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Sample records for early relapsing remitting

  1. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... of which the person is aware. What happens in RRMS? Relapsing-remitting MS is defined by inflammatory ... remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More Research in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More ...

  2. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... of which the person is aware. What happens in RRMS? Relapsing-remitting MS is defined by inflammatory ... remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More Research in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More ...

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Clinicians d Resources & Support d Library & Education Programs Email newsletter Resilience: Addressing the Challenges of MS Webinar & ... remitting MS (RRMS) Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) ...

  4. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Because the location of the damage is so variable, no two people have exactly the same symptoms. ... relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More Research in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn ...

  5. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... MS Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting ... Here Start Here Colophon Stay Informed Join Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest MS Connection About the ...

  6. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... MS Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting ... Here Start Here Colophon Stay Informed Join Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest MS Connection About the ...

  7. Perception of affective prosody in patients at an early stage of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

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    Kraemer, Markus; Herold, Michele; Uekermann, Jennifer; Kis, Bernhard; Daum, Irene; Wiltfang, Jens; Berlit, Peter; Diehl, Rolf R; Abdel-Hamid, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is well known in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described for many years. Cognitive impairment, memory, and attention deficits seem to be features of advanced MS stages, whereas depression and emotional instability already occur in early stages of the disease. However, little is known about processing of affective prosody in patients in early stages of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). In this study, tests assessing attention, memory, and processing of affective prosody were administered to 25 adult patients with a diagnosis of RRMS at an early stage and to 25 healthy controls (HC). Early stages of the disease were defined as being diagnosed with RRMS in the last 2 years and having an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) of 2 or lower. Patients and HC were comparable in intelligence quotient (IQ), educational level, age, handedness, and gender. Patients with early stages of RRMS performed below the control group with respect to the subtests 'discrimination of affective prosody' and 'matching of affective prosody to facial expression' for the emotion 'angry' of the 'Tübingen Affect Battery'. These deficits were not related to executive performance. Our findings suggest that emotional prosody comprehension is deficient in young patients with early stages of RRMS. Deficits in discriminating affective prosody early in the disease may make misunderstandings and poor communication more likely. This might negatively influence interpersonal relationships and quality of life in patients with RRMS.

  8. MRI techniques and cognitive impairment in the early phase of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

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    Zivadinov, R.; De Masi, R.; Nasuelli, D.; Monti Bragadin, L.; Cazzato, G.; Zorzon, M. [Neurological Clinic, Cattinara Hospital, Trieste (Italy); Ukmar, M.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Grop, A. [Dept. of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Science, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2001-04-01

    Correlation studies between various conventional and non-conventional MRI parameters and cognitive impairment in the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) are lacking, although it is known that a number of patients with early MS have mild cognitive impairment. Our aim was to explore whether this cognitive impairment is dependent on the extent and severity of the burden of disease, diffuse microscopic brain damage or both. We studied 63 patients with clinically definite relapsing-remitting (RR) MS, duration of disease 1-10 years and Expanded disability status scale scores {<=} 5.0. Mean age was 35.4 years, mean duration of disease 5.8 years and median EDSS score 1.5. Neuropsychological performance, psychological function, neurological impairment and disability were assessed. The patients also underwent MRI, including magnetisation-transfer (MT) studies. We quantified the lesion load on T2- and T1-weighted images, the magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) of normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) and the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF). No significant difference was found between lesion loads in patients with and without cognitive impairment. In 15 patients (23.8 %) with overall cognitive impairment, median BPF and average NABT MTR were significantly lower than those in patients without cognitive impairment (0.868 vs 0.892, P = 0.02 and 28.3 vs 29.7 P = 0.046, respectively). Multiple regression analysis models demonstrated that the only variables independently correlated with cognitive impairment were: BPF (R = 0.89, P = 0.001) and average NABT MTR (R = 0.76, P = 0.012). Our findings support the hypothesis that, cognitive decline in patients with MS, a low disability score and short duration of disease is directly associated with the extent and severity of diffuse brain damage. The loss of brain parenchyma did not correlate with the severity of microscopic damage in the NABT, indicating that the two processes could be distinct in the early stages of the disease. (orig.)

  9. Does Self-Efficacy Affect Cognitive Performance in Persons with Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Early Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Joseph Jongen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In persons with multiple sclerosis (MS a lowered self-efficacy negatively affects physical activities. Against this background we studied the relationship between self-efficacy and cognitive performance in the early stages of MS. Thirty-three patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS and early Relapsing Remitting MS (eRRMS were assessed for self-efficacy (MSSES-18, cognition (CDR System, fatigue (MFIS-5, depressive symptoms (BDI, disease impact (MSIS-29, and disability (EDSS. Correlative analyses were performed between self-efficacy and cognitive scores, and stepwise regression analyses identified predictors of cognition and self-efficacy. Good correlations existed between total self-efficacy and Power of Attention (r= 0.65; P< 0.001, Reaction Time Variability (r= 0.57; P< 0.001, and Speed of Memory (r= 0.53; P< 0.01, and between control self-efficacy and Reaction Time Variability (r= 0.55; P< 0.01. Total self-efficacy predicted 40% of Power of Attention, 34% of Reaction Time Variability, and 40% of Speed of Memory variabilities. Disease impact predicted 65% of total self-efficacy and 58% of control self-efficacy variabilities. The findings may suggest that in persons with CIS and eRRMS self-efficacy may positively affect cognitive performance and that prevention of disease activity may preserve self-efficacy.

  10. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and increased brain atrophy in early stages of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

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    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if the presence of oligoclonal bands (OB at early stages of multiple sclerosis was associated with higher brain atrophy, when compared with patients without OB. METHODS: Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients with less than two years of disease onset and OB detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were included. SIENAX was used for total brain volume (TBV, gray matter volume (GMV, and white matter volume (WMV. RESULTS: Forty patients were included, 29 had positive IgG-OB. No differences were found between positive and negative patients in gender, expanded disability status scale (EDSS, treatment received, and T2/T1 lesion load. TBV in positive IgG-OB patients was 1.5 mm³ x 10(6 compared with 1.64 mm³ x 10(6 in the negative ones (p=0.02. GMV was 0.51 mm³ x 10(6 in positive IgG-OB compared with 0.62 mm³ x 10(6 in negative ones (p=0.002. No differences in WMV (p=0.09 were seen. CONCLUSIONS: IgG-OB in the CSF was related to neurodegeneration magnetic resonance (MR markers in early RRMS.

  11. Relapsing/remitting type 1 diabetes.

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    van Megen, Kayleigh M; Spindler, Matthew P; Keij, Fleur M; Bosch, Ineke; Sprangers, Fleur; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O

    2017-08-23

    Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune disease associated with irreversible loss of insulin secretory function that follows a chronic progressive course. However, it has been speculated that relapsing/remitting disease progression may occur in type 1 diabetes. We report the case of an 18-year-old girl with Graves' disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multiple islet autoantibodies, presenting with relapsing/remitting hyperglycaemia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed for islet autoimmunity. There were two instances of hyperglycaemia relapse during CIDP flare-ups that required insulin therapy and remitted after i.v. immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy improving neurological symptoms. A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was assigned on the basis of insulin need, HbA1c and islet autoantibodies. Insulin requirements disappeared following IVIG treatment and peaked during CIDP flare-ups. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses were noted against islet autoantigens. We provide clinical evidence of relapsing/remitting type 1 diabetes associated with IVIG treatment and the regulation of islet autoimmunity. Despite sufficient residual beta cell mass, individuals can experience episodes of impaired glycaemia control. This disconnect between beta cell mass and function highlighted by our case may have implications for the use of beta cell function as the primary endpoint for immune intervention trials aiming to protect beta cell mass rather than function. Immune modulation may restore beta cell function and glycaemic control.

  12. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... that can occur in RRMS; however, each person's experience with RRMS will be unique. Following a relapse, ... progressive forms of MS are more likely to experience gradually worsening problems with walking and mobility, along ...

  13. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... as well as worsening (a confirmed increase in disability over a specified period of time following a relapse) or not worsening . An increase in disability is confirmed when the person exhibits the same ...

  14. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... the periods of remission. At different points in time, RRMS can be further characterized as either active ( ... increase in disability over a specified period of time following a relapse) or not worsening . An increase ...

  15. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... course – is characterized by clearly defined attacks of new or increasing neurologic symptoms. These attacks – also called ... either active (with relapses and/or evidence of new MRI activity) or not active , as well as ...

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging based network analysis detects alterations of neuroconnectivity in patients with clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

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    Li, Yang; Jewells, Valerie; Kim, Minjeong; Chen, Yasheng; Moon, Andrew; Armao, Diane; Troiani, Luigi; Markovic-Plese, Silva; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-12-01

    Although it is inarguable that conventional MRI (cMRI) has greatly contributed to the diagnosis and assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS), cMRI does not show close correlation with clinical findings or pathologic features, and is unable to predict prognosis or stratify disease severity. To this end, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tractography and neuroconnectivity analysis may assist disease assessment in MS. We, therefore, attempted this pilot study for initial assessment of early relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Neuroconnectivity analysis was used for evaluation of 24 early RRMS patients within 2 years of presentation, and compared to the network measures of a group of 30 age-and-gender-matched normal control subjects. To account for the situation that the connections between two adjacent regions may be disrupted by an MS lesion, a new metric, network communicability, was adopted to measure both direct and indirect connections. For each anatomical area, the brain network communicability and average path length were computed and compared to characterize the network changes in efficiencies. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) loss of communicability was revealed in our RRMS cohort, particularly in the frontal and hippocampal/parahippocampal regions as well as the motor strip and occipital lobes. Correlation with the 25-foot Walk test with communicability measures in the left superior frontal (r = -0.71) as well as the left superior temporal gyrus (r = -0.43) and left postcentral gyrus (r = -0.41) were identified. Additionally identified were increased communicability between the deep gray matter structures (left thalamus and putamen) with the major interhemispheric and intrahemispheric white matter tracts, the corpus callosum, and cingulum, respectively. These foci of increased communicability are thought to represent compensatory changes. The proposed DTI-based neuroconnectivity analysis demonstrated quantifiable, structurally relevant alterations of fiber

  17. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Syndrome (CIS) d Newly Diagnosed d Diagnosing Tools Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Evoked Potentials (EP) d Other ... active (with relapses and/or evidence of new MRI activity) or not active , as well as worsening ( ...

  18. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Treating MS d Comprehensive Care Developing a Healthcare Team Make the Most of Your Doctor Visits Advance Medical Directives d Find an MS Care Provider Partners in MS Care d Managing Relapses Plasmapheresis d Rehabilitation Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) ...

  19. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal appearing white matter in early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlations between disability and spectroscopy

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    Foronda Jesus

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What currently appears to be irreversible axonal loss in normal appearing white matter, measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is of great interest in the study of Multiple Sclerosis. Our aim is to determine the axonal damage in normal appearing white matter measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and to correlate this with the functional disability measured by Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite scale, Neurological Rating Scale, Ambulation Index scale, and Expanded Disability Scale Score. Methods Thirty one patients (9 male and 22 female with relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis and a Kurtzke Expanded Disability Scale Score of 0–5.5 were recruited from four hospitals in Andalusia, Spain and included in the study. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans and neurological disability assessments were performed the same day. Results A statistically significant correlation was found (r = -0.38 p Conclusions There is correlation between disability (measured by Expanded Disability Scale Score and the NAA/Cr ratio in normal appearing white matter. The lack of correlation between the NAA/Cr ratio and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score indicates that the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite is not able to measure irreversible disability and would be more useful as a marker in stages where axonal damage is not a predominant factor.

  20. Cognitive impairment in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis

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    Saška Roškar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify changes in cognitive abilities that affect patients with relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS and to find out which instrument manifests them best. The performance of MS patients was compared to a matched group of healthy people using three neuropsychological tests: Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST, Stroop color and word test and Trail making test (TMT part B. Results on all three tests indicate general cognitive impairments in the group of patients. Compared to the group of healthy people patients with MS exhibited impaired ability of abstract reasoning (WCST, impaired cognitive flexibility and less resistance to irrelevant stimuli (Stroop color and word test, slowed information processing and impaired ability of shifting attention from one symbol to another (TMT. The largest differences between groups occured in Stroop color and word test as well as in TMT. The estimation of cognitive abilities of MS patients is of high importance and sistematicaly observing of changes in those abilities should be considered.

  1. Spectroscopic Axonal Damage of the Right Locus Coeruleus Relates to Selective Attention Impairment in Early Stage Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

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    Gadea, Marien; Martinez-Bisbal, M. Carmen; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Espert, Raul; Casanova, Bonaventura; Coret, Francisco; Celda, Bernardo

    2004-01-01

    Lower levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of axonal damage, have been found in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients with low physical disability. However, its relation to the clinical status of these patients remains unclear. We explored the association between NAA levels…

  2. A Distinct Class of Antibodies May Be an Indicator of Gray Matter Autoimmunity in Early and Established Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

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    Ann J. Ligocki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available * These authors contributed equally to the work in this manuscript.We have previously identified a distinct class of antibodies expressed by B cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of early and established relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients that is not observed in healthy donors. These antibodies contain a unique pattern of mutations in six codons along VH4 antibody genes that we termed the antibody gene signature (AGS. In fact, patients who have such B cells in their CSF are identified as either having RRMS or developing RRMS in the future. As mutations in antibody genes increase antibody affinity for particular antigens, the goal for this study was to investigate whether AGS+ antibodies bind to brain tissue antigens. Single B cells were isolated from the CSF of 10 patients with early or established RRMS. We chose 32 of these B cells that expressed antibodies enriched for the AGS for further study. We generated monoclonal full-length recombinant human antibodies (rhAbs and used both immunological assays and immunohistochemistry to investigate the capacity of these AGS+ rhAbs to bind brain tissue antigens. AGS+ rhAbs did not recognize myelin tracts in the corpus callosum. Instead, AGS+ rhAbs recognized neuronal nuclei and/or astrocytes, which are prevalent in the cortical gray matter. This pattern was unique to the AGS+ antibodies from early and established RRMS patients, as AGS+ antibodies from an early neuromyelitis optica patient did not display the same reactivity. Prevalence of CSF-derived B cells expressing AGS+ antibodies that bind to these cell types may be an indicator of gray matter-directed autoimmunity in early and established RRMS patients.

  3. MR spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI), lesion load and clinical scores in early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study

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    Bellmann-Strobl, J.; Paul, F.; Aktas, O.; Zipp, F. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin and Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Cecilie Vogt Clinic for Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Stiepani, H.; Bohner, G.; Klingebiel, R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Wuerfel, J. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin and Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Cecilie Vogt Clinic for Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Schleswig-Holstein, Institute of Neuroradiology, Campus Luebeck, Kiel (Germany); Warmuth, C. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Wandinger, K.P. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to correlate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based lesion load assessment with clinical disability in early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Seventeen untreated patients (ten women, seven men; mean age 33.0{+-}7.9 years) with the initial diagnosis of RRMS were included for cross-sectional as well as longitudinal (24 months) clinical and MRI-based assessment in comparison with age-matched healthy controls. Conventional MR sequences, MR spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI) were performed at 1.5 T. Lesion number and volume, MRS and MTI measurements for lesions and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) were correlated to clinical scores [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC)] for monitoring disease course after treatment initiation (interferon {beta}-1a). MTI and MRS detected changes [magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR), N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio] in NAWM over time. EDSS and lesional MTR increases correlated throughout the disease course. Average MTR of NAWM raised during the study (p<0.05) and correlated to the MSFC score (r=0.476, p<0.001). At study termination, NAA/creatine ratio of NAWM correlated to the MSFC score (p<0.05). MTI and MRS were useful for initial disease assessment in NAWM. MTI and MRS correlated with clinical scores, indicating potential for monitoring the disease course and gaining new insights into treatment-related effects. (orig.)

  4. Natalizumab for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

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    Pucci, Eugenio; Giuliani, Giorgio; Solari, Alessandra; Simi, Silvana; Minozzi, Silvia; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galea, Ian

    2011-10-05

    Natalizumab (NTZ) (Tysabri(®)) is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier, thus reducing inflammation in central nervous system, and has been approved worldwide for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of NTZ in the treatment of patients with RRMS. We searched the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2010, Issue 1), MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE, all up to 19 February 2010, and bibliographies of papers. Handsearching was carried out. Trialists and pharmaceutical companies were contacted. Furthermore, the websites of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMA) and the National Institute for health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) were also checked. All double-blind, randomised, controlled trials analysing more than a single infusion of NTZ (dosage > 3 mg/kg intravenous infusion every 4 weeks), also including its use as add-on treatment, versus placebo or other drugs in patients with RRMS. No restrictions on the basis of duration of treatment or length of follow up. Three reviewers independently selected articles which met the inclusion criteria. Disagreements were solved by discussion. Two reviewers independently extracted the data and assessed the methodological quality of each trial. Missing data was sought by contacting principal authors and Biogen Idec, through Biogen-Dompé Italia. Three studies met the inclusion criteria. These included one placebo-controlled trial (942 patients) and two add-on placebo-controlled trials, i.e. one plus glatiramer acetate (110 patients) and the second plus interferon beta-1a (1171 patients).This review assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of NTZ in patients with RRMS. Data was conclusive with respect to efficacy and tolerability, but not safety. As far as

  5. Cladribine tablets for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rammohan, Kottil; Giovannoni, Gavin; Comi, Giancarlo;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the phase III CLARITY study, treatment with cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 3.5 or 5.25mg/kg over 96 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rates (ARR) versus placebo in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Further post hoc analyses....../>40 years); disease duration (10 years); prior disease-modifying drug treatment (treated/naïve); relapses in the prior year (≤1/2/≥3); Expanded Disability Status Scale score (median) at baseline (all P≤0...

  6. Serum neurofilament light chain in early relapsing remitting MS is increased and correlates with CSF levels and with MRI measures of disease severity.

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    Kuhle, Jens; Barro, Christian; Disanto, Giulio; Mathias, Amandine; Soneson, Charlotte; Bonnier, Guillaume; Yaldizli, Özguer; Regeniter, Axel; Derfuss, Tobias; Canales, Mathieu; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Krueger, Gunnar; Granziera, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients correlate with the degree of neuronal injury. To date, little is known about NfL concentrations in the serum of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and their relationship with CSF levels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of disease severity. We aimed to validate the quantification of NfL in serum samples of RRMS, as a biofluid source easily accessible for longitudinal studies. A total of 31 RRMS patients underwent CSF and serum sampling. After a median time of 3.6 years, 19 of these RRMS patients, 10 newly recruited RRMS patients and 18 healthy controls had a 3T MRI and serum sampling. NfL concentrations were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. NfL levels in serum were highly correlated to levels in CSF (r = 0.62, p = 0.0002). Concentrations in serum were higher in patients than in controls at baseline (p = 0.004) and follow-up (p = 0.0009) and did not change over time (p = 0.56). Serum NfL levels correlated with white matter (WM) lesion volume (r = 0.68, p NfL levels were highly correlated, and serum concentrations were increased in RRMS. Serum NfL levels correlated with MRI markers of WM disease severity. Our findings further support longitudinal studies of serum NfL as a potential biomarker of on-going disease progression and as a potential surrogate to quantify effects of neuroprotective drugs in clinical trials. © The Author(s), 2016.

  7. Intraventricularly injected Olig2-NSCs attenuate established relapsing-remitting EAE in mice.

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    Sher, Falak; Amor, Sandra; Gerritsen, Wouter; Baker, David; Jackson, Samuel L; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory relapsing demyelinating disease, failure to control or repair damage leads to progressive neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) has been shown to promote repair and functional recovery in the acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model for MS; the major therapeutic mechanism of these NSCs appeared to be immune regulation. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of intraventricularly injected NSCs in chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (CREAE), the animal disease model that is widely accepted to mimic most closely recurrent inflammatory demyelination lesions as observed in relapsing-remitting MS. In addition, we assessed whether priming these NSCs to become oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) by transient overexpression of Olig2 would further promote functional recovery, for example, by contributing to actual remyelination. Upon injection at the onset of the acute phase or the relapse phase of CREAE, NSCs as well as Olig2-NSCs directly migrated toward active lesions in the spinal cord as visualized by in vivo bioluminescence and biofluorescence imaging, and once in the spinal cord, the majority of Olig2-NSCs, in contrast to NSCs, differentiated into OPCs. The survival of Olig2-NSCs was significantly higher than that of injected control NSCs, which remained undifferentiated. Nevertheless, both Olig2-NSCs and NSC significantly reduced the clinical signs of acute and relapsing disease and, in case of Olig2-NSCs, even completely abrogated relapsing disease when administered early after onset of acute disease. We provide the first evidence that NSCs and in particular NSC-derived OPCs (Olig2-NSCs) ameliorate established chronic relapsing EAE in mice. Our experimental data in established neurological disease in mice indicate that such therapy may be effective in relapsing-remitting MS preventing chronic progressive

  8. [Alemtuzumab for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Results of two randomized controlled phase III studies].

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    Klotz, L; Meuth, S G; Kieseier, B; Wiendl, H

    2013-08-01

    In November 2012 the results of 2 clinical phase III trials were published which addressed the effects of alemtuzumab in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). In the CARE-MS-I study patients with early untreated MS (EDSS ≤ 3.0, disease duration alemtuzumab in patients with persisting disease activity under standard disease-modifying treatment (EDSS ≤ 5.0, disease duration alemtuzumab compared to interferon in terms of reduction of relapse rate as well as the number of new or enlarging T2 lesions and gadolinium-enhancing lesions. Moreover, the CARE-MS-II study showed a significant delay in disease progression by alemtuzumab. The portfolio and the frequency of relevant side effects, such as infusion-related reactions, development of secondary autoimmunity or infections were within the expected range. Taken together these studies confirm the high anti-inflammatory efficacy of alemtuzumab and hence provide the first evidence of superiority of a monotherapy in direct comparison to standard disease-modifying treatment in two phase III trials in relapsing-remitting MS. These data in the context of the mode of action of alemtuzumab provide evidence for the relevance of immune cells, especially T cells, in the pathophysiology of MS. Experience with long-term effects of alemtuzumab, e.g. from the phase II extension trial as well as the side effect profile argue in favor of a sustained reprogramming of the immune system as a consequence of immune cell depletion by alemtuzumab.

  9. Bruising following natalizumab infusion for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a case report

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    Gatzonis Stylianos; Siatouni Anna

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Natalizumab is a new treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Because of limited experience of this treatment, medical professionals must be alert to possible side effects. Case presentation We present a 34-year-old Caucasian woman with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. She developed bruises on her legs after the first and second administrations of the new monoclonal antibody, natalizumab. Clinical and laboratory investigations revealed no hematologica...

  10. Clinical importance of neutralising antibodies against interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Ross, Christian; Clemmesen, Katja Maria;

    2003-01-01

    Interferon beta is the first-line treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, but the drug can induce neutralising antibodies against itself, which might reduce effectiveness. We aimed to assess the clinical effect of neutralising antibodies.......Interferon beta is the first-line treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, but the drug can induce neutralising antibodies against itself, which might reduce effectiveness. We aimed to assess the clinical effect of neutralising antibodies....

  11. Clinical importance of neutralising antibodies against interferon beta in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Ross, Christian; Clemmesen, Katja Maria

    2003-01-01

    Interferon beta is the first-line treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, but the drug can induce neutralising antibodies against itself, which might reduce effectiveness. We aimed to assess the clinical effect of neutralising antibodies.......Interferon beta is the first-line treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, but the drug can induce neutralising antibodies against itself, which might reduce effectiveness. We aimed to assess the clinical effect of neutralising antibodies....

  12. Resting State Brain Entropy Alterations in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqing Zhou

    Full Text Available Brain entropy (BEN mapping provides a novel approach to characterize brain temporal dynamics, a key feature of human brain. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI, reliable and spatially distributed BEN patterns have been identified in normal brain, suggesting a potential use in clinical populations since temporal brain dynamics and entropy may be altered in disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize BEN in multiple sclerosis (MS, a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people. Since currently there is no cure for MS, developing treatment or medication that can slow down its progression represents a high research priority, for which validating a brain marker sensitive to disease and the related functional impairments is essential. Because MS can start long time before any measurable symptoms and structural deficits, assessing the dynamic brain activity and correspondingly BEN may provide a critical way to study MS and its progression. Because BEN is new to MS, we aimed to assess BEN alterations in the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS patients using a patient versus control design, to examine the correlation of BEN to clinical measurements, and to check the correlation of BEN to structural brain measures which have been more often used in MS studies. As compared to controls, RRMS patients showed increased BEN in motor areas, executive control area, spatial coordinating area, and memory system. Increased BEN was related to greater disease severity as measured by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS and greater tissue damage as indicated by the mean diffusivity. Patients also showed decreased BEN in other places, which was associated with less disability or fatigue, indicating a disease-related BEN re-distribution. Our results suggest BEN as a novel and useful tool for characterizing RRMS.

  13. Defective structural RNA processing in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurlock, Charles F; Tossberg, John T; Guo, Yan; Sriram, Subramaniam; Crooke, Philip S; Aune, Thomas M

    2015-03-25

    Surveillance of integrity of the basic elements of the cell including DNA, RNA, and proteins is a critical element of cellular physiology. Mechanisms of surveillance of DNA and protein integrity are well understood. Surveillance of structural RNAs making up the vast majority of RNA in a cell is less well understood. Here, we sought to explore integrity of processing of structural RNAs in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and other inflammatory diseases. We employed mononuclear cells obtained from subjects with RRMS and cell lines. We used quantitative-PCR and whole genome RNA sequencing to define defects in structural RNA surveillance and siRNAs to deplete target proteins. We report profound defects in surveillance of structural RNAs in RRMS exemplified by elevated levels of poly(A) + Y1-RNA, poly(A) + 18S rRNA and 28S rRNAs, elevated levels of misprocessed 18S and 28S rRNAs and levels of the U-class of small nuclear RNAs. Multiple sclerosis is also associated with genome-wide defects in mRNA splicing. Ro60 and La proteins, which exist in ribonucleoprotein particles and play different roles in quality control of structural RNAs, are also deficient in RRMS. In cell lines, silencing of the genes encoding Ro60 and La proteins gives rise to these same defects in surveillance of structural RNAs. Our results establish that profound defects in structural RNA surveillance exist in RRMS and establish a causal link between Ro60 and La proteins and integrity of structural RNAs.

  14. Intravenous immunoglobulin in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a dose-finding trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazekas, F.; Lublin, F.D.; Li, D.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several studies have reported a reduction of relapses after the long-term administration of IV immunoglobulin (IVIG) to patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), but they were mostly small and differed in terms of predefined outcome variables and treatment regimen. W...

  15. Oxidative Stress is Increased in Serum from Mexican Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

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    Genaro Gabriel Ortiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the oxidative stress markers in serum from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods: Blood samples from healthy controls and 22 patients 15 women (7 aged from 20 to 30 and 8 were > 40 years old and 7 men (5 aged from 20 to 30 and 2 were > 40 years old fulfilling the McDonald Criteria and classified as having Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis accordingly with Lublin were collected for oxidative stress markers quantification. Results: Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates/nitrites, lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde plus 4-hidroxialkenals, and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly increased in serum of subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in comparison with that of healthy controls. These data support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is a component closely linked to oxidative stress.

  16. Oxidative Stress is Increased in Serum from Mexican Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; Sustersik, Silvia; Barba, Elías Alejandro; Aguayo, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oxidative stress markers in serum from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods: Blood samples from healthy controls and 22 patients 15 women (7 aged from 20 to 30 and 8 were > 40 years old) and 7 men (5 aged from 20 to 30 and 2 were > 40 years old) fulfilling the McDonald Criteria and classified as having Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis accordingly with Lublin were collected for oxidative stress markers quantification. Results: Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates/nitrites), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde plus 4-hidroxialkenals), and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly increased in serum of subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in comparison with that of healthy controls. These data support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is a component closely linked to oxidative stress. PMID:19242067

  17. Alemtuzumab: a new therapy for active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Hans-Peter; Aktas, Orhan; Boyko, Alexey N

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD52 to deplete circulating T and B lymphocytes; lymphocyte depletion is followed by a distinctive pattern of T- and B-cell repopulation, changing the balance of the immune system. This review reports the efficacy and safety findings of the phase 2 CAMMS223 trial and the phase 3 CARE-MS I and II trials investigating alemtuzumab for the treatment of active relapsing-remitting MS. Alemtuzumab, administered intravenously, was shown to improve relapse rate versus subcutaneous interferon beta-1a in patients who were treatment-naive (CAMMS223 and CARE-MS I) or had relapsed on prior therapy (CARE-MS II), and to reduce sustained accumulation of disability (CAMMS223 and CARE-MS II). Important adverse events were infusion-associated reactions, serious infections and autoimmune events. A safety monitoring program allowed for early detection and management of autoimmune events. Recommendations for the monitoring of adverse events are made. Alemtuzumab's mechanism of action, pharmacodynamics and opportunities for future research are discussed.

  18. Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia in remitting-relapsing Bickerstaff's-like encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piffer, Silvio; Turri, Giulia; Acler, Michele; Richelli, Silvia; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Monaco, Salvatore; Bonetti, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia is a rare neurological condition due to ephaptic transmission, generally appearing in multiple sclerosis patients characterized by stereotyped attacks of slurred speech usually accompanied by ataxia, appearing many times a day. Here we describe a patient with an unusual remitting-relapsing form of Bickerstaff's-like brainstem encephalitis who manifested PDA after a relapse with the involvement of a peculiar region below the red nuclei and benefited from lamotrigine.

  19. Secondary Progressive and Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Leads to Motor-Related Decreased Anatomical Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Sørensen, Per S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) damages central white matter pathways which has considerable impact on disease-related disability. To identify disease-related alterations in anatomical connectivity, 34 patients (19 with relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS), 15 with secondary progressive MS (SP-MS) and 20 healthy...

  20. Transverse Diffusivity of Cerebral Parenchyma Predicts Visual Tracking Performance in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlop, Nele P.; Achten, Eric; Fieremans, Els; Debruyne, Jan; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between cerebral damage related to multiple sclerosis (MS) and cognitive decline as determined by two classical mental tracking tests. Cerebral damage in 15 relapsing-remitting MS patients was measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Fractional anisotropy, longitudinal and transverse diffusivity were defined…

  1. When to Initiate Disease-Modifying Drugs for Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis in Adults?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Alkhawajah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Scierosis Beta Interfaerons and Glatiramer Acetate were the first to be licensed for treatment. This review deals with one major question: when to initiate therapy? Through exploring the unique characteristics of the disease and treatement we suggest an approach that should be helpful in the process of decision-making.

