periotest values (PTVs) at the time of uncovering and after EML were assessed in order to calculate the change in PTV (ΔPTV). Improvement of the PTV was analyzed to account for dependencies between measurements on multiple implants of a single patient, along with other factors. No implant was lost during the EML. After a mean loading time of 3 years (± 1.7 years), the implant survival rate was 98.74%. The PTV of 556 implants decreased (improved) over the course of the study. The ΔPTV was statistically significant (p = .0001), and none of the factors analyzed appeared to influence it. The EML of implants does not impair the implants' stability, as determined by Periotest. On the contrary, early moderate loading seems to be beneficial at compromised bone qualities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Decrease in tick bite consultations and stabilization of early Lyme borreliosis in the Netherlands in 2014 after 15 years of continuous increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnetha Hofhuis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nationwide surveys have shown a threefold increase in general practitioner (GP consultations for tick bites and early Lyme borreliosis from 1994 to 2009 in the Netherlands. We now report an update on 2014, with identical methods as for the preceding GP surveys. Methods To all GPs in the Netherlands, a postal questionnaire was sent inquiring about the number of consultations for tick bites and erythema migrans diagnoses (most common manifestation of early Lyme borreliosis in 2014, and the size of their practice populations. Results Contrasting to the previously rising incidence of consultations for tick bites between 1994 and 2009, the incidence decreased in 2014 to 488 consultations for tick bites per 100,000 inhabitants, i.e., 82,000 patients nationwide. This survey revealed a first sign of stabilization of the previously rising trend in GP diagnosed erythema migrans, with 140 diagnoses per 100,000 inhabitants of the Netherlands. This equals about 23,500 annual diagnoses of erythema migrans nationwide in 2014. Conclusions In contrast to the constantly rising incidence of GP consultations for tick bites and erythema migrans diagnoses in the Netherlands between 1994 and 2009, the current survey of 2014 showed a first sign of stabilization of erythema migrans diagnoses and a decreased incidence for tick bite consultations.

  4. Longitudinal Stability of Pre-Reading Skill Profiles of Kindergarten Children: Implications for Early Screening and Theories of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozernov-Palchik, Ola; Norton, Elizabeth S.; Sideridis, Georgios; Beach, Sara D.; Wolf, Maryanne; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Gaab, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that early identification of developmental dyslexia is important for mitigating the negative effects of dyslexia, including reduced educational attainment and increased socioemotional difficulties. The strongest pre-literacy predictors of dyslexia are rapid automatized naming (RAN), phonological awareness (PA), letter knowledge,…

  5. Softver za proračun uzdužne statičke stabilnosti i upravljivosti aviona za osnovnu obuku pilota / Software for calculation of an axial static stability and management of airplanes for basic pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Petrović

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available U ovom radu opisan je softver za proračun uzdužne statičke stabilnosti i upravljivosti aviona za osnovnu obuku pilota. Softver je urađen sa numerom da konstruktorima omogući brzo i lako dobijanje potrebnih rezultata vezanih za stabilnost i upravljivost kod preliminarnih proračuna vezanih za ovu vrstu aviona. Program je urađen na osnovu analize velikog broja aviona iz ove klase, a njegova tačnost je testirana na avionu "Lasta". Rezultati koji su dobijeni ovim softverom bili su više od zadovoljavajućih, s obzirom na to da se radi o programu koji bi se koristio za preliminarni proračun. / This document introduced software for calculation of an axial static stability and management of airplanes for basic pilot training. The purpose of this software is to provide a quicker and an easier way of getting results regarding preliminary calculation of stability and management for these types of airplanes. The program is based upon analysis of data gathered from a large number of tested airplanes of this class. The accuracy of the program has been tested on the airplane type 'Lasta' and results were more than satisfying, especially regarding the fact that the program is meant to be used for preliminary calculation.

  6. Preventative tele-health supported services for early stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mountain Gail A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a prevalent debilitating long term condition. It is the second most common cause of emergency admission to hospital in the UK and remains one of the most costly conditions to treat through acute care. Tele-health monitoring offers potential to reduce the rates of re-hospitalisation and emergency department visits and improve quality of life for people with COPD. However, the current evidence base to support technology adoption and implementation is limited and the resource implications for implementing tele-health in practice can be very high. This trial will employ tele-health monitoring in a preventative capacity for patients diagnosed with early stage COPD following discharge from hospital to determine whether it reduces their need for additional health service support or hospital admission and improves their quality of life. Methods/Design We describe a pilot study for a two arm, one site randomized controlled trial (RCT to determine the effect of tele-health monitoring on self-management, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Sixty patients who have been discharged from one acute trust with a primary diagnosis of COPD and who have agreed to receive community clinical support following discharge from acute care will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a Tele-health supported Community COPD Service; or (b Usual Care. The tele-health supported service involves the patient receiving two home visits with a specialist COPD clinician (nurse or physiotherapist then participating in daily tele-monitoring over an eight week period. Usual care consists of six home visits to the patient by specialist COPD clinicians again over eight successive weeks. Health status and quality of life data for all participants will be measured at baseline, on discharge from the service and at six months post discharge from the service. Discussion The tele-health service under study is a

  7. The stroke oxygen pilot study: a randomized controlled trial of the effects of routine oxygen supplementation early after acute stroke--effect on key outcomes at six months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ali

    Full Text Available Post-stroke hypoxia is common, and may adversely affect outcome. We have recently shown that oxygen supplementation may improve early neurological recovery. Here, we report the six-month outcomes of this pilot study.Patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke were randomized within 24 h of admission to oxygen supplementation at 2 or 3 L/min for 72 h or to control treatment (room air. Outcomes (see below were assessed by postal questionnaire at 6 months. Analysis was by intention-to-treat, and statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05.Out of 301 patients randomized two refused/withdrew consent and 289 (148 in the oxygen and 141 in the control group were included in the analysis: males 44%, 51%; mean (SD age 73 (12, 71 (12; median (IQR National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 6 (3, 10, 5 (3, 10 for the two groups respectively. At six months 22 (15% patients in the oxygen group and 20 (14% in the control group had died; mean survival in both groups was 162 days (p = 0.99. Median (IQR scores for the primary outcome, the modified Rankin Scale, were 3 (1, 5 and 3 (1, 4 for the oxygen and control groups respectively. The covariate-adjusted odds ratio was 1.04 (95% CI 0.67, 1.60, indicating that the odds of a lower (i.e. better score were non-significantly higher in the oxygen group (p = 0.86. The mean differences in the ability to perform basic (Barthel Index and extended activities of daily living (NEADL, and quality of life (EuroQol were also non-significant.None of the key outcomes differed at 6 months between the groups. Although not statistically significant and generally of small magnitude, the effects were predominantly in favour of the oxygen group; a larger trial, powered to show differences in longer-term functional outcomes, is now on-going.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN12362720; Eudract.ema.europa.eu 2004-001866-41.

  8. Predicting Active Duty Air Force Pilot Attrition Given an Anticipated Increase in Major Airline Pilot Hiring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    pilots, including PALACE CHASE pilots), the Voluntary Separation Program (379 pilots accepting bonuses for separating early), and the 51 pilots...future. Unlike marital status, the number of children an individual may have in any given year is memory -less. That is, the number is stochastically... memory . It increased the nominal yearly ACP value in FY1998 in response to increased attrition, and then again in FY2000 as it continued to try to

  9. Heritable influences on behavioural problems from early childhood to mid-adolescence: evidence for genetic stability and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, G. J.; Plomin, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although behavioural problems (e.g. anxiety, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems) are known to be heritable both in early childhood and in adolescence, limited work has examined prediction across these ages, and none using a genetically informative sample. Method: We examined, first, whether parental ratings of behavioural problems (indexed by the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire) at ages 4, 7, 9, 12, and 16 years were stable across these ages. Second, we examined the ex...

  10. SAMBA, a plant-specific anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome regulator is involved in early development and A-type cyclin stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Nubia B; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Van Leene, Jelle; Maleux, Katrien; Vanhaeren, Hannes; De Milde, Liesbeth; Dhondt, Stijn; Vercruysse, Leen; Witters, Erwin; Mercier, Raphaël; Cromer, Laurence; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Remaut, Han; Van Montagu, Marc C E; De Jaeger, Geert; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Inzé, Dirk

    2012-08-21

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multiprotein E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of key cell cycle regulatory proteins, including the destruction of mitotic cyclins at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Despite its importance, the role of the APC/C in plant cells and the regulation of its activity during cell division remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the identification of a plant-specific negative regulator of the APC/C complex, designated SAMBA. In Arabidopsis thaliana, SAMBA is expressed during embryogenesis and early plant development and plays a key role in organ size control. Samba mutants produced larger seeds, leaves, and roots, which resulted from enlarged root and shoot apical meristems, and, additionally, they had a reduced fertility attributable to a hampered male gametogenesis. Inactivation of SAMBA stabilized A2-type cyclins during early development. Our data suggest that SAMBA regulates cell proliferation during early development by targeting CYCLIN A2 for APC/C-mediated proteolysis.

  11. The Effects of Double Oscillation Exercise Combined with Elastic Band Exercise on Scapular Stabilizing Muscle Strength and Thickness in Healthy Young Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jieun; Lee, Kyeongbong; Kim, Minkyu; Hahn, Joohee; Lee, Wanhee

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of double oscillation exercise combined with elastic band exercise on the strength and thickness ratio of the scapular stabilizing muscles in healthy young individuals. A total of 30 subjects (17 male, 13 female) were randomly assigned to an elastic band exercise group (EBG) (n = 15) or an elastic band plus double oscillation exercise group (EB-DOG) (n = 15). A total of 28 subjects completed the experiment and evaluation. Patients in the EBG performed the elastic band exercise for shoulder flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, horizontal abduction/adduction, and internal/external rotation for 30 minutes/session, five times/week, for four weeks. Patients in the EB-DOG performed the elastic band exercise for 15 minutes and the double oscillation exercise in three planes of motion (frontal, sagittal, and transverse), using a Bodyblade® for 15 minutes/session, five times/week, for four weeks. Shoulder muscle strength was assessed using a manual muscle test device during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), while the thicknesses of the scapular stabilizing muscles were assessed using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging both at rest and during MVIC. Both groups had significant effects on shoulder muscle strength, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups for change value of shoulder muscle strength (Bonferroni correction p exercise combined with elastic band exercise more effectively increased the thickness of the shoulder stabilizing muscles compared with the resistance exercise alone.

  12. Early results show WellPoint's patient-centered medical home pilots have met some goals for costs, utilization, and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskas, Ruth S; Latts, Lisa M; Hummel, Jill R; Wenners, Douglas; Levine, Harlan; Nussbaum, Sam R

    2012-09-01

    Primary care must be reengineered to improve outcomes and affordability. To achieve those goals, WellPoint invested in ten patient-centered medical home pilots that encourage care coordination, preventive care, and shared decision making. Two of the three pilots described in this article-in Colorado and New Hampshire-layer incentive payments for care coordination and quality improvement on top of a traditional fee-for-service payment. The third-in New York-pays doctors an enhanced fee that is tied to achievement of quality levels. Preliminary evaluations show encouraging signs that the Colorado and New Hampshire pilots are meeting some cost, utilization, and quality objectives. A full evaluation in all three states is ongoing. To help enable systemwide transformation, WellPoint is now applying similar payment strategies to primary care practices that may not have the resources to become full-fledged medical homes.

  13. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    be difficult to plan and conduct. It is sometimes assumed that pilot implementations are less complicated and risky than ordinary implementations. Pilot implementations are, however, neither prototyping nor small-scale versions of full-scale implementations; they are fundamentally different and have their own...

  14. Stability of the Associations between Early Life Risk Indicators and Adolescent Overweight over the Evolving Obesity Epidemic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Lise; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Petersen, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre- and perinatal factors and preschool body size may help identify children developing overweight, but these factors might have changed during the development of the obesity epidemic. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the associations between early life risk indicators and overweight...... at the age of 9 and 15 years at different stages of the obesity epidemic. METHODS: We used two population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohorts including 4111 children born in 1966 (NFBC1966) and 5414 children born in 1985-1986 (NFBC1986). In both cohorts, we used the same a priori defined prenatal factors...

  15. A pilot study to compare two types of heat-stabilized rice bran in modifying compositions of intestinal microbiota among healthy Chinese adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie K.W. So

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a rice bran dietary intervention for healthy Chinese adults, and its effects on the participants’ gut microbiome. Sixteen participants were randomized into two groups (Groups A and B, each consuming a different brand of rice bran. The feasibility of the intervention was assessed by the retention rate, and participants’ compliance to the study. Its acceptability was evaluated by participant satisfaction with the study. Changes in the microbiota profile of their stool samples were analyzed through metagenomic sequencing. High retention (81% and compliance rates (88.0% and 93.8% were observed. Most agreed the rice bran they consumed was palatable. A decrease in the intestinal abundance of Firmicutes (P = 0.01, and an increase in that of Bacteroidetes (P = 0.02, was reported in the stool samples of the participants post-intervention. Interestingly, the fecal abundance of certain propionate producers (Veillonellaceae was increased post-intervention (P < 0.01, while that of butyrate producers (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was decreased (P = 0.01. Our data show that the intervention was feasible and acceptable to the participants, and could result in changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota that maintains intestinal health in Chinese adults.

  16. Bioaugmentation as a tool for improving the start-up and stability of a pilot-scale partial nitrification biofilm airlift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrolí, Albert; Carrera, Julián; Pérez, Julio

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of bioaugmentation in the improvement of the start-up of a biofilm airlift reactor to perform partial nitrification was investigated. Two identical biofilm airlift reactors were inoculated. The non-bioaugmented reactor (NB-reactor) was inoculated with conventional activated sludge, whereas the bioaugmented reactor (B-reactor) was seeded with the same conventional activated sludge but bioaugmented with nitrifying activated sludge from a pilot plant performing full nitritation under stable conditions (100% oxidation of influent ammonium to nitrite). The fraction of specialized nitrifying activated sludge in the inoculum of the B-reactor was only 6% (measured as dry matter). To simplify comparison of the results, operational parameters were equivalent for both reactors. Partial nitrification was achieved significantly faster in the B-reactor, showing a very stable operation. The results obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization assays showed that the specialized nitrifying biomass added to the B-reactor remained in the biofilm throughout the start-up period. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Early postoperative intraocular pressure stability after combined 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomy and cataract surgery in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Yeon; Jeong, Hoon Seok; Lee, Dae Yeong; Sohn, Hee Jin; Nam, Dong Heun

    2012-10-01

    To compare rates of early postoperative hypotony and intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation between 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomies with and without phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. This study reviewed the medical records of 302 eyes of patients who underwent primary 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomy for the complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. A case series of 207 eyes that underwent combined vitrectomy and cataract surgery (combined group) was compared with that of 95 eyes that underwent vitrectomy only (vitrectomy group): The eyes that remained phakic after the vitrectomy were excluded from this study. The main outcome measures were postoperative hypotony (IOP 30 mmHg). Postoperative hypotony was identified in 4 (1.9%) of 207 eyes in combined group, but in 7 (7.4%) of 95 eyes in vitrectomy group (P = 0.048). Rate of IOP elevation was very low and not different between the two groups. The multivariate analysis showed that vitrectomy without cataract surgery was associated with the postoperative hypotony (odds ratio = 4.6, P = 0.045). The incidence of early postoperative hypotony was lower in combined sutureless vitrectomy and cataract surgery than in sutureless vitrectomy alone and that of IOP elevation was very low in both groups. The maintenance of a stable IOP with a low risk of IOP fluctuation may be an additional advantage of sutureless diabetic vitrectomy combined with cataract surgery.

  18. The main early and late promoters of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 form unstable open complexes with sigma A-RNA polymerase that are stabilized by DNA supercoiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, F; Nuez, B; Mencía, M; Salas, M

    1993-02-25

    Most Escherichia coli promoters studied so far form stable open complexes with sigma 70-RNA polymerase which have relatively long half-lives and, therefore, are resistant to a competitor challenge. A few exceptions are nevertheless known. The analysis of a number of promoters in Bacillus subtilis has suggested that the instability of open complexes formed by the vegetative sigma A-RNA polymerase may be a more general phenomenon than in Escherichia coli. We show that the main early and late promoters from the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 form unstable open complexes that are stabilized either by the formation of the first phosphodiester bond between the initiating nucleoside triphosphates or by DNA supercoiling. The functional characteristics of these two strong promoters suggest that they are not optimized for a tight and stable RNA polymerase binding. Their high activity is probably the consequence of the efficiency of further steps leading to the formation of an elongation complex.

  19. HMD symbol stabilization concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Richard L.; Greeley, Kevin W.

    1995-05-01

    Helmet-mounted displays (HMDs) present flight, navigation, and weapon information in the pilot's line of sight. The HMD was developed to allow the pilot to retain aircraft and weapon information while looking off boresight. Symbol stabilization is a key issue for HMDs. In current equipment, the lack of compensation for pilot head motion creates excessive workload during hovering and nap-of-the-earth flight. This high workload translates into excessive training requirements. At the same time, misleading symbology makes interpretation of the height of obstructions impossible. A set of standardized coordinate transformations are necessary for the development of HMD symbology and the control laws. Part of the problem is there is no agreed upon set of definitions or descriptions for how HMD symbols are driven to compensate for pilot head motion. A candidate set of coordinate definitions is proposed to address this issue.

  20. The Effects of Double Oscillation Exercise Combined with Elastic Band Exercise on Scapular Stabilizing Muscle Strength and Thickness in Healthy Young Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Cho, Kyeongbong Lee, Minkyu Kim, Joohee Hahn, Wanhee Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of double oscillation exercise combined with elastic band exercise on the strength and thickness ratio of the scapular stabilizing muscles in healthy young individuals. A total of 30 subjects (17 male, 13 female were randomly assigned to an elastic band exercise group (EBG (n = 15 or an elastic band plus double oscillation exercise group (EB-DOG (n = 15. A total of 28 subjects completed the experiment and evaluation. Patients in the EBG performed the elastic band exercise for shoulder flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, horizontal abduction/adduction, and internal/external rotation for 30 minutes/session, five times/week, for four weeks. Patients in the EB-DOG performed the elastic band exercise for 15 minutes and the double oscillation exercise in three planes of motion (frontal, sagittal, and transverse, using a Bodyblade® for 15 minutes/session, five times/week, for four weeks. Shoulder muscle strength was assessed using a manual muscle test device during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC, while the thicknesses of the scapular stabilizing muscles were assessed using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging both at rest and during MVIC. Both groups had significant effects on shoulder muscle strength, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups for change value of shoulder muscle strength (Bonferroni correction p < 0.005. Significant differences were observed in the group × time interactions for horizontal abduction, external rotation, and protraction. There was a statistically significant improvement in thickness ratio of LT and SA in the EB-DOG and no significant difference was founded in EBG (Bonferroni correction p < 0.006. In comparison between the two groups, EB-DOG showed a significant change in the thickness ratio of LT compared to EBG. In addition, significant differences were observed for the group × time interactions for the thickness ratio of the LT (F

  1. The effect of core stability exercises on variations in acceleration of trunk movement, pain, and disability during an episode of acute nonspecific low back pain: a pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluko, Augustine; DeSouza, Lorraine; Peacock, Janet

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was demonstrate if it was feasible to evaluate variations in acceleration of trunk movement, pain, and disability during an episode of acute nonspecific low back pain comparing regular trunk exercises to regular exercises in addition to core stability exercises. A pilot randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate 33 participants recruited from a National Health Service physiotherapy musculoskeletal provider in the London district of Hillingdon. Participants were allocated to 2 groups; a regular exercise group (male, 2; female, 15) with a mean (SD) age of 35.8 (9.1) years and intervention group (male, 3; female, 13) with a mean (SD) age of 36.2 (9.8) years. The regular exercise group received exercise that consisted of a core stability class including both specific and global trunk exercises. The intervention group, in addition to these core exercises, received further instruction on 8 specific stabilization muscles involving the transversus abdominis and the lumbar multifidus. Trunk sagittal acceleration, pain, and disability were measured using a Lumbar Motion Monitor, pain visual analog scale, and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, respectively. Measures were taken at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, and a 3-month follow-up. Multiple regression with adjustment for baseline value was used to analyze each outcome. All outcomes were log transformed to correct skewness and so presented as ratio of geometric means with 95% confidence interval. Differences in mean trunk sagittal acceleration between the regular exercise and intervention groups was not statistically significant at any time point (ratio of means [95% confidence interval]: 3 weeks 1.2 [0.9-1.6], P = .2; 6 weeks 1.1 [0.8-1.5], P = .7; 3 months: 1.2 [0.8-1.9], P = .9). Similarly, the effects on neither pain score nor disability score were significant (pain score: 3 weeks 1.3 [0.8-2.2], P = .3); 6 weeks 1.2 [0.7-2.0], P = .6; 3 months 1.0 [0.5-1.9], P = 1

  2. Prognosis in medically stabilized unstable angina: Early Holter ST-segment monitoring compared with predischarge exercise thallium tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmur, J.D.; Freeman, M.R.; Langer, A.; Armstrong, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relative value of invasive and noninvasive predictors of outcome in patients after unstable angina. Fifty-four patients with unstable angina who had 6-month follow-up after stabilization on medical therapy were evaluated. We prospectively compared 24-hour Holter ST-segment monitoring at admission, quantitative exercise thallium tomography, and cardiac catheterization 5 +/- 2 days after admission and analyzed their value for predicting a cardiac event in patients with unstable angina within 6 months. When patients with a favorable outcome (n = 40) were compared with patients with an unfavorable outcome (n = 11) no statistical difference was found in duration of ST shift of 1 mm or more on Holter monitoring (51 +/- 119 min compared with 37 +/- 43 min), exercise duration by the standard Bruce protocol (8.0 +/- 3.6 min compared with 7.9 +/- 3.1 min), exercise-induced ST depression (0.6 +/- 0.9 mm compared with 1.0 +/- 1.0 mm), and contrast left ventricular ejection fraction (70% +/- 10% compared with 69% +/- 15%). Patients with a favorable outcome were distinguished from those with an unfavorable outcome by a higher maximum rate-pressure product (24 x 10(3) +/- 6 x 10(3) compared with 18 x 10(3) +/- 7 x 10(3), P = 0.0025), smaller size of the reversible scintigraphic perfusion defect expressed as a percentage of total myocardium imaged (6% +/- 11% compared with 17% +/- 18%, P = 0.05) and a smaller number of vessels with stenosis of 50% or more (1.1 +/- 1.2 compared with 2.1 +/- 1.0, P = 0.01). On multiple logistic regression analysis, a history of previous myocardial infarction was the most powerful predictor of outcome. In patients without myocardial infarction, reversible exercise thallium perfusion defect size was the only predictor

  3. Controlled Pilot Study of High-Impact Low-Frequency Exercise on Bone Loss and Vital-Sign Stabilization in Adolescents With Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susanne P K; Bachrach, Laura K; Golden, Neville H

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) face an increased lifetime risk of bone fragility. This randomized controlled study examined the efficacy and safety of a high-impact activity program on markers of bone turnover and stabilization of vital signs (VSS). Forty-one hospitalized adolescents with AN were randomly assigned to routine care or routine care plus 20 jumps twice daily. Bone markers were measured at baseline days 1-3 (T1), days 4-6 (T2), and days 7-9 (T3). The primary outcome was change in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) at T3 adjusted for BSAP and % median body mass index at T1. Secondary outcomes were serum N-telopeptide (NTX) and osteocalcin at T3. Safety was determined by comparing weight gain, time to VSS and length of stay for each group. BSAP, NTX, or osteocalcin did not differ between groups at baseline or at T3. BSAP and NTX at T3 were not associated with group of enrollment or % median body mass index. VSS was significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with the control group (11.6 ± 5.7 days vs. 17 ± 10.5 days, p = .049). There was no significant difference in weight gain or length of stay between groups. Twice-daily jumping activity failed to influence markers of bone turnover in adolescents with AN but was well tolerated, shortened time to vital-sign stabilization and did not slow weight gain. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    This PhD dissertation engages in the study of pilot (system) implementation. In the field of information systems, pilot implementations are commissioned as a way to learn from real use of a pilot system with real data, by real users during an information systems development (ISD) project and before...... the final system is implemented. Among others, their use is argued to investigate the fit between the technical design and the organisational use. But what is a pilot implementation really? In this dissertation, I set out to address this conceptual question. I initially investigate this question....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...

