WorldWideScience

Sample records for early release tables

  1. EJSCREEN States Percentiles Lookup Table--2015 Public Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The States table provides percentile breaks of important EJSCREEN elements (demographic indicators and indexes, environmental indicators and indexes) at the state...

  2. EJSCREEN National Percentiles Lookup Table--2015 Public Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The USA table provides percentile breaks of important EJSCREEN elements (demographic indicators and indexes, environmental indicators and indexes) at the national...

  3. EJSCREEN Regions Percentiles Lookup Table--2015 Public Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regions table provides percentile breaks of important EJSCREEN elements (demographic indicators and indexes, environmental indicators and indexes) at the EPA...

  4. Punishment, Pharmacological Treatment, and Early Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological treatment may have an impact on aggressive and impulsive behavior. Assuming that these results are correct, would it be morally acceptable to instigate violent criminals to accept pharmacological rehabilitation by offering this treatment in return...... for early release from prison? This paper examines three different reasons for being skeptical with regard to this sort of practice. The first reason concerns the acceptability of the treatment itself. The second reason concerns the ethical legitimacy of making offers under coercive conditions. The third...

  5. Flexible Early Warning Systems with Workflows and Decision Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, F.; Chaves, F.; Zeiner, H.

    2012-04-01

    are usually only suited for rigid processes. We show how improvements can be achieved by using decision tables and rule-based adaptive workflows. Decision tables have been shown to be an intuitive tool that can be used by domain experts to express rule sets that can be interpreted automatically at runtime. Adaptive workflows use a rule-based approach to increase the flexibility of workflows by providing mechanisms to adapt workflows based on context changes, human intervention and availability of services. The combination of workflows, decision tables and rule-based adaption creates a framework that opens up new possibilities for flexible and adaptable workflows, especially, for use in early warning and crisis management systems.

  6. Planck early results. VII. The Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2011-01-01

    if they meet the high reliability criterion. The Planck ERCSC sources have known associations to stars with dust shells, stellar cores, radio galaxies, blazars, infrared luminous galaxies and Galactic interstellar medium features. A significant fraction of unclassified sources are also present in the catalogs...... the entire sky once and 60% of the sky a second time by Planck, thereby comprising the first high sensitivity radio/submillimetre observations of the entire sky. Four source detection algorithms were run as part of the ERCSC pipeline. A Monte-Carlo algorithm based on the injection and extraction....... In addition, two early release catalogs that contain 915 cold molecular cloud core candidates and 189 SZ cluster candidates that have been generated using multifrequency algorithms are presented. The entire source list, with more than 15 000 unique sources, is ripe for follow-up characterisation with Herschel...

  7. Cost effectiveness of three different release treatments of table mountain pine in a severely overstocked and pure stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Morgan; Wayne K. Clatterbuck

    2013-01-01

    Table Mountain pine (Pinus pungens Lamb.) (TMP) is a threatened species, endemic to the Southern Appalachian Mountains. This study focuses on the release of TMP stems in an overstocked and pure TMP stand on the Cherokee National Forest in eastern Tennessee. The objective of the case study was to produce a cost analysis/comparison of releasing young...

  8. The price of privately releasing contingency tables, and the spectra of random matrices with correlated rows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasiviswanathan, Shiva [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudelson, Mark [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Smith, Adam [PENNSYLVANIA STATE U

    2009-01-01

    Contingency tables are the method of choice of government agencies for releasing statistical summaries of categorical data. In this paper, we consider lower bounds on how much distortion (noise) is necessary in these tables to provide privacy guarantees when the data being summarized is sensitive. We extend a line of recent work on lower bounds on noise for private data analysis [10, 13. 14, 15] to a natural and important class of functionalities. Our investigation also leads to new results on the spectra of random matrices with correlated rows. Consider a database D consisting of n rows (one per individual), each row comprising d binary attributes. For any subset of T attributes of size |T| = k, the marginal table for T has 2{sup k} entries; each entry counts how many times in the database a particular setting of these attributes occurs. Imagine an agency that wishes to release all (d/k) contingency tables for a given database. For constant k, previous work showed that distortion {tilde {Omicron}}(min{l_brace}n, (n{sup 2}d){sup 1/3}, {radical}d{sup k}{r_brace}) is sufficient for satisfying differential privacy, a rigorous definition of privacy that has received extensive recent study. Our main contributions are: (1) For {epsilon}- and ({epsilon}, {delta})-differential privacy (with {epsilon} constant and {delta} = 1/poly(n)), we give a lower bound of {tilde {Omega}}(min{l_brace}{radical}n, {radical}d{sup k}{r_brace}), which is tight for n = {tilde {Omega}}(d{sup k}). Moreover, for a natural and popular class of mechanisms based on additive noise, our bound can be strengthened to {Omega}({radical}d{sup k}), which is tight for all n. Our bounds extend even to non-constant k, losing roughly a factor of {radical}2{sup k} compared to the best known upper bounds for large n. (2) We give efficient polynomial time attacks which allow an adversary to reconstruct sensitive infonnation given insufficiently perturbed contingency table releases. For constant k, we obtain a

  9. Release of thiotepa sterilized males into caged populations of Aedes aegypti: life table analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, René; Companioni, Ariamys; Bruzón, Rosa Y; Menéndez, Zulema; González, Aileen; Rodríguez, Misladys

    2014-04-01

    Successful SIT trials against mosquitoes in the 1960-70s were achieved by sterilizing male mosquitoes using chemosterilants. Their use was discontinued after concerns were raised about the effect of residues on non-target organisms, although scant evidence has been published. Irradiation is an expensive process; chemosterilization could be an affordable option for implementing SIT programs in developing countries. We compare life table parameters of three Aedes aegypti populations comprising different ratios of thiotepa-treated and non-treated males in order to identify the impact on reproductive potential of the presence of sterile males. No difference was observed in the survival of the treated and untreated males. The release of thiotepa sterilized males into caged Ae. aegypti populations had no effect on death or survival probability of the individuals in the cages but the fecundity of females was significantly reduced, as evaluated by hatch rate and stable age structure parameters. The significant decreases in net reproduction rate, finite rate of natural increase and intrinsic rate of natural increase in populations including sterile males are sufficient to indicate that such populations would not be able to proliferate in natural conditions. This suggests that release of Ae. aegypti thiotepa-treated males could be effective in reducing the reproductive capability of the target population and consequently contribute to vector control. Copyright © 2013 International Atomic Energy Agency 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Early Poststroke Rehabilitation Using a Robotic Tilt-Table Stepper and Functional Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey N. Kuznetsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke frequently leaves survivors with hemiparesis. To prevent persistent deficits, rehabilitation may be more effective if started early. Early training is often limited because of orthostatic reactions. Tilt-table stepping robots and functional electrical stimulation (FES may prevent these reactions. Objective. This controlled convenience sample study compares safety and feasibility of robotic tilt-table training plus FES (ROBO-FES and robotic tilt-table training (ROBO against tilt-table training alone (control. A preliminary assessment of efficacy is performed. Methods. Hemiparetic ischemic stroke survivors (age years, days after stroke were assigned to 30 days of ROBO-FES (, ROBO (, or control ( in addition to conventional physical therapy. Impedance cardiography and transcranial doppler sonography were performed before, during, and after training. Hemiparesis was assessed using the British Medical Research Council (MRC strength scale. Results. No serious adverse events occurred; 8 patients in the tilt-table group prematurely quit the study because of orthostatic reactions. Blood pressure and CBFV dipped % during robot training. In 52% of controls mean arterial pressure decreased by %. ROBO-FES increased leg strength by points, ROBO by more than control (, . CBFV increased in both robotic groups more than in controls (. Conclusions. Robotic tilt-table exercise with or without FES is safe and may be more effective in improving leg strength and cerebral blood flow than tilt table alone.

  11. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natalie Marie; Bean, Jacob; Stevenson, Kevin; Sing, David; Crossfield, Ian; Knutson, Heather; Line, Michael; Kreidberg, Laura; Desert, Jean-Michel; Wakeford, Hannah R.; Crouzet, Nicolas; Moses, Julianne; Benneke, Björn; Kempton, Eliza; Berta-Thompson, Zach; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Parmentier, Vivien; Gibson, Neale; Schlawin, Everett; Fraine, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Transiting Exoplanet ERS Team

    2018-01-01

    A community working group was formed in October 2016 to consider early release science with the James Webb Space Telescope that broadly benefits the transiting exoplanet community. Over 100 exoplanet scientists worked collaboratively to identify targets that are observable at the initiation of science operations, yield high SNR with a single event, have substantial scientific merit, and have known spectroscopic features identified by prior observations. The working group developed a program that yields representative datasets for primary transit, secondary eclipse, and phase curve observations using the most promising instrument modes for high-precision spectroscopic timeseries (NIRISS-SOSS, NIRCam, NIRSPec, and MIRI-LRS). The centerpiece of the program is an open data challenge that promotes community engagement and leads to a deeper understanding of the JWST instruments as early as possible in the mission. The program is managed under the premise of open science in order to maximize the value of the early release science observations for the transiting exoplanet community.

  12. Astronomical pacing of methane release in the Early Jurassic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, David B; Coe, Angela L; Cohen, Anthony S; Schwark, Lorenz

    2005-09-15

    A pronounced negative carbon-isotope (delta13C) excursion of approximately 5-7 per thousand (refs 1-7) indicates the occurrence of a significant perturbation to the global carbon cycle during the Early Jurassic period (early Toarcian age, approximately 183 million years ago). The rapid release of 12C-enriched biogenic methane as a result of continental-shelf methane hydrate dissociation has been put forward as a possible explanation for this observation. Here we report high-resolution organic carbon-isotope data from well-preserved mudrocks in Yorkshire, UK, which demonstrate that the carbon-isotope excursion occurred in three abrupt stages, each showing a shift of -2 per thousand to -3 per thousand. Spectral analysis of these carbon-isotope measurements and of high-resolution carbonate abundance data reveals a regular cyclicity. We interpret these results as providing strong evidence that methane release proceeded in three rapid pulses and that these pulses were controlled by astronomically forced changes in climate, superimposed upon longer-term global warming. We also find that the first two pulses of methane release each coincided with the extinction of a large proportion of marine species.

  13. Early release of neonatal ureteral obstruction preserves renal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Yimin; Pedersen, Michael; Li, Chunling

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of congenital hydronephrosis is ∼1% and is often associated with renal insufficiency. It is unknown whether early release is essential to prevent deterioration of renal function. Rats were subjected to partial unilateral ureteral obstruction (PUUO) on postnatal day 2. The obstruction...... was left in place or released after 1 or 4 wk. Renal blood flow (RBF) and kidney size were measured sequentially over 24 wk using MRI. In rats in which the obstruction was left in place, RBF of the obstructed kidney was progressively reduced to 0.92 ± 0.17 vs. 1.79 ± 0.12 ml·min−1·100 g body wt−1 (P ... downregulation of Na-K-ATPase to 62 ± 7%, aquaporin-1 to 53 ± 3%, and aquaporin-3 to 53 ± 7% of sham levels. Release after 1 wk completely prevented development of hydronephrosis, reduction in RBF and glomerular filtration rate, and downregulation of renal transport proteins, whereas release after 4 wk had...

  14. Nitrogen Release in Pristine and Drained Peat Profiles in Response to Water Table Fluctuations: A Mesocosm Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merjo P. P. Laine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the northern hemisphere, variability in hydrological conditions was suggested to increase as a consequence of climate warming, which may result in longer droughts than the area has experienced before. Due to their predominately anoxic conditions, peatlands are expected to respond to changes in hydrological conditions, such as successive drying and rewetting periods. As peatlands are rich in organic matter, any major changes in water table may influence the decomposition of it. The hydrological conditions may also influence release of nutrients from peat profiles as well as affect their transport to downstream ecosystems. In our mesocosm experiment, artificial water table fluctuations in pristine peat profiles caused an increase in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and ammonium (NH4+-N concentrations, while no response was found in drained peat profiles, although originating from the same peatland complex.

  15. Palaeoceanography: methane release in the Early Jurassic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wignall, Paul B; McArthur, John M; Little, Crispin T S; Hallam, Anthony

    2006-06-01

    Dramatic global warming, triggered by release of methane from clathrates, has been postulated to have occurred during the early Toarcian age in the Early Jurassic period. Kemp et al. claim that this methane was released at three points, as recorded by three sharp excursions of delta13C(org) of up to 3 per thousand magnitude. But they discount another explanation for the excursions: namely that some, perhaps all, of the rapid excursions could be a local signature of a euxinic basin caused by recycling of isotopically light carbon from the lower water column. This idea has been proposed previously (see ref. 3, for example) and is supported by the lack evidence for negative delta13C excursions in coeval belemnite rostra. Kemp et al. dismiss this alternative, claiming that each abrupt shift would have required the recycling of about double the amount of organic carbon that is currently present in the modern ocean; however, their measurements are not from an ocean but from a restricted, epicontinental seaway and so would not require whole-ocean mixing to achieve the excursions.

  16. A Novel Fault Early Warning Model Based on Fault Gene Table for Smart Distribution Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xiang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Since a smart distribution grid has a diversity of components and complicated topology; it is very hard to achieve fault early warning for each part. A fault early warning model for smart distribution grid combining a back propagation (BP neural network with a gene sequence alignment algorithm is proposed. Firstly; the operational state of smart distribution grid is divided into four states; and a BP neural network is adopted to explore the operational state from the historical fault data of the smart distribution grid. This obtains the relationship between each state transition time sequence and corresponding fault, and is used to construct the fault gene table. Then; a state transition time sequence is obtained online periodically, which is matched with each gene in fault gene table by an improved Smith–Waterman algorithm. If the maximum match score exceeds the given threshold, the relevant fault will be detected early. Finally, plenty of time domain simulation is performed on the proposed fault early warning model to IEEE-14 bus. The simulation results show that the proposed model can achieve efficient early fault warning of smart distribution grids.

  17. The Cosmic Evolution Early Release Science (CEERS) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven; Dickinson, M.; Ferguson, H.; Grazian, A.; Grogin, N.; Kartaltepe, J.; Kewley, L.; Kocevski, D.; Koekemoer, A.; Lotz, J.; Papovich, C.; Pentericci, L.; Perez-Gonzalez, P.; Pirzkal, N.; Ravindranath, S.; Somerville, R.; Trump, J.; Wilkins, S.

    2017-11-01

    We propose the Cosmic Evolution Early Release Science (CEERS) Survey (NOI #135), which covers 100 sq. arcmin with JWST imaging and spectroscopy, and is designed to achieve the DD-ERS goals. CEERS will inform the selection of a wide variety of spectroscopic targets for Cycle 2 with a practical choice of imaging area, depth, and wavelength coverage, targeting a field that is supported by a rich set of HST/CANDELS multi-wavelength data. CEERS will demonstrate, test, and validate efficient extragalactic surveys with coordinated, overlapping parallel observations with the JWST instrument suite, including NIRCam and MIRI imaging, NIRSpec R 100 and R 1000 spectroscopy, and NIRCam slitless grism (R 1500) spectroscopy. These tests enable Cycle 2 observations, including validating JWST parallel observing modes, dither and exposure-time strategies, and spectroscopic observing modes including slit-loss corrections. CEERS enables immediate community science into both extragalactic JWST science drivers "First Light and Reionization" and "The Assembly of Galaxies", including: 1) The discovery of 20-80 galaxies at z˜9-13, constraining their abundance and physical nature; 2) Deep spectra of >400 galaxies at z>3, including 40 known candidates at 63; and 4)Characterizing galaxy mid-IR emission to study dust-obscured star-formation and supermassive black hole growth at z˜1-3. The CEERS collaboration is diverse on many axes with demonstrated expertise in rapid delivery of high-level science products.

  18. DOC and CO2-C Releases from Pristine and Drained Peat Soils in Response to Water Table Fluctuations: A Mesocosm Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merjo P. P. Laine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological conditions are considered to be among the main drivers influencing the export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems, and hydrology is likely to alter due to climate change. We built a mesocosm experiment by using peat profiles from a pristine and from a drained (drained in 1978 peatland. A several-week-long low water table period followed by a high water table period, that is, a setting mimicking drought followed by flood, released relatively more DOC from pristine peat than from drained peat. From pristine peat profiles DOC was released into soil water in such quantities that the concentration of DOC remained stable despite dilution caused by added spring water to the mesocosms. In drained peat the DOC concentrations decreased during the high water table period indicating stronger dilution effect in comparison to pristine peat. At the landscape level DOC load from a drained peatland to the recipient water body may, however, increase during flooding because of high water runoff out of the peatland containing high DOC concentrations relative to the forest and agricultural areas. During the high water table period neither peat type nor water table had any clear impact on carbon dioxide (CO2-C fluxes.

  19. Early Science Instruments and Image Releases from SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, H.; Young, E. T.; Zinnecker, H.

    2012-09-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a joint project between NASA and DLR to provide a 2.5-m telescope that flies at stratospheric altitudes. Access to large parts of the otherwise obscured infrared spectrum is enabled. SOFIA successfully conducted its first year of science observations in 2011. The instruments that were flown in the demonstrating "Early Science" phase were the FORCAST mid-infrared camera, the GREAT heterodyne spectrometer, and the HIPO photometer. The FLITECAM near infrared imager was briefly flown married with HIPO. The remainder first generation Science Instruments to be flown is the HAWC far infrared bolometer camera, the FIFI-LS far infrared field imaging line spectrometer, and EXES, a high resolution echelon spectrometer. In this paper we present the basic characteristics of the science instruments and science highlights from the early science demonstration.

  20. The Resolved Stellar Populations Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Daniel; Anderson, J.; Boyer, M.; Cole, A.; Dolphin, A.; Geha, M.; Kalirai, J.; Kallivayalil, N.; McQuinn, K.; Sandstrom, K.; Williams, B.

    2017-11-01

    We propose to obtain deep multi-band NIRCam and NIRISS imaging of three resolved stellar systems within 1 Mpc (NOI 104). We will use this broad science program to optimize observational setups and to develop data reduction techniques that will be common to JWST studies of resolved stellar populations. We will combine our expertise in HST resolved star studies with these observations to design, test, and release point spread function (PSF) fitting software specific to JWST. PSF photometry is at the heart of resolved stellar populations studies, but is not part of the standard JWST reduction pipeline. Our program will establish JWST-optimized methodologies in six scientific areas: star formation histories, measurement of the sub-Solar mass stellar IMF, extinction maps, evolved stars, proper motions, and globular clusters, all of which will be common pursuits for JWST in the local Universe. Our observations of globular cluster M92, ultra-faint dwarf Draco II, and star-forming dwarf WLM, will be of high archival value for other science such as calibrating stellar evolution models, measuring properties of variable stars, and searching for metal-poor stars. We will release the results of our program, including PSF fitting software, matched HST and JWST catalogs, clear documentation, and step-by-step tutorials (e.g., Jupyter notebooks) for data reduction and science application, to the community prior to the Cycle 2 Call for Proposals. We will host a workshop to help community members plan their Cycle 2 observations of resolved stars. Our program will provide blueprints for the community to efficiently reduce and analyze JWST observations of resolved stellar populations.

  1. Early Holocene groundwater table fluctuations in relation to rice domestication in the middle Yangtze River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Yan; Sun, Qianli; Zong, Yongqiang; Finlayson, Brian; Chen, Zhongyuan

    2017-01-01

    The early Holocene environmental amelioration stimulated the trajectory of Neolithic farming cultures and specific geographic settings played a role in determining the nature of these cultures. Using microfossil evidence, the present study reveals that the fluctuations of the groundwater table substantially influenced rice domestication in the Dongting Lake area of the middle Yangtze River basin in the early Holocene. Our 14C-dated sediment core taken from the Bashidang (BSD) Neolithic site contains evidence that the site was a floodplain prior to human occupation ca. 8600 years ago. Poaceae, which contained wild rice (Oryza sp.) as indicated by combined pollen and phytolith evidence, and low counts of freshwater algae indicated a moist site condition. The area then gradually evolved into wetlands as the water table rose, in response to the increasing monsoon precipitation during the early Holocene. This favored rice domestication, assisted by firing and clearing, that continued to flourish for several hundred years. Finally, rice domestication declined during the late stage of the Pengtoushan culture, accompanied by evidence of the expansion of wetlands reflecting the effects of a rising groundwater table that had caused the cessation of rice farming at the Bashidang site after ca. 8000-7900 cal yr BP. This study shows that there are local effects at particular sites that may differ from the trend at the regional scale, necessitating a careful interpretation of the available evidence.

  2. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natalie; Bean, Jacob; Stevenson, Kevin; Alam, M.; Batalha, N.; Benneke, B.; Berta-Thompson, Z.; Blecic, J.; Bruno, G.; Carter, A.; Chapman, J.; Crossfield, I.; Crouzet, N.; Decin, L.; Demory, B.; Desert, J.; Dragomir, D.; Evans, T.; Fortney, J.; Fraine, J.; Gao, P.; Garcia Munoz, A.; Gibson, N.; Goyal, J.; Harrington, J.; Heng, K.; Hu, R.; Kempton, E.; Kendrew, S.; Kilpatrick, B.; Knutson, H.; Kreidberg, L.; Krick, J.; Lagage, P.; Lendl, M.; Line, M.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Louden, T.; Madhusudhan, N.; Mandell, A.; Mansfield, M.; May, E.; Morello, G.; Morley, C.; Moses, J.; Nikolov, N.; Parmentier, V.; Redfield, S.; Roberts, J.; Schlawin, E.; Showman, A.; Sing, D.; Spake, J.; Swain, M.; Todorov, K.; Tsiaras, A.; Venot, O.; Waalkes, W.; Wakeford, H.; Wheatley, P.; Zellem, R.

    2017-11-01

    JWST presents the opportunity to transform our understanding of planets and the origins of life by revealing the atmospheric compositions, structures, and dynamics of transiting exoplanets in unprecedented detail. However, the high-precision, time-series observations required for such investigations have unique technical challenges, and our prior experience with HST, Spitzer, and Kepler indicates that there will be a steep learning curve when JWST becomes operational. We propose an ERS program to accelerate the acquisition and diffusion of technical expertise for transiting exoplanet observations with JWST. This program will also provide a compelling set of representative datasets, which will enable immediate scientific breakthroughs. We will exercise the time-series modes of all four instruments that have been identified as the consensus highest priority by the community, observe the full suite of transiting planet characterization geometries (transits, eclipses, and phase curves), and target planets with host stars that span an illustrative range of brightnesses. The proposed observations were defined through an inclusive and transparent process that had participation from JWST instrument experts and international leaders in transiting exoplanet studies. The targets have been vetted with previous measurements, will be observable early in the mission, and have exceptional scientific merit. We will engage the community with a two-phase Data Challenge that culminates with the delivery of planetary spectra, time series instrument performance reports, and open-source data analysis toolkits.

  3. Constructing early warning information release system in towns enterprise clean production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Huixin; He, Xueqiu; Qian, Xinming; Yuan, Mengqi

    2017-08-01

    China’s industry boom has not only brought unprecedented prosperity, but also caused the gradual depletion of various resources and the worsening of the natural environment. Experts admit that China is facing serious environmental problem, but they believe that they can seek a new path to overcome it through joint efforts. Early warning information release and clean production are the important concepts in addressing the imminent crisis. Early warning information release system can monitor and forecast the risk that affects the clean production. The author drawn the experiences and lessons from developed countries, combined with China’s reality, put forward countermeasures and suggestions about constructing early warning information release system in process of Chinese town-scaled enterprises clean production.

  4. Table Hopping in the Cafeteria: An Exploration of "Racial" Integration in Early Adolescent Social Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman, Paul; Wilson, Vernon

    1992-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative studies of a class of 208 urban eighth graders demonstrate that loose-knit peer groups encourage interracial integration, whereas cliques do not. Loose-knit voluntary peer groups created by the social dynamic of cafeteria table hopping provide an opportunity for meaningful cross-race interaction. (SLD)

  5. Recharge of the early atmosphere of Mars by impact-induced release of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1989-01-01

    The question as to whether high impact rates early in the history of Mars could have aided in maintaining a relatively thick CO2 atmosphere is discussed. Such impacts could have released CO2 into the atmosphere by burial, by shock-induced release during impact events, and by the addition of carbon to Mars from the impacting bolides. On the assumption that cratering rates on Mars were comparable to those of the moon's Nectarial period, burial rates are a result of 'impact gardening' at the end of heavy bombardment are estimated to have ranged from 20 to 45 m/million years; at these rates, 0.1-0.2 bar of CO2 would have been released every 10 million years as a result of burial to depths at which carbonate dissociation temperatures are encountered.

  6. Capturing the externalities: National and watershed scale damages from release of reactive nitrogen beyond the farm, factory, tailpipe and table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, J.; Sobota, D. J.; McCrackin, M. L.; Harrison, J.

    2014-12-01

    Human demand for food, fuel, and industrial products results in the release of 61% of the newly fixed anthropogenic N to the environment in the US each year. This 15.8 Tg N yr-1 input to air, land and water has important social, economic and environmental consequences, yet little research clearly links this N release to the full suite of effects. Here we connect the biogeochemical fluxes of N with existing data on N-associated damages in order to quantify the externalities of N release related to human health, ecosystems and climate regulation for the US at national and watershed scales. Release of N to the environment was estimated circa 2000 with models describing N inputs by source, nutrient uptake efficiency, leaching losses, and gaseous emissions at the scale of 8-digit US Geologic Survey Hydrologic Unit Codes (HUC8s). Potential damages or benefits of anthropogenic N leaked to the environment were calculated by scaling specific N fluxes with the costs associated with human health, agriculture, ecosystems, and the climate system. For the US, annual damage costs of anthropogenic N leaked to the environment in 2000 totaled 289 billion USD. Approximately 57% of the total damages were associated with fossil fuel combustion, driven by the human respiratory health impacts of NOx as a precursor of ozone and a component of particulates. Another 37% of the damage costs were associated with agricultural N. Damages associated with agriculture were 85.5 billion, largely through eutrophication and harmful effects on aquatic habitat. Through aggressive but tangible improvements in atmospheric emissions, agricultural N use and wastewater treatment, we could reduce N export to the coast by nearly 25% within 30 years. These improvements would reduce the externalities associated with the leakage of N beyond its intended uses in agriculture, transportation and energy with minimal impact to these sectors dependent on anthropogenic N fixation.

  7. GH does not modulate the early fasting-induced release of free fatty acids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, F J; Leong, J W; Huang, L; Tan, H Y; Xie, T Y; Nelson, C; Waters, M J; Veldhuis, J D; Epelbaum, J; Chen, C

    2012-01-01

    Fasting results in the mobilization of adipose stores and the elevation of levels of free fatty acids (FFA). In humans, this process is driven by a release in GH. Little is known regarding the role of GH in modulating this process during early stages of fasting in the mouse. Confirmation of the role of GH in modulating FFA release in the fasting mouse is of particular importance given the frequent use of mouse models to study metabolic mechanisms. Here, we correlate the initial release of FFA throughout fasting in mice with pulsatile GH secretion. Observations illustrate the rapid release of FFA in response to food withdrawal. This does not correlate with a rise in GH secretion. Rather, we observed a striking loss in pulsatile secretion of GH throughout the first 6 h of fasting, suggesting that GH does not modulate the initial release of FFA in the mouse in response to fasting. This was confirmed in GH receptor knockout mice, in which we observed a robust fasting-induced rise in FFA. We further illustrate the dynamic relationship between the orexigenic and anorexigenic hormones ghrelin and leptin during fasting in the mouse. Our findings show an initial suppression of leptin and the eventual rise in circulating levels of acyl-ghrelin with fasting. However, altered acyl-ghrelin and leptin secretion occurs well after the rise in FFA and the suppression of GH secretion. Consequently, we conclude that although acyl-ghrelin and leptin may modulate the physiological response to drive food intake, these changes do not contribute to the initial loss of pulsatile GH secretion. Rather, it appears that the suppression of GH secretion in fasting may occur in response to an elevation in fasting levels of FFA or physiological stress. Observations highlight a divergent role for GH in modulating FFA release between man and mouse.

  8. Translocation and early post-release demography of endangered Laysan teal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, M.H.; Seavy, N.E.; Vekasy, M.S.; Klavitter, J.L.; Laniawe, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the high extinction risk inherent to small island populations, we translocated wild Laysan teal Anas laysanensis to a portion of its presumed prehistoric range. Most avian translocations lack the strategic post-release monitoring needed to assess early population establishment or failure. Therefore, we monitored the survival and reproduction of all founders, and their first-generation offspring using radio telemetry for 2 years after the first release. Forty-two Laysan teal were sourced directly from the only extant population on Laysan Island and transported 2 days by ship to Midway Atoll. All birds survived the translocation with nutritional and veterinary support, and spent between 4 and 14 days in captivity. Post-release survival of 42 founders was 0.857 (95% CI 0.86-0.99) during 2004-2006 or annualized 0.92 (95% CI 0.83-0.98). Seventeen of 18 founding hens attempted nesting in the first two breeding seasons. Fledgling success was 0.57 (95% CI 0.55-0.60) in 2005 and 0.63 (95% CI 0.62-0.64) in 2006. The effective founding female population (Ne) was 13. We applied these initial demographic rates to model population growth. The nascent population size increased to >100 after only 2 years post-release (?? = 1.73). If this growth rate continues, the size of the Midway population could surpass the source population before 2010. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 The Zoological Society of London.

  9. A spot test for detection of cobalt releaseearly experience and findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P.; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is often difficult to establish clinical relevance of metal exposure in cobalt-allergic patients. Dermatologists and patients may incorrectly assume that many metallic items release cobalt at levels that may cause cobalt dermatitis. Cobalt-allergic patients may be unaware...... that they are exposed to cobalt from handling work items, causing hand dermatitis. Objectives: To present early findings with a newly developed cobalt spot test. Methods and Results: A cobalt spot test based on disodium-1-nitroso-2-naphthol-3,6-disulfonate was able to identify cobalt release at 8.3 ppm. The test may...... also be used as a gel test if combined with an agar preparation. We found no false-positive reactions when testing metals and alloys known not to contain cobalt. However, one cobalt-containing alloy, which elicited cobalt dermatitis in cobalt-allergic patients, was negative upon cobalt gel testing...

  10. Effect of postharvest pretreatments on organic Early Superior Seedless "Sugraone" table grapes assigned to long term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admane, Naouel; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Di Gennaro, Domenico; Genovese, Francesco; Altieri, Giuseppe; Carlo Di Renzo, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Every year a significant amount of organic table grapes is lost during postharvest mainly due to the incidence of decay, stem browning and fast alteration of the taste and aroma. The demand for this fresh product with immaculate appearance and high sensory quality in terms of flavor, is a hard challenge considering the difficulties to conserve them, with alternative safe treatments to the sulphur dioxide (SO2) which is not allowed in organic product. The aim of this experiment was to maintain the quality of organic table grapes and extend their shelf-life for medium and long term, in order to reach new distant promising markets, by using safe methods. The effectiveness of the combination of pretreatment with Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) compounds, physical means and storage under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were performed by using detached organic table grape berries as alternatives to usual industrial SO2 application. The detached organic Early Superior Seedless "Sugraone" berries were pretreated by: i) dipping in ethanol and potassium bicarbonate; ii) massive CO2 concentrations; iii) ozone (O3) fumigation; whereas, untreated berries were included in the trial as control. Moreover, all the samples were packed in thermo-sealed ALPAK bags with MAP of 2% O2:5% CO2:93% N2 and stored at 0°C for 45 days. Initially and after 15, 30 and 45 days of storage, weight loss, decay incidence, berry/skin firmness, pedicel detachment force, skin color parameters, SSC, pH, titratable acidity and sensory evaluation scores, were monitored. After 45 days of storage, the weight loss was higher in the sample pretreated with massive CO2 concentration at 70 - 90 % and the control. The samples pretreated with CO2 at 70% and O3 at 20 ppm maintained the strength of the berry linked to its pedicel, also the berry and skin firmness were statistically higher in samples pretreated with CO2 at 90 - 70% and O3 at 20 ppm in comparison with the control. The skin color parameters and

  11. ECDC Round Table Report and ProMed-mail most useful international information sources for the Netherlands Early Warning Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijkerk, Paul; Monnier, Annelie A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Kardamanidis, Katina; Friesema, Ingrid Hm; Knol, Mirjam J

    2017-04-06

    The Netherlands Early Warning Committee (NEWC) aims to identify infectious diseases causing a potential threat to Dutch public health. Threats are assessed and published as (information) alerts for public health experts. To identify threats from abroad, the NEWC screens 10 sources reporting disease outbreaks each week. To identify the sources essential for complete and timely reporting, we retrospectively analysed 178 international alerts published between 31 January 2013 and 30 January 2014. In addition, we asked the four NEWC coordinators about the required time to scan the information sources. We documented the date and source in which the signal was detected. The ECDC Round Table (RT) Report and ProMED-mail were the most complete and timely sources, reporting 140 of 178 (79%) and 121 of 178 (68%) threats respectively. The combination of both sources reported 169 (95%) of all threats in a timely manner. Adding any of the other sources resulted in minor increases in the total threats found, but considerable additional time investment per additional threat. Only three potential relevant threats (2%) would have been missed by only using the ECDC RT Report and ProMed-mail. We concluded that using only the ECDC RT Report and ProMed-mail to identify threats from abroad maintains a sensitive Early Warning System. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  12. Planck early results. XIII. Statistical properties of extragalactic radio sources in the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.

