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Sample records for early site permit

  1. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-24

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  2. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  3. 10 CFR 51.50 - Environmental report-construction permit, early site permit, or combined license stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental report-construction permit, early site... Environmental Policy Act-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Environmental Reports-Production and Utilization Facilities § 51.50 Environmental report—construction permit, early site permit, or...

  4. 10 CFR 51.105 - Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits; limited work authorizations. 51.105 Section 51.105 Energy NUCLEAR... concerning the benefits assessment (e.g., need for power) or alternative energy sources if those issues...

  5. 77 FR 55507 - Approval of Transfer of Early Site Permit (ESP) and Conforming Amendment, Virginia Electric and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... COMMISSION Approval of Transfer of Early Site Permit (ESP) and Conforming Amendment, Virginia Electric and Power Company, North Anna ESP Site AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of request for...) interest in the North Anna ESP [Early Site Permit] Site's Early Site Permit (ESP-003). The transfer...

  6. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  7. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

  8. Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-26

    This report provides a summary of lessons learned from the demonstration of the licensing process for three Early Site Permit (ESP) applications supported as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) program. The ESP process was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to enable completion of the site evaluation component of nuclear power plant licensing under 10 CFR Part 52 before a utility makes a decision to build a plant. Early Site Permits are valid for 10 to 20 years and can be renewed for an additional 10 to 20 years. NRC review of an ESP application addresses site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. Successful completion of the ESP process will establish that a site is suitable for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Most importantly, an ESP resolves significant site-related safety and environmental issues early in the decision process and helps achieve acceptance by the public. DOE competitively selected Dominion Nuclear Energy North Anna, LLC (Dominion); System Energy Resources, Inc. (an Entergy subsidiary); and Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) in 2002 to demonstrate the ESP process and provided cost-shared support through the NP 2010 program. Dominion pursued an ESP for the North Anna site in Virginia; System Energy Resources, Inc. pursued an ESP for the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi; and Exelon pursued an ESP for the Clinton site in Illinois. After successfully demonstrating the process, the NRC issued an ESP for Clinton on March 17, 2007; Grand Gulf on April 5, 2007; and North Anna on November 27, 2007. As with all successful projects, there are lessons to be learned from the NP 2010 early site permitting demonstration that can help improve future implementation guidance documents and regulatory review standards. In general, these lessons pertain to the effectiveness of the regulatory process, experience related to

  9. Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-26

    This report provides a summary of lessons learned from the demonstration of the licensing process for three Early Site Permit (ESP) applications supported as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) program. The ESP process was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to enable completion of the site evaluation component of nuclear power plant licensing under 10 CFR Part 52 before a utility makes a decision to build a plant. Early Site Permits are valid for 10 to 20 years and can be renewed for an additional 10 to 20 years. NRC review of an ESP application addresses site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. Successful completion of the ESP process will establish that a site is suitable for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Most importantly, an ESP resolves significant site-related safety and environmental issues early in the decision process and helps achieve acceptance by the public. DOE competitively selected Dominion Nuclear Energy North Anna, LLC (Dominion); System Energy Resources, Inc. (an Entergy subsidiary); and Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) in 2002 to demonstrate the ESP process and provided cost-shared support through the NP 2010 program. Dominion pursued an ESP for the North Anna site in Virginia; System Energy Resources, Inc. pursued an ESP for the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi; and Exelon pursued an ESP for the Clinton site in Illinois. After successfully demonstrating the process, the NRC issued an ESP for Clinton on March 17, 2007; Grand Gulf on April 5, 2007; and North Anna on November 27, 2007. As with all successful projects, there are lessons to be learned from the NP 2010 early site permitting demonstration that can help improve future implementation guidance documents and regulatory review standards. In general, these lessons pertain to the effectiveness of the regulatory process, experience related to

  10. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-18

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, contains Appendices 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 covering the following topics: Eastern North American Empirical Ground Motion Data; Examination of Variance of Seismographic Network Data; Soil Amplification and Vertical-to-Horizontal Ratios from Analysis of Strong Motion Data From Active Tectonic Regions; Revision and Calibration of Ou and Herrmann Method; Generalized Ray Procedure for Modeling Ground Motion Attenuation; Crustal Models for Velocity Regionalization; Depth Distribution Models; Development of Generic Site Effects Model; Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Site Response Methodologies; Plots of Amplification Factors; Assessment of Coupling Between Vertical & Horizontal Motions in Nonlinear Site Response Analysis; and Modeling of Dynamic Soil Properties.

  11. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-18

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. Therefore, empirically based approaches that are used for other regions, such as Western North America, are not appropriate for Eastern North America. Moreover, recent advances in science and technology have now made it possible to combine theoretical and empirical methods to develop new procedures and models for estimating ground motion. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. Specifically considered are magnitudes M from 5 to 8, distances from 0 to 500 km, and frequencies from 1 to 35 Hz.

  12. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1999-10-18

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies.

  13. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOMAN, N.A.

    2000-10-01

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. This status report also addresses Permit Condition I.E.22, as interpreted in Section 12.1.25 of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Rev. 4), that states this report will be prepared annually and a copy of this report will be placed in the Facility Operating Record, General Information file by October 1 of each year.

  14. Annual Hanford Site environmental permitting status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1998-09-17

    The information contained and/or referenced in this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report (Status Report) addresses the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) of 1971 and Condition II.W. of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion (DW Portion). Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies the Permittees are responsible for all other applicable federal, state, and local permits for the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of permit condition, `best efforts` means submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies. This Status Report includes information on all existing and anticipated environmental permitting. Environmental permitting required by RCRA, the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, and non-RCRA permitting (solid waste handling, Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987, Washington State waste discharge, and onsite sewage system) is addressed. Information on RCRA and non-RCRA is current as of July 31, 1998. For the purposes of RCRA and the State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act of 1976 [as administered through the Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Active Code (WAC) 173-303], the Hanford Facility is considered a single facility. As such, the Hanford Facility has been issued one US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/State Identification Number (WA7890008967). This EPA/State identification number encompasses over 60 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) units. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) has been delegated authority by the EPA to administer the RCRA, including mixed waste authority. The RCRA permitting approach for

  15. Hanford Site air operating permit application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

  16. Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites - MO 2010 Permitted Hazardous Waste Sites - Areas(SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This is a polygon data set depicting locations of facilities' property boundaries. The data set contains sites permitted to treat, store or dispose of hazardous...

  17. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - WASTE_SOLID_ACTIVE_PERMITTED_IDEM_IN: Active Permitted Solid Waste Sites in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — WASTE_SOLID_ACTIVE_PERMITTED_IDEM_IN is a point shapefile that contains active permitted solid waste site locations in Indiana, provided by personnel of Indiana...

  18. Cumulative Permitted Vernal Pool Losses - Mitigation Sites [ds652

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile represents mitigation areas included in the Vernal Pool Clean Water Act Permit Database, developed by AECOM for the Placer Land Trust. The permit...

  19. 14 CFR 420.30 - Launch site location review for permitted launch vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch site location review for permitted... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.30 Launch site location review...

  20. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....212 Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment... hazardous waste permit or interim status as soon as it arrives in the on-site treatment, storage or disposal... permitted treatment, storage or disposal facility. (e) If the unwanted material is a hazardous waste, the...

  1. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  2. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the &apos

  3. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2013-09-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  4. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2014-06-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale and for commercial arrays for a surge wave energy converter

  5. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, Luke A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale and for commercial arrays for a surge wave energy converter

  6. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, Luke A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  7. Oil shale plant siting methodology: A guide to permits and approvals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordin, J.S.; Hill, S.; Barker, F.; Renk, R.; Dean, J.

    1988-09-01

    This report is a guide to the permits and approvals required to develop an oil shale resource. The permitting requirements of the federal government, six states (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio), and selected county or local governments are reviewed. The permits and approvals are organized into nine categories: (1) mineral leases and rights-of-way, (2) acquisition of a water supply, (3) environmental impact statement, (4) environmental quality (air quality, water quality, waste disposal, and wildlife values), (5) historical and cultural protection, (6) land use and socioeconomics, (7) prospecting and mining, (8) safety and health, and (9) transportation and communication. This report also contains examples of the permitting process required for the startup of two hypothetical oil shale plants. The first example is for a hypothetical 50,000 barrel-per-day oil shale plant located near Rio Blanco, Colorado. This plant uses conventional open pit mining and surface (Lurgi) processing of the shale. The permitting costs for this plant, including baseline data acquisition and monitoring, exceed $2 million. The second example, a 5,000 barrel-per-day demonstration plant in eastern Montgomery County, Kentucky, is based on open pit mining and surface (Hytort) processing of the shale. Permitting costs for the demonstration plant, including an environmental impact statement, could approach $500,000. Several potential impediments to the development of an oil shale resource are identified and discussed. 33 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. 10 CFR 2.604 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction permit proceeding. 2.604 Section 2.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... practicable, the membership of any atomic safety and licensing board designated to preside in the...

  9. The Hanford Site: An anthology of early histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Memories of War: Pearl Harbor and the Genesis of the Hanford Site; safety has always been promoted at the Hanford Site; women have an important place in Hanford Site history; the boom and bust cycle: A 50-year historical overview of the economic impacts of Hanford Site Operations on the Tri-Cities, Washington; Hanford`s early reactors were crucial to the sites`s history; T-Plant made chemical engineering history; the UO{sub 3} plant has a long history of service. PUREX Plant: the Hanford Site`s Historic Workhorse. PUREX Plant Waste Management was a complex challenge; and early Hanford Site codes and jargon.

  10. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  11. 10 CFR 51.75 - Draft environmental impact statement-construction permit, early site permit, or combined licesne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... With the exception of radon-222 and technetium-99 releases, no further discussion of fuel cycle release... environmental impact statement. With the exception of radon-222 and technetium-99 releases, no further... environmental report. 5 Values for releases of Rn-222 and Tc-99 are not given in the table. The amount...

  12. Some early astronomical sites in the Kashmir region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naseer; Vahia, M. N.; Masood, Tabasum; Ahmad, Aijaz

    2009-03-01

    We discuss a number of early rock art sites in the Kashmir Valley in northern India and neighbouring Pakistan, and suggest that some of these contain depictions of astronomical objects or events. The sites are in the Srinagar and Sopore regions and in or near the Ladakh region, and date to Neolithic or Upper Paleolithic times. Our studies suggest that during this period some of the ancient astronomers recorded supernovae, meteorite impacts, the Sun, the Moon and the seasons in their rock art.

  13. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  14. State waste discharge permit application for the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    Application is being made for a permit pursuant to Chapter 173--216 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC), to discharge treated waste water and cooling tower blowdown from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) to land at the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). The ETF is located in the 200 East Area and the SALDS is located north of the 200 West Area. The ETF is an industrial waste water treatment plant that will initially receive waste water from the following two sources, both located in the 200 Area on the Hanford Site: (1) the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and (2) the 242-A Evaporator. The waste water discharged from these two facilities is process condensate (PC), a by-product of the concentration of waste from DSTs that is performed in the 242-A Evaporator. Because the ETF is designed as a flexible treatment system, other aqueous waste streams generated at the Hanford Site may be considered for treatment at the ETF. The origin of the waste currently contained in the DSTs is explained in Section 2.0. An overview of the concentration of these waste in the 242-A Evaporator is provided in Section 3.0. Section 4.0 describes the LERF, a storage facility for process condensate. Attachment A responds to Section B of the permit application and provides an overview of the processes that generated the wastes, storage of the wastes in double-shell tanks (DST), preliminary treatment in the 242-A Evaporator, and storage at the LERF. Attachment B addresses waste water treatment at the ETF (under construction) and the addition of cooling tower blowdown to the treated waste water prior to disposal at SALDS. Attachment C describes treated waste water disposal at the proposed SALDS.

  15. On-site early-warning system for Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Bindi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of an on-site early warning system for Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan is outlined. Several low cost sensors equipped with MEMS accelerometers are installed in eight buildings distributed within the urban area. The different sensing units communicate each other via wireless links and the seismic data are streamed in real-time to the data center using internet. Since each single sensing unit has computing capabilities, software for data processing can be installed to perform decentralized actions. In particular, each sensing unit can perform event detection task and run software for on-site early warning. If a description for the vulnerability of the building is uploaded in the sensing unit, this piece of information can be exploited to introduce the expected probability of damage in the early-warning protocol customized for a specific structure.

  16. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P. M.

    2013-02-21

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

  17. CCS Project Permit Acquisition Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Si-Yong; Zaluski, Wade; Matthews, Vince; McPherson, Brian

    2013-06-30

    Geologic carbon storage projects require a vast range of permits prior to deployment. These include land-access permits, drilling permits, seismic survey permits, underground injection control permits, and any number of local and state permits, depending on the location of the project. For the “Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region” (RMCCS) project in particular, critical permits included site access permits, seismic survey permits, and drilling permits for the characterization well. Permits for these and other activities were acquired either prior to or during the project.

  18. 75 FR 67406 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Victoria County Station Early Site Permit Application; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... relevant environmental standards; c. Affected State and local government agencies, including those authorized to develop and enforce relevant environmental standards; d. Any affected Native American; e. Any..., April 28, 2010 (75 FR 22434). A notice of acceptance for docketing of the application for the ESP...

  19. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-08-05

    The NTS is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. NNSA/NSO is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and NSTec is the Management & Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The U10C Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of Area 9 at the NTS (Figure 1) and is located in a subsidence crater created by two underground nuclear events, one in October 1962 and another in April 1964. The disposal site opened in 1971 for the disposal of rubbish, refuse, pathological waste, asbestos-containing material, and industrial solid waste. A Notice of Intent form to operate the disposal site as a Class II site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 26, 1994, and was acknowledged in a letter to the DOE on February 8, 1994. It operated as a state of Nevada Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS) until it closed on October 5, 1995, for retrofit as a Class III SWDS. The retrofit consisted of the installation of a minimum four-foot compacted soil layer to segregate the different waste types and function as a liner to inhibit leachate and water flow into the lower waste zone. Five neutron monitoring tubes were installed in this layer to monitor possible leachate production and water activity. Upon acceptance of the installed barrier and approval of an Operating Plan by NDEP/BFF, the site reopened in January 1996 as a Class III SWDS for the disposal of industrial solid waste and other inert waste.

  20. Site correction of earthquake early warning system in Ilan, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao Chu, Hsu; Liang, Wen Kuo; Jyun Yan, Huang

    2015-04-01

    When large earthquake occurs, earthquake early warning (EEW) provides alerts to urban areas of the forthcoming strong ground shaking. Depending on the specific geometry of the epicenter and the strong motion network used in EEW, the warning time can be a few seconds to tens of seconds. This warning time can be extremely important since even a few seconds can be sufficient for pre-programmed systems to have emergency response. The Central Weather Bureau (CWB) had already used network EEW system to predict intensity map. Due to leveling of intensity was roughly divided into seven grades according to peak acceleration (PGA) in Taiwan, the warning message is not cautious for company, home and school use, the accuracy of predicted PGA were discuss for our result. A practical site correction approach for EEW was constructed in this study. Period parameter (τc) and an amplitude parameter (Pd)from the initial 3 seconds of P waves were calculated after Wu et al.(2005) first for each site of Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) in Ilan, Taiwan for focal depths less than 35 km and magnitude Mw>=5.0. Two pairs of linear relations had showed in each station between τc, magnitude (Mw) and Pd, hypocenter distance (R) that could be corrected individually. Prediction results of PGA from site correction based ground motion prediction equation (Jean et al. 2006) indicated that the corrected parameters of EEW in this study had improved the accuracy of ground motion prediction. Which means reasonable site correction of each station was needed for EEW system. Key works: earthquake early warning, P wave, site correction

  1. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by

  2. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    a systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found...... that diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites...

  3. HANFORD SITE AIR OPERATING PERMIT SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 07/01/2004 THRU 12/31/2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2005-01-19

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and September 15th each year, which are certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This semiannual report contains information from July 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004. Copies of semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, as amended in August 2002 and December 2002, identifies the following. (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5. ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period. (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2. 1.3, and 2.1, each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. Data derived from that monitoring will be reported in the Annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Report (AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions

  4. Ci PERMIT

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Permanent Mission to the International Organisations at Geneva recalls that only the spouses and children of members of personnel resident in Switzerland and in possession of a legitimation card of types 'B', 'C', 'D' or 'E' issued by the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs are entitled to benefit from a Ci Permit.The 'demande d'attestation de permis Ci' (request for a Ci permit attestation) can be sent to the Mission only through Personnel Division (Administrative Services, Office 33/1-025).Additional information on access by family members of CERN officials to the Swiss labour market are available to you on the Web site of the Relations with the Host States Service (cf. document entitled 'Employment in Switzerland for spouses and children of CERN officials' dated March 1996).Relations with the Host States Servicehttp://www.cern.ch/relations/Tel. 72848

  5. Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2006-06-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

  6. 75 FR 63521 - PSEG Power, LLC and PSEG Nuclear, LLC; PSEG Site Early Site Permit Application, Notice of Intent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... authorized to develop and enforce relevant environmental standards, c. Affected State and local government agencies, including those authorized to develop and enforce relevant environmental standards, d. Any... environmental report (ER) was published in the Federal Register on June 18, 2010 (75 FR 34794). A notice...

  7. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Semiannual Report for the period July 21 2001 Thru December 31 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-02-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and August 15th each year, which are certified for truth and accuracy by a Responsible Official. This first semiannual report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the March 15th semiannual report will contain information for the period from July 1 through December 31. The semiannual report submitted by August 15th will contain information for the period from January 1 through June 30. Copies of the semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, identifies the following: (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5, ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring that were submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2, 1.3 and 2.1. each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting

  8. Subsistence economy of el paraiso, an early peruvian site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilter, J; E, B O; Pearsall, D M; Sandweiss, D H; Jones, J G; Wing, E S

    1991-01-18

    Studies of food remains from the Preceramic monumental site of E1 Paraíso, Peru (1800 to 1500 B.C.), have shed new light on a debate regarding the relative importance of seafood versus terrestrial resources and the role of cultigens in subsistence economies during the early development of Peruvian civilization. Fish was the primary animal food at the site whereas plant foods consisted of a mixture of cultivated resources (squashes, beans, peppers, and jicama) with an additional reliance on fruits (guava, lucuma, and pacae). Wild plants, especially the roots of sedges and cat-tail, also may have accounted for a substantial part of the diet. Cotton was a chief crop, used in making fishing tackle and the textiles that served as clothing and items of high value and status. As an example of the beginnings of civilization, El Paraíso is a case in which impressive architecture was built on a relatively simple subsistence economy and energy was expended in the production of resources useful in local and regional exchange systems.

  9. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Protection and Technical Services

    2009-09-30

    This permit application provides facility information on the design, processes, and security features associated with the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit. The unit will receive and dispose of onsite and offsite containerized low-level mixed waste (LLMW) that has an approved U.S. Department of Energy nexus.

  10. Supplemental Environmental Baseline Survey for Proposed Land Use Permit Modification for Expansion of the Dynamic Explosive Test Site (DETS) 9940 Main Complex Parking Lot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, Dennis W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The “subject property” is comprised of a parcel of land within the Kirtland Military Reservation, Bernalillo County, New Mexico, as shown on the map in Appendix B of this document. The land requirement for the parking lot addition to the 9940 Main Complex is approximately 2.7 acres. The scope of this Supplemental Environmental Baseline Survey (SEBS) is for the parking lot addition land transfer only. For details on the original 9940 Main Complex see Environmental Baseline Survey, Land Use Permit Request for the 9940 Complex PERM/0-KI-00-0001, August 21, 2003, and for details on the 9940 Complex Expansion see Environmental Baseline Survey, Proposed Land Use Permit Expansion for 9940 DETS Complex, June 24, 2009. The 2.7-acre parcel of land for the new parking lot, which is the subject of this EBS (also referred to as the “subject property”), is adjacent to the southwest boundary of the original 12.3- acre 9940 Main Complex. No testing is known to have taken place on the subject property site. The only activity known to have taken place was the burial of overhead utility lines in 2014. Adjacent to the subject property, the 9940 Main Complex was originally a 12.3-acre site used by the Department of Energy (DOE) under a land use permit from the United States Air Force (USAF). Historical use of the site, dating from 1964, included arming, fusing, and firing of explosives and testing of explosives systems components. In the late 1970s and early 1980s experiments at the 9940 Main Complex shifted toward reactor safety issues. From 1983 to 1988, fuel coolant interaction (FCI) experiments were conducted, as were experiments with conventional high explosives (HE). Today, the land is used for training of the Nuclear Emergency Response community and for research on energetic materials. In 2009, the original complex was expanded to include four additional 20-acre areas: 9940 Training South, 9940 Training East, T-Range 6, and Training West Landing Zone. The proposed use of

  11. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-10-04

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is

  12. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  13. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts, Enterprise Zone within Emporia city limits. These sites are allowed discounted building permit fees., Published in 2010, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, City of Emporia / Lyon County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts dataset current as of 2010. Enterprise Zone within Emporia city limits. These sites are allowed discounted building permit...

  14. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CURN, B.L.

    2000-05-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from

  15. Early Results in Capella's Prior Learning Assessment Experimental Site Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    In July 2014, the U.S. Department of Education announced a new round of experimental sites focusing on competency-based education. Capella University was selected to participate in three of the Department of Education's competency-based education (CBE) experiments and began by implementing the prior learning assessment experiment, which allows…

  16. DOE/RL Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Annual Compliance Certification Report for the Period July 2 2001 through December 31 2001 [SEC 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-05-22

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. The AOP, Section 4.3.4, ''Annual Compliance Certification'', requires submittal of an annual compliance certification report no later than 12 months following the effective date of the permit. This report is to be certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This first annual compliance certification report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the annual compliance certification report will contain information for the period from January 1 through December 31, as required by the AOP Section 4.3, ''Submittals''. Copies of the annual compliance certification reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, Section 4.3.3, ''Annual Compliance Certification'', requires the following content for the annual compliance certification report: (1) The identification of each term or condition of the permit that is the basis of the certification; (2) The compliance status; (3) Whether compliance was continuous or intermittent; (4) The method(s) used to determine the compliance status of the source over the reporting period consistent with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173401 -61 5(3)(a); and (5) Such other facts as Ecology, WDOH, or BCAA might be required to determine the compliance status of the source. According to WAC 173-401-630(5), no certification is required for insignificant emission units. The specific terms and conditions for this annual compliance certification report consist of all emission point specific terms and conditions contained in the AOP Attachment 1 and Attachment 2 tables, plus Attachment 3 for

  17. The role of social networking sites in early adolescents’ social life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Schouten, A.P.; Krahmer, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in early adolescents’ social lives. First, we investigated the relation between SNS use and several aspects of early adolescents’ social lives (i.e., friendship quality, bridging social capital, and bonding social

  18. The Role of Social Networking Sites in Early Adolescents' Social Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antheunis, Marjolijn L.; Schouten, Alexander P.; Krahmer, Emiel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in early adolescents' social lives. First, we investigated the relation between SNS use and several aspects of early adolescents' social lives (i.e., friendship quality, bridging social capital, and bonding social capital). Second, we examined whether there are…

  19. The role of social networking sites in early adolescents’ social life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Schouten, A.P.; Krahmer, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in early adolescents’ social lives. First, we investigated the relation between SNS use and several aspects of early adolescents’ social lives (i.e., friendship quality, bridging social capital, and bonding social capita

  20. Web site review. Carolinas HealthCare recognized Internet marketing potential early.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Since the early days of the Internet, administrators Carolinas HealthCare System in Charlotte, NC, have appreciated its potential as a marketing tool. This places a lot of expectations on the Web site, www.carolinashealthcare.org, which is managed by the marketing-public relations department. Find out how the well-established site fulfills its mission and more.

  1. Experiences from site-specific landslide early warning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Michoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Landslide early warning systems (EWSs have to be implemented in areas with large risk for populations or infrastructures when classical structural remediation measures cannot be set up. This paper aims to gather experiences of existing landslide EWSs, with a special focus on practical requirements (e.g., alarm threshold values have to take into account the smallest detectable signal levels of deployed sensors before being established and specific issues when dealing with system implementations. Within the framework of the SafeLand European project, a questionnaire was sent to about one-hundred institutions in charge of landslide management. Finally, we interpreted answers from experts belonging to 14 operational units related to 23 monitored landslides. Although no standard requirements exist for designing and operating EWSs, this review highlights some key elements, such as the importance of pre-investigation work, the redundancy and robustness of monitoring systems, the establishment of different scenarios adapted to gradual increasing of alert levels, and the necessity of confidence and trust between local populations and scientists. Moreover, it also confirms the need to improve our capabilities for failure forecasting, monitoring techniques and integration of water processes into landslide conceptual models.

  2. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials for sites of early versus late seizure spread in stereoelectroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Bradley; Dionisio, Sasha; Flanigan, Patrick; Bingaman, William; Najm, Imad; Nair, Dileep; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Cortico-cortical evoked potentials offer the possibility of understanding connectivity within seizure networks to improve diagnosis and more accurately identify candidates for seizure surgery. We sought to determine if cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation oscillatory changes differ for sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. 37 patients undergoing stereoelectroencephalography were tested using a cortico-cortical evoked potential paradigm. All electrodes were classified according to the speed of ictal spread. EARLY spread sites were matched to a LATE spread site equidistant from the onset zone. Root-mean-square was used to quantify evoked responses and post-stimulation gamma band power and coherence were extracted and compared. Sites of EARLY spread exhibited significantly greater evoked responses after stimulation across all patients (t(36)=2.973, p=0.004). Stimulation elicited enhanced gamma band activity at EARLY spread sites (t(36)=2.61, p=0.03, FDR corrected); this gamma band oscillation was highly coherent with the onset zone. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation changes in gamma band activity differ between sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. The oscillatory changes can help visualize connectivity within the seizure network.

  3. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy can strain the occurrence of trocar site hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Otan, Emrah; Kocaaslan, Huseyin

    2014-11-16

    This study reports a 69-year-old, obese, female patient presenting with a biliary leakage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Closure of the umbilical trocar site had been neglected during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early, on postoperative day five, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) requirement after laparoscopic cholecystectomy resolved the biliary leakage problem but resulted with a more complicated clinical picture with an intestinal obstruction and severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a strangulated hernia from the umbilical trocar site. Increased abdominal pressure during ERCP had strained the weak umbilical trocar site. Emergency surgical intervention through the umbilicus revealed an ischemic small bowel segment which was treated with resection and anastomosis. This report demonstrates that negligence of trocar site closure can result in very early herniation, particularly if an endoscopic intervention is required in the early postoperative period.

  4. Permit application modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  5. Dinosaur Footprints of Early Cretaceous in Site 1, Yanguoxia, Yongjing Country, Gansu Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@After the report of dinosaur footprints in the Early Cretaceous in 2000 (Li et al., 2000), we followed to unearth, investigate and research the footprints with the support of National Natural Science Fundation and Stadholder Fund of Gansu Province. At present, there are ten track sites about 286 footprints within 2 km2 area in Yanguoxia, three of which are being unearthed. Among all the sites, the footprints are best preserved in Site 1, where 187 footprints are found and they are arranged into 17 trackways within about 600 m2 (Fig.1). In the site 2, 51 footprints in 17 trackways are found within the 80 m2. And 4 footprints in 2 trackways are preserved within 50 m2 of site 3. In other footprint sites, the number of footprints is different, ranging from 1 to 12.

  6. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy can strain the occurrence of trocar site hernia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatih; Sumer; Cuneyt; Kayaalp; Mehmet; Ali; Yagci; Emrah; Otan; Huseyin; Kocaaslan

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a 69-year-old, obese, female patientpresenting with a biliary leakage after laparoscopiccholecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Closure of the um-bilical trocar site had been neglected during the lapa-roscopic cholecystectomy. Early, on postoperative dayfive, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography(ERCP) requirement after laparoscopic cholecystectomyresolved the biliary leakage problem but resulted with amore complicated clinical picture with an intestinal ob-struction and severe abdominal pain. Computed tomog-raphy revealed a strangulated hernia from the umbilicaltrocar site. Increased abdominal pressure during ERCPhad strained the weak umbilical trocar site. Emergencysurgical intervention through the umbilicus revealed anischemic small bowel segment which was treated withresection and anastomosis. This report demonstratesthat negligence of trocar site closure can result in veryearly herniation, particularly if an endoscopic interven-tion is required in the early postoperative period.

  7. Permitted Exceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Anne Margrethe

    This PhD thesis examines the phenomenon of temporary use in a contemporary Northern European planning context. The background for the study is the increasing interest in initiating temporary use projects within urban redevelopment by public authorities, such as municipalities, related sub......-term perspectives. This factor seems to hold some, if not conflicting, then at least challenging aspects. Current research is inadequate to disclose what actually happens when integrating temporary exceptions into urban transformation projects. I define, document and explore these attempts as permitted exceptions...

  8. Report of the Peer Review Panel on the early site suitability evaluation of the Potential Repository Site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Yucca mountain Site Characterization Project Office (YMPO) assigned Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Technical and Management Support Services (T&MSS) contractor to the YmPo, the task of conducting an Early Site Suitability Evaluation (ESSE) of the Yucca mountain site as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. First, the assignment called for the development of a method to evaluate a single site against the DOE General Guidelines for Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories, 10 CFR Part 960. Then, using this method, an evaluation team, the ESSE Core Team, of senior YMP scientists, engineers, and technical experts, evaluated new information obtained about the site since publication of the final Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986) to determine if new suitability/unsuitability findings could be recommended. Finally, the Core Team identified further information and analyses needed to make final determinations for each of the guidelines. As part of the task, an independent peer review of the ESSE report has been conducted. Expertise was solicited that covered the entire spectrum of siting guidelines in 10 CFR Part 960 in order to provide a complete, in-depth critical review of the data evaluated and cited in the ESSE report, the methods used to evaluate the data, and the conclusions and recommendations offered by the report. Fourteen nationally recognized technical experts (Table 2) served on the Peer Review Panel. The comments from the Panel and the responses prepared by the ESSE Core Team, documented on formal Comment Response Forms, constitute the body of this document.

  9. Oldest known dinosaurian nesting site and reproductive biology of the Early Jurassic sauropodomorph Massospondylus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R; Evans, David C; Roberts, Eric M; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Yates, Adam M

    2012-02-14

    The extensive Early Jurassic continental strata of southern Africa have yielded an exceptional record of dinosaurs that includes scores of partial to complete skeletons of the sauropodomorph Massospondylus, ranging from embryos to large adults. In 1976 an incomplete egg clutch including in ovo embryos of this dinosaur, the oldest known example in the fossil record, was collected from a road-cut talus, but its exact provenance was uncertain. An excavation program at the site started in 2006 has yielded multiple in situ egg clutches, documenting the oldest known dinosaurian nesting site, predating other similar sites by more than 100 million years. The presence of numerous clutches of eggs, some of which contain embryonic remains, in at least four distinct horizons within a small area, provides the earliest known evidence of complex reproductive behavior including site fidelity and colonial nesting in a terrestrial vertebrate. Thus, fossil and sedimentological evidence from this nesting site provides empirical data on reproductive strategies in early dinosaurs. A temporally calibrated optimization of dinosaurian reproductive biology not only demonstrates the primary significance of the Massospondylus nesting site, but also provides additional insights into the initial stages of the evolutionary history of dinosaurs, including evidence that deposition of eggs in a tightly organized single layer in a nest evolved independently from brooding.

  10. Centrosome movement in the early divisions of Caenorhabditis elegans: A cortical site determining centrosome position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, A.A. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (England))

    1989-09-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, early blastomeres of the P cell lineage divide successively on the same axis. This axis is a consequence of the specific rotational movement of the pair of centrosomes and nucleus. A laser has been used to perturb the centrosome movements that determine the pattern of early embryonic divisions. The results support a previously proposed model in which a centrosome rotates towards its correct position by shortening of connections, possibly microtubules, between a centrosome and a defined site on the cortex of the embryo.

  11. Predicting the macroseismic intensity from early radiated P wave energy for on-site earthquake early warning in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondi, P.; Picozzi, M.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2015-10-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) are potentially effective tools for risk mitigation in active seismic regions. The present study explores the possibility of predicting the macroseismic intensity within EEW timeframes using the squared velocity integral (IV2) measured on the early P wave signals, a proxy for the P wave radiated energy of earthquakes. This study shows that IV2 correlates better than the peak displacement measured on P waves with both the peak ground velocity and the Housner Intensity, with the latter being recognized by engineers as a reliable proxy for damage assessment. Therefore, using the strong motion recordings of the Italian Accelerometric Archive, a novel relationship between the parameter IV2 and the macroseismic intensity (IM) has been derived. The validity of this relationship has been assessed using the strong motion recordings of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Strong Motion Data and Osservatorio Sismico delle Strutture databases, as well as, in the case of the MW 6, 29 May 2012 Emilia earthquake (Italy), comparing the predicted intensities with the ones observed after a macroseismic survey. Our results indicate that P wave IV2 can become a key parameter for the design of on-site EEWS, capable of proving real-time predictions of the IM at target sites.

  12. Towards the Study of the Early Medieval Site Bashanta-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochir-Goryaeva Maria A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors offer preliminary results on study of a new early medieval site discovered in the Gorodovikovo District (Kalmykia during a field survey near Bashanta-I hillfort at Chapaevskoe Lake (or Tsagan nur in Kalmyk language. The new site is found 8 km to the south-west from Bashanta-I hillfort, on the bank of the Egorlyk River. The site is dated by two radiocarbon dates by the middle of the 7th – late 8th centuries, i.e. by the time of Khazar Khanate. Some preliminary studies on the site included topographical mapping, collection of stray finds and a few prospection pits. These activities yielded numerous ceramic sherds, roof tiles and debris of masonry. Judging by the existing cultural stratum, remains of stone structures made of shell stone blocks and numerous ceramic finds of good quality, the new site was a settlement of Saltovo-Mayaki Culture, presumably a satellite hillfort. The identity of ceramics and construction materials allowed the authors to name this new site as Bashanta-II.