  5. Increased strength of the scapular stabilizer and lumbar muscles after twelve weeks of Pilates training using the Reformer machine: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Núbia Tomain Otoni; Raimundo, Karoline Cipriano; da Silva, Sheila Aparecida; Souza, Lara Andrade; Ferreira, Karoline Carregal; Borges Santo Urbano, Zuleika Ferreira; Gasparini, Andréa Licre Pessina; Bertoncello, Dernival

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze muscle strength in Pilates novices who used the Reformer equipment during twelve training sessions. Twenty-four healthy young female volunteers, who were non-smokers and did not exercise regularly, were split into a control group (mean age 28 ± 4 years and BMI 24.55 ± 3.21 kg/m 2 ) and a training group (mean age 29 ± 4 years and BMI 22.69 ± 2.87 kgm 2 ). The data were checked for normality using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and were then analyzed using the t-test (p Pilates group). The corresponding values for the lumbar muscles were 53.83 ± 11.66/53.28 ± 11.14 (control group) and 54.75 ± 10.27/64.80 ± 10.20 (Pilates group). After twelve sessions of Pilates with the Reformer equipment, there were improvements in lumbar extensor and scapular stabilizer strength. Several benefits are reported by practitioners of Pilates, but until now, there has been limited scientific evidence of the improvement of strength in the trunk and limbs after application of the technique. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of standardized porcine bone models to test primary stability of dental implants, using biomechanical tests and Micro-CT. An in vitro pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delmondes Freitas Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study evaluated a new porcine bone model to test the primary stability of different implants, analyzing Micro-CT, insertion torque, and pull-out strength. Materials and methods Bone cylinders were prepared from porcine bone and separated into 2 groups: 10 high density bone cylinders (HDB, and 10 low density bone cylinders (LDB. Then, 3D pre-implant analyses were performed, evaluating tridimensional bone density (ratio of trabecular bone volume and total tomographic volume, BV/TV, trabecular separation; percentage of closed pores; percentage of open pores; percentage of total porosity, in 3 bone levels (L1 bone volume corresponding to the internal part of the threads; L2 corresponding to the area between 0 to 0.5 mm from the end of threads; L3 corresponding to the area between 0.5 to 1.5 mm from the end of threads. Twenty implants of two different macrostructures were inserted in the bone cylinders, and divided into 4 groups (5 implants each: Group 1, e-Fix HE implant placed in HDB cylinder; Group 2, e-Fix HE implant in LDB cylinder; Group 3, e-Fix HE Silver implant placed in HDB cylinder; Group 4, e-Fix HE Silver implant in LDB cylinder. The insertion torque was recorded and bone cylinders were re-evaluated by Micro-CT (post-implant analysis. Then a pull-out strength test was performed. Results 3D analysis showed that pre- and post-implants intra-groups evaluation had statistically significant differences in Group 3 and 4, for all tomographic parameters assessed. Group 3 showed the best values for biomechanical tests (Friedman Test, p<0.05. Conclusion This methodology can produce standardized bone cylinders of high and low bone density, in which different implant designs are able to promote different effects, evidenced by biomechanical and image analysis.

  7. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  8. A pilot study to evaluate assisted freehand ultrasound elasticity imaging in the sizing of early breast cancer: a comparison of B-mode and AFUSON elasticity ultrasound with histopathology measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, R E; Li, J; Parker, A J C; Roskell, D; Adams, R F; Parulekar, V; Baldwin, J; Chi, Y; Noble, J A

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pilot study investigates the role of assisted-freehand ultrasound (AFUSON) elasticity imaging of the breast in assessing the contour, size and area of 23 early breast cancers by making comparison of AFUSON with the equivalent B-mode ultrasound images and gold standard histopathology slides. Methods The B-mode, AFUSON and digitised histopathology slides of three early breast cancers were compared for contour, size and area with histopathology scans. AFUSON features that corresponded to areas of known malignant change on the histopathology slides were regarded as diagnostic. These diagnostic criteria were then applied to the B-mode and AFUSON elasticity images of all 23 breast cancers in the pilot study without having the availability of the histopathology scans for reference. Corresponding diameters were measured and the results were compared with the equivalent measurements on the scans of the histology slides. The results were tabulated in histogram form. Diagnostic confidence levels were evaluated. Results Size dimension accuracy increased from 66% using B-mode alone to 82% using combined B-mode and AFUSON elasticity images. Tumour area accuracy was also increased. A small number of cases had a striking visual similarity of shape on AFUSON elasticity scans and histopathology slides. Conclusion In spite of the shortfalls in this study, AFUSON elasticity imaging was capable of acquiring some high-quality images that showed strong correlation between AFUSON elasticity and scans of histology slides. Further studies will be carried out to refine the technique and determine if it has a role in the diagnosis and management of breast cancer. PMID:21632651

  9. Centrifuge Study of Pilot Tolerance to Acceleration and the Effects of Acceleration on Pilot Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creer, Brent Y.; Smedal, Harald A.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    A research program the general objective of which was to measure the effects of various sustained accelerations on the control performance of pilots, was carried out on the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory centrifuge, U.S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, PA. The experimental setup consisted of a flight simulator with the centrifuge in the control loop. The pilot performed his control tasks while being subjected to acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a forward-facing pilot flying an atmosphere entry vehicle. The study was divided into three phases. In one phase of the program, the pilots were subjected to a variety of sustained linear acceleration forces while controlling vehicles with several different sets of longitudinal dynamics. Here, a randomly moving target was displayed to the pilot on a cathode-ray tube. For each combination of acceleration field and vehicle dynamics, pilot tracking accuracy was measured and pilot opinion of the stability and control characteristics was recorded. Thus, information was obtained on the combined effects of complexity of control task and magnitude and direction of acceleration forces on pilot performance. These tests showed that the pilot's tracking performance deteriorated markedly at accelerations greater than about 4g when controlling a lightly damped vehicle. The tentative conclusion was also reached that regardless of the airframe dynamics involved, the pilot feels that in order to have the same level of control over the vehicle, an increase in the vehicle dynamic stability was required with increases in the magnitudes of the acceleration impressed upon the pilot. In another phase, boundaries of human tolerance of acceleration were established for acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a pilot flying an orbital vehicle. A special pilot restraint system was developed to increase human tolerance to longitudinal decelerations. The results of the tests showed that human tolerance

  10. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  11. Non-invasive brain stimulation of the right inferior frontal gyrus may improve attention in early Alzheimer's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasova, Ilona; Anderkova, Lubomira; Marecek, Radek; Rektorova, Irena

    2014-11-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive tool for modulating cortical activity. In this pilot study, we evaluated the effects of high frequency rTMS applied over the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) on cognitive functions in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or incipient dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ten patients (6 men; 4 women, mean age of 72 ± 8 years; MMSE 23 ± 3.56) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled study with a crossover design. All participants received 2 sessions of 10 Hz rTMS over the non-dominant right hemisphere in random order: IFG (active stimulation site) and vertex (control stimulation site). Intensities were adjusted to 90% of resting motor threshold. A total of 2250 pulses were applied in a session. The Trail Making Test (TMT), the Stroop test, and the complex visual scene encoding task (CVSET) were administered before and immediately after each session. The Wilcoxon paired test was used for data analysis. Stimulation applied over the IFG induced improvement in the TMT parts A (p = 0.037) and B (p = 0.049). No significant changes were found in the Stroop test or the CVSET after the IFG stimulation. We observed no significant cognitive aftereffects of rTMS applied over the vertex. High frequency rTMS of the right IFG induced significant improvement of attention and psychomotor speed in patients with MCI/mild dementia due to AD. This pilot study is part of a more complex protocol and ongoing research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of shallow-mesa InAs/AlSb HEMTs with and without early-protection for long-term stability against Al(Ga)Sb oxidation*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, Eric; Moschetti, Giuseppe; Malmkvist, Mikael; Grahn, Jan; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wallart, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication process of InAs/AlSb high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been improved by depositing, after the shallow-mesa isolation of the active area, a thin SiN x -film on the exposed AlGaSb mesa floor. Devices with and without this early-protection against Al(Ga)Sb oxidation have been fabricated simultaneously on the same chip for fair comparison. Optical observations and electrical measurements over four and half years demonstrated the physical stability provided by this extra-coverage. The electrical measurements also revealed that the induced deposition of the probing pads and of the extrinsic part of the gates on SiN x slightly reduced the maximum drain current I D  (−9%) and the transconductance g m (−12%) to, respectively, 700 mA mm −1  and 1220 mS mm −1  for 2 × 20 µm 2  InAs/AlSb HEMTs with a 140 nm recessed gate. On the other hand, the gate-leakage current I G  was lowered by more than one order of magnitude, leading to a better pinch-off behavior and increased values of cut-off frequency f T (+4%) and maximum frequency of oscillation f max  (+36%) to, respectively, 230 GHz and 190 GHz at a drain voltage V DS  of 0.5 V. (paper)

  13. The Self-Reported Knowledge, Attitude and the Practices Regarding the Early Detection of Oral Cancer and Precancerous Lesions among the Practising Dentists of Dakshina Kannada-A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Shaila; Shetty, Pushparaj; Decruz, Audrey Madonna; Pai, Prakash

    2013-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of the leading causes of mortality in India. The screening and the early detection of the premalignant and malignant lesions are the only means for controlling the disease. General dental practitioners can play a great role in this direction. The objective of the present study was to assess the self-reported knowledge, attitude, as well as the practices concerning the early detection of oral cancer among the dentists of Dakshina Kannada, Karnataka, India. About 200 clinicians (BDS/MDS) were randomly selected for an 18 itemed questionnaire survey. The aspects which were enquired into were the usage of exfoliative cytology in their clinical practice, the recent attempts which are made by dentists at updating their knowledge on oral cancer, their practical approaches towards the screening for oral premalignant diseases, etc. Over 98% of the dentists reported to have not performed exfoliative cytology in their clinics. However, 85% had attended education programs on oral cancer. About 72% felt the need to be trained and they welcomed the suggestion of conducting practical workshops in this direction. 29.5% conducted biopsies when they encountered suspicious looking lesions, but only 13% counseled such patients for the habit cessation. 86% felt the need for Oral Pathology consultants in their clinics. This pilot survey identified an existing gap in the knowledge and practices among physicians and dentists and this emphasises the need to increase the numbers of oral cancer detection workshops which are held among the professional groups.

  14. Acceptability and preliminary feasibility of an internet/CD-ROM-based education and decision program for early-stage prostate cancer patients: randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Michael A; Mohamed, Nihal E; Butz, Brian P; Bar-Chama, Natan; Stock, Richard; Cesaretti, Jamie; Hassan, Waleed; Samadi, David; Hall, Simon J

    2012-01-13

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in the United States. Management options for localized disease exist, yet an evidence-based criterion standard for treatment still has to emerge. Although 5-year survival rates approach 98%, all treatment options carry the possibility for significant side effects, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. It is therefore recommended that patients be actively involved in the treatment decision process. We have developed an Internet/CD-ROM-based multimedia Prostate Interactive Educational System (PIES) to enhance patients' treatment decision making. PIES virtually mirrors a health center to provide patients with information about prostate cancer and its treatment through an intuitive interface, using videos, animations, graphics, and texts. (1) To examine the acceptability and feasibility of the PIES intervention and to report preliminary outcomes of the program in a pilot trial among patients with a new prostate cancer diagnosis, and (2) to explore the potential impact of tailoring PIES treatment information to participants' information-seeking styles on study outcomes. Participants (n = 72) were patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer who had not made a treatment decision. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 experimental conditions: (1) control condition (providing information through standard National Cancer Institute brochures; 26%), and PIES (2) with tailoring (43%) and (3) without tailoring to a patient's information-seeking style (31%). Questionnaires were administrated before (t1) and immediately after the intervention (t2). Measurements include evaluation and acceptability of the PIES intervention, monitoring/blunting information-seeking style, psychological distress, and decision-related variables (eg, decisional confidence, feeling informed about prostate cancer and treatment, and treatment preference). The PIES program was well accepted by patients and did not interfere

  15. Randomized controlled pilot study of an educational video plus telecare for the early outpatient management of musculoskeletal pain among older emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Hollowell, Allison G; Burke, Gary F; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Dayaa, Joseph A; Quigley, Benjamin R; Bush, Montika; Weinberger, Morris; Weaver, Mark A

    2018-01-05

    Musculoskeletal pain is a common reason for emergency department (ED) visits. Following discharge from the ED, patients, particularly older patients, often have difficulty controlling their pain and managing analgesic side effects. We conducted a pilot study of an educational video about pain management with and without follow-up telephone support for older adults presenting to the ED with musculoskeletal pain. ED patients aged 50 years and older with musculoskeletal pain were randomized to: (1) usual care, (2) a brief educational video only, or (3) a brief educational video plus a protocol-guided follow-up telephone call from a physician 48-72 hours after discharge (telecare). The primary outcome was the change from the average pain severity before the ED visit to the average pain severity during the past week assessed one month after the ED visit. Pain was assessed using a 0-10 numerical rating scale. Of 75 patients randomized (mean age 64 years), 57 (76%) completed follow up at one month. Of the 18 patients lost to follow up, 12 (67%) had non-working phone numbers. Among patients randomized to the video (arms 2 and 3), 46/50 viewed the entire video; among the 25 patients randomized to the video plus telecare (arm 3), 23 were reached for telecare. Baseline pain scores for the usual care, video, and video plus telecare groups were 7.3, 7.1, and 7.5. At one month, pain scores were 5.8, 4.9, and 4.5, corresponding to average decreases in pain of -1.5, -2.2, and -3.0, respectively. In the pairwise comparison between intervention groups, the video plus telecare group had a 1.7-point (95% CI 1.2, 2.1) greater decrease in pain compared to usual care, and the video group had a 1.1-point (95% CI 0.6, 1.6) greater decrease in pain compared to usual care after adjustment for baseline pain, age, and gender. At one month, clinically important differences were also observed between the video plus telecare and usual care groups for analgesic side effects, ongoing opioid use

  16. Centrifuge-induced neck and back pain in F-16 pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Nielsen, René Tyranski; Skejø, Pernille Bro

    2013-01-01

    Early in their careers, as an important part of their training to become fighter pilots, pilots undergo centrifuge training in order to learn effective anti-G straining maneuvers (AGSM) and to test their G tolerance. The exposure of pilots, especially early in their careers, to training that coul...

  17. Self-management in early-stage dementia: a pilot randomised controlled trial of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a self-management group intervention (the SMART study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine; Anderson, Daniel; Toms, Gill; Whitaker, Rhiannon; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Jones, Carys; Clare, Linda

    2014-03-08

    The possibility of living well with a long-term condition has been identified as centrally relevant to the needs of people living with dementia. Growing numbers of people with early-stage dementia are contributing accounts that emphasise the benefits of actively engaging in managing the condition. Self-management interventions share the common objectives of educating about the condition, optimising well-being, enhancing control over the situation and enabling people to take more responsibility for managing the condition. Benefits of such an approach can include improved knowledge, self-efficacy, health status, and better performance of self-management behaviours. However, there is only preliminary evidence that people with early-stage dementia can benefit from such interventions. This feasibility study involves the development of a self-management group intervention for people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or mixed Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. This study is a single-site pilot randomised-controlled trial. Forty-two people with early stage dementia, each with a caregiver (family member/friend), will be randomised to either the self-management group intervention or to treatment as usual.The self-management group intervention will involve eight weekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes, held at a memory clinic in North Wales. All participants will be re-assessed three and six months post-randomisation. This study is intended to supply an early evaluation of the self-management intervention so that a full scale trial may be powered from the best available evidence. It will assess the feasibility of the intervention, the study design and the recruitment strategies. It will estimate the parameters and confidence intervals for the research questions of interest. The primary outcome of interest is the self-efficacy score of the person with dementia at three months post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes for the person with dementia are self

  18. Time-window of early detection of response to concurrent chemoradiation in cervical cancer by using diffusion-weighted MR imaging: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying; Sun, Haoran; Bai, Renju; Ye, Zhaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of DWI in evaluating early therapeutic response of uterine cervical cancer to concurrent chemoradiation (CCR) and establish optimal time window for early detection of treatment response. This was a prospective study and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-three patients with uterine cervical cancer who received CCR underwent conventional MRI and DWI examinations prior to therapy (base-line) and at 3 days (postT1), 7 days (postT2), 14 days (postT3), 1 month (postT4) and 2 months (postT5) after the therapy initiated. Tumor response was determined by comparing the base-line and postT5 MRI by using RECIST criterion. Percentage ADC change (γADC) of complete response (CR) group at each follow up time was greater than that of partial response (PR) group, and the differences were significant at postT3 (p = 0.007), postT4 (p = 0.001), and postT5 (p = 0.019). There was positive correlation between γADC at each follow-up time and percentage size reduction at postT5. The day of 14 after the therapy initiated can be considered as the optimal time for monitoring early treatment response of uterine cervical cancer to CCR, and the representative and sensitive index was γADC. With the cut-off value of 35.4 %, the sensitivity and specificity for prediction of CR group were 100 % and 73.1 %, respectively. It is feasible to use DWI to predict and monitor early treatment response in patients with uterine cervical cancer that undergoing CCR, and optimal time window for early detection of tumor response is the day of 14 after therapy initiated

  19. Early Intervention of Intravenous KB220IV- Neuroadaptagen Amino-Acid Therapy (NAAT)™ Improves Behavioral Outcomes in a Residential Addiction Treatment Program: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Merlene; Chen, Amanda LC; Stokes, Stan D.; Silverman, Susan; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Manka, Matthew; Manka, Debra; Miller, David K.; Perrine, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas JH; Bailey, John A.; Downs, William; Waite, Roger L.; Madigan, Margaret A.; Braverman, Eric R.; Damle, Uma; Kerner, Mallory; Giordano, John; Morse, Siobhan; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Barh, Debmalya; Blum, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are inheritable and the culprit is hypodopaminergic function regulated by reward genes. We evaluated a natural dopaminergic agonist; KB220 intravenous (IV) and oral variants, to improve dopaminergic function in SUD. Our pilot experiment found a significant reduction of chronic symptoms, measured by the Chronic Abstinence Symptom Severity (CASS) Scale. The combined group (IV and oral) did significantly better than the oral-only group over the first week and 30-day follow-up period. Next, the combination was given to129 subjects and three factors; Emotion, Somatic, and Impaired Cognition, with eigenvalues greater than one were extracted for baseline CASS-Revised (CASS-R) variables. Paired sample t-tests for pre and post-treatment scales showed significant declines (p = .00001) from pre- to post-treatment: t = 19.1 for Emotion, t = 16.1 for Somatic, and t = 14.9 for Impaired Cognition. In a two-year follow-up of 23 subjects who underwent KB220IV therapy (at least five IV treatments over seven days) plus orals for 30+ days: 21 (91%) were sober at six months, 19 (82%) having no relapse; 19 (82%) were sober at one year, 18 (78%) having no relapse; and 21 (91%) were sober two-years post-treatment, 16 (70%) having no relapse. We await additional research and advise caution in interpreting these encouraging results. PMID:23457891

  20. Use of an Anti-Gravity Treadmill for Early Postoperative Rehabilitation After Total Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study to Determine Safety and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, William D; Pulido, Pamela A; Goldberg, Timothy; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the safety, feasibility, and effects of anti-gravity gait training on functional outcomes (Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], the Timed Up and Go test [TUG], Numerical Rating Scale [NRS] for pain) with the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill® device for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) rehabilitation. Subjects (N = 30) were randomized to land-based vs anti-gravity gait training over 4 weeks of physical therapy after TKA. Adverse events, complications, and therapist satisfaction were recorded. All patients completed rehabilitation protocols without adverse events. KOOS, TUG, and NRS scores improved in both groups with no significant differences between groups. For the AlterG group, Sports/Recreation and Quality of Life subscales of the KOOS had the most improvement. At the end of physical therapy, TUG and NRS pain scores improved from 14 seconds to 8 seconds and from 2.8 to 1.1, respectively. Subjectively, therapists reported 100% satisfaction with the AlterG. This initial pilot study demonstrated that the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill device was safe and feasible. While functional outcomes improved over time with use of the anti-gravity gait training, further studies are needed to define the role of this device as an alternative or adjunct to established rehabilitation protocols.

  1. Frequent chloroplast RNA editing in early-branching flowering plants: pilot studies on angiosperm-wide coexistence of editing sites and their nuclear specificity factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Anke; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2016-01-25

    RNA editing by cytidine-to-uridine conversions is an essential step of RNA maturation in plant organelles. Some 30-50 sites of C-to-U RNA editing exist in chloroplasts of flowering plant models like Arabidopsis, rice or tobacco. We now predicted significantly more RNA editing in chloroplasts of early-branching angiosperm genera like Amborella, Calycanthus, Ceratophyllum, Chloranthus, Illicium, Liriodendron, Magnolia, Nuphar and Zingiber. Nuclear-encoded RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are key editing factors expected to coevolve with their cognate RNA editing sites in the organelles. With an extensive chloroplast transcriptome study we identified 138 sites of RNA editing in Amborella trichopoda, approximately the 3- to 4-fold of cp editing in Arabidopsis thaliana or Oryza sativa. Selected cDNA studies in the other early-branching flowering plant taxa furthermore reveal a high diversity of early angiosperm RNA editomes. Many of the now identified editing sites in Amborella have orthologues in ferns, lycophytes or hornworts. We investigated the evolution of CRR28 and RARE1, two known Arabidopsis RNA editing factors responsible for cp editing events ndhBeU467PL, ndhDeU878SL and accDeU794SL, respectively, all of which we now found conserved in Amborella. In a phylogenetically wide sampling of 65 angiosperm genomes we find evidence for only one single loss of CRR28 in chickpea but several independent losses of RARE1, perfectly congruent with the presence of their cognate editing sites in the respective cpDNAs. Chloroplast RNA editing is much more abundant in early-branching than in widely investigated model flowering plants. RNA editing specificity factors can be traced back for more than 120 million years of angiosperm evolution and show highly divergent patterns of evolutionary losses, matching the presence of their target editing events.