  2. Neuropsychological Findings in Relapsing-Remitting and Chronic-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Robert K.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Assessed neuropsychological functioning in 100 patients who had relapsing-remitting or chronic-progressive courses of multiple sclerosis (MS). Both MS subgroups showed significant neuropsychological impairment, relative to a normal comparison group (N=100), but chronic-progressive MS was associated with greater impairment in each major ability…

  3. Corpus Callosum Function in Verbal Dichotic Listening: Inferences from a Longitudinal Follow-Up of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, Marien; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Arana, Estanislao; Espert, Raul; Salvador, Alicia; Casanova, Bonaventura

    2009-01-01

    This study conducted a follow-up of 13 early-onset slightly disabled Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) patients within an year, evaluating both CC area measurements in a midsagittal Magnetic Resonance (MR) image, and Dichotic Listening (DL) testing with stop consonant vowel (C-V) syllables. Patients showed a significant progressive…

  4. Natalizumab is Effective for the Treatment of Relapsing-remitting Tumefactive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masataka; Itani, Kumi; Miyake, Kousuke; Kunieda, Takenobu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 57-year-old woman presenting with a biopsy-proven tumefactive demyelinating lesion as her first clinical event. Subsequently, she displayed a relapsing-remitting course with recurrence of large demyelinating lesions exceeding 2 cm in diameter rather than the small ovoid lesions characteristic of multiple sclerosis. Administration of interferon beta did not suppress the disease activity. Finally, treatment with natalizumab, which is a humanized monoclonal antibody against the cell-adhesion molecule α4-integrin, was initiated, resulting in clinical and radiological stabilization. Our experience here suggests that natalizumab may be an effective therapeutic option for relapsing-remitting tumefactive multiple sclerosis with high disease activity. PMID:28090055

  5. Different cognitive profiles of Brazilian patients with relapsing-remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis

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    Dóra-Neide Rodrigues

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment is a symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS. Different clinical forms of multiple sclerosis have different cognitive profiles, according to findings of previous studies which used extensive batteries of neuropsychological tests. OBJECTIVE: To investigate cognitive profiles of Brazilian patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS by using a brief battery of neuropsychological tests. METHOD: Sixty-six patients, within 18-65 of age and 3-18 years of education, were paired with healthy control subjects, regarding gender, age, and education level. RESULTS: On Symbol Digit Modalities Test and Hooper Visual Organization Test, cognition was affected in 50% in RRMS and 69% in PPMS. Fluency of "F" was impaired in 24% of RRMS and 81% of PPMS. Immediate recall was affected in 32% of RRMS and in 63% of PPMS; whereas late recall, in 46% of relapsing-remitting and in 69% of primary progressive. CONCLUSION: Cognitive profiles of relapsing-remitting and primary progressive patients are different

  6. Varicella Zoster Virus and Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Sotelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated disorder; however, little is known about the triggering factors of the abnormal immune response. Different viruses from the herpes family have been mentioned as potential participants. Here, we review the evidences that support the association of varicella zoster virus (VZV with MS. Epidemiological studies from geographical areas, where incidence of MS has increased in recent decades, pointed out a high frequency of varicella and zoster in the clinical antecedents of MS patients, and also laboratory investigations have found large quantities of DNA from VZV in leucocytes and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients restricted to the ephemeral period of MS relapse, followed by disappearance of the virus during remission. The above observations and the peculiar features of VZV, mainly characterized by its neurotropism and long periods of latency followed by viral reactivation, support the idea on the participation of VZV in the etiology of MS. However, as with reports from studies with other viruses, particularly Epstein Barr virus, conflicting results on confirmatory studies about the presence of viral gene products in brain tissue indicate the need for further research on the potential participation of VZV in the etiology of MS.

  7. Advances in the treatment of relapsing - Remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Tanasescu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews and discusses the approved and emerging therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS. MS is a chronic and disabling immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS that affects mainly young adults. MS imposes a huge economic burden on healthcare systems and the society. Although the last 20 years have brought a continuous expansion in therapeutic options, there are still unmet needs in MS management. Available MS drugs have varying degrees of efficacy in reducing relapse risk. The long-term term effects of these treatments are incompletely known. New therapies, along with variations of currently available treatments, may prove more effective and tolerable than the available drugs. Treatments for MS differ with respect to the mode of administration, tolerability and likelihood of treatment adherence, side effects, and risk of major toxicity. The armamentarium of approved disease-modifying therapies in MS and those in development include: (1 the first approved, moderately effective, injectable interferon-β and glatiramer acetate; (2 oral drugs (fingolimod, laquinimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate; (3 monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab, daclizumab, alemtuzumab; and (4 immunosuppressive agents (e.g. mitoxantrone. The place of each drug in the therapeutic algorithm is dependent on its specific risk-benefit profile. Patients' clinical and paraclinical phenotypes and biomarker profile may help to elucidate disease subtypes and response to therapy in the future, thus allowing treatment individualization.

  8. Oral available agents in the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis an overview of merits and culprits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thöne J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jan Thöne, Gisa Ellrichmann Department of Neurology, St Josef-Hospital Bochum, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic immunological disease of the central nervous system characterized by early inflammatory demyelination and subsequent neurodegeneration. Major therapeutic progress has occurred during the past decade, in particular since the introduction of immunomodulatory agents, however, MS is still an incurable disease. In addition, parenteral application of the currently licensed drugs is associated with injection-related adverse events (AEs and low patient compliance. Thus, there remains an unmet need for the development of more effective and well tolerated oral therapies for the treatment of MS. A number of new orally administered agents including fingolimod, laquinimod, teriflunomide, cladribine, and BG-12 have been licensed recently or are currently under investigation in relapsing remitting MS patients. In multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled phase III clinical studies, all of these agents have already shown their efficacy on both clinical disease parameters and magnetic resonance imaging-based measures of disease activity in patients with relapsing remitting MS. However, there are essential differences concerning their clinical efficacy and side-effect profiles. Additionally, the mechanisms by which these substances exert clinical efficacy have not been fully elucidated. In this article, we review the pharmaceutical properties of fingolimod, laquinimod, teriflunomide, cladribine, and BG-12; and their suggested mechanisms of action, clinical efficacy, and side-effect profiles. Keywords: cladribine, fingolimod (FTY, fumaric acid esters (BG-12, laquinimod, teriflunomide

  9. Relapsing-Remitting Severe Bickerstaff’s Brainstem Encephalitis – Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrakowska, Zuzanna; Jakubowicz-Lachowska, Dominika; Kułakowska, Alina; Galińska-Skok, Beata; Drozdowski, Wiesław; Tarasów, Eugeniusz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (BBE) is a very rare disease of the central nervous system. Aetiology of the disease is auto-immunological. However, it is not entirely understood. Clinically BBE manifests in progressive ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and consciousness disturbances. Clinical symptoms are usually preceded by an unidentified infection of the upper respiratory tract. Usually, the disease has one phase, but individual relapses have also been described. Despite quite severe clinical symptoms, the prognosis is usually good. Case Report The article presents a case of a patient with relapsing-remitting severe BBE. The case is presented due to the relapsing-remitting clinical course of the disease that resulted in patient’s death, rarely described in the literature. We also present the results of subsequent MR scans in the course of the disease, so far described only in individual reports. It is also the first report in the world’s literature presenting the results of series of MR spectroscopy (MRS) examinations in the course of BBE. Conclusions MR examination is an important component in BBE diagnostics, allowing to differentiate atypical cases and place them under special supervision due to the possibility of the severe clinical course. MR also facilitates differentiation between Miller-Fisher Syndrome (MFS) and BBE in cases of diagnostic doubts. Adding MRS and MRI to the protocol allows us to define the nature of morphological changes more accurately in patients with suspected or diagnosed BBE. PMID:28096906

  10. Potential short-term use of oral cladribine in treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

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    Julie A Murphy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Murphy, Jacklyn A Harris, Andrew J CrannageSt Louis College of Pharmacy, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system. The clinical course of MS varies among patients. Currently, interferon (IFN products, including IFN β-1a administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously and IFN β-1b subcutaneously, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, and mitoxantrone are approved disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS. Cladribine, also known as 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, is a synthetic adenosine deaminase-resistant purine nucleoside analog that preferentially depletes lymphocyte subpopulations. This sustained effect on lymphocytes is advantageous for patients with MS. CLARITY (CLAdRIbine Tablets Treating MS OrallY, a Phase III trial, has demonstrated that short-term oral cladribine decreases relapse rates and risk of disability progression in comparison with placebo. Cladribine was well tolerated in the study, with the most common adverse effects being headache, nausea, upper respiratory tract infections, and lymphocytopenia. An ongoing study is evaluating the efficacy and safety of the combination of oral cladribine and IFN-β products. A further ongoing study is examining the use of oral cladribine in clinically isolated syndrome and time to conversion to MS. Although the results of CLARITY are promising, the exact role of oral cladribine may be better defined with the completion of ongoing studies.Keywords: cladribine, multiple sclerosis, relapsing-remitting, oral, disease-modifying therapy

  11. Work Participation and Executive Abilities in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis; Ruimschotel, Rob; Kamminga, Noëlle; Visser, Leo; Middelkoop, Huub

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Executive abilities, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, inhibition and mental flexibility may have a direct impact on the ability to maintain a job. This study investigated differences in subjective and objective executive abilities between relapsing-remitting MS patients with and without a paid job. We included 55 relapsing-remitting MS patients from a community-based sample (47 females; mean age: 47 years; 36% employed). Patients underwent neurological, cognitive and psychological assessments at their homes, including an extensive executive test battery. We found that unemployed patients had a longer disease duration (t(53)=2.76, p=0.008) and reported more organising and planning problems (χ2(1)=6.3, p=0.012), higher distractibility (Kendall's tau-b= -0.24, p=0.03) and more cognitive fatigue (U=205.0, p=0.028, r=-0.30) than employed patients. Unemployed patients completed slightly less categories on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (U=243.5, p=0.042, r=-0.28). Possible influential factors such as age, educational level, physical functioning, depression and anxiety did not differ between groups. In conclusion, while relapsing-remitting MS patients without a paid job reported more executive problems and cognitive fatigue than patients with a paid job, little differences were found in objective executive abilities. Further research is needed to examine possible causal relations.

  12. Work Participation and Executive Abilities in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin van der Hiele

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Executive abilities, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, inhibition and mental flexibility may have a direct impact on the ability to maintain a job. This study investigated differences in subjective and objective executive abilities between relapsing-remitting MS patients with and without a paid job. We included 55 relapsing-remitting MS patients from a community-based sample (47 females; mean age: 47 years; 36% employed. Patients underwent neurological, cognitive and psychological assessments at their homes, including an extensive executive test battery. We found that unemployed patients had a longer disease duration (t(53=2.76, p=0.008 and reported more organising and planning problems (χ2(1=6.3, p=0.012, higher distractibility (Kendall's tau-b= -0.24, p=0.03 and more cognitive fatigue (U=205.0, p=0.028, r=-0.30 than employed patients. Unemployed patients completed slightly less categories on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (U=243.5, p=0.042, r=-0.28. Possible influential factors such as age, educational level, physical functioning, depression and anxiety did not differ between groups. In conclusion, while relapsing-remitting MS patients without a paid job reported more executive problems and cognitive fatigue than patients with a paid job, little differences were found in objective executive abilities. Further research is needed to examine possible causal relations.

  13. Predicting relapsing-remitting dynamics in multiple sclerosis using discrete distribution models: a population approach.

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    Nieves Velez de Mendizabal

    Full Text Available Relapsing-remitting dynamics are a hallmark of autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS. A clinical relapse in MS reflects an acute focal inflammatory event in the central nervous system that affects signal conduction by damaging myelinated axons. Those events are evident in T1-weighted post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as contrast enhancing lesions (CEL. CEL dynamics are considered unpredictable and are characterized by high intra- and inter-patient variability. Here, a population approach (nonlinear mixed-effects models was applied to analyse of CEL progression, aiming to propose a model that adequately captures CEL dynamics.We explored several discrete distribution models to CEL counts observed in nine MS patients undergoing a monthly MRI for 48 months. All patients were enrolled in the study free of immunosuppressive drugs, except for intravenous methylprednisolone or oral prednisone taper for a clinical relapse. Analyses were performed with the nonlinear mixed-effect modelling software NONMEM 7.2. Although several models were able to adequately characterize the observed CEL dynamics, the negative binomial distribution model had the best predictive ability. Significant improvements in fitting were observed when the CEL counts from previous months were incorporated to predict the current month's CEL count. The predictive capacity of the model was validated using a second cohort of fourteen patients who underwent monthly MRIs during 6-months. This analysis also identified and quantified the effect of steroids for the relapse treatment.The model was able to characterize the observed relapsing-remitting CEL dynamic and to quantify the inter-patient variability. Moreover, the nature of the effect of steroid treatment suggested that this therapy helps resolve older CELs yet does not affect newly appearing active lesions in that month. This model could be used for design of future longitudinal studies and clinical trials, as

  14. Case report of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease following alemtuzumab treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David; Coles, Alasdair; Oyuela, Pedro; Purvis, Annie; Margolin, David H

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (anti-GBM disease) during alemtuzumab treatment of a relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patient. Case report. Outpatient neurology research protocol. A 35-year-old white female receiving alemtuzumab for RRMS in a clinical research protocol developed symptoms leading to diagnosis of anti-GBM disease. Patient response to the treatment of anti-GBM disease and RRMS. Early identification and treatment of anti-GBM disease resolved clinical symptoms and preserved renal function. Alemtuzumab treatment of RRMS resolved initial MS symptoms and appears to have controlled active disease to date. Close monitoring for potential side effects of alemtuzumab treatment in RRMS resulted in a positive outcome when anti-GBM disease was recognized and treated early. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. IL-12Rβ2 has a protective role in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chong; Ciric, Bogoljub; Yu, Shuo; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-15

    IL-12Rβ2 is a common receptor subunit of heterodimeric receptors for IL-12 and IL-35, two cytokines that are implicated in immunopathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. We evaluated the role of IL-12Rβ2 in relapsing-remitting EAE (RR-EAE). IL-12Rβ2-deficient SJL/J mice developed markedly more severe clinical EAE, and had greater mortality and more severe relapses compared with wild-type controls. IL-12Rβ2-deficient EAE mice also had more infiltrating mononuclear cells in the CNS, as well as higher T cell proliferative capacity and decreased IFN-γ production at the periphery. These findings demonstrate a protective role of IL-12Rβ2 in RR-EAE.

  16. Alemtuzumab improves preexisting disability in active relapsing-remitting MS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannoni, Gavin; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Coles, Alasdair J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize effects of alemtuzumab treatment on measures of disability improvement in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with inadequate response (≥1 relapse) to prior therapy. METHODS: Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis (CARE......-MS) II, a 2-year randomized, rater-blinded, active-controlled, head-to-head, phase 3 trial, compared efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab 12 mg with subcutaneous interferon-β-1a (SC IFN-β-1a) 44 μg in patients with RRMS. Prespecified and post hoc disability outcomes based on Expanded Disability Status...... Scale (EDSS), Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC), and Sloan low-contrast letter acuity (SLCLA) are reported, focusing on improvement of preexisting disability in addition to slowing of disability accumulation. RESULTS: Alemtuzumab-treated patients were more likely than SC IFN-β-1a...

  17. Alemtuzumab: evidence for its potential in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J William L; Coles, Alasdair J

    2013-01-01

    Alemtuzumab (previously known as Campath(®)) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the CD52 antigen on mature lymphocytes that results in lymphopenia and subsequent modification of the immune repertoire. Here we explore evidence for its efficacy and safety in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. One Phase II and two Phase III trials of alemtuzumab versus active comparator (interferon beta-1a) have been reported. Two of these rater-blinded randomized studies assessed clinical and radiological outcomes in treatment-naïve patients; one explored patients who had relapsed despite first-line therapy. Compared to interferon beta-1a, alemtuzumab reduced the relapse rate by 49%-74% (P Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis; CARE-MS1), there was no significant difference compared to interferon, perhaps reflecting the surprisingly low frequency of disability events in the comparator group. After alemtuzumab, the Expanded Disability Status Scale score improved by 0.14-1.2 points, culminating in a net advantage with alemtuzumab of 0.41-0.77 points over interferon in the CAMMS223 and CARE-MS2 trials (both P alemtuzumab were significantly improved when compared to interferon in all studies. Adverse events were more common following alemtuzumab than interferon beta-1a (7.2-8.66 versus 4.9-5.7 events per person-year). While infusion reactions are the most common, autoimmunity is the most concerning; within Phase III studies, thyroid disorders (17%-18% versus 5%-6%) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (1% versus 0%) were reported in patients taking alemtuzumab and interferon beta-1a, respectively. All patients responded to conventional therapy. One patient taking alemtuzumab in the Phase II study suffered a fatal intracranial hemorrhage following immune thrombocytopenic purpura, heralding assiduous monitoring of all patients thereafter. Alemtuzumab has been submitted for licensing in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in the United States and

  18. A review of the ethics of the use of placebo in clinical trials for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Andrew J; Bernat, James L

    2016-05-01

    Randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials have been considered the most rigorous method of evaluating the efficacy of novel treatment interventions. The first effective disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) were approved in the 1990s after a number of pivotal placebo-controlled trials. Since then, the ethics of the continued use of placebo in clinical trials of new DMTs for RRMS has been the subject of repeated policy statements and recommendations by international committees. As further data have accumulated demonstrating a reduction in long-term morbidity and mortality with early initiation of DMT, a growing consensus has emerged that further inclusion of placebo arms in clinical trials of novel RRMS therapies is no longer ethical.

  19. Assessment of Definitions of Sustained Disease Progression in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Brian C.; Engler, David; Glanz, Bonnie; Musallam, Alexander; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2013-01-01

    Sustained progression on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) is a common outcome measure of disease progression in clinical studies of MS. Unfortunately, this outcome may not accurately measure long-term and irreversible disease progression. To assess the performance of definitions of sustained progression, patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or a clinically isolated syndrome with evidence of lesions on a brain MRI were included in our study. Fifteen definitions of sustained progression using both the EDSS and the functional system (FS) scales were investigated. The impact of both relapses and changes in provider on the probability of maintaining progression was also evaluated. Although the provider scoring the EDSS sometimes changed during followup, the provider had access to previous EDSS scores. Between 15.8% and 42.2% of patients experienced sustained progression based on the definitions using EDSS as the outcome, but nearly 50% of these patients failed to maintain sustained progression for the duration of followup. When FS scales were used, progression was most common on the pyramidal and sensory scales. Unfortunately, progression on specific FS scales failed to be more sensitive to irreversible disability. Relapses or changes in provider did not explain the poor performance of the measures. Short-term changes in the EDSS or FS scores may not be an accurate marker of irreversible change in RRMS. PMID:23555057

  20. Depressed patients' perceptions of facial emotions in depressed and remitted states are associated with relapse - A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouhuys, AL; Geerts, E; Gordijn, MCM

    1999-01-01

    Within the framework of interpersonal and cognitive theories of depression, we investigated whether the perception of facial emotions was associated with subsequent relapse into depression. The 23 inpatients with major depression who remitted (65 admitted patients) were studied at admission (TO), at

  1. Immunomodulatory therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: monoclonal antibodies, currently approved and in testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Jessica; Markovic-Plese, Silva

    2015-05-01

    Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease, is one of the most prevalent causes of chronic disability in young adults. Studies of the disease pathogenesis have identified multiple therapeutic targets. The number of approved disease modifying therapies has almost doubled within the past 5 years, which creates a challenge for medical professionals to stay abreast of their use in everyday practice. This manuscript provides an overview of available injectable, oral, and intravenous therapies for RRMS, and offers guidance in selecting an appropriate therapy. Focus is on the recently approved and emerging monoclonal antibody therapies, because they offer more selective and superior therapeutic efficacy compared with injectable and oral disease modifying therapies. We discuss the outlook for monoclonal antibodies and their role in RRMS treatment in the future.

  2. Latin American algorithm for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis using disease-modifying agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Finkelsztejn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is estimated that circa 50,000 individuals have relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in Latin America. European and North-American algorithms for the treatment of multiple sclerosis do not foresee our regional difficulties and the access of patients to treatment. METHODS: The Latin American Multiple Sclerosis Forum is an independent and supra-institutional group of experts that has assessed the latest scientific evidence regarding efficacy and safety of disease-modifying treatments. Accesses to treatment and pharmacovigilance programs for each of the eight countries represented at the Forum were also analyzed. RESULTS: A specific set of guidelines based upon evidence-based recommendations was designed for Latin America. Future perspectives of multiple sclerosis treatment were also discussed. CONCLUSIONS: The present paper translated an effort from representatives of eight countries discussing a matter that cannot be adapted to our region directly from purely European and North-American guidelines for treatment.

  3. No evidence for spumavirus or oncovirus infection in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenningsson, A; Lycke, J; Svennerholm, B; Gronowitz, S; Andersen, O

    1992-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to investigate the possible role of human spumaretrovirus and oncoretroviruses (human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I [HTLV-I] and II [HTLV-II]) in multiple sclerosis. Eleven patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in exacerbation and 11 normal blood donors were included in the study. Cerebrospinal fluid cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and plasma were cocultured with allogeneic mononuclear cells for 6 weeks. Cultured cells were subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis with primers selected for the pol and gag (human spumaretrovirus), pol and env (HTLV-I), and pol (HTLV-II) genes. Polymerase chain reaction was negative in all patient and blood donor control samples, whereas positive controls were consistently reactive with high sensitivity. No culture exhibited cytopathic effects and supernatants were negative for reverse transcriptase activity. Thus, our results do not support a role for these retroviruses in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per S; Lisby, Steen; Grove, Richard

    2014-01-01

    withdrew from the study because of adverse events. No unexpected safety signals emerged. Infusion-related reactions were common on the first infusion day but not observed on the second infusion day. None of the patients developed human anti-human antibodies. Ofatumumab was associated with profound......OBJECTIVES: We present the first study to explore safety and efficacy of the human CD20 monoclonal antibody ofatumumab in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients received 2 ofatumumab infusions (100 mg, 300 mg...... selective reduction of B cells as measured by CD19(+) expression. New brain MRI lesion activity was suppressed (>99%) in the first 24 weeks after ofatumumab administration (all doses), with statistically significant reductions (p

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Treatments for Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A French Societal Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chevalier

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER at the public published price for delayed-release dimethyl fumarate versus relevant Multiple Sclerosis disease-modifying therapies available in France in June 2015.The economic model was adapted to the French setting in accordance with the Haute Autorité de Santé guidelines using a model previously developed for NICE. A cohort of Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis patients was simulated over a 30-year time horizon. Twenty one health states were taken into account: Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS 0-9 for Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis patients, EDSS 0-9 for Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis patients, and death. Estimates of relative treatment efficacy were determined using a mixed-treatment comparison. Probabilities of events were derived from the dimethyl fumarate pivotal clinical trials and the London Ontario Dataset. Costs and utilities were extracted from the published literature from both the payer and societal perspectives. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the model results.From both perspectives, dimethyl fumarate and interferon beta-1a (IFN beta-1a 44 mcg were the two optimal treatments, as the other treatments (IFN beta-1a 30 mcg, IFN beta-1b 250 mcg, teriflunomide, glatiramer acetate, fingolimod were dominated on the efficiency frontier. From the societal perspective, dimethyl fumarate versus IFN beta-1a 44 mcg incurred an incremental cost of €3,684 and an incremental quality-adjusted life year (QALY of 0.281, corresponding to an ICER of €13,110/QALY.Despite no reference threshold for France, dimethyl fumarate can be considered as a cost-effective option as it is on the efficiency frontier.

  6. Differential patterns of memory performance in relapsing, remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drake Marina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Memory dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS. A retrieval failure has been reported as the primary cause for the memory deficits, although some studies also described a faulty acquisition. Aims: The aim of the study was to examine memory function in relapsing remitting (RR and secondary progressive (SP MS patients, analyze the patterns of performance and to investigate whether disease course influences this performance. Design and settings: Case-control prospective study conducted in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five RR, 23 SP MS patients and 80 normal subjects were evaluated with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Memory was assessed with tasks from the Signoret memory battery. Attention and executive function were also assessed. Statistical Analysis : Univariate analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, multivariate logistic regression and Chi-square test were used as appropriate. Results: MS patients performed significantly worse than controls on almost all measures of memory ( P < 0,001. MS subgroups differed in tasks of delayed recall (logical memory- P =0,019; wordlist delayed recall, P < 0,001, semantic cued recall ( P < 0,001, recognition trials ( P =0,006 rate of forgetting ( P < 0,001 and confabulation and intrusion errors ( P =0,004. Conclusions: Memory is consistently impaired in MS patients and disease course differentially affects the pattern of performance. SP patients show greater difficulties and a more pervasive pattern of dysfunction than RR patients. Delayed recall was the most affected memory measure and performance on this task discriminates between RR and SP MS patients. Relapsing remitting patients performed within the mildly impaired range while SP patients showed a moderate to severe impairment.

  7. Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase (IDO Expression and Activity in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Mancuso

    Full Text Available Interferon gamma (IFN-γ production induces the transcription of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO resulting in the reduction of T-cell activation and proliferation through the depletion of tryptophan and the elicitation of Treg lymphocytes. IDO was shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases; we investigated whether changes in IDO gene expression and activity could be indicative of onset of relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS patients.IDO and interferon-γ (IFN-γ gene expression, serum IDO activity (Kynurenine/Tryptophan ratio and serum neopterin concentration--a protein released by macrophages upon IFN-γ stimulation--were measured in 51 individuals: 36 relapsing remitting (RR-MS patients (21 in acute phase--AMS, 15 in stable phase--SMS and 15 healthy controls (HC. PBMCs samples in AMS patients were collected before (BT-AMS and during glucocorticoids-based therapy (DT-AMS.IDO expression was increased and IFN-γ was decreased (p<0.001 in BT-AMS compared to SMS patients. Glucocorticoids-induced disease remission resulted in a significant reduction of IDO and IFN-γ gene expression, IDO catalytic activity (p<0.001. Serum neopterin concentration followed the same trend as IDO expression and activity.Measurement of IDO gene expression and activity in blood could be a useful marker to monitor the clinical course of RR-MS. Therapeutic interventions modulating IDO activity may be beneficial in MS.

  8. Clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fingolimod for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajofatto A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Gajofatto,1,2 Marco Turatti,2 Salvatore Monaco,1,2 Maria Donata Benedetti2 1Department of Neurological, Biomedical and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; 2Division of Neurology B, Verona University Hospital, Verona, Italy Abstract: Fingolimod is a selective immunosuppressive agent approved worldwide for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic and potentially disabling neurological condition. Randomized double-blind clinical trials have shown that fingolimod significantly reduces relapse rate and ameliorates a number of brain MRI measures, including cerebral atrophy, compared to both placebo and intramuscular interferon-1a. The effect on disability progression remains controversial, since one Phase III trial showed a significant benefit of treatment while two others did not. Although fingolimod has a very convenient daily oral dosing, the possibility of serious cardiac, ocular, infectious, and other rare adverse events justified the decision of the European Medicines Agency to approve the drug as a second-line treatment for MS patients not responsive to first-line therapy, or those with rapidly evolving course. In the United States, fingolimod is instead authorized as a first-line treatment. The aim of this review is to describe and discuss the characteristics of fingolimod concerning its efficacy, safety, and tolerability in the clinical context of multiple sclerosis management. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, fingolimod, safety, tolerability, efficacy

  9. Impact of natalizumab on ambulatory improvement in secondary progressive and disabled relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cadavid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an unmet need for disease-modifying therapies to improve ambulatory function in disabled subjects with multiple sclerosis. OBJECTIVES: Assess the effects of natalizumab on ambulatory function in disabled subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed ambulatory function as measured by timed 25-foot walk (T25FW in clinical trial subjects with an Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≥3.5, including RRMS subjects from the phase 3 AFFIRM and SENTINEL trials, relapsing SPMS subjects from the phase 2 MS231 study, and nonrelapsing SPMS subjects from the phase 1b DELIVER study. For comparison, SPMS subjects from the intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IM IFNβ-1a IMPACT study were also analyzed. Improvement in ambulation was measured using T25FW responder status; response was defined as faster walking times over shorter (6-9-month or longer (24-30-month treatment periods relative to subjects' best predose walking times. RESULTS: There were two to four times more T25FW responders among disabled MS subjects in the natalizumab arms than in the placebo or IM IFNβ-1a arms. Responders walked 25 feet an average of 24%-45% faster than nonresponders. CONCLUSION: Natalizumab improves ambulatory function in disabled RRMS subjects and may have efficacy in disabled SPMS subjects. Confirmation of the latter finding in a prospective SPMS study is warranted.

  10. An update on new and emerging therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2013-11-01

    Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), known to actively reduce relapses and delay disability progression, have been used for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) for over a decade. These well-known therapies include intramuscular (IM) interferon (IFN) beta-1a (Avonex), subcutaneous (SC) IFN beta-1a (Rebif), SC IFN beta- 1b (Betaseron; Extavia), and SC glatiramer acetate (Copaxone). These first-line therapies have shown only partial benefits for controlling multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity and are often associated with inadequate patient adherence. Low patient adherence to therapy may be related to the mode of administration or to the side effects associated with treatment. The intravenous DMT natalizumab (Tysabri; dosed monthly) provides high therapeutic efficacy and good compliance but is considered a second-line intervention because of the associated increased risk for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In 2010, fingolimod (Gilenya), the first oral DMT, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MS. Recently, 2 new oral DMTs received FDA approval for the treatment of RRMS: teriflunomide (Aubagio) and dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera). In addition, oral laquinimod, several monoclonal antibodies (eg, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, and ocrelizumab), and other agents have shown preliminary beneficial results in relapsing MS in phase 3 clinical trials. These new and emerging DMTs may provide a more efficacious individualized therapeutic approach, more favorable methods of administration (eg, oral administration), and/or a lower frequency of infusions (eg, annually, 3-5 daily infusions over a year for alemtuzumab) that may improve patient adherence and clinical outcomes.