  13. Andegameryx andegaviensis Ginsburg, 1971 (Artiodactyla, Ruminantia, from the early Miocene site of Estrepouy (MN3, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales, J.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several dental remains from the Early Miocene of Estrepouy (MN3, France previously reported as Amphitragulus aurelianensis by Roman & Viret (1934 are described in this work and assigned to Andegameryx andegaviensis Ginsburg, 1971. The re-study of this material and the comparison with other remains of A. andegaviensis from several european localities of the early Miocene, including the type locality of the species, have permitted us to confirm the presence of A. andegaviensis in the ruminant fauna from Estrepouy.En esta nota describimos algunos de los restos del yacimiento del Mioceno inferior de Estrepouy (MN3, Francia atribuidos por Roman & Viret (1934 a Amphitragulus aruelianensis, cambiando su asignación a Andegameryx andegaviensis Ginsburg, 1971. El reestudio del material y su comparación con los restos de A. andegaviensis de otras localidades europeas del Mioceno inferior, incluyendo la localidad tipo de la especie, permiten confirmar su presencia entre la fauna de rumiantes fósiles de Estrepouy.

  14. Rapid Estimation of Macroseismic Intensity for On-site Earthquake Early Warning in Italy from Early Radiated Energ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.; Brondi, P.; Picozzi, M.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake Early Warning System (EEWS) are effective tools for the risk mitigation in active seismic regions. Recently, a feasibility study of a nation-wide earthquake early warning systems has been conducted for Italy considering the RAN Network and the EEW software platform PRESTo. This work showed that a reliable estimations in terms of magnitude and epicentral localization would be available within 3-4 seconds after the first P-wave arrival. On the other hand, given the RAN's density, a regional EEWS approach would result in a Blind Zone (BZ) of 25-30 km in average. Such BZ dimension would provide lead-times greater than zero only for events having magnitude larger than 6.5. Considering that in Italy also smaller events are capable of generating great losses both in human and economic terms, as dramatically experienced during the recent 2009 L'Aquila (ML 5.9) and 2012 Emilia (ML 5.9) earthquakes, it has become urgent to develop and test on-site approaches. The present study is focused on the development of a new on-site EEW metodology for the estimation of the macroseismic intensity at a target site or area. In this analysis we have used a few thousands of accelerometric traces recorded by RAN related to the largest earthquakes (ML>4) occurred in Italy in the period 1997-2013. The work is focused on the integral EW parameter Squared Velocity Integral (IV2) and on its capability to predict the peak ground velocity PGV and the Housner Intensity IH, as well as from these latters we parameterized a new relation between IV2 and the Macroseismic Intensity. To assess the performance of the developed on-site EEW relation, we used data of the largest events occurred in Italy in the last 6 years recorded by the Osservatorio Sismico delle Strutture, as well as on the recordings of the moderate earthquake reported by INGV Strong Motion Data. The results shows that the macroseismic intensity values predicted by IV2 and the one estimated by PGV and IH are in good agreement.

  15. A P-wave based, on-site method for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Can we rapidly predict the potential damage of earthquakes by-passing the estimation of its location and magnitude? One possible approach is to predict the expected peak ground shaking at the site and the earthquake magnitude from the initial P-peak amplitude and characteristic period, respectively. The idea, first developed by Wu and Kanamori (2005), is to combine the two parameters for declaring the alert once the real-time measured quantities have passed pre-defined thresholds. Our proposed on-site early warning method generalized this approach, based on the analysis of strong motion data from modern accelerograph networks in Japan, Taiwan and Italy (Zollo et al., 2010). It is based on the real-time measurement of the period (τc) and peak displacement (Pd) parameters at one or more co-located stations at a given target site to be protected against the earthquake effects. By converting these real-time proxies in predicted values of Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) or instrumental intensity (IMM) and magnitude, an alert level is issued at the recording site based on a decisional table with four entries defined upon threshold values of the parameters Pd and Tc. The latter ones are set according to the error bounds estimated on the derived prediction equations. A near-source network of stations running the onsite method can provide the event location and transmit the information about the alert levels recorded at near-source stations to more distant sites, before the arrival of the most destructive phase. The network-based approach allows for the rapid and robust estimation of the Potential Damage Zone (PDZ), that is the area where most of earthquake damage is expected (Colombelli et al., 2012). A new strategy for a P-wave based, on-site earthquake early warning system has been developed and tested on Japanese strong motion data and under testing on Italian data. The key elements are the real-time, continuous measurement of three peak amplitude parameters and their

  16. Assessment of uncertainties in early off-site consequences from nuclear reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Dept. of Nuclear Energy, Upton, NY (US)); Khatib-Rahbar, M. (Energy Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (US))

    1990-04-01

    A simplified approach has been developed to calculate uncertainties in early off-site consequences from nuclear reactor accidents. The consequence model (SMART) is based on a solution procedure that uses simplified meteorology and involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position. This is different from the discretization approach currently used in the CRAC2 and MACCS codes. The SMART code is fast running, thereby providing a valuable tool for sensitivity and uncertainty studies. The code was benchmarked against both MACCS version 1.4 and CRAC2. Results of benchmarketing and detailed sensitivity and uncertainty analyses using SMART are presented.

  17. An on-site alert level early warning system for Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Alessandro; Colombelli, Simona; Elia, Luca; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    An Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) system is a real-time seismic monitoring infrastructure that has the capability to provide warnings to target cities before the arrival of the strongest shaking waves. In order to provide a rapid alert when targets are very close to the epicenter of the events, we developed an on-site EEW approach and evaluated its performance at the nation-wide scale of Italy. We use a single-station, P-wave based method that measures in real-time two ground motion quantities along the early P-wave signal: the initial Peak Displacement (Pd) and the average period parameter (τc). In output, the system provides the predicted ground shaking intensity at the monitored site, the alert level (as defined by Zollo et al., 2010) and a qualitative classification of both earthquake magnitude and source-to-receiver distance. We applied the on-site EEW methodology to a dataset of Italian earthquakes, recorded by the Italian accelerometric network, with magnitude ranging from 3.8 to 6, and evaluated the performance of the system in terms of correct warning and lead-times (i.e., time available for security actions at the target). The results of this retrospective analysis show that, for the large majority of the analyzed cases, the method is able to deliver a correct warning shortly after the P-wave detection, with more than 80% of successful intensity predictions at the target site. The lead-times increase with distance, with a value of 2-6 seconds at 30 km, 8-10 seconds at 50 km and 15-18 seconds at 100 km.

  18. Oldest playable musical instruments found at Jiahu early Neolithic site in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Harbottle, G; Wang, C; Kong, Z

    1999-09-23

    Excavations at the early Neolithic site of Jiahu in Henan Province, China have produced what may be the earliest complete, playable, tightly-dated multinote musical instruments. Jiahu was occupied from 7000 BC to 5700 BC, considerably antedating the well known Peiligang culture. Here we describe six exquisitely made complete flutes which were found in radiocarbon-dated excavation layers, along with fragments of perhaps 30 more. The flutes are made from the ulnae of the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis Millen) and have 5, 6, 7 and 8 holes. The best preserved flute has been played and tonally analysed. In addition to early musical artefacts, the archaeological record at Jiahu contains important information on the very foundations of Chinese society. We describe the archaeological characteristics of the Jiahu site, details concerning its dating, its place in the prehistory of the Chinese Neolithic, the ethnicity of its population and the results of a tonal analysis of a nearly 9,000-year-old musical instrument found there.

  19. An Early Pleistocene high-resolution paleoclimate reconstruction from the West Turkana (Kenya) HSPDP drill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhecke, Mona; Beck, Catherine; Brown, Erik T.; Cohen, Andrew; Deocampo, Daniel M.; Feibel, Craig S.; Pelletier, Jon D.; Rabideaux, Nathane M.; Sier, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP), and the related Olorgesailie Drilling Project (ODP), recovered ~2 km of drill core since 2012. At the HSPDP West Turkana Kaitio (WTK) site a 216 m-long core that covers the Early Pleistocene time window (1.3 to 1.87 Ma) during which hominids first expanded out of Africa and marine records document reorganization of tropical climate and the development of the strong Walker circulation. WTK carries particular interest for paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental reconstructions as it is located only 2.5 km from the location of one of the most complete hominin skeletons ever recovered (Nariokotome Boy). XRF core scanning data provide a means of evaluating records of past environmental conditions continuously and at high resolution. However, the record contains complex lithologies reflecting repeated episodes of inundation and desiccation along a dynamic lake margin. Here we present a methodological approach to address the highly variable lithostratigraphy of the East African records to establish comprehensive paleoclimate timeseries. The power spectrum of the presented hydroclimate record peaks at Milankovitch cycles, qualifying HSPDP drill cores from the Turkana Basin to be used as high-resolution Early Pleistocene paleoclimate archive. Comparing these data with marine climate reconstructions sheds light into athmospheric processes and continental climate dynamics.

  20. Rectilinear evolution in arvicoline rodents and numerical dating of Iberian Early Pleistocene sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmqvist, Paul; González-Donoso, José María; De Renzi, Miquel

    2014-08-01

    Lozano-Fernández et al. (2013a) have recently published a method intended for numerical dating of Early Pleistocene sites, which is based on the assumption of uniform, constant rate increase through time of mean lower molar tooth length of water voles (Mimomys savini) in a number of levels sampled in the stratigraphic sequence of Atapuerca TD site. They suggest that the regression equation obtained in this local section for site chronology on tooth size could be useful for estimating the numerical age of other localities from southwestern Europe. However, in our opinion this biostratigraphic approach has severe conceptual and methodological problems, which discourage its use as a chronometric tool. These problems include that: (1) the logic behind their approach represents a ‘fallacy of hasty generalization', because the results obtained for a local section are generalized to all possible stratigraphic sequences; (2) the study is based on tooth measurements from a limited set of samples taken in a single locality, which are represented by small numbers of specimens, cover a short time span and have a high level of age uncertainty; (3) the samples analyzed show small, statistically non-significant differences between their mean tooth length values; (4) the approach assumes a linear-straight, orthoevolutionary model of change at constant, monotonic rate for the apparent trend to increasing tooth size in the M. savini lineage; (5) these changes are better described in the Atapuerca TD section by a random walk, or even by a series of independent events, than by a model of rectilinear change; and (6) the application of this methodology to other localities such as the Orce sites, which preserve the oldest evidence of human presence in Europe, would mean that an equation adjusted within a restricted chronological range (1.01-0.8 Ma) is used for extrapolating the ages of sites that are clearly older (˜1.4 Ma).

  1. Early Pleistocene human humeri from the Gran Dolina-TD6 site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carretero, José Miguel; García-González, Rebeca; Rodríguez-García, Laura; Martinón-Torres, María; Rosell, Jordi; Blasco, Ruth; Martín-Francés, Laura; Modesto, Mario; Carbonell, Eudald

    2012-04-01

    In this report, we present a morphometric comparative study of two Early Pleistocene humeri recovered from the TD6 level of the Gran Dolina cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain. ATD6-121 belongs to a child between 4 and 6 years old, whereas ATD6-148 corresponds to an adult. ATD6-148 exhibits the typical pattern of the genus Homo, but it also shows a large olecranon fossa and very thin medial and lateral pillars (also present in ATD6-121), sharing these features with European Middle Pleistocene hominins, Neandertals, and the Bodo Middle Pleistocene humerus. The morphology of the distal epiphysis, together with a few dental traits, suggests a phylogenetic relationship between the TD6 hominins and the Neandertal lineage. Given the older geochronological age of these hominins (ca. 900 ka), which is far from the age estimated by palaeogenetic studies for the population divergence of modern humans and Neandertals (ca. 400 ka), we suggest that this suite of derived "Neandertal" features appeared early in the evolution of the genus Homo. Thus, these features are not "Neandertal" apomorphies but traits which appeared in an ancestral and polymorphic population during the Early Pleistocene. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Permitting - the latest mining risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, W.M.; Munn, F.J. [Cardinal River Coals Ltd., Hinton, AB (Canada)

    1995-05-01

    The Cheviot approach to mine permitting and the status of the Cheviot permitting process are described. The mine is the first Canadian metallurgical mine built since the early 1970s and will replace the Luscar Mine. There have been significant changes in the technology of mining equipment and with the requirements for government regulatory approvals since 1980, when the last mines were built. A permit application must be technically complete and must be legally correct. A valid public involvement process must support an application. A permit application is now an entire process that leads to submission and review of a document. Cardinal River Coals is applying two principles in order to meet these objectives: to be technically advanced and show the ability to manage the environment; and to conduct a proactive and effective public involvement program.

  3. Environmental Baseline Survey for Proposed Land Use Permit Modification for Expansion of the Dynamic Explosive Test Site (DETS) 9940 Main Complex Parking Lot.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, Dennis W.

    2016-02-01

    The approach was to perform a document search, supplemented by a visual site inspection, to identify potential environmental contamination associated with the property. Factors evaluated included hazardous substances; petroleum products and derivatives; environmental restoration sites; areas of concern; storage tanks; oil/water separators; grease traps; wash racks; waste tanks; pesticides; military munitions/ordnance; medical or bio-hazardous waste; radioactive waste; solid/municipal waste; indoor air quality; groundwater; wastewater treatment, collection, and disposal/discharge; drinking water quality; utilities; asbestos; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); radon; lead-based paint; cultural resources; floodplains; and natural/biological resources.

  4. Development sites, feeding modes and early stages of seven European Palloptera species (Diptera, Pallopteridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheray, Graham E

    2014-12-19

    Two hundred and ninety-eight rearing records and 87 larvae and puparia were obtained of seven species of Palloptera Fallén (Diptera, Pallopteridae), mainly in Scotland during 2012-2013. The third stage larva and puparium of each species were assessed morphologically and development sites and feeding modes investigated by rearing, observation and feeding tests. Early stages appear to be distinguished by the swollen, apico-lateral margins of the prothorax which are coated in vestiture and a poorly developed anal lobe with few spicules. Individual pallopteran species are separated by features of the head skeleton, locomotory spicules and the posterior respiratory organs. Five species can be distinguished by unique character states. Observations and feeding tests suggest that the frequently cited attribute of zoophagy is accidental and that saprophagy is the primary larval feeding mode with autumn/winter as the main period of development. Food plants were confirmed for flowerhead and stem developing species and rain is important for maintaining biofilms on which larvae feed. Due to difficulties in capturing adults, especially males, the distribution and abundance of many pallopteran species is probably underestimated. Better informed estimates are possible if early stages are included in biodiversity assessments. To facilitate this for the species investigated, a key to the third stage larva and puparium along with details on finding them, is provided. 

  5. ALERTES-SC3 Early Warning System prototype for South Iberian Peninsula: on-site approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Gallego Carrasco, Javier; Martín Davila, José; Rioja del Rio, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo; Vera, Angel; Ciberia, Angel; Cabieces, Roberto; Strollo, Angelo; Hanka, Winfried; Carranza, Marta

    2016-04-01

    In recent years several Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) have been developed for different parts of the world. The area between SW Cape St. Vicente and the Strait of Gibraltar is one of the most seismically active zones in the Ibero-Maghrebian region, with predominantly moderate and superficial seismicity, but also big events with associated tsunamis are well documented in the area, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In the frame of the ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) Spanish projects, the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS, regional approach, prototype has been developed at the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and is being tested in near real time for south Iberia. This prototype, based on the SeisComP3 software package, is largely based on algorithms derived from the analysis of the first seconds of the P wave records. Calculation of several parameters are carried out, mainly the characteristic period (τc) and the displacement peak (Pd), but also the velocity peak (Pv), the maximum period (τPmáx), among others. In order to warm the areas closest to the hypocentre, places located inside the "blind zone", a on-site EEWS has also been developed by ROA and integrated in the ALERTES-SC3 prototype. From the on-site approach, a warm level is declared from one station as a function of the estimated characteristic period (τc) and the displacement Peak (Pd), although the earthquake location and therefore the lead time available remains unknown. This on-site EEWS is being tested in several Western Mediterranean net (WM) stations as ARNO (Arenosillo, Huelva,Spain) or CHAS (Chafarinas island, North Africa, Spain). Also an on-site low cost station is being developed based in low cost accelerometers. In this work the current state of the on-site EEWS developed, its integration in the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS system and the low cost seismic stations are shown.

  6. Factors Influencing Learner Permit Duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathon P. Ehsani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of countries are requiring an extended learner permit prior to independent driving. The question of when drivers begin the learner permit period, and how long they hold the permit before advancing to independent licensure has received little research attention. Licensure timing is likely to be related to “push” and “pull” factors which may encourage or inhibit the process. To examine this question, we recruited a sample of 90 novice drivers (49 females and 41 males, average age of 15.6 years soon after they obtained a learner permit and instrumented their vehicles to collect a range of driving data. Participants completed a series of surveys at recruitment related to factors that may influence licensure timing. Two distinct findings emerged from the time-to-event analysis that tested these push and pull factors in relation to licensure timing. The first can be conceptualized as teens’ motivation to drive (push, reflected in a younger age when obtaining a learner permit and extensive pre-permit driving experience. The second finding was teens’ perceptions of their parents’ knowledge of their activities (pull; a proxy for a parents’ attentiveness to their teens’ lives. Teens who reported higher levels of their parents’ knowledge of their activities took longer to advance to independent driving. These findings suggest time-to-licensure may be related to teens’ internal motivation to drive, and the ability of parents to facilitate or impede early licensure.

  7. A Threshold-based, on-site earthquake early warning approach for Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Alessandro; Colombelli, Simona; Zollo, Aldo; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2017-04-01

    A real-time strategy for a P-wave based, on-site earthquake early warning system has been developed and tested using the database of Italian earthquakes. The key elements of the proposed methodology are: 1) the real-time, continuous measurement of three peak amplitude parameters (the initial peak of displacement, Pd, velocity, Pv, and acceleration, Pa) along the vertical component of the P-wave signal and 2) their empirical combination to predict the ensuing Peak Ground Velocity at the same site. The observed parameters are compared to prior established threshold values and then converted into a single, dimensionless variable. A local alert level is issued at the recording site as soon as the empirical combination overcomes a given threshold. The three parameters are continuously measured along the recorded signals, starting from the P-wave arrival time, and progressively expanding the time window. A possible risk when using this approach is the inclusion of the S-waves in the analyzed P-wave signal portion, which may lead to an overestimation of the predicted ground shaking level. To minimize the S-wave contamination, an efficient algorithm for the automatic detection of the S-wave arrival time has been included. The algorithm is based on the real-time polarization analysis of the three-component seismogram and on the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) (Rosenberger, 2010; Amoroso et al., 2012) and is able to distinguish variations in the polarization of the original signal, and to discriminate the dominant P-wave signal from the arrival of later S-wave phases. The performance of the method has been evaluated by defining successful, missed and false alarms, and counting the relative percentage, after applying the approach to a testing catalog of Italian earthquake records. The database we used for the system testing and calibration consists of more than 200 Italian events in a magnitude range 3.5 SVD filtering. The proposed methodology provides more reliable

  8. Federal Fisheries Permit (FFP)/ Federal Processor Permit (FPP) Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Federal Fisheries Permit (FFP) is required for vessels of the United States which are used to fish for groundfish in the Gulf of Alaska or Bering Sea and...

  9. An Early Cenozoic Ichthyolith Record from Demerara Rise (ODP Site 1258: Equatorial Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, R. M.; Sibert, E. C.; Norris, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Peak global warmth during the early Eocene is a partial analog to the future structure of marine ecosystems in a high pCO2 world. Early Eocene oceans are generally regarded as supporting warmer oceans with lower overall productivity than today owing to the low concentrations of preserved organic matter in pelagic sediments. It has also been proposed that Eocene oceans were about as productive as now, but higher respiration rates in a warmer-than-modern ocean more efficiently recycled organic matter and nutrients. We investigated Eocene export productivity and its link to taxonomic diversity using the pelagic ichthyolith record. Ichthyoliths are calcium phosphate microfossils including fish teeth and shark denticles and their fragments, and are a unique paleoceanographic proxy because they represent a fossil record for marine vertebrates, a charismatic and tangible part of the ecosystem that generally goes unrepresented in the fossil record. Analysis of the ichthyolith record in Ocean Drilling Program Site 1258 (NE South America) shows a remarkable increase in accumulation rate of ichthyoliths from the Paleocene into the Eocene, suggesting that onset of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum in the equatorial Atlantic was favorable to fish production. Our results suggest that, if anything, the early Eocene maintained higher productivity than in the late Paleocene. These results compare favorably with a record of ichthyolith accumulation in the South Pacific (DSDP 596), which also indicates unusually high rates of fish productivity in the peak of Eocene warm climates. Low resolution data sets from the Pacific suggest an explosion of morphotypes during the warm period associated with an increase in ichthyolith mass accumulation rates. Peak global warmth, therefore, appears to be associated with both higher fish production and higher taxonomic diversity than suggested by previous reconstructions of Eocene primary production. Increasing the amount of continuous records of

  10. Longitudinal Study of Children in Somerset County Who Were Permitted to Enter School Early under Act 312 of the 1949 Pennsylvania General Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, James J.; Breniman, Emery R.

    The academic careers of three groups of children were followed from grade 1 to grade 12 to determine the effectiveness of early school admission criteria. Children with chronological ages of less than 5 years, 7 months could qualify for early admission into first grade if they achieved a mental age of six years on the Stanford Binet, Form L. Group…

  11. Planktic foraminiferal photosymbiont bleaching during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (Site 1051, northwestern Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Valeria; D'Onofrio, Roberta; Dickens, Gerald Roy; Wade, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    The symbiotic relationship with algae is a key strategy adopted by many modern species and by early Paleogene shallow-dwelling planktic foraminifera. The endosymbionts play an important role in foraminiferal calcification, longevity and growth, allowing the host to succeed in oligotrophic environment. We have indirect evidence on the presence and loss of algae photosymbionts because symbionts modify the chemistry of the microenvironment where a foraminifer calcifies, resulting in a characteristic geochemical signature between test size and δ13C. We present here the result of a test on loss of algal photosymbiont (bleaching) in planktic foraminifera from the northwest Atlantic Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1051 across the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), the interval ( 49-53 Ma) when Earth surface temperatures and probably atmospheric pCO2 reached their Cenozoic maximum. We select this interval because two symbiont-bearing planktic foraminiferal genera Morozovella and Acarinina, that were important calcifiers of the early Paleogene tropical-subtropical oceans, experienced a marked and permanent switch in abundance at the beginning of the EECO, close to the carbon isotope excursion known as J event. Specifically, the relative abundance of Morozovella permanently decreased by at least half, along with a progressive decrease in the number of species. Concomitantly, the genus Acarinina almost doubled its abundance and diversified within the EECO. Many stressors inducing loss of photosymbiosis may have occurred during the long-lasting environmental conditions relating to the EECO extreme warmth, such as high pCO2 and possible decrease of the surface-water pH. The bleaching may therefore represent a potential mechanism to explain the rapid morozovellid decline at the start of the EECO. Our geochemical data from Site 1051 demonstrate that there was indeed a reduction of algal-symbiosis in morozovellids at the EECO beginning. This bleaching event occurred at the

  12. Advancing family health through the Garden of Eatin': on-site food gardens in early childhood education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaufan, Claudia; Yeh, Jarmin; Sigal, Byron

    2015-04-01

    Nutritional practices develop over the life course. Developing healthy habits at an early age can contribute to combating increasing child obesity rates. Through a range of activities that rely on the presence of an on-site food garden, North Bay Children's Center (NBCC), an early childhood education program, has enacted a "culture of health" into all aspects of the curriculum to promote healthy eating practices among children, families, teachers and staff. NBCC's garden program serves as a model in early childhood education and as a community-based intervention to improve family health and prevent child obesity.

  13. Integrated Geophysycal Prospecting in Late Antiquity and Early Medieval Sites in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotta, Maria Teresa; Leucci, Giovanni; De Giorgi, Lara; Matera, Loredana; Persico, Raffaele; Muci, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, the results of some integrated geophysical prospecting (magnetometric and GPR) are exposed. This work has been performed in collaboration between archaeologists and geophysicists within the research project "History and Global Archaeology of the Rural Landascapes in Italy, between Late Antiquity and Medieval period. Integrated systems of sources, methodologies, and technologies for a sustainable development", financed by the Italian Ministry for Instruction, University and Research MIUR. In particular, the archaeological sites of Badia and San Giovanni in Malcantone, both in the Apulia Region (eastern-southern Italy) have been prospect. The sites have been identified on the basis of available documents, archaeological surveys and testimonies. In particular, we know that in Badia [1] it was probable the presence of an ancient roman villa of the late ancient period (strongly damaged by the subsequent ploughing activities). Whereas in San Giovanni there is still, today, a small chapel (deconsecrated) that was likely to be part of a previous larger church (probably a basilica of the early Christian period) restricted in the subsequent centuries (probably in more phases). The Saracen raids of the XVI centuries made the site ruined and abandoned. In both sites integrated prospecting have been performed [2-6] with a the integration of archaeological, magnetometer and a GPR data have provided some interesting results, allowing to overcome the difficulties relative to an extensive GPR prospecting, that could not be performed because of the intrinsic superficial roughness and/or the intensive ploughing activities. The prospecting activities, in particular, have added elements that seem to confirm the main archaeological hypothesis that motivate their performing, as it will be show at the conference. References [1] M. T, Giannotta, G. Leucci, R. Persico, M. Leo Imperiale, The archaeological site of Badia in terra d'Otranto: contribution of the

  14. Permit.LOA table

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table includes the effective dates by vessel and permit number for each issued letter of authorization (LOA) by the Permit Office (APSD)

  15. State Licenses & Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Starting a business? Confused about whether you need a business license or permit? Virtually every business needs some form of license or permit to operate legally....

  16. Configuration and specifications of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for early site specific weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; López-Granados, Francisca; De Castro, Ana Isabel; Peña-Barragán, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A new aerial platform has risen recently for image acquisition, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). This article describes the technical specifications and configuration of a UAV used to capture remote images for early season site- specific weed management (ESSWM). Image spatial and spectral properties required for weed seedling discrimination were also evaluated. Two different sensors, a still visible camera and a six-band multispectral camera, and three flight altitudes (30, 60 and 100 m) were tested over a naturally infested sunflower field. The main phases of the UAV workflow were the following: 1) mission planning, 2) UAV flight and image acquisition, and 3) image pre-processing. Three different aspects were needed to plan the route: flight area, camera specifications and UAV tasks. The pre-processing phase included the correct alignment of the six bands of the multispectral imagery and the orthorectification and mosaicking of the individual images captured in each flight. The image pixel size, area covered by each image and flight timing were very sensitive to flight altitude. At a lower altitude, the UAV captured images of finer spatial resolution, although the number of images needed to cover the whole field may be a limiting factor due to the energy required for a greater flight length and computational requirements for the further mosaicking process. Spectral differences between weeds, crop and bare soil were significant in the vegetation indices studied (Excess Green Index, Normalised Green-Red Difference Index and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index), mainly at a 30 m altitude. However, greater spectral separability was obtained between vegetation and bare soil with the index NDVI. These results suggest that an agreement among spectral and spatial resolutions is needed to optimise the flight mission according to every agronomical objective as affected by the size of the smaller object to be discriminated (weed plants or weed patches).

  17. Configuration and specifications of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV for early site specific weed management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Torres-Sánchez

    Full Text Available A new aerial platform has risen recently for image acquisition, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV. This article describes the technical specifications and configuration of a UAV used to capture remote images for early season site- specific weed management (ESSWM. Image spatial and spectral properties required for weed seedling discrimination were also evaluated. Two different sensors, a still visible camera and a six-band multispectral camera, and three flight altitudes (30, 60 and 100 m were tested over a naturally infested sunflower field. The main phases of the UAV workflow were the following: 1 mission planning, 2 UAV flight and image acquisition, and 3 image pre-processing. Three different aspects were needed to plan the route: flight area, camera specifications and UAV tasks. The pre-processing phase included the correct alignment of the six bands of the multispectral imagery and the orthorectification and mosaicking of the individual images captured in each flight. The image pixel size, area covered by each image and flight timing were very sensitive to flight altitude. At a lower altitude, the UAV captured images of finer spatial resolution, although the number of images needed to cover the whole field may be a limiting factor due to the energy required for a greater flight length and computational requirements for the further mosaicking process. Spectral differences between weeds, crop and bare soil were significant in the vegetation indices studied (Excess Green Index, Normalised Green-Red Difference Index and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index, mainly at a 30 m altitude. However, greater spectral separability was obtained between vegetation and bare soil with the index NDVI. These results suggest that an agreement among spectral and spatial resolutions is needed to optimise the flight mission according to every agronomical objective as affected by the size of the smaller object to be discriminated (weed plants or weed patches.

  18. Prediction of residual stress due to early age behaviour of massive concrete structures: on site experiments and macroscopic modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Zreiki, Jihad; Chaouche, Mohend; Moranville, Micheline

    2008-01-01

    Early age behaviour of concrete is based on complex multi-physical and multiscale phenomena. The predication of both cracking risk and residual stresses in hardened concrete structures is still a challenging task. We propose in this paper a practical method to characterize in the construction site the material parameters and to identify a macroscopic model from simple tests. We propose for instance to use a restrained shrinkage ring test to identify a basic early age creep model based on a simple ageing visco-elastic Kelvin model. The strain data obtained from this test can be treated through an early age finite element incremental procedure such that the fitting parameters of the creep law can be quickly identified. The others properties of concrete have been measured at different ages (elastic properties, hydration kinetics, and coefficient of thermal expansion). From the identified early age model, we computed the temperature rise and the stress development in a non reinforced concrete stress for nuclear w...

  19. 75 FR 24993 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Early...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Early Site Permit, Proposed No Significant Hazards Consideration Determination, and Opportunity for a Hearing AGENCY... staff must also determine that the amendment request involves no significant hazards...

  20. Retrovirus-Mediated Expression of E2A-PBX1 Blocks Lymphoid Fate but Permits Retention of Myeloid Potential in Early Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Woodcroft

    Full Text Available The oncogenic transcription factor E2A-PBX1 is expressed consequent to chromosomal translocation 1;19 and is an important oncogenic driver in cases of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Elucidating the mechanism by which E2A-PBX1 induces lymphoid leukemia would be expedited by the availability of a tractable experimental model in which enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces pre-B-cell ALL. However, hematopoietic reconstitution of irradiated mice with bone marrow infected with E2A-PBX1-expressing retroviruses consistently gives rise to myeloid, not lymphoid, leukemia. Here, we elucidate the hematopoietic consequences of forced E2A-PBX1 expression in primary murine hematopoietic progenitors. We show that introducing E2A-PBX1 into multipotent progenitors permits the retention of myeloid potential but imposes a dense barrier to lymphoid development prior to the common lymphoid progenitor stage, thus helping to explain the eventual development of myeloid, and not lymphoid, leukemia in transplanted mice. Our findings also indicate that E2A-PBX1 enforces the aberrant, persistent expression of some genes that would normally have been down-regulated in the subsequent course of hematopoietic maturation. We show that enforced expression of one such gene, Hoxa9, a proto-oncogene associated with myeloid leukemia, partially reproduces the phenotype produced by E2A-PBX1 itself. Existing evidence suggests that the 1;19 translocation event takes place in committed B-lymphoid progenitors. However, we find that retrovirus-enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in committed pro-B-cells results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that the neoplastic phenotype induced by E2A-PBX1 is determined by the developmental stage of the cell into which the oncoprotein is introduced.

  1. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Chamness, Michele A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs.

  2. Characterization of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats sites in Streptococcus mutans isolated from early childhood caries patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Li, Tiancheng; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Huo, Yuanyuan; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2017-07-29

    The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) sites in 45 clinical Streptococcus mutans strains and their relationship to the clinical manifestations of early childhood caries (ECC). Forty-five S. mutans strains were isolated from the plaque samples taken from sixty-three children. CRISPR sites were sequenced and BLAST was used to compare these sites to those in the CRISPRTarget database. The association between the distribution of CRISPR sites and the manifestation of caries was analyzed by Chi-Square test. Further, biofilm formation (by crystal violet staining) and the synthesis of polysaccharide (by anthrone-sulfuric method) of all clinical isolated S. mutans strains with both CRISPR sites and no CRISPR site were comapared. Finally, acidogenicity and acidurity of two typical strains were determined using pH drop and acid tolerance assays. Biofilm formation and EPS synthesis by two typical strains were compared by 3D CLSM (Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope) assays and the expression of gtf genes were evaluated using qPCR. We found that most of the spacers in the clinical S. mutans strains were derived from Streptococcus phages APCM01 and M102. The number of CRISPR sites in these strains was associated with the clinical manifestations of ECC. Moreover, we found that the biofilm formation and EPS synthesis ability of the S. mutans strains with both CRISPR sites was significant improved. An association was found between the distribution of CRISPR sites and the clinical manifestations of caries. The CRISPR sites might contribute to the cariogenic potential of S. mutans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydropower : A Regulatory Guide to Permitting and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Gilbert A.

    1992-12-01

    The design, construction and operation of a hydropower project can result in many potential impacts. These potential impacts are of concern to a host of federal, state, and local authorities. Early consultation with land and water management, fish and wildlife resource protection, and health and human safety-oriented agencies should occur to determine specific concerns and study requirements for each proposed project. This Guide to Permitting and Licensing outlines the characteristic features of attractive hydropower sites; summarizes an array of developmental constraints; illustrates potential environmental impacts and concerns; and summarizes all federal, state, and local permitting and licensing requirements.

  4. Hydropower: A Regulatory Guide to Permitting and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Gilbert A.

    1992-12-01

    The design, construction and operation of a hydropower project can result in many potential impacts. These potential impacts are of concern to a host of federal, state, and local authorities. Early consultation with land and water management, fish and wildlife resource protection, and health and human safety-oriented agencies should occur to determine specific concerns and study requirements for each proposed project. This Guide to Permitting and Licensing outlines the characteristic features of attractive hydropower sites; summarizes an array of developmental constraints; illustrates potential environmental impacts and concerns; and summarizes all federal, state, and local permitting and licensing requirements.