  2. The UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial: a pilot randomised controlled trial of low-dose computed tomography screening for the early detection of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John K; Duffy, Stephen W; Baldwin, David R; Brain, Kate E; Devaraj, Anand; Eisen, Tim; Green, Beverley A; Holemans, John A; Kavanagh, Terry; Kerr, Keith M; Ledson, Martin; Lifford, Kate J; McRonald, Fiona E; Nair, Arjun; Page, Richard D; Parmar, Mahesh Kb; Rintoul, Robert C; Screaton, Nicholas; Wald, Nicholas J; Weller, David; Whynes, David K; Williamson, Paula R; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Hansell, David M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer kills more people than any other cancer in the UK (5-year survival high-risk UK population, determine optimum recruitment, screening, reading and care pathway strategies; and (2) assess the psychological consequences and the health-economic implications of screening. A pilot randomised controlled trial comparing intervention with usual care. A population-based risk questionnaire identified individuals who were at high risk of developing lung cancer (≥ 5% over 5 years). Thoracic centres with expertise in lung cancer imaging, respiratory medicine, pathology and surgery: Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital, Merseyside, and Papworth Hospital, Cambridgeshire. Individuals aged 50-75 years, at high risk of lung cancer, in the primary care trusts adjacent to the centres. A thoracic LDCT scan. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans as per protocol. Referral to multidisciplinary team clinics was determined by nodule size criteria. Population-based recruitment based on risk stratification; management of the trial through web-based database; optimal characteristics of CT scan readers (radiologists vs. radiographers); characterisation of CT-detected nodules utilising volumetric analysis; prevalence of lung cancer at baseline; sociodemographic factors affecting participation; psychosocial measures (cancer distress, anxiety, depression, decision satisfaction); and cost-effectiveness modelling. A total of 247,354 individuals were approached to take part in the trial; 30.7% responded positively to the screening invitation. Recruitment of participants resulted in 2028 in the CT arm and 2027 in the control arm. A total of 1994 participants underwent CT scanning: 42 participants (2.1%) were diagnosed with lung cancer; 36 out of 42 (85.7%) of the screen-detected cancers were identified as stage 1 or 2, and 35 (83.3%) underwent surgical resection as their primary treatment. Lung cancer was more common in the lowest socioeconomic group. Short-term adverse psychosocial

  3. Effects of peer social interaction on performance during computerized cognitive remediation therapy in patients with early course schizophrenia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis R; González, Betzamel López; Stone, William S; Guimond, Synthia; Rivas, Cristina Torres; Sheynberg, David; Kuo, Susan S; Eack, Shaun; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2017-09-04

    Recent studies show that computer-based training enhances cognition in schizophrenia; furthermore, socialization has also been found to improve cognitive functions. It is generally believed that non-social cognitive remediation using computer exercises would be a pre-requisite for therapeutic benefits from social cognitive training. However, it is also possible that social interaction by itself enhances non-social cognitive functions; this possibility has scarcely been explored in schizophrenia patients. This pilot study examined the effects of computer-based neurocognitive training, along with social interaction either with a peer (PSI) or without one (N-PSI). We hypothesized that PSI will enhance cognitive performance during computerized exercises in schizophrenia, as compared with N-PSI. Sixteen adult participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participating in an ongoing trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy completed several computerized neurocognitive remediation training sessions (the Orientation Remedial Module©, or ORM), either with a peer or without a peer. We observed a significant interaction between the effect of PSI and performance on the different cognitive exercises (pcognitive performances than with N-PSI in the ORM exercise that provides training in processing speed, alertness, and reaction time (the standard Attention Reaction Conditioner, or ARC) (pcognitive domains such as target detection and spatial attention. Our findings suggest that PSI could improve cognitive performance, such as processing speed, during computerized cognitive training in schizophrenia. Additional studies investigating the effect of PSI during cognitive remediation are needed to further evaluate this hypothesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

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    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  5. Randomized pilot trial of gene expression profiling versus heart biopsy in the first year after heart transplant: early invasive monitoring attenuation through gene expression trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Patel, Jignesh; Azarbal, Babak; Kittleson, Michelle; Chang, David; Czer, Lawrence; Daun, Tiffany; Luu, Minh; Trento, Alfredo; Cheng, Richard; Esmailian, Fardad

    2015-05-01

    The endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) is considered the gold standard in rejection surveillance post cardiac transplant, but is invasive, with risk of complications. A previous trial suggested that the gene expression profiling (GEP) blood test was noninferior to EMB between 6 and 60 months post transplant. As most rejections occur in the first 6 months, we conducted a single-center randomized trial of GEP versus EMB starting at 55 days post transplant (when GEP is valid). Sixty heart transplant patients meeting inclusion criteria were randomized beginning at 55 days post transplant to either GEP or EMB arms. A positive GEP ≥30 between 2 and 6 months, or ≥34 after 6 months, prompted a follow-up biopsy. The primary end point included a composite of death/retransplant, rejection with hemodynamic compromise or graft dysfunction at 18 months post transplant. A coprimary end point included change in first-year maximal intimal thickness by intravascular ultrasound, a recognized surrogate for long-term outcome. Corticosteroid weaning was assessed in both the groups. The composite end point was similar between the GEP and EMB groups (10% versus 17%; log-rank P=0.44). The coprimary end point of first-year intravascular ultrasound change demonstrated no difference in mean maximal intimal thickness (0.35±0.36 versus 0.36±0.26 mm; P=0.944). Steroid weaning was successful in both the groups (91% versus 95%). In this pilot study, GEP starting at 55 days post transplant seems comparable with EMB for rejection surveillance in selected heart transplant patients and does not result in increased adverse outcomes. GEP also seems useful to guide corticosteroid weaning. Larger randomized trials are required to confirm these findings. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT014182482377. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Using a Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) approach to develop and pilot a photo grid method to gain insights into early child health and development in a socio-economic disadvantaged community.

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    Lowrie, Emma; Tyrrell-Smith, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of a Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) approach to develop a new research tool to involve members of the community in thinking about priorities for early child health and development in a deprived area of the UK. The CEnR approach involves researchers, professionals and members of the public working together during all stages of research and development.Researchers used a phased approach to the development of a Photo Grid tool including reviewing tools which could be used for community engagement, and testing the new tool based on feedback from workshops with local early years professionals and parents of young children.The Photo Grid tool is a flat square grid on which photo cards can be placed. Participants were asked to pace at the top of the grid the photos they considered most important for early child health and development, working down to the less important ones at the bottom. The findings showed that the resulting Photo Grid tool was a useful and successful method of engaging with the local community. The evidence for this is the high numbers of participants who completed a pilot study and who provided feedback on the method. By involving community members throughout the research process, it was possible to develop a method that would be acceptable to the local population, thus decreasing the likelihood of a lack of engagement. The success of the tool is therefore particularly encouraging as it engages "seldom heard voices," such as those with low literacy. The aim of this research was to consult with professionals and parents to develop a new research toolkit (Photo Grid), to understand community assets and priorities in relation to early child health and development in Blackpool, a socio-economic disadvantaged community. A Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) approach was used to consult with community members. This paper describes the process of using a CEnR approach in developing a Photo Grid toolkit. A phased CEnR approach

  7. Household Chaos and Sleep-Disturbing Behavior of Family Members: Results of a Pilot Study of African-American Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, James C.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Morris, Nathan; Ehayaei, Aida; Intille, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although disorganized, chaotic households have been linked to poorer sleep outcomes, how household chaos actually manifests itself in the behaviors of others around the bedtime of a child or adolescent is not well understood. Objective To determine whether household chaos was associated with specific, nightly sleep-disturbing activities of adolescents’ family members. Design Longitudinal study Participants Twenty-six African-American or multi-ethnic early adolescent (ages 11–12 years) and parent dyads, recruited from local schools and social-service agencies in greater Cleveland, OH. Measurements Over 14 days, each night at bedtime, adolescents identified family-member activities keeping them awake or making it difficult to sleep by using a smart-phone-administered survey. Household organization was assessed via parent-completed, validated instruments. A generalized linear mixed model examined associations between each activity and household-organization measures. Results Adjusted for the effect of school being in session the next day, an increasingly chaotic household was associated with increased odds of household members disturbing adolescents’ efforts to fall asleep by watching TV/listening to music (odds ratio [OR]=1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.2–3.2), phoning/texting (OR=1.7, 95%CI =1.2–2.9), or having friends/relatives over visiting at the home (OR=1.6, 95%CI =1.0–3.0). Conversely, a more chaotic household was associated with decreased odds of adolescents reporting that “nothing” was keeping them awake or making it more difficult to sleep (OR=0.6, 95%CI =0.4–0.8). Enforced sleep rules were inconsistently associated with sleep-disturbing behaviors. Conclusion Improving early-adolescent sleep may benefit from considering the nighttime behavior of all household members and encouraging families to see that improving early-adolescent sleep requires the household’s participation. PMID:28346162

  8. Evaluation of a computer-assisted errorless learning-based memory training program for patients with early Alzheimer’s disease in Hong Kong: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee GY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Grace Y Lee,1 Calvin CK Yip,2 Edwin CS Yu,3 David WK Man4 1Occupational Therapy Department, Kwai Chung Hospital, 2CY Functional Recovery Services, 3Psychogeriatric Team, Kwai Chung Hospital, 4Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China Background: Improving the situation in older adults with cognitive decline and evidence of cognitive rehabilitation is considered crucial in long-term care of the elderly. The objective of this study was to implement a computerized errorless learning-based memory training program (CELP for persons with early Alzheimer’s disease, and to compare the training outcomes of a CELP group with those of a therapist-led errorless learning program (TELP group and a waiting-list control group. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with a single-blind research design was used in the study. Chinese patients with early Alzheimer’s disease screened by the Clinical Dementia Rating (score of 1 were recruited. The subjects were randomly assigned to CELP (n = 6, TELP (n = 6, and waiting-list control (n = 7 groups. Evaluation of subjects before and after testing, and at three-month follow-up was achieved using primary outcomes on the Chinese Mini-Mental State Examination, Chinese Dementia Rating Scale, Hong Kong List Learning Test, and the Brief Assessment of Prospective Memory-Short Form. Secondary outcomes were the Modified Barthel Index, Hong Kong Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form. The data were analyzed using Friedman's test for time effect and the Kruskal-Wallis test for treatment effect. Results: Positive treatment effects on cognition were found in two errorless learning-based memory groups (ie, computer-assisted and therapist-led. Remarkable changes were shown in cognitive function for subjects receiving CELP and emotional/daily functions in those receiving TELP. Conclusion: Positive

  9. The SOS pilot study: a RCT of routine oxygen supplementation early after acute stroke--effect on recovery of neurological function at one week.

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    Christine Roffe

    Full Text Available Mild hypoxia is common after stroke and associated with poor long-term outcome. Oxygen supplementation could prevent hypoxia and improve recovery. A previous study of routine oxygen supplementation showed no significant benefit at 7 and 12 months. This pilot study reports the effects of routine oxygen supplementation for 72 hours on oxygen saturation and neurological outcomes at 1 week after a stroke.Patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke were recruited within 24 h of hospital admission between October 2004 and April 2008. Participants were randomized to oxygen via nasal cannulae (72 h or control (room air, oxygen given only if clinically indicated. Clinical outcomes were assessed by research team members at 1 week. Baseline data for oxygen (n = 148 and control (n = 141 did not differ between groups.The median (interquartile range National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score for the groups at baseline was 6 (7 and 5 (7 respectively. The median Nocturnal Oxygen Saturation during treatment was 1.4% (0.3 higher in the oxygen than in the control group (p<0.001 during the intervention. At 1 week, the median NIHSS score had reduced by 2 (3 in the oxygen and by 1 (2 in the control group. 31% of participants in the oxygen group and 14% in the control group had an improvement of ≥4 NIHSS points at 1 week doubling the odds of improvement in the oxygen group (OR: 2.9.Our data show that routine oxygen supplementation started within 24 hours of hospital admission with acute stroke led to a small, but statistically significant, improvement in neurological recovery at 1 week. However, the difference in NIHSS improvement may be due to baseline imbalance in stroke severity between the two groups and needs to be confirmed in a larger study and linked to longer-term clinical outcome.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN12362720; European Clinical Trials Database 2004-001866-41.

  10. A pilot study of a school-based prevention and early intervention program to reduce oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Jo; Carlsson, Anthony; Vance, Alasdair

    2014-05-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) occurs when children's disruptive and antisocial behaviours start to interfere with their academic, emotional and/or social development. Recently, there has been a considerable investment to implement national school-based early intervention programs to help prevent the onset of ODD/CD. This paper describes the delivery of the Royal Children's Hospital, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service and Schools Early Action Program: a whole school, multi-level, multidisciplinary approach to address emerging ODD/CD and pre- versus post-delivery assessment in 40 schools over a 4-year period (2007-2010). All children from preparatory to grade 3 (ages 4-10 years) were screened for conduct problems (n = 8546) using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Universal, targeted and indicated interventions were delivered in school settings. In total, 304 children participated in the targeted group program where the Child Behaviour Checklist was used as a pre- and post-intervention measure. Cohen's d effect sizes and a reliability change index were calculated to determine clinical significance. Significant reductions in both parent- and teacher-reported internalizing and externalizing symptoms were noted. Parent, teacher and child feedback were very positive. A future randomized controlled trial of the program would address potential placebo and selection bias effects. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Pilot evaluation of short-term changes in macular pigment and retinal sensitivity in different phenotypes of early age-related macular degeneration after carotenoid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvi, Federico; Souied, Eric H; Falfoul, Yousra; Georges, Anouk; Jung, Camille; Querques, Lea; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the response of carotenoid supplementation in different phenotypes of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by measuring macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and retinal sensitivity. Consecutive patients with only medium/large drusen and only reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and age-matched and sex-matched controls were enrolled. At baseline, participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), MPOD and retinal sensitivity. Patients were put on vitamin supplementation (lutein 10 mg/day, zeaxanthin 2 mg/day) and 3 months later underwent a repeated ophthalmological examination. Twenty patients with medium/large drusen, 19 with RPD and 15 control subjects were included. At baseline, in controls, mean MPOD and BCVA were significantly higher compared with RPD (p=0.001 and p=0.01) but similar to medium/large drusen (p=0.9 and p=0.4). Mean retinal sensitivity was significantly higher in controls compared with RPD and medium/large drusen (for all pmacular sensitivity and MPOD than controls. After supplementation, MPOD significantly increased in RPD. These results suggest different pathophysiology for RPD as compared with medium/large drusen and may open new ways to identifying further therapeutic targets in this phenotype of early AMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. The Self-Reported Knowledge, Attitude and the Practices Regarding the Early Detection of Oral Cancer and Precancerous Lesions among the Practising Dentists of Dakshina Kannada—A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Shaila; Shetty, Pushparaj; Decruz, Audrey Madonna; Pai, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of the leading causes of mortality in India. The screening and the early detection of the premalignant and malignant lesions are the only means for controlling the disease. General dental practitioners can play a great role in this direction. The objective of the present study was to assess the self-reported knowledge, attitude, as well as the practices concerning the early detection of oral cancer among the dentists of Dakshina Kannada, Karnataka, India. Material and Methods: About 200 clinicians (BDS/MDS) were randomly selected for an 18 itemed questionnaire survey. The aspects which were enquired into were the usage of exfoliative cytology in their clinical practice, the recent attempts which are made by dentists at updating their knowledge on oral cancer, their practical approaches towards the screening for oral premalignant diseases, etc. Results: Over 98% of the dentists reported to have not performed exfoliative cytology in their clinics. However, 85% had attended education programs on oral cancer. About 72% felt the need to be trained and they welcomed the suggestion of conducting practical workshops in this direction. 29.5% conducted biopsies when they encountered suspicious looking lesions, but only 13% counseled such patients for the habit cessation. 86% felt the need for Oral Pathology consultants in their clinics. Conclusion: This pilot survey identified an existing gap in the knowledge and practices among physicians and dentists and this emphasises the need to increase the numbers of oral cancer detection workshops which are held among the professional groups. PMID:23998104

  13. Effect of Auricular Acupressure on Peri- and Early Postmenopausal Women with Anxiety: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, and Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ling Kao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested effects of auricular acupressure on peri- and early postmenopausal women with anxiety (PPWA. Fifty PPWA were randomly assigned to the auricular acupressure group (AG or the sham group (SG. After 3 meals and before sleep every day for 4 weeks, the AG received auricular acupressure on the bilateral ear shenmen and subcortex points for 3 min per point on alternating ears. The SG received sham auricular acupressure. The Alprazolam was reduced from 0.5 mg/day at baseline to 0.3 mg/day 4 weeks after auricular acupressure (4 W in the AG (P.05. The Zolpidem was reduced from 3.0 mg/day at baseline to 1.5 mg/day at 4 W (P.05, thus, significant tapering medication, suggesting auricular acupressure is helpful to PPWA.

  14. Influence of early clinical exposure for undergraduate students on self-perception of different aspects of geriatric dental care: Pilot study between two colleges from Japan and India

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    Pravinkumar G Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to identify the influence of early clinical exposure for undergraduate students on self-perception of different aspects of geriatric dental care. Materials and Methods: We have selected two different colleges from Japan and India, namely, Tokyo Dental College (TDC, Tokyo, and Government Dental College (GDC, Nagpur, respectively. The GDC students exposed to patients in a 3rd year and TDC in the 5th year of course. Survey of 74 undergraduate students GDC and 95 of TDC was conducted. The questionnaire was developed based on to the 50 points undergraduate curriculum by European College of Gerodontology. The questionnaire categorized into four parts; Part I (15 questions on aging and medicine, Part II (15 questions on communication skills, Part III (15 questions on diagnosis/treatment, and Part IV (5 questions on need of more training in Gerodontology. Their own-perception on self-knowledge and competency was scored on 4 level scale as 3, 2, 1, and 0 for response yes, rather yes, rather no, and no, respectively. Average scores were calculated and presented. Results: The differences of the opinions as per students' perception level were found to be slightly more affirmative in GDC students (1.9 for the 4th year and 2 for the 5th year than TDC students (1.1 for 5th grade and 1.5 for 6th grade. Both clinical and didactic hours should be increased in curriculum according to the TDC (89% and GDC (79% students. Separate gerodontology subject is suggested from TDC (76% to GDC (81% students. Conclusion: Average scores about own-perception of knowledge and competency about aging, medicine, and communication skills were almost same in both GDC and TDC students. With early clinical exposure, GDC students appear have better self-perception regarding the different aspects of the geriatric dental care including subject knowledge, communications, diagnosis, and treatment planning than TDC students with late clinical

  15. Clinical efficacy and prognostic indicators for lower limb pedalling exercise early after stroke: Study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

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    Myint Phyo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that repetitive, skilled, functional movement is beneficial in driving functional reorganisation of the brain early after stroke. This study will investigate a whether pedalling an upright, static exercise cycle, to provide such beneficial activity, will enhance recovery and b which stroke survivors might be able to participate in pedalling. Methods/Design Participants (n = 24 will be up to 30 days since stroke onset, with unilateral weakness and unable to walk without assistance. This study will use a modified exercise bicycle fitted with a UniCam crank. All participants will give informed consent, then undergo baseline measurements, and then attempt to pedal. Those able to pedal will be entered into a single-centre, observer-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT. All participants will receive routine rehabilitation. The experimental group will, in addition, pedal daily for up to ten minutes, for up to ten working days. Prognostic indicators, measured at baseline, will be: site of stroke lesion, trunk control, ability to ambulate, and severity of lower limb paresis. The primary outcome for the RCT is ability to voluntarily contract paretic lower limb muscle, measured by the Motricity Index. Secondary outcomes include ability to ambulate and timing of onset and offset of activity in antagonist muscle groups during pedalling, measured by EMG. Discussion This protocol is for a trial of a novel therapy intervention. Findings will establish whether there is sufficient evidence of benefit to justify proceeding with further research into clinical efficacy of upright pedalling exercise early after stroke. Information on potential prognostic indicators will suggest which stroke survivors could benefit from the intervention. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN45392701

  16. Infusing Early Childhood Mental Health into Early Intervention Services

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    Grabert, John C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of enhancing early childhood mental health awareness and skills in non-mental health staff. The author describes a pilot training model, conducted the U.S. Army's Early Intervention Services, that involved: (a) increasing early childhood mental health knowledge through reflective readings, (b) enhancing…

  17. Contacto precoz con la realidad asistencial: una experiencia piloto en medicina Early contact with medical practice: a pilot experience in medical students

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    J.E. Baños

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Varios estudios han sugerido que el contacto precoz del estudiante de medicina con la realidad asistencial puede tener unos efectos beneficiosos sobre su motivación, el conocimiento de la relación médico-paciente y la aceptación de la importancia de las materias médicas básicas. En el nuevo grado conjunto de Medicina de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona y la Universitat Pompeu Fabra se ha incorporado una asignatura denominada 'Prácticas de Grado' que se imparte durante los tres primeros años, destinada a permitir el contacto de los estudiantes con la asistencia primaria, los equipos de enfermería y los centros sociosanitarios. El presente artículo describe la experiencia y la opinión de los estudiantes que la cursaron durante el primer año. Materiales y métodos: El artículo describe las características académicas de la asignatura. Se realizó una encuesta a los estudiantes al finalizar la asignatura para evaluar su grado de satisfacción y su percepción sobre el cumplimiento de los objetivos y las competencias que debían alcanzarse. Resultados: Existió una elevada satisfacción con la nueva actividad y una percepción entre los estudiantes de que las competencias preestablecidas se habían alcanzado en su mayor parte. Conclusión: El contacto precoz con la realidad asistencial es un elemento esencial para la comprensión de la actividad médica por los estudiantes de medicina de primer año.Introduction: Several studies have suggested that early contact of medical students with medical care may have beneficial effects on their motivation, knowledge of doctor-patient relationship and acceptance of the interest of biomedical sciences. In the new joint degree of Medicine of Autonomous University of Barcelona and Pompeu Fabra University we have incorporated the subject 'Prácticas de Grado' during the first three years. It is devoted to permit the early contact of medical students with primary care, nursing

  18. A Pilot Study of the Noninvasive Assessment of the Lung Microbiota as a Potential Tool for the Early Diagnosis of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jacob S.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Drake, Wonder P.; Norris, Patrick R.; Jenkins, Judith M.; Isaacs, Richard J.; Boczko, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remains a common complication in critically ill surgical patients, and its diagnosis remains problematic. Exhaled breath contains aerosolized droplets that reflect the lung microbiota. We hypothesized that exhaled breath condensate fluid (EBCF) in hygroscopic condenser humidifier/heat and moisture exchanger (HCH/HME) filters would contain bacterial DNA that qualitatively and quantitatively correlate with pathogens isolated from quantitative BAL samples obtained for clinical suspicion of pneumonia. METHODS: Forty-eight adult patients who were mechanically ventilated and undergoing quantitative BAL (n = 51) for suspected pneumonia in the surgical ICU were enrolled. Per protocol, patients fulfilling VAP clinical criteria undergo quantitative BAL bacterial culture. Immediately prior to BAL, time-matched HCH/HME filters were collected for study of EBCF by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, convenience samples of serially collected filters in patients with BAL-diagnosed VAP were analyzed. RESULTS: Forty-nine of 51 time-matched EBCF/BAL fluid samples were fully concordant (concordance > 95% by κ statistic) relative to identified pathogens and strongly correlated with clinical cultures. Regression analysis of quantitative bacterial DNA in paired samples revealed a statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.85). In a convenience sample, qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of serial HCH/HME samples for bacterial DNA demonstrated an increase in load that preceded the suspicion of pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial DNA within EBCF demonstrates a high correlation with BAL fluid and clinical cultures. Bacterial DNA within EBCF increases prior to the suspicion of pneumonia. Further study of this novel approach may allow development of a noninvasive tool for the early diagnosis of VAP. PMID:25474571

  19. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for analysis of endogenous steroids in the luteal phase and early pregnancy in dogs: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Bodil S; Kushnir, Mark M; Bergquist, Jonas

    2015-12-01

    Blood samples from dogs are often limited in volume, only allowing few steroids to be quantified with immunoassays. In addition, immunoassays may be compromised by interferences such as anti-reagent antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) can be used for the simultaneous quantitation of several steroids. This has not been described in dogs before. The aims were to use LC-MS/MS to study steroid profiles in early pregnancy and luteal phase in dogs, and to determine if differences exist between pregnant (P) and nonpregnant (NP) dogs. Nine female dogs were included, 4 during a NP luteal phase, 4 during a P luteal phase, and one during one NP and one P luteal phase. Blood samples were collected around the time of the LH surge (Day 0) and on Day 26. Serum was analyzed for 5 classes of steroids, including glucocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, pregnanes, and progestins, using LC-MS/MS methods. The concentration of progesterone was significantly higher on Day 26 in P than in NP bitches. Distribution of concentrations of glucocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, or pregnanes in P and NP dogs were not statistically different. The predominating glucocorticoid was cortisol, and dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) was the predominating androgen. Concentration of estrone was comparable to oestradiol, whereas concentrations of pregnenolone were higher than those of 17-OH pregnenolone. Only concentration of progesterone differed between P and NP bitches, being significantly higher on Day 26 in P than in NP bitches. LC-MS/MS offers interesting possibilities for studies of canine reproductive endocrinology. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  20. Effects of Meditation versus Music Listening on Perceived Stress, Mood, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Adults with Early Memory Loss: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Khalsa, Dharma Singh; Kandati, Sahiti

    2016-04-08

    Older adults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) are at increased risk not only for Alzheimer's disease, but for poor mental health, impaired sleep, and diminished quality of life (QOL), which in turn, contribute to further cognitive decline, highlighting the need for early intervention. In this randomized controlled trial, we assessed the effects of two 12-week relaxation programs, Kirtan Kriya Meditation (KK) and music listening (ML), on perceived stress, sleep, mood, and health-related QOL in older adults with SCD. Sixty community-dwelling older adults with SCD were randomized to a KK or ML program and asked to practice 12 minutes daily for 12 weeks, then at their discretion for the following 3 months. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks, perceived stress, mood, psychological well-being, sleep quality, and health-related QOL were measured using well-validated instruments. Fifty-three participants (88%) completed the 6-month study. Participants in both groups showed significant improvement at 12 weeks in psychological well-being and in multiple domains of mood and sleep quality (p's≤0.05). Relative to ML, those assigned to KK showed greater gains in perceived stress, mood, psychological well-being, and QOL-Mental Health (p's≤0.09). Observed gains were sustained or improved at 6 months, with both groups showing marked and significant improvement in all outcomes. Changes were unrelated to treatment expectancies. Findings suggest that practice of a simple meditation or ML program may improve stress, mood, well-being, sleep, and QOL in adults with SCD, with benefits sustained at 6 months and gains that were particularly pronounced in the KK group.