    2011-01-01

    The data reported in Planck's Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) are exploited to measure the number counts (dN/dS) of extragalactic radio sources at 30, 44, 70, 100, 143 and 217 GHz. Due to the full-sky nature of the catalogue, this measurement extends to the rarest and brightest...... sources in the sky. At lower frequencies (30, 44, and 70 GHz) our counts are in very good agreement with estimates based on WMAP data, being somewhat deeper at 30 and 70 GHz, and somewhat shallower at 44 GHz. Planck's source counts at 143 and 217 GHz join smoothly with the fainter ones provided by the SPT...... and ACT surveys over small fractions of the sky. An analysis of source spectra, exploiting Planck's uniquely broad spectral coverage, finds clear evidence of a steepening of the mean spectral index above about 70 GHz. This implies that, at these frequencies, the contamination of the CMB power spectrum...

  13. Community Targets for JWST's Early Release Science Program: Evaluation of Transiting Exoplanet WASP-63b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Brian; Cubillos, Patricio; Bruno, Giovanni; Lewis, Nikole K.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Wakeford, Hannah; Blecic, Jasmina; Burrows, Adam Seth; Deming, Drake; Heng, Kevin; Line, Michael R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Morley, Caroline; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Transiting Exoplanet Early Release Science Community (Stevenson et al. 2016)

    2017-06-01

    We present observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ``A Preparatory Program to Identify the Single Best Transiting Exoplanet for JWST Early Release Science" for WASP-63b, one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Early Release Science (ERS) program. A large collaboration of transiting exoplanet scientists identified a set of ``community targets" which meet a certain set of criteria for ecliptic latitude, period, host star brightness, well constrained orbital parameters, and strength of spectroscopic features. WASP-63b was one of the targets identified as a potential candidate for the ERS program. It is presented as an inflated planet with a large signal. It will be accessible to JWST approximately six months after the planned start of Cycle 1/ERS in April 2019 making it an ideal candidate should there be any delays in the JWST timetable. Here, we observe WASP-63b to evaluate its suitability as the best target to test the capabilities of JWST. Ideally, a clear atmosphere will be best suited for bench marking the instruments ability to detect spectroscopic features. We can use the strength of the water absorption feature at 1.4 μm as a way to determine the presence of obscuring clouds/hazes. The results of atmospheric retrieval are presented along with a discussion on the suitability of WASP-63b as the best target to be observed during the ERS Program.

  14. Patient considerations in early management of Parkinson’s disease: focus on extended-release pramipexole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salawu FK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatai Kunle SalawuDivision of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Federal Medical Centre Yola, Adamawa State, NigeriaAbstract: This article reviews the role of an extended-release formulation of pramipexole in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease at an early stage. Pramipexole is a nonergot D2/D3 synthetic aminobenzothiazole derivative that is effective as monotherapy in early disease and as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with motor fluctuations. Although levodopa is the current “gold standard” for treatment of Parkinson’s disease, its effectiveness fades rapidly and its use results in serious motor fluctuations (on-off, wearing-off, freezing, involuntary movements for most patients with the disease. Pramipexole has selective actions at dopamine receptors belonging to the D2 subfamily, where it possesses full activity similar to dopamine itself. Its preferential affinity for the D3 receptor subtype could contribute to its efficacy in the treatment of both the motor and psychiatric symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The best approach to medical management of early Parkinson’s disease remains controversial. While enormous progress has been made in the treatment of the disease, challenges still remain. A variety of treatment-related and patient-related factors must be taken into account when making these decisions. The current approach to treatment of early Parkinson’s disease depends in part on individual patient factors, including age, severity and nature of symptoms and their impact, presence of cognitive dysfunction, possible underlying behavioral factors predisposing to impulse control disorders, and other comorbidities. Today, the once-daily extended-release formulation of pramipexole offers the advantages of easy continuous delivery of drug and convenience to patients, particularly early in the disease when monotherapy is the rule. Thus, a new “levodopa-sparing” paradigm for treating Parkinson’s disease may now be

  15. The problem of crime repetition risk after early release on parole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debolskiy M.G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the psychological problems encountered in the implementation of such an important legal institution as release on parole. We show the progressiveness of the measure, its stimulating effect on the law-abiding behavior of the convicts in prison. However, analysis of the practice of parole reveals a number of problems: high level of crime repetition; presence of a large proportion of convicts (60% who did not use their right to parole; a large number of disagreements between the administration of correctional institutions and the courts in assessing the degree of correction and deciding on parole; absence of unambiguous criteria of correction. We paid considerable attention to the analysis of the conceptual approaches that underpin the practice of early release of convicts in Russia and abroad. The advantages of the domestic concept are assessment of the degree of correction, and its humanistic orientation. We also describe the history of development and maintenance of foreign concepts in evaluating risk factors for parole prisoners. The author believes that the domestic and international approaches are interrelated, but the latter is more pragmatic and focused on the prediction of human behavior at large, taking into account his capacity to meet basic needs (both vital and social. The article shows the experience of applied research aimed at understanding the system of recidivism risk assessment and opportunities of repetition risk reduction in parole prisoners.

  16. Interaction of early life stress and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene: effects on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuge, Philipp; Aust, Sabine; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Gärtner, Matti; Feeser, Melanie; Bajbouj, Malek; Grimm, Simone

    2014-12-01

    Early life stress (ELS) experience is associated with persisting working memory (WM) deficits; changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system; and structural, functional, and epigenetic changes in the hippocampus. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene interact with ELS experience to predict depression as well as neuroendocrine and neuronal reactivity. Although these findings indicate that vulnerable genotypes might also show impaired WM performance after ELS experience, no previous study investigated whether there is an interaction effect of CRHR1 polymorphisms and ELS experience on WM performance. Subjects (N = 451) were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924 within the CRHR1 gene. We used an n-back task to investigate the hypothesis that WM performance in healthy subjects may be subtly influenced by functional differences in CRHR1 and represents an early marker of increased vulnerability after exposure to ELS. Exposure to ELS had a particularly strong impact on WM performance in subjects with the common homozygous GG GG genotype, whereas only severe exposure to ELS interfered with WM accuracy in AT carriers. Our data indicate that specific CRHR1 polymorphisms moderate the effect of ELS experience on WM performance. Exposure to ELS in combination with a vulnerable genotype results in subtle memory deficits in adulthood, which might develop before psychopathological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The interaction of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene and early life stress on emotional empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Simone; Wirth, Katharina; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Gärtner, Matti; Feeser, Melanie; Dziobek, Isabel; Bajbouj, Malek; Aust, Sabine

    2017-06-30

    Early life stress (ELS) is associated with increased vulnerability for depression, changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system and structural and functional changes in hippocampus. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene interact with ELS to predict depression, cognitive functions and hippocampal activity. Social cognition has been related to hippocampal function and might be crucial for maintaining mental health. However, the interaction of CRHR1 gene variation and ELS on social cognition has not been investigated yet. We assessed social cognition in 502 healthy subjects to test effects of ELS and the CRHR1 gene. Participants were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924. ELS was assessed by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, social cognition was measured via Multifaceted Empathy Test and Empathy Quotient. Severity of ELS was associated with decreased emotional, but not cognitive empathy. Subjects with the common homozygous GG GG genotype showed decreased implicit emotional empathy after ELS exposure regardless of its severity. The results reveal that specific CRHR1 polymorphisms moderate the effect of ELS on emotional empathy. Exposure to ELS in combination with a vulnerable genotype results in impaired emotional empathy in adulthood, which might represent an early marker of increased vulnerability after ELS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Early Decrease in Respiration and Uncoupling Event Independent of Cytochrome c Release in PC12 Cells Undergoing Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghella, Libera; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c is a key molecule in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. It also plays a pivotal role in cell respiration. The switch between these two functions occurs at the moment of its release from mitochondria. This process is therefore extremely relevant for the fate of the cell. Since cytochrome c mediates respiration, we studied the changes in respiratory chain activity during the early stages of apoptosis in order to contribute to unravel the mechanisms of cytochrome c release. We found that, during staurosporine (STS)- induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, respiration is affected before the release of cytochrome c, as shown by a decrease in the endogenous uncoupled respiration and an uncoupling event, both occurring independently of cytochrome c release. The decline in the uncoupled respiration occurs also upon Bcl-2 overexpression (which inhibits cytochrome c release), while the uncoupling event is inhibited by Bcl-2. We also observed that the first stage of nuclear condensation during STS-induced apoptosis does not depend on the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and is a reversibile event. These findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms affecting mitochondria during the early stages of apoptosis and priming them for the release of apoptogenic factors. PMID:22666257

  19. A Preparatory Program to Identify the Single Best Transiting Exoplanet for JWST Early Release Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    JWST will revolutionize transiting exoplanet atmospheric science due to its capability for continuous, long-duration observations and, compared to existing space-based facilities, its larger collecting area, spectral coverage, and resolution. However, it is unclear precisely how well JWST will perform and which of its myriad instruments and observing modes will be best suited for transiting exoplanet studies. The Early Release Science (ERS) program was devised to provide early and open access to a broad suite of JWST science observations subject to key data analysis challenges so that the community can quickly build experience and develop a list of best observing practices prior to the Cycle 2 proposal deadline. In a recent paper, we identified 12 transiting exoplanets (dubbed community targets) that may be suitable for time-series observations within the ERS program; however, a critical unknown for the most favorable targets is the presence of obscuring clouds. To properly assess each observing mode, it is vital that the selected community target has measurable and identifiable spectroscopic features. We propose HST/WFC3 observations of four exoplanets to identify the single best target by first measuring the size of their 1.4-micron water vapor features. Next, we will perform follow-up Spitzer observations of the top two targets to determine the slopes in their infrared transmission spectra. Together, these measurements will provide the most robust determination of clouds/hazes with the minimum amount of telescope time. Cycle 24 is our final opportunity to identify suitable community targets with cloud-free atmospheres prior to the ERS proposal deadline in mid-2017.

  20. Comparison of Airway Pressure Release Ventilation to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in the Early Management of Smoke Inhalation Injury in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of airway pressure release ventilation to conventional mechanical ventilation in the early management of smoke inhalation injury in swine...Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complication of smoke inha- lation injury, with an incidence as high as 54% in mechanically ventilated ... mechanical ventilation on oxygenation in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by wood smoke inhalation. Design: Prospective

  1. Metal Ion Release During Growth-Friendly Instrumentation for Early-Onset Scoliosis: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilgor, Caglar; Efendiyev, Ayaz; Akbiyik, Filiz; Demirkiran, Gokhan; Senkoylu, Alpaslan; Alanay, Ahmet; Yazici, Muharrem

    2018-01-01

    Metal ions released from spinal instruments can cause localized debris and distribute systemically to settle on distant organs. Children with early-onset deformities live with metallic implants for a substantial amount of time. No research focused on metal distribution in growth-friendly instrumentations. The aim of this study was to compare age-matched growing rod (GR) and magnetically controlled growing rod (MCGR) groups to noninstrumented controls. The study was designed as a multicenter, prospective, cross-sectional case series. GR and MCGR applications of three institutions were included. A total of 52 children were enrolled. Blood samples were collected between December 2014 and February 2015. Biochemical serum analyses were performed to trace and quantify titanium, vanadium, aluminum, and boron. The GR group included 15 children. Mean age was 10.7 (range 6-15). MCGR group included 22 children. Mean age was 8.5 (range 2-13). Fifteen age-matched nonoperated children formed the control group. The mean age was 10.4 (range 5-15). One-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for comparisons. The mean serum titanium level in control, GR, and MCGR groups were 2.8 ± 1.4, 7.3 ± 4.3, and 10.2 ± 6.8 μg/L, respectively. GR and MCGR group titanium levels were higher than controls' (p = .008 and p Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hubble's Early Release Observations Student Pilot Project: Implementing Formal and Informal Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.; McCallister, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Early Release Observations (EROs) were revealed to the public on September 9, 2009, and K-12 students and educators in five states across the country were able to join the celebration. To date, students and educators in Maryland, Ohio, New York, California, and Florida have participated in the Hubble Space Telescope's ERO Pilot Project. This is an interdisciplinary project created by the Space Telecope Science Institute's (STScI) Office of Public Outreach in which students use skills from subject areas such as language arts, science, art, and technology to research the four ERO objects and create compositions. In recognition of their participation, the students' compositions are displayed at host institutions in each state (a museum, science center, school, planetarium or library) during a special public event for participating students, their families, and teachers. As part of its evaluation program, STScI's Office of Public Outreach has been conducting an evaluation of the project to determine the viability and potential of conducting large-scale, formal/informal collaborative projects in the future and to share lessons learned. Lessons learned will be applied to a new interdisciplinary project, the James Webb Space Telescope Student Innovation Project.

  3. Factors Related to Early Clinical Effects of Quetiapine Extended-Release: A Multinational, Prospective, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Luis; Recinos, Byron; Paz, Bezner; Rovelo, Mauricio; Elias Rodriguez, Fanny Elizabeth; Calderón, José; Arellano, Arturo; Pomata, Santiago; Rey, María Verónica; Perez-Lloret, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The first weeks of treatment with antipsychotics are important for the development of their long-term efficacy. The objective of this study was to identify factors related to early clinical effects and quality of life (QoL) improvements with quetiapine extended-release (XR). Six hundred and sixty-five patients starting with quetiapine XR were followed up for 8 weeks (schizophrenia = 153, major depression = 200, bipolar depression = 252, other psychiatric conditions = 60). Clinical effects were assessed by the Clinical Global Impression of Change scale (CGI-C), QoL by the visual analog scale (VAS) of the EQ-5D (QoL-VAS), and adherence by the Moriksy scale. Adverse events were explored: movement disorders by the UKU and Simpson-Angus scales, weight gain by calibrated balances, and diurnal somnolence by the Epworth Somnolence Scale (ESS). The mean dose of quetiapine XR during follow-up was 195.6 ± 154.8 mg/day. CGI and QoL-VAS scores improved significantly at week 8 by 2.7 ± 0.1 points and 25.1 ± 0.9 points. Adverse events were observed in 34 and 26 % of patients at weeks 4 and 8, respectively. A significant reduction in ESS score was also observed at week 8. Factors independently associated with change in QoL-VAS ≥20 points (n = 292, 43 %) were female gender, more severe disease at baseline, higher antipsychotic dose during follow-up, and improvements in somnolence. Factors independently associated with clinically significant improvement (CGI-C ≥5, n = 610, 93 %) were greater change in QoL-VAS, less frequent movement disorders at baseline, and lack of adverse events during follow-up, especially somnolence. Results from this real-setting, large observational study in Central America suggest that disease severity at baseline, gender, antipsychotic dose, and occurrence of adverse reactions has a significant impact on the early clinical effects of quetiapine XR. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT02409823.

  4. Releasing sheltered northern red oak during the early stem exclusion stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Schuler; Gary W. Miller

    1999-01-01

    The utility of releasing sheltered northern red oak was examined in mesic hardwood stands in north central West Virginia. Different levels of release were applied in the spring of 1996 - six growing seasons after planting 2-0 seedlings that were protected with 5 ft corrugated plastic shelters. The planting was done in a 7.77 acre forest opening that developed abundant...

  5. Restraint factors and partial coefficients for crack risk analyses of early age concrete structures:diagrams and tables

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This report contains all background data for the Doctoral Thesis 2003:19 "Restraint Factors and Partial Coefficients for Crack Risk Analyses of Early Age Concrete Structures" by Martin Nilsson. This report contains all background data for the Doctoral Thesis 2003:19 "Restraint Factors and Partial Coefficients for Crack Risk Analyses of Early Age Concrete Structures" by Martin Nilsson.

  6. Early Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Release for Correction of Sagittal Imbalance in Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen R. Deukmedjian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to evaluate a novel surgical technique in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis and present our early experience with the minimally invasive lateral approach for anterior longitudinal ligament release to provide lumbar lordosis and examine its impact on sagittal balance. Methods. All patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD treated with the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion (MIS LIF for release of the anterior longitudinal ligament were examined. Patient demographics, clinical data, spinopelvic parameters, and outcome measures were recorded. Results. Seven patients underwent release of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALR to improve sagittal imbalance. All cases were split into anterior and posterior stages, with mean estimated blood loss of 125 cc and 530 cc, respectively. Average hospital stay was 8.3 days, and mean follow-up time was 9.1 months. Comparing pre- and postoperative 36′′ standing X-rays, the authors discovered a mean increase in global lumbar lordosis of 24 degrees, increase in segmental lumbar lordosis of 17 degrees per level of ALL released, decrease in pelvic tilt of 7 degrees, and decrease in sagittal vertical axis of 4.9 cm. At the last followup, there was a mean improvement in VAS and ODI scores of 26.2% and 18.3%. Conclusions. In the authors’ early experience, release of the anterior longitudinal ligament using the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach may be a feasible alternative in correcting sagittal deformity.

  7. A spot test for detection of cobalt release - early experience and findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2010-01-01

    It is often difficult to establish clinical relevance of metal exposure in cobalt-allergic patients. Dermatologists and patients may incorrectly assume that many metallic items release cobalt at levels that may cause cobalt dermatitis. Cobalt-allergic patients may be unaware that they are exposed...... to cobalt from handling work items, causing hand dermatitis....

  8. Efficacy and Safety of de Novo and Early Use of Extended-release Tacrolimus in Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vílchez, Francisco; Lambert, José Luis; Rangel, Diego; Almenar, Luis; de la Fuente, José Luis; Palomo, Jesús; Díaz Molina, Beatriz; Lage, Ernesto; Sánchez Lázaro, Ignacio; Vázquez de Prada, José A

    2018-01-01

    The extended-release formulation of tacrolimus (ERT) allows once-daily dosage, thus simplifying the immunosuppressive regimen. This study aimed to describe the safety and efficacy of the de novo and early use of ERT in heart transplantation. This was an observational, retrospective, multicenter study comparing the safety and efficacy of the de novo use of ERT (ERT group [n=94]), standard-release tacrolimus (SRT group [n=42]) and early conversion (EC) from SRT to ERT (EC group [n=44]). Extended-release tacrolimus was used between 2007 and 2012. One-year incidence rates of acute rejection, infection, and cytomegalovirus infection were analyzed. Safety parameters were also evaluated. There were no significant between-group differences in the daily dose or trough levels of tacrolimus during the first year after transplantation. The rejection incidence rates were 1.05 (95%CI, 0.51-1.54), 1.39 (95%CI, 1.00-1.78), and 1.11 (95%CI, 0.58-1.65) episodes per patient-years in the SRT group, ERT group, and EC group, respectively (P=.48). The infection incidence rates were 0.75 (95%CI, 0.60-0.86), 0.62 (95%CI, 0.52-0.71), and 0.55 (95%CI, 0.40-0.68) in the SRT group, ERT group, and EC group, respectively (P=.46). Cytomegalovirus infection occurred in 23.8%, 20.2%, and 18.2% of the patients, respectively (P=.86). No significant between-group differences were found in laboratory tests or in allograft function. There was 1 death in the SRT group and 2 in the ERT group. Both de novo and early use of ERT seem to have similar safety and efficacy profiles to conventional SRT-based immunosuppression. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Early treatment benefits of ropinirole prolonged release in Parkinson's disease patients with motor fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Bonnie P; Earl, Nancy L; Hauser, Robert A; Stacy, Mark

    2010-05-15

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the Efficacy And Safety Evaluation in Parkinson's Disease (EASE-PD) Adjunct Study, assessing the minimum time to symptom improvement after initiation of ropinirole prolonged release (2-24 mg/day) versus placebo in patients with moderate-to-advanced PD not optimally controlled with levodopa. Ropinirole prolonged release was superior to placebo at Week 2 for change from baseline in "off" time (adjusted mean treatment difference [AMTD] - 0.7 hours; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.1, -0.2; P = 0.0029), and "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia (0.4 hours; 95%CI, 0.01, 0.88; P = 0.0444). At Week 4, improvements were seen in change from baseline in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale total motor score (AMTD, -3.1; 95%CI, -4.4, -1.8; P treatment initiation. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Wheels-Off Time Uncertainty Impact on Benefits of Early Call for Release Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palopo, Kee; Chatterji, Gano B.; Almog, Noam

    2017-01-01

    Arrival traffic scenarios with 808 flights from 173 airports to Houston George Bush International airport are simulated to determine if Call For Release flights can receive a benefit in terms of less delay over other flights by scheduling prior to gate pushback (look-ahead in time) as opposed to at gate pushback. Call for Release flights are departures that require approval from Air Route Traffic Control Center prior to release. Realism is brought to the study by including gate departure delay and taxi-out delay uncertainties for the 77 major U. S. airports. Gate departure delay uncertainty is assumed to increase as a function of look-ahead time. Results show that Call For Release flights from an airport within the freeze horizon (a region surrounding the arrival airport) can get an advantage over other flights to a capacity constrained airport by scheduling prior to gate pushback, provided the wheels-off time uncertainty with respect to schedule is controlled to a small value, such as within a three-minute window. Another finding of the study is that system delay, measured as the sum of arrival delays, is smaller when flights are scheduled in the order of arrival compared to in the order of departure. Because flights from airports within the freeze horizon are scheduled in the order of departure, an increase in the number of internal airports with a larger freeze horizon increases system delay. Delay in the given scenario was found to increase by 126% (from 13.8 hours to 31.2 hours) as freeze horizon was increased from 30-minutes to 2-hours in the baseline scenario.

  11. Early crop-tree release and species cleaning in young northern hardwoods: a financial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Sendak; William B. Leak

    2008-01-01

    In 1959 a study of crop-tree release and species cleaning was established in a 25-year-old northern hardwood stand growing on an above-average hardwood site that resulted from a silvicultural clearcut in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The stand was followed for 5 years and based on the results, treatment effects were projected to a stand age of 45 years. These...

  12. Slow-release and organic fertilizers on early growth of Rangpur lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lucas Magalhães Machado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Slow-release and organic fertilizers are promising alternatives to conventional fertilizers, as both reduce losses by leaching, volatilization and problems of toxicity and/or salinity to plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different rates of the organic fertilizer Humato-Macota® compared with the slow-release fertilizer Osmocote® on the growth and nitrogen content in the dry matter of Rangpur lime. A field experiment was conducted in a factorial completely randomized design with an additional treatment (4 x 4 +1. The first factor consisted of four Humato­Macota® rates (0, 1, 2, and 3% applied to the substrate; the second factor consisted of the same Humato-Macota® concentrations, but applied as fortnightly foliar sprays; the additional treatment consisted of application of 5 kgm-3 Osmocote® 18-05-09. Means of all growth characteristics (plant height, total dry matter, root/shoot ratio and leaf area and the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm were higher when plants were fertilized with the slow-release fertilizer. The organic fertilizer applied alone did not meet the N requirement of Rangpur lime.

  13. A Table! (At the Table).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Robert M.

    A review of French dining habits and table manners outlines: elements of the place setting, courtesies used at the table, serving conventions, restaurant tipping, the size and content of the different meals of the day, subtle differences in common foods, restaurant types, menu types, general wine and cheese choices, waiter-client communication,…

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog I. Early Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    Donald P. Schneider(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA); Richards, Gordon T.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Gunn, James E.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Reichard, Timothy A.; Stoughton, C.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present the first edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 3814 objects (3000 discovered by the SDSS) in the initial SDSS public data release that have at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum larger than 1000 km/s, luminosities brighter than M_i^* = -23, and highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 494 square degrees; the majority of the objects were found in SDSS commissioning data using a multicol...

  15. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  16. The Study on Cracking Strength of AIJs to Release the Early-Age Stress of Mass Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to theoretically and numerically assess the effect of setting artificial-induced joints (AIJs during construction period of a mass concrete structure to release the early-stage thermal stress. With respect to the coupling influences of various factors such as size and boundary of AIJs, an analytical model for its cracking strength on the setting section of mass concrete is proposed based on double-parameter fracture theory. A kind of hyper-finite element analysis (FEA for many array AIJs in simplified plane pate is also presented by using bilinear cohesive force distribution. The results from the present model and numerical simulation were compared to those of experimental data to prove the efficiency and accuracy of the analytical model and FEA. The model presented in this study for the cracking strength of AIJs provides a simple useful tool to accurately evaluate how many early stress AIJs reduced. The theoretical solution and FEA results could also be significantly contributed to find the “just” and “perfect” release of the temperature stress and to improve the design level of AIJs in mass concrete structure.

  17. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Augusto Monteiro Lins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3, in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a. Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a. At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves.

  18. Some Reflections on the Periodic Table and Its Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernelius, W. Conard

    1986-01-01

    Discusses early periodic tables; effect on the periodic table of atomic numbers; the periodic table in relation to electron distribution in the atoms of elements; terms and concepts related to the table; and the modern basis of the periodic table. Additional comments about these and other topics are included. (JN)

  19. Inverse modelling for real-time estimation of radiological consequences in the early stage of an accidental radioactivity release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecha, Petr; Šmídl, Václav

    2016-11-01

    A stepwise sequential assimilation algorithm is proposed based on an optimisation approach for recursive parameter estimation and tracking of radioactive plume propagation in the early stage of a radiation accident. Predictions of the radiological situation in each time step of the plume propagation are driven by an existing short-term meteorological forecast and the assimilation procedure manipulates the model parameters to match the observations incoming concurrently from the terrain. Mathematically, the task is a typical ill-posed inverse problem of estimating the parameters of the release. The proposed method is designated as a stepwise re-estimation of the source term release dynamics and an improvement of several input model parameters. It results in a more precise determination of the adversely affected areas in the terrain. The nonlinear least-squares regression methodology is applied for estimation of the unknowns. The fast and adequately accurate segmented Gaussian plume model (SGPM) is used in the first stage of direct (forward) modelling. The subsequent inverse procedure infers (re-estimates) the values of important model parameters from the actual observations. Accuracy and sensitivity of the proposed method for real-time forecasting of the accident propagation is studied. First, a twin experiment generating noiseless simulated "artificial" observations is studied to verify the minimisation algorithm. Second, the impact of the measurement noise on the re-estimated source release rate is examined. In addition, the presented method can be used as a proposal for more advanced statistical techniques using, e.g., importance sampling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Panchromatic Catalog of Early-type Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift in the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Kaviraj, S.; O'Connell, R. W.; Hathi, N. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Crockett, R. M.; Yan, H.; Kimble, R. A.; Silk, J.; McCarthy, P. J.; Koekemoer, A.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.; Trauger, J. T.; Walker, A. R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Young, E. T.

    2012-03-01

    In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 lsim z lsim 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 1011 publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

  1. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  2. TABLE COFFEE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dextroamphetamine with amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are the best known drug treatment for ADHD. 1 However, these drugs are not available in our environment. Caffeine is a psychoactive substance available in table coffee. When consumed in a low to moderate doses, it leads to increased alertness, energy and.

  3. Mathematics Tables

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Version 2.6 Initial typesetting: Carroll Wilde Graphics: David Canright Editing: Elle Zimmerman||Contributed for inclusion in Calhoun by Prof. Charles Therrien This booklet provides convenient access to formulas and other data that are frequently used in mathematics courses. If a more comprehensive reference is needed, see, for example, the STANDARD MATHEMATICAL TABLES published by the Chemical Rubber Company, Cleveland, Ohio.

  4. Comparative toxicity of inorganic contaminants released by placer mining to early life stages of salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Kevin J.; Hamilton, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    The acute toxicities of four trace inorganics associated with placer mining were determined, individually and in environmentally relevant mixtures, to early life stages of Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) from Alaska and Montana, coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kitsutch) from Alaska and Washington, and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from Montana. The descending rank order of toxicity to all species and life stages was copper > zinc > lead > arsenic. For each of the three species, sensitivity to the inorganics was greater in juveniles than in alvenins or in swim-up fry. Arctic grayling from Alaska were more sensitive than the other species tested, including Arctic grayling from Montana. For Arctic grayling, sensitivity to all four inorganics was significantly greater in swim-up fry from Alaska than in alevins from Montana, and sensitivity to arsenic and copper was significantly greater in juveniles from Alaska than in juveniles from Montana. In tests with environmentally relevant mixtures (based on ratios of concentrations measured in streams with placer mining) of these four inorganics, copper was identified as the major toxic component because it accounted for ⩾97% of the summed toxic units of the mixture, and an equitoxic mixture of these inorganics showed less-than-additive toxicity. Total and total recoverable copper concentrations reported in five Alaskan streams with active placer mines were higher than the acutely toxic concentrations, either individually or in mixtures, that the authors found to be acutely toxic to Arctic grayling and coho salmon from Alaska. However, caution should be used when comparing our results obtained in “clear” water to field situations, because speciation and toxicity of these inorganics may be altered in the presence of sediments suspended by placer mining activities.

  5. Role of Corticotropin Releasing Factor 1 Signaling in Cocaine Seeking during Early Extinction in Female and Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Angie M; Kohtz, Amy; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) neurons are involved in stress responses, including stress's ability to drive drug relapse. Previous animal studies indicate that female rats exhibit greater drug seeking than male rats during initial drug abstinence. Moreover, females are more sensitive to the effect of stress to drive drug seeking than males. Finally, LC-NE neurons are more sensitive to CRF in females compared to males. We hypothesized that increased drug seeking in females on extinction day one (ED1) is due to increased response to the stress of early withdrawal and is dependent upon the increased response of LC in females to CRF. We predicted that LC-NE neurons would exhibit Fos activation on ED1, and that blocking CRF1 signaling would decrease drug seeking on ED1 measured by responding on an active lever previously associated with cocaine self- administration. After chronic cocaine self-administration, female and male rats underwent a test for initial extinction responding by measuring lever pressing in the absence of cocaine. Prior to this Extinction Day 1 (ED1) session, rats were injected with vehicle or the selective CRF1 antagonist (CP) to measure effects of CRF antagonism on drug seeking during early abstinence. ED1 increased corticosterone in female rats, in proportion to lever responding in male and female, indicating that ED1 was stressful. Pretreatment with CP decreased cocaine seeking on ED1 more effectively in female compared to male rats. This increase in responding was associated with an increase in activation of LC NE neurons. Together, these findings indicate that stress, and signaling at CRF receptors in LC, may be involved in the increased drug seeking during initial abstinence.