  11. Neural response to catecholamine depletion in remitted bulimia nervosa: Relation to depression and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Stefanie Verena; Mihov, Yoan; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Hasler, Gregor

    2017-07-01

    Bulimia nervosa has been associated with a dysregulated catecholamine system. Nevertheless, the influence of this dysregulation on bulimic symptoms, on neural activity, and on the course of the illness is not clear yet. An instructive paradigm for directly investigating the relationship between catecholaminergic functioning and bulimia nervosa has involved the behavioral and neural responses to experimental catecholamine depletion. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrate of catecholaminergic dysfunction in bulimia nervosa and its relationship to relapse. In a randomized, double-blind and crossover study design, catecholamine depletion was achieved by using the oral administration of alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (AMPT) over 24 h in 18 remitted bulimic (rBN) and 22 healthy (HC) female participants. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using a pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) sequence. In a follow-up telephone interview, bulimic relapse was assessed. Following AMPT, rBN participants revealed an increased vigor reduction and CBF decreases in the pallidum and posterior midcingulate cortex (pMCC) relative to HC participants showing no CBF changes in these regions. These results indicated that the pallidum and the pMCC are the functional neural correlates of the dysregulated catecholamine system in bulimia nervosa. Bulimic relapse was associated with increased depressive symptoms and CBF reduction in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus following catecholamine depletion. AMPT-induced increased CBF in this region predicted staying in remission. These findings demonstrated the importance of depressive symptoms and the stress system in the course of bulimia nervosa. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral ponesimod in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a randomised phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Tomas; Boster, Aaron; Fernández, Óscar; Freedman, Mark S; Pozzilli, Carlo; Bach, Doris; Berkani, Ouali; Mueller, Markus S; Sidorenko, Tatiana; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Melanson, Maria

    2014-11-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-finding phase IIb study evaluated the efficacy and safety of ponesimod, an oral selective S1P1 receptor modulator, for the treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). 464 patients were randomised to receive once-daily oral ponesimod 10, 20 or 40 mg, or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of new T1 gadolinium-enhanced (T1 Gd+) lesions per patient recorded every 4 weeks from weeks 12 to 24 after study drug initiation. Secondary endpoints were the annualised confirmed relapse rate (ARR) and time to first confirmed relapse. Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. The mean cumulative number of new T1 Gd+ lesions at weeks 12-24 was significantly lower in the ponesimod 10 mg (3.5; rate ratio (RR) 0.57; p=0.0318), 20 mg (1.1; RR 0.17; p<0.0001) and 40 mg (1.4; RR 0.23; p<0.0001) groups compared with placebo (6.2). The mean ARR was lower with 40 mg ponesimod versus placebo, with a maximum reduction of 52% (0.25 vs 0.53; p=0.0363). The time to first confirmed relapse was increased with ponesimod compared with placebo. The proportion of patients with ≥ 1 treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) was similar across ponesimod groups and the placebo group. Frequently reported AEs with higher incidence in the three ponesimod groups compared with placebo were anxiety, dizziness, dyspnoea, increased alanine aminotransferase, influenza, insomnia and peripheral oedema. Once-daily treatment with ponesimod 10, 20 or 40 mg significantly reduced the number of new T1 Gd+ lesions and showed a beneficial effect on clinical endpoints. Ponesimod was generally well tolerated, and further investigation of ponesimod for the treatment of RRMS is under consideration. NCT01006265. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Hypovitaminosis D association with disease activity in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jefferson; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Talim, Natália; Vidaletti, Tamara; de Paula Corrêa, Marcelo; Gomes, Irenio

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) onset is believed to result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. A prevailing theory addresses the influence of hypovitaminosis D in the development of MS. This research aimed to study the association between vitamin D serum levels and MS, as a prognostic and risk factor for the development and progression of the disease. A cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=67), according to the revised McDonald criteria (2010), accompanied in three MS centers in different Brazilian states. A control group consisted of healthy volunteers (n=61). Blood collections were carried out in late summer and late winter. This seems to be the first study of this kind in Latin America. The vitamin D serum levels for MS patients (29.63±8.08) in summer were similar to the controls (29.71±8.28); however, in winter they were lower than the healthy individuals (24.05±7.47 vs 26.56±8.01). No significant difference between the three cities was observed. No association was noted between vitamin D serum levels and gender, race and age, nor correlation of these levels with the EDSS or disease duration. In contrast, a significant association was seen between deficient vitamin D serum levels in late winter with disease activity, characterized by the onset of relapses (19.73±5.69 vs 25.30±6.22) or Gd+ lesions (17.22±3.11 vs 22.79±7.22).

  14. Alemtuzumab improves preexisting disability in active relapsing-remitting MS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeffrey A.; Coles, Alasdair J.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Havrdova, Eva; Selmaj, Krzysztof W.; Margolin, David H.; Lake, Stephen L.; Kaup, Susan M.; Panzara, Michael A.; Compston, D. Alastair S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize effects of alemtuzumab treatment on measures of disability improvement in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with inadequate response (≥1 relapse) to prior therapy. Methods: Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis (CARE-MS) II, a 2-year randomized, rater-blinded, active-controlled, head-to-head, phase 3 trial, compared efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab 12 mg with subcutaneous interferon-β-1a (SC IFN-β-1a) 44 μg in patients with RRMS. Prespecified and post hoc disability outcomes based on Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC), and Sloan low-contrast letter acuity (SLCLA) are reported, focusing on improvement of preexisting disability in addition to slowing of disability accumulation. Results: Alemtuzumab-treated patients were more likely than SC IFN-β-1a–treated patients to show improvement in EDSS scores (p < 0.0001) on all 7 functional systems. Significantly more alemtuzumab patients demonstrated 6-month confirmed disability improvement. The likelihood of improved vs stable/worsening MSFC scores was greater with alemtuzumab than SC IFN-β-1a (p = 0.0300); improvement in MSFC scores with alemtuzumab was primarily driven by the upper limb coordination and dexterity domain. Alemtuzumab-treated patients had more favorable changes from baseline in SLCLA (2.5% contrast) scores (p = 0.0014) and MSFC + SLCLA composite scores (p = 0.0097) than SC IFN-β-1a–treated patients. Conclusions: In patients with RRMS and inadequate response to prior disease-modifying therapies, alemtuzumab provides greater benefits than SC IFN-β-1a across several disability outcomes, reflecting improvement of preexisting disabilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence (based on rater blinding and a balance in baseline characteristics between arms) that alemtuzumab modifies disability measures favorably compared with SC IFN-β-1a

  15. The Effect of Disease-Modifying Drugs on Brain Atrophy in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Branger; Jean-Jacques Parienti; Maria Pia Sormani; Gilles Defer

    2016-01-01

    Background The quantification of brain atrophy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) may serve as a marker of disease progression and treatment response. We compared the association between first-line (FL) or second-line (SL) disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) and brain volume changes over time in RRMS. Materials and Methods We reviewed clinical trials in RRMS between January 1, 1995 and June 1, 2014 that assessed the effect of DMDs and reported data on brain atrophy in Medline, Embase...

  16. Motor cortex rTMS improves dexterity in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzamarany, Eman; Afifi, Lamia; El-Fayoumy, Neveen M; Salah, Husam; Nada, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The motor cortex (MC) receives an excitatory input from the cerebellum which is reduced in patients with cerebellar lesions. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces cortical facilitation which can counteract the reduced cerebellar drive to the MC. Our study included 24 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients with dysmetria. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A received two sessions of real MC rTMS and Group B received one session of real rTMS and one session of sham rTMS. Ten healthy volunteers formed group C. Evaluation was carried out using the nine-hole pegboard task and the cerebellar functional system score (FSS) of the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Group A patients showed a significant improvement in the time required to finish the pegboard task (P = 0.002) and in their cerebellar FSS (P = 0.000) directly after the second session and 1 month later. The RRMS patients showed more improvement than the SPMS patients. Group B patients did not show any improvement in the pegboard task or the cerebellar FSS. These results indicate that MC rTMS can be a promising option in treating both RRMS or SPMS patients with cerebellar impairment and that its effect can be long-lasting.

  17. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition performance in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph J; Gontkovsky, Samuel T; Kreiner, David S; Tree, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    Forty patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) completed the 10 core Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Means for age and education were 42.05 years (SD = 9.94) and 14.33 years (SD = 2.40). For all participants, the native language was English. The mean duration of MS diagnosis was 8.17 years (SD = 7.75), and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS; Kurtzke, 1983 ) score was 3.73 (SD = 1.41) with a range from 2.0 to 6.5. A control group of healthy individuals with similar demographic characteristics also completed the WAIS-IV and were provided by the test publisher. Compared to controls, patients with MS earned significantly lower subtest and composite scores. The patients' mean scores were consistently in the low-average to average range, and the patterns of performance across groups did not differ significantly, although there was a trend towards higher scores on the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) and lower scores on the Processing Speed Index (PSI). Approximately 78% of patients had actual Full Scale IQs that were significantly lower than preillness, demographically based IQ estimates.

  18. Quantitative diffusion tensor deterministic and probabilistic fiber tractography in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Bing [Department of Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Road Tianhe 600, 510630 Guangdong, Guangzhou (China); Ye Binbin [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong, Guangzhou (China); Yang Yang [Department of Information Technology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong, Guangzhou (China); Zhu Kangshun [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong, Guangzhou (China); Kang Zhuang; Kuang Sichi; Luo Lin [Department of Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Road Tianhe 600, 510630 Guangdong, Guangzhou (China); Shan Hong, E-mail: shanhong5@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Road Tianhe 600, 510630 Guangdong, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Our aim was to study the quantitative fiber tractography variations and patterns in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and to assess the correlation between quantitative fiber tractography and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Material and methods: Twenty-eight patients with RRMS and 28 age-matched healthy volunteers underwent a diffusion tensor MR imaging study. Quantitative deterministic and probabilistic fiber tractography were generated in all subjects. And mean numbers of tracked lines and fiber density were counted. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare tracked lines and fiber density in RRMS patients with those in controls. Bivariate linear regression model was used to determine the relationship between quantitative fiber tractography and EDSS in RRMS. Results: Both deterministic and probabilistic tractography's tracked lines and fiber density in RRMS patients were less than those in controls (P < .001). Both deterministic and probabilistic tractography's tracked lines and fiber density were found negative correlations with EDSS in RRMS (P < .001). The fiber tract disruptions and reductions in RRMS were directly visualized on fiber tractography. Conclusion: Changes of white matter tracts can be detected by quantitative diffusion tensor fiber tractography, and correlate with clinical impairment in RRMS.

  19. Social cognitive predictors of physical activity in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Yoojin; Joshi, Ina; Olsen, Conner; Motl, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Persons with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are often sedentary, despite the benefits of the regular physical activity. This has motivated the search for variables that act as determinants of physical activity. Such variables are derived from theory and presumably represent targets of behavioral interventions for increasing physical activity. This prospective, observational study examined variables from social cognitive theory as determinants of physical activity 6 weeks later in persons with RRMS. Persons (N = 68) with RRMS initially completed a questionnaire battery that included measures of self-efficacy, physical, social, and self-evaluative outcome expectations, functional limitations as an impediment, social support as a facilitator, and goal setting for physical activity. The participants wore an accelerometer and completed a self-reported physical activity measure 6 weeks later. Data were analyzed using path analysis in Mplus 3.0. Self-efficacy (path coefficient = 0.19, p path coefficient = -0.33, p goal setting (path coefficient = 0.26, p path coefficient = 0.12, p goal setting (path coefficient = 0.02, p = 0.66). This model explained 28 % of the variance in physical activity. This prospective study suggests that self-efficacy, functional limitations, and goal setting might represent modifiable targets of behavioral interventions for increasing physical activity among persons with RRMS.

  20. Fatigue predicts disease worsening in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Michele; Palotai, Miklos; Glanz, Bonnie I; Egorova, Svetlana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Healy, Brian C; Chitnis, Tanuja; Guttmann, Charles Rg

    2016-12-01

    It is unclear whether fatigue is a consequence or a predictive trait of disease worsening. To investigate the predictive value of fatigue toward conversion to confirmed moderate-severe disability in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). We retrospectively selected from the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigations in MS at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) study cohort RRMS patients who converted to confirmed (⩾2 years) Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ⩾3 within a follow-up period ⩾3 years. We contrasted the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) score of 33 converters, obtained at least 1 year before conversion to EDSS ⩾3, with that of 33 non-converter RRMS patients matched for baseline characteristics. Total MFIS score was higher in converter versus non-converter MS patients (median 37 vs 13; p EDSS and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) scores were also higher in the converters (median EDSS 1.5 vs 0, p EDSS: rho = 0.42, p = 0.0005; CES-D: rho = 0.72, p EDSS and CES-D in multivariate analysis, MFIS remained a significant predictor of subsequent conversion to confirmed EDSS ⩾3. Fatigue is a promising indicator of risk for conversion to confirmed moderate-severe disability in RRMS patients. © The Author(s), 2016.

  1. Histogram analysis of diffusion measures in clinically isolated syndromes and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Chunshui [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Education Ministry Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease, Beijing (China); Lin Fuchun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan (China); Liu Yaou; Duan Yunyun [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Lei Hao [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan (China); Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Education Ministry Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease, Beijing (China)], E-mail: kunchengli1955@yahoo.com.cn

    2008-11-15

    Objective: The purposes of our study were to employ diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based histogram analysis to determine the presence of occult damage in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), to compare its severity with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and to determine correlations between DTI histogram measures and clinical and MRI indices in these two diseases. Materials and methods: DTI scans were performed in 19 CIS and 19 RRMS patients and 19 matched healthy volunteers. Histogram analyses of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were performed in normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT), normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and gray matter (NAGM). Correlations were analyzed between these measures and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, T{sub 2}WI lesion volumes (LV) and normalized brain tissue volumes (NBTV) in CIS and RRMS patients. Results: Significant differences were found among CIS, RRMS and control groups in the NBTV and most of the DTI histogram measures of the NABT, NAWM and NAGM. In CIS patients, some DTI histogram measures showed significant correlations with LV and NBTV, but none of them with EDSS. In RRMS patients, however, some DTI histogram measures were significantly correlated with LV, NBTV and EDSS. Conclusion: Occult damage occurs in both NAGM and NAWM in CIS, but the severity is milder than that in RRMS. In CIS and RRMS, the occult damage might be related to both T2 lesion load and brain tissue atrophy. Some DTI histogram measures might be useful for assessing the disease progression in RRMS patients.

  2. Metabolic response to epigallocatechin-3-gallate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähler, Anja; Steiniger, Jochen; Bock, Markus; Klug, Lars; Parreidt, Nadine; Lorenz, Mario; Zimmermann, Benno F; Krannich, Alexander; Paul, Friedemann; Boschmann, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Muscle weakness and fatigue are common symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS). Green tea catechins such as (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are known to improve energy metabolism at rest and during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that EGCG improves energy metabolism and substrate utilization in patients with MS. Eighteen patients (8 men) with relapsing-remitting MS (expanded disability status scale score EGCG (600 mg/d) and placebo over 12 wk (4-wk washout in between). After each intervention, fasting and postprandial energy expenditure (EE), as well as fat oxidation (FAOx) and carbohydrate oxidation (CHOx) rates, were measured either at rest or during 40 min of exercise (0.5 W/kg). At rest, blood samples and microdialysates from adipose tissue and skeletal muscle were also taken. At rest, postprandial EE and CHOx, as well as adipose tissue perfusion and glucose supply, were significantly lower in men but higher in women receiving EGCG compared with placebo. During exercise, postprandial EE was lower after EGCG than after placebo, indicating an increased working efficiency (men > women). After placebo, exercise EE was mainly fueled by FAOx in both men and women. After EGCG, there was a shift to a higher and more stable CHOx during exercise in men but not in women. Our data indicate that EGCG given to patients with MS over 12 wk improves muscle metabolism during moderate exercise to a greater extent in men than in women, possibly because of sex-specific effects on autonomic and endocrine control. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients display an altered lipoprotein profile with dysfunctional HDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, Winde; Wouters, Elien; Bogie, Jeroen F.; Vanmierlo, Tim; Noben, Jean-Paul; Sviridov, Denis; Hellings, Niels; Somers, Veerle; Valcke, Roland; Vanwijmeersch, Bart; Stinissen, Piet; Mulder, Monique T.; Remaley, Alan T.; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In the chronic inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS), reports on lipoprotein level alterations are inconsistent and it is unclear whether lipoprotein function is affected. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analysed the lipoprotein profile of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients, progressive MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We observed smaller LDL in RRMS patients compared to healthy controls and to progressive MS patients. Furthermore, low-BMI (BMI ≤ 23 kg/m2) RRMS patients show increased levels of small HDL (sHDL), accompanied by larger, triglyceride (TG)-rich VLDL, and a higher lipoprotein insulin resistance (LP-IR) index. These alterations coincide with a reduced serum capacity to accept cholesterol via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G1, an impaired ability of HDL3 to suppress inflammatory activity of human monocytes, and modifications of HDL3’s main protein component ApoA-I. In summary, lipoprotein levels and function are altered in RRMS patients, especially in low-BMI patients, which may contribute to disease progression in these patients. PMID:28230201

  4. Regional gray matter atrophy and neuropsychologcal problems in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiyu Lin; Fuyong Chen; Fang Liu; Zhiwen Li; Ying Liu; Shifang Lin; Xiaoyi Wang; Jiting Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis, gray matter atrophy is extensive, and cognitive deficits and mood disorders are frequently encountered. It has been conjectured that focal atrophy is associated with emotional de-cline. However, conventional MRI has revealed that the pathological characteristics cannot ful y account for the mood disorders. Moreover, there is no correlation between cognitive disorders and MRI results in clinical y isolated syndromes or in cases of definite multiple sclerosis. In this case-control study, voxel-based morphometric analysis was performed on 11 subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and the results show that these patients exhibit gray matter atrophy. Moreover, the gray matter atrophy in the superior and middle gyri of the right frontal lobe in patients with multiple sclerosis was correlated with scores from the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. The scores obtained with the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status were associated with gray matter atrophy in the middle gyrus of the left frontal lobe, the superior and middle gyrus of the right frontal lobe, the middle gyrus of the left cingulate, the superior and middle gyri of the left frontal lobe, and the triangular area of the left frontal lobe. However, there was no statistical significance. These findings suggest that the cingulate and frontal cortices of the nant hemisphere are the most severely atrophic regions of the brain, and this atrophy is correlated with cognitive decline and emotional abnormalities.

  5. Azathioprine versus beta interferons for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a multicentre randomized non-inferiority trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Massacesi

    Full Text Available For almost three decades in many countries azathioprine has been used to treat relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. However its efficacy was usually considered marginal and following approval of β interferons for this indication it was no longer recommended as first line treatment, even if presently no conclusive direct β interferon-azathioprine comparison exists. To compare azathioprine efficacy versus the currently available β interferons in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, a multicenter, randomized, controlled, single-blinded, non-inferiority trial was conducted in 30 Italian multiple sclerosis centers. Eligible patients (relapsing-remitting course; ≥ 2 relapses in the last 2 years were randomly assigned to azathioprine or β interferons. The primary outcome was annualized relapse rate ratio (RR over 2 years. Key secondary outcome was number of new brain MRI lesions. Patients (n = 150 were randomized in 2 groups (77 azathioprine, 73 β interferons. At 2 years, clinical evaluation was completed in 127 patients (62 azathioprine, 65 β interferons. Annualized relapse rate was 0.26 (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.19-0.37 in the azathioprine and 0.39 (95% CI 0.30-0.51 in the interferon group. Non-inferiority analysis showed that azathioprine was at least as effective as β interferons (relapse RRAZA/IFN 0.67, one-sided 95% CI 0.96; p<0.01. MRI outcomes were analyzed in 97 patients (50 azathioprine and 47 β interferons. Annualized new T2 lesion rate was 0.76 (95% CI 0.61-0.95 in the azathioprine and 0.69 (95% CI 0.54-0.88 in the interferon group. Treatment discontinuations due to adverse events were higher (20.3% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.03 in the azathioprine than in the interferon group, and concentrated within the first months of treatment, whereas in the interferon group discontinuations occurred mainly during the second year. The results of this study indicate that efficacy of azathioprine is not inferior to that of β interferons for

  6. Azathioprine versus Beta Interferons for Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Multicentre Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massacesi, Luca; Tramacere, Irene; Amoroso, Salvatore; Battaglia, Mario A.; Benedetti, Maria Donata; Filippini, Graziella; La Mantia, Loredana; Repice, Anna; Solari, Alessandra; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Milanese, Clara

    2014-01-01

    For almost three decades in many countries azathioprine has been used to treat relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. However its efficacy was usually considered marginal and following approval of β interferons for this indication it was no longer recommended as first line treatment, even if presently no conclusive direct β interferon-azathioprine comparison exists. To compare azathioprine efficacy versus the currently available β interferons in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, a multicenter, randomized, controlled, single-blinded, non-inferiority trial was conducted in 30 Italian multiple sclerosis centers. Eligible patients (relapsing-remitting course; ≥2 relapses in the last 2 years) were randomly assigned to azathioprine or β interferons. The primary outcome was annualized relapse rate ratio (RR) over 2 years. Key secondary outcome was number of new brain MRI lesions. Patients (n = 150) were randomized in 2 groups (77 azathioprine, 73 β interferons). At 2 years, clinical evaluation was completed in 127 patients (62 azathioprine, 65 β interferons). Annualized relapse rate was 0.26 (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.19–0.37) in the azathioprine and 0.39 (95% CI 0.30–0.51) in the interferon group. Non-inferiority analysis showed that azathioprine was at least as effective as β interferons (relapse RRAZA/IFN 0.67, one-sided 95% CI 0.96; p<0.01). MRI outcomes were analyzed in 97 patients (50 azathioprine and 47 β interferons). Annualized new T2 lesion rate was 0.76 (95% CI 0.61–0.95) in the azathioprine and 0.69 (95% CI 0.54–0.88) in the interferon group. Treatment discontinuations due to adverse events were higher (20.3% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.03) in the azathioprine than in the interferon group, and concentrated within the first months of treatment, whereas in the interferon group discontinuations occurred mainly during the second year. The results of this study indicate that efficacy of azathioprine is not inferior to that of

  7. Simvastatin as add-on therapy to interferon β-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (SIMCOMBIN study): a placebo-controlled randomised phase 4 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Lycke, Jan; Erälinna, Juha-Pekka;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective. We aimed to establish whether add-on of simvastatin, a statin with anti-inflammatory properties, improves this efficacy.......Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective. We aimed to establish whether add-on of simvastatin, a statin with anti-inflammatory properties, improves this efficacy....

  8. Secondary progressive and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis leads to motor-related decreased anatomical connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lyksborg

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS damages central white matter pathways which has considerable impact on disease-related disability. To identify disease-related alterations in anatomical connectivity, 34 patients (19 with relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS, 15 with secondary progressive MS (SP-MS and 20 healthy subjects underwent diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI of the brain. Based on the dMRI, anatomical connectivity mapping (ACM yielded a voxel-based metric reflecting the connectivity shared between each individual voxel and all other brain voxels. To avoid biases caused by inter-individual brain-shape differences, they were estimated in a spatially normalized space. Voxel-based statistical analyses using ACM were compared with analyses based on the localized microstructural indices of fractional anisotropy (FA. In both RR-MS and SP-MS patients, considerable portions of the motor-related white matter revealed decreases in ACM and FA when compared with healthy subjects. Patients with SP-MS exhibited reduced ACM values relative to RR-MS in the motor-related tracts, whereas there were no consistent decreases in FA between SP-MS and RR-MS patients. Regional ACM statistics exhibited moderate correlation with clinical disability as reflected by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS. The correlation between these statistics and EDSS was either similar to or stronger than the correlation between FA statistics and the EDSS. Together, the results reveal an improved relationship between ACM, the clinical phenotype, and impairment. This highlights the potential of the ACM connectivity indices to be used as a marker which can identify disease related-alterations due to MS which may not be seen using localized microstructural indices.

  9. Vitamin D supplementation and systemic inflammation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røsjø, Egil; Steffensen, Linn H; Jørgensen, Lone; Lindstrøm, Jonas C; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Michelsen, Annika E; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Kampman, Margitta T; Torkildsen, Øivind; Holmøy, Trygve

    2015-12-01

    Observational studies have suggested that vitamin D may reduce inflammation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), but this has not been clearly confirmed in randomized controlled trials. To further explore the possible anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin D in RRMS, we examined the effect of high-dose oral vitamin D3 on eleven markers of systemic inflammation in 68 RRMS patients enrolled in a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial of vitamin D3 supplementation (20,000 IU/week) (NCT00785473). Serum inflammation markers and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were measured at baseline and week 96, and no restrictions were set on additional standard immunomodulatory treatment for RRMS. The mean 25(OH)D level rose from 56 ± 29 to 123 ± 34 nmol/L among patients receiving vitamin D3 supplementation, whereas only a minor increase from 57 ± 22 to 63 ± 24 nmol/L was seen in the placebo group. However, no significant differences appeared between the vitamin D group and the placebo group for any of the inflammation markers. Patients on immunomodulatory therapy had significantly higher levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 16 than patients without immunomodulatory treatment, but there were no clear synergistic effects between immunomodulatory therapy and vitamin D3 supplementation on any of the inflammation markers. The rise in 25(OH)D levels after vitamin D3 supplementation was unaffected by immunomodulatory treatment. We conclude that in this study of RRMS patients, high-dose oral vitamin D3 supplementation prominently increased serum 25(OH)D levels without affecting markers of systemic inflammation, while a more anti-inflammatory phenotype was found among patients on immunomodulatory treatment.

  10. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Baseline Analysis of Multi-Center Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D.; Cofield, Stacy S.; Cutter, Gary R.; Lublin, Fred D.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r = −0.133; p < 0.001) and DD (r = −0.098; p = 0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r = −0.492; p-value < 0.001), T1 LL (r = −0.473; p-value < 0.001) and nCSF (r = −0.367; p-value < 0.001). PMID:25787188

  11. Clinical outcome of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis among Hong Kong Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K H; Tsang, K L; Ho, P W L; Tse, C T; Kwan, J S C; Ho, J W M; Chu, A C Y; Chang, R S K; Ho, S L

    2011-10-01

    Clinical outcome of Chinese relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients is uncertain. To study the long-term clinical outcome of Chinese RRMS patients. RRMS patients with duration of 10 years or longer followed up in our hospital is retrospectively studied. 61 RRMS patients (75% female) were studied. Their mean symptom onset age was 25.9 years and mean duration was 20.6 years (range 10-33); 36% patients had received β-interferon and 30% azathioprine. Their mean EDSS scores were 3.3 (range 1-7) and 4.7 (range 1-8) at 10 years and latest follow-up (mean duration 20.6 years) respectively. At 10 years, 30% patients had EDSS score ≤2, 34% EDSS 2.5-3.5, 20% EDSS 4.0-5.5 and 16% ≥6; 18% developed SPMS. At latest follow-up, 15% patients had EDSS ≤2, 20% EDSS 2.5-3.5, 19% EDSS 4.0-5.5 and 46% ≥6.0; 53% developed SPMS. The median time from symptom onset to EDSS 6 was 22 years. No differences were detected in demographic characteristics, presenting neurological features, number of attacks in first 2 years, neuroradiological findings and disease modifying therapies between patients with EDSS EDSS scores at 10 years and latest follow-up were similar for patients who had received β-interferon and those who had not. Hong Kong Chinese RRMS patients may have worse long-term clinical outcome than Caucasian patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Proteomics comparison of cerebrospinal fluid of relapsing remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel P Stoop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Based on clinical representation of disease symptoms multiple sclerosis (MScl patients can be divided into two major subtypes; relapsing remitting (RR MScl (85-90% and primary progressive (PP MScl (10-15%. Proteomics analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has detected a number of proteins that were elevated in MScl patients. Here we specifically aimed to differentiate between the PP and RR subtypes of MScl by comparing CSF proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CSF samples (n = 31 were handled according to the same protocol for quantitative mass spectrometry measurements we reported previously. In the comparison of PP MScl versus RR MScl we observed a number of differentially abundant proteins, such as protein jagged-1 and vitamin D-binding protein. Protein jagged-1 was over three times less abundant in PP MScl compared to RR MScl. Vitamin D-binding protein was only detected in the RR MScl samples. These two proteins were validated by independent techniques (western blot and ELISA as differentially abundant in the comparison between both MScl types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The main finding of this comparative study is the observation that the proteome profiles of CSF in PP and RR MScl patients overlap to a large extent. Still, a number of differences could be observed. Protein jagged-1 is a ligand for multiple Notch receptors and involved in the mediation of Notch signaling. It is suggested in literature that the Notch pathway is involved in the remyelination of MScl lesions. Aberration of normal homeostasis of Vitamin D, of which approximately 90% is bound to vitamin D-binding protein, has been widely implicated in MScl for some years now. Vitamin D directly and indirectly regulates the differentiation, activation of CD4+ T-lymphocytes and can prevent the development of autoimmune processes, and so it may be involved in neuroprotective elements in MScl.

  13. Regional gray matter atrophy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: baseline analysis of multi-center data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D; Cofield, Stacy S; Cutter, Gary R; Lublin, Fred D; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-03-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson׳s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r=-0.133; p<0.001) and DD (r=-0.098; p=0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r=-0.492; P-value<0.001), T1 LL (r=-0.473; P-value<0.001) and nCSF (r=-0.367; P-value<0.001).

  14. "Always looking for a new balance": toward an understanding of what it takes to continue working while being diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meide, Hanneke van der; Gorp, Dennis van; van der Hiele, Karin; Visser, Leo

    2017-06-22

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the meaning of work in the everyday lives of people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and the barriers and facilitators to staying in work. Nineteen employed adults diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis participated in narrative interviews. All interviews were transcribed and coded for thematic analysis. For people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, continuing to work was a precarious balancing act. Five themes influenced this balance: becoming familiar with the disease, adjusting expectations, having an understanding and realistic line manager, seeing work as meaningful life activity and strategic considerations. People receiving a diagnosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis have to refamiliarize themselves with their own body in a meaningful way to be able to continue their work. Rehabilitation professionals can support them herein by taking into account not merely functional capabilities but also identity aspects of the body. Medication that stabilizes symptoms supports making the necessary adjustments. A trusting relationship with the line manager is vital for this adaptation process. Additionally, a match between being adequately challenged by work, while still having the capacity to meet those work demands, is needed, as is long-term financial stability. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation professionals can support employees with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis by taking into account not merely functional capabilities but also identity aspects of the body. A trusting relationship with the line manager, including a timely disclosure of the diagnosis, is vital for people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis to remain at work. For people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, there is a delicate balance between being adequately challenged by work while still having the capacity to meet work demands.

  15. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Trott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs, although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking.