  1. Risk of suicide and suicidal ideation in psychosis: results from an Italian multi-modal pilot program on early intervention in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Antonio; Meneghelli, Anna; Pisano, Alessia; Cocchi, Angelo

    2009-09-01

    Suicidality is high in schizophrenia, particularly in first-episode patients. Little is known about patients with prodromal symptoms of psychosis or otherwise high-risk persons. In a sample enrolled in an early intervention program implemented in Milan (Italy), a history of attempted suicide before enrollment was found in 6 first-episode schizophrenia (out of 87, 6.9%), and 7 high-risk of psychosis (out of 81, 8.6%) patients. In the first-episode group, a history of suicide attempts was related to a shorter duration of untreated psychosis. In the high-risk group, a family psychiatric history in first/second degree relatives of patients and a personal history of substance abuse were both associated with an enhanced risk of attempted suicide before enrollment. During the first year of treatment, 3 new attempted suicides were recorded among 57 (5.3%) high-risk patients, and none among first-episode patients (n=58) (no dropout in the sample). The levels of suicide ideation on the BPRS did not differ by group at assessment, and significantly declined from assessment at entry to 1-year follow-up, except in seven HRP patients who become positive for core symptoms of schizophrenia, as measured on the BPRS. At enrollment, patients at high risk of psychosis had the same prevalence of past suicide attempts than first-episode schizophrenia patients: since suicide attempt is the most important predictor of a future suicidal attempt, the assessment of suicide risk should be given a privileged role in patients at high risk of psychosis as well.

  2. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev OY

    2015-10-01

    subjects with an AHI ≥15 on PSG, OCST parameters were as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 83.3%, PPV 81.8%, and NPV 100%. Bland–Altman plotting showed an overall diagnostic agreement between OCST and PSG modalities for an AHI cutoff >5, despite fine-grained differences in estimated AHIs. Conclusion: Compared with PSG, OCST provides similar diagnostic information when run simultaneously in AIS patients. OCST is a reliable screening tool for early diagnosis of OSA in AIS patients. Keywords: portable clinical screening, obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis, acute ischemic stroke, sleep testing in stroke, acute sleep medicine

  3. Financial System Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Three essays on financial system stability. The first paper explores the stability of core-periphery interbank networks in a static simulation framework. The results are then compared to a meanfield approximation. While this proves accurate in early rounds of default, precision of this approximation suffers as the simulation evolves. The second essay contributes to the empirical literature on real-world economic and financial networks. We explore the topology of the Spanish bank-firm credi...

  4. Cable Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2014-01-01

    Superconductor stability is at the core of the design of any successful cable and magnet application. This chapter reviews the initial understanding of the stability mechanism, and reviews matters of importance for stability such as the nature and magnitude of the perturbation spectrum and the cooling mechanisms. Various stability strategies are studied, providing criteria that depend on the desired design and operating conditions.

  5. An Assessment of Early Response to Targeted Therapy via Molecular Imaging: A Pilot Study of 3′-deoxy-3′[(18F]-Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography 18F-FLT PET/CT in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorothymidine is a thymidine analog labeled with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine for positron emission tomography (18F-FLT-PET imaging. Thymidine is a nucleic acid that is used to build DNA. Fluorine-18 fluorothymidine (18F-FLT utilizes the same metabolic pathway as does thymidine but has a very low incidence of being incorporated into the DNA (<1%. 18F-FLT-PET could have a role in the evaluation of response to targeted therapy. We present here a pilot study where we investigated cellular metabolism and proliferation in patients with prostate cancer before and after targeted therapy. Seven patients with Stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, candidates for targeted therapy inhibiting the hepatocyte growth factor/tyrosine-protein kinase Met (HGF/C-MET pathway, were included in this study. The HGF/C-MET pathway is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and an evaluation of the inhibition of this pathway could be valuable. 18F-FLT was performed at baseline and within four weeks post-therapy. Tumor response was assessed semi-quantitatively and using visual response criteria. The range of SUVmax for 18F-FLT at baseline in the prostate varied from 2.5 to 4.2. This study demonstrated that 18F-FLT with positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18F-FLT PET/CT had only limited applications in the early response evaluation of prostate cancer. 18F-FLT PET/CT may have some utility in the assessment of response in lymph node disease. However, 18F-FLT PET/CT was not found to be useful in the evaluation of the prostate bed, metastatic skeletal disease, and liver disease.

  6. Technical support for universal health coverage pilots in Karnataka ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Technical support for universal health coverage pilots in Karnataka and Kerala. This project will provide evidence-based support to implement universal health coverage (UHC) pilot activities in two Indian states: Kerala and Karnataka. The project team will provide technical assistance to these early adopter states to assist ...

  7. Decrease in tick bite consultations and stabilization of early Lyme borreliosis in the Netherlands in 2014 after 15 years of continuous increase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, Agnetha; Bennema, Sita; Harms, Margriet; Vliet, van A.J.H.; Takken, W.; Wijngaard, van den C.C.; Pelt, van Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Background
    Nationwide surveys have shown a threefold increase in general practitioner (GP) consultations for tick bites and early Lyme borreliosis from 1994 to 2009 in the Netherlands. We now report an update on 2014, with identical methods as for the preceding GP

  8. On the Progression and Stability of Adolescent Identity Formation : A Five-Wave Longitudinal Study in Early-to-Middle and Middle-to-Late Adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, W.H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070442215; Van de Schoot, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833207; Keijsers, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836206; Schwartz, S.; Branje, S.J.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/192657860

    2010-01-01

    This study examined identity development in a 5-wave study of 923 early-to-middle and 390 middle-to-late adolescents thereby covering the ages of 12–20. Systematic evidence for identity progression was found: The number of diffusions, moratoriums, and searching moratoriums (a newly obtained status)

  9. Pilot Boarding Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is...

  10. Amnioinfusion in preterm premature rupture of membranes (AMIPROM): a randomised controlled trial of amnioinfusion versus expectant management in very early preterm premature rupture of membranes--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Devender; Vause, Sarah; Martin, William; Green, Pauline; Walkinshaw, Stephen; Bricker, Leanne; Beardsmore, Caroline; Shaw, Ben N J; McKay, Andrew; Skotny, Gaynor; Williamson, Paula; Alfirevic, Zarko

    2014-04-01

    Fetal survival is severely compromised when the amniotic membrane ruptures between 16 and 24 weeks of pregnancy. Reduced amniotic fluid levels are associated with poor lung development, whereas adequate levels lead to better perinatal outcomes. Restoring amniotic fluid by means of ultrasound-guided amnioinfusion (AI) may be of benefit in improving perinatal and long-term outcomes in children of pregnancies with this condition. The AI in preterm premature rupture of membranes (AMIPROM) pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of recruitment, the methods for conduct and the retention through to long-term follow-up of participants with very early rupture of amniotic membranes (between 16 and 24 weeks of pregnancy). It was also performed to assess outcomes and collect data to inform a larger, more definitive, clinical trial. A prospective, non-blinded randomised controlled trial. A computer-generated random sequence using a 1 : 1 ratio was used. Randomisation was stratified for pregnancies in which the amniotic membrane ruptured between 16(+0) and 19(+6) weeks' gestation and 20(+0) and 24(+0) weeks' gestation. The randomisation sequence was generated in blocks of four. Telephone randomisation and intention-to-treat analysis were used. Four UK hospital-based fetal medicine units - Liverpool Women's NHS Trust, St. Mary's Hospital, Manchester, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust and Wirral University Hospitals Trust. Women with confirmed preterm prelabour rupture of membranes between 16(+0) and 24(+0) weeks' gestation. Women with multiple pregnancies, resultant fetal abnormalities or obstetric indication for immediate delivery were excluded. Participants were randomly allocated to either serial weekly transabdominal AI or expectant management (Exp) until 37 weeks of pregnancy, if the deepest pool of amniotic fluid was < 2 cm. Short-term maternal, pregnancy and neonatal outcomes and long-term outcomes for the child were studied. Long-term respiratory

  11. [Aseptic process validation and stability study of an injectable preparation of fructose (5%)-glycerol (10%) as part of a hospital clinical research program on endoscopic curative treatment for early epithelial neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, M L; Salmon, D; Diouf, E; Drai, J; Filali, S; Lépilliez, V; Pioche, M; Laleye, D; Dhelens, C; Ponchon, T; Pivot, C; Pirot, F

    2015-03-01

    As part of a hospital clinical research program on endoscopic curative treatment for early epithelial neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract, a new hospital sterile and non-pyrogenic preparation of fructose (5%)-glycerol (10%) was realized. Under pharmaceutical legislation, the provision of this hospital preparation involves of aseptic process validation and achieve a stability study. After the aseptic process validation with Mediafill Test, the preparation was made under aseptic conditions associated with a sterilizing filtration according to the good practices preparation. Prepared flexible bags (100mL of solution) were stored for one year in a climatic chamber (25±2°C). To assess stability, the physicochemical controls (fructose concentration, glycerol concentration, hydroxy-methyl-5 furfural [5-HMF] concentration, sodium concentration, pH measure, osmolality and sub-visible particles count) and microbiological (bioburden, bacterial endotoxin and sterility) were performed at regular intervals for one year. Neither significant decrease of fructose concentration, glycerol concentration and sodium concentration nor pH, 5-HMF, osmolality variations out of specifications were observed for one year. The sub-visible particles count, the bacterial endotoxin and sterility were in accordance with the European pharmacopoeia attesting limpidity, apyrogenicity and sterility of this injectable preparation. The hospital preparation was stable over one year at 25±2°C, ensuring safe administration in humans within the framework of this clinical research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Antioxidant responses to an acute ultra-endurance exercise: impact on DNA stability and indications for an increased need for nutritive antioxidants in the early recovery phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Oliver; Reichhold, Stefanie; Nics, Lukas; Hoelzl, Christine; Valentini, Judit; Stadlmayr, Barbara; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2010-10-01

    Antioxidant requirements have neither been defined for endurance nor been defined for ultra-endurance athletes. To verify whether an acute bout of ultra-endurance exercise modifies the need for nutritive antioxidants, we aimed (1) to investigate the changes of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants in response to an Ironman triathlon; (2) to particularise the relevance of antioxidant responses to the indices of oxidatively damaged blood lipids, blood cell compounds and lymphocyte DNA and (3) to examine whether potential time-points of increased susceptibility to oxidative damage are associated with alterations in the antioxidant status. Blood that was collected from forty-two well-trained male athletes 2 d pre-race, immediately post-race, and 1, 5 and 19 d later was sampled. The key findings of the present study are as follows: (1) Immediately post-race, vitamin C, α-tocopherol, and levels of the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, the ferric reducing ability of plasma and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays increased significantly. Exercise-induced changes in the plasma antioxidant capacity were associated with changes in uric acid, bilirubin and vitamin C. (2) Significant inverse correlations between ORAC levels and indices of oxidatively damaged DNA immediately and 1 d post-race suggest a protective role of the acute antioxidant responses in DNA stability. (3) Significant decreases in carotenoids and γ-tocopherol 1 d post-race indicate that the antioxidant intake during the first 24 h of recovery following an acute ultra-endurance exercise requires specific attention. Furthermore, the present study illustrates the importance of a diversified and well-balanced diet to maintain a physiological antioxidant status in ultra-endurance athletes in reference to recommendations.

  13. Early results of reverse less invasive stabilization system plating in treating elderly intertrochanteric fractures: a prospective study compared to proximal femoral nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chen; Zhang, Chang-qing; Jin, Dong-xu; Chen, Yun-feng

    2011-07-01

    Intertrochanteric femur fracture is common in elderly population. Though multiple treatment options are available, the choice of implant remains controversial. The reverse less invasive stabilization system (LISS) plating was introduced for treatment of a patient with ipsilateral intertrochanteric and midshaft femoral fractures. The aim of this research was to compare such technique to intramedullary nailing (proximal femoral nail, PFN) for intertrochanteric fractures. Fifty-six patients with an age of at least sixty-five years and an AO/OTA type-A1 or A2 fractures were included and divided into LISS and PFN treatment group. parameters, fracture and surgery details were documented. Follow-up time was at least 12 months. Radiology, complication, Harris Hip Score and Rapid Disability Rating Score (RDRS) were recorded to evaluate fixation status and hip function for each patient during follow-up. There was no significant difference between the two groups in surgical time ((48.0 ± 8.6) minutes, vs. (51.8 ± 10.8) minutes, P = 0.3836) and intraoperative blood loss ((149.1 ± 45.1) ml vs. (176.4 ± 25.4) ml, P = 0.0712). The LISS group had less postoperative haemoglobin (Hb) reduction ((10.2 ± 4.5) g/L Hb, vs. (15.1 ± 5.9) g/L Hb, P = 0.0475). There was no complication observed in PFN group. All 31A1 type fracture in LISS group showed 100% maintenance of reduction. One nonunion with locking screw breakage and 2 varus union were found in the LISS group. Postoperative hip function was similar between the two groups. Though reverse LISS plating may not be recommended as a routine fixation method for elderly unstable intertrochanteric fractures compared to PFN, it may possibly be reserved for rapid fixation and damage control in polytrauma patients and ORIF of subtrochanteric and reverse oblique intertrochanteric fractures.

  14. Early Childhood Development and Obesity Risk-Factors in a Multi-Ethnic, Low-Income Community: Feasibility of The "Five Hundred under Five" Social Determinants of Health Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Mary O.; Martin, Lauren; Rafdal, Brooke H.; Robinson, Ronel; McConnell, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: First, to describe a community-academic partnership that piloted a parent and home-based programme focused on the intersection of health and education from a social determinants foundation and determine the feasibility and acceptability of such work. Second, to examine trends and co-occurrence of social and environmental context,…

  15. Evaluation of crestal bone loss and stability of immediate functional loading versus immediate non-functional loading of single-mandibular posterior implants: A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantena, Satyanarayana Raju; Sivagami, G; Gottumukkala, Sruthima Nvs

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the crestal bone loss and stability of single mandibular posterior dental implants placed in immediate functional loading (IFL) and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL) during 6 months after placement. Forty single piece root form titanium implants were placed in 20 patients using IFL and INFL techniques. The change in the level of crestal bone was measured on standardized digital periapical radiographs using SOPRO imaging software and stability of implants using resonance frequency analyser taken at the baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months. The measurements were statistically analyzed using the independent and paired t-test (P implant stability quotient (ISQ) values at first and third months were lower than those at the baseline for both the groups. However, the ISQ values at the sixth month were similar to baseline for both the groups. The crestal bone changes and the ISQ values when compared between the groups showed no statistically significant difference. IFL of dental implants have equivalent results and success rate as that of immediately provisionalized implants within the limitations of this study.

  16. Evaluation of crestal bone loss and stability of immediate functional loading versus immediate non-functional loading of single-mandibular posterior implants: A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayana Raju Mantena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the crestal bone loss and stability of single mandibular posterior dental implants placed in immediate functional loading (IFL and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL during 6 months after placement. Materials and Methods: Forty single piece root form titanium implants were placed in 20 patients using IFL and INFL techniques. The change in the level of crestal bone was measured on standardized digital periapical radiographs using SOPRO imaging software and stability of implants using resonance frequency analyser taken at the baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months. The measurements were statistically analyzed using the independent and paired t-test (P < 0.05, statistically significant. Results: The mean change in the crestal bone level from baseline to 6 months was significant in both techniques. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values at first and third months were lower than those at the baseline for both the groups. However, the ISQ values at the sixth month were similar to baseline for both the groups. The crestal bone changes and the ISQ values when compared between the groups showed no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: IFL of dental implants have equivalent results and success rate as that of immediately provisionalized implants within the limitations of this study.

  17. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  18. Cyber Deterrence and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goychayev, Rustam [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carr, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weise, Rachel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Donnelly, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Clements, Samuel L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Benz, Jacob M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rodda, Kabrena E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bartholomew, Rachel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McKinnon, Archibald D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Andres, Richard B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries, deterrence and arms control have been cornerstones of strategic stability between the superpowers. However, the weaponization of the cyber realm by State actors and the multipolar nature of cyber conflict now undermines that stability. Strategic stability is the state in which nations believe that if they act aggressively to undermine U.S. national interests and the post-World War II liberal democratic order, the consequences will outweigh the benefits. The sense of lawlessness and lack of consequences in the cyber realm embolden States to be more aggressive in taking actions that undermine stability. Accordingly, this paper examines 1) the role of deterrence and arms control in securing cyber stability, and 2) the limitations and challenges associated with these traditional national security paradigms as applied to this emerging threat domain. This paper demonstrates that many 20th-century deterrence and arms control concepts are not particularly applicable in the cyber realm. However, they are not entirely irrelevant. The United States can distill lessons learned from this rich deterrence and arms control experience to develop and deploy a strategy to advance cyber stability.

  19. A pilot eduroam service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Eduroam is a secure, worldwide roaming Wi-Fi access service developed for the international research and education community. It allows people from participating institutions to obtain an Internet connection when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop.   A pilot eduroam service has been available in IT for some months. Now this pilot service will be extended to most parts of the CERN site from early January. Introduction of this pilot service brings two advantages: CERN users who register with the eduroam service here at CERN will have easy and quick access to Wi-Fi services at many other academic institutions across Europe and beyond;   People visiting CERN from other eduroam institutes will be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network at CERN without waiting for a network connection request to be approved. Being a eduroam user obviously has advantages but, like many computing services, eduroam provides a way for malicious people to steal passwords...

  20. A pilot eduroam service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Eduroam is a secure, worldwide roaming Wi-Fi access service developed for the international research and education community. It allows people from participating institutions to obtain an Internet connection when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop.   A pilot eduroam service has been available in IT for some months. Now this pilot service will be extended to most parts of the CERN site from early January. Introduction of this pilot service brings two advantages: CERN users who register with the eduroam service here at CERN will have easy and quick access to Wi-Fi services at many other academic institutions across Europe and beyond;   People visiting CERN from other eduroam institutes will be able to connect to the Wi-Fi network at CERN without waiting for a network connection request to be approved. Being a eduroam user obviously has advantages but, like many computing services, eduroam provides a way for malicious people to steal passwords...

  1. The Effects of 37 Hours of Continuous Wakefulness on the Physiological Arousal, Cognitive Performance, Self-Reported Mood, and Simulator Flight Performance of F-117A Pilots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caldwell, John

    2003-01-01

    .... This study assessed F-117A pilots during a 37-hour period of continuous wakefulness. Although none of the pilots crashed, substantial decrements were found in flight-skills, reaction times, mood, and brain activation as early as after the...

  2. Ashtanga-Based Yoga Therapy Increases the Sensory Contribution to Postural Stability in Visually-Impaired Persons at Risk for Falls as Measured by the Wii Balance Board: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela E Jeter

    Full Text Available Persons with visual impairment (VI are at greater risk for falls due to irreparable damage to visual sensory input contributing to balance. Targeted training may significantly improve postural stability by strengthening the remaining sensory systems. Here, we evaluate the Ashtanga-based Yoga Therapy (AYT program as a multi-sensory behavioral intervention to develop postural stability in VI.A randomized, waitlist-controlled, single-blind clinical trial.The trial was conducted between October 2012 and December 2013. Twenty-one legally blind participants were randomized to an 8-week AYT program (n = 11, mean (SD age = 55(17 or waitlist control (n=10, mean (SD age = 55(10. AYT subjects convened for one group session at a local yoga studio with an instructor and two individual home-based practice sessions per week for a total of 8 weeks. Subjects completed outcome measures at baseline and post-8 weeks of AYT. The primary outcome, absolute Center of Pressure (COP, was derived from the Wii Balance Board (WBB, a standalone posturography device, in 4 sensory conditions: firm surface, eyes open (EO; firm surface, eyes closed (EC; foam surface, EO; and foam surface, EC. Stabilization Indices (SI were computed from COP measures to determine the relative visual (SIfirm, SIfoam, somatosensory (SIEO, SIEC and vestibular (SIV, i.e., FoamEC vs. FirmEO contributions to balance. This study was not powered to detect between group differences, so significance of pre-post changes was assessed by paired samples t-tests within each group.Groups were equivalent at baseline (all p > 0.05. In the AYT group, absolute COP significantly increased in the FoamEO (t(8 = -3.66, p = 0.01 and FoamEC (t(8 = -3.90, p = 0.01 conditions. Relative somatosensory SIEO (t(8 = -2.42, p = 0.04 and SIEC (t(8 = -3.96, p = 0.01, and vestibular SIV (t(8 = -2.47, p = 0.04 contributions to balance increased significantly. As expected, no significant changes from EO to EC conditions were found

  3. Ashtanga-Based Yoga Therapy Increases the Sensory Contribution to Postural Stability in Visually-Impaired Persons at Risk for Falls as Measured by the Wii Balance Board: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeter, Pamela E; Haaz Moonaz, Steffany; Bittner, Ava K; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2015-01-01

    Persons with visual impairment (VI) are at greater risk for falls due to irreparable damage to visual sensory input contributing to balance. Targeted training may significantly improve postural stability by strengthening the remaining sensory systems. Here, we evaluate the Ashtanga-based Yoga Therapy (AYT) program as a multi-sensory behavioral intervention to develop postural stability in VI. A randomized, waitlist-controlled, single-blind clinical trial. The trial was conducted between October 2012 and December 2013. Twenty-one legally blind participants were randomized to an 8-week AYT program (n = 11, mean (SD) age = 55(17)) or waitlist control (n=10, mean (SD) age = 55(10)). AYT subjects convened for one group session at a local yoga studio with an instructor and two individual home-based practice sessions per week for a total of 8 weeks. Subjects completed outcome measures at baseline and post-8 weeks of AYT. The primary outcome, absolute Center of Pressure (COP), was derived from the Wii Balance Board (WBB), a standalone posturography device, in 4 sensory conditions: firm surface, eyes open (EO); firm surface, eyes closed (EC); foam surface, EO; and foam surface, EC. Stabilization Indices (SI) were computed from COP measures to determine the relative visual (SIfirm, SIfoam), somatosensory (SIEO, SIEC) and vestibular (SIV, i.e., FoamEC vs. FirmEO) contributions to balance. This study was not powered to detect between group differences, so significance of pre-post changes was assessed by paired samples t-tests within each group. Groups were equivalent at baseline (all p > 0.05). In the AYT group, absolute COP significantly increased in the FoamEO (t(8) = -3.66, p = 0.01) and FoamEC (t(8) = -3.90, p = 0.01) conditions. Relative somatosensory SIEO (t(8) = -2.42, p = 0.04) and SIEC (t(8) = -3.96, p = 0.01), and vestibular SIV (t(8) = -2.47, p = 0.04) contributions to balance increased significantly. As expected, no significant changes from EO to EC conditions were

  4. Ashtanga-Based Yoga Therapy Increases the Sensory Contribution to Postural Stability in Visually-Impaired Persons at Risk for Falls as Measured by the Wii Balance Board: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaz Moonaz, Steffany; Bittner, Ava K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persons with visual impairment (VI) are at greater risk for falls due to irreparable damage to visual sensory input contributing to balance. Targeted training may significantly improve postural stability by strengthening the remaining sensory systems. Here, we evaluate the Ashtanga-based Yoga Therapy (AYT) program as a multi-sensory behavioral intervention to develop postural stability in VI. Design A randomized, waitlist-controlled, single-blind clinical trial Methods The trial was conducted between October 2012 and December 2013. Twenty-one legally blind participants were randomized to an 8-week AYT program (n = 11, mean (SD) age = 55(17)) or waitlist control (n=10, mean (SD) age = 55(10)). AYT subjects convened for one group session at a local yoga studio with an instructor and two individual home-based practice sessions per week for a total of 8 weeks. Subjects completed outcome measures at baseline and post-8 weeks of AYT. The primary outcome, absolute Center of Pressure (COP), was derived from the Wii Balance Board (WBB), a standalone posturography device, in 4 sensory conditions: firm surface, eyes open (EO); firm surface, eyes closed (EC); foam surface, EO; and foam surface, EC. Stabilization Indices (SI) were computed from COP measures to determine the relative visual (SIfirm, SIfoam), somatosensory (SIEO, SIEC) and vestibular (SIV, i.e., FoamEC vs. FirmEO) contributions to balance. This study was not powered to detect between group differences, so significance of pre-post changes was assessed by paired samples t-tests within each group. Results Groups were equivalent at baseline (all p > 0.05). In the AYT group, absolute COP significantly increased in the FoamEO (t(8) = -3.66, p = 0.01) and FoamEC (t(8) = -3.90, p = 0.01) conditions. Relative somatosensory SIEO (t(8) = -2.42, p = 0.04) and SIEC (t(8) = -3.96, p = 0.01), and vestibular SIV (t(8) = -2.47, p = 0.04) contributions to balance increased significantly. As expected, no significant

  5. "Proof of concept" pilot study: bioprocess chain of custody and bioresource sample management temperature observations. Sample level temperature trends and stability data obtained via utilization of bluechiip(®) temperature tracking technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lisa B; Wyatt, Kathleen; Johnston, Ian; Milljanic, Miroslav; Chaffey, Jason

    2013-04-01

    Preservation and optimization of biosample integrity to foster relevant research results and outcomes is a guiding principle of sample management. Tracking pre-analytical biospecimen lifecycle variables and bioprocessing chain of custody data enables documentation of adherence to best, regulatory and quality biobanking practices. Knowledge of individual sample and sample set temperature variability is believed to enhance delineation of artifacts during downstream analysis. Analysis of temperature responses may elucidate understanding of temperature trends which can aid downstream interpretation and provide an empirical foundation for "fit for purpose" sample management protocols and evidence-based biobanking practices. Bluechiip and the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) conducted a pilot to test the bluechiip technology(®) performance and validate key proofs of concept for tracking temperature of biological samples. One hundred six (106) Corning(®) cryovials with bluechiip(®) buttons and one hundred six (106) standard Corning(®) cryovials labeled with 1-dimensional (1D) barcoded labels were evaluated. Identifiers were tracked and temperature data recorded in corresponding environments ranging from -192°C to +57°. Nine of ten proof of concepts, defined in collaboration with ATCC successfully demonstrated functional capabilities of the bluechiip(®) technology. Bar-code label read performance was compared, producing evidence demonstrating a high rate of failure on the bar-code arm. Temperature data collected heightened observations of sample temperature variability. Prevalence of bar-code label read failure and issues affecting reliability of barcode performance may be under-reported and unrecognized in sample management practice, particularly when the temperatures are lower than -60°C. It appears the bluechiip(®) tracking technology may offer increased reliability over one-dimensional (1D) bar-coding technology; however while promising these findings

  6. Early mathematics intervention in a Danish municipality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Weng, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We describe a pilot project 2009 – 2010 about early intervention in second grade mathematics (about 8 years old) in Frederiksberg, a Danish urban municipality. We shortly describe the background of the pilot project, aims and organisation in four design cycles. We explore the pilot teachers' feed...... as a starting point. We find an urgent need to develop and research projects on early intervention in Nordic school culture, preferably in critical dialogue with international research in this field. , while critically discussing ideas and experiences from other countries....