  6. Role of Corticotropin Releasing Factor 1 Signaling in Cocaine Seeking during Early Extinction in Female and Male Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie M Cason

    Full Text Available Locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF neurons are involved in stress responses, including stress's ability to drive drug relapse. Previous animal studies indicate that female rats exhibit greater drug seeking than male rats during initial drug abstinence. Moreover, females are more sensitive to the effect of stress to drive drug seeking than males. Finally, LC-NE neurons are more sensitive to CRF in females compared to males. We hypothesized that increased drug seeking in females on extinction day one (ED1 is due to increased response to the stress of early withdrawal and is dependent upon the increased response of LC in females to CRF. We predicted that LC-NE neurons would exhibit Fos activation on ED1, and that blocking CRF1 signaling would decrease drug seeking on ED1 measured by responding on an active lever previously associated with cocaine self- administration. After chronic cocaine self-administration, female and male rats underwent a test for initial extinction responding by measuring lever pressing in the absence of cocaine. Prior to this Extinction Day 1 (ED1 session, rats were injected with vehicle or the selective CRF1 antagonist (CP to measure effects of CRF antagonism on drug seeking during early abstinence. ED1 increased corticosterone in female rats, in proportion to lever responding in male and female, indicating that ED1 was stressful. Pretreatment with CP decreased cocaine seeking on ED1 more effectively in female compared to male rats. This increase in responding was associated with an increase in activation of LC NE neurons. Together, these findings indicate that stress, and signaling at CRF receptors in LC, may be involved in the increased drug seeking during initial abstinence.

  7. The Periodic Table in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raos, N.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Croatian (Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Arts was the first academy to elect D. I. Mendeleev as its honorary member (1882, whereas the periodic table of the elements has been taught regularly at the Zagreb University since 1888. The early interest of Croatian chemists in the periodic table should be attributed primarily to their pan-Slavic attitude, particularly as proof that Slavic people were able to produce "their own Newtons" (M. V. Lomonosov and D. I. Mendeleev. Such enthusiastic views, however, did not help in analyzing the contribution of Mendeleev and other scientists to the discovery and development of the periodic table of the elements.

  8. The local luminosity function of star-forming galaxies derived from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrello, M.; Clemens, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; De Zotti, G.; Bonavera, L.; Cosco, G.; Guarese, G.; Boaretto, L.; Serjeant, S.; Toffolatti, L.; Lapi, A.; Bethermin, M.; Castex, G.; Clements, D. L.; Delabrouille, J.; Dole, H.; Franceschini, A.; Mandolesi, N.; Marchetti, L.; Partridge, B.; Sajina, A.

    2013-02-01

    The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) has offered the first opportunity to accurately determine the luminosity function of dusty galaxies in the very local Universe (i.e. distances ≲100 Mpc), at several (sub-)millimetre wavelengths, using blindly selected samples of low-redshift sources, unaffected by cosmological evolution. This project, however, requires careful consideration of a variety of issues including the choice of the appropriate flux density measurement, the separation of dusty galaxies from radio sources and from Galactic sources, the correction for the CO emission, the effect of density inhomogeneities and more. We present estimates of the local luminosity functions at 857 GHz (350 μm), 545 GHz (550 μm) and 353 GHz (850 μm) extending across the characteristic luminosity L⋆, and a preliminary estimate over a limited luminosity range at 217 GHz (1382 μm). At 850 μm and for luminosities L ≳ L⋆ our results agree with previous estimates, derived from the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) Local Universe Galaxy Survey, but are higher than the latter at L ≲ L⋆. We also find good agreement with estimates at 350 and 500 μm based on preliminary Herschel survey data.

  9. Structural and functional divergence of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors in early sarcopterygians: lungfish and Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice K V Tam

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR(2 in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP receptor (PRPR. In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR(2 in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR(2 was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR(2 had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis(GHRHR2 also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR(2, which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP.

  10. Sedimentary evidence for enhanced hydrological cycling in response to rapid carbon release during the early Toarcian oceanic anoxic event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kentaro; Kemp, David B.; Itamiya, Shoma; Inui, Mutsuko

    2018-01-01

    A pronounced excursion in the carbon-isotope composition of biospheric carbon and coeval seawater warming during the early Toarcian (∼183 Ma) has been linked to the large-scale transfer of 12C-enriched carbon to the oceans and atmosphere. A European bias in the distribution of available data means that the precise pattern, tempo and global expression of this carbon cycle perturbation, and the associated environmental responses, remain uncertain. Here, we present a new cm-scale terrestrial-dominated carbon-isotope record through an expanded lower Toarcian section from Japan that displays a negative excursion pattern similar to marine and terrestrial carbon-isotope records documented from Europe. These new data suggest that 12C-enriched carbon was added to the biosphere in at least one rapid, millennial-scale pulse. Sedimentological analysis indicates a close association between the carbon-isotope excursion and high-energy sediment transport and enhanced fluvial discharge. Together, these data support the hypothesis that a sudden strengthening of the global hydrological cycle occurred in direct and immediate response to rapid carbon release and atmospheric warming.

  11. A PANCHROMATIC CATALOG OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT IN THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Kaviraj, S.; Crockett, R. M.; Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A.; Bond, H. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yan, H. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kimble, R. A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Disney, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Physics and Astronomy, The Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, J. A. [Astronomy Department, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 10{sup 11} < M{sub *}[M{sub Sun }]<10{sup 12}. By transforming the observed photometry into the Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V) = 3.5 and (NUV-V) = 3.3, with 1{sigma} standard deviations {approx_equal}1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent ({approx}<50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

  12. Physiological and morphological effects of high water tables on early growth of giant reed (Arundo donax), elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), energycane and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennewein, Stephen Peter [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Here, an increasing demand for renewable energy sources has spurred interest in high-biomass crops used for energy production. Species potentially well-suited for biofuel production in the seasonally wet organic Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) of Florida include giant reed (Arundo donax), elephant grass (Pennisetum Purpureum), energycane (Saccharum spp.), and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.). The objectives in this study were to evaluate the role of fluctuating water tables on the morphology, physiology, and early season growth of these four genotypes. The candidate genotypes were grown in a greenhouse under three water table depths, defined by distance of the water table from the soil surface: two constant water tables (-16 cm and -40 cm) along with a flood cycle (2 weeks of flood to the soil level followed by 2 weeks at -40 cm from the soil level). The genotypes included CP 89-2143 (sugarcane), L 79-1002 (energycane), Merkeron (elephant grass), and wild type (giant reed). The experiment was repeated for plant cane, first ratoon, and successive plant cane crop cycles. Reductions in dry matter yield were observed among genotypes subjected to the -40 cm drained, periodically flooded (40F) water table relative to the -40 cm constant (40C) or -16 cm constant (16C). Plant cane dry weights were reduced by 37% in giant reed, 52% in elephant grass, 42% in energycane, and 34% in sugarcane in the 40F compared to 40C water table treatments. Similarly, in the first ratoon crop dry weights were reduced by 29% in giant reed, 42% in elephant grass, 27% in energycane, and 62% in sugarcane. In plant cane and successive plant cane, average total dry weight was greatest for elephant grass whereas ratoon total dry weight was greatest for energycane. Genotype had more pronounced effects on physiological attributes than water table including the highest stomatal conductance and SPAD values in giant reed, and the highest stalk populations in elephant grass and

  13. Nonredundant requirement for multiple histone modifications for the early anaphase release of the mitotic exit regulator Cdc14 from nucleolar chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W Hwang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conserved phosphatase Cdc14 is required for the exit from mitosis. It is anchored on nucleolar chromatin by the Cfi1/Net1 protein until early anaphase, at which time it is released into the nucleoplasm. Two poorly understood, redundant pathways promote Cdc14 release, the FEAR (Cdc fourteen early release network and the MEN (mitotic exit network. Through the analysis of genetic interactions, we report here a novel requirement for the ubiquitination of histone H2B by the Bre1 ubiquitin ligase in the cell cycle-dependent release of Cdc14 from nucleolar chromatin when the MEN is inactivated. This function for H2B ubiquitination is mediated by its activation of histone H3 methylation on lysines 4 and 79 (meH3K4 and meH3K79 but, surprisingly, is not dependent on the histone deacetylase (HDAC Sir2, which associates with Cdc14 on nucleolar chromatin as part of the RENT complex. We also observed a defect in Cdc14 release in cells lacking H3 lysine 36 methylation (meH3K36 and in cells lacking an HDAC recruited by this modification. These histone modifications represent previously unappreciated factors required for the accessibility to and/or action on nucleolar chromatin of FEAR network components. The nonredundant role for these modifications in this context contrasts with the notion of a highly combinatorial code by which histone marks act to control biological processes.

  14. Dopamine release in response to a psychological stress in humans and its relationship to early life maternal care: a positron emission tomography study using [11C]raclopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruessner, Jens C; Champagne, Frances; Meaney, Michael J; Dagher, Alain

    2004-03-17

    Mesolimbic dopamine is thought to play a role in the processing of rewards. However, animal studies also demonstrate dopamine release in response to aversive stressful stimuli. Also, in animal studies, disruptions of the mother-infant relationship have been shown to have long-lasting effects on the mesolimbic dopamine system and the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. We therefore investigated dopamine release in response to stress in human subjects, considering the relationship to early life parental care. We screened 120 healthy young college students for parental care in early life using a combination of telephone interviews and questionnaires. Five students from the top end and five students from the bottom end of the parental care distribution were then invited for a positron emission tomography study using [11C]raclopride and a psychosocial stress task. The psychosocial stressor caused a significant release of dopamine in the ventral striatum as indicated by a reduction in [11C]raclopride binding potential in the stress versus resting condition in subjects reporting low parental care. Moreover, the magnitude of the salivary cortisol response to stress was significantly correlated with the reduction in [11C]raclopride binding in the ventral striatum (r = 0.78), consistent with a facilitating effect of cortisol on dopamine neuron firing. These data suggest that aversive stressful events can be associated with mesolimbic dopamine release in humans, and that the method presented here may be useful to study the effects of early life events on neurobiological stress systems.

  15. Can an early perceptuo-motor skills assessment predict future performance in youth table tennis players? An observational study (1998-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Irene R; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Twisk, Jos W R; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2017-03-01

    This study intended to investigate the capability of the 4 test items "sprint", "agility", "speed while dribbling" and "throwing a ball" of the Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment used at the age of 7-10 years to predict table tennis performance (U13, U15 and U18) in an observational study. Data of 1191 young table tennis players, collected from 1998 to 2013, were analysed in univariable and multivariable logistic and linear regression models. The test items "sprint" and "throwing a ball" showed to be significant predictors for table tennis performance outcomes in boys (P performance. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that a perceptuo-motor skills assessment might improve the effectiveness of talent programmes in table tennis as an additional method to objectively estimate a youth players' potential. Future research focusing on the inclusion of test items specifically assessing eye hand coordination and other domains, for example, the psychological and the environmental domain, related to table tennis performance are recommended.

  16. THE SIZE EVOLUTION OF PASSIVE GALAXIES: OBSERVATIONS FROM THE WIDE-FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R. E. Jr. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cohen, S. H.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Yan, H. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Hathi, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Crockett, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Disney, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, J. A. [Galaxies Unlimited, Lutherville, MD 21093 (United States); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, J. A., E-mail: rryan@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2012-04-10

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z {approx} 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z {approx}> 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in {approx}40 arcmin{sup 2} to H < 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 {mu}m {approx}< {lambda}{sub obs} {approx}< 1.6 {mu}m with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of {approx}0.033(1 + z). We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) undergo the strongest evolution from z {approx} 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z){sup -{alpha}}, we find a tentative scaling of {alpha} Almost-Equal-To (- 0.6 {+-} 0.7) + (0.9 {+-} 0.4)log (M{sub *}/10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of high-redshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M{sub *}-R{sub e} relation for red galaxies.

  17. Effect of food on early drug exposure from extended-release stimulants: results from the Concerta, Adderall XR Food Evaluation (CAFE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auiler, J F; Liu, K; Lynch, J M; Gelotte, C K

    2002-01-01

    Stimulant therapy is the mainstay of treatment for children, adolescents and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Once-daily, extended-release oral formulations offer long acting control of symptoms by modifying drug delivery and absorption. In particular, consistency in early drug exposure is important for symptom control during school or work hours. Because these once-daily formulations are usually taken in the morning, the timing of the doses with breakfast is important. This study compared the effect of a high-fat breakfast on early drug exposure from a morning dose of two extended-release stimulant formulations: the osmotic-controlled OROS tablet of methylphenidate HCI (CONCERTA) and the capsule containing extended-release beads of mixed amphetamine salts (ADDERALL XR). The study had a single-dose, open-label, randomised, four-treatment, crossover design in which healthy subjects received either 36 mg CONCERTA or 20 mg ADDERALL XR in the morning after an overnight fast or a high-fat breakfast. Serial blood samples were collected over 28h to determine plasma concentrations of methylphenidate and amphetamine. The food effect on early drug exposure and the pharmacokinetic profiles up to 8 h after dosing of the two extended-release stimulants were directly compared using partial area (AUC(p4h), AUC(p6h) and AUC(p8h)) fed/fasted ratios. Amphetamine concentrations were markedly lower when the subjects had eaten breakfast, resulting in lower early drug exposures (p < 0.0001). By contrast, methylphenidate concentrations over the same 8 h were unaffected by breakfast, providing consistent levels of early drug exposure. Therefore, as a child's or adult's eating pattern varies, methylphenidate exposure over the first 8 h would be expected to have less day-to-day variation compared with amphetamine exposure. The osmotic-controlled OROS tablet provides a reliable and consistent delivery of methylphenidate HCI, independent of food, for patients with

  18. Can an early perceptuo-motor skills assessment predict future performance in youth table tennis players? : An observational study (1998-2013)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Irene R.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2017-01-01

    This study intended to investigate the capability of the 4 test items "sprint", "agility", "speed while dribbling" and "throwing a ball" of the Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment used at the age of 7-10 years to predict table tennis performance (U13, U15 and U18) in an observational study. Data

  19. Transient early-life forebrain corticotropin-releasing hormone elevation causes long-lasting anxiogenic and despair-like changes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Benedict J; Boyle, Maureen P; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Kelley, Crystal L; Onwuzurike, Chiamaka C; Nettles, Sabin A; Vogt, Sherri K; Muglia, Louis J

    2010-02-17

    During development, early-life stress, such as abuse or trauma, induces long-lasting changes that are linked to adult anxiety and depressive behavior. It has been postulated that altered expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) can at least partially account for the various effects of stress on behavior. In accord with this hypothesis, evidence from pharmacological and genetic studies has indicated the capacity of differing levels of CRH activity in different brain areas to produce behavioral changes. Furthermore, stress during early life or adulthood causes an increase in CRH release in a variety of neural sites. To evaluate the temporal and spatial specificity of the effect of early-life CRH exposure on adult behavior, the tetracycline-off system was used to produce mice with forebrain-restricted inducible expression of CRH. After transient elevation of CRH during development only, behavioral testing in adult mice revealed a persistent anxiogenic and despair-like phenotype. These behavioral changes were not associated with alterations in adult circadian or stress-induced corticosterone release but were associated with changes in CRH receptor type 1 expression. Furthermore, the despair-like changes were normalized with antidepressant treatment. Overall, these studies suggest that forebrain-restricted CRH signaling during development can permanently alter stress adaptation leading to increases in maladaptive behavior in adulthood.

  20. ‘Valley Pearl’ table grape

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Valley Pearl’ is an early to mid-season, white seedless table grape (Vitis vinifera L.) suitable for commercial table grape production where V. vinifera can be grown. Significant characteristics of ‘Valley Pearl’ are its high and consistent fruit production on spur pruned vines and large round berr...

  1. Comparison of the early dynamics of systemic prostacyclin release after administration of tumor necrosis factor and endotoxin to healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; van Deventer, S. J.; Büller, H. R.; Sturk, A.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Excessive production of prostaglandins may be of importance for the development of organ damage in generalized infection. To investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in systemic prostacyclin release in gram-negative septicemia, the plasma concentrations of its stable metabolite

  2. The Alfonsine tables of Toledo

    CERN Document Server

    Chabás, José

    2003-01-01

    The Alfonsine Tables of Toledo is for historians working in the fields of astronomy, science, the Middle Ages, Spanish and other Romance languages. It is also of interest to scholars interested in the history of Castile, in Castilian-French relations in the Middle Ages and in the history of patronage. It explores the Castilian canons of the Alfonsine Tables and offers a study of their context, language, astronomical content, and diffusion. The Alfonsine Tables of Toledo is unique in that it: includes an edition of a crucial text in history of science; provides an explanation of astronomy as it was practiced in the Middle Ages; presents abundant material on early scientific language in Castilian; presents new material on the diffusion of Alfonsine astronomy in Europe; describes the role of royal patronage of science in a medieval context.

  3. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs and thromboxane A2 (TXA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187 induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells.

  4. Early pregnancy loss in women stimulated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocols according to oral contraceptive pill pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellver, José; Albert, Carmen; Labarta, Elena; Pellicer, Antonio

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate and compare the risk of early pregnancy loss in patients stimulated with GnRH antagonist protocols according to oral contraceptive pill (OCP) pretreatment. Retrospective case-control study. Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. University of Valencia. Spain. One thousand five hundred thirty-nine patients, aged <36, stimulated with GnRH antagonists for IVF between January 1, 2000 and November 1, 2005. Reproductive outcome was compared based on the application (or not) of OCP pretreatment: 944 women were included in the OCP group and 595 in the non-OCP group. The Student's t test was used for statistics. Pregnancy, biochemical pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, early clinical pregnancy loss, early pregnancy loss, and ongoing pregnancy rates. No significant differences were observed in any of the outcome parameters. Early pregnancy loss rates were similar: 23% in the OCP pretreatment group versus 19.2% in the non-OCP pretreatment group. However, longer periods of ovarian stimulation and higher doses of gonadotropins needed to be employed in the OCP group. There is not sufficient evidence to confirm OCP pretreatment as a risk factor for miscarriage in patients stimulated with GnRH antagonist protocols.

  5. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  6. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  7. Pension Insurance Data Tables

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — Find out about retirement trends in PBGC's data tables. The tables include statistics on the people and pensions that PBGC protects, including how many Americans are...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and...

  9. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  10. NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and...

  11. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  12. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  13. Periodic Table of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  14. Table Tennis Club

    CERN Document Server

    Table Tennis Club

    2013-01-01

    Apparently table tennis plays an important role in physics, not so much because physicists are interested in the theory of table tennis ball scattering, but probably because it provides useful breaks from their deep intellectual occupation. It seems that many of the greatest physicists took table tennis very seriously. For instance, Heisenberg could not even bear to lose a game of table tennis, Otto Frisch played a lot of table tennis, and had a table set up in his library, and Niels Bohr apparently beat everybody at table tennis. Therefore, as the CERN Table Tennis Club advertises on a poster for the next CERN Table Tennis Tournament: “if you want to be a great physicist, perhaps you should play table tennis”. Outdoor table at restaurant n° 1 For this reason, and also as part of the campaign launched by the CERN medical service “Move! & Eat better”, to encourage everyone at CERN to take regular exercise, the CERN Table Tennis Club, with the supp...

  15. Morphological analysis of the early development of telencephalic and diencephalic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal systems in enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic medaka lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akiko; Islam, M Sadiqul; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Teleosts possess two or three paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes: gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3. Some species have lost the gnrh1 and/or gnrh3 genes, whereas gnrh2 has been completely conserved in the teleost species analyzed to date. In most teleosts that possess gnrh1, GnRH1 peptide is the authentic GnRH that stimulates gonadotropin release, whereas GnRH2 and GnRH3, if present, are neuromodulatory. Progenitors of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons originate from olfactory placodes and migrate to their destination during early development. However, because of the relatively low affinity/specificity of generally available antibodies that recognize GnRH1 or GnRH3, labeling of these neurons has only been possible using genetic manipulation. We used a model teleost, medaka, which possesses all three paralogous gnrh genes, to analyze development of forebrain GnRH neurons composed of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons. Here, we newly generated transgenic medaka lines that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of promoters for gnrh1 or gnrh3, to detect GnRH neurons and facilitate immunohistochemical analysis of the neuronal morphology. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and three-dimensional confocal microscopy image reconstructions to improve identification of neurites from GnRH1 or GnRH3 neuronal populations with greater precision. This led us to clearly identify the hypophysiotropic innervation of GnRH1 neurons residing in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA) from as early as 10 days post hatching. Furthermore, these analyses also revealed retinopetal projections of nonhypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons in vPOA, prominent during early developmental stages, and multiple populations of GnRH3 neurons with different origins and migratory pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mast cells facilitate local VEGF release as an early event in the pathogenesis of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal injury sustained at laparotomy may evoke local inflammatory responses that result in adhesion formation. Peritoneal mast cells are likely to initiate this process, whereas vascular permeability\\/endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may facilitate the degree to which subsequent adhesion formation occurs. METHODS: Mast cell deficient mice (WBB6F1-\\/-), along with their mast cell sufficient counterparts (WBB6F1+\\/+), underwent a standardized adhesion-inducing operation (AIS) with subsequent sacrifice and adhesion assessment 14 days later in a blinded fashion. Additional CD-1 and WBB6F1+\\/+, and WBB6F1-\\/- mice were killed 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours after operation for measurement of VEGF by ELISA in systemic serum and peritoneal lavage fluid. Two further groups of CD-1 mice underwent AIS and received either a single perioperative dose of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (10 mug\\/mouse) or a similar volume of IgG isotypic antibody and adhesion formation 2 weeks later was evaluated. RESULTS: WBB6F1-\\/- mice had less adhesions then did their WBB6F1+\\/+ counterparts (median [interquartile range] adhesion score 3[3-3] vs 1.5[1-2] respectively; P < .003). Local VEGF release peaked 6 hours after AIS in both WBB6F1+\\/+ and CD-1 mice whereas levels remained at baseline in WBB6F1-\\/- mice. CD-1 mice treated with a single dose of anti-VEGF therapy during operation had less adhesions than controls (2[1.25-2] vs 3[2.25-3], P = .0002). CONCLUSIONS: Mast cells and VEGF are central to the formation of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions with mast cells being responsible, either directly or indirectly, for VEGF release into the peritoneal cavity after operation. In tandem with the recent clinical success of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies in oncologic practice, our observations suggest an intriguing avenue for research and development of anti-adhesion strategy.

  17. Early release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from neurons in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Wu, Wei; Hu, Yang-Chun; Li, Hua; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Song; Li, Wei; Li, Wei-De; Ma, Biao; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2014-06-12

    Translocation of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from nucleus could trigger inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 up-regulates inflammatory response in sepsis as a late mediator. However, little was known about its role in subarachnoid hemorrhage-inducible inflammation, especially in the early stage. This study aims to identify whether HMGB1 translocation occurred early after SAH and also to clarify the potential role of HMGB1 in brain injury following SAH. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham group and SAH groups at 2 h, 12 h and on day 1, day 2. SAH groups suffered experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage by injection of 0.3 ml autoblood into the pre-chiasmatic cistern. Rats injected by recombinant HMGB1(rHMGB1) solution were divided into four groups according to different time points. Cultured neurons were assigned into control group and four hemoglobin (Hb) incubated groups. Mixed glial cells were cultured and stimulated in medium from neurons incubated by Hb. HMGB1 expression is measured by western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Downstream nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit P65 and inflammatory factor Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured by western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Brain injury was evaluated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. Our results demonstrated HMGB1 translocation occurred as early as 2 h after experimental SAH with mRNA and protein level increased. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence results indicated cytosolic HMGB1 was mainly located in neurons while translocated HMGB1 could also be found in some microglia. After subarachnoid injection of rHMGB1, NF-κB, downstream inflammatory response and cleaved caspase-3 were up-regulated in the cortex compared to the saline control group. In-vitro, after Hb incubation, HMGB1 was also rapidly released from neurons to medium. Incubation with medium from neurons up-regulated IL-1β in mixed glial

  18. Diet complexity in early life affects survival in released pheasants by altering foraging efficiency, food choice, handling skills and gut morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Mark A; Sage, Rufus; Madden, Joah R

    2015-11-01

    Behavioural and physiological deficiencies are major reasons why reintroduction programmes suffer from high mortality when captive animals are used. Mitigation of these deficiencies is essential for successful reintroduction programmes. Our study manipulated early developmental diet to better replicate foraging behaviour in the wild. Over 2 years, we hand-reared 1800 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), from 1 day old, for 7 weeks under different dietary conditions. In year one, 900 pheasants were divided into three groups and reared with (i) commercial chick crumb, (ii) crumb plus 1% live mealworm or (iii) crumb plus 5% mixed seed and fruit. In year two, a further 900 pheasants were divided into two groups and reared with (i) commercial chick crumb or (ii) crumb plus a combination of 1% mealworm and 5% mixed seed and fruit. In both years, the commercial chick crumb acted as a control treatment, whilst those with live prey and mixed seeds and fruits mimicking a more naturalistic diet. After 7 weeks reared on these diets, pheasants were released into the wild. Postrelease survival was improved with exposure to more naturalistic diets prior to release. We identified four mechanisms to explain this. Pheasants reared with more naturalistic diets (i) foraged for less time and had a higher likelihood of performing vigilance behaviours, (ii) were quicker at handling live prey items, (iii) were less reliant on supplementary feed which could be withdrawn and (iv) developed different gut morphologies. These mechanisms allowed the pheasants to (i) reduce the risk of predation by reducing exposure time whilst foraging and allowing more time to be vigilant; (ii) be better at handling and discriminating natural food items and not be solely reliant on supplementary feed; and (iii) have a better gut system to cope with the natural forage after the cessation of supplementary feeding in the spring. Learning food discrimination, preference and handling skills by the provision of a more

  19. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 1: Source behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Barker, James F.

    2013-05-01

    With the increasing use of ethanol in fuels, it is important to evaluate its fate when released into the environment. While ethanol is less toxic than other organic compounds present in fuels, one of the concerns is the impact ethanol might have on the fate of gasoline hydrocarbons in groundwater. One possible concern is the spill of denatured ethanol (E95: ethanol containing 5% denaturants, usually hydrocarbons) in sites with pre-existing gasoline contamination. In that scenario, ethanol is expected to increase the mobility of the NAPL phase by acting as a cosolvent and decreasing interfacial tension. To evaluate the E95 behaviour and its impacts on pre-existing gasoline, a field test was performed at the CFB-Borden aquifer. Initially gasoline contamination was created releasing 200 L of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) into the unsaturated zone. One year later, 184 L of E95 was released on top of the gasoline contamination. The site was monitored using soil cores, multilevel wells and one glass access tube. At the end of the test, the source zone was excavated and the compounds remaining were quantified. E95 ethanol accumulated and remained within the capillary fringe and unsaturated zone for more than 200 days, despite ~ 1 m oscillations in the water table. The gasoline mobility increased and it was redistributed in the source zone. Gasoline NAPL saturations in the soil increased two fold in the source zone. However, water table oscillations caused a separation between the NAPL and ethanol: NAPL was smeared and remained in deeper positions while ethanol moved upwards following the water table rise. Similarly, the E95 denaturants that initially were within the ethanol-rich phase became separated from ethanol after the water table oscillation, remaining below the ethanol rich zone. The separation between ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source after water table oscillation indicates that ethanol's impact on hydrocarbon residuals is likely limited to early times.

  20. CERN Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Table Tennis Club

    2014-01-01

    CERN Table Tennis Club Announcing CERN 60th Anniversary Table Tennis Tournament to take place at CERN, from July 1 to July 15, 2014   The CERN Table Tennis Club, reborn in 2008, is encouraging people at CERN to take more regular exercise. This is why the Club, thanks to the strong support of the CERN Staff Association, installed last season a first outdoor table on the terrace of restaurant # 1, and will install another one this season on the terrace of Restaurant # 2. Table tennis provides both physical exercise and friendly social interactions. The CERN Table Tennis club is happy to use the unique opportunity of the 60th CERN anniversary to promote table tennis at CERN, as it is a game that everybody can easily play, regardless of level. Table tennis is particularly well suited for CERN, as many great physicists play table tennis, as you might already know: “Heisenberg could not even bear to lose a game of table tennis”; “Otto Frisch played a lot of table tennis;...

  1. Mortality table construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  2. Long-term effects of early adolescent stress: dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and central corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 expression in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuting; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Shiping; Lu, Cuiyan; Liu, Dexiang; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Fang

    2015-07-15

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a stress-related mental disorder caused by traumatic experiences. Studies have found that exposure to early stressful events is a risk factor for developing PTSD. However, a limited number of studies have explored the effects of traumatic stress in early adolescence on behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, central corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) expression and the relative vulnerability of PTSD in adulthood. The current study aims to explore these issues using inescapable electric foot shock to induce a PTSD model in early adolescent rats. Meanwhile, running on a treadmill for six weeks and administration of the antagonist with 3.2mg/kg/day of CP-154, 526 for 14 consecutive days were used as therapeutic measures. Presently, the stress (S) group showed more anxiety and depression in the open field (OF) test and elevated plus maze (EPM) test, memory damage in the Y maze test, decreased basal CORT level, increased DEX negative feedback inhibition and exacerbated and longer-lasting reaction to CRH challenge in the DEX/CRH test compared with the control group. Central CRFR1 expression was also changed in the S group, as evidenced by the increased CRFR1 expression in the hypothalamus, amygdala and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, treadmill exercise alleviated early adolescent stress-induced behavior abnormalities and improved the functional state of the HPA axis, performing a more powerful effect than the CRFR1 antagonist CP-154, 526. Additionally, this study revealed that the alteration of central CRFR1 expression might play an important role in etiology of PTSD in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Significant adverse reactions to long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for the treatment of central precocious puberty and early onset puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Woo Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeLong-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa are commonly used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP in Korea. Although rare, there have been reports on the characteristic of adverse reactions of GnRHa in CPP among the Korean population. This study was intended to report on our clinical experience regarding significant adverse reactions to long-acting GnRHa in CPP and early onset puberty and to evaluate the prevalence rate of serious side effects.MethodsThis retrospective study included children with CPP and early onset puberty, who were administered monthly with long-acting GnRHa (leuprolide acetate, triptorelin acetate at the outpatient clinic of Department of Pediatrics, at Inha University Hospital, between January 2011 and December 2013. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients who experienced significant adverse reactions and evaluated the prevalence rate.ResultsSix serious side effects (0.9% were observed among total of 621 CPP and early onset puberty children with GnRHa therapy. The number of sterile abscess formation was four in three patients (4 events of 621. Anaphylaxis occurred in only one patient, and unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE in another one patient. Anaphylaxis occurred after the 6th administration of the monthly depot triptorelin acetate. Unilateral SCFE developed in GnRHa therapy.ConclusionSterile abscess formation occurred in 0.6% of CPP and early onset puberty patients from the administration of a monthly depot GnRHa therapy. The occurrences of anaphylaxis and SCFE are extremely rare, but can have serious implications on patients. Clinicians should be aware of these potential adverse effects related to GnRHa therapy in CPP.

  4. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: tissue distributions, early ontogeny and effects of fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Volkoff, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is classically known for its role in regulating teleost fish skin color change for environmental adaptation. Recent evidence suggests that MCH also has appetite-stimulating properties. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide family has dual roles in endocrine control of reproduction and energy status in fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are a commercially important aquaculture species inhabiting the shores of Atlantic Canada. In this study, we examine MCH and GnRH transcript expression profiles during early development as well as in central and peripheral tissues and quantify juvenile Atlantic cod MCH and GnRH hypothalamic mRNA expressions following food deprivation. MCH and GnRH3 cDNAs are maternally deposited into cod eggs, while MCH has variable expression throughout early development. GnRH2 and GnRH3 mRNAs "turn-on" during mid-segmentation once the brain is fully developed. For both MCH and GnRH, highest expression appears during the exogenous feeding stages, perhaps supporting their functions as appetite regulators during early development. MCH and GnRH transcripts are found in brain regions related to appetite regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus, hypothalamus), as well as the pituitary gland and the stomach, suggesting a peripheral function in food intake regulation. Atlantic cod MCH mRNA is upregulated during fasting, while GnRH2 and GnRH3 transcripts do not appear to be influenced by food deprivation. In conclusion, MCH might be involved in stimulating food intake in juvenile Atlantic cod, while GnRHs may play a more significant role in appetite regulation during early development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Early Release of the IVC Clamp from Different IVC Clamping Maneuvers on Changes in Hemodynamic Parameters in Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsung-Hsiao; Huang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Chao-Long; Cheng, Kwok-Wai; Wu, Shao-Chun; Yang, Sheng-Chun; Juang, Sin-Ei; Lee, Ying-En; Jawan, Bruno; Wang, Chih-Hsien

    2015-09-06

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different methods of inferior vena cava (IVC) clamping and release of the cross clamp on hemodynamic parameters of recipients during living donor liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Ninety-six adult living donor liver transplantation patients were divided into 3 groups according to cross-clamp of the IVC for all the hepatic vein and portal vein reconstruction (G1), cross-clamp of the IVC only for hepatic vein reconstruction (G2), and side-clamp of the IVC for hepatic vein reconstruction (G3). In G2 and G2, the reconstructed hepatic vein was clamped instead of the IVC for portal vein reconstruction. The hemodynamic parameters among groups were compared by 1-way ANOVA and the complications in each group were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS Changes in percentage of MAP and CO in G3 were significantly less than that of G1 and G2 for hepatic vein reconstruction. Hemodynamic parameters of G2 and G3 normalized to pre-clamped values during portal vein reconstruction, while the hemodynamics of G1 remained unstable. CONCLUSIONS Hemodynamic changes were less pronounced in LT with side-clamp of the inferior cava vein versus total cross-clamp. Early release of the IVC clamp minimized the hemodynamic changes. There were no differences in terms of outcome (morbidity and mortality).