  16. Interferon-beta for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian HE

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of interferon-beta (IFN-β as monotherapy versus placebo for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS.  Methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PEDRO, China Biology Medicine Disc (CBMDisc, as well as clinical trial registries and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP, retrieval deadline: June 2014. Furthermore, we checked reference lists of published reviews and retrieved articles, and communicated personally with investigators and biotechnology companies participating in trials of IFN-β in an effort to identify further studies or unpublished data. Two review authors independently screened studies, extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias. Formal Meta-analysis were conducted by using Review Manager software (Version 5.3.3 and the impacts of limitations in study design or execution (risk of bias, inconsistency in results, imprecision of results, indirectness of evidence and publication bias on the quality of the body of evidence were assessed.  Results A total of 576 articles were retrieved. After screening of titles and abstracts, 26 studies were provisionally selected. The full text of papers were obtained for further assessment of eligibility. Finally, 5 studies were included, involving 2129 patients with RRMS (high-dose IFN-β group: N = 1076; placebo group: N = 1053. All studies were randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel-group clinical trials with a follow-up for at least one year, evaluating IFN-β versus placebo as monotherapy for patients with RRMS. Most studies had methodological limitations, mainly on a high risk of attrition bias. Moreover, the intention to treat (ITT principle was not used in data analysis. Data from only 919 patients (43.17% were available to calculate the primary outcomes at 2 years of follow-up. Meta-analysis indicated

  17. Anti-inflammatory nutritional intervention in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco; Larocca, Marilena; Trotta, Vincenzo; Mennella, Ilario; Vitaglione, Paola; Ettorre, Michele; Graverini, Antonio; De Santis, Alessandro; Di Monte, Elisabetta; Coniglio, Maria Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the influence of nutritional intervention on inflammatory status and wellness in people with multiple sclerosis. To this end, in a seven-month pilot study we investigated the effects of a calorie-restricted, semi-vegetarian diet and administration of vitamin D and other dietary supplements (fish oil, lipoic acid, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, resveratrol and multivitamin complex) in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 10 patients with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. At 0/3/6 months, patients had neurological examination, filled questionnaires and underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. Serum fatty acids and vitamin D levels were measured as markers of dietary compliance and nutritional efficacy of treatment, whereas serum gelatinase levels were analyzed as markers of inflammatory status. All patients had insufficient levels of vitamin D at baseline, but their values did not ameliorate following a weekly administration of 5000  IU, and rather decreased over time. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increased already after three months, even under dietary restriction only. Co-treatment with interferon-beta in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis was irrelevant to vitamin D levels. After six months nutritional treatment, no significant changes in neurological signs were observed in any group. However, serum levels of the activated isoforms of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 decreased by 59% in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis and by 51% in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients under nutritional intervention, including dietary supplements. This study indicates that a healthy nutritional intervention is well accepted by people with multiple sclerosis and may ameliorate their physical and inflammatory status.

  18. Anti-inflammatory nutritional intervention in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive multiple sclerosis: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Rocco; Larocca, Marilena; Trotta, Vincenzo; Mennella, Ilario; Vitaglione, Paola; Ettorre, Michele; Graverini, Antonio; De Santis, Alessandro; Di Monte, Elisabetta; Coniglio, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the influence of nutritional intervention on inflammatory status and wellness in people with multiple sclerosis. To this end, in a seven-month pilot study we investigated the effects of a calorie-restricted, semi-vegetarian diet and administration of vitamin D and other dietary supplements (fish oil, lipoic acid, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, resveratrol and multivitamin complex) in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 10 patients with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. At 0/3/6 months, patients had neurological examination, filled questionnaires and underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. Serum fatty acids and vitamin D levels were measured as markers of dietary compliance and nutritional efficacy of treatment, whereas serum gelatinase levels were analyzed as markers of inflammatory status. All patients had insufficient levels of vitamin D at baseline, but their values did not ameliorate following a weekly administration of 5000  IU, and rather decreased over time. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increased already after three months, even under dietary restriction only. Co-treatment with interferon-beta in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis was irrelevant to vitamin D levels. After six months nutritional treatment, no significant changes in neurological signs were observed in any group. However, serum levels of the activated isoforms of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 decreased by 59% in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis and by 51% in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients under nutritional intervention, including dietary supplements. This study indicates that a healthy nutritional intervention is well accepted by people with multiple sclerosis and may ameliorate their physical and inflammatory status. PMID:26785711

  19. Trace elements in scalp hair samples from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Tamburo

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have suggested a possible role of trace elements (TE in the etiology of several neurological diseases including Multiple Sclerosis (MS. Hair analysis provides an easy tool to quantify TE in human subjects, including patients with neurodegenerative diseases.To compare TE levels in scalp hair from patients with MS and healthy controls from the same geographic area (Sicily.ICP-MS was used to determine the concentrations of 21 elements (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sb, Se, Sr, U, V and Zn in scalp hair of 48 patients with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis compared with 51 healthy controls.MS patients showed a significantly lower hair concentration of aluminum and rubidium (median values: Al = 3.76 μg/g vs. 4.49 μg/g and Rb = 0.007 μg/g vs. 0.01 μg/g; and higher hair concentration of U (median values U: 0.014 μg/g vs. 0.007 μg/g compared to healthy controls. The percentages of MS patients showing hair elemental concentrations greater than the 95th percentile of controls were 20% for Ni, 19% for Ba and U, and 15% for Ag, Mo and Se. Conversely, the percentages of MS patients showing hair elemental concentrations lower than the 5th percentile of healthy controls were 27% for Al, 25% for Rb, 22% for Ag, 19% for Fe, and 16% for Pb. No significant association was found between levels of each TE and age, disease duration or Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score. After stratification by gender, healthy subjects did not show any significant difference in trace element levels, while MS patients showed significant differences (p<0.01 for the concentrations of Ag, Cr, Fe, Ni and Sr. No significant differences were also found, at p<0.01, in relation to the use of cigarettes, consume of water, vegetables and place of living.The different distributions of TE in hair of MS patients compared to controls provides an additional indirect evidence of metabolic imbalance of chemical elements in the

  20. VDR and CYP24A1 Expression Analysis in Iranian Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Hashem; Taheri, Mohammad; Sajadi, Elham; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Arsang Jang, Shahram; Sayad, Arezou

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common disease of the central nervous system.This disease may be initiated by either vitamin deficiency or triggered by abnormality in CYP24A1 and vitamin D receptor. In this case-control study, the expression of genes encoding vitamin D receptor (VDR) and CYP24A1 in relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients was compared with normal individuals in the Iranian population. RNA from whole blood of 50 RR-MS patients (HLA-DRB1*15-negative and responders to interferonbeta with a normal vitamin D level) and 50 normal controls was extracted. The levels of CYP24A1 and VDR expression were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The RR-MS group had a significantly more than 2 times higher expression level of VDR than the normal group (P=0.04). On the other hand, there was a 0.89 times decrease in the expression level of CYP24A1 in RR-MS patients which was not statistically significant. There was no linear correlation between the risk of expanded disability status scale of Kurtzke (EDSS) and the expression level of either CYP24A1 or VDR. In addition, the expression level of CYP24A1 or VDR was not correlated with the duration of the disease. Up-regulation of VDR is likely to happen in RR-MS patients in the Iranian population. We did not observe a gene expression-phenotype correlation for CYP24A1 which may be due to limited statistical power as a result of the small sample size. Although the individuals taking part in this study had normal levels of vitamin D, the increase in VDR expression levels may perhaps be a response to a defect in vitamin D processing. Another possibility is that despite an increase in VDR expression level, factors such as micro-RNAs may result in their deactivation while an increase in VDR expression level can be seen as a compensatory response. Of course, further studies are required to identify the mechanism of action of vitamin D by analyzing genes involved in its signaling pathway, particularly VDR

  1. Optic Coherence Tomography Findings in Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients of the Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Andalib

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a simple, high-resolution technique to quantify the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and macula volume, which provide an indirect measurement of axonal damage in multiple sclerosis (MS. This study aimed to evaluate OCT finding in relapsing-remitting MS patients of the northwest of Iran and compare them with a normal control group.Methods: In a cross-sectional, descriptive, analytic study, 60 patients with MS as case group and 60 patients as controls were studied. Total macular volume (TMV and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in perioptic disk area (3.4 millimeter around the disk and macula was measured using Stratus 3000 in circular form. These findings were compared between the two groups and their relationship with the duration and severity of MS [based on Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS] and history of optic neuritis were evaluated.Results: In total, 35 men and 85 women with a mean age of 34.8 years were evaluated. The mean RNFL in MS patients were 231.9 and 233.1 micrometers in right and left eyes; while they were 246.7 and 250.4 micrometers in right and left eyes of healthy subjects, respectively. This difference in thickness of RNFL in total measure and all quadrants around the optic disk and TMV between case and control groups was analytically meaningful (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001 for right and left eyes, respectively. The mean thickness of RNFL in patients with optic neuritis was significantly lower than other patients in right and left eyes (P = 0.042 and P = 0.005. There was a significant correlation between most of OCT findings and the MS disease duration and EDSS.Conclusion: Findings of the present study in the northwest of Iran buttress the idea that RNFL thickness can be greatly affected by MS. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated with ON and MS duration and severity.

  2. The impact of health anxiety in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: Misperception, misattribution and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, Aimee L; Salkovskis, Paul M; Silber, Eli; Morris, Robin G

    2016-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease with an unpredictable prognosis. Previous studies have reported health anxiety within the MS population. This study examines the effect of health anxiety on MS patients' quality of life (QoL) and evaluates the potential contribution of cognitive factors in maintaining health anxiety. A total of 84 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) were screened for health anxiety. From this sample, a group with relatively high and another group with low anxiety (n = 21 in each group) were identified. A further 21 healthy controls were recruited for comparison. A measure of QoL was then completed. Cognitive biases were investigated by measuring perception and attribution of common bodily symptoms as well as appraisal of performance on neuropsychological and physical fatigue tests. The high health anxiety group reported poorer QoL relative to the other groups, independent of level of disability. They were also more likely to misattribute common bodily changes to MS, and perceive their (objectively intact) performance on tests of cognition and fatigue as being impaired, attributing the cause of impairment to MS. Health anxiety may be a factor in mediating the psychosocial impact of MS. Skilled psychological treatment which changes misperception and misattribution may significantly benefit patients with MS and elevated health anxiety. Clinical implications Health anxiety impacts on quality of life in patients with MS even when disability and other measures of psychological distress are taken into account. High levels of health anxiety distort perceptions of symptoms in patients with MS in line with the predictions made by the cognitive model of health anxiety. Limitations of study This study is limited to patients with RRMS within the relatively early stages of their disease and is based on a small sample size. Health anxiety is correlated with measures of generalized anxiety, depression, and worry, although

  3. Dynamic changes in meningeal inflammation correspond to clinical exacerbations in a murine model of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Caulfield, Margaret E; Hatfield, Julianne K; Brown, Melissa A

    2015-01-15

    Inflammation in the meninges, tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord that enclose the cerebrospinal fluid, closely parallels clinical exacerbations in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In preclinical disease, an influx of innate immune cells precedes loss of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and large-scale inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). T cell infiltration into the meninges is observed in acute disease as well as during relapse, when neither BBB permeability nor significant increases in peripherally-derived immune cell numbers in the CNS are observed. These findings support the idea that the meninges are a gateway for immune cell access into the CNS, a finding that has important therapeutic implications.

  4. Cognitive impairment in patients suffering from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with EDSS < or = 3.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, R M; Palermo, R; Vitello, G; Gennuso, M; Settipani, N; Piccoli, F

    2003-11-01

    Previous papers have mainly demonstrated the presence and the frequency of cognitive impairment in patients suffering from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate subjects with the relapsing-remitting form of the disease and mild clinical disability (EDSS Aphasie Test (AAT). They also underwent Clinical Depression Scale (CDQ) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The results show the presence of significant memory impairment on both WMS (P = 0.000) and BVRT (P = 0.000) in patients compared with controls. Patients were also impaired in abstract reasoning and problem-solving deficit (KT P = 0.003; RCPM P = 0.000) and in FR (P = 0.019). Cognitive decline correlated with illness duration (r = 0.761), but was independent of EDSS (r = 0.085). Cognitive decline was present even when physical disability was not yet severe, but it was mild and did not limit patients' ability to work. The cognitive impairment outlined was of the subcortical type and correlated with illness duration. This study emphasizes the importance of cognitive examination in clinical practice. It is suggested that a complete neurological examination include tests on memory and abstract reasoning.

  5. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: patterns of response to disease-modifying therapies and associated factors: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Maria José; de Sá, João; Sousa, Lívia

    2014-12-01

    Current treatments for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are only partially effective. The objective of this study was to characterize treatment response in RRMS patients in Portugal to 12-month therapy with first-line disease-modifying therapies. In this retrospective study, neurologists at participating centers completed survey questionnaires using records of patients with RRMS who had received first-line treatment with one of five European Medicine Agency-approved agents in the 12 months prior to inclusion in the survey. Sub-optimal responders included patients treated for at least 1 year, and who had ≥1 relapse(s) or an increase of 1.5 points on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS; if baseline EDSS was 0) or an increase of ≥0.5 points (baseline EDSS ≥1). Optimal responders included patients treated for at least 1 year without relapse and who had an increase of EDSS (if baseline EDSS was 0) or no increase in EDSS (baseline EDSS ≥1). Data for 1,131 patients from 15 centers were analyzed. Twenty-six percent (95% confidence interval 23-28%) of patients had sub-optimal treatment response. Duration of therapy (P EDSS score (P EDSS score at baseline and did not differ among therapies. Neurologists should closely monitor patients to optimize treatment strategies and better control disease, improving prognosis.

  6. Combination therapy with mitoxantrone and plasma exchange in aggressive relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: A preliminary clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Tabrizi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of mitoxantrone induction therapy in rapidly worsening multiple sclerosis (MS is well established. Plasma exchange is also applied as an adjuvant in exacerbations of relapsing MS. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of combination therapy with mitoxantrone and plasma exchange versus mitoxantrone alone in patients with aggressive MS. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with aggressive relapsing remitting MS were randomly put into two groups. The first group underwent monthly plasma exchange for three successive months, followed by 12 mg/m 2 mitoxantrone at the end of each course and two more doses of 6 mg/m 2 mitoxantrone in 3-month intervals. The second group received the same doses of mitoxantrone only without plasma exchange. At the end of 8 months treatment course, clinical reassessment and neuroimaging was performed and treatment was continued with interferon-β. Results: At the end of induction therapy, Expanded Disability Status Scale score was significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.001. Number of demyelinating and gadolinium-enhancing plaques in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was prominently reduced in group 2 (P ≤ 0.05, but the changes were not statistically significant in group 1, except for juxtacortical plaques. Conclusion: Administration of mitoxantrone as an induction therapy in patients of aggressive relapsing remitting MS results in significant improvement of their clinical state and MRI activity. However, combination of plasma exchange with mitoxantrone gives no more benefits than mitoxantrone alone and sometimes worsens the situation possibly by reduction of mitoxantrone efficacy as a result of plasma exchange.

  7. Spontaneously relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune uveitis in rats allows successful therapeutic oral tolerance induction in ongoing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Andrea; Diedrichs-Möhring, Maria; Wildner, Gerhild

    2015-02-01

    Antigen-specific tolerance induction is a desired therapy for uveitis patients. Our relapsing-remitting rat model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced with IRBP peptide R14 enables us to test the effect of oral tolerance on the prevention of relapsing uveitis. We investigated several peptides overlapping the sequence of R14 for prevention and different doses of R14 for therapy to determine the tolerogenic epitope and the most effective therapeutic regimen for uveitis. Lewis rats were immunized with R14-CFA to induce EAU. Oral tolerance was induced prior to immunization (prevention) or after onset of EAU to prevent relapses (therapy). Therapeutic feeding was performed with high and/or low doses of oral antigen for clonal deletion of effector and induction of regulatory T cells. Uveitis was determined clinically and histologically; mesenteric lymph node (mLN) cells of tolerized rats were tested for surface markers, cytokines and Foxp3 expression. Preventive feeding of R14 and its major epitope R16, but none of the overlapping peptides significantly suppressed EAU and also prevented relapses, irrespective of their pathogenicity. Therapeutic feeding with R14 dramatically reduced relapses, while only the consecutive feeding of high and low-dose R14 had an ameliorating effect on the first course of disease. IL-10-producing T cells from mLN decreased after oral tolerization, and with R14-stimulation in vitro the TCRαβ+/Foxp3+ population increased in the low-dose fed group. No mLN population could be clearly assigned to successful oral tolerance induction during active autoimmune uveitis.

  8. Improvement of health-related quality of life in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients after 2 years of treatment with intramuscular interferon-beta-1a.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.H.; Sindic, C.; Carton, H.; Zwanikken, C.P.; Lemmens, W.A.J.G.; Borm, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), the effect of interferon-beta (INFb) on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) is not firmly documented. The objective of this study is to assess HR-QoL during 2 years of treatment with intramuscular INFb and its correlation with disab

  9. Contrasting responses to interferon β-1b treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: Does baseline interleukin- 12p35 messenger RNA predict the efficacy of treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxel van-Dezaire, A.H.H.; Trigt van-Hoff, S.C.J.; Killestein, J.; Schrijver, H.M.; Houwelingen, J.C. van; Polman, C.H.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β treatment is effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) via an as yet unidentified mechanism. In the present study, we investigated whether the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding the interleukin (IL)-12 subunits p40 and p35, IL-12 receptor chains, IL-18,

  10. Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis in X-Linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease with Central Nervous System Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Koutsis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS and X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX, carrying a GJB1 mutation affecting connexin-32 (c.191G>A, p. Cys64Tyr which was recently reported by our group. This is the third case report of a patient with CMTX developing MS, but it is unique in the fact that other family members carrying the same mutation were found to have asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS involvement (diffuse white matter hyperintensity on brain MRI and extensor plantars. Although this may be a chance association, the increasing number of cases with CMTX and MS, especially with mutations involving the CNS, may imply some causative effect and provide insights into MS pathogenesis.

  11. Medication withdrawal may be an option for a select group of patients in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sciascia do Olival

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the clinical and radiological evolution of a stable group of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that had their disease-modifying therapy (DMT withdrawn. Forty patients, which had made continuous use of one immunomodulator and had remained free of disease for at least 5 years, had their DMT withdrawn and were observed from 13 to 86 months. Out of the followed patients, 4 (10% patients presented with new attacks. In addition to these patients, 2 (5% patients had new lesions revealed by magnetic resonance imaging that did not correspond to clinical attacks. Despite these results, the difficult decision to withdraw medication requires careful analysis. Withdrawal, however, should not be viewed as simply the suspension of treatment because these patients should be evaluated periodically, and the immunomodulators should be readily reintroduced if new attacks occur. Nonetheless, medication withdrawal is an option for a select group of patients.

  12. A clinical and laboratory study evaluating the profile of cytokine levels in relapsing remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Livia; Lucchesi, Cinzia; Pecori, Chiara; Metelli, Maria Rita; Pellegrini, Silvia; Iudice, Alfonso; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2015-01-15

    The main aim of the study was to evaluate levels of cytokines IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, TNF-alfa, TGB-beta1 and IFN-gamma in 30 patients with relapsing remitting (RRMS) compared to 30 secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) in a peripheral blood sample. Statistical analysis showed significant higher levels of IL-17 and INF-gamma, which are cytokines with pro-inflammatory properties, and lower levels of TGF-beta1, a molecule with immunosuppressant activity, in RRMS compared to SPMS. These results underline the existence of a different cytokines dysregulation in RRMS compared to SPMS phases with higher pro-inflammatory activity in RRMS.

  13. Long Term Clinical Prognostic Factors in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Insights from a 10-Year Observational Study.

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    Gabriel Bsteh

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS has a highly heterogenic course making prediction of long term outcome very difficult.The objective was to evaluate current and identify additional clinical factors that are linked to long term outcome of relapsing-remitting MS assessed by disability status 10 years after disease onset.This observational study included 793 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Clinical factors hypothesized to influence long term outcome measured by EDSS scores 10 years after disease onset were analysed by Kaplan-Meier-estimates. Multinomial logistic regression models regarding mild (EDSS ≤2.5, moderate (EDSS 3.0-5.5 or severe (EDSS ≥6.0 disability were calculated to correct for confounders.Secondary progression was the strongest predictor of severe disability (Hazard ratio [HR] 503.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 160.0-1580.1; p<0.001. Complete remission of neurological symptoms at onset reduced the risk of moderate disability (HR 0.42; CI 0.23-0.77; p = 0.005, while depression (HR 3.59; CI 1.14-11.24; p = 0.028 and cognitive dysfunction (HR 4.64; CI 1.11-19.50; p = 0.036 10 years after disease onset were associated with severe disability. Oligoclonal bands and pregnancy were not correlated with disability.We were able to identify clinically apparent chronic depression and cognitive dysfunction to be associated with adverse long term outcome in MS and to confirm that pregnancy has no negative impact. Additionally, we emphasize the positive predictive value of complete remission of initial symptoms.

  14. NORdic trial of oral Methylprednisolone as add-on therapy to Interferon beta-1a for treatment of relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis (NORMIMS study): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup; Søgaard, Lise Vejby;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective, and new more effective and safe strategies are needed. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of oral methylprednisolone as an add-on therapy to subcutaneous interferon beta-1a to reduce...... the yearly relapse rate in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. METHODS: NORMIMS (NORdic trial of oral Methylprednisolone as add-on therapy to Interferon beta-1a for treatment of relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis) was a randomised, placebo-controlled trial done in 29 neurology....... INTERPRETATION: Oral methylprednisolone given in pulses every 4 weeks as an add-on therapy to subcutaneous interferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis leads to a significant reduction in relapse rate. However, because of the small number of patients and the high dropout rate...

  15. Methylprednisolone in combination with interferon beta-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MECOMBIN study): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnborg, Mads; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Andersson, Magnus;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is commonly used to treat patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; however, the treatment is only partially effective in reducing relapses and progression of disability. Corticosteroids are used to treat relapses in patients with multiple sclerosis. We...... therefore aimed to investigate the combination of cyclic methylprednisolone and interferon beta for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. METHODS: In 2001, we designed a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, parallel-group trial, termed the methylprednisolone in combination...... with interferon beta-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MECOMBIN) study. Patients were recruited between October, 2002, and March, 2005 from 50 neurology departments in eight countries. We included treatment-naive patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who had an expanded disability...

  16. Predictors of quality of life in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a 2-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstarck, K; Pelletier, J; Boucekine, M; Auquier, P

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of which factors are determinant of quality of life (QoL) in patients with multiple scleroris (MS) would assist clinicians in choosing the most appropriate interventions. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of sociodemographic and clinical factors in the predicting QoL in a 2-year cohort of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). The study had a multi-center, multi-regional, and longitudinal design. Main inclusion criteria were: patient with a RR-MS subtype (McDonald criteria) and an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score lower than 7.0. Sociodemographic (age, gender, education level, marital and employment status) and clinical (disability, disease duration, relapse) data were recorded. The QoL was assessed using the MusiQoL (disease-specific) and SF-36 (generic) questionnaires. Each patient was investigated at baseline and 24 months post-inclusion (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00702065). Five hundred and twenty-six patients were enrolled in the present study. The 24-month MusiQoL index score was significantly inversely correlated with the disease duration. Baseline EDSS score impacted in both 'physical-like' and 'psychological-like' dimensions. At least one relapse during the follow-up period was associated with lower physical scores. Occupational status and marital status were associated with 24-month scores of MusiQoL and SF-36. After adjusting for disability and relapse occurrence, sociodemographics (age, marital status, and occupational status) and baseline QoL scores were also independent QoL predictors in MS patients. Special attention should be given to subgroups to ensure optimal management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost minimisation analysis of fingolimod vs natalizumab as a second line of treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, C; Izquierdo, G; García-Ruiz, A; Granell, M; Brosa, M

    2014-05-01

    At present, there is a lack of economic assessments of second-line treatments for relapsing-recurring multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency between fingolimod and natalizumab in Spain. A cost minimisation analysis model was developed for a 2-year horizon. The same relapse rate was applied to both treatment arms and the cost of resources was calculated using Spain's stipulated rates for 2012 in euros. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of Spain's national health system and an annual discount rate of 3% was applied to future costs. A sensitivity analysis was performed to validate the robustness of the model. Indirect comparison of fingolimod with natalizumab revealed no significant differences (hazard ratio between 0.82 and 1.07). The total direct cost, considering a 2-year analytical horizon, a 7.5% discount stipulated by Royal Decree, and a mean annual relapse rate of 0.22, was € 40914.72 for fingolimod and € 45890.53 for natalizumab. Of the total direct costs that were analysed, the maximum cost savings derived from prescribing fingolimod prescription was € 4363.63, corresponding to lower administration and treatment maintenance costs. Based on the sensitivity analysis performed, fingolimod use was associated with average savings of 11% (range 3.1%-18.7%). Fingolimod is more efficient than natalizumab as a second-line treatment option for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and it generates savings for the Spanish national health system. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Immune phenotype in children with therapy-nave remitted and relapsed Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aron; Cseh; Barna; Vasarhelyi; Kriszta; Molnar; Balazs; Szalay; Peter; Svec; Andras; Treszl; Antal; Dezsofi; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Andras; Arato; Tivadar; Tulassay; Gabor; Veres

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the prevalence of subpopulations of CD4+ cells along with that of major inhibitor or stimulator cell types in therapy-nave childhood Crohn's disease (CD) and to test whether abnormalities of immune phenotype are normalized with the improvement of clinical signs and symptoms of disease. METHODS: We enrolled 26 pediatric patients with CD. 14 therapy-nave CD children; of those, 10 children remitted on conventional therapy and formed the remission group. We also tested another group of 12...

  19. Risk Factors Associated with the Onset of Relapsing-Remitting and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review

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    Kyla A. McKay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic central nervous system disease with a highly heterogeneous course. The aetiology of MS is not well understood but is likely a combination of both genetic and environmental factors. Approximately 85% of patients present with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, while 10–15% present with primary progressive MS (PPMS. PPMS is associated with an older onset age, a different sex ratio, and a considerably more rapid disease progression relative to RRMS. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify modifiable risk factors that may be associated with these different clinical courses. We performed a search of six databases and integrated twenty observational studies into a descriptive review. Exposure to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV appeared to increase the risk of RRMS, but its association with PPMS was less clear. Other infections, such as human herpesvirus-6 and chlamydia pneumoniae, were not consistently associated with a specific disease course nor was cigarette smoking. Despite the vast literature examining risk factors for the development of MS, relatively few studies reported findings by disease course. This review exposes a gap in our understanding of the risk factors associated with the onset of PPMS, our current knowledge being predominated by relapsing-onset MS.

  20. Cytokine production profiles in chronic relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: IFN-γ and TNF-α are important participants in the first attack but not in the relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Inaba, Yuji; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Itoh, Makoto; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Nakazawa, Yozo; Koh, Chang-Sung; Ichikawa, Motoki

    2014-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease often displaying a relapsing-remitting course of neurological manifestations that is mimicked by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in animal models of MS. In particular, NOD mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55 develop chronic relapsing-remitting EAE (CREAE). To elucidate the mechanisms that cause MS relapse, we investigated the histopathology and cytokine production of spleen cells and mRNA expression levels in the central nervous system (CNS) of CREAE mice. During the first attack, inflammatory cell infiltration around small vessels and in the subarachnoid space was observed in the spinal cord. Spleen cell production and mRNA expression in the CNS of several cytokines, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, and CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), were higher in CREAE mice than in controls. Afterwards, parenchymal infiltration and demyelination were observed histologically in the spinal cord and corresponded with the more severe clinical symptoms of the first and second relapses. IL-17 and CCL2, but not IFN-γ, TNF-α, or IL-6, were also produced by spleen cells during recurrences. Our results suggested that the immune mechanisms in relapses were different from those in the first attack for CREAE. Further investigation of CREAE mechanisms may provide important insights into successful therapies for human relapsing-remitting MS.

  1. Intraventricularly Injected Olig2-NSCs Attenuate Established Relapsing-Remitting EAE in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Amor, Sandra; Gerritsen, Wouter; Baker, David; Jackson, Samuel L.; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory relapsing demyelinating disease, failure to control or repair damage leads to progressive neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) has been shown to promote repair and functional recovery in the acute

  2. Characteristic cerebrospinal fluid cytokine/chemokine profiles in neuromyelitis optica, relapsing remitting or primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Matsushita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in cytokine/chemokine profiles among patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO, relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, and primary progressive MS (PPMS, and the relationships of these profiles with clinical and neuroimaging features are unclear. A greater understanding of these profiles may help in differential diagnosis. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured 27 cytokines/chemokines and growth factors in CSF collected from 20 patients with NMO, 26 with RRMS, nine with PPMS, and 18 with other non-inflammatory neurological diseases (OND by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Interleukin (IL-17A, IL-6, CXCL8 and CXCL10 levels were significantly higher in NMO patients than in OND and RRMS patients at relapse, while granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and CCL4 levels were significantly higher in NMO patients than in OND patients. In NMO patients, IL-6 and CXCL8 levels were positively correlated with disability and CSF protein concentration while IL-6, CXCL8, G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and IFN-γ were positively correlated with CSF neutrophil counts at the time of sample collection. In RRMS patients, IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in OND patients at the relapse phase while CSF cell counts were negatively correlated with the levels of CCL2. Correlation coefficients of cytokines/chemokines in the relapse phase were significantly different in three combinations, IL-6 and GM-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF, and GM-CSF and IFN-γ, between RRMS and NMO/NMOSD patients. In PPMS patients, CCL4 and CXCL10 levels were significantly higher than in OND patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest distinct cytokine/chemokine alterations in CSF exist among NMO, RRMS and PPMS. In NMO, over-expression of a cluster of Th17- and Th1-related proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines is characteristic, while in PPMS, increased CCL4 and CXCL10 levels may reflect on-going low grade T cell

  3. Methylprednisolone in combination with interferon beta-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MECOMBIN study): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnborg, Mads; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Andersson, Magnus;

    2010-01-01

    Interferon beta is commonly used to treat patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; however, the treatment is only partially effective in reducing relapses and progression of disability. Corticosteroids are used to treat relapses in patients with multiple sclerosis. We therefore aimed...

  4. A Case of Relapsing-Remitting Neuroborreliosis Challenges in the Differential Diagnosis of Recurrent Myelitis

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    P. Albrecht

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with 4 episodes of myelitis with pleocytosis, a positive Borrelia burgdorferi serology with positive antibody indices, and full recovery each time after antibiotic and steroid treatment, suggesting neuroborreliosis. We nevertheless believe that recurrent neuroborreliosis is improbable based on the levels of the chemokine CXCL13 in cerebrospinal fluid and favor the diagnosis of post-infectious autoimmune-mediated transverse myelitis possibly triggered by an initial neuroborreliosis as the cause of the relapses observed in our patient. We demonstrate the diagnostic steps and procedures which were important in the differential diagnosis of this unusual and challenging case.