  7. Stability of medication in early psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opjordsmoen, Stein; Melle, Ingrid; Friis, Svein

    2009-01-01

    This naturalistic study aims to compare discontinuation rates for low-dose first-generation versus second-generation antipsychotics in first-episode psychotic patients.......This naturalistic study aims to compare discontinuation rates for low-dose first-generation versus second-generation antipsychotics in first-episode psychotic patients....

  8. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  9. CERN pilot greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot installation was situated near Bld. BA6 opposite to the main entrance of the Meyrin site, with respect to Route de Meyrin. See Weekly Bulletin 3/83, and also photo 8305594X, 8505898X, 8302200.

  10. An upper limb musculoskeletal model using bond graphs for rotorcraft-pilot couplings analysis

    OpenAIRE

    TOD, Georges; Malburet, François; Gomand, Julien; Barre, Pierre-Jean

    2014-01-01

    Under certain flight conditions, a rotorcraft fuselage motions and vibrations might interact with its pilot voluntary and involuntary actions leading to potentially dangerous dynamic instabilities known as rotorcraft-pilot couplings (RPCs). A better understanding of this phenomenon could be achieved by being able to reproduce the phenomenon during simulations. Design guidelines could be then obtained at an early stage of development of rotorcrafts improving flight safety for pilots and passen...

  11. Musculoskeletal Pain in High-G Aircraft Training Programs: A Survey of Student and Instructor Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    not addressed early, due to stigmas of reporting and lack of availability of effective therapies, are resulting in chronic long-term disabilities ...symptoms in pilots flying high-G aircraft, impacting mission readiness with concerns for chronic disability . We hypothesized similar prevalence of MS...will result in chronic disabilities . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Musculoskeletal pain, student pilots, instructor pilots, high-G aircraft, OMT, DNIF 16

  12. Macroeconomic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that full employment and sustainable development not necessarily are conflicting goals. On the other hand macroeconomic stability cannot be obtained without a deliberate labour sharing policy and a shift in the composition of private consumption away from traditional material...

  13. Human Factors Assessment of the UH-60M Crew Station During the Early User Demonstration Number 2 (EUD2)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kennedy, Joshua S; Durbin, David B

    2005-01-01

    Pilot workload, situational awareness (SA), and the pilot-vehicle interface (PVI) characteristics associated with the UH-60M Black Hawk crew station simulator were assessed during the Early User Demonstration...

  14. User Participation in Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Pilot implementations provide users with real-work experiences of how a system will affect their daily work before the design of the system is finalized. On the basis of a pilot implementation of a system for coordinating the transport of patients by hospital porters, we investigate pilot...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  15. DIRAC universal pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.; Krzemien, W.; Consortium, DIRAC

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing models, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are in the form of opportunistic ones. Most but not all of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. In addition, some of them, present opportunities for multi-processor computing slots to the users. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to provide the transparent, uniform interface has become essential. The transparent access to the underlying resources is realized by implementing the pilot model. DIRAC’s newest generation of generic pilots (the so-called Pilots 2.0) are the “pilots for all the skies”, and have been successfully released in production more than a year ago. They use a plugin mechanism that makes them easily adaptable. Pilots 2.0 have been used for fetching and running jobs on every type of resource, being it a Worker Node (WN) behind a CREAM/ARC/HTCondor/DIRAC Computing element, a Virtual Machine running on IaaC infrastructures like Vac or BOINC, on IaaS cloud resources managed by Vcycle, the LHCb High Level Trigger farm nodes, and any type of opportunistic computing resource. Make a machine a “Pilot Machine”, and all diversities between them will disappear. This contribution describes how pilots are made suitable for different resources, and the recent steps taken towards a fully unified framework, including monitoring. Also, the cases of multi-processor computing slots either on real or virtual machines, with the whole node or a partition of it, is discussed.

  16. Examining the sustainability potential of a multisite pilot to integrate alcohol screening and brief intervention within three primary care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D K; Gonzalez, S J; Hartje, J A; Hanson, B L; Edney, C; Snell, H; Zoorob, R J; Roget, N A

    2018-01-23

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that clinicians adopt universal alcohol screening and brief intervention as a routine preventive service for adults, and efforts are underway to support its widespread dissemination. The likelihood that healthcare systems will sustain this change, once implemented, is under-reported in the literature. This article identifies factors that were important to postimplementation sustainability of an evidence-based practice change to address alcohol misuse that was piloted within three diverse primary care organizations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded three academic teams to pilot and evaluate implementation of alcohol screening and brief intervention within multiclinic healthcare systems in their respective regions. Following the completion of the pilots, teams used the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool to retrospectively describe and compare differences across eight sustainability domains, identify strengths and potential threats to sustainability, and make recommendations for improvement. Health systems varied across all domains, with greatest differences noted for Program Evaluation, Strategic Planning, and Funding Stability. Lack of funding to sustain practice change, or data monitoring to promote fit and fidelity, was an indication of diminished Organizational Capacity in systems that discontinued the service after the pilot. Early assessment of sustainability factors may identify potential threats that could be addressed prior to, or during implementation to enhance Organizational Capacity. Although this study provides a retrospective assessment conducted by external academic teams, it identifies factors that may be relevant for translating evidence-based behavioral interventions in a way that assures that they are sustained within healthcare systems. © The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabari, Anil [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States); Fadipe, Oloruntomi [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  18. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    -termination to be a global phenomena in gene regulation. The influence of codon usage in the early coding region on messenger stability was examined, in order to establish how fast or slow the ribosome has to decode the sequence for it to protect the messenger from degradation. The experiments demonstrated that very fast...

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  20. The MALT 90 GHz Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James; Rathborne, Jill; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Brooks, Kate; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Longmore, Steven; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Walsh, Andrew; Peretto, Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    In early November, 2008, Australian and international Galactic astronomers met to plan future surveys of the Galactic plane with ATNF facilities. We intend to coordinate our efforts so that such surveys produce the maximum scientific return with minimal overlap in observations. To this end, the Millimetre Astronomers Large-area multi-Transition (MALT) team was formed. The MALT team has identified key Galactic plane surveys: a 42--50 GHz survey, a 90 GHz survey and a 115 GHz survey. In this proposal, we aim to conduct a pilot survey to explore options in the 90 GHz (3 mm) range. This pilot survey will provide detection rates, typical line strengths, and source sizes for various "finder charts" for high-mass star-forming cores. Such information is crucial for a rational design of a complete 90 GHz MALT survey.

  1. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow

    This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...... pilot projects as enabler of transition. Aspects of how to create trust and deal with distrust during a transition are addressed. The transition in focus is the concept of New Public Management and how it is applied in the management of the Employment Service in Denmark. The transition regards...

  2. Single-Pilot Workload Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Hackworth, Carla; Burian, Barbara; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Drechsler, Gena; Silverman, Evan; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Integrated glass cockpit systems place a heavy cognitive load on pilots (Burian Dismukes, 2007). Researchers from the NASA Ames Flight Cognition Lab and the FAA Flight Deck Human Factors Lab examined task and workload management by single pilots. This poster describes pilot performance regarding programming a reroute while at cruise and meeting a waypoint crossing restriction on the initial descent.

  3. Maturation and Hardening of the Stabilized Radiometer Platforms (STRAPS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholtz, A. [U.S. Naval Research Lab. Washington, DC (United States); Bluth, R. [U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Pfaff, B. [L-3 Communications, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of solar and infrared irradiance by instruments rigidly mounted to an aircraft have historically been plagued by the introduction of offsets and fluctuations into the data that are solely due to the pitch and roll movements of the aircraft. Two STabilized RAdiometer Platforms (STRAPs) were developed for the U.S. Navy in the early to mid-2000s to address this problem. The development was a collaborative effort between the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories. The STRAPs were designed and built by L-3 Communications Sonoma EO (formerly the small business Sonoma Design Group).

  4. Capacidade da lagoa de estabilização, integrante de um sistema piloto, na remoção da carga orgânica da água residuária do processamento do café por via úmida Capability of a stabilization pond, part of a pilot system, of removing the organic load of wet coffee processing wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Ferreira da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O processamento do café por via úmida, além de aumentar a eficiência para se obter cafés de melhor qualidade, diminui consideravelmente os custos de secagem e ainda, reduz o espaço ocupado no terreiro. Porém, esse tipo de processamento gera grandes quantidades de águas residuárias, que devem sofrer algum tipo de tratamento antes de serem lançadas em corpos hídricos. Nesta pesquisa, objetivou-se monitorar a Lagoa de Estabilização integrante desse sistema, avaliar a sua eficiência na remoção da carga orgânica afluente e desenvolver um modelo de ajuste para descrever a autodepuração ocorrida. Para esta pesquisa, foram considerados 300,200 litros de frutos do cafeeiro, da espécie Coffea arabica L., processados, por via úmida. A carga média diária foi de 136 kgDQO d-1, encaminhada para um sistema piloto de tratamento de água residuária do processamento do café. O monitoramento foi realizado por meio de análises químicas e físico-químicas e o modelo de ajuste foi desenvolvido a partir do cálculo do balanço hídrico, das equações de estimativa teórica de remoção de DQO e das análises de DQO realizadas. O efluente da lagoa de estabilização apresentou concentração inicial de DQO de 7,100 mg L-1 e final de 100 mg L-1. Ficou constatado que a lagoa foi a unidade de tratamento que reduziu em cerca de 80% a concentração de matéria orgânica afluente. O modelo de ajuste desenvolvido apresentou coeficiente de ajuste satisfatório (r² = 0,8015.Wet coffee processing, besides its efficiency in getting better coffee quality, also minimizes considerably drying costs, and moreover reduces the space due to the ground-flour spreading seeds. However, this type of processing produces large quantities of wastewater, which must be treated before being discharged into the sewage system. The main objective of this research was to monitor the stabilization pond, as part of a pilot system, and therefore, to evaluate its efficiency

  5. Effects of Aluminium in Forest. Results of a pilot experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, J.; Wit, H. de; Nygaard, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    This conference paper deals with an Norwegian pilot project which started in 1995 and finishing early 1999, investigates the solubility and phyto-toxicity of aluminium (Al) in mature forest ecosystems. The project consists of three major parts, including field manipulation study of Norwegian spruce stands, laboratory experiments and modelling Al chemistry in the root zone. 15 refs.

  6. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  7. Early childhood aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alink, Lenneke Rosalie Agnes

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the development, stability, and correlates of early childhood aggression were investigated. The normative development was examined in a general population sample using questionnaires completed by the parents of 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children and again one year later. Results

  8. Priming a Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus; Ie Pedersen, Maria

    Abstract. We report on the initial findings of an action research study about effects specifications. It is a part of larger IS pilot implementation project conducted in the Danish healthcare sector. Through interviews and a workshop we have identified and specified the main effects that comprise...

  9. Potential role of telemedical service centers in managing remote monitoring data transmitted daily by cardiac implantable electronic devices: results of the early detection of cardiovascular events in device patients with heart failure (detecT-Pilot) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Axel; Goette, Andreas; Perings, Christian; Nägele, Herbert; Konorza, Thomas; Spitzer, Wilhelm; Schulz, Sabine-Susan; von Bary, Christian; Hoffmann, Matthias; Albani, Marco; Sack, Stefan; Niederlöhner, Annegret; Lewalter, Thorsten

    2013-06-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) alone or combined with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-Ds) featuring automatic home monitoring (HM) function can be monitored remotely on a daily basis. Different ways of implementing HM into clinical routines are possible, with efficient patient management being the main objective. In this study, a concept using a telemedical service center (TmSC) to manage HM data was developed and investigated regarding patients' satisfaction, physicians' satisfaction, and alert filtering. Fifty-five ICD or CRT-D patients with symptomatic heart failure were enrolled. The TmSC received HM data, identified "actionable parameters" (APs) by following protocol-defined procedures, conducted structured patient interviews, and forwarded selected APs to the respective follow-up clinic. Satisfaction of patients and physicians with the TmSC was evaluated at the end of the study by purpose-designed questionnaires. During a mean follow-up of 402±200 days, 3,831 APs were identified and analyzed at the TmSC (5.28 per patient-month). Most APs were triggered by a pilot detection algorithm for worsening heart failure (2.80 per patient-month), followed by atrial tachyarrhythmia episodes (1.10 per patient-month) and ventricular pacing issues (0.87 per patient-month). The TmSC forwarded 682 APs (18% of all APs) to 10 study sites. Approximately 65% of physicians and patients deemed the TmSC improved patient care. The TmSC-based management concept was well accepted and appreciated by the majority of physicians and patients. It may be helpful in gaining symptomatic information on top of automatic HM data and in supporting smaller clinics in the follow-up of their device patients.

  10. Effects of malicious ocular laser exposure in commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakkamanil, Mathew M; Fielden, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Intentional malicious laser strikes on commercial pilots are committed by individuals who target a laser into airplane cockpits during takeoff and landing. Because laser exposure to pilots is a relatively new but growing occurrence, our study investigates the ocular effect of this laser exposure in pilots. Retrospective chart review by a single ophthalmologist. All commercial airline pilots (58 male, 3 female) who experienced a laser strike while flying between April 2012 and November 2014 who presented to our clinic were included. A retrospective chart review was performed in a retinal specialist's practice. Ocular assessment was performed within 3 days of laser exposure. A complete ophthalmic evaluation was conducted, including Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, colour vision, visual fields, intraocular pressure, slit-lamp examination, dilated fundus examination, colour fundus photographs, and ocular coherence tomography. Sixty-four laser strike incidents involving commercial pilots were included. All pilots in the study experienced some degree of immediate ocular irritation or light sensitivity. No definite cases of ocular damage were attributed to laser strikes. No pilot had any functional ocular deficits. Our study revealed that laser strikes on aircraft did not result in permanent visual functional or structural deficits. However, laser strikes cause immediate visual effects, including glare, flash blindness, and ocular irritation that can interfere with a pilot's visual function. Given the widespread accessibility of high-power lasers and the rapid increase in incidents, laser strikes threaten to jeopardize aviation safety unless effective preventative measures are put in place. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. GEANT JRA1-T2-D7.1 -Overview of SDN Pilot Description and Findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlidis, Adam; Mendiola, Alaitz; Kurbatov, Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    This document reports on SDN technology pilots utilising infrastructure deployed across the production GÉANT backbone in parallel to the infrastructure carrying production traffic. Technology pilots aim to verify the functionality and stability of novel, integrated software and hardware modules...... in a holistic way in an out-of-the-lab environment, while at the same time assessing the operational readiness of the SDN solutions....

  12. Research Data Curation Pilots: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Minor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2011, the UC San Diego Research Cyberinfrastructure (RCI Implementation Team invited researchers and research teams to participate in a research curation and data management pilot program. This invitation took the form of a campus-wide solicitation. More than two dozen applications were received and, after due deliberation, the RCI Oversight Committee selected five curation-intensive projects. These projects were chosen based on a number of criteria, including how they represented campus research, varieties of topics, researcher engagement, and the various services required. The pilot process began in September 2011, and will be completed in early 2014. Extensive lessons learned from the pilots are being compiled and are being used in the on-going design and implementation of the permanent Research Data Curation Program in the UC San Diego Library. In this paper, we present specific implementation details of these various services, as well as lessons learned. The program focused on many aspects of contemporary scholarship, including data creation and storage, description and metadata creation, citation and publication, and long term preservation and access. Based on the lessons learned in our processes, the Research Data Curation Program will provide a suite of services from which campus users can pick and choose, as necessary. The program will provide support for the data management requirements from national funding agencies.

  13. Removal of Algae in Stabilization Ponds Effluent using Moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of studies have proved natural coagulants achieve high turbidity removal in water treatment. A pilot scale study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of natural coagulant (moringa oleifera) with respect to algae removal. Required effluent from stabilization ponds was diverted into the horizontal baffle ...

  14. Pilot project as enabler?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, Margit; Glimø, Helle; Holm, Catrine Granzow

    pilot projects as enabler of transition. Aspects of how to create trust and deal with distrust during a transition are addressed. The transition in focus is the concept of New Public Management and how it is applied in the management of the Employment Service in Denmark. The transition regards......This article deals with a systemic perspective on transition. The field of study addressed is a pilot project as enabler of transition in a highly complex polycentric context. From a Luhmannian systemic approach, a framework is created to understand and address barriers of change occurred using...... the systemic change from a very control based and detailed regulated version of New Public Management towards a system allowing more flexibility and decentralized decision making empowering municipalities as well as employees own decision making...

  15. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  16. Agricultural Pilot's Audiological Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foltz, Lucas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The agricultural airplane pilot are daily exposed to intense noises, being susceptible to the noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL and its auditory and extra auditory effects. Objective: To analyze the audiological profile of this population, verifying the work's influence on its hearing. Method: It was realized a retrospective, individual, observational, and cross-sectional study through the data obtained by means of a questionnaire and audiometric thresholds of 41 agricultural pilots. To the statistical analysis were utilized the chi-square, Spearman, and Wilcoxon tests with significance level of 5%. Results: It was verified that 95,1% of the pilots use PPE ( personal protective equipment during flight and 58,5% have contact with pesticides. More than half of individuals referred to feel auditory and extra auditory symptoms, being the buzz the more frequent (29,1%. It has the occurrence of 29,3% of NIHL suggestive hearing loss and 68,3% of normality, taking this presence of unilateral notch in 24,4% and bilateral notch in 31,7%. It was found correlation statistically significant in the associations between time of service and the average of the acute frequencies in the right ear (p=0038, and in the left ear (p=0,010. It has a statistical tendency in the association between audiometric configuration and contact with pesticides (p=0,088. Conclusion: The hearing loss prevalence in this study was showed high. More than half of the sample has normal audiometric thresholds with notch configuration. Such data lead to the conclusion that the agricultural pilots, even with PPE use, they still suffer with the damages caused by noise, needing best proposals of hearing loss prevention.

  17. Orthogonal optimization of a water hydraulic pilot-operated pressure-reducing valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuyao; Wu, Chao; Li, Bin; Wu, Di

    2017-12-01

    In order to optimize the comprehensive characteristics of a water hydraulic pilot-operated pressure-reducing valve, numerical orthogonal experimental design was adopted. Six parameters of the valve, containing diameters of damping plugs, volume of spring chamber, half cone angle of main spool, half cone angle of pilot spool, mass of main spool and diameter of main spool, were selected as the orthogonal factors, and each factor has five different levels. An index of flowrate stability, pressure stability and pressure overstrike stability (iFPOS) was used to judge the merit of each orthogonal attempt. Embedded orthogonal process turned up and a final optimal combination of these parameters was obtained after totally 50 numerical orthogonal experiments. iFPOS could be low to a fairly low value which meant that the valve could have much better stabilities. During the optimization, it was also found the diameters of damping plugs and main spool played important roles in stability characteristics of the valve.

  18. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  19. Gender and family stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing trend of partnership disruption among families with children in recent decades has been accompanied by substantial changes in traditional gender roles in industrialized countries. Yet, relatively little is known about the effects of changing gender relations on family stability in the European context. In this paper, we study such gender influences at the familial and societal level in Sweden and Hungary between the mid-1960s and the early 1990s. We focus on the disruption of the first parental union (i.e. the union in which a couple's first child was born. Our analysis is based on data extracted from the Swedish and Hungarian Fertility and Family Surveys of 1992/93. We use the method of hazard regression. The results suggest (i that the establishment of the dual-earner family model influences family stability only if it is accompanied by some changes in traditional gender relations within the family, and (ii that women's and men's labor-market behavior have different effects in spite of the relatively long history of women's (also mothers' labor-force participation in both Sweden and Hungary.

  20. An experimental study of the effect of a pilot flame on technically pre-mixed, self-excited combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Bridget C.