  6. TABLE TENNIS CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    TABLE TENNIS CLUB

    2010-01-01

    2010 CERN Table Tennis Tournament The CERN Table Tennis Club organizes its traditional CERN Table Tennis Tournament, at the Meyrin club, 2 rue de livron, in Meyrin, Saturday August 21st, in the afternoon. The tournament is open to all CERN staff, users, visitors and families, including of course summer students. See below for details. In order to register, simply send an E-mail to Jean-Pierre Revol (jean-pierre.revol@cern.ch). You can also download the registration form from the Club Web page (http://www.cern.ch/tabletennis), and send it via internal mail. Photo taken on August 22, 2009 showing some of the participants in the 2nd CERN Table Tennis tournament. INFORMATION ON CERN TABLE TENNIS CLUB CERN used to have a tradition of table tennis activities at CERN. For some reason, at the beginning of the 1980’s, the CERN Table Tennis club merged with the Meyrin Table Tennis club, a member of the Association Genevoise de Tennis de Table (AGTT). Therefore, if you want to practice table tennis, you...

  7. Standard Reference Tables -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Standard Reference Tables (SRT) provide consistent reference data for the various applications that support Flight Standards Service (AFS) business processes and...

  8. Biological control of weeds release sites : Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Table of release sites of insects for biological control of invasive plants at Kulm Wetland Management District (WMD). Insects were released on Kulm WMD to...

  9. The Living Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  10. Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Table Tennis Club

    2011-01-01

    CERN Table Tennis Tournament Saturday 20th August 2011 at 13.30 at the CERN/Meyrin TT club (underneath the Piscine de Livron, rue de Livron 2, 1217 Meyrin) Details: http://cern.ch/club-TableTennis Registration: jean-pierre.revol@cern.ch Open to all CERN staff, visitors, summer students, and families

  11. Early Events of the Reaction Elicited by CSF-470 Melanoma Vaccine Plus Adjuvants: An In Vitro Analysis of Immune Recruitment and Cytokine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampena, María B.; Barrio, María M.; Juliá, Estefanía P.; Blanco, Paula A.; von Euw, Erika M.; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2017-01-01

    In a previous work, we showed that CSF-470 vaccine plus bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as adjuvants resulted in a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival when comparing vaccinated vs. IFN-α2b-treated high-risk cutaneous melanoma patients in a Phase II study. Immune monitoring demonstrated an increase in anti-tumor innate and adaptive immunities of vaccinated patients, with a striking increase in IFN-γ secreting lymphocytes specific for melanoma antigens (Ags). In an effort to dissect the first steps of the immune response elicited by CSF-470 vaccine plus adjuvants, we evaluated, in an in vitro model, leukocyte migration, cytokine production, and monocyte phagocytosis of vaccine cells. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes recruitment, mostly from the innate immune system, is an early event after CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF interaction with immune cells, possibly explained by the high expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and other chemokines by vaccine cells. Early release of TNF-α and IL-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines and efficient tumor Ags phagocytosis by monocytes take place and would probably create a favorable context for Ag processing and presentation. Although the presence of the vaccine cells hampered cytokines production stimulated by BCG in a mechanism partially mediated by TGF-β and IL-10, still significant levels of TNF-α and IL-1β could be detected. Thus, BCG was required to induce local inflammation in the presence of CSF-470 vaccine cells. PMID:29109725

  12. Early Events of the Reaction Elicited by CSF-470 Melanoma Vaccine Plus Adjuvants: An In Vitro Analysis of Immune Recruitment and Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B. Pampena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work, we showed that CSF-470 vaccine plus bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as adjuvants resulted in a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival when comparing vaccinated vs. IFN-α2b-treated high-risk cutaneous melanoma patients in a Phase II study. Immune monitoring demonstrated an increase in anti-tumor innate and adaptive immunities of vaccinated patients, with a striking increase in IFN-γ secreting lymphocytes specific for melanoma antigens (Ags. In an effort to dissect the first steps of the immune response elicited by CSF-470 vaccine plus adjuvants, we evaluated, in an in vitro model, leukocyte migration, cytokine production, and monocyte phagocytosis of vaccine cells. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes recruitment, mostly from the innate immune system, is an early event after CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF interaction with immune cells, possibly explained by the high expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and other chemokines by vaccine cells. Early release of TNF-α and IL-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines and efficient tumor Ags phagocytosis by monocytes take place and would probably create a favorable context for Ag processing and presentation. Although the presence of the vaccine cells hampered cytokines production stimulated by BCG in a mechanism partially mediated by TGF-β and IL-10, still significant levels of TNF-α and IL-1β could be detected. Thus, BCG was required to induce local inflammation in the presence of CSF-470 vaccine cells.

  13. Ancient Maya astronomical tables from Xultun, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, William A; Stuart, David; Aveni, Anthony F; Rossi, Franco

    2012-05-11

    Maya astronomical tables are recognized in bark-paper books from the Late Postclassic period (1300 to 1521 C.E.), but Classic period (200 to 900 C.E.) precursors have not been found. In 2011, a small painted room was excavated at the extensive ancient Maya ruins of Xultun, Guatemala, dating to the early 9th century C.E. The walls and ceiling of the room are painted with several human figures. Two walls also display a large number of delicate black, red, and incised hieroglyphs. Many of these hieroglyphs are calendrical in nature and relate astronomical computations, including at least two tables concerning the movement of the Moon, and perhaps Mars and Venus. These apparently represent early astronomical tables and may shed light on the later books.

  14. Empirical yield tables for Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn; Joan M. Stelman

    1989-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1983 Forest Survey of Wisconsin and presents ways the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Wisconsin`s five Forest Survey Units and 14 forest types.

  15. Empirical yield tables for Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn; Joan M. Stelman

    1984-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1980 Forest Survey of Michigan and presents ways the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Michigan's four Forest Survey Units, 14 forest types, and 5 site-index classes.

  16. The influence of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist treatment on the body weight and body mass index in girls with idiopathic precocious puberty and early puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Na Ri; Lee, Weon Kyung; Ku, Jae Kyun; Kim, Eun Jeong; Jung, Sun Hee; Chung, Woo Yeong

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) treatment on the weight and body mass index (BMI) of girls who were diagnosed with idiopathic central precocious puberty (CPP) or early puberty (EP). Patients who were younger than 8 years of age at diagnosis were classified as CPP and patients aged between 8 and 9 years at diagnosis were classified as EP. Of 129 patients, 34 were diagnosed with CPP and 95 were diagnosed with EP. The patients were divided according to pretreatment weight status into normal weight group, an overweight group, or an obese group. No significant changes were observed with respect to the weight standard deviation score (SDS) before and after 1 year, 2 years of treatment, respectively (P>0.05, P>0.05) in all patient groups. No significant changes were observed in relation to the BMI SDS before and after 1 year, 2 years of treatment, respectively (P>0.05, P>0.05) in all patient group. Depending on the degree of obesity, differences with respect to the weight SDS and BMI SDS were observed. BMI SDS increased in the GnRHa-treated patients as a whole group, but was not statistically significant. But BMI SDS increased significantly in the normal weight group after 2 years of GnRHa treatment. So, GnRHa treatment may affect the change of BMI SDS depending on degree of obesity.

  17. Elementary Statistics Tables

    CERN Document Server

    Neave, Henry R

    2012-01-01

    This book, designed for students taking a basic introductory course in statistical analysis, is far more than just a book of tables. Each table is accompanied by a careful but concise explanation and useful worked examples. Requiring little mathematical background, Elementary Statistics Tables is thus not just a reference book but a positive and user-friendly teaching and learning aid. The new edition contains a new and comprehensive "teach-yourself" section on a simple but powerful approach, now well-known in parts of industry but less so in academia, to analysing and interpreting process dat

  18. Decision table languages and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Metzner, John R

    1977-01-01

    ACM Monograph Series: Decision Table Languages and Systems focuses on linguistic examination of decision tables and survey of the features of existing decision table languages and systems. The book first offers information on semiotics, programming language features, and generalization. Discussions focus on semantic broadening, outer language enrichments, generalization of syntax, limitations, implementation improvements, syntactic and semantic features, decision table syntax, semantics of decision table languages, and decision table programming languages. The text then elaborates on design im

  19. Stimulatory effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 on expression of gonadotropin subunit genes and release of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in masu salmon pituitary cells early in gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukuma, Shunji; Onuma, Takeshi; Swanson, Penny; Luo, Qiong; Koide, Nobuhisa; Okada, Houji; Urano, Akihisa; Ando, Hironori

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been shown to be involved in pubertal activation of gonadotropin (GTH) secretion. The aim of this study was to determine if IGF-I directly stimulates synthesis and release of GTH at an early stage of gametogenesis. The effects of IGF-I on expression of genes encoding glycoprotein alpha (GPalpha), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta, and luteinizing hormone (LH) beta subunits and release of FSH and LH were examined using primary pituitary cells of masu salmon at three reproductive stages: early gametogenesis, maturing stage, and spawning. IGF-I alone or IGF-I + salmon GnRH (sGnRH) were added to the primary pituitary cell cultures. Amounts of GPalpha, FSHbeta, and LHbeta mRNAs were determined by real-time PCR. Plasma and medium levels of FSH and LH were determined by RIA. In males, IGF-I increased the amounts of all three subunit mRNAs early in gametogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, but not in the later stages. In females, IGF-I stimulated release of FSH and LH early in gametogenesis, whereas no stimulatory effects on the subunit mRNA levels were observed at any stage. IGF-I + sGnRH stimulated release of FSH and LH at all stages in both sexes, but had different effects on the subunit mRNA levels depending on subunit and stage. The present results suggest that IGF-I itself directly stimulates synthesis and release of GTH early in gametogenesis in masu salmon, possibly acting as a metabolic signal that triggers the onset of puberty.

  20. Tilt Table Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure (the bottom number in a blood pressure reading), lowers peripheral vascular resistance, increases your heart rate ... mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/tilt-table-test/basics/definition/PRC-20019879 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  1. The Periodic Table CD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  2. Setting the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  3. Permit.LOA table

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table includes the effective dates by vessel and permit number for each issued letter of authorization (LOA) by the Permit Office (APSD)

  4. VMS forms Output Tables

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These output tables contain parsed and format validated data from the various VMS forms that are sent from any given vessel, while at sea, from the VMS devices on...

  5. Les tables de multiplication

    OpenAIRE

    Ghys, Etienne

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Ah ! les tables de multiplication de notre enfance, quels mauvais souvenirs ! (en ce qui me concerne, c'est la table de 7 qui m'a posé des problèmes). Elles nous narguaient sur le dos des cahiers de brouillon... Y aurait-il encore aujourd'hui des mathématiciens qui tenteraient d'en simplifier l'usage ?

  6. Stellar Populations of Lyman Break Galaxies at z approx. to 1-3 in the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathi, N. P.; Cohen, S. H.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Finkelstein, S. L.; McCarthy, P. J.; Windhorst, R. A.; Yan, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; OConnell, R. W.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies . (LBGs) at z approx = 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST /WFC3 obse,rvations cover about 50 arcmin2 in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z approx = 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope f3 is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at .z approx = 1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities, though their median values are similar within 1a uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all. redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.90. These relations hold true - within luminosities probed in this study - for LBGs from z approx = 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z approx = 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z approx = 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys,. both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.

  7. Empirical yield tables for Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn; Gerhard K. Raile

    1982-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1977 Forest Survey of Minnesota and presents examples of how the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Minnesota's four Forest Survey Units, 14 forest types, and 5 site index classes. Presents 210 of the 350 possible tables that contained sufficient data to justify publication.

  8. Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Table Tennis Club

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Table Tennis club and the Meyrin CTT are organizing two Table Tennis workshops from 2 to 6 July and from 20 to 24 August 2012 inclusive in Meyrin. A professional would be with your children from 14.00 pm to 18.00 pm: an instructor J + S category A. Training courses with specific themes, individual courses would be given depending on the level of the child’s game, “discoveries –table tennis games” courses and games with the robot. Other activities (stretching, relaxation). Afternoons (from 18 to 20 children): 40 CHF per workshop and per child. Evenings (from 18 to 20 adults): 60 CHF per workshop and per adult. For further information, please contact Mr. Monteil : Mobile: (+33) 06 61 31 70 47 E-mail: wilfried.monteil@free.fr.

  9. Effects of a controlled-release fertilizer on yield, nutrient uptake, and fertilizer usage efficiency in early ripening rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Qiang; Peng, Jian-Wei; Wang, Wen-Ming; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Yang, Yong; Song, Hai-Xing; Guan, Chun-Yun

    Nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) are critical nutrient elements necessary for crop plant growth and development. However, excessive inputs will lead to inefficient usage and cause excessive nutrient losses in the field environment, and also adversely affect the soil, water and air quality, human health, and biodiversity. Field experiments were conducted to study the effects of controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) on seed yield, plant growth, nutrient uptake, and fertilizer usage efficiency for early ripening rapeseed (Xiangzayou 1613) in the red-yellow soil of southern China during 2011-2013. It was grown using a soluble fertilizer (SF) and the same amounts of CRF, such as SF1/CRF1 (3750 kg/hm2), SF2/CRF2 (3000 kg/hm2), SF3/CRF3 (2250 kg/hm2), SF4/CRF4 (1500 kg/hm2), SF5/CRF5 (750 kg/hm2), and also using no fertilizer (CK). CRF gave higher seed yields than SF in both seasons by 14.51%. CRF4 and SF3 in each group achieved maximum seed yield (2066.97 and 1844.50 kg/hm2, respectively), followed by CRF3 (1929.97 kg/hm2) and SF4 (1839.40 kg/hm2). There were no significant differences in seed yield among CK, SF1, and CRF1 (P>0.05). CRF4 had the highest profit (7126.4 CNY/hm2) and showed an increase of 12.37% in seed yield, and it decreased by 11.01% in unit fertilizer rate compared with SF4. The branch number, pod number, and dry matter weight compared with SF increased significantly under the fertilization of CRF (Pfertilizer rate at maturity, and the N, P, and K usage efficiency decreased with increasing the fertilizer rate. The N, P, and K uptakes and usage efficiencies of the CRF were significantly higher than those of SF (Pfertilizer, by providing sufficient N in the later growth stages, and last by reducing the residual N in the soil and increasing the N accumulation and N usage efficiency.

  10. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1-3 IN THE HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Yan, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Straughn, A. N.; Kimble, R. A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Disney, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, Jay A. [Astronomy Department, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, J. A., E-mail: nhathi@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2013-03-10

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx_equal} 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 arcmin{sup 2} in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high-redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout-selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope {beta} is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are massive, dustier, and more highly star forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L* {approx}< L {approx}< 2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1{sigma} uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, finds physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.46, and star formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.90. These relations hold true-within luminosities probed in this study-for LBGs from z {approx_equal} 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z {approx_equal} 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z {approx_equal} 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties and their evolution.

  11. The Dynamic Force Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  12. Global Reference Tables Services Architecture

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This database stores the reference and transactional data used to provide a data-driven service access method to certain Global Reference Table (GRT) service tables.

  13. A Parallel Compact Hash Table

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Steven; Laarman, Alfons; Vojnar, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    We present the first parallel compact hash table algorithm. It delivers high performance and scalability due to its dynamic region-based locking scheme with only a fraction of the memory requirements of a regular hash table.

  14. INTRODUCTION Outline of Round Tables Outline of Round Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, (ICTP), Trieste, Italy on 27 July-7 August 2009. TMB-2009 united over 180 participants ranging from students to members of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry worldwide. Responding to the community's inquiry and reaffirming the practices established at TMB-2007, two Round Tables were organized for the participants of TMB-2009 on 30 July 2009 and 6 August 2009 in the Oppenheimer Room at the Centre. The goals of the Round Tables were to encourage the information exchange among the members of the interdisciplinary and international TMB community, promote discussions regarding the state-of-the-art in TMB-related scientific areas, identify directions for frontier research, and articulate recommendations for future developments. This article is a summary of the collective work of the Round Table participants (listed alphabetically below by their last names), whose contributions form its substance and, as such, are greatly appreciated. Abarzhi, Snezhana I (University of Chicago, USA) Andrews, Malcolm (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Belotserkovskii, Oleg (Institute for Computer Aided Design of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Bershadskii, Alexander (ICAR, Israel) Brandenburg, Axel (Nordita, Denmark) Chumakov, Sergei (Stanford University, USA) Desai, Tara (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy) Galperin, Boris (University of South Florida, USA) Gauthier, Serge (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Gekelman, Walter (University of California at Los Angeles, USA) Gibson, Carl (University of California at San Diego, USA) Goddard III, William A (California Institute of Technology, USA) Grinstein, Fernando

  15. Calcium deficiency in the early stages after weaning is associated with the enhancement of a low level of adrenaline-stimulated lipolysis and reduction of adiponectin release in isolated rat mesenteric adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoki, Aki; Hara, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Dysregulation of visceral adipocytes increases the incidence of metabolic syndrome. Higher production of nonesterified fatty acid and changes in adipocytokine release may trigger insulin resistance. Many studies have suggested that calcium (Ca) deficiency is associated with insulin resistance; however, the mechanisms are poorly understood. We examined the effects of Ca deficiency on adrenaline-induced lipolysis and adipocytokine release in the early stages after weaning using freshly isolated adipocytes from mesenteric fat tissue of 3-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a normal-Ca (5 g/kg diet) or low-Ca (1 g/kg diet) diet for 4 weeks. The release rate of nonesterified fatty acid in the mesenteric adipocytes after stimulation with a low level of adrenaline (0.2 microg/mL) was much higher in the Ca-deficient group than in the control group. In contrast, adiponectin release in the mesenteric fat cells was lower in Ca-deficient rats. Leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion showed a similar tendency without significant intergroup differences, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release was not affected by Ca deficiency. We found that Ca deficiency reduced the average size of fat cells through a large increase in the number of cells slightly smaller than the average size, which may be associated with the changes in the properties of the mesenteric adipose tissue. Our present results suggest that a low intake of Ca in the early stages after weaning is associated with changes in the properties of mesenteric adipocytes, which may be linked to insulin resistance in the future.

  16. Empirical yield tables for Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton L. Essex; Jerold T. Hahn

    1976-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1968 forest survey of Wisconsin. These tables are broken down according to Wisconsin's 5 Forest Survey Units, 12 forest types, and 5 site index classes. Presents 18 tables as examples of the more than 500 that can be ordered by using the order form enclosed in the publication.

  17. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper) using Excel - 2: Pivot tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Victor

    2018-01-12

    Data analysis at the descriptive stage and the eventual presentation of results requires the tabulation and summarisation of data. This exercise should always precede inferential statistics. Pivot tables and pivot charts are one of Excel's most powerful and underutilised features, with tabulation functions that immensely facilitate descriptive statistics. Pivot tables permit users to dynamically summarise and cross-tabulate data, create tables in several dimensions, offer a range of summary statistics and can be modified interactively with instant outputs. Large and detailed datasets are thereby easily manipulated making pivot tables arguably the best way to explore, summarise and present data from many different angles. This second paper in the WASP series in Early Human Development provides pointers for pivot table manipulation in Excel™. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Table Tennis Club

    2012-01-01

    2012 CERN Table Tennis Tournament As the campaign launched by the CERN medical service “Move! & Eat better” is designed in particular to encourage people at CERN to take more regular exercise, the CERN Table Tennis Club, with its traditional CERN Table Tennis Tournament is providing an excellent opportunity to practice moving. The tournament will take place at the Meyrin CTT, 2 rue de Livron, Saturday August 25, 2012, in the afternoon (starting at 13:30). It is open to all CERN staff, users, visitors and families, including of course summer students, who are strongly encouraged to participate. In order to register, simply send an E-mail to Jean-Pierre Revol (jean-pierre.revol@cern.ch). You may also find useful information on the Club Web page http://www.cern.ch/tabletennis CERN 2011 champion Savitha Flaecher, between the finalist Bertrand Mouches on her left, the winner of the consolation draw on her right (Sudarshan Paramesvaran), and far left, Denis Moriaud (semi-finalist a...

  19. Pyrolysis of Table Sugar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Bulut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Table sugars were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 400, and 500°C in a fixed-bed reactor. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on yields of liquid, solid, and gaseous products was investigated. As expected the yield of liquid products gradually increased and the yield of solid products gradually decreased when the pyrolysis temperature was raised. The yield of liquid products was greatest (52 wt% at 500°C. The composition of bio-oils extracted with diethyl ether was identified by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The following compounds were observed in bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of table sugar at 500°C: 1,4:3,6-dianhydro-α-d-glucopyranose, 5-(hydroxymethyl furfural, 5-acetoxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, and cyclotetradecane liquid product. The relative concentration of 5-(hydroxymethyl furfural was the highest in bio-oils obtained from pyrolysis of table sugars at 500°C.

  20. Ririe Dam Release Test Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes 1420 Ririe Dam Ririe Dam 119,880 Gates opened and initial release started. 1455 115th St...16°F air temperature. Table A2. Observations made on 11 February 2013. Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes...ERDC/CRREL TR-13-10 52 Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes Travel Time* (sec) Vel.** (fps) 1224 5th

  1. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P

    1988-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...

  2. Kepler Certified False Positive Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Batalha, Natalie Marie; Colon, Knicole Dawn; Coughlin, Jeffrey Langer; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Chris; Huber, Daniel; Morton, Tim; Rowe, Jason Frank; Mullally, Susan Elizabeth; hide

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the Kepler Certied False Positive table hosted at the Exoplanet Archive1, herein referred to as the CFP table. This table is the result of detailed examination by the Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) of declared false positives in the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) tables (see, for example, Batalha et al. (2012); Burke et al.(2014); Rowe et al. (2015); Mullally et al. (2015); Coughlin et al. (2015b)) at the Exoplanet Archive. A KOI is considered a false positive if it is not due to a planet orbiting the KOI's target star. The CFP table contains all KOIs in the Exoplanet Archive cumulative KOI table. The purpose of the CFP table is to provide a list of certified false positive KOIs. A KOI is certified as a false positive when, in the judgement of the FPWG, there is no plausible planetary interpretation of the observational evidence, which we summarize by saying that the evidence for a false positive is compelling. This certification process involves detailed examination using all available data for each KOI, establishing a high-reliability ground truth set. The CFP table can be used to estimate the reliability of, for example, the KOI tables which are created using only Kepler photometric data, so the disposition of individual KOIs may differ in the KOI and CFP tables. Follow-up observers may find the CFP table useful to avoid observing false positives.

  3. Yield tables for Italian coppice stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernetti, G.

    1980-01-01

    A critical review of results from 32 yield tables for Italian coppice stands. Particular attention is paid to age of maximum m.a.i., distribution of total volume of fuelwood up to 3 cm in diameter and of brushwood, and relation between mean height and volume. A provisional general yield table is given for Quercus cerris and mixed deciduous coppice stands, based on data from 12 local tables. Maximum m.a.i. occurs relatively early, with rather low values. For Quercus ilex and mixed evergreen broadleaved coppice stands on the coast of Tuscany, tables perpared separately by Giordano and Patrone are broadly in agreement. In terms of total volume, the evergreen coppice stands of the Mediterranean maquis have a higher yield than deciduous coppice stands, and contain a higher % of brushwood. Data for Fagus sylvatica are somewhat incomplete, but m.a.i. for fuelwood appears to remain constant between the ages of 12 and 24, with maximum values of 5 and 2.1 cu.m/ha for the best and poorest quality classes respectively. Castanea sativa coppice stands can show very high rates of increment e.g. maximum m.a.i. of 20 cu.m/ha on highly fertile volcanic soils.

  4. Diet complexity in early life affects survival in released pheasants by altering foraging efficiency, food choice, handling skills and gut morphology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whiteside, Mark A; Sage, Rufus; Madden, Joah R; Börger, Luca

    2015-01-01

    .... Mitigation of these deficiencies is essential for successful reintroduction programmes. Our study manipulated early developmental diet to better replicate foraging behaviour in the wild. Over 2 years, we hand...

  5. Table 1 Experimental diets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francois Siebrits

    Cis fatty acids. 77.71. 70.63. Omega 3 fatty acids. 2.28. 2.12. Omega 6 fatty acids. 0.00. 0.00. C14 fatty acids. 0.11. 0.18. C16 fatty acids. 14.49. 15.17. C18 fatty acids. 82.29. 80.66. Table 2 Summary of fatty acids (% of total fatty acids) of sheep back fat (mean ± s.d.). Extracted SFOC. & lipoic acid. Extracted SFOC. Saponified.

  6. DETERMINING THE TECHNICAL STANDARDS OF PING PONG TABLE BY USING CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Acar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the presented study, quality measurements were made regarding three different ping pong tables that were produced with three different materials. Measurements were made on the purpose of confirming whether the tables can be used as a match table that is in the standard of International Table Tennis Federation or not. For this confirmation, bouncing height of the table tennis ball is measured which is approved by ITTF. Average bouncing height that is required by federation standards is minimum 23 cm for free falling table tennis ball from 30 cm. In order to locate the bounce on the tables, the table tennis ball is released from 30cm in free fall with equipment was. In the meantime, 24 video frames videos were shot with a Full HD (1920 × 1080 camera. Each frame of videos that were taken is separated from each other. Each frame is analyzed and highest bounce is measured. As a result of the study, the bouncing heights of the three tables were measured as 23.04 cm, 23.33 cm, 22.91 cm for table1, for table2 and for table3 respectively.

  7. Sri Lanka; Statistical Tables

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.

  8. Optical table with embedded active vibration dampers (smart table)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.; Kasturi, Prakash S.; Nastase, Adrian S.; Rigney, Thomas K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the actively damped optical table developed and introduced as a standard product, ST series SmartTable(TM), by Newport Corporation. The active damping system is self-adjusting and robust with respect to changes in payload and vibration environment. It outperforms not only the broadband damped optical tables, but also the top-of-the-line tables equipped with tuned passive vibration absorbers. The maximum resonance vibration amplitudes are reduced about ten times. Additionally, the user has the benefit of being able to monitor and analyze vibration of the table by the conditioned low-noise signals from the embedded vibration sensors. Theoretical background, analysis, design rationale and experimental verification of the system are presented, with emphasis on sensor-actuator pairs architecture, signal processing and adaptive controls.

  9. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located...

  10. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mariana Ciacciariello

    and by the use of management practices that work for laying hens, the latter particularly with regard to ... reducing rearing costs and maximising settable egg production by subjecting broiler breeders to early ..... target body weight at photostimulation as recommended for conventional broiler breeder management (2100.

  11. MCNPX Model/Table Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Hendricks, J S

    2003-01-01

    MCNPX is a Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code extending the capabilities of MCNP4C. As with MCNP, MCNPX uses nuclear data tables to transport neutrons, photons, and electrons. Unlike MCNP, MCNPX also uses (1) nuclear data tables to transport protons; (2) physics models to transport 30 additional particle types (deuterons, tritons, alphas, pions, muons, etc.); and (3) physics models to transport neutrons and protons when no tabular data are available or when the data are above the energy range (20 to 150 MeV) where the data tables end. MCNPX can mix and match data tables and physics models throughout a problem. For example, MCNPX can model neutron transport in a bismuth germinate (BGO) particle detector by using data tables for bismuth and oxygen and using physics models for germanium. Also, MCNPX can model neutron transport in UO sub 2 , making the best use of physics models and data tables: below 20 MeV, data tables are used; above 150 MeV, physics models are used; between 20 and 150 MeV, data t...

  12. JDBC Driver for AIPS++ Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J.; Young, W. K.; Waters, B.

    2005-12-01

    Integrating Java with AIPS++ can provide many advantages that cannot be realized with AIPS++ alone. Beyond simplifying architecture and code, use of Java in astronomical processing is promising because of its standardized nature, widely available tool packages and its exceptional GUI rendering abilities. We have implemented a Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) driver for the AIPS++ table system. This allows us to use the Table Query Language (TaQL), which is similar to SQL, to query and manipulate the database from Java and provides a standard interface between the AIPS++ table system and future Java applications.

  13. Comparison of early-phase arterial repair following cobalt-chrome everolimus-eluting stent and slow-release zotarolimus-eluting stent: an angioscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takayuki; Iida, Osamu; Fujita, Masashi; Masuda, Masaharu; Okamoto, Shin; Nanto, Kiyonori; Kanda, Takashi; Tsujimura, Takuya; Sunaga, Akihiro; Awata, Masaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Uematsu, Masaaki

    2017-03-02

    Whether arterial repair following implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) of the second generation differs among stent types remains unknown. We examined 41 DES placed in 28 patients (age 72 ± 7 years, male 89%) presenting with stable angina pectoris due to de novo lesions in native coronary arteries. Coronary angioscopy was performed 4 ± 1 months after stent implantation. Patients were divided into two groups based on the DES types: 22 cobalt-chrome everolimus-eluting stents (CoCr-EES) in 13 patients and 19 slow-release zotarolimus-eluting stents (R-ZES) in 15 patients. Neointimal coverage (NIC) was graded as: grade 0, stent struts exposed; grade 1, struts bulging into the lumen, although covered; grade 2, struts embedded in the neointima, but translucent; grade 3, struts fully embedded and invisible. NIC was defined as heterogeneous when the NIC grade variation was ≥1. Presence of thrombus was also investigated. Distribution of dominant NIC grade (CoCr-EES: grade 0, 9%; grade 1, 77%; grade 2, 9%; grade 3, 5%; R-ZES: grade 0, 16%; grade 1: 47%; grade 2, 37%; grade 3, 0%, P = 0.38) and heterogeneity of NIC (P = 0.43) were similar between CoCr-EES and R-ZES groups. Existence of thrombus was not significantly different in CoCr-EES and R-ZES (18 versus 42%, P = 0.17). Arterial repair occurred without significant differences between CoCr-EES and R-ZES 4 months after implantation.

  14. Water, Rather than Temperature, Dominantly Impacts How Soil Fauna Affect Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen Release from Fresh Litter during Early Litter Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Longstanding observations suggest that dissolved materials are lost from fresh litter through leaching, but the role of soil fauna in controlling this process has been poorly documented. In this study, a litterbag experiment employing litterbags with different mesh sizes (3 mm to permit soil fauna access and 0.04 mm to exclude fauna access was conducted in three habitats (arid valley, ecotone and subalpine forest with changes in climate and vegetation types to evaluate the effects of soil fauna on the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN during the first year of decomposition. The results showed that the individual density and community abundance of soil fauna greatly varied among these habitats, but Prostigmata, Isotomidae and Oribatida were the dominant soil invertebrates. At the end of the experiment, the mass remaining of foliar litter ranged from 58% for shrub litter to 77% for birch litter, and the DOC and TDN concentrations decreased to 54%–85% and increased to 34%–269%, respectively, when soil fauna were not present. The effects of soil fauna on the concentrations of both DOC and TDN in foliar litter were greater in the subalpine forest (wetter but colder during the winter and in the arid valley (warmer but drier during the growing season, and this effect was positively correlated with water content. Moreover, the effects of fauna on DOC and TDN concentrations were greater for high-quality litter and were related to the C/N ratio. These results suggest that water, rather than temperature, dominates how fauna affect the release of dissolved substances from fresh litter.