  5. Transient elevation of amygdala alpha 2 adrenergic receptor binding sites during the early stages of amygdala kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M J; Vigil, A; Savage, D D; Weiss, G K

    1990-03-01

    Enhanced noradrenergic neurotransmission retards but does not prevent the development of kindling. We previously reported that locus coeruleus (LC) alpha 2 adrenergic receptor binding sites are transiently elevated during the early stages of kindling development. Since the firing activity of LC noradrenergic neurons is partially regulated via an alpha 2 receptor-mediated recurrent inhibition, the transient elevation in LC alpha 2 receptors could decrease LC activity and consequently facilitate the development of kindling. Transient elevation of alpha 2 receptor binding sites during early stages of kindling may also occur on noradrenergic axon terminals projecting to forebrain sites. Using in vitro neurotransmitter autoradiography techniques, we investigated this hypothesis by measuring specific [3H]idazoxan binding in 5 different areas of rat forebrain at 2 different stages of kindling development. After 2 class 1 kindled seizures, specific [3H]idazoxan binding was elevated significantly in the amygdala, but not in other forebrain regions. No differences in specific [3H]idazoxan binding were observed in any of the 5 brain regions in rats kindled to a single class 5 kindled motor seizure. Saturation of binding experiments indicated that the increase in amygdala [3H]idazoxan binding, following 2 class 1 kindled motor seizures, was due to an increase in the total number of alpha 2 receptor binding sites without a change in the affinity of the binding sites for [3H]idazoxan. Thus, the transient increase in alpha 2 receptors that occurs in the LC in the early stages of kindling also occurs in the forebrain region in which the kindled seizure originates.

  6. Early decision framework for integrating sustainable risk management for complex remediation sites: Drivers, barriers, and performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harclerode, Melissa A; Macbeth, Tamzen W; Miller, Michael E; Gurr, Christopher J; Myers, Teri S

    2016-12-15

    As the environmental remediation industry matures, remaining sites often have significant underlying technical challenges and financial constraints. More often than not, significant remediation efforts at these "complex" sites have not achieved stringent, promulgated cleanup goals. Decisions then have to be made about whether and how to commit additional resources towards achieving those goals, which are often not achievable nor required to protect receptors. Guidance on cleanup approaches focused on evaluating and managing site-specific conditions and risks, rather than uniformly meeting contaminant cleanup criteria in all media, is available to aid in this decision. Although these risk-based cleanup approaches, such as alternative endpoints and adaptive management strategies, have been developed, they are under-utilized due to environmental, socio-economic, and risk perception barriers. Also, these approaches are usually implemented late in the project life cycle after unsuccessful remedial attempts to achieve stringent cleanup criteria. In this article, we address these barriers by developing an early decision framework to identify if site characteristics support sustainable risk management, and develop performance metrics and tools to evaluate and implement successful risk-based cleanup approaches. In addition, we address uncertainty and risk perception challenges by aligning risk-based cleanup approaches with the concepts of risk management and sustainable remediation. This approach was developed in the context of lessons learned from implementing remediation at complex sites, but as a framework can, and should, be applied to all sites undergoing remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-Dimensional High-Frequency Ultrasonography for Early Detection and Characterization of Embryo Implantation Site Development in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peavey, Mary C.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Szwarc, Maria M.; Gibbons, William E.; Valdes, Cecilia T.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a powerful tool to non-invasively monitor in real time the development of the human fetus in utero. Although genetically engineered mice have served as valuable in vivo models to study both embryo implantation and pregnancy progression, such studies usually require sacrifice of parous mice for subsequent phenotypic analysis. To address this issue, we used three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction in silico of high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging data for early detection and characterization of murine embryo implantation sites and their development in utero. With HFUS imaging followed by 3-D reconstruction, we were able to precisely quantify embryo implantation site number and embryonic developmental progression in pregnant C57BL6J/129S mice from as early as 5.5 days post coitus (d.p.c.) through to 9.5 d.p.c. using a VisualSonics Vevo 2100 (MS550S) transducer. In addition to measurements of implantation site number, location, volume and spacing, embryo viability via cardiac activity monitoring was also achieved. A total of 12 dams were imaged with HFUS with approximately 100 embryos examined per embryonic day. For the post-implantation period (5.5 to 8.5 d.p.c.), 3-D reconstruction of the gravid uterus in mesh or solid overlay format enabled visual representation in silico of implantation site location, number, spacing distances, and site volume within each uterine horn. Therefore, this short technical report describes the feasibility of using 3-D HFUS imaging for early detection and analysis of post-implantation events in the pregnant mouse with the ability to longitudinally monitor the development of these early pregnancy events in a non-invasive manner. As genetically engineered mice continue to be used to characterize female reproductive phenotypes, we believe this reliable and non-invasive method to detect, quantify, and characterize early implantation events will prove to be an invaluable investigative tool for the study of female

  8. 78 FR 73704 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... sufficient to offset the estimated costs associated with working with the applicants to develop site plans... protocols for testing their effectiveness. The Service anticipates limiting costs associated with studying... for working with applicants, assessing permit applications, and undertaking monitoring associated...

  9. Pi-EEWS: a low cost prototype for on-site earthquake early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Vera, Angel; Morgado, Arturo; Rioja, Carlos; Davila, Jose Martin; Cabieces, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA), with the participation of the Cadiz University (UCA), have been developed the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS (regional approach) based on the SeisComP3 software package. This development has been done in the frame of the Spanish ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) projects, and now a days it is being tested in real time for south Iberia. Additionally, the ALERTES-SC3 system integrates an on-site EEWS software, developed by ROA-UCA, which is running for testing in real time in some seismic broad band stations of the WM network. Regional EEWS are not able to provide alerts in the area closet to the epicentre (blind zone), so a dense on-site EEWS is necessary. As it was mentioned, ALERTES-SC3 inludes the on-site software running on several WM stations but a more dense on-site stations are necessary to cover the blind zones. In order to densify this areas, inside of the "blind zones", a low cost on-site prototype "Pi-EEWS", based on a Raspberry Pi card and low cost acelerometers. In this work the main design ideas, the components and its capabilities will be shown.

  10. Major early Eocene carbon cycle perturbations and changes in planktic foraminiferal assemblages from the southeast Atlantic Ocean (ODP Site 1263)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Valeria; D'Onofrio, Roberta; Dickens, Gerald Roy; Wade, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    On a paleoclimatic perspective the early Paleogene represents one of the most interesting and dynamic intervals of the Earth's history. Present record indicates that the Earth climate system reached its Cenozoic maximum peak of global warming and probably of pCO2 during the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO, 49-53 Ma). Superimposed to the general trend, our planet experienced short-term ( 40-200 kyr) repeated peaks in global temperatures and major changes in the carbon cycle, known as hyperthermals. Great scientific interest has been focused on the early Paleogene hyperthermal events, given the assumed similarity with the current climatic scenario. Less attention has been dedicated to the EECO long lasting perturbation of extraordinary warming thus many characters of this interval still remain largely unconstrained, especially as for the biotic response. We present here results on early Eocene planktic foraminiferal analysis from the southeast Atlantic Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge, Leg 208) to explore possible relationship between changes in assemblages and carbon cycle perturbation. The time interval is of particular interest for an abrupt switch occurred at low-latitude of the northern hemisphere between two important calcifiers of the tropical-subtropical early Paleogene oceans, the genera Morozovella and Acarinina at the carbon isotopic excursion known as J event, at the EECO onset. Precisely, the relative abundance of Morozovella permanently decreased by at least half, along with a progressive decrease in the number of species. Concomitantly, Acarinina almost doubled its abundance and diversified. Site 1263 was located during the early Eocene at a latitude of 40° south therefore representing a temperate setting of southern hemisphere not yet explored for planktic foraminiferal changes. We document a permanent decrease in Morozovella abundance at the beginning of the EECO, although this decline is delayed by 165 kyr with respect to

  11. Site Development and Teaching of Motor Skills in Early Childhood Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gil Madrona

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the stage of Early Childhood Education children continue a progressive discovery of their body itself as a source of feelings and sensations, exploring the different possibilities of action and body functions, will constitute the necessary experiences upon which children’s thought is being built. Besides, affective relationships established in situations of psychomotor education, and particularly through game, will be essential for children’s emotional development. In this sense, this article is focused on justifying the necessary presence of Psychomotor education in Early Childhood Education as well as on showing a pedagogical proposal based on an attractive and entertaining motor intervention for children at this stage. This article contains concepts and assumptions about the psychomotor development, movement contents, motor game and the methodological approach where psychomotor storytelling, learning corners, workshops and projects based on action and adventure spaces shine in their own right. Moreover, a didactic design based on programming motor skills at this stage of Early Childhood Education in a funny and lively way also plays a relevant role in this article. We argue that professionals working in the field of Early Childhood psychomotor skills may know and recognize the value of the proposals shown here so that they can teach us to be more critical regarding our professional practice, increasing our concern about the development of motor skills – physical education in Early Childhood Education in its systematic form – which without any doubt will result in children’s higher levels of welfare and health with regards to their own construction of the reality which surrounds them.

  12. BCDC Minor Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — An administrative permit can be issued for an activity that qualifies as a minor repair or improvement in a relatively short period of time and without a public...

  13. Coal Mine Permit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — ESRI ArcView shapefile depicting New Mexico coal mines permitted under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), by either the NM Mining these...

  14. BCDC Major Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Data depicts the majority of the major permits that BCDC has issued. Data has been created by a team of interns and staff and has been digitized using maps provided...

  15. California Tribal Gasoline Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing a draft general permit under the Clean Air Act Federal Indian Country Minor NSR program for gasoline dispensing facilities, such as gas stations, located in Indian country within the geographical boundaries of California.

  16. Allegheny County Asbestos Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Asbestos permit data issued by the County for commercial building demolitions and renovations as required by the EPA. This file is updated daily and can be...

  17. Early Exposures to Ecogenomics: Effects of Priming and Web Site Interactivity Among Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Mark J.W.; Koolstra, Cees M.; Willems, J.T.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of public introductions to emerging technologies, this study examined effects of priming and Web site interactivity on adolescents’ attitude development and information processing. In a four (priming) by three (interactivity levels) experiment, participants (N = 273) were required to

  18. Early establishment of multiple release site connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groc, Laurent; Gustafsson, Bengt; Hanse, Eric

    2003-05-01

    The strength of the synaptic transmission between two neurons critically depends on the number of release sites connecting the neurons. Here we examine the development of connectivity between gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) were recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamped CA1 pyramidal neurons. By comparing spontaneous and miniature (action potential-independent) GABAergic PSCs, we found that multiple release site connectivity is established already at the first postnatal day and that the degree of connectivity remains unaltered into adulthood. During the same time there is a dramatic increase in the number of GABAergic synapses on each pyramidal neuron as indicated by the increase in frequency of miniature GABAergic PSCs. These results indicate that during development a given interneuron contacts an increasing number of target pyramidal neurons but with the same multiple release site connectivity. It has been shown previously that the connectivity between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons is initially restricted to one release site, and develops gradually. The present result thus suggests different mechanisms to govern the maturation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmissions.

  19. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  20. Tibial nerve SEPs localized the lesion site in a patient with early tabes dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, M; Katayama, A; Miura, T; Shimizu, T; Inoue, K

    2005-04-26

    There is controversy regarding the initial pathology of tabes dorsalis. In a patient with early tabes dorsalis, tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials elicited normal P15, a delayed traveling peak in the lumbar bipolar leads, and absent subsequent components. Based on the comparison with normative data and stimulation at different intensities, the authors conclude that only the slower conducting antidromic motor volleys are preserved, whereas the dorsal root is damaged at its distal end.

  1. Sedimentary Environment of the Early Pleistocene Gravels of the Edfu formation from the Saqqara Archaeological Site (Egypt – Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocka Anna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A gravel horizon is preserved in several locations within the world-wide known archaeological site in Saqqara (northern Egypt. It is characterized by a variable thickness, composed of coarse, quartz, quartzitic and flint pebbles, and considered to correspond to gravels of the Edfu Formation, deposited in the Early Pleistocene by the early phase of the Nile development (Protonile Phase. This relatively short (ca. 200 ka and at the same time very dynamic period of Protonile activity during the Edfu Pluvial is one of the most poorly recognized hydrological-climatic episodes of the Quaternary in north-eastern Africa. This paper is focused on the preliminary sedimentological-petrographic characteristics of these deposits and an attempt to indicate their source areas as well as mechanisms of transportation and deposition in the context of Pleistocene pluvial episodes.

  2. The archaeology, chronology and stratigraphy of Madjedbebe (Malakunanja II): A site in northern Australia with early occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Chris; Smith, Mike; Marwick, Ben; Fullagar, Richard; Wallis, Lynley A; Faulkner, Patrick; Manne, Tiina; Hayes, Elspeth; Roberts, Richard G; Jacobs, Zenobia; Carah, Xavier; Lowe, Kelsey M; Matthews, Jacqueline; Florin, S Anna

    2015-06-01

    Published ages of >50 ka for occupation at Madjedbebe (Malakunanja II) in Australia's north have kept the site prominent in discussions about the colonisation of Sahul. The site also contains one of the largest stone artefact assemblages in Sahul for this early period. However, the stone artefacts and other important archaeological components of the site have never been described in detail, leading to persistent doubts about its stratigraphic integrity. We report on our analysis of the stone artefacts and faunal and other materials recovered during the 1989 excavations, as well as the stratigraphy and depositional history recorded by the original excavators. We demonstrate that the technology and raw materials of the early assemblage are distinctive from those in the overlying layers. Silcrete and quartzite artefacts are common in the early assemblage, which also includes edge-ground axe fragments and ground haematite. The lower flaked stone assemblage is distinctive, comprising a mix of long convergent flakes, some radial flakes with faceted platforms, and many small thin silcrete flakes that we interpret as thinning flakes. Residue and use-wear analysis indicate occasional grinding of haematite and woodworking, as well as frequent abrading of platform edges on thinning flakes. We conclude that previous claims of extensive displacement of artefacts and post-depositional disturbance may have been overstated. The stone artefacts and stratigraphic details support previous claims for human occupation 50-60 ka and show that human occupation during this time differed from later periods. We discuss the implications of these new data for understanding the first human colonisation of Sahul.

  3. Becoming people : early iron age courtyard sites in Norway as arenas for rites de passage

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Niall John Oma

    2010-01-01

    This paper suggests that the courtyard sites of western Scandinavia were primarily arenas for transformation rituals from childhood to manhood. These were central, defining practices for both individuals and society as a whole. Due to their liminality, these processes can be difficult to engage with archaeologically. Also our cultural situatedness often leaves marginality out of interpretations. This paper wishes to show how youths and age-set institutions could be the producers of m...

  4. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  5. Notes about the Early Bronze Age site of “Grotta dei Banditi”.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pacciarelli

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Grotta dei Banditi is a cave located in the Vena del Gesso Romagnola (a Miocenic Gypsum Geological Formation near Brisighella. Excavations made in 1973 have revealed a thick stratum (from 1,30 to about 3 meters, in which have been found stratified hearths and abundant finds of the Early Bronze Age. The pottery may be assigned to an advanced – but probably not final – stage of this period, according with a 14C date (1890-1750 BC 1 ?.

  6. Clearcutting and Site Preparation, but Not Planting, Promoted Early Tree Regeneration in Boreal Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Morimoto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The stand initiation stage decisively influences future forest structure and composition, particularly in the boreal forest which is a stand replacement disturbance driven system. In boreal Alaska, the conventional forest management paradigm has focused on the production of large-dimension timber, particularly white spruce (Picea glauca. However, energy generation and heating from wood is increasing, and is likely to significantly expand total forest harvest, further shifting management focus to fuelwood production. We evaluated the effects of forest harvest management practices on post-harvest regeneration by examining whether harvest type, site preparation method, and reforestation technique resulted in differences in forest regeneration in terms of species presence, dominance, basal area, and total stem biomass using a stochastic gradient boosting (TreeNet algorithm. We recorded diameter at breast height and height of white spruce, birch (Betula neoalaskana, and aspen (Populus tremuloides in 726 plots from 30 harvest units, distributed across the various harvest and treatment types, harvest years, harvest sizes, and geographical locations. Our results indicate that management practices suitable/acceptable for woody biomass production differ from the more traditional dimensional timber production from white spruce-focused management. Artificial reforestation does not differ from natural regeneration in obtaining more stems or producing greater biomass. Clearcutting and site preparation increased tree regeneration, basal area, and woody biomass when compared to a partial harvest with no site preparation. Planting of white spruce in the Alaskan boreal forest may only be necessary in some specific circumstances, such as years with no/low white spruce seed crop, or in landscapes depleted of seed trees.

  7. Early precursors of site-specific cancers in college men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, A S; Paffenbarger, R S; Anderson, K; Lee, J E

    1985-01-01

    Physical and social characteristics recorded at college physical examination and reported in subsequent questionnaires to alumni in 1962 or 1966 by 50,000 former students from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania were reviewed for their relationship to major site-specific cancer occurrence. The records of 1,359 subjects who died with a major site-specific cancer in a 16- to 50-year follow-up period and of 672 subjects who reported such a cancer by mail questionnaire in 1976 or 1977 were compared with those of 8,084 matched classmates who were known to be alive and free of cancer at the time subjects with cancer had died or had been diagnosed. Cigarette smoking, as reported both in student years and years as alumni, predicted increased risk for cancers of the respiratory tract, pancreas, and bladder. Student coffee consumption was associated with elevated risk for leukemia, but it was unrelated to cancers of the pancreas and bladder. Male students with a record of proteinuria at college physical examination experienced increased risk of kidney cancer, and those with a history of tonsillectomy experienced increased risk of prostate cancer. Students who at college entrance reported occasional vague abdominal pain were at elevated risk for pancreatic and colorectal cancers in later years. Increased body weight during college was associated with increased risks of kidney and bladder cancers, whereas for alumni this index was associated only with kidney cancer. Increased weight-for-height during college (but not in 1962 or 1966) predicted increased occurrence of female breast cancer. Jewish students experienced elevated risk for subsequent cancers of the female breast, colon, and combined colorectum. These and other findings are presented as clues deserving further exploration for any etiologic significance that they may hold for the cancer sites studied.

  8. Early human occupation of Western Europe: Paleomagnetic dates for two paleolithic sites in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oms, O.; Parés, J. M.; Martínez-Navarro, B.; Agustí, J.; Toro, I.; Martínez-Fernández, G.; Turq, A.

    2000-01-01

    The lacustrine deposits infilling the intramontane Guadix-Baza Basin, in the Betic Range of Southern Spain, have yielded abundant well-preserved lithic artifacts. In addition, the lake beds contain a wide range of micromammals including Mimomys savini and Allophaiomys burgondiae and large mammals such as Mammuthus and Hippopotamus together with the African saber-toothed felid Megantereon. The association of the lithic artifacts along with the fossil assemblages, themselves of prime significance in the Eurasian mammal biochronology, is providing new insight into the controversy of the human settlement in Southern Europe. Despite the importance of the artifacts and fossil assemblage, estimates of the geological age of the site are still in conflict. Some attempts at dating the sediments have included biochronology, uranium series, amino acid racemization, and stratigraphic correlation with other well-dated sections in the basin, but so far have failed to yield unambiguous ages. Here we present paleomagnetic age dating at the relevant localities and thus provide useful age constraints for this critical paleoanthropological and mammal site. Our data provide firm evidence for human occupation in Southern Europe in the Lower Pleistocene, around 1 mega-annum ago. The current view of when and how hominids first dispersed into Europe needs to be reevaluated. PMID:10973485

  9. Uav Surveying for a Complete Mapping and Documentation of Archaeological Findings. The Early Neolithic Site of Portonovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, E. S.; Conati Barbaro, C.; Pierdicca, R.; Bozzi, C. A.; Tassetti, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    The huge potential of 3D digital acquisition techniques for the documentation of archaeological sites, as well as the related findings, is almost well established. In spite of the variety of available techniques, a sole documentation pipeline cannot be defined a priori because of the diversity of archaeological settings. Stratigraphic archaeological excavations, for example, require a systematic, quick and low cost 3D single-surface documentation because the nature of stratigraphic archaeology compels providing documentary evidence of any excavation phase. Only within a destructive process each single excavation cannot be identified, documented and interpreted and this implies the necessity of a re- examination of the work on field. In this context, this paper describes the methodology, carried out during the last years, to 3D document the Early Neolithic site of Portonovo (Ancona, Italy) and, in particular, its latest step consisting in a photogrammetric aerial survey by means of UAV platform. It completes the previous research delivered in the same site by means of terrestrial laser scanning and close range techniques and sets out different options for further reflection in terms of site coverage, resolution and campaign cost. With the support of a topographic network and a unique reference system, the full documentation of the site is managed in order to detail each excavation phase; besides, the final output proves how the 3D digital methodology can be completely integrated with reasonable costs during the excavation and used to interpret the archaeological context. Further contribution of this work is the comparison between several acquisition techniques (i.e. terrestrial and aerial), which could be useful as decision support system for different archaeological scenarios. The main objectives of the comparison are: i) the evaluation of 3D mapping accuracy from different data sources, ii) the definition of a standard pipeline for different archaeological needs

  10. A reappraisal of the stratigraphy and chronology of Early Pliocene palaeontological sites from Lanzarote Island containing fossil terrestrial animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomoschitz, Alejandro; Sánchez Marco, Antonio; Huertas, María José; Betancort, Juan F.; Isern, Arnau; Sanz, Elena; Meco, Joaquín

    2016-11-01

    The Famara massif, in the north of Lanzarote Island, constitutes the remains of a former island inhabited by the oldest known vertebrate fauna of the Canary archipelago off the coast of Africa. In this study, new ages are offered for the underlying and overlying basaltic lava flows of two paleontological sites. The island's three major palaeontological sites, which contain remains of this ancient fauna (Valle Grande, Valle Chico and Fuente de Gusa), are intercorrelated according to their lithologies, sedimentology, palaeontological content and geochronology. The new K/Ar age interval for the fossiliferous sedimentary deposits ranges between 4.3 ± 0.7 and 3.78 ± 0.71 Ma, within the Early Pliocene, and shows that the first known terrestrial animals in Lanzarote were present on the island for about 500 ka. The principal component of the deposits is a bioclastic calcarenite of aeolian origin (sand sheet deposits), which is present in all three sites and constitutes 65% of the beds. The remaining 35% is of fluvial-aeolian origin (mainly stream deposits). All the beds contain the same fossils (insect egg pods, land snails, avian eggshells and tortoise eggshells). The local palaeogeography and the formation of the deposits were conditioned by a flat plain, larger than 16 km2, over which aeolian sands moved freely with a prevailing NNE-WSW wind direction. In agreement with previous investigations, the palaeoclimate in this interval (ca. 4.3 to 3.8 Ma) must have been mainly dry with some rainy episodes.

  11. Approaches to Streamline Air Permitting for Combined Heat and Power: Permits by Rule and General Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This factsheet provides information about permit by rule (PBR) and general permit (GP) processes, including the factors that contributed to their development and lessons learned from their implementation.

  12. Pleistocene magnetochronology of early hominin sites at Ceprano and Fontana Ranuccio, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttoni, Giovanni; Scardia, Giancarlo; Kent, Dennis V.; Swisher, Carl C.; Manzi, Giorgio

    2009-08-01

    Paleomagnetic analyses were conducted on two cores drilled at Ceprano in central Italy where an incomplete hominin cranium was discovered in 1994, as well as on two additional cores from the nearby site of Fontana Ranuccio that yielded hominin remains associated with an Acheulean industry. No evidence for the 0.78 Ma Brunhes-Matuyama boundary was found at Ceprano down to 45 m below the level that yielded the hominin cranium. The Ceprano lithostratigraphy and the paleomagnetic age constraints are broadly consistent with the stratigraphy of the Liri lacustrine sequence of the Latina Valley, constrained by published K-Ar ages between ~ 0.6 and ~ 0.35 Ma, and according to an age model with magnetic susceptibility supported by pollen facies data, suggest that the level that yielded the hominin cranium has an age of ~ 0.45 (+ 0.05, - 0.10) Ma. Evidence for the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary was found at Fontana Ranuccio about 40 m below the hominin level, consistent with a K-Ar age of ~ 0.46 Ma reported for this level. Hence the Ceprano and Fontana Ranuccio hominin occurrences may be of very similar mid-Brunhes age.

  13. Implementation of Malaria Dynamic Models in Municipality Level Early Warning Systems in Colombia. Part I: Description of Study Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Daniel; Cerón, Viviana; Molina, Adriana M.; Quiñónes, Martha L.; Jiménez, Mónica M.; Ahumada, Martha; Gutiérrez, Patricia; Osorio, Salua; Mantilla, Gilma; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Integrated National Adaptation Pilot project and the Integrated Surveillance and Control System, the Colombian National Institute of Health is working on the design and implementation of a Malaria Early Warning System framework, supported by seasonal climate forecasting capabilities, weather and environmental monitoring, and malaria statistical and dynamic models. In this report, we provide an overview of the local ecoepidemiologic settings where four malaria process-based mathematical models are currently being implemented at a municipal level. The description includes general characteristics, malaria situation (predominant type of infection, malaria-positive cases data, malaria incidence, and seasonality), entomologic conditions (primary and secondary vectors, mosquito densities, and feeding frequencies), climatic conditions (climatology and long-term trends), key drivers of epidemic outbreaks, and non-climatic factors (populations at risk, control campaigns, and socioeconomic conditions). Selected pilot sites exhibit different ecoepidemiologic settings that must be taken into account in the development of the integrated surveillance and control system. PMID:24891460

  14. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  15. 32 CFR 767.9 - Content of permit holder's final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Content of permit holder's final report. 767.9... JURISDICATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Permit Guidelines § 767.9 Content of permit holder's final report. The permit holder's final report shall include the following: (a) A site history and a...

  16. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  17. Early Pleistocene human hand phalanx from the Sima del Elefante (TE) cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Pablos, Adrián; Carretero, José Miguel; Huguet, Rosa; Valverdú, Josep; Martinón-Torres, María; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Carbonell, Eudald; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new Early Pleistocene proximal hand phalanx (ATE9-2) from the Sima del Elefante cave site (TE - Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain), ascribed to Homo sp., is presented and comparatively described in the context of the evolution of the genus Homo. The ATE9-2 specimen is especially important because of the paucity of hand bones in the human fossil record during the Early Pleistocene. The morphological and metrical analyses of the phalanx ATE9-2 indicate that there are no essential differences between it and comparator fossil specimens for the genus Homo after 1.3 Ma (millions of years ago). Similar to Sima de los Huesos and Neandertal specimens, ATE9-2 is a robust proximal hand phalanx, probably reflecting greater overall body robusticity in these populations or a higher gracility in modern humans. The age of level TE9 from Sima del Elefante and morphological and metrical studies of ATE9-2 suggest that the morphology of the proximal hand phalanges and, thus, the morphology of the hand could have remained stable over the last 1.2-1.3 Ma. Taking into account the evidence recently provided by a metacarpal from Kaitio (Kenya) from around 1.42 Ma, we argue that modern hand morphology is present in the genus Homo subsequent to Homo habilis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of Early Leak-Detection Capabilities at a Commercial-Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. D.; Vermeul, V. R.; Oostrom, M.; Porse, S.

    2014-12-01

    In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a large Midwest carbon capture and storage (CCS) project will upgrade a power plant with oxy-combustion technology to capture approximately 1.1 million metric tons (MMT) of CO2 each year. This project will design and construct a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant that incorporates CCS. The project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies that includes early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone in regions of increased leakage potential (e.g., near wells that penetrate the caprock). In support of early leak-detection monitoring systems design, numerical models were developed and used to evaluate the relative value of various leak detection metrics over a range of hypothetical leakage scenarios. This preliminary modeling evaluation was based on a simplified model that assumed uniform properties for each model layer and interrogated both pressure and geochemical response in the first permeable interval overlying the primary confining zone. Simulation results indicate that pressure is likely to be the earliest indicator of leakage, given the rapid and areally extensive nature of this response. Simulated geochemical signals are much more localized and take much longer to develop than the pressure responses. Because of the buoyancy effect associated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2), early leak-detection monitoring for these leakage scenarios would be best achieved through monitoring in the upper portion of the interval near the contact with overlying low-permeability materials. Conversely, monitoring for geochemical signals associated with brine leakage exhibited less lateral spread than for scCO2 cases and detection of leakage would be best achieved through monitoring at the base of the interval. Results from these preliminary models for a suite of leakage scenarios and monitoring location distances will be presented. These preliminary models will be

  19. Wind Energy: Offshore Permitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Technological advancements and tax incentives have driven a global expansion in the development of renewable energy resources. Wind energy , in...particular, is now often cited as the fastest growing commercial energy source in the world. Currently, all U.S. wind energy facilities are based on land...authority to permit and regulate offshore wind energy development within the zones of the oceans under its jurisdiction. The federal government and coastal

  20. New ESR/U-series data for the early Middle Pleistocene site of Isernia la Pineta, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao Qingfeng, E-mail: shao@mnhn.fr [Departement de Prehistoire du Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7194 CNRS, 1 rue Rene Panhard, F-75013 Paris (France); Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Falgueres, Christophe [Departement de Prehistoire du Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7194 CNRS, 1 rue Rene Panhard, F-75013 Paris (France); Peretto, Carlo; Arzarello, Marta; Minelli, Antonella; Thun Hohenstein, Ursula [Dipartimento di Biologia ed Evoluzione, Universita di Ferrara, C.so Ercole I d' Este 32, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Dolo, Jean-Michel; Garcia, Tristan [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Frank, Norbert; Douville, Eric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, LSCE/IPSL, UMR 8212 CNRS-CEA-UVSQ, Domaine du CNRS, F-91198 Gif/Yvette cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    Located in Southern Italy, the Early Palaeolithic site of Isernia la Pineta has provided numerous palaeontological remains and artefacts in well-defined fluvio-lacustrine sequence. The normal magnetization of the main archaeological layer t3a and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 40}Ar date of 610 {+-} 10 (2{sigma}) ka, obtained from the immediately overlaying geological level, put the Isernia assemblage in the first part of the Middle Pleistocene. Previous ESR/U-series analyses of Isernia fossil teeth have displayed both recent U-uptake and severe underestimation of the ESR/U-series dates in comparison with the {sup 39}Ar/{sup 40}Ar age. In order to identify the cause of this age underestimation, new analyses were realized in the present study on four bovid teeth directly recovered from the archaeological surface t3a. The ESR/U-series dates obtained were once again strongly underestimated, with an error weighted mean age of 435 {+-} 24 (1{sigma}) ka. These too young dates could be associated to a change of the environmental {gamma}-dose rate during the geological history of the Isernia site, related to the revealed recent U-uptake into the palaeontological remains of the archaeological level. If we consider that this dose rate change was coeval with a wet interglacial period and taking the {sup 39}Ar/{sup 40}Ar age as geochronological reference, simulations with two dose rate steps indicate that this change could be correlated with marine isotopic stage 7 (MIS 7).

  1. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciammella, Patrizia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Botto, Barbara [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Gavarotti, Paolo [Hematology, University of Torino and Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Hematology Unit, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Vitolo, Umberto [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Iotti, Cinzia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  2. Early-middle Eocene transition in calcareous nannofossil assemblages at IODP Site U1410 (Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, NW Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Carlotta; Agnini, Claudia; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2017-04-01

    The early-middle Eocene interval documents the shift from the warmest greenhouse conditions occurred during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 52-50 Ma) to the beginning of the cooling phase which led to the Oligocene icehouse regime. This important transition is well expressed as a reversal in the global oxygen and carbonate isotope trends (Zachos et al., 2001). Moreover, this interval was a time of remarkable transformation in the marine biosphere. Communities of calcareous nannoplankton, marine calcifying algae at the base of the oceans food chain, experienced transient and permanent profound changes. Calcareous nannofossil are regarded as remarkable tools both in biostratigraphy and paleoecology, with several taxa that show different responses to changes in physical parameters of surface waters. Here, we aim to document calcareous nannoplankton assemblage changes across the early-middle Eocene transition, in order to upset the biostratigraphic framework and to increase comprehension of how phytoplankton communities responded to paleoenvironmental changes at that time. The sedimentary successions recovered at IODP Site U1410 (Exp. 342; 41˚ 19.6987'N; 49˚ 10.1995'W, Norris et al., 2012) on the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge (NW Atlantic) offer an expanded record of the early-middle Eocene interval that is marked by an increase in accumulation rate related to sedimentation of clay-rich nannofossil oozes. Quantitative analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages was conducted, encompassing calcareous nannofossil Zones NP12 -NP15 or CNE4-CNE10 (Martini, 1971; Agnini et al., 2014). The study interval records the appearance and proliferation of Noelaerhabdaceae family (i.e, Reticulofenestra/Dictyococcites group), which can be considered one of the most significant shifts in the assemblage structure of the Paleogene. This change was probably favored by modifications in surface water chemistry. The middle Eocene clay-rich sediments contain well preserved

  3. Waste Feed Delivery Environmental Permits and Approvals Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOLLEFSON, K.S.

    2000-01-18

    This plan describes the environmental permits approvals, and other requirements that may affect establishment of a waste feed delivery system for the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This plan identifies and screens environmental standards for potential applicability, outlines alternatives for satisfying applicable standards, and describes preferred permitting and approval approaches.

  4. Pacific Islands Region Fishing Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sustainable Fisheries Division Permits Program issues around 300 permits annually for pelagic longline and troll & handline, bottomfish, crustacean (lobster...

  5. Vessel Permit System Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GARFO issues federal fishing permits annually to owners of fishing vessels who fish in the Greater Atlantic region, as required by federal regulation. These permits...