    Combustion instabilities are a problem facing the gas turbine industry in the operation of lean, pre-mixed combustors. Secondary flames known as "pilot flames" are a common passive control strategy for eliminating combustion instabilities in industrial gas turbines, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame's stabilizing effect are not well understood. This dissertation presents an experimental study of a pilot flame in a single-nozzle, swirl-stabilized, variable length atmospheric combustion test facility and the effect of the pilot on combustion instabilities. A variable length combustor tuned the acoustics of the system to excite instabilities over a range of operating conditions without a pilot flame. The inlet velocity was varied from 25 -- 50 m/s and the equivalence ratio was varied from 0.525 -- 0.65. This range of operating conditions was determined by the operating range of the combustion test facility. Stability at each operating condition and combustor length was characterized by measurements of pressure oscillations in the combustor. The effect of the pilot flame on the magnitude and frequency of combustor stability was then investigated. The mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame effect were studied using chemiluminescence flame images of both stable and unstable flames. Stable flame structure was investigated using stable flame images of CH* chemiluminescence emission. The effect of the pilot on stable flame metrics such as flame length, flame angle, and flame width was investigated. In addition, a new flame metric, flame base distance, was defined to characterize the effect of the pilot flame on stable flame anchoring of the flame base to the centerbody. The effect of the pilot flame on flame base anchoring was investigated because the improved stability with a pilot flame is usually attributed to improved flame anchoring through the recirculation of hot products from the pilot to the main flame base. Chemiluminescence images

  1. Uptake of Radium-223 Dichloride and Early [18F]NaF PET Response Are Driven by Baseline [18F]NaF Parameters: a Pilot Study in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Arthur; Johnson, Alison C; Kit, Nicolas How; Savigny, Jean-François; Batalla, Alain; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Aide, Nicolas

    2017-10-12

    The purpose of this study is to identify predictive factors on baseline [ 18 F]NaF positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of early response to radium-223 dichloride after 3 cycles of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Analysis of 152 metastases was performed in six consecutive patients who underwent [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT at baseline and for early monitoring after 3 cycles of radium-223 dichloride. All metastases depicted on whole-body [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT were contoured and CT (density in Hounsfield units, sclerotic, mixed, or lytic appearance) as well as [ 18 F]NaF [maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), SUV mean , and lesion volume (V 18F-NaF )] patterns were recorded. Tumor response was defined as percentage change in SUV max and SUV mean between baseline and post-treatment PET. Bone lesions were defined as stable, responsive, or progressive, according to thresholds derived from a recent multicentre test-retest study in [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT. Total [ 18 F]NaF uptake in metastases, defined as MATV × SUV mean , was correlated to uptake of radium-223 on biodistribution scintigraphy performed 7 days after the first cycle of treatment. Among metastases, 116 involved the axial skeleton and 36 the appendicular skeleton. Lesions were sclerotic in 126 cases and mixed in 26 cases. No lytic lesion was depicted. ROC analysis showed that SUV max and SUV mean were better predictors of lesion response than V 18F-NaF and density on CT (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). SUV max and SUV mean were predictors of individual tumor response in separate multivariate models (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). CT pattern (mixed versus sclerotic) and lesion density were independent predictors only when assessing response with delta SUV max (P = 0.002 and 0.007, respectively). A good correlation between total [ 18 F]NaF uptake within metastases and their relative radium-223 uptake assessed by two observers 7

  2. Comparison between tapered and cylindrical implants in the posterior regions of the mandible: A prospective, randomized, split-mouth clinical trial focusing on implant stability changes during early healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waechter, Janine; Madruga, Marina de Matos; Carmo Filho, Luiz Carlos do; Leite, Fábio Renato Manzolli; Schinestsck, André Ribeiro; Faot, Fernanda

    2017-08-01

    Companies affirm that tapered implants show adequate initial stability, while their installation in the lower arch is uncommon in clinical practice. To compare the clinical outcomes of tapered and cylindrical implants and to study their effect on bone site characteristics and peri-implant health during healing. The implant site dimensions were assessed by linear measurements using CBCT prior to the installation of 40 implants in the posterior mandible (20 tapered and 20 cylindrical). The bone type was registered during drilling via the surgeon's tactile perception, following the classification of Lekholm and Zarb. Primary stability (PS) was determined by the insertion torque (IT) and the implant stability quotient (ISQ). Secondary stability (SS) and the peri-implant health was monitored for 3 months through the visible plaque index (VPI), the peri-implant inflammation (PI), the probing depth index (PDI), and the gingival bleeding index (GBI). Significant differences were investigated with t-tests for independent samples, chi-square tests or Fisher's exact test. Pearson's correlation test was used to investigate the relationship between the bone site characteristics and PS (IT and ISQ), as well as the relationships between IT and ISQ for each implant type. Tapered and cylindrical implants showed no significant differences for any outcome variable (P > .05). A significant decrease in ISQ was observed after 7 days of healing (P = .0002), followed by a gradual increase beginning at 21 days (P = .0010) until the last follow-up time at 90 days (P = .0319). The cortical height was correlated with IT; while medullary bone dimensions were correlated with the PS as evidenced by the ISQ values. The insertion torque was significantly correlated with the PS only for the cylindrical dental implants. Tapered and cylindrical implants have similar biological behavior during the healing process. Bone site characteristics can influence insertion torque and implant

  3. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  5. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Final results of a phase I/II pilot study of capecitabine with or without vinorelbine after sequential dose-dense epirubicin and paclitaxel in high-risk early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Volkmar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of the non-cross-resistant chemotherapeutic agents capecitabine and vinorelbine into an intensified dose-dense sequential anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimen in high-risk early breast cancer (EBC could improve efficacy, but this combination was not examined in this context so far. Methods Patients with stage II/IIIA EBC (four or more positive lymph nodes received post-operative intensified dose-dense sequential epirubicin (150 mg/m² every 2 weeks and paclitaxel (225 mg/m² every 2 weeks with filgrastim and darbepoetin alfa, followed by capecitabine alone (dose levels 1 and 3 or with vinorelbine (dose levels 2 and 4. Capecitabine was given on days 1-14 every 21 days at 1000 or 1250 mg/m2 twice daily (dose levels 1/2 and 3/4, respectively. Vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 was given on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day course (dose levels 2 and 4. Results Fifty-one patients were treated. There was one dose-limiting toxicity (DLT at dose level 1. At dose level 2 (capecitabine and vinorelbine, five of 10 patients experienced DLTs. Therefore evaluation of vinorelbine was abandoned and dose level 3 (capecitabine monotherapy was expanded. Hand-foot syndrome and diarrhoea were dose limiting with capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 twice daily. At 35.2 months' median follow-up, the estimated 3-year relapse-free and overall survival rates were 82% and 91%, respectively. Conclusions Administration of capecitabine monotherapy after sequential dose-dense epirubicin and paclitaxel is feasible in node-positive EBC, while the combination of capecitabine and vinorelbine as used here caused more DLTs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN38983527.

  7. A survey of the sleep status among military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-er WANG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the sleep habit, common sleep problems, level of daytime sleepiness, and sleep quality among military pilots during nighttime before flying. Methods  Random cluster sampling survey was conducted to complete the questionnaire for 1380 military pilots. Statistical analysis of data from the 1328 participants was conducted. Results  The mean nighttime sleep duration of pilots was 6.99h and the mean sleep duration during a 24-h period was 8.10h. Approximately 4.10% of the pilots slept less than 6h in a 24-h period. The incidence of moderate and severe snoring was 22.80%. The incidence of nocturnal awakening and/or early morning awakening and difficulty in initiating sleep ≥3 times/week among the pilots was 7.65% and 5.81%, respectively. Consequently, the incidence of nocturia was 4.03%. The mean score of the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS was 5.59±4.40. ESS scores of ≥11 were taken to represent excessive daytime sleepiness, the incidence of which was 14.99%. Further, the incidence of drowsiness during a flight was 14.20%. Among the respondents, 62.53% had changed in their normal sleep schedules and habits during the night before flying. Conclusions  Pilots have diverse sleep problems and their normal sleep habits change in the night before flying, which might affect flight safety. Therefore, proper intervention for the sleep problems is recommended in pilots.

  8. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  9. RECON Pilot Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Henriette D.

    One of the specific recommendations in the Retrospective Conversion (RECON) feasibility report (ED 032 895) was that a pilot project be established to test various conversion techniques, ideally covering the highest priority material (English-language monograph records from 1960-68). A two-year pilot project was initiated in August 1969. This…

  10. Dump Truck Stability During Unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Baryshnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of stability of the truck while unloading. The main symptom is a loss of stability of a vehicle rollover. The most common vehicle rollover occurs when unloading on sloped sites. The unloading area can be both longitudinal and cross slope. In this regard, the main task of the calculation is to determine the stability of the car the maximum allowable angle of discharge site and loads acting on the bearing system of the car.The paper presents a developed mathematical model of the truck when unloading on the longitudinal slope. It also offers the procedure of the step change in the parameters for the calculation of the critical angle of the site. The formulas for calculating the force interaction platform and the support system in the truck unloading at the site with a longitudinal slope are given. On the basis of the developed technique, a program for calculating longitudinal stability and loads acting on the bearing system dump trucks is created.Modern methods to assess stability while unloading the truck on a cross slope are analyzed. It is noted that the solution of this problem is developing in two directions. The first approach involves the testing truck samples on the special stands. Examples of bench tests on the stability of trucks are given. Another approach uses computational methods for the study. However, this requires the creation of a complex mathematical model of the truck, which should take into account the structural features of the suspension, the nonlinear elastic suspension components and tires, as well as the possibility of plastic deformation of the support system in torsion. In this formulation, the problem can only be solved using numerical methods and may be the subject of further research.The proposed approach allows multiple calculations for truck strength and stability already at an early designing stage in order to find the optimal design solution.

  11. {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT as an imaging tool for early prediction of pathological response in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crippa, Flavio; Padovano, Barbara; Alessi, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Emilio; Pascali, Claudio; Bogni, Anna [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Agresti, Roberto; Maugeri, Ilaria; Rampa, Mario; Martelli, Gabriele [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Breast Surgery Unit; Sandri, Marco [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Molecular Targeting Unit; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia; De Braud, Filippo [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Medical Oncology Unit; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Pathology Unit; Trecate, Giovanna [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Radiology-RMI Unit

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT PET) can predict the final postoperative histopathological response in primary breast cancer after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). In this prospective cohort study of 15 patients with locally advanced operable breast cancer, FLT PET evaluations were performed before NCT, after the first cycle of NCT, and at the end of NCT. All patients subsequently underwent surgery. Variables from FLT PET examinations were correlated with postoperative histopathological results. At baseline, median of maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) in the groups showing a complete pathological response (pCR) + residual cancer burden (RCB) I, RCB II or RCB III did not differ significantly for the primary tumour (5.0 vs. 2.9 vs. 8.9, p = 0.293) or for axillary nodes (7.9 vs. 1.6 vs. 7.0, p = 0.363), whereas the Spearman correlation between SUV{sub max} and Ki67 proliferation rate index was significant (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). Analysis of the relative percentage change of SUV{sub max}in the primary tumour (∇SUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1})) and axillary nodes (∇SUVN{sub max}(t{sub 1})) after the first NCT cycle showed that the power of ∇SUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1}) to predict pCR + RCB I responses (AUC = 0.91, p < 0.001) was statistically significant, whereas ∇SUVN{sub max}(t{sub 1}) had a moderate ability (AUC = 0.77, p = 0.119) to separate subjects with ΔSUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1}) > -52.9 % into two groups: RCB III patients and a heterogeneous group that included RCB I and RCB II patients. A predictive score μ based on ΔSUVT{sub max}(t{sub 1}) and ΔSUVN{sub max}(t{sub 1}) parameters is proposed. The preliminary findings of the present study suggest the potential utility of FLT PET scans for early monitoring of response to NCT and to formulate a therapeutic strategy consistent with the estimated efficacy of NCT. However, these results in a small patient population

  12. Greek In-Service and Preservice Teachers' Views about Bullying in Early Childhood Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psalti, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the plethora of studies regarding bullying worldwide, there are limited studies at the early childhood level. This article presents the results of a pilot study aiming at exploring preservice and in-service early childhood teachers' views on bullying in Greek early childhood settings. A total of 192 early childhood teachers completed a…

  13. Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.R.; Perry, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.

  14. Comparison between tapered and cylindrical implants in the posterior regions of the mandible: A prospective, randomized, split-mouth clinical trial focusing on implant stability changes during early healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waechter, Janine; Madruga, Marina de Mattos; Carmo Filho, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Companies affirm that tapered implants show adequate initial stability, while their installation in the lower arch is uncommon in clinical practice. PURPOSE: To compare the clinical outcomes of tapered and cylindrical implants and to study their effect on bone site characteristics and...... correlated with the PS only for the cylindrical dental implants. CONCLUSIONS: Tapered and cylindrical implants have similar biological behavior during the healing process. Bone site characteristics can influence insertion torque and implant stability.......BACKGROUND: Companies affirm that tapered implants show adequate initial stability, while their installation in the lower arch is uncommon in clinical practice. PURPOSE: To compare the clinical outcomes of tapered and cylindrical implants and to study their effect on bone site characteristics...... and peri-implant health during healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The implant site dimensions were assessed by linear measurements using CBCT prior to the installation of 40 implants in the posterior mandible (20 tapered and 20 cylindrical). The bone type was registered during drilling via the surgeon...

  15. Live Piloting and Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rizzo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents current trends in service design research concerning large scale projects aimed at generating changes at a local scale. The strategy adopted to achieve this, is to co-design solutions including future users in the development process, prototyping and testing system of products and services before their actual implementation. On the basis of experience achieved in the European Project Life 2.0, this paper discusses which methods and competencies are applied in the development of these projects, eliciting the lessons learnt especially from the piloting phase in which the participatory design (PD approach plays a major role. In the first part, the topic is introduced jointly with the theoretical background where the user center design and participatory design methods are presented; then the Life 2.0 project development is described; finally the experience is discussed from a service design perspective, eliciting guidelines for piloting and prototyping services in a real context of use. The paper concludes reflecting on the designers’ role and competencies needed in this process.

  16. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    CERN Document Server

    Stagni, F; McNab, A; Luzzi, C

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be s...

  17. Identity Formation in Adolescence: Change or Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimstra, Theo A.; Hale, William W., III; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Branje, Susan J. T.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this five-wave longitudinal study of 923 early to middle adolescents (50.7% boys; 49.3% girls) and 390 middle to late adolescents (43.3% boys and 56.7% girls) is to provide a comprehensive view on change and stability in identity formation from ages 12 to 20. Several types of change and stability (i.e., mean-level change, rank-order…

  18. Fuel effects on the stability of turbulent flames with compositionally inhomogeneous inlets

    KAUST Repository

    Guiberti, T. F.

    2016-10-11

    This paper reports an analysis of the influence of fuels on the stabilization of turbulent piloted jet flames with inhomogeneous inlets. The burner is identical to that used earlier by the Sydney Group and employs two concentric tubes within the pilot stream. The inner tube, carrying fuel, can be recessed, leading to a varying degree of inhomogeneity in mixing with the outer air stream. Three fuels are tested: dimethyl ether (DME), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and compressed natural gas (CNG). It is found that improvement in flame stability at the optimal compositional inhomogeneity is highest for CNG and lowest for DME. Three possible reasons for this different enhancement in stability are investigated: mixing patterns, pilot effects, and fuel chemistry. Numerical simulations realized in the injection tube highlight similarities and differences in the mixing patterns for all three fuels and demonstrate that mixing cannot explain the different stability gains. Changing the heat release rates from the pilot affects the three fuels in similar ways and this also implies that the pilot stream is unlikely to be responsible for the observed differences. Fuel reactivity is identified as a key factor in enhancing stability at some optimal compositional inhomogeneity. This is confirmed by inference from joint images of PLIF-OH and PLIF-CHO, collected at a repetition rate of 10kHz in turbulent flames of DME, and from one-dimensional calculations of laminar flames using detailed chemistry for DME, CNG, and LPG.

  19. 33 CFR 385.12 - Pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pilot projects. 385.12 Section... Processes § 385.12 Pilot projects. (a) The Plan includes pilot projects to address uncertainties associated... management, and wastewater reuse. The purpose of the pilot projects is to develop information necessary to...

  20. Pilot Model Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Matsubara, Genyo; Nakamura, Takeshi

    The motion of an aircraft controlled by a pilot is decided depending on the characteristics of a man-machine system. Although analysis and investigation are usually performed using a mathematical model of the aircraft including the control system, a method for making a mathematical model of the pilot, which is necessary for the analysis and study of man-machine systems, has not been established. Although a method for constructing a mathematical model of a pilot using a transfer function 1) has been reported, it is thought that a more accurate and more flexible pilot model may be obtained by applying a neural network (NN). Therefore, various studies have examined a pilot model to which a NN has been applied. As a result, it has been clarified that the application of a NN to a pilot model provides better performance compared to the case of applying a transfer function. Moreover, it has also been clarified that a single versatile pilot model, which can deal with various conditions, can be obtained by applying a NN and studying the control results under various conditions.

  1. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  2. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  3. Idiopathic Syringomyelia in a Military Helicopter Pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemer, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    A syrinx is a fluid-filled cavity within the spinal cord. They can lead to a variety of symptoms, including limb weakness and back pain. Incidental finding of syringomyelia provides a challenge for clinicians due to the wide variety of possible symptoms. In military aviation, neurological findings in pilots can result in extensive investigation that can lead to potentially invasive management. Conversely, the potential for chronic progression of a spinal syrinx and subsequent neurological deterioration makes early identification critical. Ultimately, the discovery of a lesion may have implications for flying status and operational capability. A 25-yr-old man working as a navy Seahawk helicopter pilot presented with episodes of right arm paraesthesia and pain between the scapulae. On at least one occasion, these symptoms woke him at night. Upon magnetic resonance imaging, dilatation of the central canal in a syrinx-like pattern in the lower cervical region was noted. Neurology review suggested the finding was persistent and unlikely to be responsible for his symptoms. No surgical input was recommended. His symptoms were attributed to mild cervical spondylosis, which resolved with ongoing physiotherapy, and he was returned to flying status. This case highlights several issues involved with the incidental finding of a syringomyelia. Surgical intervention has been known to worsen symptoms. Conversely, studies have identified minimal radiological progression in cases of idiopathic syringomyelia, with fewer individuals displaying neurological deterioration. For aircrew, potentially unnecessary neurosurgical intervention poses risks to a flying career and overall operational capability.Schiemer A. Idiopathic syringomyelia in a military helicopter pilot. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(10):962-965.

  4. OPTIMASI POSISI PILOT MENGGUNAKAN ALGORITMA GENETIKA UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KINERJA Wi-Fi 802.11n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyul Amien Syafei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wi-Fi is wireless communication technology that  used widely not only for accessing the internet but also communicating data, image, voice and video. The newest wi-fi technology is 802.11n as an extention of 802.11a/b/g. By  combining OFDM and MIMO techniques it can provide throughput up to 600Mbps. One of important factors to achieve such high throughput is the pilot position in training sequence. Wi-fi802.11n allocates it’s pilots orthogonally. This research optimizes the pilot location using Genetic Algorithm Differential Evolution. Optimum pilot position improves the accuracy of synchronization which leads to enhance the performance. The invented optimum pilot position set then be implemented into wi-fi 802.11n simulator to be analyzed the performance enhancement which represented in grafic BER vs SNR curve.Run test under channel model B and D proof that the invented optimum pilot position gives performance enhancement of 0,5 dB and maintain it’s stability compared towi-fi 802.11n system with  set ortogonal pilot position.

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Douglas James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-27

    The mission of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to demonstrate the safe, environmentally sound, cost effective, permanent disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste left from production of nuclear weapons.

  6. US Daily Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot Balloon observational forms for the United States. Taken by Weather Bureau and U.S. Army observers. Period of record 1918-1960. Records scanned from the NCDC...

  7. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  8. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  9. [Study on relationship between emotional stability in flight and nerve system excitability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Huang, Wei-fen; Jing, Xiao-lu; Zhang, Ping

    2003-06-01

    To study the related factors of emotional stability in flight. Based on the operable definition of emotional stability in flight and the related literature review, 63 experienced pilots and flight coaches were investigated and the other-rating questionnaire of emotional stability in flight was established. To test the senior nerve system, Uchida Kraeplin (UK) test was administrated on 153 19-21 years old male student pilots of the second grade in the department of flight technique in China Civil Aviation College, who were selected through 13 h flight, 35 h solo flight, and acted as the standardization group. In the end, the correlation was explored between the testing results and their emotional behavioral characteristics in flight. Significant positive correlation was found between emotional feature indexes of emotional stability in flight and excitability in UK test. The excitability in UK test are good predictors for emotional stability in flight.

  10. PC11 PILOT Reference Manual,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    file management , text editing and other features of the EXEC were used to prepare PILOT programs. These features of the EXEC are described in the...on the EXEC and ECL commands. Section 2.1.2 describes ECL commands pertinent to PCIIT PILOT. 2.1.1 Executive Control Language Fundamantals 2.1.1.1...some microcomputers compatible with it. The file management , text editing and other features of the IBM Disk Operating System (DOS) were used to

  11. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  12. Pilot study on infant swimming classes and early motor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jorge A B de S; Manoel, Edison de J; Dias, Roberta B de M; Okazaki, Victor H A

    2013-12-01

    Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) scores were examined before and after four months of swimming classes in 12 babies (ages 7 to 9 mo.) assigned to Experimental (n = 6) and Control (n = 6) groups matched on age and developmental status. Infants from both groups improved their developmental status from pre- to post-test; the Experimental group improved on mean percentile rank. The sample size and the discriminative power of the AIMS do not allow conclusive judgments on these group differences, hence on the effect of infant swimming classes. Nevertheless, a number of recommendations are made for future studies on the effect of swimming classes on infant motor development.

  13. Stability of parallel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Betchov, R

    2012-01-01

    Stability of Parallel Flows provides information pertinent to hydrodynamical stability. This book explores the stability problems that occur in various fields, including electronics, mechanics, oceanography, administration, economics, as well as naval and aeronautical engineering. Organized into two parts encompassing 10 chapters, this book starts with an overview of the general equations of a two-dimensional incompressible flow. This text then explores the stability of a laminar boundary layer and presents the equation of the inviscid approximation. Other chapters present the general equation

  14. Toronto hybrid taxi pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, M.; Marans, B.

    2009-10-01

    This paper provided details of a hybrid taxi pilot program conducted to compare the on-road performance of Toyota Camry hybrid vehicles against conventional vehicles over a 1-year period in order to determine the business case and air emission reductions associated with the use of hybrid taxi cabs. Over 750,000 km worth of fuel consumption was captured from 10 Toyota Camry hybrids, a Toyota Prius, and 5 non-hybrid Camry vehicles over an 18-month period. The average real world fuel consumption for the taxis demonstrated that the Toyota Prius has the lowest cost of ownership, while the non-hybrid Camry has the highest cost of ownership. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) reductions associated with the 10 Camry hybrid taxis were calculated at 236 tonnes over a 7-year taxi service life. Results suggested that the conversion of Toronto's 5680 taxis would yield annual CO 2 emission reductions of over 19,000 tonnes. All hybrid purchasers identified themselves as highly likely to purchase a hybrid again. 5 tabs., 9 figs.

  15. Feedback stabilization initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes

  16. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  17. Impaired postural stability after laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, K Z; Staehr-Rye, A K; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early postoperative mobilisation may reduce patient morbidity and improve hospital efficiency by accelerated discharge. The aim of this study was to measure postural stability early after laparoscopic surgery in order to assess how early it is safe to mobilise and discharge patients....... METHODS: We included 25 women undergoing outpatient gynaecological laparoscopic surgery in the study. Patients received standardised anaesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. Postural stability was assessed preoperatively, at 30 min after tracheal extubation, and at discharge from the post......-anaesthesia care unit using a force platform where sway area, mean sway and sway velocity were determined. The assessments were done with eyes closed and with eyes open. The primary outcome was the change in sway area with eyes closed 30 min after extubation. Data are reported as median (25-75% range). RESULTS...

  18. Health Equity Pilot Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    and diet beyond early years • Physical activity (and sedentary behaviour) In each case, reviews of the literature were conducted on the impact and efficiency of policies and actions on health inequalities related to these lifestyle determinants, including evidence on the effectiveness and efficiency...... of interventions in reducing inequalities as well as the existing behavioural economics literature. Topics covered Nutrition and diet in the first 1000 days • Socio-economic status and breastfeeding up to 6 months • Socio-economic status and childhood obesity at different ages Nutrition and diet beyond early years......: inequities in power, money and resources. They argued that social and economic inequalities underpin the determinants of health: the range of interacting factors that shape health and well-being. Recent analyses of health inequalities and their causes in Europe have supported the findings of the CSDH...

  19. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot... U.S. Armed Forces undergraduate pilot training school and received a rating qualification as a... person graduated from a military undergraduate pilot training school from the Armed Forces from a foreign...

  20. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ...] Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Receipt and Acceptance for Review: Preliminary Application for Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Florida... Airport's preliminary application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received...

  1. Pilot 2002 Environmental Performance Index (EPI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pilot 2002 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) is designed to measure current environmental status at the national scale. The Pilot 2002 EPI derives from a...

  2. Evolution of the early Antarctic ice ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebrand, Diederik; de Bakker, Anouk T M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371573734; Beddow, Helen M; Wilson, Paul A; Bohaty, Steven M; Ruessink, Gerben|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/169093360; Pälike, Heiko; Batenburg, Sietske J; Hilgen, Frederik J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102639876; Hodell, David A; Huck, Claire E; Kroon, Dick; Raffi, Isabella; Saes, Mischa J M; van Dijk, Arnold E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341412082; Lourens, Lucas J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125023103

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the stability of the early Antarctic ice cap in the geological past is of societal interest because present-day atmospheric CO2 concentrations have reached values comparable to those estimated for the Oligocene and the Early Miocene epochs. Here we analyze a new high-resolution

  3. [Human thrombin: drug stability and stabilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodzeĭskaia, M V; Sokolovskiĭ, V A; Volkov, G L

    2006-01-01

    Stabilization of enzymes is a key factor when using biocatalysis in practice. Each enzyme stability depends both on the structure of its molecule and on the effect of various environmental factors, thus, one of the methods of the enzyme stability preservation is the formation of optimal macromedium. Thus, water structure and enzyme hydration change in the presence of solvable additives that affects its stability and catalytic properties. The paper deals with a new method of stabilization of human thrombin developed by the authors. It is proposed to use some known organic-ligands which have ion group and different nonpolar hydrophobic groups instead of traditional additives (salts, aminoacids, polyols, polyethylene glycols etc.). Thrombin stabilization proceeds in the conditions something changed compared with traditional ones. Processes of thrombin stabilization by the above compound have been investigated, enzyme stability at different temperatures and long-term storage of diluted solutions of the preparation in different conditions have been studied. It has been established that rosselin and orange II are the most efficient ligands. Optimal finite concentrations of stabilizing agents make approximately 0.0012-0.0014 M which are rather low in the system thrombin-ligand. It has been found that diluted solutions of thrombin are more stable, than concentrated ones. In the latter case the process of autolysis is included that affects negatively the catalytic effect of the enzyme, as far as there occurs the change of thrombin molecule structure, especially of thrombin beta-chain sections, evoking conformational changes of some sites of its active centre. The experiments directed to increasing thrombin intensity in the presence of organic ligands rosselin and orange II are discussed in details. Special attention is given to autolytic method of thrombin inactivation. It is admitted on the basis of already obtained data that thrombin binding with organic ligands proceeds

  4. Personality profiles and stress-coping strategies of Slovenian military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Meško

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a pilot also depends on the pilot's personality profile and their stresscoping style. In our study we aimed to analyze, by means of the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ and the Coping Responses Inventory (CRI, the personality profiles, stress-coping strategies and the relationship between them among Slovenian military pilots. The study involved 120 respondents: 30 of whom were military pilots in the experimental group, while the other 90 were in the control groups. The control groups included sport pilots, the general population and soldiers with no involvement in aviation. The members of the control group were selected with regard to the characteristics of the experimental group members, so that both groups were equivalent in terms of relevant factors (e.g. gender, age, health state, level of education etc, thus participating in a study of equivalent pairs. A statistical analysis identified statistically significant differences between the groups in the following BFQ dimensions: energy, conscientiousness and emotional stability; in the dimensions of CRI 'cognitive avoidance' (cognitive effort to avoid realistic consideration of a problem; and 'emotional discharge or emptying' (behavioural attempts to alleviate tension by venting negative emotions. Results revealed that certain personality characteristics were differentially and significantly related to specific stress coping strategies adopted by military pilots.