  15. The redoubtable ecological periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological periodic tables are repositories of reliable information on quantitative, predictably recurring (periodic) habitat–community patterns and their uncertainty, scaling and transferability. Their reliability derives from their grounding in sound ecological principle...

  16. The Table Mountain Field Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Table Mountain Field Site, located north of Boulder, Colorado, is designated as an area where the magnitude of strong, external signals is restricted (by State...

  17. Table 1: Biofuels simulation scenarios

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A spreadsheet containing information used to generate Table 1. Agricultural Market sector results presented in the spreadsheet were generated elsewhere (non-EPA) and...

  18. Blast-induced moderate neurotrauma (BINT) elicits early complement activation and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release in a rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Chavko, Mikulas; Dubick, Michael A; Adeeb, Saleena; Falabella, Michael J; Slack, Jessica L; McCarron, Richard; Li, Yansong

    2012-07-15

    Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a major medical concern yet its etiology is largely undefined. Complement activation may play a role in the development of secondary injury following traumatic brain injury; however, its role in BINT is still undefined. The present study was designed to characterize the complement system and adaptive immune-inflammatory responses in a rat model of moderate BINT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a moderate blast (120 kPa) using an air-driven shock tube. Brain tissue injury, systemic and local complement, cerebral edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production were measured at 0.5, 3, 48, 72, 120, and 168 h. Injury to brain tissue was evaluated by histological evaluation. Systemic complement was measured via ELSIA. The remaining measurements were determined by immunohistoflourescent staining. Moderate blast triggers moderate brain injuries, elevated levels of local brain C3/C5b-9 and systemic C5b-9, increased leukocyte infiltration, unregulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and aquaporin-4 in rat brain cortex at 3- and 48-hour post blast. Early immune-inflammatory response to BINT involves complement and TNFα, which correlates with hippocampus and cerebral cortex damage. Complement and TNFα activation may be a novel therapeutic target for reducing the damaging effects of BINT inflammation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. On generating neutron transport tables with the NJOY system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Claro, Luiz H., E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: luizhenu@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Incorrect values for the product of the average number of neutrons released per fission and the fission microscopic cross-section were detected in several energy groups of a neutron transport table generated with the most updated version of the NJOY system. It was verified that the problem persists when older versions of this system are utilized. Although this problem exists for, at least, ten years, it is still an open question. (author)

  20. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  1. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  2. New table grapes in turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atak A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Table grape consumption is increasing day by day all around the world. New varieties are derived from breeding programs in different countries around the world. Breeding programs in particular are shaped in accordance with the demands of consumers. Especially in recent years, the demands increased for cultivars of table grapes with large berry and maturation at different times, in Turkey as well as in the world market. Also, new cultivars which are tolerant to fungal diseases, late-season and can be stored for a long time had much demand in recent years. For this purpose, new table grapes with these characteristics have been developed by Yalova Atatürk from Central Horticultural Research Institute. Especially in the last few years, the numbers of new cultivars of a total of 12 varieties have been registered. Atak 77, Pembe 77, İsmetbey, Arifbey, Samancı çekirdeksizi, and Yalova Beyazıtable grapes cultivars have been registered in the last few years among the new cultivars. Each one of them is different from the standard cultivars and has been registered with superior properties. Most of these cultivars need less pesticide application in high humidity areas and can be grown successfully. These new cultivars were tested in different ecology and determined suitable regions. These new table grape varieties started to be grown in different part of Turkey nowadays.

  3. General purpose steam table library :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, John H.; Belcourt, Kenneth Noel; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Completion of the CASL L3 milestone THM.CFD.P7.04 provides a general purpose tabular interpolation library for material properties to support, in particular, standardized models for steam properties. The software consists of three parts, implementations of analytic steam models, a code to generate tables from those models, and an interpolation package to interface the tables to CFD codes such as Hydra-TH. Verification of the standard model is maintained through the entire train of routines. The performance of interpolation package exceeds that of freely available analytic implementation of the steam properties by over an order of magnitude.

  4. An interoperability experiment for sharing hydrological rating tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, D.; Taylor, P.; Sheahan, P.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing demand on freshwater resources is requiring authorities to produce more accurate and timely estimates of their available water. Calculation of continuous time-series of river discharge and storage volumes generally requires rating tables. These approximate relationships between two phenomena, such as river level and discharge, and allow us to produce continuous estimates of a phenomenon that may be impractical or impossible to measure directly. Standardised information models or access mechanisms for rating tables are required to support sharing and exchange of water flow data. An Interoperability Experiment (IE) is underway to test an information model that describes rating tables, the observations made to build these ratings, and river cross-section data. The IE is an initiative of the joint World Meteorological Organisation/Open Geospatial Consortium's Hydrology Domain Working Group (HydroDWG) and the model will be published as WaterML2.0 part 2. Interoperability Experiments (IEs) are low overhead, multiple member projects that are run under the OGC's interoperability program to test existing and emerging standards. The HydroDWG has previously run IEs to test early versions of OGC WaterML2.0 part 1 - timeseries. This IE is focussing on two key exchange scenarios: Sharing rating tables and gauging observations between water agencies. Through the use of standard OGC web services, rating tables and associated data will be made available from water agencies. The (Australian) Bureau of Meteorology will retrieve rating tables on-demand from water authorities, allowing the Bureau to run conversions of data within their own systems. Exposing rating tables and gaugings for online analysis and educational purposes. A web client will be developed to enable exploration and visualization of rating tables, gaugings and related metadata for monitoring points. The client gives a quick view into available rating tables, their periods of applicability and the

  5. Supplemental Table S4.xls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A, B, C, D, E, F. 1, Supplementary table 4.73 putative orthorlogous gene groups between rice and Arabidopsis and their responses towards N starvation stress. Genes differentially ... S1_at, lectin receptor-type protein kinase, putative, expressed. 36, AT4G02410.1, 1880, D, -0.7, 255502_at, lectin protein kinase family protein.

  6. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  7. Analysis and Interpretation of Semantic HTML Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wensheng; Guo, Feifei; Xu, Fan; Chen, Xiuguo

    Table is an effective manifestation of structural knowledge, on which the semantic analysis is a very important part in semantic document analysis. To interpret the structure and the semantic relations of the HTML documents, definitions of normalized table and tabular coordinate system are proposed according to database relation theory. This paper classifies cells into normalized cells and visual cells, indicates that row or column and its combined cell are the primary semantic expression forms of table and nested tables are the further expansion of a certain table cell. Finally, a table analyzing algorithm is given based on tabular coordinate system. Practice shows that the algorithm is simple, fast and having certain practical significance.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Modified Release and Immediate Release Tacrolimus Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Simon; Alloway, Rita R

    2017-09-01

    The science of drug delivery has evolved considerably and has led to the development of multiple sustained release formulations. Each of these formulations can present particular challenges in terms of clinical evaluation and necessitate careful study to identify their optimal use in practice. Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive agent that is widely used in organ transplant recipients. However, it is poorly soluble, has an unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile subject to important genetic polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions, and has a narrow therapeutic index. For these reasons, it represents an agent that could benefit from modified release formulations to overcome these limitations. The objective of this review is to discuss the clinical evaluation of immediate and modified release tacrolimus formulations in renal transplant recipients. Clinical trials from early development of immediate release tacrolimus to formulation-specific post-marketing trials of modified release tacrolimus formulations are reviewed with an emphasis on key elements relating to trial design end endpoint assessment. Particular elements that can be addressed with formulation alterations, such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics, and toxicity and corresponding clinical evaluations are discussed. In addition, current knowledge gaps in the clinical evaluation of immediate and modified release tacrolimus formulations are discussed to highlight potential avenues for the future development of different tacrolimus formulations with outcomes relevant to the regulators, the transplant community, and to transplant recipients. This review shows that new formulations may alter tacrolimus bioavailability, alleviate certain adverse events while potentially enhancing patient convenience.

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals...

  10. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2014In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  13. Stream Tables and Watershed Geomorphology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillquist, Karl D.; Kinner, Patricia W.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews copious stream tables and provides a watershed approach to stream table exercises. Results suggest that this approach to learning the concepts of fluvial geomorphology is effective. (Contains 39 references.) (DDR)

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis to Shigellosis - 2014. In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases...

  16. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2014.In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  17. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  18. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2015. In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  3. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  4. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†infrequently reported notifiable diseases...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile to Zika

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile to Zika - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  10. The origins of Ptolemy's astronomical tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R. R.

    Following the line set by his earlier book 'The crime of Claudius Ptolemy' the author discusses here the numerous astronomical tables in Ptolemy's work that have been calculated with the aid of trigonometric tables, as well as a few that are nonlinear but that do not involve trigonometry. The purpose in this study is to determine, if possible, whether Ptolemy calculated these tables or whether he copied them from now-lost original works. The conclusion isthat Ptolemy made few if any original contributions to astronomy, either observational or computational.Contents: 1. Introduction; thetable of chords. 2. The tables of the latitude and of gnomon shadows.3. Tables of the Sun. 4. Astronomical geography. 5. The tables of theMoon. 6. Eclipse tables. 7. Tables of the planets. 8. The empirical basis for Hipparchus's mean motions of the Moon. 9. Summary and conclusions.

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis to Shigellosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  16. NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  17. NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Varicella

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Varicella - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  1. Global Reference Tables for Management Information Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This database is a collection of reference tables that store common information used throughout SSA. These tables standardize code structures and code usage of SSA...

  2. Global Reference Tables for Production Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This database is a collection of reference tables that store common information used throughout SSA. These tables standardized code structures and code usage of SSA...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza - 2014. In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Giardiasis to Haemophilus influenza - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  10. Water-table contours of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of water-table contours for Nevada. These data were created as part of an effort to provide statewide information on water table and depth to...

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Rubella to Salmonellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rubella to Salmonellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Coccidioidomycosis - 2014.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Vibriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Vibriosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Vibriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Vibriosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Rubella to Salmonellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rubella to Salmonellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  16. NNDSS - Table II. Legionellosis to Malaria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Legionellosis to Malaria - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  17. NNDSS - Table II. Legionellosis to Malaria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Legionellosis to Malaria - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  19. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 50)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Martin A. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 Australia; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Photovoltaics (RCPV), Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Ibaraki Tsukuba 305-8568 Japan; Warta, Wilhelm [Department: Characterisation and Simulation/CalLab Cells, Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2 Freiburg D-79110 Germany; Dunlop, Ewan D. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Directorate C-Energy, Transport and Climate, Via E. Fermi 2749 Ispra IT-21027 VA Italy; Levi, Dean H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Hohl-Ebinger, Jochen [Department: Characterisation and Simulation/CalLab Cells, Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2 Freiburg D-79110 Germany; Ho-Baillie, Anita W. H. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 Australia

    2017-06-21

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2017 are reviewed.

  20. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Shiga toxin to Shigellosis - 2015. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Babesiosis to Campylobacteriosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Varicella

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Tetanus to Varicella - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  9. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  10. On Importance of Rows for Decision Tables

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2017-06-21

    In this paper, we propose a method for the evaluation of importance of rows for decision tables. It is based on indirect information about changes in the set of reducts after removing the considered row from the table. We also discuss results of computer experiments with decision tables from UCI Machine Learning Repository.

  11. 21 CFR 890.3750 - Mechanical table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mechanical table. 890.3750 Section 890.3750 Food... DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3750 Mechanical table. (a) Identification. A mechanical table is a device intended for medical purposes that has a flat surface that can be...

  12. Modal Characterization of a Piezoelectric Shaker Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    MODAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A PIEZOELECTRIC SHAKER TABLE THESIS MARCH 2015 Randall J. Hodkin Jr...15-J-001 MODAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A PIEZOELECTRIC SHAKER TABLE THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and... PIEZOELECTRIC SHAKER TABLE Randall J. Hodkin Jr., BS Captain, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. A. N. Palazotto Chair Dr. M. B. Ruggles-Wrenn

  13. The Different Periodic Tables of Dmitrii Mendeleev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Between 1869 and 1905 the Russian chemist Dmitrii Mendeleev published several tables with different arrangements of the chemical elements. Four of these are compared with periodic tables by Russian scientists from 1934 and 1969. The difficulties caused by the lanthanoid elements are clearly seen in the table of 1905, which satisfactorily includes…

  14. Managing Restaurant Tables using Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, Alfio; Brown, Kenneth N.; Beck, J. Christopher

    Restaurant table management can have significant impact on both profitability and the customer experience. The core of the issue is a complex dynamic combinatorial problem. We show how to model the problem as constraint satisfaction, with extensions which generate flexible seating plans and which maintain stability when changes occur. We describe an implemented system which provides advice to users in real time. The system is currently being evaluated in a restaurant environment.

  15. Supplemental Table S5.xls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weibo Xie

    1, Supplementary table 5B. Target genes of osa-miR399 and osa-miR530. The potential targets were predicted by the program of miRU: Plant microRNA Potential Target Finder at http://bioinfo3.noble.org/miRNA/miRU.htm. 2. 3, Target genes of osa-miR399i. 4. 5, ID, Target Site Alignment, Site, Score, Mismatch, Annotation.

  16. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  17. WWW Table of Radioactive Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, R. B.; Ekstrom, L. P.; Chu, S. Y. F.

    1999-10-01

    An electronic sequel to the Table of Radioactive Isotopes (John Wiley, 1986) is being developed for use on the WWW. Updated adopted and decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Decay File (ENSDF) and other sources have been combined and edited. Decay scheme normalizations are revised when necessary. Gamma-ray and alpha-particle energies can be searched interactively by energy or parent half-life, mass, and atomic or neutron number. Summary data including half-lives, Q-values, production mode(s), genetic feedings, and a list of references published since the last full evaluation are available. Users can display energy or intensity ordered tables of gamma-rays, K and L x-rays, alpha-particles, and beta endpoints. Spectra of betas and bremsstrahlung, and Auger/conversion electrons can be viewed with an interactive JAVA applet. Decay schemes can be displayed with the JAVA version of Isotope Explorer 3.0. The URL for the Table of Radioactive Isotopes is http://nucleardata.nuclear.lu.se/nucleardata/toi/.

  18. Open radical retropubic prostatectomy using high anterior release of the levator fascia and constant haptic feedback in bilateral neurovascular bundle preservation plus early postoperative phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition: a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubanks, J Mikel; Umbreit, Eric C; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Myers, Robert P

    2012-05-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer who choose surgery want cure and decent quality of life, namely, pad-free urinary control and, often, erectile function satisfactory for sexual intercourse. Determine in a prospective study the positive surgical margin rate and functional outcomes for a consecutive series of patients undergoing open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP) with bilateral neurovascular bundle preservation (BNVBP) performed by one experienced surgeon. Of 197 consecutive patients undergoing BNVBP during 2008, 123 were evaluable, allowing both immediate postoperative phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition (PDE5i) and a third-party questionnaire with validated urinary and erectile function domains provided preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 mo postoperatively. Two interventions were used: (1) ORRP with ×4.3 optical loupes and constant digital tactile monitoring during BNVBP preceded by high anterior release (HAR) of levator fascia and neurovascular bundles and (2) early postoperative PDE5i. Age; biopsy Gleason score; clinical stage; preoperative prostate-specific antigen level; pathologic grade; stage; margin status; University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index domain for urinary pad use and bother; and International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) were used. Surgical margins were positive in 1 of the 123 evaluable patients (1%). At 1 yr, 95% of patients were pad-free. Satisfactory erectile function was achieved by 109 patients (89%): 82 (67%) scored an IIEF-5 of 22-25, and 27 (22%) scored erection within the first year. Mean hospital stay was 1.3 d. Limitations were (1) observational, noncomparative, single-surgeon series and (2) in third-party methodology, failure to capture patient answers for all questionnaire intervals with resultant inability to address durability of functional results for all patients. ORRP using ×4.3 optical loupe magnification, constant haptic feedback in BNVBP with HAR, and immediate

  19. Linking Water Table Dynamics to Carbon Cycling in Artificial Soil Column Incubations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertje, Pronk; Adrian, Mellage; Tatjana, Milojevic; Fereidoun, Rezanezhad; Cappellen Philippe, Van

    2016-04-01

    The biogeochemistry of wetlands soils is closely tied to their hydrology. Water table fluctuations that cause flooding and drying of these systems may lead to enhanced degradation of organic matter and release of greenhouse gasses (e.g. CO2, CH4) to the atmosphere. However, predicting the influence of water table fluctuations on the biogeochemical functioning of soils requires an understanding of the interactions of soil hydrology with biogeochemical and microbial processes. To determine the effects of water table dynamics on carbon cycling, we are carrying out state-of-the-art automated soil column experiments with fully integrated monitoring of hydro-bio-geophysical process variables under both constant and oscillating water table conditions. An artificial, homogeneous mixture consisting of minerals and organic matter is used to provide a well-defined starting material. The artificial soils are composed of quartz sand, montmorillonite, goethite and humus from a forested riparian zone, from which we also extracted the microbial inoculum added to the soil mixture. The artificial soils are packed into 60 cm high, 7.5 cm wide columns. In the currently ongoing experiment, three replicate columns are incubated while keeping the water table constant water at mid-depth, while another three columns alternate between drained and saturated conditions. Micro-sensors installed at different depths below the soil surface record time-series redox potentials (Eh) varying between oxidizing (~+700 mV) and reducing (~-200 mV) conditions. Continuous O2 levels throughout the soil columns are monitored using high-resolution, luminescence-based, Multi Fiber Optode (MuFO) microsensors. Pore waters are collected periodically with MicroRhizon samplers from different depths, and analyzed for pH, EC, dissolved inorganic and organic carbon and ion/cation compositions. These measurements allow us to track the changes in pore water geochemistry and relate them to differences in carbon cycling

  20. Guide to mathematical tables supplement no 1

    CERN Document Server

    Burunova, N M; Fedorova, R M

    1960-01-01

    A Guide to Mathematical Tables is a supplement to the Guide to Mathematical Tables published by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences in 1956. The tables contain information on subjects such as powers, rational and algebraic functions, and trigonometric functions, as well as logarithms and polynomials and Legendre functions. An index listing all functions included in both the Guide and the Supplement is included.Comprised of 15 chapters, this supplement first describes mathematical tables in the following order: the accuracy of the table (that is, the number of decimal places or significant

  1. Table-top job analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to establish general training program guidelines for training personnel in developing training for operation, maintenance, and technical support personnel at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. TTJA is not the only method of job analysis; however, when conducted properly TTJA can be cost effective, efficient, and self-validating, and represents an effective method of defining job requirements. The table-top job analysis is suggested in the DOE Training Accreditation Program manuals as an acceptable alternative to traditional methods of analyzing job requirements. DOE 5480-20A strongly endorses and recommends it as the preferred method for analyzing jobs for positions addressed by the Order.

  2. Chemical release module facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical release module provides the capability to conduct: (1) thermite based metal vapor releases; (2) pressurized gas releases; (3) dispersed liquid releases; (4) shaped charge releases from ejected submodules; and (5) diagnostic measurements with pi supplied instruments. It also provides a basic R-F and electrical system for: (1) receiving and executing commands; (2) telemetering housekeeping data; (3) tracking; (4) monitoring housekeeping and control units; and (5) ultrasafe disarming and control monitoring.

  3. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is released by female mouse bladder urothelial cells and expressed by the urothelium as an early response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Ming; Alvarez-Lugo, Lery; Chen, Gang; Chai, Toby C

    2017-04-01

    We studied in vitro and in vivo response of primary mouse bladder urothelial cells (mBUC) and bladder urothelium to lipopolysaccharides (LPS), focusing on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. Female C57BL/6 mBUC were exposed for 12 hr to differing concentrations of LPS (100 ng/ml to 10 µg/ml). mBUC were also exposed to a single dose of LPS (1 µg/ml) for 3, 6, 12 hr. Neutralizing GM-CSF antibody (0.1 μg/ml) was used block GM-CSF activity in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed, whereby, LPS (1 mg/ml) was instilled intravesically and left to dwell for 30 min followed by harvest of bladder urothelium 3 to 18 hr later. ELISA measured GM-CSF. qPCR quantitated mRNA for GM-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA for GM-CSF, GM-CSFRα, and β in bladder tissues. Immunohistofluorescence and Western blots for GM-CSFRα were performed on bladder tissues. LPS induced a dose-dependent release of GM-CSF by mBUC. Mouse bladder urothelium did not express GM-CSF mRNA at baseline, but expressed GM-CSF mRNA 3 hr after in vivo LPS exposure, with GM-CSF mRNA expression disappearing 18 hr later. GM-CSFRα expression was confirmed in bladder urothelium. GM-CSF neutralizing antibody significantly diminished LPS-induced increases of VEGF and COX-2 mRNA expression. Urothelium and mBUC secreted GM-CSF as an early response to LPS. GM-CSF mediated downstream expression of VEGF and COX-2. Urothelial GM-CSF may function as a signaling mediator for both inflammation and pain transduction. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1020-1025, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A table-top LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2011-01-01

    Many years ago, when ATLAS was no more than a huge empty underground cavern and Russian artillery shell casings were being melted down to become part of the CMS calorimetry system, science photographer Peter Ginter started documenting the LHC’s progress. He was there when special convoys of equipment crossed the Jura at night, when cranes were lowering down detector slices and magnet coils were being wound in workshops. Some 18 years of LHC history have been documented by Ginter, and the result has just come out as a massive coffee table book full of double-page spreads of Ginter’s impressive images.   The new coffee table book, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider. Published by the Austrian publisher Edition Lammerhuber in cooperation with CERN and UNESCO Publishing, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider is an unusual piece in the company’s portfolio. As the publisher’s first science book, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider weighs close to five kilos and comes in a s...

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Thermodynamic tables to accompany Modern engineering thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balmer, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    This booklet is provided at no extra charge with new copies of Balmer's Modern Engineering Thermodynamics. It contains two appendices. Appendix C contains 40 thermodynamic tables, and Appendix D consists of 6 thermodynamic charts. These charts and tables are provided in a separate booklet to give instructors the flexibility of allowing students to bring the tables into exams. The booklet may be purchased separately if needed.

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-09-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Testing of monitoring devices for JP-4 releases in the subsurface. Final report, 1 Sep 88-30 Apr 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramanayke, G.B.; Kittel, J.A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Voudrias, E.A.; Reichenbach, N.G.

    1990-04-01

    This research sought to select and test the performance of a set of external monitoring devices having potential application for both underground storage tanks (USTs) and general subsurface monitoring. These devices may be used to detect and/or monitor jet fuel in the subsurface from leaking USTs or other sources. Seven devices were tested for both vapor-phase and liquid-phase monitoring of JP-4 jet fuel. Cylindrical tanks 12' diam. and 4' deep containing a uniform sand were used as test beds. A release that averaged less than 0.02 gal/hr of JP-4 was simulated at the central location of the sand test beds. Gas chromatography analysis was used to determine actual concentrations for comparison to device response. Fresh JP-4 was released into dry sand and moist sand to simulate vadose zone monitoring. JP-4 was also released into a test bed with a static water table to simulate a leak contaminating the groundwater. Measurement of floating fuel thickness was determined throughout the liquid phase experiments, as well as liquid and vapor hydrocarbon concentrations. Devices were tested for false positives. The rapid vapor concentration rise that occurs during a leak indicates that vapor-phase monitoring is an excellent method for early warning of product release. Devices using vapor phase detection for leaking JP-4 had the best overall performance. Devices monitoring for JP-4 floating product on the water table are not as quick or sensitive as the vapor phase devices at detecting a leak.

  15. TACO: Visualizing Changes in Tables Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Christina; Stitz, Holger; Hourieh, Reem; Grassinger, Florian; Aigner, Wolfgang; Streit, Marc

    2017-08-29

    Multivariate, tabular data is one of the most common data structures used in many different domains. Over time, tables can undergo changes in both structure and content, which results in multiple versions of the same table. A challenging task when working with such derived tables is to understand what exactly has changed between versions in terms of additions/deletions, reorder, merge/split, and content changes. For textual data, a variety of commonplace "diff" tools exist that support the task of investigating changes between revisions of a text. Although there are some comparison tools which assist users in inspecting differences between multiple table instances, the resulting visualizations are often difficult to interpret or do not scale to large tables with thousands of rows and columns. To address these challenges, we developed TACO, an interactive comparison tool that visualizes the differences between multiple tables at various levels of detail. With TACO we show (1) the aggregated differences between multiple table versions over time, (2) the aggregated changes between two selected table versions, and (3) detailed changes between the selected tables. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we show its application by means of two usage scenarios.

  16. CRC standard mathematical tables and formulae

    CERN Document Server

    Zwillinger, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    New in the 31st edition:Game theory and voting powerHeuristic search techniquesQuadratic fieldsReliabilityRisk analysis and decision rulesA table of solutions to Pell's equationA table of irreducible polynomials in Z2[x]An interpretation of powers of 10A collection of ""proofs without words""Representations of groups of small orderCounting principlesTesselations and tilings…and much more!An indispensable, up-to-date resource, CRC Standard Mathematical Tables and Formulae, 31st Edition makes it effortless to find the equations, tables, and formulae you need most often.

  17. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 48): Solar cell efficiency tables (version 48)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Martin A. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, University of New South Wales, Sydney New South Wales 2052 Australia; Emery, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro [Research Center for Photovoltaics (RCPV), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1 Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-8568 Japan; Warta, Wilhelm [Characterisation and Simulation/CalLab Cells, Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2 D-79110 Freiburg Germany; Dunlop, Ewan D. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Renewable Energy Unit, Institute for Energy, Via E. Fermi 2749 IT-21027 Ispra VA Italy

    2016-06-17

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2016 are reviewed.

  18. Setting Places at the Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Briscoe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A recent survey by the National Endowment for the Arts found that only 2% of Americans listen to “Classical” music with regularity, and fewer practice or play art or historic music even once in a year. The rotating kaleidoscope of new technologies, repertories, interpretation, and cultural values can become not an ultimate bewilderment, a nail in the coffin of art and historic music, but a powerful tool for revitalizing how it engages persons of all age groups and how it can broaden its understanding. The table of musical places we set can respond to the narrative we carefully conceive for any condition at hand, for the student or scholar or layperson we address, for an intentional kaleidoscope of presentations. Such an attitude might let the other 98% discover art and historic music and see their lives mirrored and bettered.

  19. A periodic table for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Cancers exhibit differences in metastatic behavior and drug sensitivity that correlate with certain tumor-specific variables such as differentiation grade, growth rate/extent and molecular regulatory aberrations. In practice, patient management is based on the past results of clinical trials adjusted for these biomarkers. Here, it is proposed that treatment strategies could be fine-tuned upfront simply by quantifying tumorigenic spatial (cell growth) and temporal (genetic stability) control losses, as predicted by genetic defects of cell-cycle-regulatory gatekeeper and genome-stabilizing caretaker tumor suppressor genes, respectively. These differential quantifications of tumor dysfunction may in turn be used to create a tumor-specific 'periodic table' that guides rational formulation of survival-enhancing anticancer treatment strategies.

  20. The periodic table in Flatland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negadi, T. [Universite d`Oran, Es-Senia (Algeria); Kibler, M. [Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)

    1996-01-05

    The D-dimensional Coulomb system serves as a starting point for generating generalized atomic shells. These shells are ordered according to a generalized Madelung rule in D dimensions. This rule together with an Aujbau Prinzip is applied to produce a D-dimensional periodic table. A model is developed to rationalize the ordering of the shells predicted by the generalized Madelung rule. This model is based on the introduction of a Hamiltonian, invariant under the q-deformed algebra U{sub q}(so(D)), that breaks down the SO(D + 1) dynamical symmetry of the hydrogen atom in D dimensions. The D = 2 case (Flatland) is investigated in some detail. It is shown that the neutral atoms and the (moderately) positive ions correspond to the values q = 0.8 and q = 1, respectively, of the deformation parameter q. 55 refs.

  1. TableMaker: An Excel Macro for Publication-Quality Tables

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Hlavac

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces TableMaker, a Microsoft Excel macro that produces publicationquality tables and includes them as new sheets in workbooks. The macro provides an intuitive graphical user interface that allows for the full customization of all table features. It also allows users to save and load table templates, and thus allows layouts to be both reproducible and transferable. It is distributed in a single computer file. As such, the macro is easy to share, as well as accessible to even...

  2. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  3. Nuttall Oak Volume and Weight Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce E. Schlaegel; Regan B. Willson

    1983-01-01

    Volume and weight tables were constructed from a 62-tree sample of Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palmer) taken in the Mississippi Delta. The tables present volume, green weight, and dry weight of bole wood, bole wood plus bark, and total tree above a one-foot stump as predicted from the nonlinear model Y = 0Db

  4. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  6. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  7. Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Version 51)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, Dean H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Green, Martin A. [University of New South Wales; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST); Dunlop, Ewan D. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre; Hohl-Ebinger, Jochen [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems; Ho-Baillie, Anita W. Y. [University of New South Wales

    2017-12-14

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined and new entries since July 2017 are reviewed, together with progress over the last 25 years. Appendices are included documenting area definitions and also listing recognised test centres.

  8. Online Periodic Table: A Cautionary Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izci, Kemal; Barrow, Lloyd H.; Thornhill, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to evaluate ten online periodic table sources for their accuracy and (b) to compare the types of information and links provided to users. Limited studies have been reported on online periodic table (Diener and Moore 2011; Slocum and Moore in "J Chem Educ" 86(10):1167, 2009). Chemistry students'…

  9. 29 CFR 1915.118 - Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shipbreaking. Table E-1—Dimensions and Spacing of Wood Independent-Pole Scaffold Members Structural members...-3—Specifications for the Construction of Horses Structural members Height in feet ≤10 >10≤16 16≤20... Swaged Terminal attachment. (B)—Mechanical Sleeve attachment. (C)—Hand Tucked Splice attachment. Table G...

  10. Scenario-based table top simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole; Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and tested a scenario-based table top simulation method in a user-driven innovation setting. A team of researchers worked together with a user group of five medical staff members from the existing clinic. Table top simulations of a new clinic were carried out in a simple model...