  5. Clinical efficacy of BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: subgroup analyses of the CONFIRM study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2013-09-01

    In the phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled and active reference (glatiramer acetate) comparator CONFIRM study in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, oral BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) reduced the annualized relapse rate (ARR; primary endpoint), as well as the proportion of patients relapsed, magnetic resonance imaging lesion activity, and confirmed disability progression, compared with placebo. We investigated the clinical efficacy of BG-12 240 mg twice daily (BID) and three times daily (TID) in patient subgroups stratified according to baseline demographic and disease characteristics including gender, age, relapse history, McDonald criteria, treatment history, Expanded Disability Status Scale score, T2 lesion volume, and gadolinium-enhancing lesions. BG-12 treatment demonstrated generally consistent benefits on relapse-related outcomes across patient subgroups, reflecting the positive findings in the overall CONFIRM study population. Treatment with BG-12 BID and TID reduced the ARR and the proportion of patients relapsed at 2 years compared with placebo in all subgroups analyzed. Reductions in ARR with BG-12 BID versus placebo ranged from 34% [rate ratio 0.664 (95% confidence interval 0.422-1.043)] to 53% [0.466 (0.313-0.694)] and from 13% [0.870 (0.551-1.373)] to 67% [0.334 (0.226-0.493)] with BG-12 TID versus placebo. Treatment with glatiramer acetate reduced the ARR and the proportion of patients relapsed at 2 years compared with placebo in most patient subgroups. The results of these analyses indicate that treatment with BG-12 is effective on relapses across a broad range of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with varied demographic and disease characteristics.

  6. Effect of glatiramer acetate on peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor and phosphorylated TrkB levels in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacaras, Vitalie; Major, Zsigmond Z; Muresanu, Dafin F; Krausz, Tibor L; Marginean, Ioan; Buzoianu, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is one of the most widely used disease-modifying drugs for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; is assumed to have inductor effects on neurotrophic factor expression. One of these neurotrophic factor systems is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) pathway. Peripheral blood is thought to contain soluble BDNF, and some blood cells express TrkB. We attempted to determine whether GA treatment leads to changes in plasma BDNF levels and TrkB activation. Such a phenomenon are relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients is significantly reduced; GA treatment is not influencing peripheral BDNF levels, after one year of sustained therapy, not from the point of view of total free BDNF nor the phosphorylated TrkB.

  7. Long-term persistence with injectable therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: an 18-year observational cohort study.

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    Simon Zhornitsky

    Full Text Available Disease modifying therapies (DMTs reduce the frequency of relapses and accumulation of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS. Long-term persistence with treatment is important to optimize treatment benefit. This long-term, cohort study was conducted at the Calgary MS Clinic. All consenting adults with relapsing-remitting MS who started either glatiramer acetate (GA or interferon-β 1a/1b (IFN-β between January 1st, 1996 and July 1st, 2011 were included. Follow-up continued to February 1st, 2014. Time-to-discontinuation of the initial and subsequently-prescribed DMTs (switches was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Group differences were compared using log-rank tests and multivariable Cox regression models. Analysis included 1471 participants; 906 were initially prescribed GA and 565 were initially prescribed IFN-β. Follow-up information was available for 87%; 29 (2% were lost to follow-up and 160 (11% moved from Southern Alberta while still using DMT. Median time-to-discontinuation of all injectable DMTs was 11.1 years. Participants with greater disability at treatment initiation, those who started treatment before age 30, and those who started between 2006 and 2011 were more likely to discontinue use of all injectable DMTs. Median time-to-discontinuation of the initial DMT was 8.6 years. Those initially prescribed GA remained on treatment longer. Of 610 participants who discontinued injectable DMT, 331 (54% started an oral DMT, or a second-line DMT, or resumed injectable DMT after 90 days. Persistence with injectable DMTs was high in this long-term population-based study. Most participants who discontinued injectable DMT did not remain untreated. Further research is required to understand treatment outcomes and outcomes after stopping DMT.

  8. A 2-year observational study of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis converting to glatiramer acetate from other disease-modifying therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bajenaru, Ovidiu A; Carrá, Adriana;

    2014-01-01

    .32 (95 % CI 0.26-0.40; p disability was halted, as the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores remained stable. Patients improved significantly (p ...Studies suggest that patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who do not benefit from other disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) may benefit from converting to glatiramer acetate (GA). COPTIMIZE was a 24-month observational study designed to assess the disease course of patients...

  9. Effects of interferon β-1a and interferon β-1b monotherapies on selected serum cytokines and nitrite levels in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stępień, Adam; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Lubina-Dąbrowska, Natalia;

    2013-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)β treatment is a mainstay of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) immunotherapy. Its efficacy is supposedly a consequence of impaired trafficking of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system and modification of the proinflammatory/antiinflammatory cytokine balance....... However, the effects of long-term monotherapy using various IFNβ preparations on cytokine profiles and the relevance of these effects for the therapy outcome have not yet been elucidated....

  10. HOW DOES FINGOLIMOD (GILENYA® FIT IN THE TREATMENT ALGORITHM FOR HIGHLY ACTIVE RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS?

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    Franz eFazekas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurological disorder characterised by inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS. Until recently, disease modifying treatment was based on agents requiring parenteral delivery, thus limiting long-term compliance. Basic treatments such as beta-interferon provide only moderate efficacy, and although therapies for second-line treatment and highly active MS are more effective, they are associated with potentially severe side effects. Fingolimod (Gilenya® is the first oral treatment of MS and has recently been approved as single disease-modifying therapy in highly active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS for adult patients with high disease activity despite basic treatment (beta-interferon and for treatment-naïve patients with rapidly evolving severe RRMS. At a scientific meeting that took place in Vienna on November 18th, 2011, experts from 10 Central and Eastern European countries discussed the clinical benefits and potential risks of fingolimod for MS, suggested how the new therapy fits within the current treatment algorithm and provided expert opinion for the selection and management of patients.

  11. Assessment of Serum Nitrogen Species and Inflammatory Parameters in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Different Therapeutic Approaches

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    Natalia Niedziela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nitric oxide and its reactive derivatives (NOx is well known in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, which is an inflammatory disease while NOx seems to be important in coordinating inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to assess serum NOx as one of the nitrogen species and inflammatory parameters in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and to compare the effectiveness of various types of disease-modifying therapies that reduce nitric oxide and inflammatory biomarkers. Elevated NOx level was observed in patients who received the first-line disease-modifying therapy (interferons beta-1a and beta-1b in comparison with the subjects treated with the second-line disease-modifying therapy (natalizumab; fingolimod and healthy controls without significant differences in C-reactive protein and interleukin-1 beta. A negative correlation was observed between serum NOx level and the duration of multiple sclerosis confirmed in the whole study population and in subjects treated with the first-line agents. Only serum NOx, concentration could reveal a potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapy with a better reduction in NOx level due to the second-line agents of disease-modifying therapy.

  12. Symptoms and Association with Health Outcomes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Results of a US Patient Survey

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    Angela E. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A variety of symptoms have been reported, but the prevalence of specific symptoms in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, how they are related to one another, and their impact on patient reported outcomes is not well understood. Objective. To describe how symptoms of RRMS cooccur and their impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods. Individuals who reported a physician diagnosis of RRMS in a large general health survey in the United States indicated the symptoms they experience because of RRMS and completed validated scales, including the work productivity and activity impairment questionnaire and either the SF-12v2 or SF-36v2. Symptom clusters were identified through hierarchical cluster analysis, and the relationship between clusters and outcomes was assessed through regression. Results. Fatigue, difficulty walking, and numbness were the most commonly reported symptoms. Seven symptom clusters were identified, and several were significantly related to patient reported outcomes. Pain, muscle spasms, and stiffness formed a cluster strongly related to physical quality of life; depression was strongly related to mental quality of life and cognitive difficulty was associated with work impairment. Conclusions. Symptoms in RRMS show a strong relationship with quality of life and should be taken into consideration in treatment decisions and evaluation of treatment success.

  13. Gray Matter Correlates of Cognitive Performance Differ between Relapsing-Remitting and Primary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Laura E Jonkman

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory/demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Most patients experience a relapsing-remitting (RR course, while about 15-20% of patients experience a primary progressive (PP course. Cognitive impairment affects approximately 40-70% of all MS patients and differences in cognitive impairment between RR-MS and PP-MS have been found. We aimed to compare RR-MS and PP-MS patients in terms of cognitive performance, and to investigate the MRI correlates of cognitive impairment in the two groups using measures of brain volumes and cortical thickness. Fifty-seven patients (42 RR-MS, 15 PP-MS and thirty-eight matched controls underwent neuropsychological (NP testing and MRI. PP-MS patients scored lower than RR-MS patients on most of the NP tests in absence of any specific pattern. PP-MS patients showed significantly lower caudate volume. There was no significant difference in MRI correlates of cognitive impairment between the two groups except for a prevalent association with MRI measures of cortical GM injury in RR-MS patients and with MRI measures of subcortical GM injury in PP-MS patients. This suggests that although cognitive impairment results from several factors, cortical and subcortical GM injury may play a different role depending on the disease course.

  14. Deciphering Depressive Mood in Relapsing-Remitting and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis and Its Consequence on Quality of Life.

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    Delphine Lamargue Hamel

    Full Text Available Depressive mood and other emotional symptoms are common in multiple sclerosis (MS. The patient-reported outcome version of the "Echelle d'Humeur Dépressive" (EHD-PRO aims to differentiate between two dimensions of depressive mood in people living with MS (PwMS.First, to compare EHD-PRO assessment and its two dimensions, lack of emotional control and emotional blunting, between a large sample of healthy controls (HCs and two samples of PwMS, relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS and primary progressive MS (PPMS; and second, to analyse the relationships between EHD-PRO scores with neurological disability, cognitive function, fatigue and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL.Regardless of their phenotype, PwMS had significantly higher EHD-PRO scores than HCs. EHD-PRO scores did not differ between the two MS groups. EHD-PRO scores did not correlate with disability and fatigue scores, disease duration or cognitive z scores. In RRMS, the lack of emotional control was independently associated with a decrease in HR-QOL.The EHD-PRO is able to easily detect depressive mood and to differentiate between two clinical dimensions, emotional blunting and lack of emotional control. The scale is sensitive and seems robust to confounding factors. Lack of emotional control seems to contribute significantly to altered HR-QOL in RRMS.

  15. Fadiga na forma remitente recorrente da esclerose múltipla Fatigue in multiple sclerosis relapsing-remitting form

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    MARIA FERNANDA MENDES

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliados 95 pacientes com forma remitente-recorrente da esclerose múltipla quanto à presença de fadiga. A Escala de Severidade de Fadiga foi aplicada em todos os pacientes. Em 64 pacientes (67,4% a fadiga foi encontrada. Não observamos diferenças clínicas quanto ao gênero, idade, grau de incapacidade funcional e depressão, nos pacientes com e sem fadiga. Foi encontrada correlação entre ansiedade e tempo de doença com a presença de fadiga. Ao analisarmos estas variáveis quanto à intensidade da fadiga, observamos haver associação entre fadiga grave e maior incapacidade funcional.In 95 patients with the remitting-relapsing form of multiple sclerosis we investigated fatigue. All of them were evaluated with the Fatigue Severity Scale and we found it in 64 patients (67.4%. Gender, age, depression and fuctional incapacity was not predictive of fatigue occurrence, while anxiety and time of disease seems to be correlated with it. When we analysed the fatigue severity, a correlation between the EDSS and the increasing fatigue severity was found.

  16. Decreased Frequency of Circulating Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein B Lymphocytes in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

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    Annie Elong Ngono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is no evidence for a role of anti-MOG antibodies in adult MS, no information on B lymphocytes with MOG-committed BCR is available. We report here on the frequency of anti-MOG B cells forming rosettes with polystyrene beads (BBR covalently bound to the extracellular domain of rhMOG in 38 relapsing-remitting patients (RRMS and 50 healthy individuals (HI. We show a substantial proportion of circulating anti-MOG-BBR in both RRMS and HI. Strikingly, MOG-specific B cells frequencies were lower in MS than in HI. Anti-MOG antibodies measured by a cell-based assay were not different between MS patients and controls, suggesting a specific alteration of anti-MOG B cells in MS. Although anti-MOG-BBR were higher in CNS fluid than in blood, no difference was observed between MS and controls. Lower frequency of MOG-BBR in MS was not explained by an increased apoptosis, but a trend for lower proliferative capacity was noted. Despite an efficient B cell transmigration across brain derived endothelial cells, total and anti-MOG B cells transmigration was similar between MS and HI. The striking alteration in MOG-specific B cells, independent of anti-MOG antibody titers, challenges our view on the role of MOG-specific B cells in MS.

  17. Reassessment of blood gene expression markers for the prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

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    Michael Hecker

    Full Text Available Despite considerable advances in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, current drugs are only partially effective. Most patients show reduced disease activity with therapy, but still experience relapses, increasing disability, and new brain lesions. Since there are no reliable clinical or biological markers of disease progression, long-term prognosis is difficult to predict for individual patients. We identified 18 studies that suggested genes expressed in blood as predictive biomarkers. We validated the prognostic value of those genes with three different microarray data sets comprising 148 patients in total. Using these data, we tested whether the genes were significantly differentially expressed between patients with good and poor courses of the disease. Poor progression was defined by relapses and/or increase of disability during a two-year follow-up, independent of the administered therapy. Of 110 genes that have been proposed as predictive biomarkers, most could not be confirmed in our analysis. However, the G protein-coupled membrane receptor GPR3 was expressed at significantly lower levels in patients with poor disease progression in all data sets. GPR3 has therefore a high potential to be a biomarker for predicting future disease activity. In addition, we examined the IL17 cytokines and receptors in more detail and propose IL17RC as a new, promising, transcript-based biomarker candidate. Further studies are needed to better understand the roles of these receptors in multiple sclerosis and its treatment and to clarify the utility of GPR3 and IL17RC expression levels in the blood as markers of long-term prognosis.

  18. Alemtuzumab in the long-term treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: an update on the clinical trial evidence and data from the real world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Thomas, Katja

    2017-10-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), given as two annual courses on five consecutive days at baseline and on three consecutive days 12 months later. Here we provide an update on the long-term efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab in RRMS, including real-world experience, and advances in our understanding of its mechanism of action. Recent data from the phase II/III extension study have demonstrated that alemtuzumab reduces relapse rates, disability worsening, and the rate of brain volume loss over the long term, with many patients achieving no evidence of disease activity. In high proportions of patients, preexisting disability remained stable or improved. Alemtuzumab is associated with a consistent safety profile over the long term, with no new safety signals emerging and the overall annual incidence of reported adverse events decreasing after the first year on treatment. Acyclovir prophylaxis reduces herpetic infections, and monitoring has been shown to mitigate the risk of autoimmune adverse events, allowing early detection and overall effective management. Data from clinical practice and ongoing observational studies are providing additional information on the real-world use of alemtuzumab. Recent evidence on the mechanism of action of alemtuzumab indicates that in addition to its previously known effects of inducing depletion and repopulation of T and B lymphocytes, it also results in a relative increase of cells with memory and regulatory phenotypes and a decrease in cells with a proinflammatory signature, and may further promote an immunoregulatory environment through an impact on other innate immune cells (e.g. dendritic cells) that play a role in MS. These effects may allow preservation of innate immunity and immunosurveillance. Together, these lines of evidence help explain the durable clinical efficacy of alemtuzumab, in the absence of continuous treatment, in patients

  19. TH1/TH2 Cytokine profile in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with Glatiramer acetate or Natalizumab

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    Oreja-Guevara Celia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The balance between T helper cells Th2- and Th1-related cytokines plays a key role in multiple sclerosis (MS. A shift from a Th1 towards a Th2 cytokine profile could have a beneficial effect on the clinical course of the disease. The objective of this study was to assess Th2/Th1 cytokine profile in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS patients receiving an immunosuppressive treatment with natalizumab (NAT, or an immunomodulatory treatment with glatiramer acetate (GA after one year of treatment. Methods This was an observational cross-sectional study. All consecutive patients diagnosed with RRMS who had received GA or NAT for 12 months were included in the study. We determined serum levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1a, IL-1b, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, monocyte chemotactic protein [MCP]-1, tumor-necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interferon [IFN]-γ and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF] by flow cytometry. Th2/Th1 bias was defined based on the ratio of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 or IL-10 Th2 cytokines and proinflammatory INF-γ or TNF-α Th1 cytokines. Results Eleven patients under treatment with NAT and 12 patients treated with GA were evaluated. RRMS patients treated with NAT showed significantly higher levels of IL-6 (p  Conclusion In conclusion, our findings suggest that GA promotes a superior Th2-biased anti-inflammatory response as compared with NAT in the systemic circulation of RRMS patients. Future studies with larger cohorts will determine whether this immune Th2 shift in GA patients is associated with a beneficial effect on disease outcome.

  20. Pathological Assessment of Brain White Matter in Relapsing-Remitting MS Patients using Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging

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    Khodarahm Pahlevan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS is characterized by lesions in the white matter (WM of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most specific and sensitive method for diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. However, the ability of conventional MRI to show histopathologic heterogeneity of MS lesions is insufficient. Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging (qMTI is a relatively new method to investigate pathologic processes of the brain tissue occurring in MS patients. Material and Methods: Voxel-based analyses allow regional comparisons between groups to be made for the whole brain in a single analysis. This is done by coregistering data from all individual subjects to a reference brain, generally referred to as the "standard space", and then comparing them on a voxel-by-voxel basis. This study aimed to analyze whole-brain quantitative T1 maps, not to find global changes or changes in selected regions, but specifically to investigate the spatial distribution throughout the brain of T1 increases in MS WM with respect to control WM. In this study, 11 healthy controls, 10 relapsing-remitting (RR MS patients and 13 CIS patients were studied using MT-MRI imaging. MT parameters, including magnetization transfer ratio (MTR, magnetization transfer rate between free protons and restricted macromolecular protons, Ksat and longitudinal relaxation times (with and without MT saturation pulse, T1sat and T1free values were evaluated. Results: The results showed that, at a group level, there is widespread involvement of WM throughout the brain in CIS MS and especially in RRMS, where a significant T1 increase was found in 15.58% of WM voxels (normals < RR. Discussion and Conclusion: This study demonstrates that WM in large parts of the brain is susceptible to disease processes in RR and CIS MS

  1. Regulatory Cell Populations in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Patients: Effect of Disease Activity and Treatment Regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodi, Maria; Dimisianos, Nikolaos; de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Sakellaraki, Panagiota; Deraos, George; Matsoukas, John; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of autoimmune etiology that results from an imbalance between CNS-specific T effector cells and peripheral suppressive mechanisms mediated by regulatory cells (RC). In this research, we collected blood samples from 83 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients and 45 healthy persons (HC), to assess the sizes of their RC populations, including CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ (nTregs), CD3+CD4+HLA−G+, CD3+CD8+CD28−, CD3+CD56+, and CD56bright cells, and how RC are affected by disease activity (acute phase or remission) and types of treatment (methylprednisolone, interferon, or natalizumab). In addition, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cultured them with peptides mapping to myelin antigens, to determine RC responsiveness to autoantigens. The results showed decreased levels of nTregs in patients in the acute phase ± methylprednisolone and in remission + natalizumab, but HC levels in patients in remission or receiving interferon. Patients + interferon had the highest levels of CD3+CD4+HLA−G+ and CD3+CD8+CD28− RC, and patients in the acute phase + methylprednisolone the lowest. Patients in remission had the highest levels of CD3+CD56+, and patients in remission + natalizumab the highest levels of CD56bright cells. Only nTregs responded to autoantigens in culture, regardless of disease activity or treatment. The highest suppressive activity was exhibited by nTregs from patients in remission. In conclusion, in RRMS disease activity and type of treatment affect different RC populations. nTregs respond to myelin antigens, indicating that it is possible to restore immunological tolerance through nTreg induction. PMID:27571060

  2. Multiple sclerosis: microRNA expression profiles accurately differentiate patients with relapsing-remitting disease from healthy controls.

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    Andreas Keller

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is heterogenous with respect to clinical manifestations and response to therapy. Identification of biomarkers appears desirable for an improved diagnosis of MS as well as for monitoring of disease activity and treatment response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs, which have been shown to have the potential to serve as biomarkers for different human diseases, most notably cancer. Here, we analyzed the expression profiles of 866 human miRNAs. In detail, we investigated the miRNA expression in blood cells of 20 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS and 19 healthy controls using a human miRNA microarray and the Geniom Real Time Analyzer (GRTA platform. We identified 165 miRNAs that were significantly up- or downregulated in patients with RRMS as compared to healthy controls. The best single miRNA marker, hsa-miR-145, allowed discriminating MS from controls with a specificity of 89.5%, a sensitivity of 90.0%, and an accuracy of 89.7%. A set of 48 miRNAs that was evaluated by radial basis function kernel support vector machines and 10-fold cross validation yielded a specificity of 95%, a sensitivity of 97.6%, and an accuracy of 96.3%. While 43 of the 165 miRNAs deregulated in patients with MS have previously been related to other human diseases, the remaining 122 miRNAs are so far exclusively associated with MS. The implications of our study are twofold. The miRNA expression profiles in blood cells may serve as a biomarker for MS, and deregulation of miRNA expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of MS.

  3. Depressão na esclerose multipla forma remitente-recorrente Depression in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

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    Maria Fernanda Mendes

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A possibilidade de correlação entre depressão e esclerose múltipla (EM é conhecida há muitos anos, porém os estudos de prevalência não são conclusivos. No nosso meio a prevalência deste sintoma na EM permanece desconhecida. O objetivo deste estudo é verificar a prevalência da depressão em pacientes com EM, estudando a sua correlação com a incapacidade funcional, o sexo, a idade e o tempo de doença. Foram avaliados 84 pacientes com EM remitente-recorrente (EMRR. A depressão foi avaliada através da Escala de Beck e da Escala para Ansiedade e Depressão (HAD, e a incapacidade funcional pela Escala de Incapacidade Funcional Expandida (EDSS. A depressão estava presente em 17,9% e a ansiedade em 34,5% dos pacientes com EMRR. Os maiores escores das escalas de depressão correlacionaram-se com maior incapacidade funcional (p=0,0002, porém não estão associados ao tempo de doença, ao sexo ou a idade dos pacientes. Nossos dados indicam que a depressão é frequente nos pacientes com EM e sugerem haver correlação entre a depressão e a incapacidade funcional.The suggestion of a possible relationship between depression and multiple sclerosis (MS has existed for many years, and the prevalence studies are believed by potential biases. In our country, the prevalence of clinical depression in patients with MS is unknown. The objective of the present study was to ascertain the rate of depression in a group of MS patients and to analyze the relationship to depression, disability, gender, age and duration of illness. We evaluated 84 relapsing-remitting MS patients using the Beck Scale (BS, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. The depression was presented at 17.9% and the anxiety at 34.5% of the RRMS patients. There is a correlation between depression and functional disability (p=0.0002, but there is no relation between depression and sex, age or duration of the illness. This

  4. The Effect of Disease-Modifying Drugs on Brain Atrophy in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Pierre Branger

    Full Text Available The quantification of brain atrophy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS may serve as a marker of disease progression and treatment response. We compared the association between first-line (FL or second-line (SL disease-modifying drugs (DMDs and brain volume changes over time in RRMS.We reviewed clinical trials in RRMS between January 1, 1995 and June 1, 2014 that assessed the effect of DMDs and reported data on brain atrophy in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database and meeting abstracts. First, we designed a meta-analysis to directly compare the percentage brain volume change (PBVC between FLDMDs and SLDMDs at 24 months. Second, we conducted an observational and longitudinal linear regression analysis of a 48-month follow-up period. Sensitivity analyses considering PBVC between 12 and 48 months were also performed.Among the 272 studies identified, 117 were analyzed and 35 (18,140 patients were included in the analysis. Based on the meta-analysis, atrophy was greater for the use of an FLDMD than that of an SLDMD at 24 months (primary endpoint mean difference, -0.86; 95% confidence interval: -1.57--0.15; P = 0.02. Based on the linear regression analysis, the annual PBVC significantly differed between SLDMDs and placebo (-0.27%/y and -0.50%/y, respectively, P = 0.046 but not between FLDMDs (-0.33%/y and placebo (P = 0.11 or between FLDMDs and SLDMDs (P = 0.49. Based on sensitivity analysis, the annual PBVC was reduced for SLDMDs compared with placebo (-0.14%/y and -0.56%/y, respectively, P<0.001 and FLDMDs (-0.46%/y, P<0.005, but no difference was detected between FLDMDs and placebo (P = 0.12.SLDMDs were associated with reduced PBVC slope over time in RRMS, regardless of the period considered. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying atrophy progression in RRMS.

  5. The Effect of Disease Modifying Therapies on Disease Progression in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

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    Georgios Tsivgoulis

    Full Text Available A number of officially approved disease-modifying drugs (DMD are currently available for the early intervention in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluate the effect of DMDs on disability progression in RRMS.We performed a systematic review on MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases to include all available placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (RCTs of RRMS patients that reported absolute numbers or percentages of disability progression during each study period. Observational studies, case series, case reports, RCTs without placebo subgroups and studies reporting the use of RRMS therapies that are not still officially approved were excluded. Risk ratios (RRs were calculated in each study protocol to express the comparison of disability progression in RRMS patients treated with a DMD and those RRMS patients receiving placebo. The mixed-effects model was used to calculate both the pooled point estimate in each subgroup and the overall estimates.DMDs for RRMS were found to have a significantly lower risk of disability progression compared to placebo (RR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.66-0.79; p20% rates of loss to follow-up were reported in many study protocols, while financial and/or other support from pharmaceutical industries with a clear conflict of interest on the study outcomes was documented in all included studies.Available DMD are effective in reducing disability progression in patients with RRMS, independently of the route of administration and their classification as "first" or "second" line therapies. Attrition bias needs to be taken into account in the interpretation of these findings.

  6. Effects of Adjunct Low-Dose Vitamin D on Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Progression: Preliminary Findings of a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the effect of low-dose oral vitamin D in combination with current disease-modifying therapy on the prevention of progression of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. A phase II double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between October 2007 and October 2008 included 50 patients with confirmed RRMS aged 25 to 57 years and normal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. They were randomly allocated to receive 12 months of treatment with either escalating calcitriol doses up to 0.5 μg/day or placebo combined with disease-modifying therapy. Response to treatment was assessed at eight-week intervals. In both groups, the mean relapse rate decreased significantly (P<0.001. In the 25 patients treated with placebo, the mean (SD Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS increased from 1.70 (1.21 at baseline to 1.94 (1.41 at the end of study period (P<0.01. Average EDSS and relapse rate at the end of trial did not differ between groups. Adding low-dose vitamin D to routine disease-modifying therapy had no significant effect on the EDSS score or relapse rate. A larger phase III multicenter study of vitamin D in RRMS is warranted to more assess the efficacy of this intervention.

  7. Protective Effects on Central Nervous System by Acidic Polysaccharide of Panax ginseng in Relapse-Remitting Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis-Induced SJL/J Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Hwang, Insun; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Song, Jie-Young; Jee, Youngheun

    2016-01-01

    Bearing pathologic and clinical similarities to human multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is used as a murine model to test potential therapeutic agents for MS. Recently, we reported the protective effects of an acidic polysaccharide of Panax ginseng (APG) in C57BL/6 strain-dependent EAE, a model of primary progressive MS. In this study, we extend our previous findings on the therapeutic capacity of APG in relapsing-remitting EAE (rr-EAE), the animal model to closely mimic recurrent inflammatory demyelination lesions of relapsing-remitting MS. Treatments with APG led to a significant reduction of clinical symptoms and the relapse rate of EAE than vehicle treatments. Consistent with this, histological examination revealed that APG markedly modulated the infiltration of CD4[Formula: see text] T cells and CD11b[Formula: see text] macrophages into the spinal cord and the APG-treated CNS was devoid of demyelination and axonal damages. In addition, APG decreased the proliferation of peripheral PLP-reactive T cells and the production of pro-inflammatory factors such as IFN-[Formula: see text], IL-17 and TNF-[Formula: see text]. The fact that APG can induce clinically beneficial effects to distinct types of EAE furthers our understanding on the basis of its immunosuppression in EAE and, possibly, in MS. Our results suggest that APG may serve as a new therapeutic agent for MS as well as other human autoimmune diseases, and warrants continued evaluation for its translation into therapeutic application.

  8. Sustained disease-activity-free status in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis treated with cladribine tablets in the CLARITY study: a post-hoc and subgroup analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannoni, Gavin; Cook, Stuart; Rammohan, Kottil

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of various clinical and MRI measurements, the phase 3 Cladribine Tablets Treating Multiple Sclerosis Orally (CLARITY) study in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) showed that short-course oral treatment with cladribine at cumulative doses of 3·5 and 5·25 mg/kg...

  9. Natalizumab improves ambulation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: results from the prospective TIMER study and a retrospective analysis of AFFIRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshyna, N; Havrdová, E; Hutchinson, M; Nehrych, T; You, X; Belachew, S; Hotermans, C; Paes, D

    2015-03-01

    Impaired ambulation is a prominent disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis and can lead to reduced quality of life. Whether natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody shown to reduce disease activity in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, could impact ambulation performance was examined. A prospective open-label study, TIMER, was conducted in natalizumab-naive patients (n = 215). The timed 25-foot walk (T25FW) and timed 100-m walk (T100MW) were assessed at baseline and at weeks 24 and 48 of natalizumab therapy, together with Expanded Disability Status Scale scores. The effects of natalizumab on T25FW performance were also examined in a retrospective analysis of natalizumab-treated patients (n = 627) and placebo control patients (n = 315) from the AFFIRM study. In TIMER, a significant increase from baseline in T25FW speed was seen at week 24 (P = 0.0074) and in T100MW speed at weeks 24 and 48 (both P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients showed clinically meaningful increases (≥20%) in walking speed on the T100MW (25%) than on the T25FW (13%) at week 48 (P = 0.032). In AFFIRM, natalizumab increased the proportion of patients with ≥20% confirmed improvement in T25FW speed at year 2 by 78% versus placebo (P = 0.0133). Natalizumab increased walking speed in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The T100MW may be more sensitive to changes in ambulation capacity than the T25FW, and both tests appear to detect clinically meaningful improvements in ambulatory function. © 2014 Biogen Idec. European Journal Of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology.