  6. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-05-31

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  7. Prevalence of candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesion of early childhood caries (ECC) according to sampling site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Sefidgar, Seyed Ali Asghar; Eyzadian, Haniyeh; Gharakhani, Samaneh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans may have cariogenic potential but its role in caries etiology has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine candida albicans in supragingival dental plaque and infected dentine of cervical and proximal in early childhood caries (ECC). Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 6o children aged 2-5 years, which were divided into 3 groups: children with at least one cervical caries; children with at least one proximal caries and caries-free. The infected dentine was collected from cervical and proximal caries lesions and plaque samples were collected from the three groups in order to compare the frequency of candida albicans in the collected sites. All samples were cultured in Sabouraud and CHROMagar medium and the cases that were positive for candida albicans were cultured in germ tube. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the children was 3.9 years. From 100 samples, candida albicans samples were isolated in 55%, mold fungi were found in 29% cases and there was no fungal growth in 16% of the samples. In plaque samples, candida albicans were found in 15% of caries-free samples, 20% of the proximal and 80% of the cervical caries. In samples extracted from the caries, candida albicans were found in 60% of the proximal and 100% of the cervical caries. Mothers with university educational level had children with more cervical decays, caries free and proximal caries, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that prevalence of Candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesions of children with early childhood caries were relatively high and the prevalence was higher in cervical caries group. PMID:24551436

  8. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration 30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin <11g/dL (OR 7.5; p=0.002) were associated with SSI. The study supports the role of restrictive lung disorders and the values specified above for preoperative BMI, serum total protein and cortisol concentrations, and MCV, and of post-operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  9. Regulatory and Permitting Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Myer

    2005-12-01

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., reviewed current state and federal regulations related to carbon dioxide capture and storage within geologic formations and enhanced carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. We have evaluated and summarized the current and possible future permitting requirements for the six states that comprise the West Coast Regional Partnership. Four options exist for CO{sub 2} injection into appropriate geologic formations, including storage in: (1) oil and gas reservoirs, (2) saline formations, (3) unmineable coal beds, and (4) salt caverns. Terrestrial CO{sub 2} sequestration involves improved carbon conservation management (e.g. reduction of deforestation), carbon substitution (e.g., substitution for fossil fuel-based products, energy conservation through urban forestry, biomass for energy generation), and improved carbon storage management (e.g., expanding the storage of carbon in forest ecosystems). The primary terrestrial options for the West Coast Region include: (1) reforestation of under-producing lands (including streamside forest restoration), (2) improved forest management, (3) forest protection and conservation, and (4) fuel treatments for the reduction of risk of uncharacteristically severe fires (potentially with associated biomass energy generation). The permits and/or contracts required for any land-use changes/disturbances and biomass energy generation that may occur as part of WESTCARB's activities have been summarized for each state.

  10. CpG sites with continuously increasing or decreasing methylation from early to late human fetal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eberhard; Dittrich, Marcus; Böck, Julia; Nanda, Indrajit; Müller, Tobias; Seidmann, Larissa; Tralau, Tim; Galetzka, Danuta; El Hajj, Nady; Haaf, Thomas

    2016-10-30

    Normal human brain development is dependent on highly dynamic epigenetic processes for spatial and temporal gene regulation. Recent work identified wide-spread changes in DNA methylation during fetal brain development. We profiled CpG methylation in frontal cortex of 27 fetuses from gestational weeks 12-42, using Illumina 450K methylation arrays. Sites showing genome-wide significant correlation with gestational age were compared to a publicly available data set from gestational weeks 3-26. Altogether, we identified 2016 matching developmentally regulated differentially methylated positions (m-dDMPs): 1767m-dDMPs were hypermethylated and 1149 hypomethylated during fetal development. M-dDMPs are underrepresented in CpG islands and gene promoters, and enriched in gene bodies. They appear to cluster in certain chromosome regions. M-dDMPs are significantly enriched in autism-associated genes and CpGs. Our results promote the idea that reduced methylation dynamics during fetal brain development may predispose to autism. In addition, m-dDMPs are enriched in genes with human-specific brain expression patterns and/or histone modifications. Collectively, we defined a subset of dDMPs exhibiting constant methylation changes from early to late pregnancy. The same epigenetic mechanisms involving methylation changes in cis-regulatory regions may have been adopted for human brain evolution and ontogeny. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pilgrimstad revisited - a multi-proxy reconstruction of Early/Middle Weichselian climate and environment at a key site in central Sweden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlfarth, B.; Alexanderson, H.; Ampel, L.; Bennike, O.; Engels, S.; Johnsen, T.; Lundqvist, J.; Martins, M.; Reimer, P.

    2011-01-01

    The site Pilgrimstad in central Sweden has often been cited as a key locality for discussions of ice-free/ice-covered intervals during the Early and Middle Weichselian. Multi-proxy investigations of a recently excavated section at Pilgrimstad now provide a revised picture of the climatic and environ

  12. A study of a possible early reindeer domestication site on the Iamal peninsula (Russia) using geoarchaeological methods and lipid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrault, Loic; Milek, Karen; Dawson, Lorna; Anderson, David

    2016-04-01

    In past centuries, indigenous hunters in Northern Eurasia shifted from being hunters to being herders of reindeer. Even at low human population densities, large reindeer herds can alter the landscape and leave long-term biochemical signatures in the soil. Although indigenous social-ecological systems have been thought to be resilient in space and time, most are considered to be at risk due to climate and socio-economic changes related to anthropogenic activities. This situation calls for a long-term perspective to place human-animal relations in their respective contexts. As an ancient livelihood still practiced across vast areas of Northern Eurasia, reindeer herding is a nexus for feedbacks between humans, animals and environment. The Iarte site, on the Iuribei River in the central part of the Iamal peninsula is thought to be an important site of reindeer domestication dating back to the 12th century due to the enormous quantities of butchered reindeer bones found in recent excavations. The large amount of buried reindeer bones found at the settlement suggests that herds should have stood near the site despite the lack of any architectural remains of corrals or pens. The history of a possible early relation to domesticate reindeer can be described with geoarchaeological methods, including lipid biomarkers, which can indicate the presence of past human and animal activities. Among lipid biomarkers, faecal markers such as stanols and bile acids have already been used in archaeological contexts to identify and distinguish between different species because they are persistent over time and can have a species specific profile. Near the Iarte settlement, we conducted a soil survey and sampling programme and combined geoarchaeological measurements (including electrical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility and elemental analysis) with lipid analysis of soil samples, to identify the potential presence of standing reindeer herds. The different soil layers have been

  13. Early Pleistocene short-term intermediate water mass variability influences Carbonate Mound development in the NE Atlantic (IODP Site 1317)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Margreth, S.; Liebetrau, V.; Dullo, W.; Eisenhauer, A.; Iodp Expedition 307 Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Exp. 307 drilled the 155 m high Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight (SW off Ireland) in order to investigate for the first time sediments from the base of a giant carbonate mound. In this study we focus on sediments from the base of Challenger Mound (Porcupine Seabight, SW off Ireland) IODP Site 1317 in high resolution. The mound initiation and start-up phase coincides with the intensification of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (INHG) at around 2.6 Ma. Further carbonate mound development seems to be strongly dependent on rapid changes in paleoceanographic and climatic conditions at the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary, especially characterized and caused by the interaction of intermediate water masses, the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW), the Eastern North Atlantic Water (ENAW) and the influence of Southern Component Water (SCW). This study is based on well-established proxies such as δ18O and δ13C of planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) and benthic foraminifera (Fontbotia wuellerstorfi, Discanomalina coronata, Lobatula lobatula, Lobatula antarctica, and Planulina ariminensis) as well as grain size parameters to identify the paleoenvironmental and paleoecological setting favourable for the initial coral colonization on the mound. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope records of benthic foraminiferal species indicate that L. lobatula provides a reliable isotopic signature for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. In particular, δ18O values of L. lobatula indicate initial mound growth started in a glacial mode with moderate excursions in δ18O values. Bottom water temperatures, calculated using standard equations based on δ18O of foraminiferal tests, range between 7 and 11°C, consistent with the known temperature range conducive for cold-water coral growth and development. Bottom currents transporting intermediate water masses of southern origin (Mediterranean, Bay of Biscay) enhanced at 2.6 Ma supporting first coral

  14. Introducing a multi-site program for early diagnosis of HIV infection among HIV-exposed infants in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malisa Isaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, less than a third of HIV infected children estimated to be in need of antiretroviral therapy (ART are receiving it. In this setting where other infections and malnutrition mimic signs and symptoms of AIDS, early diagnosis of HIV among HIV-exposed infants without specialized virologic testing can be a complex process. We aimed to introduce an Early Infant Diagnosis (EID pilot program using HIV DNA Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR testing with the intent of making EID nationally available based on lessons learned in the first 6 months of implementation. Methods In September 2006, a molecular biology laboratory at Bugando Medical Center was established in order to perform HIV DNA PCR testing using Dried Blood Spots (DBS. Ninety- six health workers from 4 health facilities were trained in the identification and care of HIV-exposed infants, HIV testing algorithms and collection of DBS samples. Paper-based tracking systems for monitoring the program that fed into a simple electronic database were introduced at the sites and in the laboratory. Time from birth to first HIV DNA PCR testing and to receipt of test results were assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results From October 2006 to March 2007, 510 HIV-exposed infants were identified from the 4 health facilities. Of these, 441(87% infants had an HIV DNA PCR test at a median age of 4 months (IQR 1 to 8 months and 75(17% were PCR positive. Parents/guardians for a total of 242(55% HIV-exposed infants returned to receive PCR test results, including 51/75 (68% of those PCR positive, 187/361 (52% of the PCR negative, and 4/5 (80% of those with indeterminate PCR results. The median time between blood draw for PCR testing and receipt of test results by the parent or guardian was 5 weeks (range Conclusions The EID pilot program successfully introduced systems for identification of HIV-exposed infants. There was a high response as hundreds of HIV-exposed infants were registered

  15. The Sopeña Rockshelter, a New Site in Asturias (Spain bearing evidence on the Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic in Northern Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakiparta, J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Iberia has become a major focus of modern human origins research because the early dates for the Aurignacian in some sites in northernSpain seem to preclude an ‘Aurignacian invasion’ from east to west. Neanderthals associated with Mousterian industries occur late in time. The occurrence of Neanderthal-modern hybrids dated to around 24 ka, and the possibility of in situ transition between the Middle and Upper Paleolithic along the north Spanish coast, also raise important questions. To approach these questions requires excavations with modern methods of sites containing relevant archaeological records, in situ stratigraphic deposits, and reliable dating. Here we offer a preliminary report on the Sopeña site, a rockshelter containing well stratified late Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic deposits. We describe the sedimentology for the archaeological layers, dates obtained so far, and lithic and faunal materials including the micromammal taphonomy from a deep test pit along the east wall.

  16. Avoiding Title V permitting pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laswell, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires states to implement new air operating permit programs. States have a great deal of flexibility in developing their permit programs. Industry should work now to ensure that state programs contain the favorable aspects of the federal regulations and do not contain more stringent requirements that are not required under the Clean Air Act. This article outlines areas of the permit program that have the potential to handicap industry`s ability to expand.

  17. [System construction of early warning for ecological security at cultural and natural heritage mixed sites and its application: a case study of Wuyishan Scenery District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wei-Bin; He, Dong-Jin; Qin, De-Hua; Ji, Zhi-Rong; Wu, Li-Yun; Yu, Jian-An; Chen, Bing-Rong; Tan, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposed a new concept of ecological security for protection by a comprehensive analysis of the contents and standards of world heritage sites. A frame concept model named "Pressure-State-Control" for early warning of ecological security at world heritage mixed sites was constructed and evaluation indicators of this frame were also selected. Wuyishan Scenery District was chosen for a case study, which has been severely disturbed by natural and artificial factors. Based on the frame model of "Pressure-State-Control" and by employing extension analysis, the matter-element model was established to assess the ecological security status of this cultural and natural world heritage mixed site. The results showed that the accuracy of ecological security early warning reached 84%. Early warning rank was I level (no alert status) in 1997 and 2009, but that in 2009 had a higher possibility to convert into II level. Likewise, the early-warning indices of sensitive ranks were different between 1997 and 2009. Population density, population growth rate, area index for tea garden, cultivated land owned per capita, level of drought, and investment for ecological and environmental construction were the main limiting factors to hinder the development of ecological security from 2009 to future. In general, the status of Wuyishan Scenery District ecological security was relatively good and considered as no alert level, while risk conditions also existed in terms of a few early-warning indicators. We still need to pay more attention to serious alert indicators and adopt effective prevention and control measures to maintain a good ecological security status of this heritage site.

  18. JC virus promoter/enhancers contain TATA box-associated Spi-B-binding sites that support early viral gene expression in primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leslie J; Moore, Lisa D; Mirsky, Matthew M; Major, Eugene O

    2012-03-01

    JC virus (JCV) is the aetiological agent of the demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, an AIDS defining illness and serious complication of mAb therapies. Initial infection probably occurs in childhood. In the working model of dissemination, virus persists in the kidney and lymphoid tissues until immune suppression/modulation causes reactivation and trafficking to the brain where JCV replicates in oligodendrocytes. JCV infection is regulated through binding of host factors such as Spi-B to, and sequence variation in the non-coding control region (NCCR). Although NCCR sequences differ between sites of persistence and pathogenesis, evidence suggests that the virus that initiates infection in the brain disseminates via B-cells derived from latently infected haematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow. Spi-B binds adjacent to TATA boxes in the promoter/enhancer of the PML-associated JCV Mad-1 and Mad-4 viruses but not the non-pathogenic, kidney-associated archetype. The Spi-B-binding site of Mad-1/Mad-4 differs from that of archetype by a single nucleotide, AAAAGGGAAGGGA to AAAAGGGAAGGTA. Point mutation of the Mad-1 Spi-B site reduced early viral protein large T-antigen expression by up to fourfold. Strikingly, the reverse mutation in the archetype NCCR increased large T-antigen expression by 10-fold. Interestingly, Spi-B protein binds the NCCR sequence flanking the viral promoter/enhancer, but these sites are not essential for early viral gene expression. The effect of mutating Spi-B-binding sites within the JCV promoter/enhancer on early viral gene expression strongly suggests a role for Spi-B binding to the viral promoter/enhancer in the activation of early viral gene expression.

  19. Early Oligocene geomagnetic field behavior from ODP Site 1128: Complex records of short-period polarity events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Garza, R. S.; Fuller, M. D.

    2001-12-01

    At Site 1128, in the Great Australian Bight, Leg 182 of the Ocean Drilling Program recovered a thick (~350 m) section of Upper Eocene and Lower Oligocene marine calcareous clays. Shipboard measurements established a magnetostratigraphy that can unambiguously be correlated to chrons C13n to C10n of the global polarity time scale (GPTS), and a less complete record of chrons C17n to C15r (due to poor core recovery). Correlation to the GPTS is further supported by available biostratigraphic data. For the Lower Oligocene sequence, average sedimentation rate is estimated at ~4 cm/kyr. The sediments recovered thus allow to test for the completeness and reliability of the geomagnetic field polarity during the Early Oligocene. The original shipboard long-core measurements suggested the presence of additional short polarity events or geomagnetic field excursions during chrons C13n, C12r, C11r, and C11n. In order to examine the reliability of the record and the nature of possible short-polarity events, we obtained discrete samples from the entire sequence at ~1 m intervals, with a closer sample spacing in critical intervals (~10 cm). The natural remanence of these sediments is normally simple. After removing a small soft overprint, the magnetization decays towards the origin with distributed coercivities and distributed unblocking temperatures. Demagnetization behavior and other rock magnetic data indicate that the remanence resides primarily in a cubic phase such as magnetite or maghemite, with a small contribution from hematite. Discrete samples from chron C12r did not reproduce the long-core record for two of the supposed events, single samples suggest the presence of short events or cryptochrons near the base of both C13n and C12r, and multiple samples suggest the existence of short-period normal polarity events during C11r and near the top of C12r. The records of these events are, however, complex. Demagnetization results indicate that the magnetization consists of an

  20. Tradeable Emission Permits in Oligopoly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fershtman, C.; de Zeeuw, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper considers an oligopolistic industry in which pollution is a by-product of production. Firms are assumed to have emission permits that restrict the amount that they pollute. These permits are assumed to be tradeable and the paper discusses a structure in which the same set of firms operates

  1. Occult breast primary malignancy presenting as isolated axillary lymph node metastasis - early detection of primary site by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Ramya; Naswa, Niraj; Karunanithi, Sellam; Walia, Ritika; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer patients rarely present with isolated axillary lymph node metastasis without any clinical or radiological evidence of primary tumor. Identification of the primary site of tumor helps in planning appropriate patient management which has definite impact on patient's survival. We present here a case of 30-year-old female who presented with isolated right axillary lymph node metastasis with no evidence of primary tumor clinically. Conventional imaging modalities were negative for primary site. She underwent whole body 18F-Flurodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and it contributed significantly in early detection of occult primary tumor in right breast.

  2. Early growth performance of full-sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies at three different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Aimin, Atirah Abdullah; Abdullah, Mohd Zaki; Muhammad, Norwati; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Field trials of 14 full sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies were evaluated for growth performance at three sites (Bintulu, Mentakab and Segamat). Results indicated that there were significant differences (p> 0.05) for diameter breast height (Dbh) and total height (Ht) among the progenies and different sites. Superior progenies have been identified for future tree selection and improvement.

  3. Early Human Dispersals and Submerged Landscapes : comment on news feature "Migration: value of submerged early sites" in Nature's May 2012 special issue "Peopling the Planet"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flemming, Nicholas; Bailey, Geoffrey N.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Arias, Pablo; Canals, M.; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Cohen, K.M.; Erlandson, Jon; Faught, Michael K.; Flatman, Joe; Fischer, Anders; Galili, Ehud; Harff, Jan; Lericolais, Gilles; Lűth, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Your articles on human dispersal in the late Pleistocene epoch (Nature 485, 23; 2012) overlook the significance of now-submerged archaeological sites on the continental shelf during this period (126,000–11,000 years ago). It is wrong to assume that these were completely destroyed by the sea and that

  4. 2008 Contruction General Permits & Multi-Sector General Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — View stormwater notices of intent (NOIs) for construction projects under EPA's 2008 Construction General Permit (CGP), for Low Erosivity Waivers (LEWs) submitted...

  5. Early tissue responses to zoledronate, locally delivered by bone screw, into a compromised cancellous bone site: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnoldi, Joerg; Alves, Antoine; Procter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    ...) a potent BP was loaded on bone screws and evaluated in a local delivery model. Whilst mid- to long-term effects are already reported, early cellular events occurring at the implant/bone interface are not well described...

  6. Noncooperative models of permit markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godal, Odd

    2011-07-15

    The applicability of some popular and basic permit market theories has been questioned. Drawing on noncooperative equilibrium theory for pure exchange economies, this article adapts several well-established alternative models to permit exchange. Some qualitative properties of the associated equilibria are provided, including two games with equilibria that in a sense coincide. Nevertheless, as there exist quite a few models potentially applicable to emissions trading, with equilibria that range from autarky to Pareto optimality, it seems that economics lacks a broadly accepted basic theory for permit markets. (Author)

  7. Early avian research at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina: historical highlights and possibilities for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, J.M.; Odum, E.P.; Dunning, John B.=; Kilgo, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Avian biology and collection of baseline population data was a major part of the first decade (1951-1961) of field research at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Baseline inventories involving organisms and land-use types were part of the mission in the early contracts between the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) and the University of Georgia prior to the establishment of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) as a National Environmental Research Park Laboratory. About 27% of the SREL publications during this first decade dealt with birds. Since that time, research on the SRS landscape has expanded and broadened with less than 10% of the publications dealing with birds. SRS changed also from an agriculturally dominated area with ca. 40% open areas (fields, crops, pastures) to a timber-managed area with ca. 80% forests, 12% open areas, and 2% open water impoundments. Baseline breeding bird populations of the SRS in the 1950s were typical for the region with avian species richness and density increasing with the age and succession of the vegetation (0-26 species and densities of 0-741 pairs/km2 for the habitats surveyed). During the first decade at the SRS, the resident game bird population of Northern Bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) increased and the Mourning Dove (Zenaida rnacroura) population, a migratory upland game bird, remained stable. Current avian research efforts, as well as new opportunities to reexamine the breeding bird populations and the landscape of SRS, will provide a better understanding of the potential causes of declines of neotropical migratory birds, declines of resident and migratory game birds, and how habitat influences invasions and extinctions of breeding birds in the region. Emphasis for future research and monitoring should be on neotropical migratory bird populations in decline (Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Coccyzus americanus; Eastern Wood-Pewee, Contopus virens; Wood Thrush, Hylocichla mustelina; Prairie Warbler

  8. Dakota Magic Casino NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit ND-0030813, the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise is authorized to discharge from the wastewater treatment facility in Richland County, North Dakota, to a roadside ditch flowing to an unnamed tributary to the Bois de Sioux.

  9. Permit trading and credit trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Jan-Tjeerd; R. Dijstra, Bouwe

    This paper compares emissions trading based on a cap on total emissions (permit trading) and on relative standards per unit of output (credit trading). Two types of market structure are considered: perfect competition and Cournot oligopoly. We find that output, abatement costs and the number...... of firms are higher under credit trading. Allowing trade between permit-trading and credit-trading sectors may increase in welfare. With perfect competition, permit trading always leads to higher welfare than credit trading. With imperfect competition, credit trading may outperform permit trading....... Environmental policy can lead to exit, but also to entry of firms. Entry and exit have a profound impact on the performance of the schemes, especially under imperfect competition. We find that it may be impossible to implement certain levels of total industry emissions. Under credit trading several levels...

  10. 50 CFR 13.28 - Permit revocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit revocation. 13.28 Section 13.28... GENERAL PERMIT PROCEDURES Permit Administration § 13.28 Permit revocation. (a) Criteria for revocation. A... revocation. (1) When the issuing officer believes there are valid grounds for revoking a permit,...

  11. 9 CFR 104.2 - Permit authorized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... permits for importing biological products. They shall be: (1) U.S. Veterinary Biological Product Permit for Research and Evaluation; (2) U.S. Veterinary Biological Product Permit for Distribution and Sale; or (3) U.S. Veterinary Biological Product Permit for Transit Shipment Only. (b) A permit shall not be...

  12. Regulation and Risk: Early Childhood Education and Care Services as Sites where the "Laugh of Foucault" Resounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Marianne; Sumsion, Jennifer; Goodfellow, Joy

    2008-01-01

    This article problematises the construction of regulation as an effective manager of risks to children in early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. Adopting a Foucaldian, governmentalist approach to regulation and risk, the authors suggest that governments in Australia have "risk colonised" regulation to meet their own…

  13. Water Quality Trading Toolkit for Permit Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Water Quality Trading Toolkit for Permit Writers is EPA’s first “how-to” manual on designing and implementing water quality trading programs. It helps NPDES permitting authorities incorporate trading provisions into permits.

  14. PERMITTING LEADERSHIP IN THE UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Nemeth

    2002-09-01

    In accordance with the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) proposal, as incorporated into NETL/DE-FC26-97FT34199, the objective of this agreement is to streamline the environmental technology permitting process site-to-site, state-to-state, and industry-to-industry to achieve remediation and waste processing faster, better and cheaper. SSEB is working with member Governors, legislators and regulators to build consensus on streamlining the permitting process for new and innovative technologies for addressing the legacy of environmental problems from 50 years of weapons research, development and production. This report reviews mechanisms whereby industry consortiums and the Department of Energy (DOE) have been working with State regulators and other officials in technology deployment decisions within the DOE complex. The historic development of relationships with State regulators is reviewed and the current nature of the relationships examined. The report contains observations from internal DOE reviews as well as recommendations from the General Accounting Office (GAO) and other external organizations. The report discusses reorganization initiatives leading up to a DOE Top-to-Bottom review of the Environmental Management (EM) Program and highlights points of consideration for maintaining effective linkages with State regulators. It notes how the proposed changes will place new demands upon the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and how NETL can leverage its resources by refocusing existing EM efforts specifically to states that have DOE facilities within their borders (host-states). Finally, the report discusses how SSEB's Permitting Leadership in the United States (PLUS) program can provide the foundation for elements of NETL's technical assistance program that are delivered to regulators and other decision- makers in host-states. As a regional compact commission, SSEB provides important direct linkages to regulators and stakeholders who need

  15. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 400 Area Septic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affects groundwater or has the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 400 Area Septic System. The influent to the system is domestic waste water. Although the 400 Area Septic System is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. Therefore, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used.

  16. Site of auditory plasticity in the brain stem (VLVp) of the owl revealed by early monaural occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogdans, J; Knudsen, E I

    1994-12-01

    1. The optic tectum of the barn owl contains a physiological map of interaural level difference (ILD) that underlies, in part, its map of auditory space. Monaural occlusion shifts the range of ILDs experienced by an animal and alters the correspondence of ILDs with source locations. Chronic monaural occlusion during development induces an adaptive shift in the tectal ILD map that compensates for the effects of the earplug. The data presented in this study indicate that one site of plasticity underlying this adaptive adjustment is in the posterior division of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VLVp), the first site of ILD comparison in the auditory pathway. 2. Single and multiple unit sites were recorded in the optic tecta and VLVps of ketamine-anesthetized owls. The owls were raised from 4 wk of age with one ear occluded with an earplug. Auditory testing, using digitally synthesized dichotic stimuli, was carried out 8-16 wk later with the earplug removed. The adaptive adjustment in ILD coding in each bird was quantified as the shift from normal ILD tuning measured in the optic tectum. Evidence of adaptive adjustment in the VLVp was based on statistical differences between the VLVp's ipsilateral and contralateral to the occluded ear in the sensitivity of units to excitatory-ear and inhibitory-ear stimulation. 3. The balance of excitatory to inhibitory influences on VLVp units was shifted in the adaptive direction in six out of eight owls. In three of these owls, adaptive differences in inhibition, but not in excitation, were found. For this group of owls, the patterns of response properties across the two VLVps can only be accounted for by plasticity in the VLVp. For the other three owls, the possibility that the difference between the two VLVps resulted from damage to one of the VLVps could not be eliminated, and for one of these, plasticity at a more peripheral site (in the cochlea or cochlear nucleus) could also explain the data. In the remaining two

  17. FIRE PERMIT NOW ON EDH!

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS General Safety Group or

    2001-01-01

    The electronic version of the Fire Permit form is now active. The aim of the Fire Permit procedure is to reduce the risk of fire or explosion. It is mandatory when performing 'hot work' (mainly activities which involve the use of naked flames or other heat sources - e.g. welding, brazing, cutting, grinding, etc.). Its use is explained in the CERN Fire Protection Code E. (Fire Protection) The new electronic form, which is substantially unchanged from the previous authorizing procedure, will be available on the Electronic Document Handling system (https://edh.cern.ch/) as of 1st September 2001. From this date use of the paper version should be discontinued.

  18. Early evidence for complex social structure in Proboscidea from a late Miocene trackway site in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Faysal; Kraatz, Brian; Craig, Nathan; Beech, Mark; Schuster, Mathieu; Hill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Many living vertebrates exhibit complex social structures, evidence for the antiquity of which is limited to rare and exceptional fossil finds. Living elephants possess a characteristic social structure that is sex-segregated and multi-tiered, centred around a matriarchal family and solitary or loosely associated groups of adult males. Although the fossil record of Proboscidea is extensive, the origin and evolution of social structure in this clade is virtually unknown. Here, we present imagery and analyses of an extensive late Miocene fossil trackway site from the United Arab Emirates. The site of Mleisa 1 preserves exceptionally long trackways of a herd of at least 13 individuals of varying size transected by that of a single large individual, indicating the presence of both herding and solitary social modes. Trackway stride lengths and resulting body mass estimates indicate that the solitary individual was also the largest and therefore most likely a male. Sexual determination for the herd is equivocal, but the body size profile and number of individuals are commensurate with those of a modern elephant family unit. The Mleisa 1 trackways provide direct evidence for the antiquity of characteristic and complex social structure in Proboscidea. PMID:22357934

  19. Early evidence for complex social structure in Proboscidea from a late Miocene trackway site in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Faysal; Kraatz, Brian; Craig, Nathan; Beech, Mark; Schuster, Mathieu; Hill, Andrew

    2012-08-23

    Many living vertebrates exhibit complex social structures, evidence for the antiquity of which is limited to rare and exceptional fossil finds. Living elephants possess a characteristic social structure that is sex-segregated and multi-tiered, centred around a matriarchal family and solitary or loosely associated groups of adult males. Although the fossil record of Proboscidea is extensive, the origin and evolution of social structure in this clade is virtually unknown. Here, we present imagery and analyses of an extensive late Miocene fossil trackway site from the United Arab Emirates. The site of Mleisa 1 preserves exceptionally long trackways of a herd of at least 13 individuals of varying size transected by that of a single large individual, indicating the presence of both herding and solitary social modes. Trackway stride lengths and resulting body mass estimates indicate that the solitary individual was also the largest and therefore most likely a male. Sexual determination for the herd is equivocal, but the body size profile and number of individuals are commensurate with those of a modern elephant family unit. The Mleisa 1 trackways provide direct evidence for the antiquity of characteristic and complex social structure in Proboscidea.

  20. INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS FOR EARLY SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN ELECTIVE ORTHOPAEDIC IMPLANT SURGERIES: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Surgical site infections in orthopaedic implant surgery is devasting complication range from 1 - 2% to 22%. It leads to increase case cost , prolongs antibiotic use/abuse , increases morbidity and rehabilitation. METHOD : This prospective cross sectional study was conducted on 624 patients with closed fracture cases undergoing clean and elective orthopaedic implant surgeries admitted at Gandhi Medical College and Hamidia Hospital , Bhopal (Madhya Pradesh , India between ‘1st November 2013 to 31st October 2014’. RESULTS : The surgical site infection was diagnosed in 43 (6.89% pati ents within 30 days after surgery. Klebsiella was most common infective organism islolated in 39.53% cases. On data analysis SSI was significantly associated with increasing age , duration of hospital stay more than 7 days , duration of surgery more than 120 minutes , pre - operative Hb less than 12 gm% , diabetes mellitus , use of intra - operative negative suction and tourniquet. CONCLUSION : Incidence of SSI in implants surgeries are quite high , proper measure are needed to control it. In this study gram negative organism has emerged as major threat in contrast to staphylococcus aureus.

  1. New foot remains from the Gran Dolina-TD6 Early Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablos, Adrián; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Martinón-Torres, María; Carbonell, Eudald; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents and describes new foot fossils from the species Homo antecessor, found in level TD6 of the site of Gran Dolina (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain). These new fossils consist of an almost complete left talus (ATD6-95) and the proximal three-quarters of a right fourth metatarsal (ATD6-124). The talus ATD6-95 is tentatively assigned to Hominin 10 of the TD6 sample, an adult male specimen with which the second metatarsal ATD6-70+107 (already published) is also tentatively associated. Analysis of these fossils and other postcranial remains has made possible to estimate a stature similar to those of the specimens from the Middle Pleistocene site of Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain). The morphology of the TD6 metatarsals does not differ significantly from that of modern humans, Neanderthals and the specimens from Sima de los Huesos. Talus ATD6-95, however, differs from the rest of the comparative samples in being long and high, having a long and wide trochlea, and displaying a proportionally short neck. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hanford Site Comprehensive site Compliance Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the second annual submittal by WHC, ICF/KH, PNL and BHI and contains the results of inspections of the stormwater outfalls listed in the Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1993a) as required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-000F (WA-R-00-A17F): This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation, as required in Part IV, Section D, {ampersand} C of the General Permit, summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation, and documents significant leaks and spills.

  3. 19 CFR 142.24 - Special permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Special Permit for Immediate Delivery § 142.24 Special permit. (a) Conditions for issuance. At the discretion of the port director, a special permit for immediate delivery may be issued on... of a shipment of merchandise under a special permit for immediate delivery, the importer shall note a...

  4. PSD Permit Applications In Region 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following permits have been submitted to EPA Region 4 as Proposed Title V permits. While EPA has the right to a 45-day review period for all Proposed Title V permits, EPA Region 4 targets only a subset of these permits for comprehensive review.

  5. 50 CFR 13.27 - Permit suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit suspension. 13.27 Section 13.27... GENERAL PERMIT PROCEDURES Permit Administration § 13.27 Permit suspension. (a) Criteria for suspension... Government. Such suspension shall remain in effect until the issuing officer determines that the...

  6. The early Eocene birds of the Messel fossil site: a 48 million-year-old bird community adds a temporal perspective to the evolution of tropical avifaunas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gerald

    2016-04-08

    Birds play an important role in studies addressing the diversity and species richness of tropical ecosystems, but because of the poor avian fossil record in all extant tropical regions, a temporal perspective is mainly provided by divergence dates derived from calibrated molecular analyses. Tropical ecosystems were, however, widespread in the Northern Hemisphere during the early Cenozoic, and the early Eocene German fossil site Messel in particular has yielded a rich avian fossil record. The Messel avifauna is characterized by a considerable number of flightless birds, as well as a high diversity of aerial insectivores and the absence of large arboreal birds. With about 70 currently known species in 42 named genus-level and at least 39 family-level taxa, it approaches extant tropical biotas in terms of species richness and taxonomic diversity. With regard to its taxonomic composition and presumed ecological characteristics, the Messel avifauna is more similar to the Neotropics, Madagascar, and New Guinea than to tropical forests in continental Africa and Asia. Because the former regions were geographically isolated during most of the Cenozoic, their characteristics may be due to the absence of biotic factors, especially those related to the diversification of placental mammals, which impacted tropical avifaunas in Africa and Asia. The crown groups of most avian taxa that already existed in early Eocene forests are species-poor. This does not support the hypothesis that the antiquity of tropical ecosystems is key to the diversity of tropical avifaunas, and suggests that high diversification rates may be of greater significance.