  11. The entropy of the life table: A reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Oscar E; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2015-09-01

    The life table entropy provides useful information for understanding improvements in mortality and survival in a population. In this paper we take a closer look at the life table entropy and use advanced mathematical methods to provide additional insights for understanding how it relates to changes in mortality and survival. By studying the entropy (H) as a functional, we show that changes in the entropy depend on both the relative change in life expectancy lost due to death (e(†)) and in life expectancy at birth (e0). We also show that changes in the entropy can be further linked to improvements in premature and older deaths. We illustrate our methods with empirical data from Latin American countries, which suggests that at high mortality levels declines in H (which are associated with survival increases) linked with larger improvements in e0, whereas at low mortality levels e(†) made larger contributions to H. We additionally show that among countries with low mortality level, contributions of e(†) to changes in the life table entropy resulted from averting early deaths. These findings indicate that future increases in overall survival in low mortality countries will likely result from improvements in e(†). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. History of early abuse as a predictor of treatment response in patients with fibromyalgia : A post-hoc analysis of a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pae, Chi-Un; Masand, Prakash S.; Marks, David M.; Krulewicz, Stan; Han, Changsu; Peindl, Kathleen; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted a post-hoc analysis to determine whether a history of physical or sexual abuse was associated with response to treatment in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release (CR) in fibromyalgia. Methods. A randomized, double-blind,

  13. Des tables pascales aux tables astronomiques et retour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Lejbowicz

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available L’article étudie la naissance et le développement du calendrier ecclésiastique chrétien, i. e. le comput, depuis les premiers témoignages de la célébration annuelle de la résurrection de Jésus jusqu’aux traductions des tables astronomiques arabes au xiie siècle. Il privilégie les procédures qui aboutissent à la détermination des dates pascales et à leur mise en forme tabulaire. Les analyses sont conduites à partir d’un double point de vue. L’un est scientifique. Il s’appuie sur les données astronomiques retenues par Ptolémée et sur l’apport de la tradition mathématique grecque au calcul par approximations. Les cycles soli-lunaires sont posés à partir des fractions continues et le cycle soli-hebdomadaire à partir du plus petit commun multiple. Le second point de vue est social : l’unification du comput participe à celle de la chrétienté comprise comme une configuration politico-religieuse. Deux conclusions s’imposent. Quelle que soit l’importance que la civilisation médiévale a attribuée au comput, il reste que : 1 / les Pâques sont porteuses de significations irréductibles aux techniques chronométriques qui inscrivent cette fête dans le déroulement de l’année ; 2 / ces techniques ont toutefois marqué profondément les curiosités intellectuelles des Latins et les ont préparé à accueillir avec ferveur les zīj et la numération de position.The article studies the birth and development of the Christian ecclesiastical calendar, i.e. the computus, from the first witnesses to the yearly celebration of the resurrection of Jesus to the translations of arabic astronomical tables in the 12th century. It focuses on the procedures which resulted in determinig the dates of Easter and their being put into tabular form. These analyses were undertaken from two perspectives. One was scientific, relying on the astronomical data preserved by Ptolemy and on the contribution of the Greek mathematical

  14. A Classification Table for Achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennaoui-Aoudjehane, H.; Larouci, N.; Jambon, A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Classifying chondrites is relatively easy and the criteria are well documented. It is based on mineral compositions, textural characteristics and more recently, magnetic susceptibility. It can be more difficult to classify achondrites, especially those that are very similar to terrestrial igneous rocks, because mineralogical, textural and compositional properties can be quite variable. Achondrites contain essentially olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclases, oxides, sulphides and accessory minerals. Their origin is attributed to differentiated parents bodies: large asteroids (Vesta); planets (Mars); a satellite (the Moon); and numerous asteroids of unknown size. In most cases, achondrites are not eye witnessed falls and some do not have fusion crust. Because of the mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility similarity with terrestrial igneous rocks for some achondrites, it can be difficult for classifiers to confirm their extra-terrestrial origin. We -as classifiers of meteorites- are confronted with this problem with every suspected achondrite we receive for identification. We are developing a "grid" of classification to provide an easier approach for initial classification. We use simple but reproducible criteria based on mineralogical, petrological and geochemical studies. We presented the classes: acapulcoites, lodranites, winonaites and Martian meteorites (shergottite, chassignites, nakhlites). In this work we are completing the classification table by including the groups: angrites, aubrites, brachinites, ureilites, HED (howardites, eucrites, and diogenites), lunar meteorites, pallasites and mesosiderites. Iron meteorites are not presented in this abstract.

  15. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  16. 7 CFR 944.503 - Table Grape Import Regulation 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vinifera species table grapes, except Emperor, Calmeria, Almeria, and Ribier varieties, is prohibited... Table, as set forth in the United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type...

  17. Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) Rx Table Listing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Statistical Compendium table listing (below) enables users to choose to view Medicaid prescription drug tables for 1999 - 2009, and to select the tables for the...

  18. The Astronomical Tables of Moses Farissol Botarel

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Bernard R.; Chabás, José

    2017-01-01

    Moses Farissol Botarel (Avignon, late fifteenth century) was an astronomer who wrote in Hebrew and continued various traditions that depended on astronomy in al-Andalus which, in turn, derived in large part from the zij of al-Battānī (Raqqa, d. 929). His astronomical tables are unusual in that they combine elements from the Parisian Alfonsine Tables with elements from the tables of Levi ben Gerson (Orange, France, d. 1344), Immanuel ben Jacob Bonfils (Tarascon, France, fl. 1350), and Jacob be...

  19. Energetics of Table Tennis and Table Tennis-Specific Exercise Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Leite, Jorge Vieira de Mello; Papoti, Marcelo; Beneke, Ralph

    2016-11-01

    To test the hypotheses that the metabolic profile of table tennis is dominantly aerobic, anaerobic energy is related to the accumulated duration and intensity of rallies, and activity and metabolic profile are interrelated with the individual fitness profile determined via table tennis-specific tests. Eleven male experienced table tennis players (22 ± 3 y, 77.6 ± 18.9 kg, 177.1 ± 8.1 cm) underwent 2 simulated table tennis matches to analyze aerobic (WOXID) energy, anaerobic glycolytic (WBLC) energy, and phosphocreatine breakdown (WPCr); a table tennis-specific graded exercise test to measure ventilatory threshold and peak oxygen uptake; and an exhaustive supramaximal table tennis effort to determine maximal accumulated deficit of oxygen. WOXID, WBLC, and WPCr corresponded to 96.5% ± 1.7%, 1.0% ± 0.7%, and 2.5% ± 1.4%, respectively. WOXID was interrelated with rally duration (r = .81) and number of shots per rally (r = .77), whereas match intensity was correlated with WPCr (r = .62) and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (r = .58). The metabolic profile of table tennis is predominantly aerobic and interrelated with the individual fitness profile determined via table tennis-specific tests. Table tennis-specific ventilatory threshold determines the average oxygen uptake and overall WOXID, whereas table tennis-specific maximal accumulated oxygen deficit indicates the ability to use and sustain slightly higher blood lactate concentration and WBLC during the match.

  20. Influence of passive leg movements on blood circulation on the tilt table in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czell David

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One problem in the mobilization of patients with neurological diseases, such as spinal cord injury, is the circulatory collapse that occurs while changing from supine to vertical position because of the missing venous pump due to paralyzed leg muscles. Therefore, a tilt table with integrated stepping device (tilt stepper was developed, which allows passive stepping movements for performing locomotion training in an early state of rehabilitation. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if passive stepping and cycling movements of the legs during tilt table training could stabilize blood circulation and prevent neurally-mediated syncope in healthy young adults. Methods In the first experiment, healthy subjects were tested on a traditional tilt table. Subjects who had a syncope or near-syncope in this condition underwent a second trial on the tilt stepper. In the second experiment, a group of healthy subjects was investigated on a traditional tilt table, the second group on the tilt ergometer, a device that allows cycling movements during tilt table training. We used the chi-square test to compare the occurrence of near-syncope/syncope in both groups (tilt table/tilt stepper and tilt table/tilt ergometer and ANOVA to compare the blood pressure and heart rate between the groups at the four time intervals (supine, at 2 minutes, at 6 minutes and end of head-up tilt. Results Separate chi-square tests performed for each experiment showed significant differences in the occurrence of near syncope or syncope based on the device used. Comparison of the two groups (tilt stepper/ tilt table in experiment one (ANOVA showed that blood pressure was significantly higher at the end of head-up tilt on the tilt stepper and on the tilt table there was a greater increase in heart rate (2 minutes after head-up tilt. Comparison of the two groups (tilt ergometer/tilt table in experiment 2 (ANOVA showed that blood pressure was significantly

  1. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  2. Exploring Thailand's mortality transition with the aid of life tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Gordon A

    2011-01-01

    The project Thai Health-Risk Transition: A National Cohort Study seeks to better understand the health implications of modernisation and globalisation forces impacting on Thailand. As part of its "look-back" component this paper seeks, using available life tables, to document the country's post-war mortality transition. The onset of transition through mass campaigns of the late 1940s and 1950s is first discussed before attention turns to the life tables. They are predictably far from flawless, but careful analysis does permit trends that have seen around 30 years added to life expectancy to be traced, and age patterns of improved survivorship and their relation to initiatives to improve health to be examined. The broad benefits generated by mass campaigns, ongoing improvements in infant and early childhood mortality, and a phased impact of the expansion of primary health care in rural areas on adult survival prospects after the mid-1970s are demonstrated. The paper also investigates the consequences for mortality of a motorcycle-focused rapid increase in road fatalities in the late 1980s and early 1990s and the HIV/AIDS epidemic that developed after 1984.

  3. Modelling biocide release based on coating properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erich, S.J.F.; Baukh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of micro-organisms on coated substrates is a common problem, since it reduces the performance of materials, in terms of durability as well as aesthetics. In order to prevent microbial growth biocides are frequently added to coatings. Unfortunately, early release of these biocides reduces the

  4. Authenticated hash tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triandopoulos, Nikolaos; Papamanthou, Charalampos; Tamassia, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Hash tables are fundamental data structures that optimally answer membership queries. Suppose a client stores n elements in a hash table that is outsourced at a remote server so that the client can save space or achieve load balancing. Authenticating the hash table functionality, i.e., verifying ...... fixed constants 0 1/ε, the server can provide a proof of integrity of the answer to a (non-)membership query in constant time, requiring O(nε/logκε--1 n) time to treat updates, yet keeping the communication and verification costs constant. This is the first construction...... for authenticating a hash table with constant query cost and sublinear update cost. Our solution employs the RSA accumulator in a nested way over the stored data, strictly improving upon previous accumulator-based solutions. Our construction applies to two concrete data authentication models and lends itself...

  5. Stark broadening parameter tables for In II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron-, proton-, and ionized helium-impact broadening parameter tables for In II spectral lines, are presented as a function of the temperature and the perturber density. Calculations have been performed within the semiclassical perturbation approach.

  6. Map and table of world copper smelters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map and table comprise information on 124 world copper smelters (2 of which are closed and 1 of which is under development) and 4 (low-grade solvent...

  7. Ecological periodic tables: In principle and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification and the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram are iconic information organizing structure in chemistry, biology and astronomy, respectively, because they are simple, exceptionally useful and they foster the expansion of sci...

  8. Installation Torque Tables for Noncritical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Rosario, Hazel T.; Powell, Joseph S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project is to define torque values for bolts and screws when loading is not a concern. Fasteners require a certain torque to fulfill its function and prevent failure. NASA Glenn Research Center did not have a set of fastener torque tables for non-critical applications without loads, usually referring to hand-tight or wrench-tight torqueing. The project is based on two formulas, torque and pullout load. Torque values are calculated giving way to preliminary data tables. Testing is done to various bolts and metal plates, torqueing them until the point of failure. Around 640 torque tables were developed for UNC, UNF, and M fasteners. Different lengths of thread engagement were analyzed for the 5 most common materials used at GRC. The tables were put together in an Excel spreadsheet and then formatted into a Word document. The plan is to later convert this to an official technical publication or memorandum.

  9. The astronomical tables of Giovanni Bianchini

    CERN Document Server

    Chabas, Jose

    2009-01-01

    This book describes and analyses, for the first time, the astronomical tables of Giovanni Bianchini of Ferrara (d. after 1469), explains their context, inserts them into an astronomical tradition that began in Toledo, and addresses their diffusion.

  10. TableMaker: An Excel Macro for Publication-Quality Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Hlavac

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces TableMaker, a Microsoft Excel macro that produces publicationquality tables and includes them as new sheets in workbooks. The macro provides an intuitive graphical user interface that allows for the full customization of all table features. It also allows users to save and load table templates, and thus allows layouts to be both reproducible and transferable. It is distributed in a single computer file. As such, the macro is easy to share, as well as accessible to even beginning and casual users of Excel. Since it allows for the quick creation of reproducible and fully customizable tables, TableMaker can be very useful to academics, policy-makers and businesses by making the presentation and formatting of results faster and more efficient.

  11. Genetic warfarin dosing: tables versus algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Brian S; Gage, Brian F; Johnson, Julie A; Brensinger, Colleen M; Kimmel, Stephen E

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of genetic tables and formal pharmacogenetic algorithms for warfarin dosing. Pharmacogenetic algorithms based on regression equations can predict warfarin dose, but they require detailed mathematical calculations. A simpler alternative, recently added to the warfarin label by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is to use genotype-stratified tables to estimate warfarin dose. This table may potentially increase the use of pharmacogenetic warfarin dosing in clinical practice; however, its accuracy has not been quantified. A retrospective cohort study of 1,378 patients from 3 anticoagulation centers was conducted. Inclusion criteria were stable therapeutic warfarin dose and complete genetic and clinical data. Five dose prediction methods were compared: 2 methods using only clinical information (empiric 5 mg/day dosing and a formal clinical algorithm), 2 genetic tables (the new warfarin label table and a table based on mean dose stratified by genotype), and 1 formal pharmacogenetic algorithm, using both clinical and genetic information. For each method, the proportion of patients whose predicted doses were within 20% of their actual therapeutic doses was determined. Dosing methods were compared using McNemar's chi-square test. Warfarin dose prediction was significantly more accurate (all p algorithm (52%) than with all other methods: empiric dosing (37%; odds ratio [OR]: 2.2), clinical algorithm (39%; OR: 2.2), warfarin label (43%; OR: 1.8), and genotype mean dose table (44%; OR: 1.9). Although genetic tables predicted warfarin dose better than empiric dosing, formal pharmacogenetic algorithms were the most accurate. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, N.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Wieser, M.E.; Singleton, G.; Walczyk, T.; Yoneda, S.; Mahaffy, P.G.; Tarbox, L.V.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 150 years, the Periodic Table of the Elements has served as a guide to the world of elements by highlighting similarities and differences in atomic structure and chemical properties. To introduce students, teachers, and society to the existence and importance of isotopes of the chemical elements, an IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes (IPTI) has been prepared and can be found as a supplement to this issue.

  13. Listing of Available ACE Data Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This document is divided into multiple sections. Section 2 lists some of the more frequently used ENDF/B reaction types that can be used with the FM input card. The remaining sections (described below) contain tables showing the available ACE data tables for various types of data. These ACE data libraries are distributed by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) with MCNP6.

  14. Flavonoid intake from food and beverages: What We Eat in America, NHANES 2007-2008, Tables 1-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Food Surveys Research Group of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center has released 4 flavonoid intake data tables that make available, for the first time, nationally representative estimates of the intake of 29 individual flavonoids in six classes (as well as the sum of those flavonoids)...

  15. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction project (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  16. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1992-10-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  17. 7 CFR 51.914 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.914 Section 51.914... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Metric Conversion Table § 51.914 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 3/16 equals 12.7 9/16 equals 14.3...

  18. Verification of aerial photo stand volume tables for southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore S. Setzer; Bert R. Mead

    1988-01-01

    Aerial photo volume tables are used in the multilevel sampling system of Alaska Forest Inventory and Analysis. These volume tables are presented with a description of the data base and methods used to construct the tables. Volume estimates compiled from the aerial photo stand volume tables and associated ground-measured values are compared and evaluated.

  19. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partially Soluble HAP 7 Table 7 to... Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVVVV, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63—Partially Soluble HAP As required... partially soluble HAP listed in the following table. Partially soluble HAP name CAS No. 1. 1,1,1...

  20. 26 CFR 1.807-1 - Mortality and morbidity tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortality and morbidity tables. 1.807-1 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Investment Income § 1.807-1 Mortality and morbidity tables. (a) Tables to be used... is issued, then the mortality and morbidity tables set forth in this subsection are used to compute...

  1. Fluoride release/recharging ability and bond strength of glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-17

    Aug 17, 2015 ... and erosion of GICs during the early setting period, followed by a rapid .... fluoride ions released from each specimen were measured at. 1, 2, 4, 8, 15, .... adhesion to enamel and dentin tissues and fluoride release are some of ...

  2. Miniature Release Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to design, build and functionally test a miniature release mechanism for CubeSats and other small satellites. The WFF 6U satellite structure will be...

  3. The 2017 Release Cloudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, G. J.; Chatzikos, M.; Guzmán, F.; Lykins, M. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.; Abel, N. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Keenan, F. P.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the 2017 release of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, summarizing the many improvements to the scope and accuracy of the physics which have been made since the previous release. Exporting the atomic data into external data files has enabled many new large datasets to be incorporated into the code. The use of the complete datasets is not realistic for most calculations, so we describe the limited subset of data used by default, which predicts significantly more lines than the previous release of Cloudy. This version is nevertheless faster than the previous release, as a result of code optimizations. We give examples of the accuracy limits using small models, and the performance requirements of large complete models. We summarize several advances in the H- and He-like iso-electronic sequences and use our complete collisional-radiative models to establish the densities where the coronal and local thermodynamic equilibrium approximations work.

  4. Required Information Release

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Stephen N

    2010-01-01

    Many computer systems have a functional requirement to release information. Such requirements are an important part of a system’s information security requirements. Current information-flow control techniques are able to reason about permitted information flows, but not required information flows. In this paper, we introduce and explore the specification and enforcement of required information release in a language-based setting. We define semantic security conditions that express both what i...

  5. Required Information Release

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Stephen N

    2012-01-01

    Many computer systems have a functional requirement to release information. Such requirements are an important part of a system's information security requirements. Current information-flow control techniques are able to reason about permitted information flows, but not required information flows. In this paper, we introduce and explore the specification and enforcement of required information release in a language-based setting. We define semantic security conditions that express both wha...

  6. A Prospective Survey on Safety of Sustained-Release Theophylline in Treatment of Asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohei Makino

    2006-01-01

    Conclusions: The present survey demonstrates that sustained-release theophylline is safe, as long as used appropriately, although adverse reactions tend to develop early after initiation of administration.

  7. A contingency table approach to nonparametric testing

    CERN Document Server

    Rayner, JCW

    2000-01-01

    Most texts on nonparametric techniques concentrate on location and linear-linear (correlation) tests, with less emphasis on dispersion effects and linear-quadratic tests. Tests for higher moment effects are virtually ignored. Using a fresh approach, A Contingency Table Approach to Nonparametric Testing unifies and extends the popular, standard tests by linking them to tests based on models for data that can be presented in contingency tables.This approach unifies popular nonparametric statistical inference and makes the traditional, most commonly performed nonparametric analyses much more comp

  8. Mathematics of Periodic Tables for Benzenoid Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jerry Ray

    2007-01-01

    The upper and lower bounds for invariants of polyhex systems based on the Harary and Harborth inequalities are studied. It is shown that these invariants are uniquely correlated by the Periodic Table for Benzenoid Hydrocarbons. A modified periodic table for total resonant sextet (TRS) benzenoids based on the invariants of Ds and r(empty) is presented; Ds is the number of disconnections among the empty rings for fused TRS benzenoid hydrocarbons. This work represents a contribution toward deciphering the topological information content of benzenoid formulas.

  9. Early Sprouts: Cultivating Healthy Food Choices in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalich, Karrie; Bauer, Dottie; McPartlin, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    Plant lifelong healthy eating concepts in young children and counteract the prevalence of childhood obesity with "Early Sprouts." A research-based early childhood curriculum, this "seed-to-table" approach gets children interested in and enjoying nutritious fruits and vegetables. The "Early Sprouts" model engages…

  10. Interfacial Fast Release Layer in Monodisperse Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microspheres Accelerates the Drug Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Zhao, Xiaoli; Yeung, Kelvin W K; To, Michael K T

    2016-01-01

    Understanding microstructural evolutions of drug delivery devices during drug release process is essential for revealing the drug release mechanisms and controlling the drug release profiles. In this study, monodisperse poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres in different diameters were fabricated by microfluidics in order to find out the relationships between the microstructural evolutions and the drug release profiles. It was found that poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres underwent significant size expansion which took place from the periphery to the center, resulting in the formation of interfacial fast release layers. At the same time, inner pores were created and the diffusion rate was increased so that the early stage drug release was accelerated. Due to the different expansion rates, small poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres tendered to follow homogeneous drug release while large poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres tendered to follow heterogeneous drug release. This study suggests that the size expansion and the occurrence of interfacial fast release layer were important mechanisms for early stage drug release of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres.

  11. Multi-Touch Tables and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Steve; Mercier, Emma; Burd, Liz; Joyce-Gibbons, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The development of multi-touch tables, an emerging technology for classroom learning, offers valuable opportunities to explore how its features can be designed to support effective collaboration in schools. In this study, small groups of 10- to 11-year-old children undertook a history task where they had to connect various pieces of information…

  12. Water-table altitude of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a raster-based, depth to ground-water data set for the State of Nevada. The source of this data set is a statewide water-table contour data set constructed...

  13. The periodic table: icon and inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Tang, Samantha

    2015-03-13

    To start this discussion meeting on the new chemistry of the elements held on 12 May 2014, Martyn Poliakoff, Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society, was invited to give the opening remarks. As a chemist and a presenter of the popular online video channel 'The periodic table of videos', Martyn communicates his personal and professional interest in the elements to the public, who in turn use these videos both as an educational resource and for entertainment purposes. Ever since Mendeleev's first ideas for the periodic table were published in 1869, the table has continued to grow as new elements have been discovered, and it serves as both icon and inspiration; its form is now so well established that it is recognized the world over as a symbol for science. This paper highlights but a few of the varied forms that the table can take, such as an infographic, which can convey the shortage of certain elements with great impact. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Johnson

    2005-06-27

    The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

  15. Table-top diffuse optical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturgeon, K.A.; Bakker, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the work done during a six months internshipat Philips Research for a Masters in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. An existing table-top tomography system for measuring lightin phantom breasts was restored. Updated software control and image reconstruction software was

  16. Experiences with Interactive Multi-touch Tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.; Hakvoort, M.; Hakvoort, M.C.; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.; Reidsma, D.; Reidsma, Dennis; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Interactive multi-touch tables can be a powerful means of communication for collaborative work as well as an engaging environment for competition. Through enticing gameplay we have evaluated user experience on competitive gameplay, collaborative work and musical expression. In addition, we report on

  17. Normal yield tables for red alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman P. Worthington; Floyd A. Johnson; George R. Staebler; William J. Lloyd

    1960-01-01

    Increasing interest in the management of red alder (Alnus rubra) has created a need for reliable yield information. Existing yield tables for red alder have been very useful as interim sources of information, but they are generally inadequate for current and prospective management needs. The advisory committee for the Station's Olympia...

  18. Problem Posing with the Multiplication Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical problem posing is an important skill for teachers of mathematics, and relates readily to mathematical creativity. This article gives a bit of background information on mathematical problem posing, lists further references to connect problem posing and creativity, and then provides 20 problems based on the multiplication table to be…

  19. Ecological periodic tables for estuarine habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwood (1977; J Anim Ecol 46: 337-365) compared the situation in ecology to that in chemistry before the development of the periodic table when each fact, for example, the solubility or reactivity of a chemical element, had to be discovered independently and remembered in isol...

  20. Submatrices of character tables and basic sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling

    2012-01-01

    combinatorial determinant formulae for submatrices of the character table and Cartan matrices with respect to basic sets; we observe that similar phenomena occur for the transition matrices between power sum symmetric functions to bounded partitions and the k-Schur functions dened by Lapointe and Morse....... Arithmetic properties of the numbers occurring in this context are studied via generating functions...

  1. 3D virtual table in anatomy education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads Ronald; Simonsen, Eivind Ortind

    The ‘Anatomage’ is a 3D virtual human anatomy table, with touchscreen functionality, where it is possible to upload CT-scans and digital. Learning the human anatomy terminology requires time, a very good memory, anatomy atlas, books and lectures. Learning the 3 dimensional structure, connections...

  2. Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A.; Arnett, M.

    1997-10-01

    During the history of SRS, continual improvements in facilities, process, and operations, and changes in the site`s mission have reduced the amount of radioactive liquid releases. In the early years of SRS (1958 to 1965), the amount of tritium discharged to the Savannah River averaged approximately 61,000 curies a year. During the mid-1980`s (1983 to 1988), liquid releases of tritium averaged 27,000 curies a year. By 1996, liquid releases of tritium are projected to be just 3000 curies for the year. This large projected decrease is the result of the planned shut-down of all reactors and the anticipated significant decline in the amount of tritium migrating from the site seepage basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility.

  3. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  4. A scalable lock-free hash table with open addressing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Puge; Karlsson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    resolve any duplicate or conflicting values. Our hash table has a constant and low memory usage that is less than existing lock-free hash tables at a fill level of 33% and above. The hash table exhibits good cache locality. Compared to prior art, our hash table results in 16% and 15% fewer L1 and L2 cache...... misses respectively, leading to 21% fewer memory stall cycles. Our experiments show that our hash table scales close to linearly with the number of threads and outperforms, in throughput, other lock-free hash tables by 19%...

  5. Drug safety evaluation of ropinirole prolonged release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Radicati, Fabiana G; Torti, Margherita

    2014-03-01

    The need for multiple administrations and a difficult titration schedule has always represented a limit in the use of dopamine agonists in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease. To avoid these problems, Ropinirole prolonged release (RPR), a non-ergoline dopamine receptor agonist that can be taken once a day, has been formulated. The prolonged release formulation has higher patient compliance due to a simpler and fastest titration schedule; the once-a-day administration makes this molecule especially suitable for young Parkinsonian patients who are still working and having an active lifestyle. In this paper, we will review ropinirole's mechanism of action including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic data and the results of the main clinical studies in early and advanced PD patients. We will also discuss safety data shown during the experimental phase and after RPR commercialization. This article reviews the use of RPR in early and advanced Parkinsonian patients. Medical literature on the use of RPR in Parkinson's disease was identified using MEDLINE and the reference lists of published articles. RPR is effective in the treatment of patients with early Parkinson's disease; in advanced Parkinsonian patients, the amount of daily off-time significantly decreases, improving the mean on time. RPR has also demonstrated to be effective in ameliorating the quality of sleep without increasing the occurrence of daily sleepiness and nocturnal psychosis. RPR was generally well tolerated in both early and advanced Parkinsonian patients.

  6. From the Mendeleev periodic table to particle physics and back to the periodic table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibler, Maurice R. [Universite de Lyon, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    We briefly describe in this paper the passage from Mendeleev's chemistry (1869) to atomic physics (in the 1900's), nuclear physics (in the 1932's) and particle physics (from 1953 to 2006). We show how the consideration of symmetries, largely used in physics since the end of the 1920's, gave rise to a new format of the periodic table in the 1970's. More specifically, this paper is concerned with the application of the group SO(4,2)xSU(2) to the periodic table of chemical elements. It is shown how the Madelung rule of the atomic shell model can be used for setting up a periodic table that can be further rationalized via the group SO(4,2)xSU(2) and some of its subgroups. Qualitative results are obtained from this nonstandard table. (author)

  7. Release the Prisoners Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  8. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopic...

  9. Table grape of Ukraine – varietal resources, pers­pectives of production and consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. В. Власов

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To enrich and improve the range of table grape varieties of Ukraine. Methods. Breeding, hybridological, mathematic, visual ones. Results. Modern Ukrainian gene pool of table grape varieties has been created on the base of the best introduced and homegrown cultivars and selections. New genotypes that are creating at the National Scientific Centre “Institute of Viticulture and Wine-Making named after V. Ye. Tairov” under the breeding program “Resistense plus Quality” are the basis of current and future regional assortments for the south and central areas of the steppe zone of Ukraine. The complexity of the origine explains the genetically determined high-level manifestation of commercially valuable characters. New varieties and selections are ecologically safe for humans and the environment, as the level of their resistance to the group of fungal main diseases is not less than 6.5 points according to the 9-point scale, therefore they do not require a large pesticide load. New promising table varieties demonstrate a stable yield and high marketability of grapes – 5–10 kg per plant with the marketability nearly 80–87% during the last five years. In addition, dense flesh of grapes is a guarantee of high transportability. The variety of table genotypes taste, shape and berries ripening from very early to very late embodied in the innovative and highly profitable development “Conveyor of table grapes”. Depending on the ecological and geographical conditions, the conveyor can include a diffe­rent quantity of varieties, but to in order increase the efficiency and profitability it is necessary to have a few groups (from 2 to 4 varietes of different ripening. The approximate ratio (% of varieties of different ripening time is recommended: very early – 22%, early – 22%, average – 17%, mid-late – 17%, and late – 22%. Conclusions. The variation of shape, flavour and color of new promising genotypes of table grapes makes

  10. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Carbapenemase-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Carbapenemase-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever - 2014. In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or...

  15. Tropical forest biomass estimation from truncated stand tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. J. R. Gillespie; S. Brown; A. E. Lugo

    1992-01-01

    Total aboveground forest biomass may be estimated through a variety of techniques based on commercial inventory stand and stock tables. Stand and stock tables from tropical countries commonly omit trees bellow a certain commercial limit.

  16. Karna Particle Size Dataset for Tables and Figures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains 1) table of bulk Pb-XAS LCF results, 2) table of bulk As-XAS LCF results, 3) figure data of particle size distribution, and 4) figure data for...

  17. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute, by type) A & B

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute, by type) A & B - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute, by type) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute, by type) C - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) A & B

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) A & B - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue virus infection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue virus infection - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Varicella to West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Varicella to West Nile virus disease - 2014. In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals...

  9. Malheur NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Water Table Depth Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water table wells assist in filling a critical information gap related to fluctuating water table depth and its influence on habitat expression within wet meadow...

  10. Ecological periodic tables: in principle and practice - January 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification and the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram are iconic information organizing structures in chemistry, biology and astronomy, respectively. Ecological periodic tables are information organizing structures for ecology. T...

  11. Ecological periodic tables: Killer apps for translational ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification and the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram are information organizing structures that have transformed chemistry, biology and astronomy, respectively. Ecological periodic tables are information organizing structures wit...

  12. Literature review tables for Karna et al. 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — N/A. Users will need to access the manuscript to see non-EPA data presented in tables and figures. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: The tables in the...

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

  14. Periodic table for Floquet topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rahul; Harper, Fenner

    2017-10-01

    Dynamical phases with novel topological properties are known to arise in driven systems of free fermions. In this paper, we obtain a `periodic table' to describe the phases of such time-dependent systems, generalizing the periodic table for static topological insulators. Using K theory, we systematically classify Floquet topological insulators from the ten Altland-Zirnbauer symmetry classes across all dimensions. We find that the static classification scheme described by a group G becomes G×n in the time-dependent case, where n is the number of physically important gaps in the quasienergy spectrum (including any gaps at quasienergy π ). The factors of G may be interpreted as arising from the bipartite decomposition of the unitary time-evolution operator. Topologically protected edge modes may arise at the boundary between two Floquet systems, and we provide a mapping between the number of such edge modes and the topological invariant of the bulk.

  15. Improving GRADE evidence tables part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langendam, Miranda; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Santesso, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) working group has developed GRADE evidence profiles (EP) and summary of findings (SoF) tables to present evidence summaries in systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, and health technology assessments....... Explanatory notes are used to explain choices and judgments in these summaries, for example, on rating of the quality of evidence. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A systematic survey of the explanations in SoF tables in 132 randomly selected Cochrane Intervention reviews and in EPs of 10 guidelines. We analyzed...... the content of 1,291 explanations using a predefined list of criteria. RESULTS: Most explanations were used to describe or communicate results and to explain downgrading of the quality of evidence, in particular for risk of bias and imprecision. Addressing the source of baseline risk (observational data...

  16. The Table of Chords and Greek Trigonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Buscherini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trigonometry was born due to the need of ancient astronomy to calculate and to predict the movement of the heavenly bodies. However it is hard to know who the founder of this mathematical branch was: it is likely that its origins date back to Hipparchus of Nicaea who compiled the first table of chords, which are the forerunners of the modern trigonometric function “sine”. Nevertheless the most ancient existing work on trigonometry is the Almagest of Ptolemy in which the author describes the mathematical steps that are necessary for the compilation of the table of chords. These steps are based on more ancient theories and for this reason one gets the impression that they could be the result of a preparatory study. This article is not only a brief survey of Greek trigonometry but it also analyzes the Greek numeration system, the sexagesimal fractions and the arithmetical operations which were used in the calculation of the chords.

  17. Shaking Table Tests of Reinforced Concrete Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    The purpose of the paper is to present a series of shaking table experiments performed at the Structural Laboratory at Aalborg University, Denmark during the autumn of 1996 and to show some selected results from these experiments. The aim of the tests was to test methods for identification of time...... in the shaking table test are 2-bay, 6-storey RC-frames in scale 1:5 with outer measures of 2.4 m in with and 3.3 m in height. The structures are subjected to a series of sequential earthquakes and after each earthquake the structure is visually inspected. The results of the work have revealed that the recursive...... vector ARMA model is suitable for modal identification of degrading reinforced concrete structures and the maximum softening damage index calculated from the obtained identification provides a valuable tool for assessment of the damage state of the structure....