  10. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, O.; Arroyo, R.; Martínez-Yélamos, S.; Marco, M.; Merino, J. A. García; Muñoz, D.; Merino, E.; Roque, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6–1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6–94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28–7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  11. Comparing the cost-effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs for the first-line treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lawrence D D; Edwards, Natalie C; Fincher, Contessa; Doan, Quan V; Al-Sabbagh, Ahmad; Meletiche, Dennis M

    2009-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system that primarily afflicts young adults. Approximately 400,000 people in the United States are affected by MS. Although several forms of MS exist, the most common course is known as relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), which affects about 85% of MS patients. This form of MS is characterized by relapses of neurologic symptoms followed by periods of recovery. Progression of disease can lead to increasingly severe disability. Since the introduction of immunomodulatory biologic agents, such as interferon betas and glatiramer acetate, treatment has helped to change the course of the disease. Under budgetary constraints, health services payers are challenged to differentiate the economic value of these agents for formulary selection and/or placement. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the 2-year cost-effectiveness of 4 disease modifying drugs (DMDs) used as first-line treatment of RRMS: glatiramer acetate, interferon (IFN) Beta-1a IM injection, IFN Beta-1a SC injection, and IFN Beta-1b SC injection. An Excel-based model was developed to compare the relative effectiveness and cost components of relapses, disability progression, and DMDs in the treatment of RRMS over a 2-year time horizon. The relative risk reduction (RRR) method was used to compare reduction in relapse rates and disease progression data from pivotal randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials of the DMDs. RRRs for relapses and disability progression, respectively, were calculated as the relative difference (treatment vs. placebo) in relapse rates and disease progression rates from placebo-controlled clinical trials. These RRRs were applied to the weighted average rates of relapse and number of disability progression steps seen in the placebo arms of the pivotal studies. The evaluation was conducted from the perspective of a U.S. health care payer (only direct medical costs considered

  12. Effects of glatiramer acetate on fatigue and days of absence from work in first-time treated relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

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    Apfel Rainer

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with glatiramer acetate has been demonstrated a beneficial effect on disease activity. The objective of this prospective naturalistic study was to evaluate the impact of glatiramer acetate on fatigue and work absenteeism. Methods 291 treatment-naïve patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis were included and treated with glatiramer acetate for twelve months. Relapse rates, disability, fatigue symptoms, days of absence from work and adverse events were monitored. Fatigue was measured with the MFIS scale and with a visual analogue scale. Results Total MFIS scores decreased by 7.6 ± 16.4 from 34.6 to 27.0 (p ≤ 0.001. Significant reductions were observed on all three subscales of the MFIS. Fatigue symptoms, assessed using a visual analogue scale, decreased by 1.04 ± 2.88 cm from 4.47 cm to 3.43 cm (p ≤ 0.001. The proportion of patients absent from work at least once was reduced by a factor of two from 65.1% to 30.1% (p ≤ 0.001. Tolerance to treatment was rated as very good or good in 78.3% of patients. Adverse effects, most frequently local injection site reactions, were reported in 15.1% of patients. Conclusion Treatment with glatiramer acetate was associated with a significant improvement in fatigue symptoms and a marked reduction in absence from work. Treatment was well-tolerated. Such benefits are of relevance to overall patient well-being.

  13. Altered glutamate reuptake in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis cortex: correlation with microglia infiltration, demyelination, and neuronal and synaptic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellino, Marco; Merola, Aristide; Piacentino, Chiara; Votta, Barbara; Capello, Elisabetta; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Mutani, Roberto; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Cavalla, Paola

    2007-08-01

    Cortical involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) is emerging as an important determinant of disease progression. The mechanisms responsible for MS cortical pathology are not fully characterized. The objective of this study was to assess the role of excitotoxicity in MS cortex, evaluating excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) expression and its relationship with demyelination, inflammation, gliosis, and neuronal and synaptic pathology. EAATs are essential in maintaining low extracellular glutamate concentrations and preventing excitotoxicity. Ten MS brains (3 relapsing-remitting MS cases and 7 secondary progressive MS cases) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for myelin basic protein, CD68, HLA-DR, EAAT1, EAAT2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), synaptophysin, and neurofilaments. Cortical lesions were frequently observed in MS brains in variable numbers and extensions. In cortical lesions, activated microglia infiltration correlated with focal loss of EAAT1, EAAT2, and synaptophysin immunostaining, and with neuronal immunostaining for pJNK, a protein involved in response to excitotoxic injury. No reduction of EAATs or synaptophysin immunostaining was observed in demyelinated cortex in the absence of activated microglia. Alterations of the mechanisms of glutamate reuptake are found in cortical MS lesions in the presence of activated microglia and are associated with signs of neuronal and synaptic damage suggestive of excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity may be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelination and of neuronal and synaptic damage in MS cortex.

  14. Real-World Safety and Patient Profile of Fingolimod in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective Analysis in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Patrucco, Liliana; Miguez, Jimena; Cristiano, Edgardo

    2017-10-02

    The aim was to evaluate fingolimod safety and patient profiles in a real-world setting in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Relapsing-remitting patients with multiple sclerosis who had been prescribed fingolimod and at least 18 months or more of follow-up were included. Demographic, clinical, and safety issues were described during first dose and follow-up. A total of 145 patients were included, 68% female; mean age, 30 ± 10.5 years; mean disease duration, 6.5 ± 3.1 years; mean fingolimod use, 25 ± 13 months. Eleven patients (7.6%) discontinued fingolimod (7 owing to disease activity/4 owing to desire of pregnancy and personal decisions). Forty-two percent of patients experienced adverse events: headache, fatigue, liver enzyme elevation, and lymphopenia were the most commonly found. No serious cardiac event was reported during the first dose. The safety and patient profile of fingolimod in a new real-world setting were consistent with information provided from phase III clinical trials.

  15. Quantitative detection of epstein-barr virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina E Cocuzza

    Full Text Available The presence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and peripheral blood (PB samples collected from 55 patients with clinical and radiologically-active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS and 51 subjects with other neurological diseases was determined using standardized commercially available kits for viral nucleic acid extraction and quantitative EBV DNA detection. Both cell-free and cell-associated CSF and PB fractions were analyzed, to distinguish latent from lytic EBV infection. EBV DNA was detected in 5.5% and 18.2% of cell-free and cell-associated CSF fractions of patients with RRMS as compared to 7.8% and 7.8% of controls; plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC positivity rates were 7.3% and 47.3% versus 5.8% and 31.4%, respectively. No significant difference in median EBV viral loads of positive samples was found between RRMS and control patients in all tested samples. Absence of statistically significant differences in EBV positivity rates between RRMS and control patients, despite the use of highly sensitive standardized methods, points to the lack of association between EBV and MS disease activity.

  16. Disease-Modifying Drugs Reduce Cortical Lesion Accumulation and Atrophy Progression in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Results from a 48-Month Extension Study

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    Francesca Rinaldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical lesions (CLs and atrophy are pivotal in multiple sclerosis (MS pathology. This study determined the effect of disease modifying drugs (DMDs on CL development and cortical atrophy progression in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS over 48 months. Patients (n=165 were randomized to sc IFN β-1a 44 μg, im IFN β-1a 30 μg, or glatiramer acetate 20 mg. The reference population comprised 50 DMD-untreated patients with RRMS. After 24 months, 43 of the untreated patients switched to DMDs. The four groups of patients were followed up for an additional 24 months. At 48 months the mean standard deviation number of new CLs was significantly lower in patients treated with sc IFN β-1a (1.4 ± 1.0, range 0–5 compared with im IFN β-1a (2.3 ± 1.3, range 0–6, P=0.004 and glatiramer acetate (2.2 ± 1.5, range 0–7, P=0.03. Significant reductions in CL accumulation and new white matter and gadolinium-enhancing lesions were also observed in the 43 patients who switched to DMDs after 24 months, compared with the 24 months of no treatment. Concluding, this study confirms that DMDs significantly reduce CL development and cortical atrophy progression compared with no treatment.

  17. Quantitative Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Samples of Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Rosario; Oggioni, Davide; Andreoni, Simona; Gardinetti, Margherita; Fusco, Letizia; Frigo, Maura; Banfi, Paola; Rottoli, Maria R.; Confalonieri, Paolo; Rezzonico, Monica; Ferrò, Maria T.; Cavaletti, Guido; Frigeni, Barbara; Mascoli, Nerina; Conti, Marta; Antozzi, Carlo; Andreetta, Francesca; Ambrosoni, Elena; Mainardi, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    The presence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) samples collected from 55 patients with clinical and radiologically-active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and 51 subjects with other neurological diseases was determined using standardized commercially available kits for viral nucleic acid extraction and quantitative EBV DNA detection. Both cell-free and cell-associated CSF and PB fractions were analyzed, to distinguish latent from lytic EBV infection. EBV DNA was detected in 5.5% and 18.2% of cell-free and cell-associated CSF fractions of patients with RRMS as compared to 7.8% and 7.8% of controls; plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) positivity rates were 7.3% and 47.3% versus 5.8% and 31.4%, respectively. No significant difference in median EBV viral loads of positive samples was found between RRMS and control patients in all tested samples. Absence of statistically significant differences in EBV positivity rates between RRMS and control patients, despite the use of highly sensitive standardized methods, points to the lack of association between EBV and MS disease activity. PMID:24722060

  18. Quantitative detection of epstein-barr virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocuzza, Clementina E; Piazza, Fabrizio; Musumeci, Rosario; Oggioni, Davide; Andreoni, Simona; Gardinetti, Margherita; Fusco, Letizia; Frigo, Maura; Banfi, Paola; Rottoli, Maria R; Confalonieri, Paolo; Rezzonico, Monica; Ferrò, Maria T; Cavaletti, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The presence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) samples collected from 55 patients with clinical and radiologically-active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and 51 subjects with other neurological diseases was determined using standardized commercially available kits for viral nucleic acid extraction and quantitative EBV DNA detection. Both cell-free and cell-associated CSF and PB fractions were analyzed, to distinguish latent from lytic EBV infection. EBV DNA was detected in 5.5% and 18.2% of cell-free and cell-associated CSF fractions of patients with RRMS as compared to 7.8% and 7.8% of controls; plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) positivity rates were 7.3% and 47.3% versus 5.8% and 31.4%, respectively. No significant difference in median EBV viral loads of positive samples was found between RRMS and control patients in all tested samples. Absence of statistically significant differences in EBV positivity rates between RRMS and control patients, despite the use of highly sensitive standardized methods, points to the lack of association between EBV and MS disease activity.

  19. Immediate effect of two yoga-based relaxation techniques on cognitive functions in patients suffering from relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargav, Praerna; Bhargav, Hemant; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Garner, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) is an important feature of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Yogic relaxation techniques have been found useful in improving various cognitive domains in health and disease. Eighteen subjects (13 females) in the age range of 51.5 ± 12.72 years with the diagnosis of RRMS by a neurologist (McDonald Criteria 2010) since last 18.16 ± 12.59 years were recruited into the study from a neuro-rehabilitation centre in Germany. Assessments were done before and immediately after two randomly allocated 30-min sessions of yogic relaxation: Cyclic Meditation (CM) and SR (supine rest or shavasana). Assessments were done for attention, psychomotor performance, information processing speed, executive functions, and immediate and delayed recall using standard psychometric tools. RMANOVA was applied to analyse the data using SPSS version 10. Both CM and SR sessions improved scores on Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST) (p < 0.01) and Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) (p < 0.05). There was a significantly better performance in Trail Making Test (TMT)-A and forward digit span (FDS) after CM as compared to SR (p < 0.01). Yogic relaxation techniques may have an immediate enhancing effect on processing speed, psychomotor performance, and recall of RRMS patients. CM is better than SR in improving processing speed, short-term memory, and verbal working memory.

  20. Normal levels of cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 and daytime sleepiness during attacks of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and monosymptomatic optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, S; Jennum, P J; Korsholm, K

    2008-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that multiple sclerosis (MS), the hypothalamic sleep-wake regulating neuropeptide hypocretin-1 (hcrt-1) and the sleep disorder narcolepsy may be connected. Thus, the major pathophysiological component of narcolepsy is lack of hcrt-1. Dysfunction of the hypocretin system...... has been reported in MS case reports with attacks of hypothalamic lesions, undetectable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hcrt-1 and hypersomnia, but not found during remission in small samples. Finally, daytime sleepiness, the major symptom of narcolepsy, is reported in several MS populations......, and there are case reports of co-existent narcolepsy and MS. However, it is unknown whether hcrt-1 and daytime sleepiness generally change during MS attacks. We therefore analyzed whether daytime sleepiness (using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)) and CSF hcrt-1 levels differed between MS attack and remission......, in 48 consecutively referred patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or monosymptomatic optic neuritis (MON). Twenty-seven patients were in attack and 21 in remission. ESS was normal both during attacks (5.4 +/- 3.0) and remission (5.8 +/- 2.6), and mean CSF hcrt-1 was normal (456 +/- 41 pg...

  1. Functional cortical changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis at amplitude configuration: a resting-state fMRI study

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    Liu H

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heng Liu,1,* Hua Chen,1,* Bo Wu,1 Tijiang Zhang,1 Jinhui Wang,2,3 Kexin Huang,1 Ganjun Song,1 Jian Zhan4 1Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Medical Imaging Center of Guizhou Province, Zunyi, Guizhou, 2Department of Psychology, Hangzhou Normal University, 3Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou, 4Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the amplitude of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method. Methods: ALFF and SPM8 were utilized to assess alterations in regional spontaneous brain activities in patients with RRMS in comparison with healthy controls (HCs. The beta values of altered brain regions between patients with RRMS and HCs were extracted, and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was generated to calculate the sensitivities and specificities of these different brain areas for distinguishing patients with RRMS from HCs. Pearson correlation analyses were applied to assess the relationships between the beta values of altered brain regions and disease duration and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score. Patients and participants: A total of 18 patients with RRMS (13 females; five males and 18 sex-, age-, and education-matched HCs (14 females; four males were recruited for this study. Measurements and results: Compared with HCs, patients with RRMS showed higher ALFF responses in the right fusiform gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 37 and lower ALFF responses in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortices (BA 24 and 32, bilateral heads of the caudate nuclei, and bilateral brainstem. The ROC analysis revealed that the beta values of these abnormal brain areas

  2. Reabilitação vestibular em pacientes com esclerose múltipla remitente-recorrente Vestibular rehabilitation in patients with relapsing- remitting multiple sclerosis

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    Karina Pavan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A esclerose múltipla (EM é doença desmielinizante, inflamatória, que acomete a substância branca do sistema nervoso central, e sensações vestibulares anormais (vertigem, desequilíbrio são freqüentes. A reabilitação vestibular (RV é determinada por mecanismos de adaptações, substituições e compensações neurais. Este estudo avaliou a melhora da vertigem central ou periférica em pacientes com EM remitente-recorrente submetidos à RV (exercícios de Cawthorne-Cooksey, através da escala de Berg e Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. Nesta amostra de 4 casos a RV, realizada em um período de 2 meses, demonstrou a melhora em 3 pacientes avaliados pela escala de Berg e em 2 pacientes quando avaliados pela DHI.Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating, inflammatory illness, that attack the white matter of the central nervous system, and abnormal vestibular sensations (vertigo, disequilibrium are frequent. The vestibular rehabilitation (VR is determined by mechanisms of adaptations, neural substitutions and compensations. This study evaluated the improvement of the central or peripheral vertigo in patients with relapsing-remitting MS submitted to the VR (exercises of Cawthorne-Cooksey, through the scale of Berg and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. In this sample of 4 cases the VR, carried through in a period of 2 months, demonstrated the improvement in 3 patients according to the Berg scale and in 2 patients considering that of the DHI.

  3. A discrete event simulation to model the cost-utility of fingolimod and natalizumab in rapidly evolving severe relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephen M; Maruszczak, Maciej J; Slater, David; Kusel, Jeanette; Nicholas, Richard; Adlard, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Two disease-modifying therapies are licensed in the EU for use in rapidly-evolving severe (RES) relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), fingolimod and natalizumab. Here a discrete event simulation (DES) model to analyze the cost-effectiveness of natalizumab and fingolimod in the RES population, from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, is reported. A DES model was developed to track individual RES patients, based on Expanded Disability Status Scale scores. Individual patient characteristics were taken from the RES sub-groups of the pivotal trials for fingolimod. Utility data were in line with previous models. Published costs were inflated to NHS cost year 2015. Owing to the confidential patient access scheme (PAS) discount applied to fingolimod in the UK, a range of discount levels were applied to the fingolimod list price, to capture the likelihood of natalizumab being cost-effective in a real-world setting. At the lower National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) threshold of £20,000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY), fingolimod only required a discount greater than 0.8% of list price to be cost-effective. At the upper threshold of £30,000/QALY employed by the NICE, fingolimod was cost-effective if the confidential discount is greater than 2.5%. Sensitivity analyses conducted using fingolimod list-price showed the model to be most sensitive to changes in the cost of each drug, particularly fingolimod. The DES model shows that only a modest discount to the UK fingolimod list-price is required to make fingolimod a more cost-effective option than natalizumab in RES RRMS.

  4. The effect of disease modifying therapies on brain atrophy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Tsivgoulis

    Full Text Available The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of disease-modifying drugs (DMD on brain atrophy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS using available randomized-controlled trial (RCT data.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis according to PRISMA guidelines of all available RCTs of patients with RRMS that reported data on brain volume measurements during the study period.We identified 4 eligible studies, including a total of 1819 RRMS patients (71% women, mean age 36.5 years, mean baseline EDSS-score: 2.4. The mean percentage change in brain volume was found to be significantly lower in DMD versus placebo subgroup (standardized mean difference: -0.19; 95%CI: -0.27--0.11; p<0.001. We detected no evidence of heterogeneity between estimates (I2 = 30%, p = 0.19 nor publication bias in the Funnel plots. Sensitivity analyses stratifying studies according to brain atrophy neuroimaging protocol disclosed no evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.16. In meta-regression analyses, the percentage change in brain volume was found to be inversely related with duration of observation period in both DMD (meta-regression slope = -0.03; 95% CI: -0.04--0.02; p<0.001 and placebo subgroups (meta-regression slope = -0.05; 95% CI: -0.06--0.04; p<0.001. However, the rate of percentage brain volume loss over time was greater in placebo than in DMD subgroup (p = 0.017, ANCOVA.DMD appear to be effective in attenuating brain atrophy in comparison to placebo and their benefit in delaying the rate of brain volume loss increases linearly with longer treatment duration.

  5. Longitudinal study of visual function in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with and without a history of optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Gómez, A; García-Ben, A; Soler García, A; García-Basterra, I; Padilla Parrado, F; García-Campos, J M

    2017-03-15

    The contrast sensitivity test determines the quality of visual function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this study is to analyse changes in visual function in patients with relapsing-remitting MS with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON). We conducted a longitudinal study including 61 patients classified into 3 groups as follows: a) disease-free patients (control group); b) patients with MS and no history of ON; and c) patients with MS and a history of unilateral ON. All patients underwent baseline and 6-year follow-up ophthalmologic examinations, which included visual acuity and monocular and binocular Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity tests. Monocular contrast sensitivity was significantly lower in MS patients with and without a history of ON than in controls both at baseline (P=.00 and P=.01, respectively) and at 6 years (P=.01 and P=.02). Patients with MS and no history of ON remained stable throughout follow-up whereas those with a history of ON displayed a significant loss of contrast sensitivity (P=.01). Visual acuity and binocular contrast sensitivity at baseline and at 6 years was significantly lower in the group of patients with a history of ON than in the control group (P=.003 and P=.002 vs P=.006 and P=.005) and the group with no history of ON (P=.04 and P=.038 vs P=.008 and P=.01). However, no significant differences were found in follow-up results (P=.1 and P=.5). Monocular Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity test may be used to detect changes in visual function in patients with ON. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of peginterferon β-1a exposure and Gd-enhanced lesion or T2 lesion response in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Yaming; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shifang; Deykin, Aaron; Nestorov, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    The effect of subcutaneous (SC) peginterferon β-1a exposure on reduction of gadolinium-enhanced (Gd+) lesion count over time was evaluated in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in a Phase 3 study (ADVANCE). Patients were randomized to receive SC injections of placebo (n = 500), 125 mcg every-2-weeks (n = 512), or 125 mcg every-4-weeks (n = 500) for 1 year, and then active treatment in the second year. Steady state 4-week AUC (AUCss) was derived for each individual based on sparse pharmacokinetic (PK) sample and a population PK model. Several longitudinal count models, including marginal, mixed effect, and mixture models, were compared to explore the relationship between AUCss and Gd+ lesion count (or T2 lesion count). A mixture model which divided subjects into two subpopulations by low and high baseline lesion activity was found to yield best goodness-of-fit for the data. In this model, the point estimate and 95 % CI for drug effect slope on log(λ) are -0.0256 (-0.0304, -0.0216) for Gd+ lesion and -0.0147 (-0.0170, -0.0124) for T2 lesion. This suggested that reduction of Gd+ lesion (or T2 lesion) count over time is significantly related to SC peginterferon β-1a exposure, and that the increased reduction lesion count with the every-2-week regimen versus the every-4-week regimen was driven by the higher exposure achieved in that treatment arm (mean Gd+ lesion count 0.2 and 0.7 at Year 2, respectively). The every-2-week regimen produced an exposure range that was close to the plateau range of the exposure-response curve, supporting its selection as the regulatory approved dosage.

  7. Cognitive profile of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis Perfil cognitivo de pacientes com esclerose múltipla do tipo surto-remissão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN M. ANDRADE

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a common disease in Western countries of temperate/cold climate, but in tropical countries an increasing number of cases have been diagnosticated. Moved by the lack of information about cognitive dysfunction of Brazilian MS patients, the present study attempted to describe features of neuropsychological alterations in patients with relapsing remitting MS living in the city of São Paulo. They were compared to healthy volunteers, matched for age and education. In the absence of global intellectual deterioration, the patients had a deficit: a in learning and verbal long-term memory tasks and in visual long-term memory of complex figure; b in timed tasks, accounted for by a slowness of mental processes; c in tasks with a motor component. Tendency to depression was observed; anxiety levels were normal.A esclerose múltipla (EM é doença comum em países de clima temperado/frio, mas também em países tropicais um crescente número de casos tem sido diagnosticado. Motivado pela escassez de informações acerca da cognição dos portadores de EM em nosso país, o presente estudo procurou traçar o perfil neuropsicológico de pacientes com EM da forma surto-remissão, residentes no município de São Paulo, os quais foram comparados a pessoas sadias, com idade e escolaridade semelhantes. A inteligência geral dos pacientes estava preservada mas foram detectados déficits: a em tarefas de aprendizagem e de memória verbal e visual de figura complexa, ambas de longo prazo; b em tarefas cronometradas, explicados por lentificação do processamento mental; c em tarefas com componente motor. Tendência a depressão foi observada; os níveis de ansiedade encontravam-se normais.

  8. Randomized control trial evaluation of a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irish AK

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amanda K Irish,1 Constance M Erickson,1 Terry L Wahls,2,3 Linda G Snetselaar,4 Warren G Darling1 1Motor Control Laboratories, Department of Health and Human Physiology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The University of Iowa, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Background/objective: A Paleolithic diet may improve fatigue and quality of life in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS patients, but past research has evaluated the effects of this dietary intervention in combination with other treatments such as exercise. Thus, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention (MPDI in the treatment of fatigue and other symptoms in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS.Methods: We measured the effects of a MPDI in 17 individuals with RRMS. Of 34 subjects randomly assigned to control (maintain usual diet and intervention (MPDI groups, nine subjects (one man completed the control group and eight subjects (one man completed the MPDI.Results: Significant improvements were seen in Fatigue Severity Scale score and also in Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 and time to complete (dominant hand 9-Hole Peg Test from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls. Increased vitamin K serum levels were also observed in MPDI subjects postprotocol compared to controls.Conclusion: A Paleolithic diet may be useful in the treatment and management of MS, by reducing perceived fatigue, increasing mental and physical quality of life, increasing exercise capacity, and improving hand and leg function. By increasing vitamin K serum levels, the MPDI may also reduce inflammation. Keywords: diet therapy, nutrition therapy, gluten-free, quality of life, fatigue, complementary medicine, alternative medicine

  9. Alemtuzumab improves quality-of-life outcomes compared with subcutaneous interferon beta-1a in patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo González, Rafael; Kita, Mariko; Crayton, Heidi; Havrdova, Eva; Margolin, David H; Lake, Stephen L; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2017-09-01

    Alemtuzumab was superior on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcomes versus subcutaneous interferon beta-1a in phase 3 trials in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. To examine quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes in the alemtuzumab phase 3 trials. Patients who were treatment naive (Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif(®) Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis I [CARE-MS I]) or had an inadequate response to prior therapy (CARE-MS II) received annual courses of alemtuzumab 12 mg/day at baseline (5 days) and Month 12 (3 days) or subcutaneous interferon beta-1a 44 µg three times/week. QoL was measured every 6 or 12 months using Functional Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis (FAMS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and its visual analog scale (EQ-VAS), and 36-Item Short-Form Survey (SF-36). Statistically significant improvements from baseline with alemtuzumab were observed on all three QoL instruments at the earliest post-baseline assessment and sustained through Year 2. Statistically significant greater QoL improvements over subcutaneous interferon beta-1a were seen at all time points in CARE-MS II with FAMS, EQ-VAS and SF-36 physical component summary, and in CARE-MS I with FAMS. Patients treated with alemtuzumab had improvements in physical, mental, and emotional QoL regardless of treatment history. Improvements were significantly greater with alemtuzumab versus subcutaneous interferon beta-1a on both disease-specific and general measures of QoL.

  10. Treatment of mice with the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 mimetic peptide, tyrosine kinase inhibitor peptide, prevents development of the acute form of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and induces stable remission in the chronic relapsing/remitting form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Mustafa G; Flowers, Lawrence O; Patel, Chintak B; Patel, Ravi A; Haider, Mohammad I; Johnson, Howard M

    2005-10-15

    We have previously characterized a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor peptide (Tkip) that is a mimetic of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and inhibits JAK2 phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT1alpha. We show in this study that Tkip protects mice against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Mice are immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) for induction of disease. Tkip (63 mug) administered every other day suppressed the development of acute EAE in 75% of New Zealand White (NZW) mice. Furthermore, Tkip completely protected SJL/J mice, which where induced to get the relapsing/remitting form of EAE, against relapses compared with control groups in which >70% of the mice relapsed after primary incidence of disease. Protection of mice by Tkip was similar to that seen with the type I IFN, IFN-tau. Protection of mice correlated with lower MBP Ab titers in Tkip-treated groups as well as suppression of MBP-induced proliferation of splenocytes taken from EAE-afflicted mice. Cessation of Tkip and IFN-tau administration resulted in SJL/J mice relapsing back into disease. Prolonged treatment of mice with Tkip produced no evidence of cellular toxicity or weight loss. Consistent with its JAK2 inhibitory function, Tkip also inhibited the activity of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, which uses the STAT1alpha transcription factor. The data presented in this study show that Tkip, like the type I IFN, IFN-tau, inhibits both the autoreactive cellular and humoral responses in EAE and ameliorates both the acute and chronic relapsing/remitting forms of EAE.

  11. Oral Palmitoylethanolamide Treatment Is Associated with Reduced Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Interferon-β1a and Circulating Proinflammatory Cytokines in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orefice, Nicola S; Alhouayek, Mireille; Carotenuto, Antonio; Montella, Silvana; Barbato, Franscesco; Comelli, Albert; Calignano, Antonio; Muccioli, Giulio G; Orefice, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator known to reduce pain and inflammation. However, only limited clinical studies have evaluated the effects of PEA in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune and inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Although subcutaneous administration of interferon (IFN)-β1a is approved as first-line therapy for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS), its commonly reported adverse events (AEs) such as pain, myalgia, and erythema at the injection site, deeply affect the quality of life (QoL) of patients with MS. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we tested the effect of ultramicronized PEA (um-PEA) added to IFN-β1a in the treatment of clinically defined RR-MS. The primary objectives were to estimate whether, with um-PEA treatment, patients with MS perceived an improvement in pain and a decrease of the erythema width at the IFN-β1a injection site in addition to an improvement in their QoL. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the effects of um-PEA on circulating interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 serum levels, N-acylethanolamine plasma levels, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression, and safety and tolerability after 1 year of treatment. Patients with MS receiving um-PEA perceived an improvement in pain sensation without a reduction of the erythema at the injection site. A significant improvement in QoL was observed. No significant difference was reported in EDSS score, and um-PEA was well tolerated. We found a significant increase of palmitoylethanolamide, anandamide and oleoylethanolamide plasma levels, and a significant reduction of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 serum profile compared with the placebo group. Our results suggest that um-PEA may be considered as an appropriate add-on therapy for the treatment of IFN-β1a-related adverse effects in

  12. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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  15. Modelling disease progression in relapsing-remitting onset multiple sclerosis using multilevel models applied to longitudinal data from two natural history cohorts and one treated cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Kate; Lawton, Michael; Robertson, Neil; Tremlett, Helen; Zhu, Feng; Harding, Katharine; Oger, Joel; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2016-10-01

    The ability to better predict disease progression represents a major unmet need in multiple sclerosis (MS), and would help to inform therapeutic and management choices. To develop multilevel models using longitudinal data on disease progression in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary-progressive MS (SPMS); and to use these models to estimate the association of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) with progression. Secondary analysis of three MS cohorts. Two natural history cohorts: University of Wales Multiple Sclerosis (UoWMS) cohort, UK, and British Columbia Multiple Sclerosis (BCMS) cohort, Canada. One observational DMT-treated cohort: UK MS risk-sharing scheme (RSS). The UoWMS database has > 2000 MS patients and the BCMS database (as of 2009) has > 5900 MS patients. All participants who had definite MS (RRMS/SPMS), who reached the criteria set out by the Association of British Neurologists (ABN) for eligibility for DMT [i.e. age ≥ 18 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of ≤ 6.5, occurrence of two or more relapses in the previous 2 years] and who had at least two repeated outcome measures were included: 404 patients for the UoWMS cohort and 978 patients for the BCMS cohort. Through the UK MS RSS scheme, 5583 DMT-treated patients were recruited, with the analysis sample being the 4137 who had RRMS and were eligible and treated at baseline, with at least one valid EDSS score post baseline. EDSS score observations post ABN eligibility. We used multilevel models in the development cohort (UoWMS) to develop a model for EDSS score with time since ABN eligibility, allowing for covariates and appropriate transformation of outcome and/or time. These methods were then applied to the BCMS cohort to obtain a 'natural history' model for changes in the EDSS score with time. We then used this natural history model to predict the trajectories of EDSS score in treated patients in the UK MS RSS database. Differences between the

  16. Review of interferon beta-1b in the treatment of early and relapsing multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Paolicelli

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Damiano Paolicelli, Vita Direnzo, Maria TrojanoDepartment of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, University of Bari, Bari, ItalyAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common autoimmune illness of the central nervous system. For many years the inflammatory manifestations of MS were treated using only corticosteroids. Since the 1990s the results of several clinical trials with immunomodulatory agents have changed the therapeutic approach to this disease. Interferon beta (IFNβ-1b represents the pioneer of those therapies. There is growing evidence from clinical trials on relapsing-remitting MS and clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS that IFNβ-1b reduces the frequency and severity of relapses and the development of new and active brain lesions as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Long-term data suggest a persistent efficacy of IFNβ-1b on disease activity and a positive effect in slowing disability worsening. Furthermore a reduction of relapse rate and a slight positive effect on the progression were demonstrated when IFNβ-1b was administered to still-active secondary progressive MS. IFNβ-1b therapy is well tolerated and relatively free of long-term side effects. In spite of the emergence of new agents for the treatment of MS, IFNβ-1b still remains a first-line therapy with a fundamental role in all stages of the disease.Keywords: interferon beta-1b, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, clinically isolated syndromes, efficacy, safety, neutralizing antibodies

  17. Progressive-Relapsing MS (PRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Local Support Group Ask an MS Navigator Edward M. Dowd Personal Advocate Program Connect with Peers ... relapsing MS (PRMS) Types of MS Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Primary progressive MS ( ...