  5. Wind-tunnel investigation of an armed mini remotely piloted vehicle. [conducted in Langley V/STOL tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, A. E., III

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a full scale remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) armed with rocket launchers was conducted. The model had unacceptable longitudinal stability characteristics at negative angles of attack in the original design configuration. The addition of a pair of fins mounted in a V arrangement on the propeller shroud resulted in a configuration with acceptable longitudinal stability characteristics. The addition of wing mounted external stores to the modified configuration resulted in a slight reduction in the longitudinal stability. The lateral directional characteristics of the model were generally good, but the model had low directional stability at low angles of attack. Aerodynamic control power was very strong around all three axes.

  6. PIO I-II tendencies. Part 2. Improving the pilot modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is conceived in two parts and aims to get some contributions to the problem ofPIO aircraft susceptibility analysis. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the mainsteps of deriving a complex model of human pilot. The current Part II of the paper considers a properprocedure of the human pilot mathematical model synthesis in order to analyze PIO II typesusceptibility of a VTOL-type aircraft, related to the presence of position and rate-limited actuator.The mathematical tools are those of semi global stability theory developed in recent works.

  7. 48 CFR 212.7002 - Pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilot program. 212.7002... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Pilot Program for Transition to Follow-On Contracting After Use of Other Transaction Authority 212.7002 Pilot program. ...

  8. 7 CFR 1955.132 - Pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pilot projects. 1955.132 Section 1955.132 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.132 Pilot projects. FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 may conduct pilot projects to test policies and...

  9. Ergonomic evaluation of pilot oxygen mask designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, W.; Yang, Xiaopeng; Jung, Daehan; Park, Seikwon; Kim, Heeeun; You, Heecheon

    2018-01-01

    A revised pilot oxygen mask design was developed for better fit to the Korean Air Force pilots’ faces. The present study compared an existing pilot oxygen mask and a prototype of the revised mask design with 88 Korean Air Force pilots in terms of subjective discomfort, facial contact pressure,

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Airline Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Dana; Conlon, Helen Acree

    2018-02-01

    The health of an airline pilot is imperative to the safe travels of millions of people worldwide. Medical providers evaluate the cardiovascular risks for airline pilots and the medical requirements to obtain and maintain licensure as an airline pilot. It is the role of the occupational health nurse practitioner to evaluate and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population.

  11. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Pava

    Full Text Available The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184 or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506 produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability. Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1 receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis.

  12. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Matthew J; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis.

  13. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Matthew J.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis. PMID:27031992

  14. Internet Addiction: Stability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined five indices of stability and change in Internet addiction: structural stability, mean-level stability, differential stability, individual-level stability, and ipsative stability. The study sample was 351 undergraduate students from end of freshman year to end of junior year. Convergent findings revealed stability…

  15. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author at the Uni......This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author...... and their derivation, thus stimulating them to write interactive and dynamic programs to analyze instability and vibrational modes....

  16. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    to life at high temperatures so are their enzymes, as a result the high stability is accompanied by low activity at moderate temperatures. Thus, much effort had been put into decoding the mechanisms behind the high stability of the thermophilic enzymes. The hope is to enable scientist to design enzymes...... in the high stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. The thesis starts with an introduction to the field of protein and enzyme stability with special focus on the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes and proteins. After the introduction three original research manuscripts present the experimental data...

  17. Early literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from the Danish contribution to the EASE project, a European research project running from 2008 to 2010 on early literacy in relation to the transition from childcare to school. It explores a holistic, inclusive approach to early literacy that resists a narrow...... and schools. The paper also draws on Gee’s (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008) sociocultural approach to literacy, and Honneth’s (2003, 2006) concept of recognition. Emphasizing participation and recognition as key elements, it claims that stakeholders in early liter- acy must pay attention to how diverse early literacy...... opportunities empower children, especially when these opportunities are employed in a project-based learning environ- ment in which each child is able to contribute to the shared literacy events....

  18. Descrição, produtividade e estabilidade da cultivar de soja IAC-23, resistente a insetos Description, yield and stability of early soybean insect resistant cultivar IAC-23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Albino Coelho de Miranda

    2003-01-01

    Ribeirão Preto (1996/97; and Campinas (1998/99. Conclusive trials were conducted in randomized blocks with four replications. This cultivar shows long juveniIe period, flowering time at 43 days, and complete life cicle around 106 days after seed germination, with plant height about 67 cm. The average yield was 3017 kg.ha-1. Plants show brown pubescence, yellow seeds with brown hilum. The new cultivar is resistant to: bacterial pustule (Xanthomonas campestris pv. glycines, wildfire (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, stem canker (Phomopsis phaseoli f.sp. meridionalis and soybean mosaic birus (SMV. IAC-23 productivity, large stability and resistance levels to leaf and pod feeders insects is similar to that observed for IAC-17, and superior to that of IAS-5. The cultivar IAC-23 is then recommended for cultivation in the State of São Paulo and in similar environmental conditions.

  19. Improving Sunflower Halva Stability and Texture by Controlling Tahini Particle Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad Mureşan; Lucian Cuibus; Anna Olari; Emil Racolţa; Carmen Socaciu; Sabine Danthine; Sevastița Muste; Christophe Blecker

    2015-01-01

    Sunflower halva is an appreciated product, but shows currently a quality below the expectations of the new generation of consumers, having a hard texture and oil exuded on the surface (low stability). The aim of this work was to assess the influence of tahini particle size on sunflower halva texture and stability. Eight different particle size sunflower tahini samples were produced at pilot plant scale, the higher the number of passes through the colloidal mill, the smaller the particle size ...

  20. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao X.; Hover John; Wlodek Tomasz; Wenaus Torre; Frey Jaime; Tannenbaum Todd; Livny Miron

    2011-01-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA 'AutoPilot' scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  1. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Hover, John; Wlodek, Tomasz; Wenaus, Torre; Frey, Jaime; Tannenbaum, Todd; Livny, Miron

    2011-01-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA 'AutoPilot' scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  2. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  3. Coastal Piloting & Charting: Navigation 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Alison

    This curriculum guide for a beginning course on marine navigation describes marine navigation (the art of and science of determining position of a ship and its movement from one position to another in order to keep track of where the ship is and where it is going) and defines dead reckoning, piloting, electronic navigation, and celestial…

  4. Compilation of Pilot Personality Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Weaknesses of Typical Air Force Pilots in 1968 (Ref 5). Their compiled norms on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory ( MMPI ) were subsequently...often confused and have difficulty concentrating. .73 Borderline Features (BOR) Measures many elements relating to severe personality disorders...Battery-Second Edition MMPI Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory NEO PI-R Revised NEO Personality Inventory PAI Personality

  5. Synchronous municipal sewerage-sludge stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukuru, Godefroid; Jian, Yang

    2005-01-01

    A study on a pilot plant accomplishing synchronous municipal sewerage-sludge stabilization was conducted at a municipal sewerage treatment plant. Stabilization of sewerage and sludge is achieved in three-step process: anaerobic reactor, roughing filter and a microbial-earthworm-ecofilter. The integrated ecofilter utilizes an artificial ecosystem to degrade and stabilize the sewerage and sludge. When the hydraulic retention time(HRT) of the anaerobic reactor is 6 h, the hydraulic load(HL) of the bio-filter is 16 m3/(m2 x d), the HL of the eco-filter is 5 m3/(m2 x d), the recycle ratio of nitrified liquor is 1.5, the removal efficiency is 83%-89% for COD(Cr), 94%-96% for BOD5, 96%-98% for SS, and 76%-95% for NH3-N. The whole system realizes the zero emission of sludge, and has the characteristics of saving energy consumption and operational costs.

  6. Conformational stability of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.S.; Trandum, C.; Larsen, N.

    2005-01-01

    The conformational stability of calreticulin was investigated. Apparent unfolding temperatures (T-m) increased from 31 degrees C at pH 5 to 51 degrees C at pH 9, but electrophoretic analysis revealed that calreticulin oligomerized instead of unfolding. Structural analyses showed that the single C......-terminal a-helix was of major importance to the conformational stability of calreticulin....

  7. Structural Stability and Vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Sine Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    This book offers an integrated introduction to the topic of stability and vibration. Strikingly, it describes stability as a function of boundary conditions and eigenfrequency as a function of both boundary conditions and column force. Based on a post graduate course held by the author...

  8. Microwave stability at transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Colestock, P.L.

    1995-05-01

    The question of microwave stability at transition is revisited using a Vlasov approach retaining higher order terms in the particle dynamics near the transition energy. A dispersion relation is derived which can be solved numerically for the complex frequency in terms of the longitudinal impedance and other beam parameters. Stability near transition is examined and compared with simulation results

  9. Visual attention and stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathot, Sebastiaan; Theeuwes, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In the present review, we address the relationship between attention and visual stability. Even though with each eye, head and body movement the retinal image changes dramatically, we perceive the world as stable and are able to perform visually guided actions. However, visual stability is not as

  10. Conformational stability of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Trandum, Christa; Larsen, Nanna Brink

    2005-01-01

    The conformational stability of calreticulin was investigated. Apparent unfolding temperatures (Tm) increased from 31 degrees C at pH 5 to 51 degrees C at pH 9, but electrophoretic analysis revealed that calreticulin oligomerized instead of unfolding. Structural analyses showed that the single C......-terminal alpha-helix was of major importance to the conformational stability of calreticulin....

  11. Postural stability after inguinal herniorrhaphy under local infiltration anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, F; Kristensen, Billy Bjarne; Lund, Claus

    2001-01-01

    . RESULTS: Dynamic postural stability was impaired 30 min (p pain in one and an attack of asthma in the other. Balance also returned to normal within an hour. CONCLUSION......OBJECTIVE: To investigate postural stability in patients after inguinal herniorrhaphy under local infiltration anaesthesia, to see if the anaesthetics and analgesics used influenced it and therefore hindered early discharge. DESIGN: Open study. SETTING: Teaching hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 55...... with polypropylene mesh repair (Prolene). Measurement of postural stability before operation and 30 and 60 minutes afterwards using the "Basic Balance Master" system, and balance assessed by visual analogue scale and verbal rating scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postural stability and subjectively assessed balance...

  12. The statistical stability phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Igor I

    2017-01-01

    This monograph investigates violations of statistical stability of physical events, variables, and processes and develops a new physical-mathematical theory taking into consideration such violations – the theory of hyper-random phenomena. There are five parts. The first describes the phenomenon of statistical stability and its features, and develops methods for detecting violations of statistical stability, in particular when data is limited. The second part presents several examples of real processes of different physical nature and demonstrates the violation of statistical stability over broad observation intervals. The third part outlines the mathematical foundations of the theory of hyper-random phenomena, while the fourth develops the foundations of the mathematical analysis of divergent and many-valued functions. The fifth part contains theoretical and experimental studies of statistical laws where there is violation of statistical stability. The monograph should be of particular interest to engineers...

  13. Stability and activity of anaerobic sludge from UASB reactors treating sewage in subtropical regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seghezzo, L.; Cuevas, C.M.; Trupiano, A.P.; Guerra, R.G.; Gonzalez, S.M.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2006-01-01

    The production of small amounts of well-stabilized biological sludge is one of the main advantages of upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors over aerobic wastewater treatment systems. In this work, sludge produced in three pilot-scale UASB reactors used to treat sewage under subtropical

  14. Pilot mental workload: how well do pilots really perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Charles H; Leung, Ying K

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing mental demands on various aspects of aircrew performance. In particular, the robustness of the prioritization and allocation hierarchy of aviate-navigate-communicate was examined, a hierarchy commonly used within the aviation industry. A total of 42 trainee pilots were divided into three workload groups (low, medium, high) to complete a desktop, computer-based exercise that simulated combinations of generic flight deck activities: flight control manipulation, rule-based actions and higher level cognitive processing, in addition to Air Traffic Control instructions that varied in length from one chunk of auditory information to seven chunks. It was found that as mental workload and auditory input increased, participants experienced considerable difficulty in carrying out the primary manipulation task. A similar decline in prioritization was also observed. Moreover, when pilots were under a high mental workload their ability to comprehend more than two chunks of auditory data deteriorated rapidly.

  15. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability.

  16. Postural stability in young and old women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    USE OF VARIABILITY, SPEED AND ACCELERATION PARAMETERS TO EVALUATE POSTURAL BALANCE IN OLD VS YOUNG INDIVIDUALS   Jørgensen MG1,3, Larsen AH3, Caserotti P2,3, Nielsen OBF1, Aagaard P3   1Geriatric Department and Fall Clinic, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg Hospital; 2National Institute on Aging......, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense   INTRODUCTION: Poor postural balance control (stability) is one of the major risk factors for falling. If individuals at risk of falling are to be identified...... at an early stage, good knowledge and sensitive measurements of postural stability are essential. In addition, in order to develop effective intervention strategies such knowledge is of major importance. However, no single postural stability parameter has effectively been able to identify individuals at risk...

  17. Gravity stabilizes itself

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-08-15

    We show that a possible resolution to the stabilization of an extra spatial dimension (radion) can be obtained solely in the context of gravitational dynamics itself without the necessity of introducing any external stabilizing field. In this scenario the stabilized value of the radion field gets determined in terms of the parameters appearing in the higher curvature gravitational action. Furthermore, the mass of the radion field and its coupling to the standard model fields are found to be in the weak scale implying possible signatures in the TeV scale colliders. Some resulting implications are also discussed. (orig.)

  18. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    was yet no experimental method for counting the num- ber of molecules in a given volume of gas which would allow direct verification of Avogadro's hypothesis. 6. Periodic Properties of Elements. By the early 19th century, about fifty elements had been discovered and their properties investigated. Based on these studies ...

  19. Early intervention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family conflict.12 We also know that the effects of violence exposure are likely magnified in unstable ... and how chronic 'toxic stress' may lead to difficulties in self-regulation, poor control of emotions, and ... High levels of violence affect every family in South Africa. Exposure to violence starts early, in both the home.

  20. The validity and reliability of a dynamic neuromuscular stabilization-heel sliding test for core stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Young Joo; Lee, Jae Jin; Kim, Do Hyun; You, Joshua Sung H

    2017-10-23

    Core stabilization plays an important role in the regulation of postural stability. To overcome shortcomings associated with pain and severe core instability during conventional core stabilization tests, we recently developed the dynamic neuromuscular stabilization-based heel sliding (DNS-HS) test. The purpose of this study was to establish the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of the novel DNS-HS test. Twenty young adults with core instability completed both the bilateral straight leg lowering test (BSLLT) and DNS-HS test for the criterion validity study and repeated the DNS-HS test for the test-retest reliability study. Criterion validity was determined by comparing hip joint angle data that were obtained from BSLLT and DNS-HS measures. The test-retest reliability was determined by comparing hip joint angle data. Criterion validity was (ICC2,3) = 0.700 (pTest-retest reliability was (ICC3,3) = 0.953 (pvalidity data demonstrated a good relationship between the gold standard BSLLT and DNS-HS core stability measures. Test-retest reliability data suggests that DNS-HS core stability was a reliable test for core stability. Clinically, the DNS-HS test is useful to objectively quantify core instability and allow early detection and evaluation.

  1. Piloted simulator assessments of agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Edward T.

    1990-01-01

    NASA has utilized piloted simulators for nearly two decades to study high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, agility, and air-to-air combat. These studies have included assessments of an F-16XL aircraft equipped with thrust vectoring, an assessment of the F-18 HARV maneuvering requirements to assist in thrust vectoring control system design, and an agility assessment of the F-18. The F-18 agility assessment was compared with in-flight testing. Open-loop maneuvers such as 180-deg rolls to measure roll rate showed favorable simulator/in-flight comparison. Closed-loop maneuvers such as rolls to 90 deg with precision stops or certain maximum longitudinal pitching maneuvers showed poorer performance due to reduced aggressiveness of pilot inputs in flight to remain within flight envelope limits.

  2. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  3. Pilot chargeback system program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.

    1997-03-01

    This planning document outlines the steps necessary to develop, test, evaluate, and potentially implement a pilot chargeback system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for the treatment, storage, and disposal of current waste. This pilot program will demonstrate one system that can be used to charge onsite generators for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. In FY 1997, mock billings will begin by July 15, 1997. Assuming approvals are received to do so, FY 1998 activities will include modifying the associated automated systems, testing and evaluating system performance, and estimating the amount generators will spend for waste storage, treatment, and disposal in FY 1999. If the program is fully implemented in FY 1999, generators will pay actual, automated bills for waste management services from funds transferred to their budgets from Environmental Management

  4. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  5. WozARd: A Wizard of Oz Method for Wearable Augmented Reality Interaction—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Alce

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Head-mounted displays and other wearable devices open up for innovative types of interaction for wearable augmented reality (AR. However, to design and evaluate these new types of AR user interfaces, it is essential to quickly simulate undeveloped components of the system and collect feedback from potential users early in the design process. One way of doing this is the wizard of Oz (WOZ method. The basic idea behind WOZ is to create the illusion of a working system by having a human operator, performing some or all of the system’s functions. WozARd is a WOZ method developed for wearable AR interaction. The presented pilot study was an initial investigation of the capability of the WozARd method to simulate an AR city tour. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 21 participants performing a simulated AR city tour. The data analysis focused on seven categories that can have an impact on how the WozARd method is perceived by participants: precision, relevance, responsiveness, technical stability, visual fidelity, general user-experience, and human-operator performance. Overall, the results indicate that the participants perceived the simulated AR city tour as a relatively realistic experience despite a certain degree of technical instability and human-operator mistakes.

  6. Core stability exercise principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuthota, Venu; Ferreiro, Andrea; Moore, Tamara; Fredericson, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Core stability is essential for proper load balance within the spine, pelvis, and kinetic chain. The so-called core is the group of trunk muscles that surround the spine and abdominal viscera. Abdominal, gluteal, hip girdle, paraspinal, and other muscles work in concert to provide spinal stability. Core stability and its motor control have been shown to be imperative for initiation of functional limb movements, as needed in athletics. Sports medicine practitioners use core strengthening techniques to improve performance and prevent injury. Core strengthening, often called lumbar stabilization, also has been used as a therapeutic exercise treatment regimen for low back pain conditions. This article summarizes the anatomy of the core, the progression of core strengthening, the available evidence for its theoretical construct, and its efficacy in musculoskeletal conditions.

  7. Gyroscopic Control and Stabilization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Li-Sheng; Krishnaprasad, P. S

    1991-01-01

    .... To assess the stability of relative equilibria in the resultant feedback systems, they extend the energy-momentum block-diagonalization theorem of Simo, Lewis, Posbergh, and Marsden to gyroscopic systems with symmetry...

  8. Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-05-02

    This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

  9. Intelligent passively stabilized quadrotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayfeddine, D.; Bulgakov, A. G.; Kruglova, T. N.

    2017-10-01

    Quadrotor stability is one of the most topical researches worldwide. It is due to the simplicity, availability and cost of such platform. This miniature aerial vehicle is highly manoeuvrable, straight forward to use and to maintain. It can be deployed to perform wide variety of tasks. On the other hand, the quadrotor suffers from non-stability, which makes it unreliable, especially when flying on low speed, high altitude and in windy circumstances. This paper discusses the improvement of the quadrotor by adding a stabilizing mechanism working as a passive breaking system in sharp and spontaneous turns. The mechanism is described and simulated as a standalone module. The end result represents the determination of the stiffness coefficient of the stabilizing actuator using fuzzy logic controller.

  10. Contagion and Stability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    The Contagion and Stability Game provided a forum% for discussing the military, economic, informational, political, and medical aspects of contagion in an environmentally stressed region of the less-developed world-South Asia...

  11. Fostering Early Math Comprehension: Experimental Evidence from Paraguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund-Hadley, Emma; Parker, Susan W.; Hernandez-Agramonte, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that preschool children need to learn pre-math skills to build a foundation for primary- and secondary-level mathematics. This paper presents the results from the early stages of a pilot mathematics program implemented in Cordillera, Paraguay. In a context of significant gaps in teacher preparation and pedagogy, the program uses…

  12. Teaching Expository Comprehension Skills in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culatta, Barbara; Hall-Kenyon, Kendra M.; Black, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This pilot project implemented and evaluated a theme-based unit designed to teach expository comprehension skills to young children in four preschool classrooms. Method: The program and the unit were collaborative efforts of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and early childhood educators. Within topically related units, 71 children ages…

  13. Determination of benefit of early identification of severe forms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aims: A pilot study to determine benefits of early identification of severe forms of malaria in peripheral centres was carried out in 3 rural communities of South Eastern Nigeria. Methodology: The study area is located in the rain forest belt of South Eastern Nigeria with high temperature and humidity. It is a typical ...

  14. Automatic Fiscal Stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis Eduard Mitu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Policies or institutions (built into an economic system that automatically tend to dampen economic cycle fluctuations in income, employment, etc., without direct government intervention. For example, in boom times, progressive income tax automatically reduces money supply as incomes and spendings rise. Similarly, in recessionary times, payment of unemployment benefits injects more money in the system and stimulates demand. Also called automatic stabilizers or built-in stabilizers.

  15. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  16. PFP solution stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1996-04-30

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  17. CCR study: evidence for benefit of TARP vaccine for men with early stage prostate cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a pilot clinical trial found that TARP, or T-cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein, vaccination slowed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) rise in the majority of patients with early stage prostate cancer.

  18. Central serous retinopathy with permanent visual deficit in a commercial air transport pilot: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, David G

    2002-11-01

    This report describes a case of central serous retinopathy (CSR) in the right eye of a commercial air transport pilot which resulted in a permanent reduction in visual acuity and the loss of his license. The previously fit and well pilot developed sudden loss of central vision, which resolved spontaneously. He then went on to experience recurrent episodes of fluctuating visual acuity (down to 6/60) and visual dysfunction in the right eye. His left eye remained unaffected. Eventually his condition stabilized, and he was left with a permanent reduction in right visual acuity (6/36) with intact peripheral visual fields and a completely normal left eye. After a period of grounding of 12 mo, he sought to have his license reinstated. He was considered to be a functionally monocular pilot, and as such was granted a conditional Class 1 medical category. The aeromedical disposition of this pilot and the issues involved in determining the fitness to fly of pilots with permanent visual defects arising from CSR are discussed.

  19. Keratoconus in Civil Aviation Pilots in a Report of Six Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Albert; Rodrigues, Bênesson; Pereira, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive noninflammatory ectatic corneal dystrophy, characterized by corneal thinning and increased curvature with central or paracentral tapered protrusion. Such changes in corneal morphology induce irregular astigmatism and myopia, resulting in visual acuity impairment. This report assesses cases in which keratoconus is not an absolute disabling condition for civil aviation pilots. Six cases of keratoconus in active pilots are presented. This report includes cases which were treated with crosslinking therapy and even corneal transplantation. In such cases, the civil aviation medical authority considered four aspects in the medical assessment: best corrected visual acuity, condition stability, risk of sudden incapacitation, and pilot category. Six civil pilots with ages between 19 and 45 yr of age presented with keratoconus in different stages. Using the Snellen scale, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured in 12 eyes, all of them having equal or better than 20/30 (20/20, N = 9; 20/25, N = 2; 20/30, N = 1). All of them are currently fit for aviation activity and have been given an aviation medical certificate with limitation of use of corrective lenses by the Brazilian Civil Aviation Authority (ANAC in Portuguese). Among these cases, there is a pilot who had undergone treatment with crosslinking therapy and another that had undergone corneal transplantation. These cases demonstrate that keratoconus is not always a disabling condition for civil aviation pilots. Nevertheless, it has to be analyzed on a case-by-case basis.Rebello A, Rodrigues B, Pereira M. Keratoconus in civil aviation pilots in a report of six cases. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):574-578.