  18. Mobile Lift Table Capacity 300 kg

    OpenAIRE

    Kirst, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Bakalářská práce se zabývá mobilní manipulační plošinou o nosnosti 300 kg. Hlavním cílem je tuto manipulační plošinu navrhnout. Práce se zaměřuje na manipulační plošinu s nůžkovým mechanismem a s elektrohydraulickým pohonem. V první části je řešena technická zpráva pro navrhovanou plošinu a druhá část obsahuje výkresovou dokumentaci. Bachelor’s thesis is dealing with mobile lift table - capacity 300kg. The main target is to create mobile lift table. My work aims at the mobile scissor lift ...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6140 - Medical chair and table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6140 Medical chair and table. (a) Identification. A medical chair or table is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical chair and table. 880.6140 Section 880.6140...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart B of Part 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables to Subpart B of Part 88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program. Pt. 88, Subpart B, Tables Tables to Subpart B of Part 88...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart C of Part 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables to Subpart C of Part 88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program Incentives for the purchase of Inherently Low-Emission Vehicles. Pt. 88, Subpt. C, Tables Tables to Subpart C of Par...

  2. 42 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart I of Part 84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tables to Subpart I of Part 84 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks Canister bench tests; minimum requirements. Pt. 84, Subpt. I, Tables Tables...

  3. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Species Code 2 Table 2 to Part 680..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900 Box Lopholithodes mandtii. 910 Dungeness Cancer magister. 921 Red king crab Paralithodes camtshaticus. 922 Blue king...

  4. 7 CFR 51.2854 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.2854 Section 51.2854 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards...) Metric Conversion Table § 51.2854 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 1/8 3.2 1/4 6.4 3/8 9...

  5. 7 CFR 51.653 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.653 Section 51.653 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., and Arizona) Metric Conversion Table § 51.653 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 1/4...

  6. 7 CFR 51.714 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.714 Section 51.714 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., and Arizona) Metric Conversion Table § 51.714 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 1/4...

  7. 30 CFR 250.1200 - Question index table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Question index table. 250.1200 Section 250.1200... Security § 250.1200 Question index table. The table in this section lists questions concerning Oil and Gas Production Measurement, Surface Commingling, and Security. Frequently asked questions CFR citation 1. What...

  8. 16 CFR 501.5 - Paper table covers, bedsheets, pillowcases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paper table covers, bedsheets, pillowcases... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.5 Paper table covers, bedsheets, pillowcases. Table covers, bedsheets, and pillowcases, fabricated from paper, are exempt from the requirements of § 500.12 of this...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart Hh of... - Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables Appendix to Subpart HH of Part..., Subpt. HH, App. Appendix to Subpart HH of Part 63—Tables Table 1 to Subpart HH of Part 63—List of Hazardous Air Pollutants for Subpart HH CAS Number a Chemical name 75070 Acetaldehyde 71432 Benzene...

  10. 31 CFR Appendix to Part 341 - Tables of Redemption Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables of Redemption Values Appendix... RETIREMENT PLAN BONDS Pt. 341, App. Appendix to Part 341—Tables of Redemption Values Table of Redemption Values Providing an Investment Yield of 33/4 Percent per Annum for Bonds Bearing Issue Dates Beginning...

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. 32 CFR Attachment D to Subpart B... - Decision Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decision Tables D Attachment D to Subpart B of Part 147 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY... Investigative Standards Pt. 147, Subpt. B, Att. D Attachment D to Subpart B of Part 147—Decision Tables Table 1...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ggg of... - Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Soluble HAP 3 Table 3 to Subpart GGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... for Pharmaceuticals Production Pt. 63, Subpt. GGG, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart GGG of Part 63—Soluble...

  14. Advances in food composition tables in Japan-Standard Tables Of Food Composition in Japan - 2015 - (Seventh Revised Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Kawai, Ryoko

    2018-01-01

    The latest version of the Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan-2015- comprises the main food composition table (Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan-2015-[Seventh revised Edition)) and three supplementary books. The supplementary books are Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan - 2015 - (Seventh Revised Edition) - Amino Acids -, Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan - 2015 - (Seventh Revised Edition) - Fatty Acids - and Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan - 2015 - (Seventh Revised Edition) - Available Carbohydrates, Polyols and Organic Acids-. We believe understanding these food composition tables can give greater insight into Japan's gastronomic culture and changes in eating habits. We expect them to play important roles as part of the East Asia food composition tables. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The Caux Round Table principles for business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, L L

    1996-02-01

    In 1994, the Caux Round Table in Switzerland developed what is believed to be the first international code of business ethics. Business leaders from Japan, Europe and the United States collaborated to create a set of principles rooted in two basic ideals: kyosei and human dignity. Because of its importance and its applicability to the conduct of today's health care businesses, this entire column is devoted to reprinting these "Principles for Business."

  16. Tables of double beta decay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyak, V.I. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine)]|[Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires; Zdesenko, Y.G. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1995-12-31

    A compilation of experimental data on double beta decay is presented. The tables contain the most stringent known experimental limits or positive results of 2{beta} transitions of 69 natural nuclides to ground and excited states of daughter nuclei for different channels (2{beta}{sup -}; 2{beta}{sup +}; {epsilon}{beta}{sup +}; 2{epsilon}) and modes (0{nu}; 2{nu}; 0{nu}M) of decay. (authors). 189 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.

    1982-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units.

  18. Web life: The Periodic Table of Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Eagle-eyed readers may spot a change in this column. Previously known as Blog life, it highlighted top picks from the physics blogosphere, and was itself an outgrowth of an earlier column on physics books, Shelf life. The new Web life column will continue to feature the best of physics blogging, but it will also include other types of Web content of interest to Physics World readers. First up is a periodic table of videos from Nottingham University in the UK.

  19. XII Tables for researchers on extraterrestrial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca, Aldo Armando

    In the legal field, studies on extraterrestrial intelligence began four years before the leading article on interstellar communication was published. Even though discussion of the legal problems still lacks a juridical framework of universal acceptance, a few guidelines are suggested under the title of XII Tables (or Commandments). The XII Tables, which was the Romans' first code, also included provisions on international law and may be seen as a very important source of the law of nations. Their great merit was brevity, which allowed the progressive development of the law. These XII Tables have been divided into six to guide reactions in the event messages or signals are received, and six to determine the behavior of those responsible for answering if and when a communication attempt takes place. They were drafted on the basis of what is known as "ethics" and "law" in a way that any progress in this respect may be to the credit of our civilization and the human condition. For a wise and cautious analysis of the matter, the creation of a committee of representatives of governmental and non-governmental organizations is proposed.

  20. Mini table de radionucléides

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Cette table est un outil pratique et quotidien pour tous les travailleurs opérant au contact de radionucléides. Elle concerne tous les secteurs scientifiques et techniques, comme la médecine, la recherche ou l'industrie. La Mini Table de radionucléides a été conçue comme un instrument permettant de repérer et valider rapidement les principales caractéristiques des radionucléides les plus utilisés (environ 300) que l'on rencontre en milieu médical, industriel, nucléaire, gestion des déchets, etc. Présentée en format de poche, elle permet pour chaque radionucléide d'indiquer ses caractéristiques fondamentales : La période radioactive ; Le ou les principaux modes de désintégration ; Les principales émissions en termes d'énergie et d'intensité. Pour des caractéristiques complètes, l'ouvrage renvoie aux Tables de Données de référence. Au sein du CEA, le Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) est mandaté par le Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais (LNE) comme laboratoir...

  1. STILTS -- Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library Tool Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark

    STILTS is a set of command-line tools for processing tabular data. It has been designed for, but is not restricted to, use on astronomical data such as source catalogues. It contains both generic (format-independent) table processing tools and tools for processing VOTable documents. Facilities offered include crossmatching, format conversion, format validation, column calculation and rearrangement, row selection, sorting, plotting, statistical calculations and metadata display. Calculations on cell data can be performed using a powerful and extensible expression language. The package is written in pure Java and based on STIL, the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library. This gives it high portability, support for many data formats (including FITS, VOTable, text-based formats and SQL databases), extensibility and scalability. Where possible the tools are written to accept streamed data so the size of tables which can be processed is not limited by available memory. As well as the tutorial and reference information in this document, detailed on-line help is available from the tools themselves. STILTS is available under the GNU General Public Licence.

  2. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  3. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  4. Hydra Code Release

    OpenAIRE

    Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Thomas, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Comment: A new version of the AP3M-SPH code, Hydra, is now available as a tar file from the following sites; http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html , http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/~pat/hydra/hydra.html . The release now also contains a cosmological initial conditions generator, documentation, an installation guide and installation tests. A LaTex version of the documentation is included here

  5. Sudden releases of gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloupecká Hana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  6. Releasable suture technique for trabeculectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Pushpa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of the releasable suture technique on immediate postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP. Nine eyes of nine patients with glaucoma had trabeculectomy with a releasable suture. In the six eyes that did not receive antimitotics, the suture was released by the fifth postoperative day; in the others suture release was delayed up to the fourteenth day. Of the nine patients, one had an acceptable postoperative IOP and did not need suture release; in another the suture broke and could not be released. In the remaining seven patients, the difference between the pre-release and post-release IOP was statistically significant (p < 0.001. The complications of this technique include failed suture release, subconjunctival hematoma and a distinctive "windshield wiper" keratopathy.

  7. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  8. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  9. International thermodynamic tables of the fluid state helium-4

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, S; McCarty, R D

    2013-01-01

    International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State Helium-4 presents the IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables for the thermodynamic properties of helium. The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project has therefore encouraged the critical analysis of the available thermodynamic measurements for helium and their synthesis into tables. This book is divided into three chapters. The first chapter discusses the experimental results and compares with the equations used to generate the tables. These equations are supplemented by a vapor pressure equation, which represents the 1958 He-4 scale of temperature that is

  10. Measuring Disclosure Risk and Data Utility for Flexible Table Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Natalie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statistical agencies are making increased use of the internet to disseminate census tabular outputs through web-based flexible table-generating servers that allow users to define and generate their own tables. The key questions in the development of these servers are: (1 what data should be used to generate the tables, and (2 what statistical disclosure control (SDC method should be applied. To generate flexible tables, the server has to be able to measure the disclosure risk in the final output table, apply the SDC method and then iteratively reassess the disclosure risk. SDC methods may be applied either to the underlying data used to generate the tables and/or to the final output table that is generated from original data. Besides assessing disclosure risk, the server should provide a measure of data utility by comparing the perturbed table to the original table. In this article, we examine aspects of the design and development of a flexible table-generating server for census tables and demonstrate a disclosure risk-data utility analysis for comparing SDC methods. We propose measures for disclosure risk and data utility that are based on information theory.

  11. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  12. Gas releases from salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  13. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  14. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    The SDSS collaboration; Abazajian, Kevork

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordina...

  15. Mechanisms of HSP72 release

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-15

    Mar 15, 2007 ... Cancer; Chaperokine; heat shock proteins; inflammation; receptors, signal transduction ... release mechanism, including necrotic cell death, severe blunt trauma, surgery and following infection with lytic viruses, and an active release mechanism which involves the non classical protein release pathway.

  16. Decolonizing Trauma Studies Round-Table Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Craps

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This round-table, which featured literary critics Professor Stef Craps, Professor Bryan Cheyette and Dr. Alan Gibbs, was recorded as part of the “Decolonizing Trauma Studies” symposium organized by Dr. Sonya Andermahr and Dr. Larissa Allwork at The School of The Arts, The University of Northampton (15 May 2015. Convened a week after the University of Zaragoza’s “Memory Frictions” conference, where Cheyette, Gibbs, Andermahr and Allwork gave papers, the Northampton symposium and round-table was sponsored by The School of The Arts to coincide with Andermahr’s guest editorship of this special issue of Humanities. Craps, Cheyette and Gibbs addressed five questions during the round-table. Namely, does trauma studies suffer from a form of psychological universalism? Do you see any signs that trauma studies is becoming more decolonized? What are the challenges of a decolonized trauma studies for disciplinary thinking? How does a decolonized trauma studies relate to pedagogical ethics? Finally, where do you see the future of the field? While this edited transcript retains a certain informality of style, it offers a significant contribution to knowledge by capturing a unique exchange between three key thinkers in contemporary trauma studies, providing a timely analysis of the impact of postcolonial theory on trauma studies, the state of the field and its future possibilities. Issues addressed include the problematic scholarly tendency to universalize a western model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD; the question of the centrality of the Holocaust in trauma studies and the implications of this for the study of atrocities globally; the vexed issues posed by the representation of perpetrators; as well as how the basic tenets of western cultural trauma theory, until recently so often characterized by a Caruth-inspired focus on belatedness and afterwardness, are being rethought, both in response to developments in the US and in answer to

  17. Distributed hash table theory, platforms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hao; Xie, Haiyong; Yu, Nenghai

    2013-01-01

    This SpringerBrief summarizes the development of Distributed Hash Table in both academic and industrial fields. It covers the main theory, platforms and applications of this key part in distributed systems and applications, especially in large-scale distributed environments. The authors teach the principles of several popular DHT platforms that can solve practical problems such as load balance, multiple replicas, consistency and latency. They also propose DHT-based applications including multicast, anycast, distributed file systems, search, storage, content delivery network, file sharing and c

  18. Hot Air Drying of Green Table Olives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayit Sargin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of hot air-drying of green table olives (Domat variety by using a tray dryer were studied. Air temperature varied from 40 to 70 °C with an air velocity of 1 m/s. Drying rate curves were determined and quality of dried green olives was evaluated by instrumental analysis (bulk density, particle density, porosity, shrinkage, moisture content, water activity, colour value, protein content, oil content, peroxide value and acidity. Consumers’ acceptance test and microbiological analysis were also applied.

  19. Construction of an automated table standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, R. E.; Barbero, M. D.; Di Giulio, E. A.; Folco, J. F.; Jiménez, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the construction of an upright stretcher designed for patients in rehabilitation. The standing back to patients' expectations of therapeutic improvement, allowing correct all the troubles of a passive long. It has been shown that this table favors not only physically but also has a psychological reach beyond the scope of physical therapy and strongly affects the recovery. At the same time, the use of an upright stretcher greatly decreases the biomechanical disorders of hospital staff in the process of recovery. Thus the problem of rehabilitation of trafficking in a comprehensive way which not only focuses on the patient's undivided attention but also includes medical and auxiliary personnel.

  20. Combining contingency tables with missing dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, F

    2000-06-01

    We propose a methodology for estimating the cell probabilities in a multiway contingency table by combining partial information from a number of studies when not all of the variables are recorded in all studies. We jointly model the full set of categorical variables recorded in at least one of the studies, and we treat the variables that are not reported as missing dimensions of the study-specific contingency table. For example, we might be interested in combining several cohort studies in which the incidence in the exposed and nonexposed groups is not reported for all risk factors in all studies while the overall numbers of cases and cohort size is always available. To account for study-to-study variability, we adopt a Bayesian hierarchical model. At the first stage of the model, the observation stage, data are modeled by a multinomial distribution with fixed total number of observations. At the second stage, we use the logistic normal (LN) distribution to model variability in the study-specific cells' probabilities. Using this model and data augmentation techniques, we reconstruct the contingency table for each study regardless of which dimensions are missing, and we estimate population parameters of interest. Our hierarchical procedure borrows strength from all the studies and accounts for correlations among the cells' probabilities. The main difficulty in combining studies recording different variables is in maintaining a consistent interpretation of parameters across studies. The approach proposed here overcomes this difficulty and at the same time addresses the uncertainty arising from the missing dimensions. We apply our modeling strategy to analyze data on air pollution and mortality from 1987 to 1994 for six U.S. cities by combining six cross-classifications of low, medium, and high levels of mortality counts, particulate matter, ozone, and carbon monoxide with the complication that four of the six cities do not report all the air pollution variables. Our

  1. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  2. ECOGRAMS FOR PHYTOSOCIOLOGICAL TABLES BASED ON ELLENBERG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. ELLENBERG

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Description of the method to obtain ecograms, which can be calculated from normal phytosociological tables, plotting average values of Ellenberg’s Zeigewerte on 6 axes corresponding to diagonals of a hexagon. The ecogram is the ecological fingerprint of the association. With adequate software the ecogram can be obtained automatically. It makes possible the immediate comparison among different communities. Ecograms give the synecological characterization of associations and can be used for detecting ecological gradients and the delimitation of higher syntaxa. A first example consisting of a selected group of 33 forest communities from Italy is discussed.

  3. Improved Outcome of Fracture Treatment by Early Operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treated by early operative reduction because of shorter hospital stay. early return to work. ... bed rest is avoided and shortened hospital stay is ... The types of operations done were analysed in Table l. which has shown major differences between. 1997 and 1998 in the operative fixation of fractures (25.3 % in 1997 compared ...

  4. Tables of physical and chemical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kaye, George William C

    "It is now over ninety years since the first edition of Kaye and Laby's tables was published. Over that period a further fifteen editions were published at, roughly, five- to ten-year intervals. Following the launch of the sixteenth edition, the Editorial Board considered how the next edition should be prepared and what form it should take; should we propose a pocket version or a CD-ROM-based edition? We also explored publishing Kaye and Laby as a web-site. Above all, we felt, and our contributors agreed, that the tables were still extremely useful and that the tradition started by Kaye and Laby should be maintained. Our hope was that a paper version and a web-site could be launched together. However our publisher decided, for policy reasons, that he was not able to support the next edition of the book. The contract with the Editorial Board stipulated that, when the stocks of the sixteenth edition were exhausted, ownership of the rights to Kaye and Laby should pass to the Board. No alternative publisher wa...

  5. Physical explanation of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, V N

    2003-05-01

    The Periodic Table of the elements, the most important generalization in chemistry, is often considered as a representative special case in the study of the relation between chemistry and physics. Its quantum interpretation was initiated, but not completed, by Niels Bohr. In this paper, post-Bohr conceptual developments are discussed from historical and epistemological points of view. The difference between high-precision numerical calculations for individual atoms and the theory of the periodic system as a whole is emphasized. Periodic laws met in Nature are not restricted to the chemical Periodic Table. A comparative study of these laws makes it possible to single out essential features that define the particular pattern of periodicity. It is shown that the periodic system of neutral ground state atoms now has a firm nonempirical quantum-theoretical basis. Alternative approaches, based on group theory and other mathematical schemes, are briefly discussed. It is argued that, while quantum theory is capable of fully accurate calculations for relatively simple atoms or molecular objects, the complexity of polyatomic molecules and chemical reactions guarantees the flourishing of chemistry as a separate scientific discipline.

  6. Electrical impedance tomography of the 1995 OGI gasoline release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1996-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) was used to image the plume resulting from a release of 378 liters (100 gallons) of gasoline into a sandy acquifer. Images were made in 5 planes before and 5 times during the release, to generate a detailed picture of the spatial as well as the temporal development of the plume as it spread at the water table. Information of the electrical impedance (both in phase and out of phase voltages) was used or several different frequencies to produce images. We observed little dispersion in the images either before or after the gasoline entered the acquifer. Likewise, despite some laboratory measurements of impedances, there was no evidence of a change in the reactance in the soil because of the gasoline.

  7. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  8. 28 CFR 550.55 - Eligibility for early release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 550.55 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... offenses committed upon minors; (5) Inmates who have a current felony conviction for: (i) An offense that... committed upon minors; (6) Inmates who have been convicted of an attempt, conspiracy, or other offense which...

  9. Electroweak phase transition and entropy release in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Dolgov, A.

    2018-01-01

    It is shown that the vacuum-like energy of the Higgs potential at non-zero temperatures leads, in the course of the cosmological expansion, to a small but non-negligible rise of the entropy density in the comoving volume. This increase is calculated in the frameworks of the minimal standard model. The result can have a noticeable effect on the outcome of baryo-through-leptogenesis.

  10. Do children with obesity have worse table manners? Associations between child table manners, weight status and weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Naomi F; Cesaro, Robert J; Appugliese, Danielle P; Miller, Alison L; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Pesch, Megan H

    2018-01-31

    Children with obesity experience stigma stemming from stereotypes, one such stereotype is that people with obesity are "sloppy" or have poor manners. Teaching children "proper table manners" has been proposed as an obesity prevention strategy. Little is known about the association between children's weight status and table manners. To examine correlates of child table manners and to examine the association of child table manners with child obese weight status and prospective change in child body mass index z-score (BMIz). Mother-child dyads (N = 228) participated in a videotaped laboratory eating task with cupcakes. Coding schemes to capture child table manners (making crumbs, chewing with mouth open, getting food on face, shoving food in mouth, slouching, and getting out of seat), and maternal attentiveness to child table manners, were reliably applied. Anthropometrics were measured at baseline and at follow-up two years later. Regression analyses examined the association of participant characteristics with child table manners, as well as the associations of child table manners with child obese weight status, and prospective change in BMIz/year. Predictors of poorer child table manners were younger child age, greater cupcake consumption, and greater maternal attentiveness to child table manners. Poorer child table manners were not associated with child obese (vs. not) weight status, but were associated with a prospective decrease in BMIz/year in children with overweight/obesity. Obesity interventions to improve table manners may be perpetuating unfavorable stereotypes and stigma. Future work investigating these associations is warranted to inform childhood obesity guidelines around table manners. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A piecewise lookup table for calculating nonbonded pairwise atomic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinping; Liu, Lijun; Su, Peng; Duan, Pengbo; Lu, Daihui

    2015-11-01

    A critical challenge for molecular dynamics simulations of chemical or biological systems is to improve the calculation efficiency while retaining sufficient accuracy. The main bottleneck in improving the efficiency is the evaluation of nonbonded pairwise interactions. We propose a new piecewise lookup table method for rapid and accurate calculation of interatomic nonbonded pairwise interactions. The piecewise lookup table allows nonuniform assignment of table nodes according to the slope of the potential function and the pair interaction distribution. The proposed method assigns the nodes more reasonably than in general lookup tables, and thus improves the accuracy while requiring fewer nodes. To obtain the same level of accuracy, our piecewise lookup table accelerates the calculation via the efficient usage of cache memory. This new method is straightforward to implement and should be broadly applicable. Graphical Abstract Illustration of piecewise lookup table method.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental regulatory update table, March--April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Salk, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. 7 CFR 51.1538 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.1538 Section 51.1538... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Metric Conversion Table § 51.1538 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters(mm) 1/8 equals 3.2 1/4 equals 6.4 3/8 equals 9.5 1/2 equals...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2009 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.2009 Section 51.2009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Metric Conversion Table § 51.2009 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 62/64 24.6 59/64 23.4 56/64 22.2 49/64 19.4 48/64 19.0...

  20. 7 CFR 51.2660 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.2660 Section 51.2660... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Metric Conversion Table § 51.2660 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 8/64 equals 3.2 16/64 equals 6.4 24/64 equals 9.5 32/64 equals 12.7...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2549 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.2549 Section 51.2549... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Pistachio Nuts in the Shell § 51.2549 Metric conversion table. Use the following table for metric conversion: Inches Millimeters 5/64 1.98 18/100 .46 1/4 6.35...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1566 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.1566 Section 51.1566... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Metric Conversion Table § 51.1566 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 1/8 equals 3.2 1/4 equals 6.4 1/2 equals 12.7 3/4 equals 19.1 1...

  3. 7 CFR 51.2562 - Metric Conversion Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric Conversion Table. 51.2562 Section 51.2562... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pistachio Nuts § 51.2562 Metric Conversion Table. Use the following table for metric conversion: Inches Millimeters 5/64 1.98 16/64 6.35 24/64 9.53...

  4. 7 CFR 51.3212 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.3212 Section 51.3212... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Bermuda-Granex-Grano Type Onions Metric Conversion Table § 51.3212 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 1/8 3.2 1/4 6.4 3/8 9.5 1/2 12.7 5/8 15.9 3...

  5. 7 CFR 51.3160 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.3160 Section 51.3160... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Nectarines Metric Conversion Table § 51.3160 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 1/8 equals 3.2 1/4 equals 6.4 3/8 equals 9.5 1/2 equals 12.7 5/8...

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. An Alternate Graphical Representation of Periodic table of Chemical Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakr, Mohd

    2009-01-01

    Periodic table of chemical elements symbolizes an elegant graphical representation of symmetry at atomic level and provides an overview on arrangement of electrons. It started merely as tabular representation of chemical elements, later got strengthened with quantum mechanical description of atomic structure and recent studies have revealed that periodic table can be formulated using SO(4,2)* SU(2) group. IUPAC, the governing body in Chemistry, doesn't approve any periodic table as a standard...

  8. Environmental regulatory update table: September/October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Query-Adaptive Reciprocal Hash Tables for Nearest Neighbor Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglong; Deng, Cheng; Lang, Bo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have witnessed the success of binary hashing techniques in approximate nearest neighbor search. In practice, multiple hash tables are usually built using hashing to cover more desired results in the hit buckets of each table. However, rare work studies the unified approach to constructing multiple informative hash tables using any type of hashing algorithms. Meanwhile, for multiple table search, it also lacks of a generic query-adaptive and fine-grained ranking scheme that can alleviate the binary quantization loss suffered in the standard hashing techniques. To solve the above problems, in this paper, we first regard the table construction as a selection problem over a set of candidate hash functions. With the graph representation of the function set, we propose an efficient solution that sequentially applies normalized dominant set to finding the most informative and independent hash functions for each table. To further reduce the redundancy between tables, we explore the reciprocal hash tables in a boosting manner, where the hash function graph is updated with high weights emphasized on the misclassified neighbor pairs of previous hash tables. To refine the ranking of the retrieved buckets within a certain Hamming radius from the query, we propose a query-adaptive bitwise weighting scheme to enable fine-grained bucket ranking in each hash table, exploiting the discriminative power of its hash functions and their complement for nearest neighbor search. Moreover, we integrate such scheme into the multiple table search using a fast, yet reciprocal table lookup algorithm within the adaptive weighted Hamming radius. In this paper, both the construction method and the query-adaptive search method are general and compatible with different types of hashing algorithms using different feature spaces and/or parameter settings. Our extensive experiments on several large-scale benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed techniques can significantly outperform both

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table July/August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Efficient tabling of structured data with enhanced hash-consing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Neng-Fa; Have, Christian Theil

    2012-01-01

    Current tabling systems suffer from an increase in space complexity, time complexity or both when dealing with sequences due to the use of data structures for tabled subgoals and answers and the need to copy terms into and from the table area. This symptom can be seen in not only B-Prolog, which ...... of applications such as language parsing and bio-sequence analysis applications. We confirm this improvement with experimental results....

  19. Environmental regulatory update table November--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Multimedia Pivot Tables for Multimedia Analytics on Image Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Worring, M; Koelma, D.; Zahálka, J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multimedia analytics solution for getting insight into image collections by extending the powerful analytic capabilities of pivot tables, found in the ubiquitous spreadsheets, to multimedia. We formalize the concept of multimedia pivot tables and give design rules and methods for the multimodal summarization, structuring, and browsing of the collection based on these tables, all optimized to support an analyst in getting structural and conclusive insights. Our proposed solution p...

  1. An Ancient Egyptian Diagonal Star Table in Mallawi, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Sarah; Cockcroft, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A coffin belonging to an Egyptian Middle Kingdom official Hor-em-hetepu, on public display in the Mallawi Monuments Museum, Egypt, contains a previously-unpublished diagonal star table (or "diagonal star clock"). This table adds to the other twenty-four examples of this type of astronomical record or calendar from around 2100 B.C. The table displays a regular diagonal pattern of decan (star or asterism) names, with some interesting points of content, epigraphy, and typology.

  2. Tables of Products of Tensor Operators and Stevens Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    Numerical tables of products of tensor (Racah) operators, Rl,m(J), and Stevens operators Olm(J), working within a J-multiplet are given as a function of X=J(J+1). Examples of the use of the tables, such as the calculation of commutation relations and thermal averages are given.......Numerical tables of products of tensor (Racah) operators, Rl,m(J), and Stevens operators Olm(J), working within a J-multiplet are given as a function of X=J(J+1). Examples of the use of the tables, such as the calculation of commutation relations and thermal averages are given....

  3. Contributing Input-Output Tables to the GTAP Data Base

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, Karen; McDougall, Robert; Walmsley, Terrie L.

    2000-01-01

    This document is written for those who wish to contribute to the GTAP data base, whether by providing an input-output table for a country not separately represented in the data base, or by updating the table for a region that is already represented. It provides specifications and advice on the structure of the table, sectoral classification, treatment of imports, and other key points. It also describes what we at the Center for Global Trade Analysis do once we receive your table. This vers...

  4. Gini coefficient as a life table function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a toolkit for measuring and analyzing inter-individual inequality in length of life by Gini coefficient. Gini coefficient and four other inequality measures are defined on the length-of-life distribution. Properties of these measures and their empirical testing on mortality data suggest a possibility for different judgements about the direction of changes in the degree of inequality by using different measures. A new computational procedure for the estimation of Gini coefficient from life tables is developed and tested on about four hundred real life tables. The estimates of Gini coefficient are precise enough even for abridged life tables with the final age group of 85+. New formulae have been developed for the decomposition of differences between Gini coefficients by age and cause of death. A new method for decomposition of age-components into effects of mortality and composition of population by group is developed. Temporal changes in the effects of elimination of causes of death on Gini coefficient are analyzed. Numerous empirical examples show: Lorenz curves for Sweden, Russia and Bangladesh in 1995, proportional changes in Gini coefficient and four other measures of inequality for the USA in 1950-1995 and for Russia in 1959-2000. Further shown are errors of estimates of Gini coefficient when computed from various types of mortality data of France, Japan, Sweden and the USA in 1900-95, decompositions of the USA-UK difference in life expectancies and Gini coefficients by age and cause of death in 1997. As well, effects of elimination of major causes of death in the UK in 1951-96 on Gini coefficient, age-specific effects of mortality and educational composition of the Russian population on changes in life expectancy and Gini coefficient between 1979 and 1989. Illustrated as well are variations in life expectancy and Gini coefficient across 32 countries in 1996-1999 and associated changes in life expectancy and Gini

  5. A self-referential HOWTO on release engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galassi, Mark C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Release engineering is a fundamental part of the software development cycle: it is the point at which quality control is exercised and bug fixes are integrated. The way in which software is released also gives the end user her first experience of a software package, while in scientific computing release engineering can guarantee reproducibility. For these reasons and others, the release process is a good indicator of the maturity and organization of a development team. Software teams often do not put in place a release process at the beginning. This is unfortunate because the team does not have early and continuous execution of test suites, and it does not exercise the software in the same conditions as the end users. I describe an approach to release engineering based on the software tools developed and used by the GNU project, together with several specific proposals related to packaging and distribution. I do this in a step-by-step manner, demonstrating how this very paper is written and built using proper release engineering methods. Because many aspects of release engineering are not exercised in the building of the paper, the accompanying software repository also contains examples of software libraries.

  6. The role of substrate morphology for the cytokine release profile of immature human primary macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartneck, Matthias [Department of Medicine III, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Heffels, Karl-Heinz [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Bovi, Manfred [Electron Microscopic Facility, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Groll, Jürgen [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research and Dept. of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that the physicochemical nature of any given material is a dominant factor for the release of cytokines by innate immune cells, specifically of macrophages, and thus majorly influences their interaction with other cell types. Recently, we could show that the 3D structure of star shaped polytheylene oxide–polypropylene oxide co-polymers (sP(EO-stat-PO))-hydrogel coated substrates has a stronger influence on the release pattern of cytokines after 7 days of culture than surface chemistry. Here, we focused on the analysis of cytokine release over time and a more detailed analysis of cell morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Therefore, we compared different strategies for SEM sample preparation and found that using osmium tetroxide combined with aqua bidest led to best preparation results. For cytokine release we show significant changes from day 3 to day 7 of cell culture. After 3 days, the sP(EO-stat-PO)-coated substrates led to an induction of pro-angiogenic CCL3 and CCL4, and of low amounts of the anti-inflammatory IL10, which declined at day 7. In contrast, pleiotropic IL6 and the pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL1β were expressed stronger at day 7 than at day 3. - Highlights: • Strategies for the preparation of macrophages on hydrogel materials (Fig. 1) • Cytokine release of immature macrophages on the substrates (Fig. 2 and Table 1) • Changes in cytokine release during macrophage maturation (Table 2)

  7. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these....... Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future...