  7. 31 CFR 11.6 - Terms of permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., periodicals, publications, confections, tobacco products, foods, beverages, chances for any lottery authorized... responsibilities set forth in 34 CFR 395.35 (a); (b) The permit shall be issued for an indefinite period of time... the bureau on-site property management officer of the appropriate Treasury bureau and the...

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas: an unusual site of relapse from early-stage lung cancer: 12-month postsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Polychronis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and backache, weight loss of 10 kg and irregular bowel movements. He was previously diagnosed with Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of lung and had undergone lobectomy 12 months previously. Investigations including imaging revealed a cystic mass in the body and tail of the pancreas which was biopsied and it was confirmed to be a recurrence of the squamous lung cancer involving the pancreas. He was treated with systemic chemotherapy and has shown a partial response on repeat imaging. This case illustrates a rare and unusual site of relapse in lung cancer after adjuvant therapy and a key message for follow-up surveillance for these patients. PMID:23608858

  9. Using GPR early-time amplitude analysis to monitor variations in soil water content at a clay-rich agricultural site in response to irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeo, Jonathan; Van Dam, Remke; Slater, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical methods are increasingly used to analyze spatial variation in soil water content (SWC). Electrical resistivity (ER), ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and time-domain reflectometry (TDR) have all been applied to this problem. However, TDR is limited in terms of its ability to provide good spatial coverage over large areas, ER can be very time consuming depending on the survey, and GPR direct wave and reflection methods are ineffective in clay-rich environments. We employed a relatively new GPR methodology, early-time amplitude analysis, during an infiltration experiment conducted in a clay-rich agricultural field. The research took place at the Samford Ecological Research Facility, Queensland, Australia, with the goal of monitoring changes in SWC in response to irrigation. We hypothesize that early-time analysis can be used to detect and monitor infiltration in clay-rich soils where direct wave and reflection GPR fails, thus opening new avenues of hydrogeophysical research in the increasingly important field of water resource management. Initial field work showed that traditional methods of using GPR reflection surveys and ground wave velocity analysis were ineffective due to the excessive signal attenuation caused by the clay-rich soil at the site. GPR and TDR datasets were collected over a 20 meter by 15 meter section of the field. GPR datasets were collected once daily, at 10 am, and TDR measurements were collected once daily at 11 am from Thursday, August 28th, 2014 until Monday, September 1st, 2014. A sprinkler irrigation was carried out on the evening of Thursday, August 28th. The results suggest that the early-time GPR method is capable of monitoring the resulting changes in SWC due to infiltration in clayey soils despite the failure of reflection and ground wave velocity analysis. The early time GPR results are consistent with moisture content estimates from TDR and gravimetric analysis of soil cores taken in the field.

  10. Interpreting detailed brine chemistry changes during early periods of in-zone CO2 storage at Cranfield site, Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A. Y.; Islam, A.; Lu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical reactions can play important role on the long-term geological storage of CO2 in sites where the target formations have reactive minerals. Although the use of batch models (experimental or theoretical) is expedient, it leaves questions about how to interpret the results from the context of field scale injection. The goal of this study is to investigate changes in fluid compositions using a detailed reactive transport model. Most published CO2 geochemical studies tend to consider only a small number of components because of expensive calculations and therefore simultaneous mobility of large number of heavy metals is not clearly known. In this study we present results of coupled multiphase, multicomponent reactive transport simulations of Cranfield site, Mississipi, USA at relatively fine scale, which are obtained using the parallel PFLOTRAN code. The geochemical system consists of 22 primary or basis species, in-situ CO2 and O2 gaseous components, and 5 minerals. The number of secondary elements is 37, representing very simple to complex mineralizations occurred simultaneously in saline formation (1.81 molality). The fluid chemical compositions were measured from production fluids and mineral composition of the formation was obtained from XRD analysis of core samples. The results show brine chemistry changes in the reservoir and shed insights on the need to monitor the mobility of heavy metals such as Mg, Ca, Al, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, and Cd. The study provides simultaneous potential mobile inventory of these metals in the storage formations and warns possible risk through leakage into overlying zone. From storage point of view we also aim to observe the sensitivity of aforementioned constituents. Our results show pH drop from 6.91 to 3.5 and relatively small changes in HCO3- and Fe concentrations. However aqueous Ca and Al increase by orders of magnitude. The detailed geochemical effect shows trapping efficiency increased by few percent. The brine

  11. Environmental proteomics reveals early microbial community responses to biostimulation at a uranium- and nitrate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Nissen, Silke [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Pffifner, Susan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    High performance mass spectrometry instrumentation coupled with improved protein extraction techniques enable metaproteomics to identify active members of soil and groundwater microbial communities. Metaproteomics workflows were applied to study the initial responses (i.e., 4 days post treatment) of the indigenous aquifer microbiota to biostimulation with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) at a uranium-contaminated site. Members of the Betaproteobacteria (i.e., Dechloromonas, Ralstonia, Rhodoferax, Polaromonas, Delftia, Chromobacterium) and Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated aquifer community. Proteome characterization revealed distinct differences in protein expression between the microbial biomass collected from groundwater influenced by biostimulation and groundwater collected up-gradient of the EVO injection points. In particular, proteins involved in ammonium assimilation, EVO degradation, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule formation were prominent following biostimulation. Interestingly, the atypical NosZ of a Dechloromonas sp. was highly expressed suggesting active nitrous oxide (N2O) respiration. c-type cytochromes were barely detected, as was citrate synthase, a biomarker for hexavalent uranium reduction activity, suggesting that metal reduction has not commenced 4 days post EVO delivery. Environmental metaproteomics identified microbial community responses to biostimulation and elucidated active pathways demonstrating the value of this technique for complementing nucleic acid-based approaches.

  12. Early Holocene fauna from a new subfossil site: A first assessment from Christmas River, south central Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C. Wright

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on faunal remains recovered during recent explo­rations at ‘Christmas River’, the only subfossil locality known from Madagascar’s south central plateau. Recovered remains of several extinct taxa date to approximately 10,000 14C years before present (BP, including crocodiles, tortoises, the elephant bird Aepyornis, the carnivoran Cryptoprocta spelea, the lemurs Archaeolemur majori, Pachylemur insignis, and Megaladapis edwardsi, and abundant remains of the dwarf hippopotamus, Hippopotamus lemerlei. The presence of southern – limited, forest – dependent species at Christmas River supports the hypothesis that forest once extended, perhaps discontinu­ously, across the central highlands towards the west. One theory is that sites in the north central highlands, which are higher in elevation, maintained more mesic conditions during Plio–Quaternary climate shifts than those of the lower elevation sites of the south central highlands. Thus, elevation above sea level may have acted as a filter that limited species dispersal across the island in the past. Such a scenario would explain the distinction between more humid, higher elevation, northern highland subfossil communities versus more arid, lower eleva­tion, southern subfossil communities. Continued exploration at Christmas River thus provides a remarkable opportunity for deciphering ecological changes that have taken place in south central Madagascar during the Holocene. RÉSUMÉMadagascar est reconnue comme l’une des régions les plus sensibles du monde en ce qui concerne les menaces pesant sur sa biodiversité, et cela à cause de niveaux d’endémisme inégalés, d’une diversité variée et d’un impact humain important sur l’environnement. Suite à la colonisation par l’Homme il y a plus de 2000 ans, des extinctions de masse de la faune et un important recul forestier ont eu lieu en laissant des marques sur les écosystèmes modernes qui sont dans un état de

  13. Increasing Healthy Start food and vitamin voucher uptake for low income pregnant women (Early Years Collaborative Leith Pioneer Site).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Graham; Dougall, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Poverty has a detrimental impact on health and wellbeing. Healthy Start food and vitamin vouchers provide support for low income families across the UK, but at least 25% of eligible women and children miss out. We set out to increase uptake, with an aim of 90% of eligible women and children (n~540 eligible, varying over time) receiving vouchers in the initial team's catchment area by December 2015. Starting with one midwife and one pregnant woman in March 2014 we used the model for improvement to identify ways to improve documentation, sign up, and referral. Weekly data on process measures and monthly data on voucher receipt were plotted on run charts. Comparing medians for January-June 2014 and March-August 2015 there was a 13.3% rise in voucher receipt in Lothian (increase from 313 to 355 women), versus an 8.4% decline for the rest of Scotland (fall from 1688 to 1546 women). Figures varied by team, influenced by staff, family, and area factors. The initial aim proved unrealistic, as signing up a woman for vouchers increases both the numerator and denominator. Accordingly, the percentage uptake has not increased at a regional level (remains at 75%), though the figure for the initiating team ("team 3" in graphs) has increased from 73.0% (January 2014) to 79.0% (November 2015). We have continued testing, achieving recent increases in the number of women referred for welfare rights advice on benefits, tax credits, employment rights, childcare, and debt, securing on average £4,500 per client during 2015/16 (£404k for 89 clients by mid September 2015). This improvement project, part of the Early Years Collaborative in Scotland, has had a measureable impact on pregnant women across Lothian. Success has relied on testing, an electronic maternity record, rapid dissemination of findings through direct engagement with clinical teams, and persistence. Our findings have relevance across the UK, particularly at a time of worsening finances for many families.

  14. Facing Title V permit constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patankar, U.M. [JACA Corp., Fort Washington, PA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The new Title V operating permit requirement under state regulations pursuant to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments will cover every emission source at a facility. These rules will significantly affect an operation by setting minimum compliance requirements, mandating periodic compliance certification, prescribing complex monitoring, record keeping and reporting procedures and making state and EPA approval of routine operational changes necessary through a permit amendment. The main concern with Title V is its effect on the operational flexibility of a facility, and individual emission sources within that facility. Unless properly addressed in a permit document, the term operational flexibility, so freely used by regulators in the context of the Title V program, can turn into a misnomer and the ability to operate as before may be significantly compromised under Title V. True operational flexibility is essential for businesses to respond to real changes in the marketplace. In the age of automation, just-in-time inventories and increased competition, flexibility to operate can mean the difference between growth and stagnation.

  15. Site-specific analysis of gene expression in early osteoarthritis using the Pond-Nuki model in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroki Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive and debilitating disease that often develops from a focal lesion and may take years to clinically manifest to a complete loss of joint structure and function. Currently, there is not a cure for OA, but early diagnosis and initiation of treatment may dramatically improve the prognosis and quality of life for affected individuals. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of analyzing changes in gene expression of articular cartilage using the Pond-Nuki model two weeks after ACL-transection in dogs, and to characterize the changes observed at this time point. Methods The ACL of four dogs was completely transected arthroscopically, and the contralateral limb was used as the non-operated control. After two weeks the dogs were euthanatized and tissues harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles of both limbs. Two dogs were used for histologic analysis and Mankin scoring. From the other two dogs the surface of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau were divided into four regions each, and tissues were harvested from each region for biochemical (GAG and HP and gene expression analysis. Significant changes in gene expression were determined using REST-XL, and Mann-Whitney rank sum test was used to analyze biochemical data. Significance was set at (p Results Significant differences were not observed between ACL-X and control limbs for Mankin scores or GAG and HP tissue content. Further, damage to the tissue was not observed grossly by India ink staining. However, significant changes in gene expression were observed between ACL-X and control tissues from each region analyzed, and indicate that a unique regional gene expression profile for impending ACL-X induced joint pathology may be identified in future studies. Conclusion The data obtained from this study lend credence to the research approach and model for the characterization of OA, and the identification and validation of

  16. 23 CFR 650.805 - Bridges not requiring a USCG permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bridges not requiring a USCG permit. 650.805 Section 650... OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Navigational Clearances for Bridges § 650.805 Bridges not... permit is not required for bridge construction. This determination shall be made at an early stage...

  17. A New Role for Annexin A11 in the Early Secretory Pathway via Stabilizing Sec31A Protein at the Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit Sites (ERES)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hideki; Kanadome, Takashi; Sugiura, Hirofumi; Yokoyama, Takeru; Yamamuro, Minami; Moss, Stephen E.; Maki, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Exit of cargo molecules from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for transport to the Golgi is the initial step in intracellular vesicular trafficking. The coat protein complex II (COPII) machinery is recruited to specialized regions of the ER, called ER exit sites (ERES), where it plays a central role in the early secretory pathway. It has been known for more than two decades that calcium is an essential factor in vesicle trafficking from the ER to Golgi apparatus. However, the role of calcium in the early secretory pathway is complicated and poorly understood. We and others previously identified Sec31A, an outer cage component of COPII, as an interacting protein for the penta-EF-hand calcium-binding protein ALG-2. In this study, we show that another calcium-binding protein, annexin A11 (AnxA11), physically associates with Sec31A by the adaptor function of ALG-2. Depletion of AnxA11 or ALG-2 decreases the population of Sec31A that is stably associated with the ERES and causes scattering of juxtanuclear ERES to the cell periphery. The synchronous ER-to-Golgi transport of transmembrane cargoes is accelerated in AnxA11- or ALG-2-knockdown cells. These findings suggest that AnxA11 maintains architectural and functional features of the ERES by coordinating with ALG-2 to stabilize Sec31A at the ERES. PMID:25540196

  18. Analysis of early bacterial communities on volcanic deposits on the island of Miyake (Miyake-jima), Japan: a 6-year study at a fixed site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Reiko; Sato, Yoshinori; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Nanba, Kenji; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kamijo, Takashi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Microbial colonization on new terrestrial substrates represents the initiation of new soil ecosystem formation. In this study, we analyzed early bacterial communities growing on volcanic ash deposits derived from the 2000 Mount Oyama eruption on the island of Miyake (Miyake-jima), Japan. A site was established in an unvegetated area near the summit and investigated over a 6-year period from 2003 to 2009. Collected samples were acidic (pH 3.0-3.6), did not utilize any organic substrates in ECO microplate assays (Biolog), and harbored around 106 cells (g dry weight)(-1) of autotrophic Fe(II) oxidizers by most-probable-number (MPN) counts. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and the Leptospirillum groups I, II and III were found to be abundant in the deposits by clone library analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The numerical dominance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was also supported by analysis of the gene coding for the large subunit of the form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). Comparing the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from samples differing in age, shifts in Fe(II)-oxidizing populations seemed to occur with deposit aging. The detection of known 16S rRNA gene sequences from Fe(III)-reducing acidophiles promoted us to propose the acidity-driven iron cycle for the early microbial ecosystem on the deposit.

  19. Early evidence of Acheulean settlement in northwestern Europe--la Noira site, a 700,000 year-old occupation in the center of France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncel, Marie-Hélène; Despriée, Jackie; Voinchet, Pierre; Tissoux, Hélène; Moreno, Davinia; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Courcimault, Gilles; Falguères, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The human settlement of Europe during Pleistocene times was sporadic and several stages have been recognized, both from paleaoanthropological and archaeological records. If the first phase of hominin occupation (as early as 1.4 Ma) seems mainly restricted to the southern part of the continent, the second phase, characterized by specific lithic tools (handaxes), is linked to Acheulean settlements and to the emergence of Homo heidelbergensis, the ancestor of Neanderthals. This phase reached northwestern Europe and is documented in numerous sites in Germany, Great Britain and northern France, generally after 600 ka. At la Noira (Brinay, Central France), the Middle Pleistocene alluvial formation of the Cher River covers an archaeological level associated with a slope deposit (diamicton). The lithic assemblage from this level includes Large Cutting Tools (LCTs), flakes and cores, associated with numerous millstone slabs. The lithic series is classified as Acheulean on the basis of both technological and typological analyses. Cryoturbation features indicate that the slope deposits and associated archaeological level were strongly frozen and disturbed after hominin occupation and before fluvial deposition. Eight sediment samples were dated by the electron spin resonance (ESR) method and the weighted average age obtained for the fluvial sands overlying the slope deposits is 665±55 ka. This age is older than previous chronological data placing the first European Acheulean assemblages north of 45(th) parallel north at around 500 ka and modifies our current vision of the initial peopling of northern Europe. Acheulean settlements are older than previously assumed and the oldest evidences are not only located in southern Europe. La Noira is the oldest evidence of Acheulean presence in north-western Europe and attests to the possibility of pioneering phases of Acheulean settlement which would have taken place on a Mode 1-type substratum as early as 700 ka. The lithic assemblage

  20. Early Upper Paleolithic chronology in the Levant: new ABOx-SC accelerator mass spectrometry results from the Mughr el-Hamamah Site, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Aaron Jonas; Shea, John J; Rech, Jason A; Pigati, Jeffrey S; Wilson, Jim; Belmaker, Miriam; Albert, Rosa Maria; Arpin, Trina; Cabanes, Dan; Clark, Jamie L; Hartman, Gideon; Hourani, Fuad; White, Chantel E; Nilsson Stutz, Liv

    2015-08-01

    Methodological developments and new paleoanthropological data remain jointly central to clarifying the timing and systemic interrelationships between the Middle-Upper Paleolithic (MP-UP) archaeological transition and the broadly contemporaneous anatomically modern human-archaic biological turnover. In the recently discovered cave site of Mughr el-Hamamah, Jordan, in situ flint artifacts comprise a diagnostic early Upper Paleolithic (EUP) assemblage. Unusually well-preserved charcoal from hearths and other anthropogenic features associated with the lithic material were subjected to acid-base-wet oxidation-stepped combustion (ABOx-SC) pretreatment. This article presents the ABOx-SC accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates on nine charcoal specimens from a single palimpsest occupation layer. Date calibration was carried out using the INTCAL13 radiocarbon calibration dataset. With the bulk of the material dating to 45-39 ka cal BP (thousands of years calibrated before present), the Mughr el-Hamamah lithic artifacts reveal important differences from penecontemporaneous sites in the region, documenting greater technological variability than previously known for this time frame in the Levant. The radiocarbon data from this EUP archaeological context highlight remaining challenges for increasing chronological precision in documenting the MP-UP transition.

  1. Mortality profiles of the large herbivores from the Lingjing Xuchang Man Site,Henan Province and the early emergence of the modern human behaviors in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ShuangQuan; LI ZhanYang; ZHANG Yue; GAO Xing

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a detailed study of mortality profiles of the large herbivores from the Middle Palaeolithic (MP) bone assemblage of the Lingjing Xuchang Man Site,Henan Province.Based on the analysis of the crown heights of fossil teeth from this assemblage,we come to a conclusion that aurochs (Bos primigenius) and horse (Equus caballus) are the major prey species in this assemblage and the age structures of these animals can be best described as the "prime-dominated pattern".This study confirmed the well-established notions at many Middle and Upper Palaeolithic sites across Eurasia and Africa that MSA/MP foragers were fully effective in hunting aggressive prey species,particularly aurochs and horse.This find indicates that the hunting behaviors and subsistence strategies were not significantly different between MP and UP (the Upper Palaeolithic) humans in East Asia and hence suggests the early emergence of the modern human behaviors in this area.

  2. 77 FR 48514 - Water Asset Management, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Water Asset Management, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit... June 6, 2012, Water Asset Management, Inc., New York, filed an application for a preliminary permit... Winnemucca Farms West site project.\\1\\ \\1\\ Water Asset Management, Inc. Winnemucca Farms West Pump...

  3. 77 FR 48513 - Water Asset Management, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Water Asset Management, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2012, Water Asset Management, Inc., New York, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant... Farms East site project.\\1\\ \\1\\ Water Asset Management, Inc., Winnemucca Farms East Pump Storage...

  4. A ~600 kyr duration Early Pleistocene record from the West Turkana (Kenya) HSPDP drill site: elemental XRF variability to reconstruct climate change in Turkana Boy's backyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhecke, M.; Beck, C. C.; Brown, E. T.; Cohen, A.; Deino, A. L.; Feibel, C. S.; Sier, M.

    2015-12-01

    Outcrops in the Kenyan and Ethiopian rift valleys document repeated occurrences of freshwater lakes and wooded landscapes over the past 4 million years at locations that are currently seasonally-dry savanna. Studies of the rich fossil records, in combination with outcropping lacustrine sequences, led to major breakthroughs in our knowledge of driving factors in human evolution. However, study of continuous drill core from ancient lake basins provides a basis for to unravel East African climate dynamics in an unseen fashion. The Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP), and the related Olorgesailie Drilling Project, recovered ~2 km of drill core since 2012. A major project goal is characterization of East African paleoclimate in order to evaluate its impact on hominin evolution. XRF core scanning data provide a means of evaluating records of past environmental conditions continuously and at high resolution. However, the HSPDP records contain complex lithologies reflecting repeated episodes of inundation and desiccation of the lake basins. Nevertheless, careful data evaluation based on detailed lithostratigraphy, which includes smear-slide microscopic analyses and X-radiographic images, allows disentanglement of complex signals and robust identification of continuous sequences for any cyclostratigraphic and statistical analysis. At the HSPDP Turkana Basin site a 175.6 m-long core the covers the Early Pleistocene time window during which hominids first expanded out of Africa and marine records document reorganization of tropical climate and the development of the strong Walker circulation. This drill site carries particular interest as it is located in only 2.5 km from the location of one of the most complete hominin skeletons ever recovered (Turkana Boy). Here we present a methodological approach to address the highly variable lithostratigraphy of the East African records to establish comprehensive and environmentally meaningful paleoclimate timeseries

  5. Ancient DNA analyses of early archaeological sites in New Zealand reveal extreme exploitation of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) at all life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskam, Charlotte L.; Allentoft, Morten E.; Walter, Richard; Scofield, R. Paul; Haile, James; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael; Jacomb, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The human colonisation of New Zealand in the late thirteenth century AD led to catastrophic impacts on the local biota and is among the most compelling examples of human over-exploitation of native fauna, including megafauna. Nearly half of the species in New Zealand' s pre-human avifauna are now extinct, including all nine species of large, flightless moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). The abundance of moa in early archaeological sites demonstrates the significance of these megaherbivores in the diet of the first New Zealanders. Combining moa assemblage data, based on DNA identification of eggshell and bone, with morphological identification of bone (literature and museum catalogued specimens), we present the most comprehensive audit of moa to date from several significant 13th-15th century AD archaeological deposits across the east coast of the South Island. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was amplified from 251 of 323 (78%) eggshell fragments and 22 of 27 (88%) bone samples, and the analyses revealed the presence of four moa species: Anomalopteryx didiformis; Dinornis robustus; Emeus crassus and Euryapteryx curtus. The mtDNA, along with polymorphic microsatellite markers, enabled an estimate of the minimum number of individual eggs consumed at each site. Remarkably, in one deposit over 50 individual eggs were identified - a number that likely represents a considerable proportion of the total reproductive output of moa in the area and emphasises that human predation of all life stages of moa was intense. Molecular sexing was conducted on bones (n = 11). Contrary to previous ancient DNA studies from natural sites that consistently report an excess of female moa, we observed an excess of males (2.7:1), suggestive that males were preferential targets. This could be related to different behaviour between the two highly size-dimorphic sexes in moa. Lastly, we investigated the moa species from recovered skeletal and eggshell remains from seven Wairau Bar burials, and identified

  6. Rapid and massive carbon injections of the Early Paleogene: The carbonate and planktonic foraminifera records at ODP Site 1215 (Equatorial Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, L.; Dickens, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    Models for ocean chemistry indicate that anthropogenic input of CO2 will decrease seawater pH and the concentration of carbonate ion. This should cause dissolution of pelagic carbonate on the seafloor and may reduce biogenic calcification. Stable carbon isotope records spanning the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene show a series of pronounced negative excursions (CIEs) interpreted as massive inputs of carbon. We therefore studied carbonate-rich sediments at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1215, which were deposited on the flank of the East Pacific Rise from the Late Paleocene to Early Eocene, to track potential lysocline and ecological changes before, during and after the CIEs. We document four negative CIEs, which correlate to the PETM (Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum, ~55.5 Ma), H1/ETM2 (~53.7 Ma), I1 (~53.2 Ma), and K/X (~52.5 Ma) events. These excursions are characterized by horizons of low carbonate content and an absence of planktonic foraminifers. Shortly after each perturbation, carbonate content and planktonic foraminifer abundance increased dramatically. We interpret these signals as representing time intervals when the lysocline and CCD initially shoaled because of massive carbon addition and subsequently deepened because of accelerated weathering and addition of alkalinity. We observe permanent ecological changes within the photic zone after the PETM. Globanomalinids (intermediate dwellers) more common in the record before the PETM locally disappeared afterwards. In contrast, acarinids and morozovellids (surface dwellers, photosymbont-bearing) were nearly absent before the PETM but become relatively abundant just after. Chiloguembelinids and “Tenuitellids” (intermediate dwellers) are more abundant between the H1/ETM2 and the I1 events, which could be an indication of enhanced carbonate preservation within the recovery phase of the lysocline or conditions that were more favorable for intermediate dwellers. Subbotinids and igorinids are rare in the

  7. Forest Products Industry Permitting Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Rosebud Casino and Hotel NPDES Proposed Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian Country, Minor Permit, proposed permit SD-0034584, Rosebud Casino and Hotel, South Dakota, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Todd County, South Dakota to an unnamed drainageway(s) tributary to Rock Creek.

  9. Air Force Academy MS4 NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit CO-R042007, the U.S. Air Force Academy is authorized to discharge from all municipal separate storm sewer system outfalls to the receiving waters specified in the permit in El Paso County, Colorado.

  10. 45 CFR 670.13 - Permit administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Permits § 670.13 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of the... U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) or any native bird which is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16...

  11. Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Permit Landings Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data set contains annual shrimp landings at the permit level from 2005-current fishing year. This also contains annual value of permit holders shrimp landings by...

  12. 36 CFR 13.112 - Permit revocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit revocation. 13.112... NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Cabins General Provisions § 13.112 Permit revocation. (a) The... request for a hearing concerning the revocation, based on the cause listed above, of a permit or...

  13. 50 CFR 21.41 - Depredation permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.41... control purposes. No permit is required merely to scare or herd depredating migratory birds other than... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Depredation permits. 21.41 Section 21.41...

  14. Permitting plan for Hanford tanks initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-10

    This plan describes all the possible permitting actions that could be required to implement the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project (HTI). Since the HTI Project Plan has several decision points where possible future activities could be eliminated, not all permitting actions described will be implemented. The cost and schedule for the permitting actions are included.

  15. 36 CFR 13.188 - Permit terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit terms. 13.188 Section....188 Permit terms. The Superintendent shall allow for use and occupancy of a temporary facility only to... Superintendent may also establish permit terms that: (a) Limit use to a specified period, not to exceed...

  16. 36 CFR 13.164 - Permit terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit terms. 13.164 Section... PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Cabins Cabin Use for Subsistence Purposes § 13.164 Permit terms. The Superintendent shall, among other conditions, establish terms of a permit that: (a) Allow for use and...

  17. 78 FR 18420 - Special Permit Applications Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... processing of, special permits from the Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR... permit S.P No. Applicant Regulation(s) thereof MODIFICATION SPECIAL PERMIT GRANTED 11470-M Veolia ES... Flanders, NJ. marking requirements. 15655-M Walt Disney Parks and 49 CFR 173.56(b) and To modify the...

  18. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 183-N Backwash Discharge Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. Liquid effluents on the Hanford Site have been classified as Phase I, Phase II, and Miscellaneous Streams. The Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 establishes milestones for State Waste Discharge Permit application submittals for all Phase I and Phase II streams, as well as the following 11 Miscellaneous Streams as identified in Table 4 of the Consent Order No. DE91NM-177.

  19. State Waste Discharge Permit application for industrial discharge to land: 200 East Area W-252 streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This document constitutes the WAC 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit application for six W-252 liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site. Appendices B through H correspond to Section B through H in the permit application form. Within each appendix, sections correspond directly to the respective questions on the application form. The appendices include: Product or service information; Plant operational characteristics; Water consumption and waterloss; Wastewater information; Stormwater; Other information; and Site assessment.

  20. Federal Environmental Permitting Handbook. Environmental Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    The handbook consists of eight chapters addressing permitting and licensing requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (CERCLA/SARA), the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Federal Insectide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Each chapter consists of: (1) an introduction to the statute and permitting requirements; (2) a diagram illustrating the relationship between permitting requirements under the statute being discussed and permitting requirements from other environmental statutes which may have to be addressed when applying for a particular permit (e.g., when applying for a RCRA permit, permits and permit applications under the CWA, CAA, SDWA, etc. would have to be listed in the RCRA permit application); and, (3) a compilation of the permitting requirements for the regulatory program resulting from the statute. In addition, the Handbook contains a permitting keyword index and a listing of hotline telephone numbers for each of the statutes.

  1. 40 CFR 124.9 - Administrative record for draft permits when EPA is the permitting authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....9 Administrative record for draft permits when EPA is the permitting authority. (a) The provisions... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative record for draft permits when EPA is the permitting authority. 124.9 Section 124.9 Protection of Environment...

  2. 40 CFR 124.18 - Administrative record for final permit when EPA is the permitting authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....18 Administrative record for final permit when EPA is the permitting authority. (a) The Regional... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative record for final permit when EPA is the permitting authority. 124.18 Section 124.18 Protection of Environment...

  3. Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs; identification of oropharyngeal tonsils as sites of primary and sustained viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Stenfeldt

    Full Text Available A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural, intra-oropharyngeal, inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglottic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi characterized by regional localization of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus. At this time FMDV antigen was localized in cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells and CD172a-expressing leukocytes of the crypt epithelium of the paraepiglottic tonsils. De novo replication of FMDV was first detected in oropharyngeal swab samples at 12 hpi and viremia occurred at 18-24 hpi, approximately 24 hours prior to the appearance of vesicular lesions. From 12 through 78 hpi, microscopic detection of FMDV was consistently localized to cytokeratin-positive cells within morphologically characteristic segments of oropharyngeal tonsil crypt epithelium. During this period, leukocyte populations expressing CD172a, SLA-DQ class II and/or CD8 were found in close proximity to infected epithelial cells, but with little or no co-localization with viral proteins. Similarly, M-cells expressing cytokeratin-18 did not co-localize with FMDV proteins. Intra-epithelial micro-vesicles composed of acantholytic epithelial cells expressing large amounts of structural and non-structural FMDV proteins were present within crypts of the tonsil of the soft palate during peak clinical infection. These findings inculpate the paraepiglottic tonsils as the primary site of FMDV infection in pigs exposed via the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, the continuing replication of FMDV in the oropharyngeal tonsils during viremia and peak clinical infection with no concurrent amplification of virus occurring in the lower respiratory tract indicates that these sites are the major source of shedding of FMDV from pigs.

  4. Early to middle Miocene climate evolution: New insights from IODP Sites U1335, U1337 and U1338 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Karlos G. D.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Lyle, Mitch; Raffi, Isabella; Channell, James E.; Andersen, Nils

    2015-04-01

    The lower to middle Miocene (~20 to 13 Ma) carbonate-rich sedimentary successions recovered at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites U1335, U1337 and U1338 allow unsurpassed resolution over the Climatic Optimum (16.9-14.7 Ma) and the transition into a colder climate mode after 13.9 Ma with re-establishment of permanent Antarctic ice sheets. High-resolution (1-10 kyr) stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes of well-preserved epibenthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides mundulus and Planulina wuellerstorfi) from these three sites show that the Climatic Optimum was characterized by high-amplitude climate variations and intense perturbations of the carbon cycle. Episodes of peak warmth coincided with transient shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth and enhanced carbonate dissolution in the deep ocean. The U1335 and U1337 records additionally reveal that the rapid global warming and/or polar ice melting event, marking the onset of the Climatic Optimum at ~16.9 Ma, was coupled to a massive increase in carbonate dissolution, indicated by sharp drops in carbonate percentages and accumulation rates and by the fragmentation or complete dissolution of planktonic foraminifers. After ~14.7 Ma, stepwise global cooling, culminating with extensive ice growth over Antarctica at ~13.8 Ma, coincide with enhanced opal and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, suggesting that increased siliceous productivity and organic carbon burial may have contributed to CO2 drawdown. Integration of age models derived from orbitally-tuned, high-resolution isotopes, biostratigraphic data and magnetic reversals allows further constraints on the temporal sequence of events and helps unravel the drivers of early to middle Miocene climate variations.

  5. 2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

    2003-02-20

    The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

  6. The cheetah Acinonyx pardinensis (Croizet et Jobert, 1828) s.l. at the hominin site of Dmanisi (Georgia) - A potential prime meat supplier in Early Pleistocene ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Helmut; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Vekua, Abesalom K.

    2011-09-01

    The fossil site of Dmanisi (southern Georgia) has yielded a significant amount of hominin remains dated to around 1.8 Ma, in addition to a rich contemporaneous faunal record. Based on topographic information combined with an updated list of the vertebrate faunal assemblage, the corresponding palaeo-landscape has been reconstructed. Over a distance of some kilometres the landscape pattern changed from that of a forested valley floor, to tree savannah and open grasslands, thus providing typical habitats for carnivores hunting in open spaces. Morphological analysis of the elements from a nearly complete cat's foreleg reveals the existence of a large and stoutly built cheetah, Acinonyx pardinensis (Croizet et Jobert, 1828) s.l., in the Dmanisi faunal assemblage. Body mass estimations based on the humerus and metacarpals point to a cat of around 100 kg. The amount of pure meat and associated leftovers produced by the cheetah's hunting activity available for other consumers has been estimated. Within Early Pleistocene ecosystems, the cheetah must be considered as a potential fresh prime meat supplier, above that of any other felid.