  18. Evaluator-blinded trial evaluating nurse-led immunotherapy DEcision Coaching In persons with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis (DECIMS) and accompanying process evaluation: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Anne Christin; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Vettorazzi, Eik; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Heesen, Christoph

    2015-03-21

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological condition usually starting in early adulthood and regularly leading to severe disability. Immunotherapy options are growing in number and complexity, while costs of treatments are high and adherence rates remain low. Therefore, treatment decision-making has become more complex for patients. Structured decision coaching, based on the principles of evidence-based patient information and shared decision-making, has the potential to facilitate participation of individuals in the decision-making process. This cluster randomised controlled trial follows the assumption that decision coaching by trained nurses, using evidence-based patient information and preference elicitation, will facilitate informed choices and induce higher decision quality, as well as better decisional adherence. The decision coaching programme will be evaluated through an evaluator-blinded superiority cluster randomised controlled trial, including 300 patients with suspected or definite relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, facing an immunotherapy decision. The clusters are 12 multiple sclerosis outpatient clinics in Germany. Further, the trial will be accompanied by a mixed-methods process evaluation and a cost-effectiveness study. Nurses in the intervention group will be trained in shared decision-making, coaching, and evidence-based patient information principles. Patients who meet the inclusion criteria will receive decision coaching (intervention group) with up to three face-to-face coaching sessions with a trained nurse (decision coach) or counselling as usual (control group). Patients in both groups will be given access to an evidence-based online information tool. The primary outcome is 'informed choice' after six months, assessed with the multi-dimensional measure of informed choice including the sub-dimensions risk knowledge (questionnaire), attitude concerning immunotherapy (questionnaire), and immunotherapy uptake (telephone survey

  19. Design of TRUST, a non-interventional, multicenter, 3-year prospective study investigating an integrated patient management approach in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Gass, Achim; Wuerfel, Jens; Bayas, Antonios; Tackenberg, Björn; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf; Mäurer, Mathias; Haas, Judith; Stangel, Martin; Meergans, Matthias; Harlin, Olof; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2016-07-12

    Natalizumab provides rapid and high-efficacy control of multiple sclerosis disease activity with long-term stabilization. However, the benefits of the drug are countered by a risk of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients infected with the John Cunningham Virus. Close monitoring is required in patients with increased progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy risk receiving natalizumab in the long-term for an optimal benefit-risk evaluation. Standardized high-quality monitoring procedures may provide a superior basis for individual benefit and risk evaluation and thus improve treatment decisions. The non-interventional study TRUST was designed to capture natalizumab effectiveness under real-life conditions and to examine alternate approaches for clinical assessments, magnetic resonance imaging monitoring and use of biomarkers for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy risk stratification. TRUST is a non-interventional, multicenter, prospective cohort study conducted at approximately 200 German neurological centers. The study is intended to enroll 1260 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients with ongoing natalizumab therapy for at least 12 months. Patients will be followed for a period of 3 years, irrespective of treatment changes after study start. Data on clinical, subclinical and patient-centric outcomes will be documented in order to compare the effectiveness of continuous versus discontinued natalizumab treatment. Furthermore, the type and frequency of clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and biomarker assessments, reasons for continuation or discontinuation of therapy and the safety profile of natalizumab will be collected to explore the impact of a systematic patient management approach and its potential impact on patient outcome. Specifically, the role of biomarkers, the use of expert opinions, the impact of high-frequency magnetic resonance imaging assessment for early progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

  20. Cortico-amygdala coupling as a marker of early relapse risk in cocaine-addicted individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith J Mchugh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Addiction to cocaine is a chronic condition characterized by high rates of early relapse. This study builds on efforts to identify neural markers of relapse risk by studying resting state functional connectivity (rsFC in neural circuits arising from the amygdala; a brain region implicated in relapse-related processes including craving and reactivity to stress following acute and protracted withdrawal from cocaine. Whole-brain resting-state fMRI connectivity (6 min was assessed in 45 cocaine-addicted individuals and 22 healthy controls. Cocaine-addicted individuals completed scans in the final week of a residential treatment episode. To approximate preclinical models of relapse-related circuitry separate seeds were derived for the left and right basolateral (BLA and corticomedial (CMA amygdala. Participants also completed the Iowa Gambling Task, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Cocaine Craving Questionnaire, Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Use scale, Temperament and Character Inventory and the NEO-PI-R. Relapse within the first 30 days post-treatment (n = 24 was associated with reduced rsFC between the left CMA and ventromedial prefrontal cortex/rostral anterior cingulate cortex (vmPFC/rACC relative to cocaine-addicted individuals who remained abstinent (non-relapse, n = 21. Non-relapse participants evidenced reduced rsFC between the bilateral BLA and visual processing regions (lingual gyrus/cuneus compared to controls and relapsed participants. Early relapse was associated with fewer years of education but unrelated to trait reactivity to stress, neurocognitive and clinical characteristics or cocaine use history. Findings suggest that rsFC within neural circuits implicated in preclinical models of relapse may provide a promising marker of relapse risk in cocaine-addicted individuals. Future efforts to replicate the current findings and alter connectivity within these circuits may yield novel interventions and improve treatment outcomes.

  1. RESULTS OF AN OPEN-LABEL COMPARATIVE RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL OF AXOGLATIRAN® FS (F-SINTEZ, RUSSIA EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY IN COMPARISON WITH COPAXONE®-TEVA (TEVA PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRIES LTD., ISRAEL IN PATIENTS WITH RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Khabirov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Comparison of Axoglatiran® FS (F-Sintez,  Russia and Copaxone®-Teva (Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.,  Israel efficiency and safety in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Materials and methods. In the study 150 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis were randomized into 2 groups: patients in the 1st group (n = 100 received treatment with Axoglatiran® FS, patients in the 2nd group (n = 50 received treatment with Copaxone®-Teva. Vital signs of every patient in the study were monitored accompanied by physical examinations, neurological examinations with EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale and MSFC (Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite evaluations, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and lab tests. Results. Mean age (M ± SD of the patients in the 1st group was 32.8 ± 8.7 years (20–54  years, percentages of men and women were 34 and 66 % respectively, mean age of multiple sclerosis onset was 27.93 ± 7.72 years (11–48 years. Median (Me, lower and upper quartiles estimates [LQ; UQ] on the EDSS scale were 2 [1.5; 3.0] steps (1.0–4.5  steps. In the 2nd group mean age of the patients was 35.2 ± 9.5 years (18–57  years, percentages of men and women were 24 and 76 % respectively, mean age of multiple sclerosis onset was 26.5 ± 6.9 years (18–47  years, EDSS estimates were 2.25 [1.5; 3.5] steps (1–5  steps. In the 1st group 88 (88 % patients completed the study, in the 2nd  group 44 (88 % patients completed the study. Among them in 73 (82.95 % patients in the 1st group and 34 (77.27 % patients in the 2nd  group the disease didn’t exacerbate (p > 0.05. In both groups no progression according to the EDSS and MSFC scale was observed (p > 0.05. Magnetic resonance imaging data showed that dynamics of the total number of T2 lesions, contrast-enhancing T1 lesions, atrophy degree estimated using internuclear index were comparable in both groups (p > 0.05. Safety profiles of

  2. Hypermethylation of MIR21 in CD4+ T cells from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis associates with lower miRNA-21 levels and concomitant up-regulation of its target genes

    KAUST Repository

    Ruhrmann, Sabrina

    2017-08-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors. DNA methylation, an epigenetic mechanism that controls genome activity, may provide a link between genetic and environmental risk factors.We sought to identify DNA methylation changes in CD4+ T cells in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR-MS) and secondary-progressive (SP-MS) disease and healthy controls (HC).We performed DNA methylation analysis in CD4+ T cells from RR-MS, SP-MS, and HC and associated identified changes with the nearby risk allele, smoking, age, and gene expression.We observed significant methylation differences in the VMP1/MIR21 locus, with RR-MS displaying higher methylation compared to SP-MS and HC. VMP1/MIR21 methylation did not correlate with a known MS risk variant in VMP1 or smoking but displayed a significant negative correlation with age and the levels of mature miR-21 in CD4+ T cells. Accordingly, RR-MS displayed lower levels of miR-21 compared to SP-MS, which might reflect differences in age between the groups, and healthy individuals and a significant enrichment of up-regulated miR-21 target genes.Disease-related changes in epigenetic marking of MIR21 in RR-MS lead to differences in miR-21 expression with a consequence on miR-21 target genes.

  3. Subcutaneous Interferon β-1a Administration by Electronic Auto-injector is Associated with High Adherence in Patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis in a Real-life Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Elina; Multanen, Juha; Atula, Sari

    2017-02-20

    The objective was to investigate adherence measured by an electronic auto-injector device, and self-reported adherence and treatment convenience in subjects with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), using an electronic auto-injector Rebismart(®) to self-inject interferon β-1a. Thirty one patients with RRMS using the electronic auto-injector Rebismart(®) for self-injecting interferon β-1a subcutaneously three times weekly were included in a real-life clinical multicenter study for 24 weeks in Finland. Mean adherence reported by the device and mean self-assessment of adherence were studied. Reasons for missing injections and treatment convenience were assessed. Association between adherence and gender and age were studied. The mean adherence calculated from the device data was 93.5%. The mean self-assessment of adherence was 96.6%. The most common reason for missing an injection was forget-fulness. Adherence (measured by the device) was not changed over time. In the high adherence group there were more females and young patients (auto-injector was found to substantially ease the treatment by 90% of the patients. The electronic auto-injector was associated with high adherence to treatment. The device was found to ease the patient's treatment and it was perceived as easy to use. It is a convenient tool to assess patient's adherence to treatment.

  4. Comparative Diagnostic Accuracy of Ganglion Cell-Inner Plexiform and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measures by Cirrus and Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio J. González-López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate sensitivity and specificity of several optical coherence tomography (OCT measurements for detecting retinal thickness changes in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, such as macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL thickness measured with Cirrus (OCT and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL thickness measured with Cirrus and Spectralis OCT. Methods. Seventy patients (140 eyes with RRMS and seventy matched healthy subjects underwent pRNFL and GCIPL thickness analysis using Cirrus OCT and pRNFL using Spectralis OCT. A prospective, cross-sectional evaluation of sensitivities and specificities was performed using latent class analysis due to the absence of a gold standard. Results. GCIPL measures had higher sensitivity and specificity than temporal pRNFL measures obtained with both OCT devices. Average GCIPL thickness was significantly more sensitive than temporal pRNFL by Cirrus (96.34% versus 58.41% and minimum GCIPL thickness was significantly more sensitive than temporal pRNFL by Spectralis (96.41% versus 69.69%. Generalised estimating equation analysis revealed that age (P=0.030, optic neuritis antecedent (P=0.001, and disease duration (P=0.002 were significantly associated with abnormal results in average GCIPL thickness. Conclusion. Average and minimum GCIPL measurements had significantly better sensitivity to detect retinal thickness changes in RRMS than temporal pRNFL thickness measured by Cirrus and Spectralis OCT, respectively.

  5. Increasing signal intensity within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1W magnetic resonance images in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlation with cumulative dose of a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent, gadobutrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan A. [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Clinical Center Nis, Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Clinical Center Nis, Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Clinical Center Nis, Clinic for Neurology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate correlation between cumulative dose of gadobutrol and signal intensity (SI) within dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted images in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Dentate nucleus-to-pons and globus pallidus-to-thalamus SI ratios, and renal and liver functions, were evaluated after multiple intravenous administrations of 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol at 27, 96-98, and 168 weeks. We compared SI ratios based on the number of administrations, total amount of gadobutrol administered, and time between injections. Globus pallidus-to-thalamus (p = 0.025) and dentate nucleus-to-pons (p < 0.001) SI ratios increased after multiple gadobutrol administrations, correlated with the number of administrations (ρ = 0.263, p = 0.046, respectively) and depended on the length of administration (p = 0.017, p = 0.037, respectively). Patients receiving gadobutrol at 27 weeks showed the greatest increase in both SI ratios (p = 0.006; p = 0.014, respectively, versus 96-98 weeks). GGT increased at the end of the study (p = 0.004). In patients with RRMS, SI within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus increased on unenhanced T1-weighted images after multiple gadobutrol injections. Administration of the same total amount of gadobutrol over a shorter period caused greater SI increase. (orig.)

  6. Early lymphocyte recovery as a predictor of outcome, including relapse, after hematopoieticstem cell transplantation

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    Juliane Morando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite advances in the treatment of acute leukemia, many patients need to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent studies show that early lymphocyte recovery may be a predictor of relapse and survival in these patients. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the influence of lymphocyte recovery on Days +30 and +100 post-transplant on the occurrence of relapse and survival. METHODS: A descriptive, retrospective study was performed of 137 under 21-year-old patients who were submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia between 1995 and 2008. A lymphocyte count 0.3 x 10(9/L were considered adequate. Lymphocyte recovery was also analyzed on Day +100 with < 0.75 x 10(9/Land < 0.75 x 10(9/L being considered inadequate and adequate lymphocyte recovery, respectively. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the occurrence of relapse between patients with inadequate and adequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +30 post-transplant. However, the transplant-related mortality was significantly higher in patients with inadequate recovery on Day +30. Patients with inadequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +30 had worse overall survival and relapse-free survival than patients with adequate recovery. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of infections and acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Patients with inadequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +100 had worse overall survival and relapse-free survival and a higher cumulative incidence of relapse. CONCLUSION: The evaluation of lymphocyte recovery on Day +30 is not a good predictor of relapse after transplant however patients with inadequate lymphocyte recovery had worse overall survival and relapse-free survival. Inadequate lymphocyte recovery on Day +100 is correlated with higher cumulative relapse as well as lower overall survival and relapse-free survival.

  7. Changes in magnetic resonance imaging disease measures over 3 years in mildly disabled patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis receiving interferon β-1a in the COGnitive Impairment in MUltiple Sclerosis (COGIMUS study

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    Quarantelli Mario

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS. In clinical trials, MRI has been found to detect treatment effects with greater sensitivity than clinical measures; however, clinical and MRI outcomes tend to correlate poorly. Methods In this observational study, patients (n = 550; 18-50 years; relapsing-remitting MS [Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤4.0] receiving interferon (IFN β-1a therapy (44 or 22 µg subcutaneously [sc] three times weekly [tiw] underwent standardized MRI, neuropsychological and quality-of-life (QoL assessments over 3 years. In this post hoc analysis, MRI outcomes and correlations between MRI parameters and clinical and functional outcomes were analysed. Results MRI data over 3 years were available for 164 patients. T2 lesion and T1 gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+ lesion volumes, but not black hole (BH volumes, decreased significantly from baseline to Year 3 (P P = 0.025 and T1 BH volumes (-7.8% vs +10.3%, P = 0.002. A decrease in T2 lesion volume over 3 years predicted stable QoL over the same time period. Treatment with IFN β-1a, 44 μg sc tiw, predicted an absence of cognitive impairment at Year 3. Conclusion Subcutaneous IFN β-1a significantly decreased MRI measures of disease, with a significant benefit shown for the 44 µg over the 22 µg dose; higher-dose treatment also predicted better cognitive outcomes over 3 years.

  8. CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Green, Margaret L; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Riddell, Stanley R; Boeckh, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Different Interferon Beta Products for Relapsing-Remitting and Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: Decision Analysis Based on Long-Term Clinical Data and Switchable Treatments

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    Shekoufeh Nikfar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a highly debilitating immune mediated disorder and the second most common cause of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults. Iran is amongst high MS prevalence countries (50/100,000. Economic burden of MS is a topic of important deliberation in economic evaluations study. Therefore determining of cost-effectiveness interferon beta (INF β and their copied biopharmaceuticals (CBPs and biosimilars products is significant issue for assessment of affordability in Lower-middle-income countries (LMICs.Methods:A literature-based Markov model was developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of three INF βs products compared with placebo for managing a hypothetical cohort of patients diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS (RRMS in Iran from a societal perspective. Health states were based on the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. Disease progression transition probabilities for symptom management and INF β therapies were obtained from natural history studies and multicenter randomized controlled trials and their long term follow up for RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS. A cross sectional study has been developed to evaluate cost and utility. Transitions among health states occurred in 2-years cycles for fifteen cycles and switching to other therapies was allowed. Calculations of costs and utilities were established by attachment of decision trees to the overall model. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER of cost/quality adjusted life year (QALY for all available INF β products (brands, biosimilars and CBPs were considered. Both costs and utilities were discounted. Sensitivity analyses were done to assess robustness of model.Results:ICER for Avonex, Rebif and Betaferon was 18712, 11832, 15768 US Dollars ($ respectively when utility attained from literature review has been considered. ICER for available CBPs and biosimilars in Iran was $847, $6964 and $11913.Conclusions:The Markov

  10. Short-term MRI measurements as predictors of EDSS progression in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: grey matter atrophy but not lesions are predictive in a real-life setting.

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    von Gumberz, Johanna; Mahmoudi, Mina; Young, Kim; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Heesen, Christoph; Siemonsen, Susanne; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best biomarker of inflammatory disease activity in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) so far but the association with disability is weak. Appearance of new MRI-lesions is used to evaluate response to immunotherapies in individual patients as well as being the most common primary outcome in phase-2 trials. Measurements of brain atrophy show promising outcomes in natural cohort studies and some phase-2 trials. From a theoretical perspective they might represent irreversible neurodegeneration and be more closely associated with disability. However, these atrophy measurements are not yet established as prognostic factors in real-life clinical routine. High field MRI has improved image quality and resolution and new methods to measure atrophy dynamics have become available. To investigate the predictive value of MRI classification criteria in to high/low atrophy and inflammation groups, and to explore predictive capacity of two consecutive routine MRI scans for disability progression in RRMS in a real-life prospective cohort. 82 RRMS-patients (40 untreated, 42 treated with immunotherapies, mean age 40 years, median Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) of 2, underwent two clinically indicated MRI scans (3 Tesla) within 5-14 months, and EDSS assessment after a mean of 3.0 (1.5-4.2) years. We investigated the predictive value of predefined classifications in low/high inflammatory and atrophy groups for EDSS progression (≥1.5 if baseline EDSS = 0, ≥1.0 if baseline EDSS EDSS and higher grey matter atrophy (FreeSurfer) as best predictors (R (2) = 0.29) for EDSS progression and the accuracy was overall good (Area under the curve = 0.81). Beside EDSS at baseline, short-term grey matter atrophy is predictive for EDSS progression in treated and untreated RRMS. The development of atrophy measurements for individual risk counselling and evaluation of treatment response seems possible, but needs further validation in larger

  11. Iron deposition in the gray matter in patients with relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis: A longitudinal study using three-dimensional (3D)-enhanced T2*-weighted angiography (ESWAN)

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    Du, Silin, E-mail: 182389558@qq.com; Sah, Shambhu K., E-mail: mrsks2007@hotmail.com; Zeng, Chun, E-mail: zengchun19840305@163.com; Wang, Jingjie, E-mail: 345151097@qq.com; Liu, Yi, E-mail: 993537544@qq.com; Xiong, Hua, E-mail: rjdfxyh@163.com; Li, Yongmei, E-mail: lymzhang70@aliyun.com

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the iron content by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinic correlation in patients with relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) over a two-year period. Methods: Thirty RRMS patients and 30 healthy control subjects were examined twice, two years apart, by undergoing brain conventional MRI and three-dimensional (3D)-enhanced T2*-weighted angiography (ESWAN) sequences at 3.0 T. Quantitative differences in iron content in deep gray matter (GM) nuclei and precentral gyrus GM between patients and control subjects with repeated-measures the mean phase values (MPVs) for ESWAN-filtered phase images. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis was used to evaluate correlations of the MPVs, both 2-year-difference and single-time measurements, to disease duration, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and times of recurrence. Results: The RRMS patients had higher GM iron concentration than that of the healthy control subjects in both single-time measurements, but only the substantia nigra (SN), and the precentral gyrus GM (PGM) showed a significant statistical difference (p < 0.05). Using the paired samples t test, we found that there were significant differences in two-year-difference measurements of the MPVs in the putamen (PUT), the globus pallidus (GP), the head of the caudate nucleus (HCN), the thalamus (THA), SN, the red nucleus (RN), the dentate nucleus (DN) and PGM, especially in SN (t = 2.92, p = 0.007) in RRMS patients. The MPVs of the PUT, GP, HCN, THA, SN, RN, DN and PGM for the subgroup with RRMS patients in times of recurrence less than twice were similar to the healthy controls. There was no significant difference in all regions of interests (ROIs). However, there were significant differences in all ROIs except THA and GP for the other subgroup with RRMS patients in times of recurrence more than and equal to twice. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis showed there were

  12. Amplified loci on chromosomes 8 and 17 predict early relapse in ER-positive breast cancers.

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    Erhan Bilal

    Full Text Available Adjuvant hormonal therapy is administered to all early stage ER+ breast cancers, and has led to significantly improved survival. Unfortunately, a subset of ER+ breast cancers suffer early relapse despite hormonal therapy. To identify molecular markers associated with early relapse in ER+ breast cancer, an outlier analysis method was applied to a published gene expression dataset of 268 ER+ early-stage breast cancers treated with tamoxifen alone. Increased expression of sets of genes that clustered in chromosomal locations consistent with the presence of amplicons at 8q24.3, 8p11.2, 17q12 (HER2 locus and 17q21.33-q25.1 were each found to be independent markers for early disease recurrence. Distant metastasis free survival (DMFS after 10 years for cases with any amplicon (DMFS = 56.1%, 95% CI = 48.3-63.9% was significantly lower (P = 0.0016 than cases without any of the amplicons (DMFS = 87%, 95% CI = 76.3% -97.7%. The association between presence of chromosomal amplifications in these regions and poor outcome in ER+ breast cancers was independent of histologic grade and was confirmed in independent clinical datasets. A separate validation using a FISH-based assay to detect the amplicons at 8q24.3, 8p11.2, and 17q21.33-q25.1 in a set of 36 early stage ER+/HER2- breast cancers treated with tamoxifen suggests that the presence of these amplicons are indeed predictive of early recurrence. We conclude that these amplicons may serve as prognostic markers of early relapse in ER+ breast cancer, and may identify novel therapeutic targets for poor prognosis ER+ breast cancers.

  13. Observation on the effect of methylprednisolone combined with interferon in the treatment of patients with relapse remitting multiple sclerosis%甲泼尼龙联合干扰素治疗复发缓解型多发性硬化症疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴祥; 杨军

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察甲泼尼龙冲击疗法(MPPT)联合干扰素治疗复发缓解型多发性硬化症(MS)的疗效.方法 90例患者被随机分为观察组及对照组,每组各45例.观察组在急性期采用MPPT治疗,缓解期采用干扰素-β1α(IFN-β1α)治疗;对照组仅在急性期采用MPPT治疗.结果 MPPT急性期总有效率达98.9%.观察组采用IFN-β1α治疗期间,MS复发率为30.2%,对照组随访2年复发率为53.3%,观察组显著低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 对于复发缓解型MS,在急性发作时采用MPPT疗法缓解急性期症状,缓解期采用IFN-β1α预防复发,是较好的治疗方案.%Objective To explore the effect of methylprednisolone combined with interferon in the treatment patients with relapse remitting multiple sclerosis.Methods 90 patients with relapse remitting multiple sclerosis were randomly divided into experimental group and treatment group.The experimental group during the acute stage with methylprednisolone pulse therapy,remission with interferon β (IFN-β) treatment; the control group only in the acute phase with methylprednisolone pulse therapy.Results The total effective rate of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in the acute stage was 98.9%.Experimental group during the treatment with IFN-β1α,relapse rate was 30.2% ;patients in the control group were followed up for two years,the recurrence rate was 53.3%.Experimental group and control group was significantly different ( P < 0.05 ),the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group.Conclusion For relapsing-remitting MS,using MPPT could relieve acute symptom in the acute stage,and in remission using of IFN-β1α relapse prevention was a good choice for clinicians.

  14. TSH-receptor-autoantibody-titers in untreated toxic diffuse goitres - an early indicator of relapse

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    Becker, W.; Reiners, C.; Boerner, W.

    1984-10-01

    TSH-receptor-auto antibodies were determined in follow-up of 30 patients with relapse of toxic diffuse goitres, i.e. patients with Graves' disease and toxic disseminated autonomy, and in 13 patients with spontaneous remission after antithyroid drug therapy by use of a commercially available TSH-radioreceptorassay (TRAK-assay). All the patients with very high receptor-autoantibody-titers in untreated thyrotoxicosis (F > 20%) had one or more periods of hyperthyroidism or a very severe course of disease. None of these patients showed a spontaneous remission of disease. They all could be identified as Graves' patients. Patients with TRAK-titers 3% <= F <= 20% also had to be classified as cases of Graves' disease. But in follow-up of those patients there as no difference of TRAK-titers with regard to relapse or spontaneous remission. IF TSH-receptor-autoantibodies were undetectable (TRAK-titers F <= 3%), most of the patients could be identified as disseminated autonomies when there were no simultaneous signs of Graves' ophthalmopathy or secondary clinical signs of immunologic Graves' disease. In these patients a prediction of relapse was also not possible. Very high TSH-reactor-autoantibody-titers in untreated Graves' disease could be a good predictor of possible relapse or severe course of disease, indicating the early need for ablative therapy. Low titers or negative titers in some cases of Graves' disease do not allow any prediction of relapse. The lack of TSH-receptor-autoantibodies - correlating very well with secondary clinical signs of disseminated autonomy - supports the indication for ablative therapy in most cases as well.

  15. Immunomodulator therapy migration in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: a study of 152 cases Migração medicamentosa de imunomoduladores em esclerose múltipla: estudo em 152 pacientes

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    Sergio Semeraro Jordy

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since 1997, immunological modulators have been used for treatment of Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS in the Multiple Sclerosis Attendance and Treatment Center (CATEM with significant alterations in this disease natural history. AIM: To add data on the experience of CATEM for the treatment of RRMS patients that had immunomodulators. METHOD: RRMS patients that received continuously immunomodulator drugs were evaluated on adherence, migration, withdrawal and progression rates. The patients were divided in three groups by the period of immunomodulators intake. RESULTS: There were registered in Group 1 withdrawal in 98 patients (25% and adherence in 292 cases (74%; Group 2 interruption of therapy in 140 patients, 92 (31% due to progression for PSMS, 14 (5% for pregnancy, withdrawal in 34 (11%, adherence in 88%; Group 3 progression in 41 (26%, pregnancy in 3 (2% withdrawal in 42 (27% and adherence in 72%. The migration rate was about one third (31.57% and the principal cause was therapeutic failure; the mean migrating time was 0.5-2.5 years in group 3. CONCLUSION: Immunomodulatory treatment for RRMS patients may have significant levels of failure and side effects; the adherence was compatible with the international literature.INTRODUÇÃO: Na última década foram introduzidos os imunomoduladores para o tratamento da esclerose múltipla (EM forma remitente-recorrente (RR. OBJETIVO: Complementar o relato anterior da experiência de centro brasileiro no acompanhamento dos pacientes em uso dos imunomoduladores. MÉTODO: 390 pacientes que faziam uso de imunomoduladores no Centro de Atendimento à Esclerose Múltipla (CATEM, foram subdivididos por tempo de uso em três grupos, avaliando-se as ocorrências de: abandono, gravidez, conversão da forma RR para secundária progressiva (SP e da aderência. RESULTADOS: No Grupo 1, foram observados abandono do uso de imunomoduladores em 98 pacientes (25% e aderência de 292 casos (74%; no

  16. Donor chimerism early after reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation predicts relapse and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P

    2014-10-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T cell-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). We evaluated 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid and 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18 to 74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T cell-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched), with a median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6 to 120.7). In multivariable analysis, total donor cell and T cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism D100 total donor cell chimerism or T cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts who may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker after keratoplasty due to Fusarium solani keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daas, L; Bischoff-Jung, M; Viestenz, A; Seitz, B; Viestenz, A

    2017-01-01

    In the case of therapy-resistant keratitis an infection with Fusarium solani should be taken into consideration as a rare but very severe eye disease. In the majority of cases Fusarium solani keratitis will result in a protracted clinical course despite aggressive medicinal and surgical interventions. We describe the case of a referred patient after intensive topical, intracameral and systemic antibacterial and antimycotic therapy as well as surgical treatment with emergency keratoplasty à chaud because of Fusarium solani keratitis. The patient presented to our department with persistent discomfort for further therapeutic interventions. Using confocal microscopy we were able to demonstrate the presence of fungal hyphae in the host cornea and the graft, which was important for making further surgical decisions. Furthermore, this emphasizes the role of confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker during the clinical monitoring.