  8. Effect of Specific Drills through Table Tennis Ball Feeding Machine on Selected Skill Performance Variables of Non- Table Tennis Players

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. M. Srinivasan; Ilangovan, P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of effect of specific drills through table tennis ball feeding machine on selected skill performance variables of non- table tennis players. To achieve the purpose 30 men non-table tennis players from faculty of general and adapted physical education and yoga, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University and Maruthi College of Physical Education, Coimbatore. The age of the subject’s was ranged from 23 to 28 years. the selected subjects were c...

  9. QTL Information Table: 24 [Q-TARO

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Resistance or Tolerance Submergency tolerance early elongation ability using the lo...west elongated internode (LEI) concept RFLP C)Interval F2 Patnai 23 Goai B R1709 RM235 pha Nemoto, K., Ukai, Y., Tan...g, D.Q., Kasai, Y., and Morita, M. (2004). Inheritance of early elongation ability in floating rice revealed by diallel and QTL analyses. Theor Appl Genet 109, 42-47. ...

  10. Flash release an alternative for releasing complex MEMS devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  11. Discoloration of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as a proxy for water-table depth in peatlands: validation and assessment of seasonal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Robert K.; Hotchkiss, Sara C.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: 1. Discoloration of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape has been used in peatland ecological and hydrological studies as an inexpensive way to monitor changes in water-table depth and reducing conditions. 2. We investigated the relationship between depth of PVC tape discoloration and measured water-table depth at monthly time steps during the growing season within nine kettle peatlands of northern Wisconsin. Our specific objectives were to: (1) determine if PVC discoloration is an accurate method of inferring water-table depth in Sphagnum-dominated kettle peatlands of the region; (2) assess seasonal variability in the accuracy of the method; and (3) determine if systematic differences in accuracy occurred among microhabitats, PVC tape colour and peatlands. 3. Our results indicated that PVC tape discoloration can be used to describe gradients of water-table depth in kettle peatlands. However, accuracy differed among the peatlands studied, and was systematically biased in early spring and late summer/autumn. Regardless of the month when the tape was installed, the highest elevations of PVC tape discoloration showed the strongest correlation with midsummer (around July) water-table depth and average water-table depth during the growing season. 4. The PVC tape discoloration method should be used cautiously when precise estimates are needed of seasonal changes in the water-table.

  12. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2007-05-23

    This report was revised in May 2007 to correct values in Section 3.4.1.7, second paragraph, last sentence; 90Sr values in Tables 3.22 and 3.32; and 99Tc values Table 4.3 and in Chapter 5. In addition, the tables in Appendix F were updated to reflect corrections to the 90Sr values. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in May 2005. CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contam¬inants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

  13. Cuscuta reflexa invasion induces Ca2+ release in its host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, M.; Krol, van der A.R.; Kaldenhoff, R.

    2010-01-01

    Cuscuta reflexa induces a variety of reaction in its hosts. Some of these are visual reactions, and it is clear that these morphological changes are preceded by events at the molecular level, where signal transduction is one of the early processes. Calcium (Ca(2+)) release is the major second

  14. daily, sustained-release theophylline on sleep in nocturnal asthmatics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    during the early hours of the morning and nocturnal asthma attacks are therefore not always prevented.2 However, improved control of nocturnal asthma has been reported with the use of once-daily, sustained-release, evening- administered theophylline.1. The influence of theophylline on sleep is not clear and.

  15. New NIA Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... you have a family member or friends with Alzheimer's disease? Are you wondering what they're going ...

  16. The next step in biology: A periodic table?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... In my opinion, a bio-periodic table could be defined as a tabular arrangement of unique biological elements that, in combinations, produce distinct higher-level properties of the system. This paper examines the possibility of using 'protein fold' as building block of a molecular periodic table. Before we delve ...

  17. Comparative study of effects of table sugar, laboratory grade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    A study was conducted to investigate effects of table sugar, laboratory grade sucrose and mannitol on growth of banana ... l-1 of laboratory grade sucrose, table sucrose and mannitol was used with no sugar as a control treatment. ..... of banana plantlets under in vitro condition at a level of 30g x l-1. However, reducing sugar ...

  18. TABLE AND CHAIRS CRAFTSMAN IBM IN BULADU VILLAGE GORONTALO DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuddin Ayuddin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Gorontalo Community still rely on tables and chairs furniture made from rattan, but along with the time, tables and chairs from rattan is already becoming obsolete, one reason is growing furniture design that more convincing than other materials such as wood and aluminum. The society Devotion (IBM will provide re-design solutions for a table and chairs made from rattan by considering three main concepts, namely efficiency, aesthetic, and functional. With this concept can produce tables and chairs that are more innovative, powerful, and has a higher aesthetic so that it becomes a product of superior competition. Specific targets to be achieved is the increase: 1 knowledge and skills about designing tables and chairs from rattan using three concepts, namely efficiency, aesthetic, and functional, 2 increased revenue artisans from rattan tables and chairs. In addition to these targets, also the administrative improvement craftsmen and marketing management. The method used is the training and assistance directly to the artisans of the strategies and techniques in the manufacture of tables and chairs made of rattan. The results are expected to be an increase in the sale price so that the welfare of artisans tables and chairs to be better in the future.

  19. 7 CFR 51.322 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.322 Section 51.322 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Metric Conversion Table § 51.322 Metric conversion...

  20. Using Mathematica to build Non-parametric Statistical Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Perez Sainz de Rozas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I present computational procedures to obtian statistical tables. The tables of the asymptotic distribution and the exact distribution of Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic Dn for one population, the table of the distribution of the runs R, the table of the distribution of Wilcoxon signed-rank statistic W+ and the table of the distribution of Mann-Whitney statistic Ux using Mathematica, Version 3.9 under Window98. I think that it is an interesting cuestion because many statistical packages give the asymptotic significance level in the statistical tests and with these porcedures one can easily calculate the exact significance levels and the left-tail and right-tail probabilities with non-parametric distributions. I have used mathematica to make these calculations because one can use symbolic language to solve recursion relations. It's very easy to generate the format of the tables, and it's possible to obtain any table of the mentioned non-parametric distributions with any precision, not only with the standard parameters more used in Statistics, and without transcription mistakes. Furthermore, using similar procedures, we can generate tables for the following distribution functions: Binomial, Poisson, Hypergeometric, Normal, x2 Chi-Square, T-Student, F-Snedecor, Geometric, Gamma and Beta.

  1. 26 CFR 1.382-1 - Table of contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.382-1 Section 1.382-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.382-1 Table of contents. This section lists the captions that...

  2. VirtualTable: a projection augmented reality game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Steenstrup, Kasper Hornbak

    2015-01-01

    VirtualTable is a projection augmented reality installation where users are engaged in an interactive tower defense game. The installation runs continuously and is designed to attract people to a table, which the game is projected onto. Any number of players can join the game for an optional period...

  3. Decreased summer water table depth affects peatland vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, A.J.G.; Robroek, B.J.M.; Limpens, J.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Schouten, M.G.C.; Berendse, F.

    2009-01-01

    Climate change can be expected to increase the frequency of summer droughts and associated low water tables in ombrotrophic peatlands. We studied the effects of periodic water table drawdown in a mesocosm experiment. Mesocosms were collected in Southern Sweden, and subsequently brought to an

  4. 10 CFR 32.28 - Same: Table of organ doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Same: Table of organ doses. 32.28 Section 32.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exempt Concentrations and Items § 32.28 Same: Table of organ doses. Part of...

  5. 10 CFR 32.24 - Same: Table of organ doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Same: Table of organ doses. 32.24 Section 32.24 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exempt Concentrations and Items § 32.24 Same: Table of organ doses. Part of...

  6. Multimedia Pivot Tables for Multimedia Analytics on Image Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worring, M.; Koelma, D.; Zahálka, J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multimedia analytics solution for getting insight into image collections by extending the powerful analytic capabilities of pivot tables, found in the ubiquitous spreadsheets, to multimedia. We formalize the concept of multimedia pivot tables and give design rules and methods for the

  7. Temperature and Coefficient of Restitution of a Table Tennis Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonyoung Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coefficient of restitution (COR of a bouncing table tennis ball was measured at varying ball temperatures with a Motion Detector. It was found that there is a negative linear relationship between the COR and the temperature of the table tennis ball for temperatures ranging from 5 to 56 ̊C.

  8. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 946 - Airport Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport Tables B Appendix B to Part... MODERNIZATION OF THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE Pt. 946, App. B Appendix B to Part 946—Airport Tables “A” Level Service Airports: *Akron, OH CAK *Albany, NY ALB *Atlanta, GA ATL *Baltimore, MD BWI *Boston, MA BOS...

  9. A comparison of northern and southern table mountain pine stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick H. Brose; Thomas A. Waldrop; Helen H. Mohr

    2010-01-01

    Table Mountain pine (Pinus pungens) stands occur throughout the Appalachian Mountains, but ecological research has concentrated on the southern part of this region. In 2006, research was initiated in northern Table Mountain pine stands growing in PA to compare some basic attributes of those stands with previously described ones in TN. Overall, the...

  10. 40 CFR Table 6 of Subpart Bbbbbbb... - General Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Maintenance Yes. § 63.8(c)(1)(i) CMS maintenance Yes. § 63.8(c)(1)(ii) Spare Parts for CMS Malfunction Yes... Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., Table 6 Table 6 of Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63—General Provisions Citation Subject Applies to subpart...

  11. 2014-15 System Accountability Report. Appendix: Data Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This system accountability report provides the Data Tables that are appended to the 2014-2015 accountability report. The data tables include detailed statistical information presented in a tabular format on the following subject matter: (1) Financial Resources; (2) Personnel; (3) Enrollment; (4) Undergraduate Education; (5) Graduate Education; and…

  12. Snow impact on groundwater recharge in Table Mountain Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snowmelt in the mountainous areas of the Table Mountain Group (TMG) in South Africa is believed to be one of sources of groundwater recharge in some winter seasons. This paper provides a scientific assessment of snow impact on groundwater recharge in Table Mountain Group Aquifer Systems for the first time.

  13. A common periodic table of codons and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C; Benyó, B; Sansom, C; Szlávecz, A; Fördös, G; Micsik, T; Benyó, Z

    2003-06-27

    A periodic table of codons has been designed where the codons are in regular locations. The table has four fields (16 places in each) one with each of the four nucleotides (A, U, G, C) in the central codon position. Thus, AAA (lysine), UUU (phenylalanine), GGG (glycine), and CCC (proline) were placed into the corners of the fields as the main codons (and amino acids) of the fields. They were connected to each other by six axes. The resulting nucleic acid periodic table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons. The corresponding amino acid table also displaced periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydropathy) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table emphasizes the importance of the central nucleotide in the codons and predicts that purines control the charge while pyrimidines determine the polarity of the amino acids. This prediction was experimentally tested.

  14. Press Oil Final Release Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    There are forty-eight 55 gallon barrels filled with hydraulic oil that are candidates for release and recycle. This oil needs to be characterized prior to release. Principles of sampling as provided in MARSAME/MARSSIM approaches were used as guidance for sampling.

  15. Workload Control with Continuous Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, B. S. Nguyen; Land, M. J.; Gaalman, G. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Workload Control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept which is suitable for the needs of make-to-order job shops. Release decisions based on the workload norms form the core of the concept. This paper develops continuous time WLC release variants and investigates their due date

  16. The Granting of Work Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, William E.; Humphrey, John A.

    1981-01-01

    Analyzed the process of granting work release. Administrative data on a 10 percent random sample of incarcerated males provided the basis for a path analysis. High custody grade was found to have a very strong direct path with granting of work releases. Other variables had weaker paths. (Author)

  17. Experimental plasma astrophysics using a T{sup 3} (Table-top Terawatt) laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, T.

    1996-11-01

    Lasers that can deliver immense power of Terawatt (10{sup 12}W) and can still compactly sit on a Table-Top (T{sup 3} lasers) emerged in the 1990s. The advent of these lasers allows us to access to regimes of astronomical physical conditions that once thought impossible to realize in a terrestrial laboratory. We touch on examples that include superhigh pressure materials that may resemble the interior of giant planets and white dwarfs and of relativistic temperature plasmas that may exist in the early cosmological epoch and in the neighborhood of the blackhole event horizon.

  18. Shaking Table Experiment of Trampoline Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, S.; Kunugi, T.; Fujiwara, H.

    2010-12-01

    It has been widely thought that soil response to ground shaking do not experience asymmetry in ground motion. An extreme vertical acceleration near four times gravity was recorded during the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi earthquake at IWTH25 station. This record is distinctly asymmetric in shape; the waveform envelope amplitude is about 1.6 times larger in the upward direction compared to the downward direction. To explain this phenomenon, Aoi et al. (2008) proposed a simple model of a mass bouncing on a trampoline. In this study we perform a shaking table experiment of a soil prototype to try to reproduce the asymmetric ground motion and to investigate the physics of this asymmetric behavior. A soil chamber made of an acrylic resin cylinder with 200 mm in diameter and 500 mm in height was tightly anchored to the shaking table and vertically shaken. We used four different sample materials; Toyoura standard sands, grass beads (particle size of 0.1 and 0.4 mm) and sawdust. Sample was uniformly stacked to a depth of 450 mm and, to measure the vertical motions, accelerometers was installed inside the material (at depths of 50, 220, and 390 mm) and on the frame of the chamber. Pictures were taken from a side by a high speed camera (1000 frames/sec) to capture the motions of particles. The chamber was shaken by sinusoidal wave (5, 10, and 20 Hz) with maximum amplitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 g. When the accelerations roughly exceeded gravity, for all samples, granular behaviors of sample materials became dominant and the asymmetric motions were successfully reproduced. Pictures taken by the high speed camera showed that the motions of the particles are clearly different from the motion of the chamber which is identical to the sinusoidal motion of the shaking table (input motion). Particles are rapidly flung up and freely pulled down by gravity, and the downward motion of the particles is slower than the upward motion. It was also observed that the timing difference of the falling motions

  19. Performance of a table vibration type coffee grading machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available One of important coffee beans quality is the size uniformity. To confirm with the standart requirement, coffee beans have to be graded before being traded. Until now, grading process is still carried out fully manual, so that the grading cost is very expensive about 40% of total processing cost. Meanwhile, shortage of skill workers is as a limiting factor of the process. Therefore, machine for grading coffee beans is good alternative for grading cost. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed a table vibration type coffee grading machine for grouping of coffee beans in order to consistent quality and reduce grading cost. The machine has dimension of 272 cm length, 126 cm height, and 144 cm width. The machine has three primary components, i.e. grader table, combustion engine, and beam. The machine has three kinds of grader table that each grader table has different holes size, i.e. 7 mm x 7 mm for top grader table, 5 mm x 5 mm for axle grader table, and 4 mm x 4 mm for bottom grader table. Each grader table has dimension of 206 cm length, 105.5 cm height, and 14 cm width. The grading mechanism is by vibration grader table with the power source 5.5 HP combustion engine. The results shown that the outlet are in farms of three grades of coffee beans with connected to each compartement. Assessment of the grading machine reveals that the optimum capacity of 1,406 kg/hour reached when the speed 2,600 rpm and the angle 10O. Economic analysis showed that operational cost for grading one kilogram Robusta coffee beans with moisture content 13—14% wet basis is Rp 7.17.Key words : grading, coffee, quality, vibration table.

  20. A survey on table tolerances and couch overrides in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsky, Bonnie; Patel, Rakesh; Panfil, Joshua; Surucu, Murat; Roeske, John C

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to survey current departmental policies on treatment couch overrides and the values of table tolerances used clinically. A 25-question electronic survey on couch overrides and tolerances was sent to full members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The first part of the survey asked participants if table overrides were allowed at their institution, who was allowed to perform these overrides, and if imaging was required with overrides. The second part of the survey asked individuals to provide table tolerance data for the following treatment sites: brain/head and neck (H&N), lung, breast, abdo-men/pelvis and prostate. Each site was further divided into IMRT/VMAT and 3D conformal techniques. Spaces for free-text were provided, allowing respondents to enter any table tolerance data they were unable to specify under the treatment sites listed. A total of 361 individuals responded, of which approximately half partici-pated in the couch tolerances portion of the survey. Overall, 86% of respondents' institutions allow couch tolerance overrides at treatment. Therapists were the most common staff members permitted to perform overrides, followed by physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians, respectively. Of the institutions allowing overrides, 34% reported overriding daily. More than half of the centers document the over-ride and/or require a setup image to radiographically verify the treatment site. With respect to table tolerances, SRS/SBRT table tolerances were the tightest, while clinical setup table tolerances were the largest. There were minimal statistically significant differences between IMRT/VMAT and 3D conformal table tolerances. Our results demonstrated that table overrides are relatively common in radiotherapy despite being a potential safety concern. Institutions should review their override policy and table tolerance values in light of the practices of other institutions. Careful attention to these matters

  1. Toxics Release Inventory Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) dataset contains hazard information about the chemicals reported in TRI. Users can use this XML-format dataset to create their own databases and hazard analyses of TRI chemicals. The hazard information is compiled from a series of authoritative sources including the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The dataset is provided as a downloadable .zip file that when extracted provides XML files and schemas for the hazard information tables.

  2. Nickel mobilization in a groundwater well field: Release by pyrite oxidation and desorption from manganese oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming

    1997-01-01

    is furthermore characterized by enhanced Mn2+ concentrations. Apparently nickel accumulates on manganese oxides during pyrite oxidation. When the water table rises again, partially oxidized pyritic layers are resubmerged, and due to an insufficient supply of oxygen, the oxidation of Fe2+ released during pyrite...... oxidation becomes incomplete. The mobilized Fe2+ may reduce manganese oxides and thereby release large amounts of Ni2+ to the groundwater. Calculations using a surface complexation model indicate retardation of nickel to be strongly affected by bulk water composition. At the background groundwater...

  3. Novelty, coherence, and Mendeleev's periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Predictivism is the view that successful predictions of "novel" evidence carry more confirmational weight than accommodations of already known evidence. Novelty, in this context, has traditionally been conceived of as temporal novelty. However temporal predictivism has been criticized for lacking a rationale: why should the time order of theory and evidence matter? Instead, it has been proposed, novelty should be construed in terms of use-novelty, according to which evidence is novel if it was not used in the construction of a theory. Only if evidence is use-novel can it fully support the theory entailing it. As I point out in this paper, the writings of the most influential proponent of use-novelty contain a weaker and a stronger version of use-novelty. However both versions, I argue, are problematic. With regard to the appraisal of Mendeleev' periodic table, the most contentious historical case in the predictivism debate, I argue that temporal predictivism is indeed supported, although in ways not previously appreciated. On the basis of this case, I argue for a form of so-called symptomatic predictivism according to which temporally novel predictions carry more confirmational weight only insofar as they reveal the theory's presumed coherence of facts as real.

  4. Tool Support for Software Lookup Table Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Wilcox

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of scientific applications are performance-limited by expressions that repeatedly call costly elementary functions. Lookup table (LUT optimization accelerates the evaluation of such functions by reusing previously computed results. LUT methods can speed up applications that tolerate an approximation of function results, thereby achieving a high level of fuzzy reuse. One problem with LUT optimization is the difficulty of controlling the tradeoff between performance and accuracy. The current practice of manual LUT optimization adds programming effort by requiring extensive experimentation to make this tradeoff, and such hand tuning can obfuscate algorithms. In this paper we describe a methodology and tool implementation to improve the application of software LUT optimization. Our Mesa tool implements source-to-source transformations for C or C++ code to automate the tedious and error-prone aspects of LUT generation such as domain profiling, error analysis, and code generation. We evaluate Mesa with five scientific applications. Our results show a performance improvement of 3.0× and 6.9× for two molecular biology algorithms, 1.4× for a molecular dynamics program, 2.1× to 2.8× for a neural network application, and 4.6× for a hydrology calculation. We find that Mesa enables LUT optimization with more control over accuracy and less effort than manual approaches.

  5. CFD analysis of LLNL downdraft table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Jayaraman, Buvana; Kristoffersen, Astrid R.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2003-10-01

    This study examines the airflow and contaminant transport in an existing room (89 inch x 77 inch x 98 inch) that houses a downdraft table at LLNL. The facility was designed and built in the 1960's and is currently being considered for redesign. One objective of the redesign is to reduce airflow while maintaining or improving user safety. Because this facility has been used for many years to handle radioactive material it is impractical to conduct extensive experimental tests in it. Therefore, we have performed a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of the facility. The study examines the current operational condition and some other cases with reduced airflow. Reducing airflow will lead to savings in operating costs (lower fan power consumption), and possible improvements in containment from reduced turbulence. In addition, we examine three design (geometry) changes. These are: (1) increasing the area of the HVAC inlet on the ceiling, (2) adding a 15{sup o} angled ceiling inlet and (3) increasing the area of the slot in the doorway. Of these three geometry modifications, only the larger doorway slot leads to improved predicted containment.

  6. Ancient Maya astronomical tables from Xultun, Guatemala

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saturno, William A; Stuart, David; Aveni, Anthony F; Rossi, Franco

    2012-01-01

    ....), but Classic period (200 to 900 C.E.) precursors have not been found. In 2011, a small painted room was excavated at the extensive ancient Maya ruins of Xultun, Guatemala, dating to the early 9th century C.E...

  7. Johannes Kepler and the Rudolphine Tables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    sis of the observations of Mars. This engraving from Kepler's Mysterium. Cosmographicum illustrates his early idea that the distances of the planets from the sun were related to the five regular polyhe- dra. The outer sphere, for Saturn, circum- scribes a cube which circumscribes the sphere of Jupiter. Continuing inward are a.

  8. Effect of Coating Solvent Ratio on the Drug Release Lag Time of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro drug release studies to assess lag time was performed in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). ... the roughness of coated surface which contributed to a burst release of drug due to early opening of the tablet as a result of the high osmotic pressure and low mechanical strength of the

  9. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  10. MENDF71x. Multigroup Neutron Cross Section Data Tables Based upon ENDF/B-VII.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parsons, Donald Kent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gardiner, Steven J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Gray, Mark Girard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lee, Mary Beth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, Morgan Curtis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-17

    A new multi-group neutron cross section library has been released along with the release of NDI version 2.0.20. The library is named MENDF71x and is based upon the evaluations released in ENDF/B-VII.1 which was made publicly available in December 2011. ENDF/B-VII.1 consists of 423 evaluations of which ten are excited states evaluations and 413 are ground state evaluations. MENDF71x was created by processing the 423 evaluations into 618-group, downscatter only NDI data tables. The ENDF/B evaluation files were processed using NJOY version 99.393 with the exception of 35Cl and 233U. Those two isotopes had unique properties that required that we process the evaluation using NJOY version 2012. The MENDF71x library was only processed to room temperature, i.e., 293.6 K. In the future, we plan on producing a multi-temperature library based on ENDF/B-VII.1 and compatible with MENDF71x.

  11. 7 CFR 51.1451 - Metric conversion table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metric conversion table. 51.1451 Section 51.1451... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Metric Conversion Table § 51.1451 Metric conversion table. Inches Millimeters (mm) 8/16 12.7 7/16 11.1 6/16 9.5 5/16 7.9 4/16 6.4 3/16 4.8 2/16 3.2 6...

  12. Table des matières de 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table des matières de 1987: Au milieu de ce numéro, vous trouverez une double feuille détachable contenant la Table des matières de 1987. Comme d'habitude, deux tables y sont présentées: l'une alphabétique par auteur, l'autre par matière. Nous tenons à remercier un de nos membres, Y. Leroux, pour les avoir soigneusement préparées

  13. Learning Residual Finite-State Automata Using Observation Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kasprzik

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We define a two-step learner for RFSAs based on an observation table by using an algorithm for minimal DFAs to build a table for the reversal of the language in question and showing that we can derive the minimal RFSA from it after some simple modifications. We compare the algorithm to two other table-based ones of which one (by Bollig et al. 2009 infers a RFSA directly, and the other is another two-step learner proposed by the author. We focus on the criterion of query complexity.

  14. Chlorine international thermodynamic tables of the fluid state

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, S; de Reuck, K M

    1985-01-01

    Chlorine: International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State-8 is a four-chapter book that covers available and estimated data on chlorine; estimation of the element's properties; the correlating equations for the element; and how the tabulated properties are calculated from chosen equation. The tables in this book give the volume, entropy, enthalpy, isobaric heat capacity, compression factor, fugacity/pressure ratio, Joule-Thomson coefficient, ratio of the heat capacities, and speed of sound as a function of pressure and temperature. Given in the tables as well are the pressure, entropy, i

  15. Automated edge finishing using an active XY table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Clifford S.; Starr, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for automated edge finishing using hybrid position/force control of an XY table. The disclosure is particularly directed to learning the trajectory of the edge of a workpiece by "guarded moves". Machining is done by controllably moving the XY table, with the workpiece mounted thereon, along the learned trajectory with feedback from a force sensor. Other similar workpieces can be mounted, without a fixture on the XY table, located and the learned trajectory adjusted

  16. Effect of cuticular waxes compounds from table grapes on growth, germination and gene expression in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Moreno, Evelyn; Brito-Echeverría, Jocelyn; López, Miguel; Ríos, Juan; Balic, Iván; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Polanco, Rubén

    2016-05-01

    Botrytis cinerea attacks a broad range of host causing significant economic losses in the worldwide fruit export industry. Hitherto, many studies have focused on the penetration mechanisms used by this phytopathogen, but little is known about the early stages of infection, especially those such as adhesion and germination. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of cuticular waxes compounds from table grapes on growth, germination and gene expression of B. cinerea. To accomplish this, growth was analyzed using as substrate n-alkanes extracted from waxes of fresh fruit (table grapes, blueberries and apricots). Subsequently, the main compounds of table grape waxes, oleanolic acid (OA) and n-fatty alcohols, were mixed to generate a matrix on which conidia of B. cinerea were added to assess their effect on germination and expression of bctub, bchtr and bchex genes. B. cinerea B05.10, isolated from grapes, increased its growth on a matrix composed by table grapes n-alkanes in comparison to a matrix made with n-alkanes from apricot or blueberries. Moreover, at 2.5 h, B05.10 germination increased 17 and 33 % in presence of n-alkanes from table grape, in comparison to conditions without alkanes or with blueberries alkanes, respectively. Finally, expression of bchtr and bchex showed a significant increase during the first hour after contact with n-fatty alcohols and OA. In conclusion, B. cinerea displays selectivity towards certain compounds found in host waxes, mainly n-fatty alcohols, which could be a good candidate to control this phytopathogen in early stages of infection.

  17. Pseudomonas fluorescens' view of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    Growth in a biofilm modulates microbial metal susceptibility, sometimes increasing the ability of microorganisms to withstand toxic metal species by several orders of magnitude. In this study, a high-throughput metal toxicity screen was initiated with the aim of correlating biological toxicity data in planktonic and biofilm cells to the physiochemical properties of metal ions. To this end, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 was grown in the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) and biofilms and planktonic cells of this microorganism were exposed to gradient arrays of different metal ions. These arrays included 44 different metals with representative compounds that spanned every group of the periodic table (except for the halogens and noble gases). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values were obtained after exposing the biofilms to metal ions for 4 h. Using these values, metal ion toxicity was correlated to the following ion-specific physicochemical parameters: standard reduction-oxidation potential, electronegativity, the solubility product of the corresponding metal-sulfide complex, the Pearson softness index, electron density and the covalent index. When the ions were grouped according to outer shell electron structure, we found that heavy metal ions gave the strongest correlations to these parameters and were more toxic on average than the other classes of the ions. Correlations were different for biofilms than for planktonic cells, indicating that chemical mechanisms of metal ion toxicity differ between the two modes of growth. We suggest that biofilms can specifically counter the toxic effects of certain physicochemical parameters, which may contribute to the increased ability of biofilms to withstand metal toxicity.

  18. Heparin release from thermosensitive hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutowska, Anna; Bae, You Han; Feijen, Jan; Kim, Sung Wan

    1992-01-01

    Thermosensitive hydrogels (TSH) were synthesized and investigated as heparin releasing polymers for the prevention of surface induced thrombosis. TSH were synthesized with N-isopropyl acrylamide (NiPAAm) copolymerized with butyl methacrylate (BMA) (hydrophobic) or acrylic acid (AAc) (hydrophilic)

  19. PCDD/PCDF release inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, H. [UNEP Chemicals, Chatelaine (Switzerland)

    2004-09-15

    The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) entered into force on 17 May 2004 with 50 Parties. In May 2004, 59 countries had ratified or acceded the Convention. The objective of the Convention is ''to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants''. For intentionally produced POPs, e.g., pesticides and industrial chemicals such as hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, this will be achieved by stop of production and use. For unintentionally generated POPs, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), measures have to be taken to ''reduce the total releases derived from anthropogenic sources''; the final goal is ultimate elimination, where feasible. Under the Convention, Parties have to establish and maintain release inventories to prove the continuous release reduction. Since many countries do not have the technical and financial capacity to measure all releases from all potential PCDD/PCDF sources, UNEP Chemicals has developed the ''Standardized Toolkit for the Identification of Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases'' (''Toolkit'' for short), a methodology to estimate annual releases from a number of sources. With this methodology, annual releases can be estimated by multiplying process-specific default emission factors provided in the Toolkit with national activity data. At the seventh session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee, the Toolkit was recommended to be used by countries when reporting national release data to the Conference of the Parties. The Toolkit is especially used by developing countries and countries with economies in transition where no measured data are available. Results from Uruguay, Thailand, Jordan, Philippines, and Brunei Darussalam have been published.

  20. The Second Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork; ̈ueros, Marcel A. Ag; Allam, Sahar S.; Anderson, KurtS. J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Baldry, Ivan K.; StevenBastian; Berlind, Andreas; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R.; BochanskiJr., John J.; Boroski, William N.; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert J.; ́ari, Tam ́asBudav; Carey, Larry N.; Carliles, Samuel; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, A. J.; Csabai, Istvan; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, RoyR.; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Gurbani, Vijay K.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hamabe, Masaru; Harris, Frederick H.; C.Harris, Hugh; Harvanek, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Hendry, John S.; Hennessy, Gregory S.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Hogan, Craig J.; Hogg, David W.; Holmgren, Donald J.; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E.; Jorgensen, AndersM.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S. J.; Knapp, G. R.; Kniazev, Alexei Yu.; Kron, Richard G.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z.; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Q.Lamb, Donald; Lampeitl, Hubert; Lee, Brian C.; Leger, R. French; Li, Nolan; Lin, Huan; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H.; Malik, Tanu; BruceMargon; Matsubara, Takahiko; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McKay, Timothy A.; AveryMeiksin; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Nakajima, Reiko; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Eric H. Jr.; JoNewberg, Heidi; Newman, Peter R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Okamura, Sadanori; O'Mullane, William; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Pope, Adrian C.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Richards, Gordon T.; Richmond, Michael W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, Erin; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Smith, J. Allyn; ́c, Vernesa Smolči; Snedden, Stephanie A.; AlbertStebbins; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istv ́an; Szkody, Paula; Szokoly, Gyula P.; Tegmark, Max; Teodoro, Luis; Thakar, AniruddhaR.; Tremonti, Christy; Tucker, Douglas L.; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S.; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P.; M.Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wang, Shu-i; Weinberg, David H.; West, Andrew A.; White, Simon D.M.; Wilhite, BrianC.; Xu, Yongzhong; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D. R.; York, Donald G.; Zehavi, Idit; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2004-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its Second Data Release. This data release consists of 3324 square degrees of five-band (u g r i z) imaging data with photometry for over 88 million unique objects, 367,360 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 2627 degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data reach a depth of r ~ 22.2 (95% completeness limit for point sources) and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The imaging data have all been processed through a new version of the SDSS imaging pipeline, in which the most important improvement since the last data release is fixing an error in the model fits to each object. The result is that model magnitudes are now a good proxy for point spread function (PSF) magnitudes for point sources, and Petrosian magnitudes for extended sources. The spectroscopy extends from 38...