  7. Correlation of the KHS Tuff of the Kibish Formation to volcanic ash layers at other sites, and the age of early Homo sapiens (Omo I and Omo II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Francis H; McDougall, Ian; Fleagle, John G

    2012-10-01

    Hominin specimens Omo I and Omo II from Member I of the Kibish Formation, Ethiopia are attributed to early Homo sapiens, and an age near 196 ka has been suggested for them. The KHS Tuff, within Member II of the Kibish Formation has not been directly dated at the site, but it is believed to have been deposited at or near the time of formation of sapropel S6 in the Mediterranean Sea. Electron microprobe analyses suggest that the KHS Tuff correlates with the WAVT (Waidedo Vitric Tuff) at Herto, Gona, and Konso (sample TA-55), and with Unit D at Kulkuletti in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Konso sample TA-55 is older than 154 ka, and Unit D at Kulkuletti is dated at 183 ka. These correlations and ages provide strong support for the age originally suggested for the hominin remains Omo I and Omo II, and for correlation of times of deposition in the Kibish region with formation of sapropels in the Mediterranean Sea. The Aliyo Tuff in Member III of the Kibish Formation is dated at 104 ka, and correlates with Gademotta Unit 15 in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  9. Five-year results: the initial clinical trial of MammoSite balloon brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation in early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Pamela R; Keisch, Martin E; Vicini, Frank; Stolier, Alan; Scroggins, Troy; Walker, Alonzo; White, Julia; Hedberg, Peter; Hebert, Mary; Arthur, Doug; Zannis, Vic; Quiet, Coral; Streeter, Oscar; Silverstein, Mel

    2007-10-01

    Patients with early-stage invasive ductal breast cancer were prospectively evaluated using MammoSite RTS balloon brachytherapy (RTS Cytyc Corp, Marlborough, MA) as the sole modality for delivering accelerated partial breast irradiation to the lumpectomy bed with breast-conserving surgery. This report presents the 5-year results of the treated patients. From May 2000 to October 2001, 70 patients were enrolled in this prospective study. Forty-three patients completed accelerated partial breast irradiation with MammoSite brachytherapy following lumpectomy and axillary staging. Thirty-six patients have been followed for a median of 5.5 years (mean 65.2 months). Criteria for entry into the study were unifocal invasive ductal carcinoma, tumor size or = 45 years, absence of extensive intraductal component, cavity size > or = 3 cm in 1 dimension, node-negative, and final margins negative per National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project definition. A minimum balloon-to-skin surface distance of 5 mm was required. A dose of 34 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions over 5 days prescribed to 1 cm from the applicator surface using iridium-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Data on infection, seromas, cosmetic outcome, and toxicities were collected at 3 and 6 months and at yearly intervals. Local recurrences, both true recurrences in the lumpectomy bed and failures outside the initially treated target volume (elsewhere failures), were recorded. Contralateral breast failure rates were noted. The catheter was not implanted in 16 of the 70 enrolled patients due to cavity size not amenable to balloon placement (n = 10), ineligible by criteria (n = 4), and skin spacing (n = 2). Fifty-four patients were implanted and 43 were successfully treated with MammoSite balloon brachytherapy. Reasons for catheter explantation in 11 patients were poor cavity conformance in 7, inadequate skin spacing in 2, positive node in 1 and age less than 45 years in 1. Of the 43 patients who completed

  10. Case history review--demilitarization combustion permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaborek, B J

    2000-02-01

    In May 1993, Administrative Browner of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) announced that an indirect exposure health risk assessment was required for all hazardous waste combustion facilities seeking a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit. These types of risk assessments evaluate the health and environmental effects from inhalation of emissions (direct exposure) and from contact with environmental media and consumption of food products impacted by the emissions (indirect exposure). Completion of an indirect exposure risk assessment is often complicated by the various methodologies available for generating results and by the requirements of the regulating community. To minimize this complexity and to maximize consistency between risk assessments, the USEPA developed a number of detailed guidance documents. Site-specific conditions and toxicological data gaps, however, continue to present challenges not addressed by these guidance documents. This paper presents some of the specific challenges encountered by the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine when performing indirect exposure health risk assessments for several demilitarization combustion facilities.

  11. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1(+∕+)-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady

  12. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

  13. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  14. Overview of prohibited and permitted plant regulatory listing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Tasker, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Pest risk analysis is a process that evaluates the risks involved with a proposed species to help determine whether it should be permitted or denied entry into a country, and how the risks could be managed if it is imported. The prohibited listing approach was developed in the late 1800s and early 1900s in response to outbreaks of plant and animals pests such as foot and mouth disease of livestock, Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann), and Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.). Under this approach, selected species of concern are evaluated to determine if they should be regulated for entry. Under the permitted listing approach that was first used on a national level in Australia in the 1990s, all species that are proposed for introduction are assessed to determine if they should be regulated.

  15. EPA Region 2 Discharge Pipes for Facilites with NPDES Permits from the Permit Compliance GIS Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Permit and Compliance System (PCS) contains data on the National Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permit-holding facilities. This includes...

  16. Building Permits, permits plus data base, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Building Permits dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'permits plus data base'. Data by...

  17. 19 CFR 10.61 - Withdrawal permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal permit. 10.61 Section 10.61 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... bond, when required, the port director shall issue a permit on Customs Form 7501 or 7512....

  18. Dielectric permitivity measurement of cotton lint

    Science.gov (United States)

    A technique was developed for making broad band measurements of cotton lint electrical permitivity. The fundamental electrical permitivity value of cotton lint at various densities and moisture contents; is beneficial for the future development of cotton moisture sensors as it provides a...

  19. 75 FR 54649 - Endangered Wildlife; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Wildlife; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... Wildlife Service (Service), invite the public to comment on applications for permits to conduct enhancement..., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 911 NE. 11th Avenue, Portland, OR 97232-4181. FOR...

  20. 45 CFR 3.24 - Parking permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parking permits. 3.24 Section 3.24 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL..., a person may not park a motor vehicle without displaying a parking permit, currently valid for...

  1. 32 CFR 552.90 - Permit office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Permit office. 552.90 Section 552.90 National... CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.90 Permit office... non-training acess to the range complex. The office is open 0700-1900 hours, seven days a week,...

  2. 78 FR 36822 - Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Special Permit Applications AGENCY: Pipeline And... Applications. SUMMARY: In accordance with the procedures governing the application for, and the processing of..., Subpart B), notice is hereby given of the actions on special permits applications in (May to May 2013...

  3. 9 CFR 104.3 - Permit application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PERMITS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 104.3 Permit application. (a) Each person desiring to import a biological product shall make...

  4. Permitting plan for Hanford Tanks Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W.

    1998-03-19

    This plan describes all the permitting actions that have been identified as required to implement the Hanford Tanks Initiative. It reflects changes in the scope to the Hanford Tanks Initiative since the Rev. 0 plan was issued. The cost and schedule for the permitting actions are included.

  5. 30 CFR 740.13 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... necessary to support surface coal mining and reclamation operations. (B) An evaluation of impacts to the... regulatory authority has not yet rendered a final decision with respect to the permit application; and (iii... lands administered by a Federal land management agency. Upon receipt of a permit application package...

  6. 78 FR 43268 - Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... hazardous material. (modes 1, 2, 3, 4) 15860-N......... Apple Inc. 49 CFR To authorize the Cupertino, CA... modify the Inc. Baton 173.306(a)(3). special permit to Rouge, LA. reflect current statutes and... modify the Technologies special permit to Inc. (Former change a drawing Grantee: Conax number;...

  7. 78 FR 72830 - Migratory Bird Permits; Delegating Falconry Permitting Authority to 17 States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... Permitting Authority to 17 States AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... have requested that we delegate permitting for falconry to the State, as provided under our regulations... relevant regulation at 50 CFR 21.29 governing the transfer of permitting authority to these States has...

  8. 50 CFR 18.31 - Scientific research permits and public display permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research permits and public... Scientific research permits and public display permits. The Director may, upon receipt of an application and... importation of marine mammals for scientific research purposes or for public display. (a) Application...

  9. 77 FR 22267 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Parts 13 and 22 RIN 1018-AX91 Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: We propose to revise the regulations for permits for nonpurposeful take of golden eagles...

  10. 77 FR 27174 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Parts 13 and 22 RIN 1018-AX91 Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule... 13, 2012, proposed rule to revise the regulations for permits for nonpurposeful take of golden...

  11. Market performance and environmental policy. Four tradeable permits schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boom, J.T.; Duizendstraal, A.; De Jong, R.; Koster, J.M.M.; Nentjes, A.; Zhang, Z.X. [Department of Economics and Public Finance of the University of Groningen ECOF, Groningen (Netherlands); Van Buiren, K.; Van Es, G.A.; De Groot, A.W.M.; Velthuijsen, J.W. [Foundation for Economic Research of the University of Amsterdam SEO, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Duyse, P.; Heijnes, H. [Applied Environmental Economics TME, The Hague (Netherlands); Dijkgraaf, E.; Varkevisser, M. [Research Centre for Economic Policy OCfEB, Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wiersma, D.

    1998-08-01

    Six feasible schemes of tradeable permits are presented and the cost savings arising from the application of such schemes instead of conventional policies have been calculated. In this background study four other schemes are discussed. The major reason for their separate presentation is twofold: there was insufficient statistical information available to calculate potential cost savings that are sufficiently reliable and further study is needed to determine the most appropriate design of the schemes. Only after the questions about cost savings and design have been answered it can be established whether indeed introduction of the schemes will improve environmental effectiveness and cost effectiveness of environmental policy. The schemes to be presented in the next sections are tradeable permits for winning sand, for mortar and cement, for noise control on industrial sites, for packaging materials and for heavy metals in waste water and sludge. 13 refs.

  12. 2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Associated Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meachum, Teresa Ray; Michael G. Lewis

    2003-02-01

    The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

  13. Minilaparoscopic radical hysterectomy (mLPS-RH) vs laparoendoscopic single-site radical hysterectomy (LESS-RH) in early stage cervical cancer: a multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagotti, Anna; Ghezzi, Fabio; Boruta, David M; Scambia, Giovanni; Escobar, Pedro; Fader, Amanda N; Malzoni, Mario; Fanfani, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    To compare the perioperative outcomes of laparoendoscopic single-site radical hysterectomy (LESS-RH) and minilaparoscopic radical hysterectomy (mLPS-RH). Retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Seven institutions in Italy. Forty-six patents with early cervical cancer (FIGO stage IA2-IB1/IIA1) were included in the study. Nineteen patients (41.3%) underwent LESS-RH, and 27 (58.7%) underwent mLPS-RH. Pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in all patients. In the LESS-RH group, all surgical procedures were performed through a single umbilical multichannel port. In the mLPS-RH group, the procedure was completed using a 5-mm umbilical optical trocar and 3 additional 3-mm ancillary trocars, placed suprapubically and in the left and right lower abdominal regions. There was no difference in clinicopathologic characteristics at the time of diagnosis between the LESS-RH and mLPS-RH groups. Median operative time was 270 minutes (range, 149-380 minutes) for LESS-RH, and was 180 minutes (range, 90-240 minutes) for mLPS-RH (p = .001). No further differences were detected between the 2 groups insofar as type of radical hysterectomy, number of lymph nodes removed, or perioperative outcomes. In the LESS-RH group, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 1 patient (5.3%) because of external iliac vein injury, and in another patient, conversion to standard laparoscopy was required because of truncal obesity. In the mLPS-RH group, no conversions were observed; however, a repeat operation was performed to repair a ureteral injury. The percentage of patients discharged 1 day after surgery was significantly higher in the LESS-RH group (57.9%) compared with the mLPS-RH group (25.0%) (p = .03). After a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 9-73 months), only 1 patient, who had undergone mLPS-RH, experienced pelvic recurrence and died of the disease. Both LESS-RH and mLPS-RH are feasible ultra-minimally invasive approaches for performance of radical hysterectomy

  14. Ships Docked at Title V Permitted Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. 76 FR 59423 - Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-Use Permit, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Point Reyes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... National Park Service Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-Use Permit, Draft Environmental Impact Statement... statement to consider the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-use permit in Drakes Estero, Point Reyes... National Seashore Web site, at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/pore (click on the Drakes Bay Oyster...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 50 - Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To Construct and Licenses To Operate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Construct and Licenses To Operate Nuclear Power Reactors of Identical Design at Multiple Sites N Appendix N... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App.N Appendix N to Part 50—Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To..., apply to construction permits and operating licenses subject to this appendix N. 2. Applications for...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Permit Gear Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data set contains annual vessel gear characterization of permit holders shrimp vessel. Data includes net type, TED type, BRD type, etc.

  18. 40 CFR 71.9 - Permit fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Consumer Price Index. (2) Part 71 permit program costs and fees will be reviewed by the... Administrator, the changes will be published in the Federal Register. (o) Use of revenue. All fees,...

  19. 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP) covers discharges of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a residue, in areas where EPA is the NPDES...

  20. 2013 EPA Vessels General Permit (VGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Information for any vessel that submitted a Notice of Intent (NOI), Notice of Termination (NOT), or annual report under EPA's 2013 Vessel General Permit (VGP)....

  1. Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit CO-0034762, the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station is authorized to discharge from the interior storm drainage system and air exhaust stacks at the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, in El Paso County, Colorado, to tributaries Fountain Creek.

  2. Storm Water General Permit 2 for Construction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #2 for storm water discharges associated with industrial activity for Construction Activities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination...

  3. Rosebud Casino and Hotel NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit SD-0034584, Rosebud Casino and Hotel, South Dakota, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Todd County, South Dakota to an unnamed drainageway(s) tributary to Rock Creek.

  4. Crow Nation Water Treatment Plant NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030538, the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs is authorized to discharge from the Crow Agency water treatment plants via the wastewater treatment facility located in Bighorn County, Montana to the Little Bighorn River.

  5. Absaloka Mine South Extension NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030783, Westmoreland Resources, Inc. is authorized to discharge mine drainage from outfalls associated with the Absaloka Mine South Extension on the Crow Indian reservation near Hardin, Montana to Middle Fork of Sarpy Creek.

  6. 75 FR 2560 - Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ...) the application was filed in good faith, (2) the granted permit would not operate to the disadvantage... County 74 FR 46222, September December 17, 2009 Zoo. 8, 2009. 225871 Lorenzo J. Ferraro..... 74 FR...

  7. 40 CFR 233.21 - General permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... apply for an individual permit. This discretionary authority will be based on concerns for the aquatic... the discharger of his decision to exercise discretionary authority to require an individual...

  8. 77 FR 4271 - Special Permit Marking Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Removal of obsolete Special Permit markings... first shopping event, whichever occurred first. This document relieves tank car owners from that...

  9. Web Air Permits (WAP R7)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for Web Air Permits in Region 7 (WAP R7), a Lotus Notes application that once tracked comment...

  10. Permit Review - Florida Gas Transmission Company (FGT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Branch of Air Quality Permit Review for Florida Gas Transmission Company and their expansion of Compressor Station Number 10 in Wiggins, Mississippi. The facility is...

  11. 30 CFR 773.10 - Review of permit history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review of permit history. 773.10 Section 773.10... REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMITS AND PERMIT PROCESSING § 773.10 Review of permit history. (a) We, the regulatory authority, will rely upon the permit history information you, the applicant, submit under § 778.12 of this...

  12. 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresa R. Meachum

    2004-02-01

    The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

  13. State waste discharge permit application: Hydrotest, maintenance and construction discharges. Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    On December 23, 1991, the US DOE< Richland Operation Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of the Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 (216 Consent Order) (Ecology and US DOE 1991). The 216 Consent Order list regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site and requires compliance with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized on the 216 Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams; Phase II Streams; Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams were initially addressed in two report. Miscellaneous Streams are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the 216 Consent Order. This document constitutes the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit application for hydrotest,maintenance and construction discharges throughout the Hanford Site. This categorical permit application form was prepared and approved by Ecology.

  14. The glycocalyx of the mouse uterine luminal epithelium during estrus, early pregnancy, the peri-implantation period, and delayed implantation. I. Acquisition of Ricinus communis I binding sites during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, D J; Anderson, T L

    1985-06-01

    Mouse uteri were examined during estrus, early pregnancy, the peri-implantation period, and delayed implantation to determine whether changes in the surface coat of the luminal epithelium could be associated with receptivity of the uterus to the presence of blastocyst-stage embryos or blastocyst adhesion. By using alkaline bismuth subnitrate to label periodate-oxidized glycols within the glycocalyx we were able to measure the thickness and examine the morphology of the glycocalyx by electron microscopy. Ferritin-conjugated Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA-I) demonstrated the presence of D-galactose at terminal, nonreducing positions within the glycocalyx. A relatively thick (0.06-0.1-micron) surface coat was present during estrus, but contained almost no RCA-I binding sites. During Day 3 of pregnancy the surface coat remained up to 0.1 micron thick and RCA-I binding sites were present. At Day 4 and during delay the glycocalyx had a fibrillar appearance, contained RCA-I binding sites, and was reduced to 0.06-0.08 micron in thickness. During Day 5 of pregnancy the thickness of the surface coat was greatly reduced, but there remained uniform lectin binding adjacent to the plasma membrane both at sites of blastocyst attachment and between implantation sites. The results indicate that the luminal epithelium of the mouse uterus acquired RCA-I binding sites during pregnancy and that the thickness of the surface coat was greatly reduced at the time of implantation.

  15. The 5' end of U2 snRNA is in close proximity to U1 and functional sites of the pre-mRNA in early spliceosomal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, Gizem; Hartmuth, Klaus; Kastner, Berthold; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2007-02-09

    Recognition and pairing of the correct 5' and 3' splice sites (ss) of a pre-mRNA are critical events that occur early during spliceosome assembly. Little is known about the spatial organization in early spliceosomal complexes of the U1 and U2 snRNPs, which together with several non-snRNP proteins, are involved in juxtapositioning the functional sites of the pre-mRNA. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of splice-site recognition/pairing, we have examined the organization of U2 relative to U1 and pre-mRNA in spliceosomal complexes via hydroxyl-radical probing with Fe-BABE-tethered U2 snRNA. These studies reveal that functional sites of the pre-mRNA are located close to the 5' end of U2 both in E and A complexes. U2 is also positioned close to U1 in a defined orientation already in the E complex, and their relative spatial organization remains largely unchanged during the E to A transition.

  16. Section 404 permitting in coastal Texas: a longitudinal analysis of the relationship between peak streamflow and wetland alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Wesley E

    2012-04-01

    As early as the passage of the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act the U.S. government has sought to protect the nation's water resources through regulatory tools. While there has been a large amount of research on wetlands and wetland mitigation, very little is known about the impact of Section 404 permitting on water quantity. This research examines the impact of Section 404 permit types on peak annual streamflow in Coastal Texas from 1996 to 2003. Results of cross-sectional time-series regression analyses indicate that all four permit types have positive and significant effects on peak streamflow. These effects also vary by permit type, with Individual permits having the highest per-permit impact on peak annual flow.

  17. Section 404 Permitting in Coastal Texas: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Relationship Between Peak Streamflow and Wetland Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Wesley E.

    2012-04-01

    As early as the passage of the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act the U.S. government has sought to protect the nation's water resources through regulatory tools. While there has been a large amount of research on wetlands and wetland mitigation, very little is known about the impact of Section 404 permitting on water quantity. This research examines the impact of Section 404 permit types on peak annual streamflow in Coastal Texas from 1996 to 2003. Results of cross-sectional time-series regression analyses indicate that all four permit types have positive and significant effects on peak streamflow. These effects also vary by permit type, with Individual permits having the highest per-permit impact on peak annual flow.

  18. 9 CFR 78.2 - Handling of certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... âSâ brand permits for interstate movement of animals. 78.2 Section 78.2 Animals and Animal Products... certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals. (a) Any certificate, permit, or “S” brand permit required by this part for the interstate movement of animals shall be...

  19. IFQ Halibut/Sablefish and CDQ Halibut Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Under the IFQ Halibut/Sablefish Permit Program and CDQ Halibut Permit Program permits are issued for harvesting and receiving/processing halibut, and non-trawl...

  20. State Waste Discharge Permit ST-4502 Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, M.J.; LECLAIR, M.D.

    2000-09-27

    Plan has been developed to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements set forth in Permit ST-3502 and as a line management tool for use in maintaining configuration control of permit as well as documentation used to implement permit requirements.

  1. Permitting of Landfill Bioreactor Operations: Ten Years after ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to promulgation of the Rule, there were approximately 20 full-scale bioreactor projects in North America, including one in Canada. Of these, six were permitted by EPA (four Project XL sites and two projects listed separately under a cooperative research agreement at the Outer Loop Landfill in Kentucky). In March 2014, there were about 40 bioreactor projects reported, including 30 active RD&D projects in 11 approved states and one project on tribal lands. Wisconsin features the largest number of projects at 13, due primarily to the fact that landfill owners in the state must either eliminate landfill disposal of biodegradable materials or to achieve the complete stabilization of deposited organic waste at MSW landfills within 40 years after closure. Most landfill operators have selected a bioreactor approach to attempt to achieve the latter goal. In summary, only 16 of 50 (32%) states have currently adopted the Rule, meaning that development of RD&D permitting procedures that are consistent with EPA’s requirements has generally not occurred. The predominant single reason cited for not adopting the Rule was lack of interest amongst landfill facilities in the state. Subtitle D and its state derivatives already allow leachate recirculation over prescriptive (i.e., minimum technology) liner systems, which is often the primary goal of site operators seeking to control leachate treatment costs. Other reasons related to concerns over increased time, cost

  2. 78 FR 21146 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    .... 552). Permit TE-98707A Applicant: Mitchell Lockhart, Sallisaw, Oklahoma. Applicant requests a new... Zoo and Aquarium. Permit TE-00347B Applicant: Alisha Powell, Sallisaw, Oklahoma. Applicant requests...

  3. Fission product iodine during early Hanford-Site operations: Its production and behavior during fuel processing, off-gas treatment and release to the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, L.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate the radiological dose impact that Hanford Site operations may have made on the local and regional population. This impact is estimated by examining operations involving radioactive materials that were conducted at the Hanford Site from the startup of the first reactor in 1944 to the present. HEDR Project work is divided among several technical tasks. One of these tasks, Source Terms, is designed to develop quantitative estimates of all significant emissions of radionuclides by Hanford Site operations since 1944. Radiation doses can be estimated from these emissions by accounting for specific radionuclide transport conditions and population demography. This document provides technical information to assist in the evaluation of iodine releases. 115 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Feasibility of Undertaking Off-Site Infant Eye-Tracking Assessments of Neuro-Cognitive Functioning in Early-Intervention Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballieux, Haiko; Tomalski, Przemyslaw; Kushnerneko, Elena; Johnson, Mark H.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Moore, Derek G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work suggests that differences in functional brain development are already identifiable in 6- to 9-month-old infants from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. Investigation of early SES-related differences in neuro-cognitive functioning requires the recruitment of large and diverse samples of infants, yet it is often difficult to…

  5. Primary site and regional lymph node involvement are independent prognostic factors for early-stage extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoQing Niu; YuJing Zhang; Yong Yang; YiYang Li; Ge Wen; Liang Wang; ZhiMing Li; HanYu Wang; LuLu Zhang; YunFei Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nasal‑type extranodal natural killer/T‑cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) originates primarily in the nasal cavity or extra‑nasal sites within the upper aerodigestive tract. However, it is unclear whether the primary site can serve as an independent prognostic factor or whether the varying clinical outcomes observed with different primary sites can be attributed merely to their propensities of regional lymph node involvement. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic implications of the primary site and regional lymph node involvement in patients with early‑stage nasal‑type ENKTCL. Methods: To develop a nomogram, we reviewed the clinical data of 215 consecutively diagnosed patients with early‑stage nasal‑type ENKTCL who were treated in Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center with chemotherapy and radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011. The predictive accuracy and discriminative ability of the nomogram were determined using a concordance index (C‑index) and calibration curve. Results: The 5‑year overall survival (OS) and progression‑free survival (PFS) rates of patients with nasal ENKTCL were higher than those of patients with extra‑nasal ENKTCL (OS: 68.2% vs. 46.0%, P = 0.030; PFS: 53.4% vs. 26.6%, P = 0.010).The 5‑year OS and PFS rates of patients with Ann Arbor stage IE ENKTCL were higher than those of patients with Ann Arbor stage IIE ENKTCL (OS: 66.3% vs. 59.2%, P = 0.003; PFS: 51.4% vs. 40.3%, P = 0.009). Multivariate analysisshowed that age >60 years, ECOG performance status score nasal primary site, and regional lymph node involvement were significantly associated with lower 5‑year OS rate;≥2, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, extra‑age >60 years, elevated LDH level, extra‑nasal primary site, and regional lymph node involvement were significantly associated with lower 5‑year PFS rate. The nomogram included the primary site and regional lymph node involve‑ment based on multivariate analysis. The

  6. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-18

    This document, Set 2, the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part B Permit Application, consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of WAC 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. This permit application contains umbrella- type'' documentation with overall application to the Hanford Facility. This documentation is broad in nature and applies to all TSD units that have final status under the Hanford Facility Permit.

  7. 77 FR 66406 - Migratory Bird Permits; Delegating Falconry Permitting Authority to Seven States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. This rule delegates authority to States... Permitting Authority to Seven States AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... requested that we delegate permitting for falconry to the State, as provided under our regulations. We have...

  8. 76 FR 71910 - Migratory Bird Permits; States Delegated Falconry Permitting Authority; Technical Corrections to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... number of small entities. This rule delegates authority to States that have requested it, and those... Falconry Permitting Authority; Technical Corrections to the Regulations AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wyoming have requested that we delegate permitting for...

  9. 30 CFR 947.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control structures, roads, and other significant features contained in the application marked by flags. (c... regulations: (1) Department of Ecology: Surface Water Rights Permit, RCW 90.03.250 Dam Safety Approval, RCW 90....03.380 Ground Water Permit, RCW 90.44.050 New Source Construction Approval, RCW 79.94.152...

  10. Early cretaceous (Valanginian and Hauterivian) belemnites and organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts from a marine hydrothermal vent site and adjacent facies of the Mecsek Mts., Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bujtor, L.; Janssen, N.M.M.; Verreussel, R.M.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The first record of belemnites from fossil hydrothermal vent sites in the Mecsek Mountains of Hungary emphasizes the occurrences of belemnites in Mesozoic chemosynthetic-microbial based ecosystems reported only from cold seep carbonates to date. From the outer shelf-upper bathyal (<300 m) hydrotherm

  11. Incidence of early symptomatic port-site hernia: a case series from a department where laparoscopy is the preferred surgical approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D C

    2012-12-01

    Potential benefits of laparoscopic surgery include decreased post-operative pain, improved cosmesis and a shorter hospital stay. However as the volume and complexity of laparoscopic procedures increase, there appears to be a simultaneous increase in complications relating to laparoscopic access. Development of a port-site hernia is one such complication.

  12. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients (n = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection (p-value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  13. Feasibility of Undertaking Off-Site Infant Eye-Tracking Assessments of Neuro-Cognitive Functioning in Early-Intervention Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballieux, Haiko; Tomalski, Przemyslaw; Kushnerneko, Elena; Johnson, Mark H; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Moore, Derek G

    2016-01-01

    Recent work suggests that differences in functional brain development are already identifiable in 6- to 9-month-old infants from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. Investigation of early SES-related differences in neuro-cognitive functioning requires the recruitment of large and diverse samples of infants, yet it is often difficult to persuade low-SES parents to come to a university setting. One solution is to recruit infants through early intervention children's centres (CCs). These are often located in areas of high relative deprivation to support young children. Given the increasing portability of eye-tracking equipment, assessment of large clusters of infants could be undertaken in centres by suitably trained early intervention staff. Here, we report on a study involving 174 infants and their parents, carried out in partnership with CCs, exploring the feasibility of this approach. We report the processes of setting up the project and participant recruitment. We report the diversity of sample obtained on the engagement of CC staff in training and the process of assessment itself. We report the quality of the data obtained, and the levels of engagement of parents and infants. We conclude that this approach has great potential for recruiting large and diverse samples worldwide, provides sufficiently reliable data and is engaging to staff, parents and infants.

  14. Technological Analysis of the World’s Earliest Shamanic Costume: A Multi-Scalar, Experimental Study of a Red Deer Headdress from the Early Holocene Site of Star Carr, North Yorkshire, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Aimée; Elliott, Benjamin; Conneller, Chantal; Pomstra, Diederik; Evans, Adrian A.; Fitton, Laura C.; Holland, Andrew; Davis, Robert; Kershaw, Rachel; O’Connor, Sonia; O’Connor, Terry; Sparrow, Thomas; Wilson, Andrew S.; Jordan, Peter; Collins, Matthew J.; Colonese, André Carlo; Craig, Oliver E.; Knight, Rebecca; Lucquin, Alexandre J. A.; Taylor, Barry; Milner, Nicky

    2016-01-01

    Shamanic belief systems represent the first form of religious practice visible within the global archaeological record. Here we report on the earliest known evidence of shamanic costume: modified red deer crania headdresses from the Early Holocene site of Star Carr (c. 11 kya). More than 90% of the examples from prehistoric Europe come from this one site, establishing it as a place of outstanding shamanistic/cosmological significance. Our work, involving a programme of experimental replication, analysis of macroscopic traces, organic residue analysis and 3D image acquisition, metrology and visualisation, represents the first attempt to understand the manufacturing processes used to create these artefacts. The results produced were unexpected—rather than being carefully crafted objects, elements of their production can only be described as expedient. PMID:27073850

  15. Residential Parking Permits and Parking Supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Ommeren (Jos); J. de Groote (Jesper); G. Mingardo (Giuliano)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe estimate welfare losses of policies that provide on-street parking permits to residents almost free of charge in shopping districts. Our empirical results indicate that parking supply is far from perfectly price elastic, implying that there are substantial welfare losses related to un

  16. 36 CFR 13.162 - Permit issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) In making a decision on a permit application, the Superintendent shall consider whether the use by local rural residents of a cabin or other structure for subsistence purposes is customary and... structure is “necessary to reasonably accommodate” the applicant's subsistence uses. In making...

  17. Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NWCC Siting Work Group

    2002-08-01

    This handbook has been written for individuals and groups involved in evaluating wind projects: decision-makers and agency staff at all levels of government, wind developers, interested parties and the public. Its purpose is to help stakeholders make permitting wind facility decisions in a manner which assures necessary environmental protection and responds to public needs.

  18. 27 CFR 22.24 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permits. 22.24 Section 22.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Administrative Provisions Authorities §...

  19. 27 CFR 20.25 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permits. 20.25 Section 20.25 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Administrative Provisions...

  20. Standing Rock Rural Water System NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit SD-0030996, the Standing Rock Rural Water System is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Corson County, South Dakota, to an unnamed tributary to Fisher Creek, a tributary to Oahe Reservoir on the Missouri R.

  1. 75 FR 41233 - Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... application was filed in good faith, (2) the granted permit would not operate to the disadvantage of the... 62586; November April 01, 2010 Mexico, Museum of 30, 2009. Southwestern Biology. 08939A Los Angeles Zoo... University of 16, 2009. California at Berkeley. 228022 Metro Richmond Zoo..... 75 FR 427; January 5, April...

  2. 75 FR 12564 - Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ...) the application was filed in good faith, (2) the granted permit would not operate to the disadvantage..., 2009 16, 2009. 220887 Fort Worth Zoo 74 FR 55062; October February 19, 2010 26, 2009. 223400 Earth... Zoo 74 FR 66675; December February 2, 2010 16, 2009. 231594 Seneca Park Zoo 74 FR 58977;...

  3. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of an emergency. An emergency constitutes an affirmative defense to an action brought for... such deviations and any corrective actions or preventive measures taken. The Administrator will define... requirements in the event of a challenge to any portions of the permit. (7) Provisions stating the...

  4. 50 CFR 665.203 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... If one or more persons on a vessel-based bottomfish fishing trip holds an MHI non-commercial permit... fishing occurs during or as a result of a vessel-based fishing trip, then the fishing trip is considered... incapacitation, vessel breakdowns, and the loss of the vessel at sea if the event prevented the vessel...

  5. 50 CFR 660.25 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., accumulation limits, fees, and appeals are described at § 660.150, subpart D. (vi) C/P endorsement. A C/P... of permit ownership, accumulation limits, fees, and appeals are described at § 660.140, subpart D. (d... receiver to receive, purchase, or take custody, control or possession of landings from the Shorebased...

  6. 43 CFR 36.9 - Issuing permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... purposes for which the affected area was established or is managed; (2) Requirements for restoration.... (5) Requirements to protect the interests of individuals living in the general area of the right-of-way permit who rely on the fish, wildlife and biotic resources of the area for subsistence...

  7. 30 CFR 773.17 - Permit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (e) The permittee shall take all possible steps to minimize any adverse impact to the environment or... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY...

  8. 9 CFR 104.1 - Permit required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PERMITS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 104.1... biological product into the United States shall be issued in accordance with the regulations in this part....

  9. 77 FR 10183 - Reissuance of Nationwide Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ..., 2011, issue of the Federal Register (76 FR 9174), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) published... adopted the concept of general permits in its final rule published on July 25, 1975 (see 40 FR 31321). The... specific activities or situations that are not authorized, or for which a PCN is required to allow...

  10. 50 CFR 679.4 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... permits—(1) Operators of commercial fishing vessels using power troll gear. The operator of a fishing vessel using power troll gear may engage in commercial fishing for salmon in the Salmon Management Area if the operator: (i) Held a valid State of Alaska power troll permanent entry permit on May 15,...

  11. 50 CFR 648.4 - Vessel permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... apply for a IFQ scallop permit who disputes NMFS's determination of the vessel's contribution factor... is in the process of construction or rerigging or under agreement or written contract for construction or rerigging, as of the effective baseline specification date in which case the baseline...

  12. 9 CFR 122.2 - Permits required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permits required. 122.2 Section 122.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0015)...

  13. 75 FR 44987 - Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 146 (Friday, July 30, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 44987-44988] [FR Doc No: 2010-18754] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R9-IA-2010-N153] [96300-1671-0000-P5] Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  14. Conditioning of self-assembled monolayers at two static immersion test sites along the east coast of Florida and its effect on early fouling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, I; Bauer, S; Vater, S; Zargiel, K; Finlay, J A; Arpa-Sancet, M P; Alles, M; Callow, J A; Callow, M E; Swain, G W; Grunze, M; Rosenhahn, A

    2014-09-01

    Among the first events after immersion of surfaces in the ocean is surface 'conditioning'. Here, the accumulation and composition of the conditioning films formed after immersion in the ocean are analyzed. In order to account for different surface chemistries, five self-assembled monolayers that differ in resistance to microfouling and wettability were used. Water samples from two static immersion test sites along the east coast of Florida were collected at two different times of the year and used for experiments. Spectral ellipsometry revealed that conditioning films were formed within the first 24 h and contact angle goniometry showed that these films changed the wettability and rendered hydrophobic surfaces more hydrophilic and vice versa. Infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy showed that the composition of the conditioning film depended on both the wettability and immersion site. Laboratory and field assays showed that the presence of a conditioning film did not markedly influence settlement of microorganisms.