  20. Pilot Implementation of Health Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2009-01-01

    Pilot implementation is a powerful and widely used approach in identifying design flaws and implementation issues before the full-scale deployment of new health information systems. However, pilot implementations often fail in the sense that they say little about the usability and usefulness...... information system. Based on the findings from this study, we identify three main challenges: (1) defining an appropriate scope for pilot implementation, (2) managing the implementation process, and (3) ensuring commitment to the pilot. Finally, recommendations for future research and implications...... of the proposed system designs. This calls for studies that seek to uncover and analyze the reasons for failure, so that guidelines for conducting such pilots can be developed. In this paper, we present a qualitative field study of an ambitious, but unsuccessful pilot implementation of a Danish healthcare...

  1. Intensive alternatives to custody process evaluation of pilots in five areas

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Kevin; O'Keeffe, Caroline; Ellingworth, Daniel; Senior, Paul

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative process evaluation of five Intensive Alternative to Custody (IAC) pioneer areas was undertaken to assess implementation of IAC, identify approaches to implementation and capture the lessons learnt. The findings indicated that many of the persistent offenders (those with at least 29 prior convictions) targeted by pilots were positive about the IAC order. Although intensive, it provided order and stability, allowing them to move away from a criminal lifestyle. Sentencers welcomed ...

  2. Early discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Felde, Lina; Gichangi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Discontinuation of medical drug treatment is a serious problem in primary care. The need for a better understanding of the processes, including physician-specific mechanisms, is apparent. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between general practitioners' prescribing....... There was a positive association between the prevalence of prescribing for the specific drugs studied (antidepressants, antidiabetics, drugs against osteoporosis and lipid-lowering drugs) and early discontinuation (r = 0.29 -0.44), but not for anti-hypertensive drugs. The analysis of the association between prevalence...... of all drugs and drug-specific early discontinuation showed some degree of positive association - strongest for anti-hypertensive drugs (r = 0.62) and antidepressants (r = 0.43). Conclusion This study confirmed our hypothesis that general practitioners with high levels of prescribing attain higher rates...

  3. Pilot 2006 Environmental Performance Index (EPI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pilot 2006 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) centers on two broad environmental protection objectives: (1) reducing environmental stresses on human health,...

  4. Pilot plants for polymers: Safety considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, C.F.; Zvanut, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Air Products and Chemicals is a major manufacturer of polyvinyl alcohol, vinyl acetate-ethylene emulsions and suspension PVC. Polyvinyl alcohol is a water soluble polymer and its primary end-uses are as a textile sizing agent and in adhesives. The emulsion products are used primarily in adhesives, paper, paints, and non-wovens. In order to support these business areas and to expand into new product lines, Air Products operates several polymer pilot plants. The safe operation of these pilot plants mandates careful attention to both design and operating procedures. Often, more care is needed in operating a polymer pilot plant than in other pilot plants or manufacturing facilities.

  5. Early results of two methods of posterior spinal stabilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Discussion. PSR has become the gold standard in posterior spinal fusion techniques. Its success has revolutionized spinal surgery. The Advantages include three column fusion as against one column fusion as is seen in other posterior fusion techniques like Rogers and Bohlman's techniques.[9‑13] Other.

  6. Early results of two methods of posterior spinal stabilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , surgical site infection (P ≥ 0.416), neurological deficits (P ≥ 0.461) and implant related complications (P ≥ 0.461) in the two groups of patients. Cost of implant in the PSR group range from N138,000 (for 2 level fusion) (1USD = N159) to ...

  7. Stabilization of cat paw trajectory during locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishko, Alexander N; Farrell, Bradley J; Beloozerova, Irina N; Latash, Mark L; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2014-09-15

    We investigated which of cat limb kinematic variables during swing of regular walking and accurate stepping along a horizontal ladder are stabilized by coordinated changes of limb segment angles. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) animals stabilize the entire swing trajectory of specific kinematic variables (performance variables); and 2) the level of trajectory stabilization is similar between regular and ladder walking and 3) is higher for forelimbs compared with hindlimbs. We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis to quantify the structure of variance of limb kinematics in the limb segment orientation space across steps. Two components of variance were quantified for each potential performance variable, one of which affected it ("bad variance," variance orthogonal to the UCM, VORT) while the other one did not ("good variance," variance within the UCM, VUCM). The analysis of five candidate performance variables revealed that cats during both locomotor behaviors stabilize 1) paw vertical position during the entire swing (VUCM > VORT, except in mid-hindpaw swing of ladder walking) and 2) horizontal paw position in initial and terminal swing (except for the entire forepaw swing of regular walking). We also found that the limb length was typically stabilized in midswing, whereas limb orientation was not (VUCM ≤ VORT) for both limbs and behaviors during entire swing. We conclude that stabilization of paw position in early and terminal swing enables accurate and stable locomotion, while stabilization of vertical paw position in midswing helps paw clearance. This study is the first to demonstrate the applicability of the UCM-based analysis to nonhuman movement. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Stabilization of cat paw trajectory during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klishko, Alexander N.; Farrell, Bradley J.; Beloozerova, Irina N.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated which of cat limb kinematic variables during swing of regular walking and accurate stepping along a horizontal ladder are stabilized by coordinated changes of limb segment angles. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) animals stabilize the entire swing trajectory of specific kinematic variables (performance variables); and 2) the level of trajectory stabilization is similar between regular and ladder walking and 3) is higher for forelimbs compared with hindlimbs. We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis to quantify the structure of variance of limb kinematics in the limb segment orientation space across steps. Two components of variance were quantified for each potential performance variable, one of which affected it (“bad variance,” variance orthogonal to the UCM, VORT) while the other one did not (“good variance,” variance within the UCM, VUCM). The analysis of five candidate performance variables revealed that cats during both locomotor behaviors stabilize 1) paw vertical position during the entire swing (VUCM > VORT, except in mid-hindpaw swing of ladder walking) and 2) horizontal paw position in initial and terminal swing (except for the entire forepaw swing of regular walking). We also found that the limb length was typically stabilized in midswing, whereas limb orientation was not (VUCM ≤ VORT) for both limbs and behaviors during entire swing. We conclude that stabilization of paw position in early and terminal swing enables accurate and stable locomotion, while stabilization of vertical paw position in midswing helps paw clearance. This study is the first to demonstrate the applicability of the UCM-based analysis to nonhuman movement. PMID:24899676

  9. HL-10 on lakebed with pilot John Manke

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    John Manke is shown here on the lakebed next to the HL-10, one of four different lifting-body vehicles he flew, including the X-24B, which he flew 16 times. His total of 42 lifting-body flights was second only to the 51 flights Milt Thompson achieved, including one in the remotely piloted Hyper III. The HL-10 was one of five heavyweight lifting-body designs flown at NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC--later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from July 1966 to November 1975 to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle designed for reentry from space. Northrop Corporation built the HL-10 and M2-F2, the first two of the fleet of 'heavy' lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center. The contract for construction of the HL-10 and the M2-F2 was $1.8 million. 'HL' stands for horizontal landing, and '10' refers to the tenth design studied by engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. After delivery to NASA in January 1966, the HL-10 made its first flight on Dec. 22, 1966, with research pilot Bruce Peterson in the cockpit. Although an XLR-11 rocket engine was installed in the vehicle, the first 11 drop flights from the B-52 launch aircraft were powerless glide flights to assess handling qualities, stability, and control. In the end, the HL-10 was judged to be the best handling of the three original heavy-weight lifting bodies (M2-F2/F3, HL-10, X-24A). The HL-10 was flown 37 times during the lifting body research program and logged the highest altitude and fastest speed in the Lifting Body program. On Feb. 18, 1970, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag piloted the HL-10 to Mach 1.86 (1,228 mph). Nine days later, NASA pilot Bill Dana flew the vehicle to 90,030 feet, which became the highest altitude reached in the program. Some new and different lessons were learned through the successful flight testing of the HL-10. These lessons, when combined with information from it's sister ship

  10. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    groundwaters, and also by stable isotopes and uranium isotopes in secondary minerals. Information on timing of water and solute movements is important because it indicates any correlation with the timing of external events that might have perturbed and destabilised the groundwater system in the past, and allows a timescale to be estimated for the persistence of stable conditions. Data from a number of published site investigation projects and research programmes are reviewed to illustrate the patterns of geochemical data and the relationships between them, and how these are interpreted in terms of hydrodynamic stability. Data from Aespoe and Stripa and from exploratory boreholes at Finnsjoen and other sites in Sweden are compiled and discussed. Preliminary data from SKB's ongoing site investigations at Simpevarp/Laxemar and Forsmark are not considered in detail but their general similarities with Aespoe and Finnsjoen/SFR respectively are introduced into the discussion of geochemical evidence for groundwater stability in inland and coastal areas. Relevant data from Finnish sites including Olkiluoto, from the Whiteshell URL area in Canada, from Sellafield in the UK, and from the Tono area and URL in Japan are also summarised in appendices and discussed because they add further insights into the interpretation of geochemical indicators for a range of geological environments. The compiled data provide only limited scope for comparison of groundwater evolution and stability between inland and coastal areas in Sweden, because of the patchiness of representative data especially from early site studies. The external changes that might have perturbed stable groundwater conditions in the past are glaciation (i.e. melt water, mechanical loading/unloading and permafrost) and varying sea water infiltration at coastal sites due to changes in palaeo-Baltic and isostatic conditions. The present distributions of palaeo-Baltic sea water in groundwaters at coastal sites vary, reflecting

  11. Behavior of Stabilized Peat Soils in Unconfined Compression Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Wong L. Sing; Roslan Hashim; Faisal H. Ali

    2008-01-01

    Problem statement: Deep stabilized peat columns were known to be economical at forming foundations to support highway embankments constructed on deep peat land. However, failure in the formation of the columns with adequate strength was often attributed to unsuitable type and insufficient dosage of binder added to the soil. Organic matter in peat was known to impede the cementing process in the soil, thus retarding the early strength gain of stabilized peat. Approach: To evaluate the strength...

  12. Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic stability

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekhar, S

    1981-01-01

    Dr. Chandrasekhar's book received high praise when it first appeared in 1961 as part of Oxford University Press' International Series of Monographs on Physics. Since then it has been reprinted numerous times in its expensive hardcover format. This first lower-priced, sturdy paperback edition will be welcomed by graduate physics students and scientists familiar with Dr. Chandrasekhar's work, particularly in light of the resurgence of interest in the Rayleigh-Bénard problem. This book presents a most lucid introduction to the Rayleigh-Bénard problem: it has also been applauded for its thorough, clear coverage of the theory of instabilities causing convection. Dr. Chandrasekhar considers most of the typical problems in hydromagnetic stability, with the exception of viscous shear flow; a specialized domain deserving a book unto itself. Contents include: Rotation; Stability of More General Flows; Bénard Problem; Gravitational Equilibrium and Instability; Stability of a Magnetic Field; Thermal Instability of a L...

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Zohm, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    This book bridges the gap between general plasma physics lectures and the real world problems in MHD stability. In order to support the understanding of concepts and their implication, it refers to real world problems such as toroidal mode coupling or nonlinear evolution in a conceptual and phenomenological approach. Detailed mathematical treatment will involve classical linear stability analysis and an outline of more recent concepts such as the ballooning formalism. The book is based on lectures that the author has given to Master and PhD students in Fusion Plasma Physics. Due its strong lin

  14. Accelerator terminal voltage stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, J. A.; Kolonko, J. J.; Phillips, S. H.; Lunstrum, S. J.

    1992-02-01

    Measurements reported at the 11th International Conference on Applications of Accelerators in Research and Industry [Schroeder et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B56/B57 (1991) 1033] for a 1 MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator equipped with corona probe and tank liner voltage stabilizers have been extended by measuring the resonant yield of γ-rays from the 27Al(p, γ) 28Si reaction at 992 keV. Results show that terminal voltage stability is consistent with the earlier measurement of 31 V FWHM for ripple at 1 MV for periods of about one-half ( {1}/{2}) hour.

  15. Accelerator terminal voltage stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry, J.A.; Kolonko, J.J.; Phillips, S.H.; Lunstrum, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements reported at the 11th International Conference on Applications of Accelerators in Research and Industry for a 1 MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator equipped with corona probe and tank liner voltage stabilizers have been extended by measuring the resonant yield of γ-rays from the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si reaction at 992 keV. Results show that terminal voltage stability is consistent with the earlier measurement of 31 V FWHM for ripple at 1 MV for periods of about one-half (1/2) hour. (orig.)

  16. Premixed conical flame stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikunova, A. I.; Son, E. E.; Saveliev, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    In the current work, stabilization of premixed laminar and lean turbulent flames for wide range of flow rates and equivalence ratios was performed. Methane-air mixture was ignited after passing through premixed chamber with beads and grids, and conical nozzle (Bunsen-type burner). On the edge of the nozzle a stabilized body-ring was mounted. Ring geometry was varied to get the widest stable flame parameters. This work was performed as part of the project on experimental investigation of premixed flames under microgravity conditions.

  17. Stability of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Xiaoxin; Yu, P 0

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of developing stability theory is to examine dynamic responses of a system to disturbances as the time approaches infinity. It has been and still is the object of intense investigations due to its intrinsic interest and its relevance to all practical systems in engineering, finance, natural science and social science. This monograph provides some state-of-the-art expositions of major advances in fundamental stability theories and methods for dynamic systems of ODE and DDE types and in limit cycle, normal form and Hopf bifurcation control of nonlinear dynamic systems.ʺ Presents

  18. NACA/NASA test pilot Stanley P. Butchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Stanley P. Butchart joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' High-Speed Flight Research Station on May 10, 1951. Stan was the fourth research pilot hired at the Station affording him the opportunity to fly the early research aircraft. Stan began a flying career while attending Junior College. He received primary and secondary civilian pilot training, enlisting in the U.S. Navy in July 1942. Stan took his Navy air training at Corpus Christi, Texas. Upon completion of training he was assigned to a torpedo-bomber Air Group, VT-51, flying Grumman-General Motors TBM Avenger, a torpedo-bomber, from the carrier San Jacinto in the South Pacific. When World War II ended, Stan was released from active duty as a Navy Lieutenant, with a Distinguished Flying Cross and a Presidential Unit Citation among his service medals. Butchart elected to stay in the Naval Reserve group and flew for an additional 5 years while he attended the University of Washington. By 1950, Stan had earned bachelor degrees in aeronautical engineering and mechanical engineering. After graduation he went to work for Boeing Aircraft as a junior design engineer and was assigned to the B-47 body group. In May 1951, he arrived at the NACA facility to start a career as a research pilot. Stan flew the Douglas D-558-I #3 (12 flights, first on October 19, 1951), the Douglas D-558-II #3 (2 pilot check-out flights, first on June 26, 1953), Northrop X-4 (4 flights, first on May 27, 1952), Bell X-5 (13 flights, first in early December 1952). Other aircraft flown on research projects were the Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker, Convair CV-990, Boeing B-52-003, Boeing B-747, North American F-100A, Convair F-102, Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, General Dynamics F-111, Boeing B-720, Convair CV-880, and the Boeing B-47 Stratojet, his favorite. he also flew many other aircraft. Stan did nearly all of the big airplane work at the Center. The biggest work load was flying the Boeing B-29 Stratofortress (Navy designation: P2B

  19. Piloted Aircraft Environment Simulation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    matdriel fonctionnant en temps rdel si lIon veut amrver A une certaine efficacitE pour l’expdrnmentation. La CELAR a effectuE un effort important...arritre. Les deux projecteurs sont sinai poaltionnts au-dessua de Ia tete du pilote salon un axe inclinE de 30 degrds vers I’arridre par rapport A Is...axes de rotation. Ce montage supprinie les accdldrations exagdrdes mar les moteurs d’entrainement.£ La source d’Eclairage est munie dWon mouvement de

  20. Pilot solid-waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, M.G.; Hootman, H.E.; Trapp, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental program to develop and confirm technology for incinerating solid radioactive waste is in progress at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) in support of the short-term and long-term waste management objectives of the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This report reviews the experience of a pilot incinerator with a capacity of 1.0 lb/hr. The facility was tested with nonradioactive materials similar to the radioactive waste generated at the Savannah River site. The experimental program included determining operating parameters, testing wet and dry off-gas treatment systems, and evaluating materials of construction

  1. Age Learning Factors Affecting Pilot Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, Brison

    This document, intended for pilot education and flight safety specialists, consists chiefly of a review of the literature on physiological factors that affect pilot education and an examination of environmental factors that should be scrutinized in order to improve the effectiveness of aviation learning facilities. The physiological factors…

  2. The Pilot Staffing Conundrum: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-2. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB, OH, June...Kafer, John H. Relationship of Airline Pilot Demand and Air Force Pilot Retention. Graduate Research Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-11. School of Logistics

  3. Reengineering Joint Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    involved the high-quality end-product. T-1 pilots flow into the heavy community with a heightened sense of Crew Resource Management ( CRM ) as well as...in the future and can be an investment for a 20 year career. Pilot training is a relatively safe environment, comparatively cheap , and instructor

  4. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijderveen, M. van; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The

  5. Communicating Instantaneous Air Quality Data: Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communicating Instantaneous Air Quality Data: Pilot ProjectEPA is launching a pilot project to test a new tool for making instantaneous outdoor air quality data useful for the public. The new “sensor scale” is designed to be used with sensors

  6. Pilot plant environmental conditions (OPDD Appendix C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, C.M.; Whitson, M.E.; Coggi, J.V.

    1978-08-15

    This is Appendix C to the Pilot Plant Overall Plant design description document for the 10-MW pilot central receiver plant to be located at Barstow, California. The environmental design criteria to be used for plant design day performance, operational limits, and survival environmental limits are specified. Data are presented on insolation, wind, temperature, and other meteorological conditions. (WHK)

  7. Conflict Resolution Automation and Pilot Situation Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Brandt, Summer L.; Bacon, Paige; Kraut, Josh; Nguyen, Jimmy; Minakata, Katsumi; Raza, Hamzah; Rozovski, David; Johnson, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared pilot situation awareness across three traffic management concepts. The Concepts varied in terms of the allocation of traffic avoidance responsibility between the pilot on the flight deck, the air traffic controllers, and a conflict resolution automation system. In Concept 1, the flight deck was equipped with conflict resolution tools that enable them to fully handle the responsibility of weather avoidance and maintaining separation between ownship and surrounding traffic. In Concept 2, pilots were not responsible for traffic separation, but were provided tools for weather and traffic avoidance. In Concept 3, flight deck tools allowed pilots to deviate for weather, but conflict detection tools were disabled. In this concept pilots were dependent on ground based automation for conflict detection and resolution. Situation awareness of the pilots was measured using online probes. Results showed that individual situation awareness was highest in Concept 1, where the pilots were most engaged, and lowest in Concept 3, where automation was heavily used. These findings suggest that for conflict resolution tasks, situation awareness is improved when pilots remain in the decision-making loop.

  8. Pilot projects in Evidence Based Policy Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, H.S.I.; Ker Rault, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    In Evidence Based Policy Making, pilot projects have been recognized as important tools to develop ‘evidence’ of policy innovations. This paper presents a theoretical and empirical study of three water management pilot projects in the Rhine basin to deepen understanding of how they can contri-bute

  9. Personnel thermoluminescent dosimetry of plane pilots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin V, J.C.; Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the research realized in the pilots of commercial planes of the different flight equipment existing. The results obtained show that the pilots receive during their work, doses of ionizing radiation greater than the limit recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection. (Author)

  10. Results from the CERN pilot CLOUD experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duplissy, J.; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Aplin, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    During a 4-week run in October–November 2006, a pilot experiment was performed at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in preparation for the CLOUD1 experiment, whose aim is to study the possible influence of cosmic rays on clouds. The purpose of the pilot experiment was firstly to carry out exploratory m...

  11. Analysis of empty ATLAS pilot jobs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The pilot model used by the ATLAS production system has been in use for many years. The model has proven to be a success with many advantages over push models. However one of the negative side-effects of using a pilot model is the presence of 'empty pilots' running on sites which consume a small amount of walltime and not running a useful payload job. The impact on a site can be significant with previous studies showing a total 0.5% walltime usage with no benefit to either the site or to ATLAS. Another impact is the number of empty pilots being processed by a site's Compute Element and batch system which can be 5% of the total number of pilots being handled. In this paper we review the latest statistics using both ATLAS and site data and highlight edge cases where the number of empty pilots dominate. We also study the effect of tuning the pilot factories to reduce the number of empty pilots.

  12. Pilot beverage cartons : extended technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoden van Velzen, E.U.; Brouwer, M.T.; Keijsers, E.R.P.; Pretz, Th.; Feil, A.; Jansen, M.

    2014-01-01

    This report gives a technological description of the four common collection and recycling schemes that have been tested in the Netherlands as part of the pilot beverage cartons in 2013. During this pilot the collection and recycling of beverage cartons was tested in 37 different municipalities, with

  13. 77 FR 6619 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ...-Site Examinations. SBA's Office of Credit Risk Management (OCRM) will evaluate the CA Lender's level of... Community Advantage Pilot Program loan applications (or requests for loan numbers submitted under a lender's... Advantage Lenders (``CA Lenders'') to pledge loans made under the CA Pilot Program (``CA loans'') as...

  14. Pilot/Controller Coordinated Decision Making in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Chris; Miller, Ronald c.; Orasanu, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: NextGen technologies promise to provide considerable benefits in terms of enhancing operations and improving safety. However, there needs to be a thorough human factors evaluation of the way these systems will change the way in which pilot and controllers share information. The likely impact of these new technologies on pilot/controller coordinated decision making is considered in this paper using the "operational, informational and evaluative disconnect" framework. Method: Five participant focus groups were held. Participants were four experts in human factors, between x and x research students and a technical expert. The participant focus group evaluated five key NextGen technologies to identify issues that made different disconnects more or less likely. Results: Issues that were identified were: Decision Making will not necessarily improve because pilots and controllers possess the same information; Having a common information source does not mean pilots and controllers are looking at the same information; High levels of automation may lead to disconnects between the technology and pilots/controllers; Common information sources may become the definitive source for information; Overconfidence in the automation may lead to situations where appropriate breakdowns are not initiated. Discussion: The issues that were identified lead to recommendations that need to be considered in the development of NextGen technologies. The current state of development of these technologies provides a good opportunity to utilize recommendations at an early stage so that NextGen technologies do not lead to difficulties in resolving breakdowns in coordinated decision making.

  15. Marital stability and repartnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Mariana V; Costa, Patrício; Peterson, Brennan D

    2014-01-01

    a second union have higher initial levels of stress in their original relationship and higher changes in stress levels over the course of treatments. These findings suggest that high infertility-related stress levels before entering fertility treatment can negatively affect the stability of marital...

  16. Ractor stability monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka.

    1991-01-01

    A stability monitor for a BWR type reactor determines the index of stability by statistic processing of signals from an average power region monitor or the like, but it takes much time and the reliability thereof is not always high. Then, parameters such as reactor core power are measured on every sampling periods as observation data and pretreatments such as normalization are applied successively, to obtain monitored amount and store them successively. Differentiation coefficient relative to time are calculated by using the observed amount at present and that one sample period before, to evaluate on a phasal plane using the amount of observation and the differentiation coefficient with time on the axes of coordinate. As a result, information relative to the stability can be represented accurately, thereby enabling to monitor the stability at a high accuracy. Further, judgement for the condition considering the amplitude is conducted upon oscillation, thereby enabling to conduct control operation certainly. The operation in a region where it has been limited under great caution can be conducted appropriately and safely, enabling to conduct controlled operation of excellent economical property. (N.H.)

  17. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  18. Stability in straight stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-07-01

    The stability of the straight stellarator against localized interchange modes is investigated employing the Mercier-Greene-Johnson criterion. Critical values of β are obtained both numerically and analytically. The conclusion is that for classical helical stellarators the average limiting β's are quite low of order three to four percent

  19. Ventil – ochrana stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan

    Červenec (2017) ISSN 2464-7888 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * ITER * tokamak * valve * VAT * gyrotron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.3pol.cz/cz/rubriky/jaderna-fyzika-a-energetika/2035-ventil-ochrana-stability

  20. Early emergency prognosis and response centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An emergency early warning system for the fourteen nuclear generating units in the country has been developed at the Nuclear Research Institute of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences. All units are connected to the host computer in the emergency center of the State Nuclear Power Authority in Kiew and interconnected with each other. The early warning system is to make another reactor accident of the magnitude of Chernobyl impossible. Installation of the hardware is to begin at the South Ukraine 3 nuclear generating unit in 1997; the costs of the pilot project are estimated at U.S. Dollar 40 million. After subsequent feasibility studies, the software and the hardware may be modified; the early warning system could be in operation countrywide by 1999. (orig.) [de