  15. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  16. 40 CFR 270.60 - Permits by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment works. The owner or operator of a POTW which accepts for treatment hazardous waste, if the owner... ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Special Forms of Permits § 270.60 Permits by... operator of a barge or other vessel which accepts hazardous waste for ocean disposal, if the owner or...

  17. 14 CFR 437.9 - Issuance of an experimental permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issuance of an experimental permit. 437.9..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.9 Issuance of an experimental permit. The FAA issues an experimental permit authorizing an unlimited number of launches...

  18. 14 CFR 437.7 - Scope of an experimental permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of an experimental permit. 437.7..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.7 Scope of an experimental permit. An experimental permit authorizes launch or reentry of a reusable suborbital rocket....

  19. 14 CFR 437.5 - Eligibility for an experimental permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligibility for an experimental permit. 437... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.5 Eligibility for an experimental permit. The FAA will issue an experimental permit to a person to launch...

  20. 14 CFR 437.83 - Compliance with experimental permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance with experimental permit. 437.83..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Terms and Conditions of an Experimental Permit § 437.83 Compliance with experimental permit. A permittee must conduct any launch or reentry under...

  1. 14 CFR 437.11 - Duration of an experimental permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duration of an experimental permit. 437.11..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.11 Duration of an experimental permit. An experimental permit lasts for one year from the date it is issued. A permittee...

  2. 14 CFR 437.15 - Transfer of an experimental permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of an experimental permit. 437.15..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.15 Transfer of an experimental permit. An experimental permit is not transferable....

  3. 50 CFR 15.24 - Permits for cooperative breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for cooperative breeding. 15.24... PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Permits and Approval of Cooperative Breeding Programs § 15.24 Permits for cooperative breeding. (a) Application requirements for permits for cooperative breeding....

  4. 40 CFR 124.41 - Definitions applicable to PSD permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions applicable to PSD permits... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Specific Procedures Applicable to PSD Permits § 124.41 Definitions applicable to PSD permits. Whenever PSD permits are processed under this part, the following terms shall have...

  5. 50 CFR 648.88 - Multispecies open access permit restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multispecies open access permit... Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.88 Multispecies open access permit restrictions. (a) Handgear permit. A vessel issued a valid open access NE multispecies Handgear permit...

  6. Study on Mt.Tonglu Site, Panlongcheng Site and Bronze Civilization in Early China%铜绿山与盘龙城及中国早期青铜文明之关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐少华

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the ancient sites of mining and metallurgy in Mt .Tonglu and other places distrib-uted in the Middle and Lower Reaches Area of Yangtze River has proved that the copper mine of this area was exploited and smelted no later than Shang Dynasty , and then lasted more than one thousand years , through-out the shining evolution course of Chinese bronze civilization in Zhou , Qin and Han dynasties.Pan-longcheng Site was the regional center of Shang′s southern territory.Besides its political and military func-tions, the other one acted as a process and transit base to obtain abundant mine sources from the south , and then transported them to the north .The rising and development of Shang culture of Panlongcheng Site has had the close relationship with the mining and smelting of the copper mine in Mt .Tonglu as well as other similar places in the south .%以铜绿山为代表的一大批古矿冶遗址的发现,证明长江中下游地区的铜矿资源最迟于商代即得到开采、冶炼,历两周至秦汉,前后延续有一千多年,几乎伴随着中国青铜文明的整个历程。盘龙城遗址是商王室统治南方的区域中心,除了政治、军事上的作用之外,还起着获取南方丰富的矿料资源,并以此作为加工、中转基地,不断输往中原商王室的重要职能;盘龙城商文化的兴起、发展,与铜绿山等地铜矿资源的采冶具有密切的内在联系。

  7. Offshore Wind Energy Permitting: A Survey of U.S. Project Developers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a goal to generate 20% of the nation’s electricity from wind power by 2030. Achieving this “20% Wind Scenario” in 2030 requires acceleration of the current rate of wind project development. Offshore wind resources contribute substantially to the nation’s wind resource, yet to date no offshore wind turbines have been installed in the U.S. Progress developing offshore wind projects has been slowed by technological challenges, uncertainties about impacts to the marine environment, siting and permitting challenges, and viewshed concerns. To address challenges associated with siting and permitting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) surveyed offshore wind project developers about siting and project development processes, their experience with the environmental permitting process, and the role of coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) in development of the offshore wind industry. Based on the responses to survey questions, we identify several priority recommendations to support offshore wind development. Recommendations also include considerations for developing supporting industries in the U.S. and how to use Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) to appropriately consider ocean energy among existing ocean uses. In this report, we summarize findings, discuss the implications, and suggest actions to improve the permitting and siting process.

  8. 75 FR 31775 - Draft National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Pesticide General Permit for Point...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... AGENCY Draft National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Pesticide General Permit for Point... discharges to waters of the United States of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a... or e-mail. The http://www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means...

  9. State waste discharge permit application for cooling water and condensate discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, R.D.

    1996-08-12

    The following presents the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) Application for the Cooling Water and Condensate Discharges on the Hanford Site. This application is intended to cover existing cooling water and condensate discharges as well as similar future discharges meeting the criteria set forth in this document.

  10. Permitting of Landfill Bioreactor Operations: Ten Years after the RD&D Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to promulgation of the Rule, there were approximately 20 full-scale bioreactor projects in North America, including one in Canada. Of these, six were permitted by EPA (four Project XL sites and two projects listed separately under a cooperative research agreement at the Ou...

  11. Permitting of Landfill Bioreactor Operations: Ten Years after the RD&D Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to promulgation of the Rule, there were approximately 20 full-scale bioreactor projects in North America, including one in Canada. Of these, six were permitted by EPA (four Project XL sites and two projects listed separately under a cooperative research agreement at the Ou...

  12. 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meachum, Teresa Ray; Lewis, Michael George

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

  13. 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

    2002-02-15

    The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

  14. Building Permits, Buidling permits pulled from apprasial database and geocoded to loctions for all types of permits issued, Published in unknown, Johnson County AIMS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Building Permits dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of unknown. It is described as 'Buidling permits pulled from...

  15. La Cueva del Ángel (Lucena, Córdoba, a site of the Middle and Early Upper Pleistocene in the South of the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botella Ortega, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we offer a preview of the excavations of a Palaeolithic site in the southern Iberian Peninsula: the Cueva del Ángel (Lucena, Córdoba. Since 1995, year in which its archaeological potential was discovered, there have been four excavation campaigns and there is now a 5- meter deep stratigraphic sequence. Together with the on-site excavations, there is also the technological and typological analysis of the lithic industry, on-going zoological study, as well as a geological approach, both of the cavity and the sedimentary deposit that filled it. The fauna and lithic industry recovered, together with the absolute dating offered by the stratigraphic sequence, allow us to conclude that we are studying a Middle and Old Upper Pleistocene, which makes this cave an exceptional site in the Iberian Peninsula.

    En este artículo presentamos un avance de los trabajos realizados en un nuevo yacimiento paleolítico del sur de la Península Ibérica: la Cueva del Ángel (Lucena, Córdoba. Desde el descubrimiento en 1995 de su potencial arqueológico, se ha excavado durante cuatro campañas y, hasta el momento, presenta un corte estratigráfico de unos 5 metros de potencia. Paralelamente se analiza la tecnología y tipología, la fauna, la geología de la cavidad y su relleno sedimentario. La fauna, la industria lítica y las dataciones absolutas sitúan el yacimiento en el Pleistoceno medio y el Pleistoceno superior antiguo; lo que hace que esta cueva sea excepcional en la Península Ibérica.

  16. Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

    2000-12-01

    Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

  17. Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

    2000-12-01

    Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

  18. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, DSHWPOPermittedUsedOilFacilities-Location in Utah of all Used Oil Facilities: Marketers, Porcessoors, Transfer, Transport and Off-specification Permitted by UDEQ Division of Hazardous Waste (DSHW) - Used Oil Section. Federal Fiscal Year 2006. Dataset Upda, Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information...

  19. Activities of the society of archaeology, history and ethnography on Bolgar hillfort site in the late XIX – early XIX centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persova Svetlana G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of published and archival sources, the article analyzes the activity of the Society for Archaeology, History and Ethnography (SAHE with Kazan Imperial University devoted to the study and preservation of the Bolgar hillfort site. Initial excavations with SAHE participation were conducted here in 1887 at the ruins of the “White Chamber” by I.I. Vashchuk and V.V. Glinski, the trustees of Moscow 1st-guild merchant N.S. Rasteryaev. SAHE’s role was reduced to participation of V.A. Kazarinov, a researcher, as observer. Nevertheless, the Society laid the foundation for professional research of the Bolgar hillfort, collected exhibits displayed in SAHE museum, compiled plans of the settlement and individual buildings, performed measurements and topographic surveying, identified the destination of the majority of architectural monuments and provided partially accurate determination of their construction periods. In 1916, the last pre-revolutionary season on Bolgar hillfort site was held. The researcher V.F. Smolin studied the ruins of the “Hellenic Chamber”. In 1916, Archaeological prospecting was aimed at finding Christian burials in the vicinity of the edifice. Excavations by SAHE uncovered only a small part of the Bolgar hillfort area. The obstacles for the scientific activity of the Society were a lack of money, and then WWI. Despite all the shortcomings, during the pre-revolutionary period SAHE researchers accumulated a certain experience and offered a framework methodology for the study of this historical and archaeological medieval settlement.

  20. Dual functions of transcription factors, transforming growth factor-beta-inducible early gene (TIEG)2 and Sp3, are mediated by CACCC element and Sp1 sites of human monoamine oxidase (MAO) B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Kevin; Shih, Jean C

    2004-05-14

    Monoamine oxidases (MAO) A and B catalyze the oxidative deamination of many biogenic and dietary amines. Abnormal expression of MAO has been implicated in several psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Human MAO B core promoter (-246 to -99 region) consists of CACCC element flanked by two clusters of overlapping Sp1 sites. Here, we show that cotransfection with transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-inducible early gene (TIEG)2 increased MAO B gene expression at promoter, mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels in both SH-SY5Y and HepG2 cells. Mutation of the CACCC element increased the MAO B promoter activity, and cotransfection with TIEG2 further increased the promoter activity, suggesting that CACCC was a repressor element. This increase was reduced when the proximal Sp1 overlapping sites was mutated. Similar interactions were found with Sp3. These results showed that TIEG2 and Sp3 were repressors at the CACCC element but were activators at proximal Sp1 overlapping sites of MAO B. Gel-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TIEG2 and Sp3 bound directly to CACCC element and the proximal Sp1 sites in both synthetic oligonucleotides and natural MAO B core promoter. TIEG2 had a higher affinity to Sp1 sites than CACCC element, whereas Sp3 had an equal affinity to both elements. Thus, TIEG2 was an activator, but Sp3 had no effect on MAO B gene expression. This study provides new insights into MAO B gene expression and illustrates the complexity of gene regulation.

  1. Early Shang Sacrificial Site in the Shang City at Yanshi,Henan%河南偃师商城商代早期王室祭祀遗址

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国社会科学院考古研究所

    2002-01-01

    The Shang city in Yanshi was the capital of the early Shang Dynasty. In the north of its palace city, a group of remains were found to be vestiges of Shang royal aristocrats' sacrificial activities. The main part consists roughly of three zones with a little difference from each other. The victims commonest seen in the sacrificial area are pigs, which are buried together with or without other species of animals. The rest of offerings include human victims and plants. The sacrificial area was used at many stages of the Shang cultural remains in the Shang city of Yanshi, from the first phase of the first period through the sixth phase of the third period. Its discovery clarified the layout and area division of the palace city and enriched the knowledge of it. Large quantities of serial charcoal samples and pigs' remains provided comparable "dual" serial data for dating the function of the Shang city in Yanshi.

  2. Should Advertising by Aesthetic Surgeons be Permitted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations. PMID:28529421

  3. Rates and Reasons for Early Change of First HAART in HIV-1-Infected Patients in 7 Sites throughout the Caribbean and Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.; Fink, Valeria I.; Schechter, Mauro; Tuboi, Suely H.; Wolff, Marcelo; Pape, Jean W.; Leger, Paul; Padgett, Denis; Madero, Juan Sierra; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine C.; Masys, Daniel R.; Cahn, Pedro E.

    2010-01-01

    Background HAART rollout in Latin America and the Caribbean has increased from approximately 210,000 in 2003 to 390,000 patients in 2007, covering 62% (51%–70%) of eligible patients, with considerable variation among countries. No multi-cohort study has examined rates of and reasons for change of initial HAART in this region. Methodology Antiretroviral-naïve patients > = 18 years who started HAART between 1996 and 2007 and had at least one follow-up visit from sites in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico and Peru were included. Time from HAART initiation to change (stopping or switching any antiretrovirals) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier techniques. Cox proportional hazards modeled the associations between change and demographics, initial regimen, baseline CD4 count, and clinical stage. Principal Findings Of 5026 HIV-infected patients, 35% were female, median age at HAART initiation was 37 years (interquartile range [IQR], 31–44), and median CD4 count was 105 cells/uL (IQR, 38–200). Estimated probabilities of changing within 3 months and one year of HAART initiation were 16% (95% confidence interval (CI) 15–17%) and 28% (95% CI 27–29%), respectively. Efavirenz-based regimens and no clinical AIDS at HAART initiation were associated with lower risk of change (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7 (95% CI 1.1–2.6) and 2.1 (95% CI 1.7–2.5) comparing neverapine-based regimens and other regimens to efavirenz, respectively; HR = 1.3 (95% CI 1.1–1.5) for clinical AIDS at HAART initiation). The primary reason for change among HAART initiators were adverse events (14%), death (5.7%) and failure (1.3%) with specific toxicities varying among sites. After change, most patients remained in first line regimens. Conclusions Adverse events were the leading cause for changing initial HAART. Predictors for change due to any reason were AIDS at baseline and the use of a non-efavirenz containing regimen. Differences between participant sites were observed

  4. Trace element geochemistry (Li, Ba, Sr, and Rb) using Curiosity's ChemCam: early results for Gale crater from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Ann M.; Newsom, Horton E.; Clark, Benton; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnes; Blank, Jen G.; Mangold, Nicolas; Sautter, Violaine; Maurice, Sylvestre; Clegg, Samuel M.; Gasnault, Olivier; Forni, Olivier; Tokar, Robert; Lewin, Eric; Dyar, M. Darby; Lasue, Jeremie; Anderson, Ryan; McLennan, Scott M.; Bridges, John; Vaniman, Dave; Lanza, Nina; Fabre, Cecile; Melikechi, Noureddine; Perett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; King, Penelope L.; Barraclough, Bruce; Delapp, Dorothea; Johnstone, Stephen; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Rosen-Gooding, Anya; Williams, Josh

    2013-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument package on the Mars rover, Curiosity, provides new capabilities to probe the abundances of certain trace elements in the rocks and soils on Mars using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We focus on detecting and quantifying Li, Ba, Rb, and Sr in targets analyzed during the first 100 sols, from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest. Univariate peak area models and multivariate partial least squares models are presented. Li, detected for the first time directly on Mars, is generally low (100 ppm and >1000 ppm, respectively. These analysis locations tend to have high Si and alkali abundances, consistent with a feldspar composition. Together, these trace element observations provide possible evidence of magma differentiation and aqueous alteration.

  5. Trace element geochemistry (Li, Ba, Sr, and Rb) using Curiosity's ChemCam: Early results for Gale crater from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Ann M.; Newsom, Horton E.; Clark, Benton; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnes; Blank, Jen G.; Mangold, Nicolas; Sautter, Violaine; Maurice, Sylvestre; Clegg, Samuel M.; Gasnault, Olivier; Forni, Olivier; Tokar, Robert; Lewin, Eric; Dyar, M. Darby; Lasue, Jeremie; Anderson, Ryan; McLennan, Scott M.; Bridges, John; Vaniman, Dave; Lanza, Nina; Fabre, Cecile; Melikechi, Noureddine; Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; King, Penelope L.; Barraclough, Bruce; Delapp, Dorothea; Johnstone, Stephen; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Rosen-Gooding, Anya; Williams, Josh

    2014-01-01

    ChemCam instrument package on the Mars rover, Curiosity, provides new capabilities to probe the abundances of certain trace elements in the rocks and soils on Mars using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We focus on detecting and quantifying Li, Ba, Rb, and Sr in targets analyzed during the first 100 sols, from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest. Univariate peak area models and multivariate partial least squares models are presented. Li, detected for the first time directly on Mars, is generally low (100 ppm and >1000 ppm, respectively. These analysis locations tend to have high Si and alkali abundances, consistent with a feldspar composition. Together, these trace element observations provide possible evidence of magma differentiation and aqueous alteration.

  6. Trace element geochemistry (Li, Ba, Sr, and Rb) using Curiosity's ChemCam: early results for Gale crater from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Ann M.; Newsom, Horton E.; Clark, Benton; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnes; Blank, Jen G.; Mangold, Nicolas; Sautter, Violaine; Maurice, Sylvestre; Clegg, Samuel M.; Gasnault, Olivier; Forni, Olivier; Tokar, Robert; Lewin, Eric; Dyar, M. Darby; Lasue, Jeremie; Anderson, Ryan; McLennan, Scott M.; Bridges, John; Vaniman, Dave; Lanza, Nina; Fabre, Cecile; Melikechi, Noureddine; Perett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; King, Penelope L.; Barraclough, Bruce; Delapp, Dorothea; Johnstone, Stephen; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Rosen-Gooding, Anya; Williams, Josh

    2014-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument package on the Mars rover, Curiosity, provides new capabilities to probe the abundances of certain trace elements in the rocks and soils on Mars using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We focus on detecting and quantifying Li, Ba, Rb, and Sr in targets analyzed during the first 100 sols, from Bradbury Landing Site to Rocknest. Univariate peak area models and multivariate partial least squares models are presented. Li, detected for the first time directly on Mars, is generally low (100 ppm and >1000 ppm, respectively. These analysis locations tend to have high Si and alkali abundances, consistent with a feldspar composition. Together, these trace element observations provide possible evidence of magma differentiation and aqueous alteration.

  7. Early implementation evaluation of a multi-site housing first intervention for homeless people with mental illness: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Geoffrey; Stefancic, Ana; Rae, Jennifer; Townley, Greg; Tsemberis, Sam; Macnaughton, Eric; Aubry, Tim; Distasio, Jino; Hurtubise, Roch; Patterson, Michelle; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Piat, Myra; Goering, Paula

    2014-04-01

    This research sought to determine whether the implementation of Housing First in a large-scale, multi-site Canadian project for homeless participants with mental illness shows high fidelity to the Pathways Housing First model, and what factors help or hinder implementation. Fidelity ratings for 10 Housing First programs in five cities were made by an external quality assurance team along five key dimensions of Housing First based on 84 key informant interviews, 10 consumer focus groups, and 100 chart reviews. An additional 72 key informant interviews and 35 focus groups yielded qualitative data on factors that helped or hindered implementation. Overall, the findings show a high degree of fidelity to the model with more than 71% of the fidelity items being scored higher than 3 on a 4-point scale. The qualitative research found that both delivery system factors, including community and organizational capacity, and support system factors, training and technical assistance, facilitated implementation. Fidelity challenges include the availability of housing, consumer representation in program operations, and limitations to the array of services offered. Factors that accounted for these challenges include low vacancy rates, challenges of involving recently homeless people in program operations, and a lack of services in some of the communities. The study demonstrates how the combined use of fidelity assessment and qualitative methods can be used in implementation evaluation to develop and improve a program.

  8. Middle-to-Upper Palaeolithic site formation processes at the Bordes-Fitte rockshelter (Central France)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubry, Thierry; Dimuccio, Luca Antonio; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2014-01-01

    . In this article we use the Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic archaeo-stratigraphic record from the Bordes-Fitte rockshelter (les Roches d'Abilly site, Central France), a Bayesian analysis of the ages obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon on ultrafiltered collagen and by luminescence on quartz...... and feldspar grains, to establish a timeline for material culture and sedimentary dynamic changes during the Middle-to-Upper Palaeolithic transition. Technology, refitting studies and taphonomy of lithic artifacts recovered in the geoarchaeological field units D1 and D2 permit to characterize 3 reduction...

  9. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes.

  10. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  11. A novel splice-site mutation in ALS2 establishes the diagnosis of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a family with early onset anarthria and generalized dystonias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Siddiqi

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3 encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes.

  12. A novel splice-site mutation in ALS2 establishes the diagnosis of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a family with early onset anarthria and generalized dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Saima; Foo, Jia Nee; Vu, Anthony; Azim, Saad; Silver, David L; Mansoor, Atika; Tay, Stacey Kiat Hong; Abbasi, Sumiya; Hashmi, Asraf Hussain; Janjua, Jamal; Khalid, Sumbal; Tai, E Shyong; Yeo, Gene W; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A) in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3) encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes.

  13. Early Surgical Site Infection Following Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction with or without Acellular Dermal Matrix: National Benchmarking Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Winocour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical site infections (SSIs result in significant patient morbidity following immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction (ITEBR. This study determined a single institution's 30-day SSI rate and benchmarked it against that among national institutions participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP.MethodsWomen who underwent ITEBR with/without acellular dermal matrix (ADM were identified using the ACS-NSQIP database between 2005 and 2011. Patient characteristics associated with the 30-day SSI rate were determined, and differences in rates between our institution and the national database were assessed.Results12,163 patients underwent ITEBR, including 263 at our institution. SSIs occurred in 416 (3.4% patients nationwide excluding our institution, with lower rates observed at our institution (1.9%. Nationwide, SSIs were significantly more common in ITEBR patients with ADM (4.5% compared to non-ADM patients (3.2%, P=0.005, and this trend was observed at our institution (2.1% vs. 1.6%, P=1.00. A multivariable analysis of all institutions identified age ≥50 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 vs. 4.25 hours (OR, 1.9; CI, 1.5-2.4 as risk factors for SSIs. Our institutional SSI rate was lower than the nationwide rate (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.2-1.1, although this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.07.ConclusionsThe 30-day SSI rate at our institution in patients who underwent ITEBR was lower than the nation. SSIs occurred more frequently in procedures involving ADM both nationally and at our institution.

  14. In vitro levamisole selection pressure on larval stages of Haemonchus contortus over nine generations gives rise to drug resistance and target site gene expression changes specific to the early larval stages only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarai, Ranbir S; Kopp, Steven R; Knox, Malcolm R; Coleman, Glen T; Kotze, Andrew C

    2015-06-30

    There is some evidence that resistance to levamisole and pyrantel in trichostrongylid nematodes is due to changes in the composition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which represent the drug target site. Altered expression patterns of genes coding for nAChR subunits, as well as the presence of truncated versions of several subunits, have been implicated in observed resistances. The studies have mostly compared target sites in worm isolates of very different genetic background, and hence the ability to associate the molecular changes with drug sensitivity alone have been clouded to some extent. The present study aimed to circumvent this issue by following target site gene expression pattern changes as resistance developed in Haemonchus contortus worms under laboratory selection pressure with levamisole. We applied drug selection pressure to early stage larvae in vitro over nine generations, and monitored changes in larval and adult drug sensitivities and target site gene expression patterns. High level resistance developed in larvae, with resistance factors of 94-fold and 1350-fold at the IC50 and IC95, respectively, in larval development assays after nine generations of selection. There was some cross-resistance to bephenium (70-fold increase in IC95). The expression of all the putative subunit components of levamisole-sensitive nAChRs, as well as a number of ancillary protein genes, particularly Hco-unc-29.1 and -ric-3, were significantly decreased (up to 5.5-fold) in the resistant larvae at generation nine compared to the starting population. However, adult worms did not show any resistance to levamisole, and showed an inverse pattern of gene expression changes, with many target site genes showing increased expression compared to the starting population. A comparison of the larval/adult drug sensitivity data with the known relationships for field-derived isolates indicated that the adults of our selected population should have been highly resistant

  15. CCS Acceptability: Social Site Characterization and Advancing Awareness at Prospective Storage Sites in Poland and Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunsting Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the work on the social dimension conducted within the EU FP7 SiteChar project. The most important aim of the research was to advance public awareness and draw lessons for successful public engagement activities when developing a CO2 storage permit application. To this end, social site characterization (e.g. representative surveys and public participation activities (focus conference were conducted at two prospective Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS sites: an onshore site in Poland and an offshore site in Scotland. The research consisted of four steps over a time period of 1.5 year, from early 2011 to mid-2012. The first step consisted of four related qualitative and quantitative research activities to provide a social characterization of the areas: desk research, stakeholder interviews, media analyses, and a survey among representative samples of the local community. The aim was to identify: stakeholders or interested parties; factors that may drive their perceptions of and attitudes towards CCS. Results were used to as input for the second step, in which a new format for public engagement named ‘focus conferences’ was tested at both sites involving a small sample of the local community. The third step consisted of making available generic as well as site-specific information to the general and local public, by: setting up a bilingual set of information pages on the project website suitable for a lay audience; organizing information meetings at both sites that were open to all who took interest. The fourth step consisted of a second survey among a new representative sample of the local community. The survey was largely identical to the survey in step 1 to enable the monitoring of changes in awareness, knowledge and opinions over time. Results provide insight in the way local CCS plans may be perceived by the local stakeholders, how this can be reliably assessed at early stage without raising unnecessary concerns, and how

  16. 34 CFR 395.35 - Terms of permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., periodicals, publications, confections, tobacco products, foods, beverages, chances for any lottery authorized... PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.35 Terms of permit. Every permit shall describe the location...

  17. 78 FR 27249 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ...-839213 Applicant: David P. Muth, Martinez, California The applicant requests a permit renewal to take...-804203 Applicant: Stephen J. Meyers, Moreno Valley, California The applicant requests a permit renewal to...

  18. 40 CFR 49.10049 - Permits to operate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TRIBAL CLEAN AIR ACT AUTHORITY Implementation Plans for Tribes-Region X Implementation Plan for the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians of Oregon § 49.10049 Permits to operate. Permits to operate are required...

  19. 75 FR 52965 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) within Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Texas. Permit TE-037155.... Applicant requests a new permit for research and recovery purposes to obtain seeds of Welsh's milkweed... fonticola), San Marcos gambusia (Gambusia georgei), Comal Springs riffle beetle (Heterelmis...

  20. Environmental permitting strategies for the twenty-first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, B.E.; Wallis, C.M.

    1999-07-01

    Recent trends in economic markets have caused mining companies to look harder at reducing costs for collecting information, performing studies, and conducting other necessary activities to complete environmental permitting. In some cases, it may be in the operator's best interest to delay permitting and related expenditures to the extent possible. In most cases, however, agency mandates and the need to continue operations require that permits be obtained and maintained in the most expedient and economical way possible. This paper explores some basic approaches to environmental permitting which are intended to strategically guide the permitting process through the maze of requirements in a relatively straightforward manner. Through application of common sense and KISS (Keep it simple, stupid) the authors have found that permitting can be conducted in a quicker fashion than most applicants experience. The authors explore and explain some of these basic principles by drawing on their own experiences in the Arizona Aquifer Protection Permit and other environmental permit programs.

  1. Towards tradable permits for filamentous green algae pollution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Lange, Willem J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available a reserve price for pollution permits. The subsequent market making process is explained according to five steps including permit design, terms, conditions and transactional protocol, the monitoring system, piloting and implementation. The monetary...

  2. A Framework for Building Efficient Environmental Permitting Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ulibarri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance as a tool for protecting air and water quality, and for mitigating impacts to protected species and ecosystems, the environmental permitting process is widely recognized to be inefficient and marked by delays. This article draws on a literature review and interviews with permitting practitioners to identify factors that contribute to delayed permit decisions. The sociopolitical context, projects that are complex or use novel technology, a fragmented and bureaucratic regulatory regime, serial permit applications and reviews, and applicant and permitting agency knowledge and resources each contribute to permitting inefficiency when they foster uncertainty, increase transaction costs, and allow divergent interests to multiply, yet remain unresolved. We then use the interviews to consider the potential of a collaborative dialogue between permitting agencies and applicants to mitigate these challenges, and argue that collaboration is well positioned to lessen permitting inefficiency.

  3. 76 FR 26313 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    .... Applicant requests a new permit for husbandry and holding of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), hawksbill... display for two non-releasable green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) at the Oklahoma Aquarium. Permit...

  4. 46 CFR 169.211 - Permit to proceed for repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit to proceed for repair. 169.211 Section 169.211... Inspection and Certification Certificate of Inspection § 169.211 Permit to proceed for repair. (a) The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may issue a permit to proceed to another port for repair, Form...

  5. Markets for tradeable emission and ambient permits : A dynamic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermoliev, Y; Michalevich, M; Nentjes, A

    This paper discusses trade mechanisms in pollution permit markets. Proofs are given, that sequential, bilateral trade in tradeable emissions permits converges to a market equilibrium with minimal total costs of pollution control. If ambient or deposition permits are traded, the convergence of

  6. 75 FR 45650 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on this permit... issuance of enhancement of survival permit to conduct certain activities with endangered species...

  7. 50 CFR 20.64 - Foreign export permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foreign export permits. 20.64 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Importations § 20.64 Foreign export permits. No... such birds are accompanied by export permits, tags, or other documentation required by applicable...

  8. 21 CFR 1312.22 - Application for export permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for export permit. 1312.22 Section... EXPORTATION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exportation of Controlled Substances § 1312.22 Application for export permit. (a) An application for a permit to export controlled substances shall be made on DEA Form 161...

  9. 21 CFR 1312.23 - Issuance of export permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of export permit. 1312.23 Section 1312.23... CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exportation of Controlled Substances § 1312.23 Issuance of export permit. (a) The... regulation in § 1312.30 of this part be exported only pursuant to the issuance of an export permit. The...

  10. 76 FR 75897 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ...-57473A Applicant: Stephen Ramirez, San Marcos, Texas. Applicant requests a new permit for research and..., San Antonio, Texas. Applicant requests an amendment to a current permit for husbandry and holding of..., San Antonio, Texas. Permit TE-58781A Applicant: University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona....

  11. 40 CFR 270.65 - Research, development, and demonstration permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research, development, and... Special Forms of Permits § 270.65 Research, development, and demonstration permits. (a) The Administrator may issue a research, development, and demonstration permit for any hazardous waste treatment facility...

  12. 76 FR 39368 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... migratory bird abatement permit. On January 12, 2007, we published a Federal Register notice (72 FR 1556..., we published a Federal Register notice (72 FR 69705-69706) announcing final permit conditions. This... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement...

  13. 25 CFR 173.13 - Permit not a lease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permit not a lease. 173.13 Section 173.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONCESSIONS, PERMITS AND LEASES ON LANDS WITHDRAWN OR ACQUIRED IN CONNECTION WITH INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECTS § 173.13 Permit not a lease. Any...

  14. 77 FR 24470 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No. 17032

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA929 Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No... conduct commercial/educational photography in Alaska. ADDRESSES: The permit and related documents are.../educational photography had been submitted by the above- named applicant. The requested permit has been...

  15. 76 FR 33337 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ..., Fort Hunter Liggett, California. The applicant requests a permit to take (harass by survey, capture... Fort Hunter Liggett, Monterey County, California, for the purpose of enhancing the species' survival. Permit No. TE-42833A Applicant: Ian Maunsell, San Diego, California. The applicant requests a permit...

  16. 33 CFR 325.6 - Duration of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 325.6 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROCESSING OF DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERMITS § 325.6 Duration of permits. (a) General. DA permits... issued for the transport of dredged material for the purpose of disposing of it in ocean waters...

  17. 49 CFR 231.20 - Variation in size permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Variation in size permitted. 231.20 Section 231.20..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.20 Variation in size permitted. To... total variation of 5 percent below size given is permitted....

  18. 25 CFR 167.11 - Tenure of grazing permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tenure of grazing permits. 167.11 Section 167.11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO GRAZING REGULATIONS § 167.11 Tenure of grazing permits. (a) All active regular grazing permits shall be for one year and shall...

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion): Volume 3, Revision 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This report, Part B (Vol. 3) of the permit application for the WIPP facility, contains information related to the site characterization of the facility, including geology, design, rock salt evaluations, maps, drawings, and shaft excavations. (CBS)

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revison 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements.

  1. 76 FR 36917 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... AGENCY Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for TransAlta Centralia Generation, LLC--Coal- Fired Power Plant AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... to a citizen petition asking EPA to object to an operating permit issued by the Southwest Clean...

  2. 75 FR 81139 - Migratory Bird Permits; States Delegated Falconry Permitting Authority; Technical Corrections to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... number of small entities. This rule delegates authority to States that have requested it, and those... Falconry Permitting Authority; Technical Corrections to the Regulations AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service..., South Dakota, and Washington have requested that we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, delegate...

  3. 14 CFR 211.20 - Initial foreign air carrier permit or transfer of a permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO FOREIGN AIR CARRIERS..., etc., from the beginning of operations to the present. Also, if the applicant is a new airline (i.e., an airline that began direct air services within the past 12 months), briefly summarize the business...

  4. 30 CFR 937.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... on State lands (ORS 273.005-273.815); Solid Waste Disposal Permits, Hazardous Waste Transportation.... 937.773 Section 937.773 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON...

  5. Permit Allocation in Emissions Trading using the Boltzmann Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Ji-Won; Isard, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In emissions trading, the initial permit allocation is an intractable issue because it needs to be essentially fair to the participating countries. There are many ways to distribute a given total amount of emissions permits among countries, but the existing distribution methods such as auctioning and grandfathering have been debated. Here we describe a new model for permit allocation in emissions trading using the Boltzmann distribution. The Boltzmann distribution is introduced to permit allocation by combining it with concepts in emissions trading. A price determination mechanism for emission permits is then developed in relation to the {\\beta} value in the Boltzmann distribution. Finally, it is demonstrated how emissions permits can be practically allocated among participating countries in empirical results. The new allocation model using the Boltzmann distribution describes a most probable, natural, and unbiased distribution of emissions permits among multiple countries. Based on its simplicity and versati...

  6. 40 CFR 70.5 - Permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., including company name and address (or plant name and address if different from the company name), owner's name and agent, and telephone number and names of plant site manager/contact. (2) A description of the...

  7. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  8. Palaeomagnetic results from the southern Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico: evidence for Early Cretaceous or Laramide remagnetization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnel, H.; Gose, W. A.; Testarmata, M. M.; Bocanegra Noriega, G.

    1990-12-01

    A large suite of samples from the Latest Triassic Huizachal and Early Jurassic Huayacocotla Groups and the Latest Jurassic Taman and Earliest Cretaceous Pimienta Formations was collected in the southern Sierra Madre Oriental for a palaeomagnetic study. Only the samples from three sites belonging to the Huizachal Group and the Las Juntas Formation possibly have retained their primary magnetization. If so, their pole position does not reveal any palaeomagnetically discernable motion relative to cratonic North America. All remaining sites were remagnetized as evidenced by a negative fold test at four sites and the fact that the pole positions cluster better at the 95% significance level if no structural corrections are applied. The tightness of the cluster ( α95 = 4.6 °) and the same polarity, suggest that the samples were remagnetized at some common time. These results permit two interpretations. (1) If the sampling region has not suffered any significant tectonic rotation, then the remagnetization can be dated by comparison with the polar wander path for North America as Early Cretaceous (≈ 130 Ma). This Early Cretaceous phase of deformation is not recognized in the northern Sierra Madre Oriental and clearly pre-dates the Early Tertiary Laramide orogeny. (2) If the southern Sierra Madre Oriental did rotate counterclockwise by ≈ 20 °, then the remagnetization could have originated in any Cretaceous or Early Tertiary time, and may indeed be related to the Laramide deformation. In either case, the data imply that the southern Sierra Madre Oriental constitutes an independent tectonic domain.

  9. TWRS privatization phase 1 master site plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1996-09-30

    The DOE-RL is pursuing a new business strategy of hiring private contractors for treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. This strategy is called `privatization` and includes design, permitting, construction, operation and deactivation of facilities for tank waste treatment. The TWRS Privatization Infrastructure Project consists of several sub-projects which will provide key services needed to support the privatization mission. This master site plan presently describes all pertinent aspects of the site and identifies all planned provisions for site development, utilities and other site services. It is a baseline document which will be revised as privatization proceeds through design, construction and start-up.

  10. Watershed-based point sources permitting strategy and dynamic permit-trading analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shu-Kuang; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2007-09-01

    Permit-trading policy in a total maximum daily load (TMDL) program may provide an additional avenue to produce environmental benefit, which closely approximates what would be achieved through a command and control approach, with relatively lower costs. One of the important considerations that might affect the effective trading mechanism is to determine the dynamic transaction prices and trading ratios in response to seasonal changes of assimilative capacity in the river. Advanced studies associated with multi-temporal spatially varied trading ratios among point sources to manage water pollution hold considerable potential for industries and policy makers alike. This paper aims to present an integrated simulation and optimization analysis for generating spatially varied trading ratios and evaluating seasonal transaction prices accordingly. It is designed to configure a permit-trading structure basin-wide and provide decision makers with a wealth of cost-effective, technology-oriented, risk-informed, and community-based management strategies. The case study, seamlessly integrating a QUAL2E simulation model with an optimal waste load allocation (WLA) scheme in a designated TMDL study area, helps understand the complexity of varying environmental resources values over space and time. The pollutants of concern in this region, which are eligible for trading, mainly include both biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N). The problem solution, as a consequence, suggests an array of waste load reduction targets in a well-defined WLA scheme and exhibits a dynamic permit-trading framework among different sub-watersheds in the study area. Research findings gained in this paper may extend to any transferable dynamic-discharge permit (TDDP) program worldwide.

  11. Geographic information system programs for use in the water-supply-allocation permitting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Paul; Price, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    Computer programs designed for use in a geographic information system as an aid in the water-supply- allocation permitting process are described. These programs were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey during a project conducted in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. The programs enable a user to display proposed water-supply-allocation sites in a defined area together with present sites and important hydrologic and geographic features on a computer screen or on hardcopy plots. The programs are menu-driven and do not require familiarity with geographic information systems. Source codes for the programs are included in appendixes.

  12. Geothermal policy development program: expediting the local geothermal permitting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    For a number of years, concerns have been raised about the length of time and the complexity involved in obtaining required permits in order to develop the geothermal resource at the Geysers. Perhaps the most important factor is jurisdiction. At the Geysers, all three levels of government - local, state, and federal - exercise significant authority over various aspects of geothermal development. In addition, several agencies within each governmental level play an active role in the permitting process. The present study is concerned primarily with the local permitting process, and the ways in which this process could be expedited. This report begins by looking at the local role in the overall permitting process, and then reviews the findings and conclusions that have been reached in other studies of the problem. This is followed by a case study evaluation of recent permitting experience in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties, and the report concludes by outlining several approaches to expediting the local permitting process.

  13. 40 CFR 71.5 - Permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... schedule established pursuant to § 71.9. (1) Identifying information, including company name and address (or plant name and address if different from the company name), owner's name and agent, and telephone number and names of plant site manager/contact. (2) A description of the source's processes and products...

  14. 40 CFR 71.24 - Permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... company name, telephone number, and address (or plant name, telephone number, and address if different from the company name); owner's name, telephone number, and agent; and telephone number(s) and name(s) of plant site manager/contact; (2) All information required in § 63.74 of this chapter, including...

  15. Guide to Permitting Hydrogen Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Carl [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-28

    The purpose of this guide is to assist project developers, permitting officials, code enforcement officials, and other parties involved in developing permit applications and approving the implementation of hydrogen motor fuel dispensing facilities. The guide facilitates the identification of the elements to be addressed in the permitting of a project as it progresses through the approval process; the specific requirements associated with those elements; and the applicable (or potentially applicable) codes and standards by which to determine whether the specific requirements have been met. The guide attempts to identify all applicable codes and standards relevant to the permitting requirements.

  16. 78 FR 12776 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... (Eretmochelys imbricata) within Sea Life Aquarium, Grapevine, Texas. Permit TE-92366A Applicant: Kimley-Horn and... borealis) within Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North...

  17. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program: environmental permit compliance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodamer, Jr., James W.; Bocchino, Robert M.

    1979-11-01

    This Environmental Permit Compliance Plan is intended to assist the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division in acquiring the necessary environmental permits for their proposed Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant in a time frame consistent with the construction schedule. Permits included are those required for installation and/or operation of gaseous, liquid and solid waste sources and disposal areas. Only those permits presently established by final regulations are described. The compliance plan describes procedures for obtaining each permit from identified federal, state and local agencies. The information needed for the permit application is presented, and the stepwise procedure to follow when filing the permit application is described. Information given in this plan was obtained by reviewing applicable laws and regulations and from telephone conversations with agency personnel on the federal, state and local levels. This Plan also presents a recommended schedule for beginning the work necessary to obtain the required environmental permits in order to begin dredging operations in October, 1980 and construction of the plant in September, 1981. Activity for several key permits should begin as soon as possible.

  18. 76 FR 57757 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ...-47878A The applicant requests a permit to import biological specimens of African dwarf crocodiles (Osteolaemus tetraspis tetraspis) and slender snouted crocodiles (Crocodylus cataphractus) collected from...

  19. 76 FR 14424 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... applicant requests a permit to take (survey by pursuit) the Quino checkerspot butterfly... pursuit) the Quino checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryasedithaquino) in conjunction with surveys throughout...

  20. 76 FR 63322 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ...), hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), green (Chelonia mydas), and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtles.... Applicant requests a new permit for husbandry and holding of green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtles within...

  1. Hanford Site comprehensive compliance evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, R.D.

    1998-08-13

    On September 9, 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued General Permit No. WA-R-00-OOOF, Authorization to Discharge Under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). DOE-RL submitted a Notice of Intent to comply with this permit to the EPA in accordance with the General Permit requirements on October 1, 1992. On February 14, 1994, EPA issued a Storm Water General Permit Coverage Notice (WA-R-00-Al 7F). The Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC-SD-EN-EV-02 1) was certified by DOE-RL on September 24, 1996, in compliance with Part 4.B(i) of the General Permit. As required by General Permit, Section 4, Part D, Section 4.c, an annual report must be developed by DOE-RL and retained onsite to verify that the requirements listed in the General Permit are implemented. This document fulfills the requirement to prepare an annual report and contains the results of inspections of the storm water discharges listed in Appendix B. This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation (SWCSCE) as required in the General Permit, Part 4, Section D.4.c; summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation; and documents significant leaks and spills. The time frames for this SWCSCE report is July 1, 1997 through June 30, 1998. There were no significant spills or leaks during this reporting period.

  2. 78 FR 48201 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... sites at various sub-Antarctic (within geographic coverage area of the Antarctic Treaty) and Antarctic... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541) AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  3. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Allan; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed....

  4. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed....

  5. Cooperative Emissions Trading Game: International Permit Market Dominated by Buyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Keita

    2015-01-01

    Rapid reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is required to mitigate disastrous impacts of climate change. The Kyoto Protocol introduced international emissions trading (IET) to accelerate the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The IET controls CO2 emissions through the allocation of marketable emission permits to sovereign countries. The costs for acquiring additional permits provide buyers with an incentive to reduce their CO2 emissions. However, permit price has declined to a low level during the first commitment period (CP1). The downward trend in permit price is attributed to deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol: weak compliance enforcement, the generous allocation of permits to transition economies (hot air), and the withdrawal of the US. These deficiencies created a buyer's market dominated by price-making buyers. In this paper, I develop a coalitional game of the IET, and demonstrate that permit buyers have dominant bargaining power. In my model, called cooperative emissions trading (CET) game, a buyer purchases permits from sellers only if the buyer forms a coalition with the sellers. Permit price is determined by bargaining among the coalition members. I evaluated the demand-side and supply-side bargaining power (DBP and SBP) using Shapley value, and obtained the following results: (1) Permit price is given by the product of the buyer's willingness-to-pay and the SBP (= 1 - DBP). (2) The DBP is greater than or equal to the SBP. These results indicate that buyers can suppress permit price to low levels through bargaining. The deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol enhance the DBP, and contribute to the demand-side dominance in the international permit market.

  6. Pseudoshadows for site planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    A horizontal projection technique using ''pseudoshadows'' and gnomonic diagrams allows the shading effects on any surface in any orientation to be seen directly and calculated. Cotangent horizontal projection of facade surfaces according to the rules of solar geometry and the superposition of real shadows on a common horizontal plane permit analysis of solar rights, shading, and direct gains on walls and windows. The exact location of shading lines, dynamic and transient shading problems, the percent of the facade shading, and the determination of critical rear profiles for shading are rapidly accomplished from the same study using only building plans. The graphical results produce dynamic and axonometric projections, making them an ideal tool for conceptual design. They are sufficiently precise to assess and calculate direct solar gain, beam daylighting, and critical site massing envelopes.

  7. 48 CFR 52.247-2 - Permits, Authorities, or Franchises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Franchises. 52.247-2 Section 52.247-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....247-2 Permits, Authorities, or Franchises. As prescribed in 47.207-1(a), insert the following clause: Permits, Authorities, or Franchises (JAN 1997) (a) The offeror does □, does not □, hold authorization...

  8. 50 CFR 22.24 - Permits for falconry purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... government employee who has trapped a golden eagle under a Federal depredation permit or under a depredation... location. A golden eagle may only be taken from a livestock or wildlife depredation area declared by USDA Wildlife Services and permitted under § 22.23, or from a livestock depredation area authorized in...

  9. 75 FR 27814 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... in the Zoological Society of San Diego's original permit. Applicant: George Carden Circus... education. The permit numbers and animals are: 070854, Bimbo Jr.; 079868, Vickie; 079870, Jenny; 079871... FR 9251). We made an error and neglected to report one species from which specimens would be...

  10. 50 CFR 300.182 - HMS international trade permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false HMS international trade permit. 300.182... FISHERIES REGULATIONS International Trade Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.182 HMS international trade permit. (a) General. An importer, entering for consumption fish or...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-49 - Permit-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit-TB/ALL. 30.10-49 Section 30.10-49 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-49 Permit—TB/ALL. The term permit refers to endorsement on the certificate of inspection, authorizing the presence...

  12. 75 FR 59711 - Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... waiver of the gravity component of any penalties resulting from noncompliance uncovered by the Audit... on the Audit Program for Texas flexible permit holders, please contact Mr. John Jones, Air...). EPA is proposing the Audit Program as a mechanism for Texas Flexible Permit holders to transition...

  13. 40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Incinerators § 264.344 Hazardous waste incinerator permits. (a) The owner or operator of a... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits...

  14. 76 FR 33334 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  15. 75 FR 27361 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  16. 76 FR 8374 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  17. 75 FR 52012 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  18. 76 FR 18576 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  19. 76 FR 10063 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  20. 75 FR 5101 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... receipt of applications to conduct certain activities pertaining to enhancement of survival of endangered species. The Endangered Species Act requires that we invite public comment on these permit...

  1. 50 CFR 15.22 - Permits for scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for scientific research. 15.22... for scientific research. (a) Application requirements for permits for scientific research. Each... description of the scientific research to be conducted on the exotic bird requested, including: (i) Formal...

  2. 78 FR 20352 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Applicant: Bat Conservation International, Austin, Texas. Applicant requests a new permit for research and... (Dermochelys coriacea) Hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) Permit TE-98704A Applicant: Dogs for Conservation... Houston toads (Bufo houstonensis) from the Houston Zoo for work with training dogs how to detect...

  3. 75 FR 427 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx Zoo... ADDRESSES. Applicant: Chelonian Conservation Center, Ojai, CA, PRT-217124 The applicant requests a permit to... period. Applicant: Metro Richmond Zoo, Moseley, VA, PRT-228022 The applicant requests a permit to...

  4. 46 CFR 78.40-10 - No smoking permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No smoking permitted. 78.40-10 Section 78.40-10 Shipping... § 78.40-10 No smoking permitted. (a) The master shall have appropriate “No Smoking” signs posted and shall take all necessary precautions to prevent smoking or carrying of lighted or smoldering...

  5. 76 FR 34095 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... permit to import biological samples from ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), collected in the wild in... the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Duke Lemur Center, Duke University, Durham, NC; PRT-43685A The applicant requests a permit to import biological samples from mouse lemur species (Microcebus...

  6. 25 CFR 173.20 - Revocation of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Revocation of permits. 173.20 Section 173.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONCESSIONS, PERMITS AND LEASES ON LANDS WITHDRAWN OR ACQUIRED IN CONNECTION WITH INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECTS § 173.20 Revocation of...

  7. 36 CFR 20.4 - Revocation of permits; appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revocation of permits; appeal. 20.4 Section 20.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ISLE ROYALE NATIONAL PARK; COMMERCIAL FISHING § 20.4 Revocation of permits; appeal. The...

  8. 76 FR 67650 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... for a specific permit authorizing the use of raptors in abatement activities (76 FR 39368). The... the advance notice of proposed rulemaking, please refer to that document at 76 FR 39368 (July 6, 2011... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement...

  9. 25 CFR 163.26 - Forest product harvesting permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forest product harvesting permits. 163.26 Section 163.26... Forest Management and Operations § 163.26 Forest product harvesting permits. (a) Except as provided in §§ 163.13 and 163.27 of this part, removal of forest products that are not under formal...

  10. 76 FR 7577 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ...--Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona. Applicant requests an amendment to a current permit for research... topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis sonoriensis) at the museum. Permit TE-31412A Applicant: John Kuba... recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys for the following species: Texas blind...

  11. 19 CFR 12.104c - Importations permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Importations permitted. 12.104c Section 12.104c Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104c Importations permitted....

  12. 76 FR 27307 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit Application No. 16360

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA426 Marine Mammals; Photography Permit..., Auckland, New Zealand has applied in due form for a permit to conduct commercial/educational photography of... for photography for educational or commercial purposes involving non-endangered and...

  13. 76 FR 40338 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360 AGENCY..., Auckland, New Zealand to conduct commercial/educational photography of cetaceans off Hawaii. ADDRESSES: The... request for a permit to conduct commercial/educational photography on 12 cetacean species had...

  14. 77 FR 2037 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No. 17032

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA929 Marine Mammals; Photography Permit File No... for a permit to conduct commercial or educational photography on killer (Orcinus orca) and...

  15. 77 FR 49483 - Actions on Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... liters (11888 USWG) max. 11458-M Costco Wholesale, 49 CFR 172.203(a) and To modify the special permit.... 11836-M Hydrite Chemical Co., 49 CFR 173.24; 173.203.. To modify the special permit Brookfield, WI. by... 173.159 To authorize the Group, Inc., Milwaukee, transportation in commerce WI. of certain...

  16. 9 CFR 82.23 - Issuance of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... poultry, vehicles, cages, coops, containers, troughs, or other equipment or material if the interstate... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Chlamydiosis in Poultry § 82.23 Issuance of permits. (a) Application for the permit...

  17. 77 FR 31044 - Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... No: 2012-12616] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY: The National Science Foundation (NSF) is required to publish...

  18. 78 FR 37840 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... applicant requests a permit to take (survey by pursuit) the Quino checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha quino) in conjunction with surveys throughout the range of the species in California for the purpose of... applicant requests a permit to take (survey by pursuit) the Quino checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha...

  19. 76 FR 50751 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ..., San Diego, California The applicant requests a permit to take (survey by pursuit) the Quino checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha quino) and take (capture, collect, and kill) the Conservancy fairy... Gadsby, Encinitas, California The applicant requests a permit to take (survey by pursuit) the Quino...

  20. 77 FR 54604 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... applicant requests a permit to export sport hunted trophies of one male addax (Addax nasomaculatus), one.... Applicant: John Fry, Carson City, NV; PRT-82592A The applicant requests a permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled from a captive herd maintained...

  1. 75 FR 38117 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-hunted trophy of one female scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) taken in the Republic of South Africa, for...; PRT-10400A The applicant requests a permit to import the sport-hunted trophy of one male scimitar... permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled from...

  2. 29 CFR 2.12 - Audiovisual coverage permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audiovisual coverage permitted. 2.12 Section 2.12 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.12 Audiovisual coverage permitted. The following are the types of hearings where the...

  3. Permitted Suicide: Model Roles for Mental Health Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elliot D.

    2001-01-01

    In mental health practice, no explicit provisions have been made for existing law and codes of ethics to protect freedom and confidences of clients who rationally desire to end their lives. Makes a case for permitting suicide by providing an analysis of permitted suicide, the legal background for applying this concept, and ten model rules for…

  4. Savannah River Site Environmental report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Michael; Jannik, Timothy; Cauthen, Kim; Bryant, Tracy; Coward, Lori; Eddy, Teresa; Vangelas, Karen; O' Quinn, Sadika; Meyer, Amy; Ackerman, Jana D.; Adams, John; Fanning, Greta; Thompson, Martha; Farfan, Eduardo B.; Dixon, Kenneth L.; Kemmerlin, Robert; Millings, Ted; Maxwell, Sherrod; Blas, Susan; Looney, Brian; Jackson, Dennis; Paller, Michael; Wabbersen, William

    2013-09-12

    This report is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 2012 - including the Site's performance against applicable standards and requirements. Details are provided on major programs such as the Environmental Management System (EMS) and permit compliance.

  5. Early secondary alveoloplasty in cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Paolo; Marianetti, Tito M; Tedaldi, Massimiliano; Ramieri, Valerio; Cascone, Piero

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this study were to present a personal surgical technique throughout the review of international literature concerning surgical techniques, objectives, and outcomes in early secondary alveoloplasty and to describe our personal surgical techniques in alveolar bone defect repair in cleft lip and palate.Throughout a literature analysis, it is now settled that early secondary alveoloplasty could reestablish the continuity of alveolar bone and prevent upper dental arch collapse after presurgical orthopedic upper maxilla expansion; it also might give a good bone support for teeth facing the cleft and allow the eruption of permanent elements with the bone graft and rebalance the symmetry of dental arch, improve facial aesthetic, guarantee an adequate amount of bone tissue for a further prosthetic reconstruction with implant, and finally close the eventual oronasal fistula.The surgical technique we are presenting permitted a total number of 35 early secondary alveoloplasty on which a long-term follow-up is still taking place.We can assess that early secondary alveoloplasty must be performed before permanent canine eruption. Iliac crest is the suggested donor site for bone grafting; orthopedic and orthodontic treatments must be performed in association with surgery, and if there is the dental element agenesia, an implantation treatment must be considered.

  6. Qualitative identification of permitted and non-permitted color additives in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Bermudez, Enio; Harp, Bhakti Petigara; Barrows, Julie N

    2014-01-01

    Color additives are dyes, pigments, or other substances that can impart color when added or applied to foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, or the human body. These substances must be pre-approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and listed in the Code of Federal Regulations before they may be used in FDA-regulated products. Both domestic and imported cosmetic products sold in interstate commerce fall under FDA jurisdiction, and FDA's district laboratories use a combination of analytical methods for identifying or confirming the presence of potentially violative color additives. We have developed a qualitative method for identifying 29 water- and methanol-soluble color additives in various types of cosmetic products. The color additives are extracted with combinations of methylene chloride, methanol, acetic acid, and water and are identified by LC with photodiode array detection. Estimated LOD values ranged from 0.1 to 1.5 mg/L. A survey of lip products, nail polishes, eye products, blushes, body glitter, face paints, bath products, creams, and toothpastes identified permitted and non-permitted color additives. Our new LC method is intended to supplement the visible spectrophotometry and TLC methods currently used by FDA's district laboratories and will help optimize the use of time, labor, and solvents.

  7. 77 FR 13601 - Notice of Proposed NPDES General Permit; Proposed NPDES General Permit for New and Existing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... discharging to the Outer Continental Shelf offshore of Louisiana and Texas. The discharge of produced water to... study to obtain more representative data to evaluate impacts to water quality. Marine Protection... territorial seas of Louisiana and Texas is also authorized by this permit. This draft permit proposes...

  8. 75 FR 75463 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition To Object to Title V Permit for Luke Paper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIROMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition To Object to Title V Permit for Luke Paper... issues during the comment period or that the grounds for objection or other issue arose after the comment...

  9. 78 FR 35539 - Transforming Our Nation's Electric Grid Through Improved Siting, Permitting, and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... positioned to thrive in the global economy while protecting the environment and increasing prosperity. In order to ensure the growth of America's clean energy economy and improve energy security, we must... transmission grid is the backbone of our economy, a key factor in future economic growth, and a...

  10. Political and Economic Scope for Permit Markets in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    (organized polluters) due to the possibility of a free, initial distribution (grand-fathering). As such, a mix of green taxes (in relation to non-organized interests) and grandfathered permit markets (in relation to organized interests) should be considered in the search for cost-effective and politically...... of permit markets in the US. Therefore, the policy recommendation for e.g. CO2 reduction in Europe is to apply taxation in relation to large and non-organized groups only, such as households and the transportation sector. A permit market, on the other hand, is politically more attrac-tive to the industry...

  11. Political and Economic Scope for Permit Markets in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    (organized polluters) due to the possibility of a free, initial distribution (grand-fathering). As such, a mix of green taxes (in relation to non-organized interests) and grandfathered permit markets (in relation to organized interests) should be considered in the search for cost-effective and politically...... of permit markets in the US. Therefore, the policy recommendation for e.g. CO2 reduction in Europe is to apply taxation in relation to large and non-organized groups only, such as households and the transportation sector. A permit market, on the other hand, is politically more attrac-tive to the industry...

  12. Site Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahedi, Haseebullah

    2016-01-01

    different practices in the construction phase. The research is based on an ethnographic study of a case in Denmark. The empirical data were collected through direct observations and semi-structured interviews with site managers, contract managers, foremen and craftsmen. Findings revealed...... that the construction phase comprises several communities and practices, leading to various uses of the drawings. The results indicated that the craftsmen used drawings to position themselves in the correct location, and that the site managers and contract managers used them as management tools and legal documents...

  13. Storm Water General Permit 3 for Rock and Asphalt

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #3 for storm water discharges associated with industrial activity for Asphalt Plants, Concrete Batch Plants, Rock Crushing Plants and Construction...

  14. Storm Water General Permit 1 for Industrial Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #1 for storm water discharges associated with industrial facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.

  15. 46 CFR 115.204 - Permit to carry excursion party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... issued an excursion permit will normally be required to meet the minimum stability, survival craft, life jacket, fire safety, and manning standards applicable to a vessel in the service for which the excursion...

  16. 50 CFR 21.30 - Raptor propagation permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... entirely enclosed with wood, wire netting, or other suitable material which provides a safe, health... sport of falconry only if such use is designated in both the propagation permit and the permittee's...

  17. 75 FR 82409 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ..., reproductive physiology, genetics, nutrition, and animal health and is a continuation of activities currently.... Applicant: Reggie Pratt, Minot, ME; PRT-30840A. The applicant requests a permit to import a sport-hunted...

  18. 75 FR 34766 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... Agriculture/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife Service/ National Wildlife Research Center... following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok...

  19. 75 FR 14627 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... permit to import a female cheetah (Acrinonyx jubatus) from DeWildt Cheetah Breeding Centre, South Africa where the individual cheetah was captive bred for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the...

  20. 2016: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  1. 78 FR 57650 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, and Colorado for the purpose of enhancing the species' survival. Permit... San Francisco garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis tetrataenia) and take (harass by survey, capture...

  2. 77 FR 15383 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    .... The proposed research will cover all aspects of behavior, reproductive physiology, genetics, nutrition...Nicol, Chandler, AR; PRT-66555A The applicant requests a permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of...

  3. 77 FR 7599 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... personal identifying information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your... Applicant: Daniel Judy, Mount Dora, Florida Applicant requests amendment of permit to allow for the take...

  4. 76 FR 46837 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... your personal identifying information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us... Cave mold beetle (Batrisodes texanus) . Permit TE-170625 Applicant: Daniel Howard, Sioux Falls,...

  5. 2012: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  6. 75 FR 4136 - Pipeline Safety: Requests for Special Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... construction hydrostatic testing of the pipeline. These original construction hydrostatic tests were conducted more than thirty years ago. The application is for a special permit to waive the requirement to...

  7. Market power in auction and efficiency in emission permits allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Min Xing; Yang, Dong Xiao; Chen, Zi Yue; Nie, Pu Yan

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyzes how to achieve the cost-effectiveness by initial allocation of CO2 emission permits when a single dominant firm in production market has market power in auction, and compare two prevalent allocation patterns, mixed allocation and single auction. We show how the firm with market power may manipulate the auction price, thereby this leads to fail to achieve cost-effective solution by auction unless the total permits for allocation equal to the effective emissions cap. Provided that the market power firm receives strictly positive free permits, the effective emissions cap of mixed allocation is larger than that of single auction. The production market share of dominant firm is increasing with the free permits it holds. Finally, we examine the compliance costs and welfare of mixed allocation and single auction, the result show that the former is preferred to the later when policy makers consider economic welfare without welfare cost due to CO2 emissions.

  8. 77 FR 29453 - Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    .... permit to authorize the containment cylinder or salvage cylinder without the internal piston. 11914-M... classified as other than Class 1 dependent on the characteristics of the AE. BILLING CODE 4909-60-M...

  9. EPA Office of Water (OW): Pollutant Discharge Permit Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — U.S. States (Generalized) represents the 50 states and the District of Columbia of the United States joined with data from the NPDES Permit Backlog Report for the...

  10. Cameron Trading Post; Proposed NPDES Permit NN0021610

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing to issue NPDES permit (No. NN0021610) to Cameron Trading Post for the wastewater treatment facility located on private land in Cameron (Township 29N, Range 9E, Section 22), Coconino County, Arizona.

  11. 75 FR 20857 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ..., Wheat Ridge, Colorado. The applicant requests an amendment to an existing permit (October 7, 2002, 67 FR... (Solano grass) and Cordylanthus palmatus (palmate-bracted bird's-beak) from Federal lands in...

  12. Wesco Operating, Inc. – Maverick Springs NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit WY-0000469, Wesco Operating, Inc. - Maverick Springs is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Fremont County, Wyoming to a tributary to Five Mile Creek.

  13. Marathon Oil Company – Maverick Springs NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit WY-0000779, the Marathon Oil Company – Maverick Springs is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Fremont County, Wyoming to a tributary to Five Mile Creek.

  14. Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial Pilot Water Treatment Plant NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit MT-0031827, the Crow Indian Tribe is authorized to discharge from the Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial (MR&I) Pilot Water Treatment Plant in Bighorn County, Montana to the Bighorn River.

  15. 75 FR 20621 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service ; Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and... applications to conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal...

  16. 2015: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  17. Butte County Air Quality Management District Stationary Source Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. EPA Public Notice: EPA is finalizing action on three permitting rules submitted as a revision to the Butte County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP).

  18. 77 FR 19313 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... endangered species, we found that (1) The application was filed in good faith, (2) The granted permit would... Richmond 77 FR 3493: March 15, 2012. Zoo. January 24, 2012. 694126 National 76 FR 80384; March 15,...

  19. 77 FR 38653 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... endangered species, we found that (1) the application was filed in good faith, (2) the granted permit would.... 58210A Point Defiance Zoo & 77 FR 9687; February May 4, 2012. Aquarium. 17, 2012. 65782A, 65783A,...

  20. 76 FR 27660 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... endangered species, we found that (1) The application was filed in good faith, (2) The granted permit would... Zoological 76 FR 12990; March 9, April 21, 2011. Society dba 2011. Brookfield Zoo. 24269A Chelonian...

  1. 77 FR 58406 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... endangered species, we found that (1) The application was filed in good faith, (2) The granted permit would... Zoo and 77 FR 46514; August 3, August 27, 2012. Garden. 2012. Marine Mammals Receipt of...

  2. 76 FR 60863 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... endangered species, we found that (1) The application was filed in good faith, (2) The granted permit would... September 22, 2011. Society dba Gladys 17, 2011. Porter Zoo. Marine Mammals 48293A Red Rock Films 76...

  3. 77 FR 74506 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... conservation responsibilities for affected species, and in consideration of section 10(a)(1)(A) of the... before final action is taken. III. Permit Applications A. Endangered Species Applicant: Palm Beach Zoo...

  4. 77 FR 49453 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    .... Applicant: Rancho Milagro, San Diego, TX; PRT-80160A The applicant requests a captive-bred wildlife.... Applicant: Rancho Milagro, San Diego, TX; PRT-80158A The applicant requests a permit authorizing...

  5. Administration of the NPDES Stormwater Permit Program in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    In New England, the NPDES Stormwater Permit Program is administered by state government in Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont ('authorized states') or by EPA, in partnership with the states, in Massachusetts and New Hampshire ('non-authorized states').

  6. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... flowers of sulphur or sulphur flour to 100 gallons of water; or a specifically permitted proprietary brand... such period as may be required under the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C., Supp. III, 601 et seq...

  7. 75 FR 30428 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; PRT-10640A The applicant requests a permit to import dried skin samples... (Lontra feline), manatees (Trichechus spp.), dugongs (Dugong dugon), polar bears (Ursus maritimus)...

  8. 9 CFR 82.11 - Issuance of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.11 Issuance of permits. (a) Application for...

  9. 50 CFR 300.114 - Dealer permits and preapproval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FISHERIES REGULATIONS Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.114 Dealer permits and preapproval. (a... calculating administrative costs of special products and services. The fee is specified with the...

  10. EPA Office of Water (OW): Pollutant Discharge Permit Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — U.S. States (Generalized) represents the 50 states and the District of Columbia of the United States joined with data from the NPDES Permit Backlog Report for the...

  11. 77 FR 64121 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... tigers (Panthera tigris) for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species from Alexander... of their permits to re-export and re-import three captive born tigers (Panthera tigris) to...

  12. 2014: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  13. 2017: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  14. 78 FR 69849 - Issuance of an Experimental Use Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ...: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has granted an experimental use permit (EUP) to the pesticide applicant Monsanto...-0780). Issuance. Monsanto Company, 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63167. This EUP, issued...

  15. 75 FR 28650 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Service, George Jordan, Pallid Sturgeon Recovery Coordinator, Billings, MT; PRT-03492A The applicant..., Program Analyst, Branch of Permits, Division of Management Authority. BILLING CODE 4310-55-S...

  16. 40 CFR 124.16 - Stays of contested permit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Uncontested conditions which are not severable from those contested shall be stayed together with the... shall be granted based on the staying of any State-issued permit except at the discretion of the...

  17. 76 FR 33703 - Endangered Species; Permit No. 16439

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ...'' from the Features box on the Applications and Permits for Protected Species (APPS) home page, https.... A first subset of fish would be anesthetized and tagged with acoustic transmitters; a second...

  18. 2013: Special Use Permits : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is a collection of Special Use Permits originating from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR Complex. The Complex consists of Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR,...

  19. 77 FR 36571 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ...; PRT-00568A The applicant requests a permit to import: hair and tissue samples collected noninvasively... Lake, WI; PRT-74920A Applicant: Joseph Sultan, Belmont, MA; PRT-73620A Applicant: Gary Young, Windfield...

  20. 75 FR 66123 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... R. Huffman, Phoenix, Arizona. The applicant requests a permit to take (survey by pursuit) the Quino.... Michael M. Long, Acting Regional Director, Region 8, Sacramento, California. BILLING CODE 4310-55-P...