  18. High Relapse Rates Despite Early Intervention with Intravenous Methylprednisolone Pulse Therapy for Severe Childhood Alopecia Areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexandra; Trüeb, Ralph M; Theiler, Martin; Hauser, Valérie; Weibel, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Previous data suggest that early application of intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy (IV-MPPT) may improve the disease course of alopecia areata. The objective of this study was to investigate the outcome of IV-MPPT in severe childhood alopecia areata, predominantly with short disease duration. Eighteen children (10 girls, 8 boys) younger than 17 years old (median age 7.7 yrs, range 2.1-16.5 yrs) treated with IV-MPPT for severe childhood alopecia areata in a referral center for pediatric dermatology over 3 years (median disease duration 4 mos, range 1-12 mos) were retrospectively evaluated. Five patients had alopecia areata totalis or universalis and 13 had alopecia multilocularis. The median scalp area affected by alopecia was 60% (range 30%-100%). All patients underwent two or three cycles of IV-MPPT at monthly intervals (maximum 500 mg/day on three consecutive days). Within 7 months after the last IV-MPPT session, 10 of 18 children had good response (≥75% of hair regrowth), with eight showing improvement within the first 4 months. Of the remaining eight patients, one had moderate response (50%-74% regrowth), three had poor response (1%-49% regrowth), and four (all with alopecia areata universalis or totalis) had no response. Seven of the initial 10 good responders experienced relapses, with marked hair loss after the last IV-MPPT session. The estimated median time to relapse was 8 months (95% confidence interval 7, 9 mos). IV-MPPT, even early in the course of disease, did not affect long-term outcome of alopecia areata in our group of severely affected patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Differences in miRNA expression in early stage lung adenocarcinomas that did and did not relapse.

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    Mick D Edmonds

    Full Text Available Relapse of adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, is a major clinical challenge to improving survival. To gain insight into the early molecular events that contribute to lung adenocarcinoma relapse, and taking into consideration potential cell type specificity, we used stringent criteria for sample selection. We measured miRNA expression only from flash frozen stage I lung adenocarcinomas, excluding other NSCLC subtypes. We compared miRNA expression in lung adenocarcinomas that relapsed within two years to those that did not relapse within three years after surgical resection prior to adjuvant therapy. The most significant differences in mRNA expression for recurrent tumors compared to non-recurrent tumors were decreases in miR-106b*, -187, -205, -449b, -774* and increases in miR-151-3p, let-7b, miR-215, -520b, and -512-3p. A unique comparison between adjacent normal lung tissue from relapse and non-relapse groups revealed dramatically different miRNA expression, suggesting dysregulation of miRNA in the environment around the tumor. To assess patient-to-patient variability, miRNA levels in the tumors were normalized to levels in matched adjacent normal lung tissue. This analysis revealed a different set of significantly altered miRNA in tumors that recurred compared to tumors that did not. Together our analyses elucidated miRNA not previously linked to lung adenocarcinoma that likely have important roles in its development and progression. Our results also highlight the differences in miRNA expression in normal lung tissue in adenocarcinomas that do and do not recur. Most notably, our data identified those miRNA that distinguish early stage tumors likely to relapse prior to treatment and miRNA that could be further studied for use as biomarkers for prognosis, patient monitoring, and/or treatment decisions.

  20. Overexpression of Gli1 in cancer interstitial tissues predicts early relapse after radical operation of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hua Li; Hai-Feng Gao; Yan Wang; Fang Liu; Xiao-Feng Tian; Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether Gli1 expression is important in relapse after radical operation of breast cancer.Methods:Using immunohistochemistry,Glil expression was analyzed in human primary breast cancer (n=284) and paracancerous tissues (n=20),and also in local lymph nodes (n=28) and metastatic lymph nodes (n=28).Results:Initial analysis of Gli1 expression in a small cohort of 20 breast tumors and their paracancerous tissues showed a tendency towards Gli1 overexpression in breast cancer tissues (P<0.001).Further,Gli1 expression in 284 breast cancer tissue samples was analyzed and a significant correlation was found between increased expression of nuclear Gli1 and unfavorable recurrence-free survival (RFS) (P<0.05).The nuclear expression of Gli1 in metastatic lymph nodes following relapse after radical operation was much higher than that in the local lymph nodes of primary carcinoma (P<0.05).Most interestingly,the expression of Gli1 was much higher in the interstitial tissues of the relapsed group than of the non-relapsed group (P<0.001).Conclusions:Breast cancer shows a high prevalence of Gli1 expression,which is significantly correlated with aggressive features and unfavorable RFS.Nuclear Gli1 overexpression,especially in the interstitial tissues,signified early relapse after radical operation of breast cancer.

  1. Early detection of prostate cancer relapse by biochemistry and diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, L; Zattoni, F; Rossi, E; Karnes, R J; Lowe, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a common malignancy in men associated with an increase in the incidence rate. Radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) represents the most employed treatments for the local control of disease. However, 10-50% of patients who experienced a recurrence of disease after primary treatments can benefit from salvage or palliative therapies. To date, prostate specific antigen (PSA) is usually used in clinical practice to monitor the status of disease and to early detect the recurrence of PCa. Nevertheless, PSA cannot discriminate the presence of local vs. distant metastatic disease. Circulating tumor cells are considered as a sign of disease widespread, but their correlation with metastatic PCa and local recurrence of disease is still indeterminate. Digital rectal exploration and transrectal ultrasonography are considered the first clinical and diagnostic approach to identify the local recurrence of PCa, but are associated with a low detection rate and low diagnostic accuracies. Conversely, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained a great importance in this setting of disease, being able to determine the presence of local recurrence with high sensitivity, also in the presence of low serum PSA levels. Lastly, the introduction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with radiolabeled choline agents let to improve the management of patients with early recurrence of disease, although its accuracy is linked to the PSA and PSA dynamic values. New radiopharmaceutical agents, like 68Ga-PSMA or 18F-FACBC and others could improve the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT, but the data is still preliminary. In the present review we will discuss both clinical and diagnostic instrumentations, actually available in clinical practice, able to early identify the presence of recurrent PCa and to differentiate between local and distant relapse of tumor.

  2. Co-morbid anxiety disorders predict early relapse after inpatient alcohol treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Buitelaar, J.; Verkes, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Alcohol dependence and anxiety disorders often co-occur. Yet, the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on the alcohol relapse-risk after treatment is under debate. This study investigated the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on relapse rates in alcohol dependence. We hypothesized

  3. Co-morbid anxiety disorders predict early relapse after inpatient alcohol treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.F.A.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Buitelaar, J.K.; Verkes, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dependence and anxiety disorders often co-occur. Yet, the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on the alcohol relapse-risk after treatment is under debate. This study investigated the effect of co-morbid anxiety disorders on relapse rates in alcohol dependence. We hypothesized

  4. EARLY DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF NEUROMYELITIS OPTICA PREVENTS RELAPSES AND LIMITS VISUAL DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Srinivas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or devics disease was considered as a variant of Multiple sclerosis, w ith recent advances in investigations and with better understanding of etiopathogenesis, NMO is a distinct immune mediated, largely relapsing, inflammatory , demyelinating disease of central nervous system. NMO most commonly i nvolves the optic nerves and spinal cord. Relapsing and monophasic are two var iants of NMO , as relapsing NMO is a rapidly disabling disease, prompt diagnosis of the type from the monophasic, helps in the management as well as decreasing the motor and visual morbidity

  5. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.M.E.; Vegt, de F.; Siesling, S.; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heiden-van der Loo, van der M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Dijck, van J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The Neth

  6. Predictive value of early F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in chemosensitive relapsed lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, B; van Imhoff, G; Pruim, J; Sluiter, W; Vaalburg, W; Vellenga, E

    2003-01-01

    F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a better tool than computerized tomography (CT) in predicting long-term treatment outcome in patients with relapsed chemosensitive lymphoma who are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). We studied patien

  7. Early detection of tumor relapse/regrowth by consecutive minimal residual disease monitoring in high-risk neuroblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Satoshi; Saitoh, Atsuro; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Kozaki, Aiko; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nishio, Hisahide; Nishimura, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor accounting for ~15% of cancer-associated mortalities in children. Despite the current intensive therapy, >50% of high-risk patients experience tumor relapse or regrowth caused by the activation of minimal residual disease (MRD). Although several MRD detection protocols using various reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) markers have been reported to evaluate the therapeutic response and disease status of neuroblastoma patients, their clinical significance remains elusive. The present study reports two high-risk neuroblastoma patients, whose MRD was consecutively monitored using 11 RT-qPCR markers (CHRNA3, CRMP1, DBH, DCX, DDC, GABRB3, GAP43, ISL1, KIF1A, PHOX2B and TH) during their course of treatment. The two patients initially responded to the induction therapy and reached MRD-negative status. The patients' MRD subsequently became positive with no elevation of their urinary homovanillic acid, urinary vanillylmandelic acid and serum neuron-specific enolase levels at 13 or 19 weeks prior to the clinical diagnosis of tumor relapse or regrowth. The present cases highlight the possibility of consecutive MRD monitoring using 11 markers to enable an early detection of tumor relapse or regrowth in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27446404

  8. Ataxia-telangiectasia and wilms tumor: reduced treatment but early relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Villena, Ana; Cormenzana, María; de Prada, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio; Aleo, Esther

    2013-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, a high incidence of lymphoreticular tumors, and an increased sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. The appropriate cancer therapy remains unknown because of high toxicity rates with full-dose conventional protocols. We present a patient with A-T and nephroblastoma, who received an adapted treatment regimen. To our knowledge this is the second report on nephroblastoma in a patient with A-T but the first with confirmed premortem studies. Although the patient tolerated the chemotherapy regimen well, the patient relapsed and died a year after initial diagnosis.

  9. Quantifying risk of early relapse in patients with first demyelinating events: Prediction in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spelman, Tim; Meyniel, Claire; Rojas, Juan Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Scale (EDSS) at baseline, first symptom location, oligoclonal bands and various brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics were all predictors of conversion. Conversely, older age and DMD exposure post-CIS were associated with reduced rates. Prognostic nomograms demonstrated high...... concordance between estimated and observed conversion probabilities. CONCLUSION: This multinational study shows that age at CIS onset, DMD exposure, EDSS, multiple brain and spinal MRI criteria and oligoclonal bands are associated with shorter time to relapse. Nomogram assessment may be useful in clinical...

  10. Identification of a homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation caused by acquired uniparental disomy in a relapsed early T-cell precursor ALL patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Seki, Masafumi; Kato, Motohiro; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Atsuya; Kaneda, Daisuke; Fujiki, Atsushi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Nakatani, Takuya; Osone, Shinya; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Taki, Tomohiko; Takita, Junko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Hosoi, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of genetic alterations associated with relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may help to identify druggable targets for specific therapies. Early T-cell precursor ALL (ETP-ALL) is a subtype of T-ALL with poor prognosis. Although the genetic landscape of ETP-ALL has been determined, genetic alterations related to the relapse of ETP-ALL have not been fully investigated. Here, we report the first patient with relapsed pediatric ETP-ALL to exhibit a homozygous JAK3 activating mutation, V674A, caused by acquired uniparental disomy (UPD). Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed acquired UPD (aUPD) at the 19p13.3-p12 locus only in leukemic cells at relapse. Sanger sequence of the JAK3 gene, which was located at 19p13.1 and frequently mutated in ETP-ALL, was performed in paired leukemic samples to determine homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation only in relapsed leukemic cells. In contrast, leukemic cells at initial diagnosis harbored hemizygous JAK3 V674A mutation. Further, whole-exome sequencing revealed mutations in 18 genes only in relapsed samples, although none of these was recurrent in T-ALL. These findings suggest that aUPD at 19p13.1 is partly associated with relapse in this patient. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 may be therapeutic in such cases.

  11. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  12. A placebo-controlled trial of oral cladribine for relapsing multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannoni, Gavin; Comi, Giancarlo; Cook, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Cladribine provides immunomodulation through selective targeting of lymphocyte subtypes. We report the results of a 96-week phase 3 trial of a short-course oral tablet therapy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis....

  13. Chimerism Analysis of Cell-Free DNA in Patients Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation May Predict Early Relapse in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Aljurf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We studied DNA chimerism in cell-free DNA (cfDNA in patients treated with HSCT. Methods. Chimerism analysis was performed on CD3+ cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN cells, and cfDNA using 16 small tandem repeat loci. The resulting labeled PCR-products were size-fractionated and quantified. Results. Analyzing samples from 191 patients treated with HSCT for nonneoplastic hematologic disorders demonstrated that the cfDNA chimerism is comparable to that seen in PMN cells. Analyzing leukemia patients (N = 126 showed that, of 84 patients with 100% donor DNA in PMN, 16 (19% had evidence of clinical relapse and >10% recipient DNA in the plasma. Additional 16 patients of the 84 (19% showed >10% recipient DNA in plasma, but without evidence of relapse. Eight patients had mixed chimerism in granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma, but three of these patients had >10% recipient DNA in plasma compared to PMN cells and these three patients had clinical evidence of relapse. The remaining 34 patients showed 100% donor DNA in both PMN and lymphocytes, but cfDNA showed various levels of chimerism. Of these patients 14 (41% showed laboratory or clinical evidence of relapse and all had >10% recipient DNA in cfDNA. Conclusion. Monitoring patients after HSCT using cfDNA might be more reliable than cellular DNA in predicting early relapse.

  14. Long-Term Outcomes and Patterns of Relapse of Early-Stage Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy With Curative Intent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teckie, Sewit; Qi, Shunan; Lovie, Shona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Navarrett, Scott [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Hsu, Meier [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Noy, Ariela; Portlock, Carol [Lymphoma Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome and patterns of relapse of a large cohort of marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) patients treated with curative-intent radiation therapy (RT) alone. Patients and Methods: We reviewed the charts of 490 consecutive patients with stage IE or IIE MZL referred between 1992 and 2012 to our institution. Of those, 244 patients (50%) were treated with RT alone. Pathology was confirmed by hematopathologists at our institution. Patient and disease factors were analyzed for association with relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Median age of the cohort was 59 years, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. Ann Arbor stage was IE in 92%. Most common disease sites were stomach (50%), orbit (18%), non-thyroid head-and-neck (8%), skin (8%), and breast (5%). Median RT dose was 30 Gy. Five-year OS and RFS were 92% and 74%, respectively. Cumulative incidence of disease-specific death was just 1.1% by 5 years. Sixty patients (24%) developed relapse of disease; 10 were in the RT field. Crude rate of transformation to pathologically confirmed large-cell lymphoma was 1.6%. On multivariable analysis, primary disease site (P=.007) was independently associated with RFS, along with age (P=.04), presence of B-symptoms (P=.02), and International Prognostic Index risk group (P=.03). All disease sites except for head-and-neck had worse RFS relative to stomach. Conclusion: Overall and cause-specific survival are high in early-stage extra-nodal MZL treated with curative RT alone. In this large cohort of 244 patients, most patients did not experience relapse of MZL after curative RT; when relapses did occur, the majority were in distant sites. Stomach cases were less likely to relapse than other anatomic sites. Transformation to large-cell lymphoma was rare.

  15. [CEA and early detection of relapse in breast cancer subtypes: Comparison with CA 15-3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Goussot, Vincent; Desmoulins, Isabelle; Lorgis, Véronique; Coutant, Charles; Beltjens, Françoise; Lizard, Sarab; Fumoleau, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    This retrospective study evaluates the interest of CEA measurement for early detection of breast cancer recurrences. Among 804 patients with invasive breast cancer, we selected 97 patients without recurrence (WR) for 5 years or more, 32 with a local recurrence (LR) and 131 with at least one distant metastasis (DM). Elevated CEA and CA 15-3 levels (>3.1 μg/L and >26 kU/L respectively) were found in 6 % and 22 % of patients with RL respectively and in 49 % and 69 % of patients with DM. Both CEA and CA 15-3 retained a significant value in predicting DM by univariate and multivariate analysis. Higher sensitivity of CEA and CA 15-3 were found in tumors with positive hormonal receptor status. CEA and CA 15-3 levels at DM were raised respectively in 23 and 65 % of the triple negative group, 58 and 75 % of the luminal, 56 and 78 % of the luminal-HER2 and 50 and 30 % of HER2-enriched group (P=0.0094 and 0.0252 respectively). The combination of CEA and CA 15-3 increased CA 15-3 sensitivity in especially luminal and HER2-enriched groups. In conclusion, elevated CA 15-3 and CEA levels at initial diagnosis of recurrence were found to be associated with hormonal receptor status and breast cancer subtypes. The combination of CEA and CA 15-3 appeared useful especially luminal and HER2-enriched groups.

  16. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting.......Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  17. Are cognitive deficits similar in remitted early bipolar I disorder patients treated with lithium or valproate? Data from the STOP-EM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Kesavan; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Bücker, Joana; Silveira, Leonardo E; Torres, Ivan J; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2015-02-01

    In bipolar disorder (BD), lithium and valproate are both reportedly associated with mild cognitive deficits with impaired psychomotor speed and verbal memory ascribed to both while impairments in learning and attention are mainly attributed to valproate. However, there are few direct comparisons of the impact of lithium and valproate on cognitive function in early BD. Using data from the STOP-EM study, we compared neurocognitive functioning in BD patients, who had recently recovered from a first episode of mania, and were on treatment with lithium (n = 34) or valproate (n = 38), to a comparable sample of healthy controls (HC; n = 40), on the domains of processing speed, attention, verbal memory, nonverbal memory, working memory and executive functions. The three groups were comparable on socio-demographic (all p > 0.12) and clinical variables (all p > 0.08). MANOVA revealed a significant difference between the three groups on overall cognitive functioning (Wilk's lambda = 0.644; F = 3.775; p lithium (p = 0.001) and HC groups (p lithium and valproate groups on other cognitive domains (all p > 0.13). Treatment with valproate and not lithium may be associated with working memory deficits early in the course of BD. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Alemtuzumab for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis after disease-modifying therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coles, Alasdair J; Twyman, Cary L; Arnold, Douglas L

    2012-01-01

    The anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab reduces disease activity in previously untreated patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of alemtuzumab compared with interferon beta 1a in patients who have relapsed despite first-line treatment....

  19. Early relapse after single auto-SCT for multiple myeloma is a major predictor of survival in the era of novel agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Zepeda, V H; Reece, D E; Trudel, S; Chen, C; Tiedemann, R; Kukreti, V

    2015-02-01

    The role of auto-SCT in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) in the era of novel agents continues to evolve. It is now clear that the depth of response and clinical outcomes have significantly improved as a result of the combination of these strategies. However, not all patients with MM who undergo auto-SCT are able to sustain a meaningful response and 20% of patients relapse shortly after auto-SCT. In this study, we aimed to assess the impact of early relapse (ER) after auto-SCT on OS for MM patients undergoing single auto-SCT who had received novel agent-based induction regimens. All consecutive patients with MM undergoing single auto-SCT from January 2002 to September 2012 who had novel induction therapy were evaluated. A total of 184 patients were identified. The median OS and PFS for the group of transplanted patients were 93 and 25.4 months, respectively. Median time to relapse was 17.2 months with 40% having relapsed at the time of analysis. ER (auto-SCT) was seen in 27 (36%) out of 75 patients who had relapsed, and median OS was significantly shorter than in those with non-ER. Multivariate analysis showed ER as the major independent prognostic factor for OS. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that not only attainment of a good response, but sustainability of it, appears to be a major prognostic variable in MM in the era of novel therapy. Patients with ER post auto-SCT should biologically be characterized in prospective studies to better understand the mechanisms of resistance associated with this particular entity.

  20. The Impact of Hypofractionated Whole Breast Radiotherapy on Local Relapse in Patients With Grade 3 Early Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Weir, Lorna [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Grade 3 early breast cancer have an inferior rate of local disease control at 10 years with hypofractionated radiotherapy compared with more conventionally fractionated schedules. Methods and Materials: Local relapse rates were compared between patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy or conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast in a population-based cohort of women with early-stage (T1-T2, N0, M0) Grade 3 breast cancers diagnosed between 1990 and 2000 and referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Cumulative rates of local relapse were estimated using a competing risk method, and factors significant on univariate analysis were included with fractionation group in a multivariate model. The primary end point was local control at 10 years. Results: A total of 1,335 patients with Grade 3 tumors were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, 252 with conventional fractionation, and 1,083 with a hypofractionated schedule. The 10-year cumulative incidence of local relapse was 6.9% in the hypofractionated group and 6.2% in the conventionally fractionated group (p = 0.99). Conclusions: There is no evidence that hypofractionation is inferior to conventional fractionation for breast conserving therapy in patients with Grade 3 breast cancer in this large population-based series after 10 years of follow-up.

  1. 甲泼尼龙冲击治疗对缓解复发型多发性硬化早期血清中IL-23和IL-17A水平的影响%Effect of methylprednisolone on the serum leves of IL-23 and IL-17A among patients with relapsing remitting multi-ple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁军利; 赵丽君; 钱琪; 吕海东; 袁利; 马晓丽

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the serum levels of IL‐23 and IL‐17A in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients after methylprednisolone pulse therapy .Methods ELISA method was used to detect the levels of IL‐23 and IL‐17A and the positive rate (450 nm D value 2.1 times more than the negative control D value both before and after treatment was defined as positive ,the positive rate= positive cases/total number of cases multiplied by 100% ) in 24 cases of RRMS patients before and after corticosteroid therapy (1.0 g ,intravenous drip per day for three days and 0.5 g intravenous drip per day in the next 4 days) and 20 cases with non‐inflammatory diseases of nervous system (NIDNS) patients .Results The detection rate of IL‐23 and IL‐17A in the RRMS group was significantly higher than the NIDNS group (IL‐23 :79.17% vs .35.00% ,χ2 =7.071 ,P=0.008 ;IL‐17A :83.33% vs .30.00% ,χ2 =10.725 ,P=0.001);The levels of IL‐23 and IL‐17A descended in serum of RRMS patients after methylprednisolone pulse therapy [IL‐23:(382.4 ± 124.7) pg/mL vs .(610.6 ± 102.5) pg/mL ,t=14.672 ,P=0.000 ;IL‐17A :(32.8 ± 20.2) pg/mL vs .(74.6 ± 21.7) pg/mL , t=11.108 ,P=0.000] , but were still much higher than those in the NIDNS group [IL‐23 :(88.7 ± 8.4) pg/mL ,t=10.344 ,P=0.000 ;IL‐17A :(18.1 ± 0.9) pg/mL ,t=9.205 ,P=0.000] .Conclusions IL‐23 and IL‐17A are associated with the pathogenesis of MS .Methylprednisolone pulse therapy can reduce the levels of IL‐23 and IL‐17A in sera of RRMS patients .%目的:探讨甲泼尼龙(MP)冲击治疗对复发缓解型多发性硬化(RRMS)患者血清中IL‐23和IL‐17A水平的影响。方法选择24例 RRMS患者(RRMS组)及20例神经系统非炎性疾病患者(NIDNS 组),采用ELISA方法检测MP冲击治疗(1.0 g 静脉滴注1次/d ×3,之后0.5 g 静脉滴注1次/d ×4)前后血清中IL‐23、IL‐17A的水平并计算阳性检出率〔以治疗前后450 nm处 D(λ)值

  2. 应用体素的形态学研究复发缓解型多发性硬化患者的全脑灰质萎缩特点%Feature of grey matter atrophy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis:a voxel-based morphometry Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段云云; 李坤成; 刘亚欧; 梁佩鹏; 贾秀琴; 于春水; 秦文; 叶静; 孙慧

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feature of regional grey matter volume changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients by voxel-based morphometry ( VBM) and presume the possible pathophysiological basis.Methods Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T1-weighted three-dimensional MRI were obtained from 32 RRMS and 32 sex- and age-matched normal controls.The comparison of grey matter volume between the two groups was analyzed by statistical analysis software SPM5 and VBM.A Pearson correlational analysis was used to assess correlation between gre matter loss and disease duration,expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and visible brain lesion volume.Results Compared with normal controls,RRMS patients had extensive bilateral grey matter atrophy in thalami (left 2031 and right 1711),caudate (left 815 and right 1031) and parahippocampal gyrus (left 313 and right 467),as well as several cortical regions in frontal,temporal,parietal,and occipital lobes (t value were between 8.853 and 11.163,all P < 0.01).Regional grey matter loss in bilateral thalami ( r value were - 0.596 on left and were - 0.694 on right) and right caudate ( r = - 0.409 ) were strongly negatively correlated with visible brain lesion volume in RRMS (all P < 0.05 ).Conclusions By means of VBM,extensive grey matter atrophy are found in RRMS patients,especially in deep grey matter.Axonal degeneration secondary to visible brain lesions may be a key pathogenesis of grey matter atrophy in RRMS.%目的 利用基于体素的形态学研究方法比较复发缓解型多发性硬化(relapsingremitting multiple selerosis,RRMS)患者和健康志愿者局部脑灰质的体积差异,推断灰质体积变化可能的病理生理机制.方法 对32例RRMS患者和32名性别、年龄匹配的健康志愿者进行常规MRI和三维T1WI扫描,采用参数统计软件包SPM5进行图像后处理,对RRMS组及对照组数据进行基于体素的统计学比较.利用相

  3. Chemotherapy versus radiotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin's disease: evidence of a more difficult rescue for patients relapsed after chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimino, G.; Cartoni, C. (Univ. ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy). Dept. of Human Biopathology); Biti, G.P.; Magrini, S.M. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1992-08-01

    Six cycles of mechloretamine, vincristine, procarbazine and prednisone (MOPP) chemotherapy were randomly compared with extended field radiotherapy (RT) in 89 adult patients with pathological stage I-II A Hodgkin's disease (HD). 45 patients received RT and 44 were treated with MOPP. Complete remission (CR) was obtained in all patients in the RT group and in 40 of 44 in the MOPP group. 12 patients relapsed in both groups. 10 out of 44 patients treated with MOPP died of HD, compared with only 2 in the RT group. 3 more patients died in the MOPP group following the occurrence of second cancers. 11 out of the 12 (96%) patients relapsing after RT achieved a second CR, compared with 6 out of the 12 (50%) patients relapsing after MOPP. With a median follow-up of more than 8 years, overall survival of patients was significantly better for RT compared with MOPP; 93 and 56% respectively (P < 0.001). The authors conclude RT alone remains the treatment of choice for adult patients with early-stage HD with favourable prognosis. (Author).

  4. Trends and tenets in relapsing and progressive opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D

    2016-05-01

    Despite advances in inducing remission in pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS), relapse remains a challenge. By definition, relapse is not a characteristic of monophasic OMS, but occurs at any time in the course of multiphasic OMS. Due to variability and heterogeneity, patients are best approached and treated on a case-by-case basis, using precepts derived from clinical and scientific studies. Treatment of provocations, such as infection or immunotherapy tapering, is the short-term goal, but discovering unresolved neuroinflammation and re-configuring disease-modifying agents is crucial in the long-term. The working hypothesis is that much of the injury in OMS results from neuroinflammation involving dysregulated B cells, which may cause loss of tolerance and autoantibody production. Biomarkers of disease activity include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cell frequency, oligoclonal bands (OCB), B cell attractants (CXCL13) and activating factors (BAFF). Measuring these markers comprises modern detection and characterization of neuroinflammation or verifies 'no evidence of disease activity'. The decision making process is three-tiered: deciding if the relapse is bone fide, identifying its etiology, and formulating a therapeutic plan. Relapsing-remitting OMS is treatable, and combination multimodal/multi-mechanistic immunotherapy is improving the outcome. However, some patients progress to a refractory state with cognitive impairment and disability from failure to go into remission, multiple relapses, or more aggressive disease. This report provides new insights on underappreciated risks and pitfalls inherent in relapse, pro-active efforts to avoid progression, the need for early and sufficient treatment beyond corticosteroids and immunoglobulins, and utilization of disease activity biomarkers to identify high-risk patients and safely withdraw immunotherapy.

  5. Disease-modifying therapies in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio González-Andrade

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabricio González-Andrade1, José Luis Alcaraz-Alvarez21Department of Medicine, Metropolitan Hospital, Quito, Ecuador; 2School of Medicine, University of Mayab, Merida, MexicoClinical question: What is the best current disease-modifying therapy for relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis?Results: The evidence shows that the most effective disease-modifying therapy for delaying short- to medium-term disability progression, prevention of relapses, reducing the area and activity of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging, with the least side effects, is high-dose, high-frequency subcutaneous interferon-β1a 44 μg three times per week.Implementation: The pitfalls in treatment of MS can be avoided by remembering the following points: • The most effective therapy to prevent or delay the appearance of permanent neurological disability with the fewest side effects should be chosen, and treatment should not be delayed.• Adherence to treatment should be monitored closely, and needs comprehensive patient information and education to establish long-term adherence, which is a critical determinant of long-term outcome.• The correct approach to the disease includes disease management, symptom management, and patient management. A combination of tools is necessary to ease the various symptoms, which fall into three broad categories, i.e. rehabilitation, pharmacological, and procedural.• It is important to understand that no treatment modality should be used alone, unless it is in itself sufficient to remedy the particular symptom/problem.Keywords: relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, interferon, disease-modifying therapy, relapse prevention

  6. Trichurs suis ova theraphy in relapsing multiple sclerosis is safe but without signals of beneficial effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldsgaard, A.; Bager, P.; Garde, E.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An observational study has suggested that relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients with helminth infections have lower disease activity and progression than uninfected multiple sclerosis patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy on MRI activity of treatment with ...... not change. CONCLUSIONS: In a small group of relapsing multiple sclerosis patients, Trichuris suis oral therapy was well tolerated but without beneficial effect.......BACKGROUND: An observational study has suggested that relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients with helminth infections have lower disease activity and progression than uninfected multiple sclerosis patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy on MRI activity of treatment...... with TSO in relapsing MS. METHODS: The study was an open-label, magnetic resonance imaging assessor-blinded, baseline-to-treatment study including ten patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Median (range) age was 41 (24-55) years, disease duration 9 (4-34) years, Expanded Disability Status...

  7. BG-12 and its potential for the prevention of relapse in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannetti P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Giannetti,1 Flavia Niccolini,2 Richard Nicholas11Centre for Neurosciences, Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK; 2University of Rome “Sapienza”, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS arises from an immune attack on the central nervous system producing demyelination and axonal loss. Clinically the relapsing–remitting course is characterized by subacute onset of neurological symptoms usually with partial or complete recovery, while the progressive course, predominant in the later stages, is characterized by progressive disability in the absence of relapses. A number of disease-modifying treatments have been developed and are increasingly effective at targeting relapses. Early injectable therapies such as interferon and glatiramer acetate are only partially effective, but have a good safety record. Recently, natalizumab, an intravenous therapy, demonstrated increased effectiveness, but side effects complicate its use. The first oral therapy offering good efficacy and convenience, fingolimod, was approved in USA in 2010 and Europe in 2011. BG-12 is a potential novel oral therapy for MS, which has previously been used as a different formulation for psoriasis. It has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions in vitro, which makes it a promising candidate for future therapies. Phase II studies showed that BG-12 reduced MRI inflammatory activity over placebo, which was confirmed in two Phase III studies indicating immune modulation may be its principal action rather than neuroprotection. In these studies, BG-12 reduced relapse rates consistently with variable effects on progression and few serious adverse events. With its favorable efficacy–tolerability profile, BG-12 could offer a substantial step forward for the care for subjects affected by relapsing MS.Keywords: BG-12, multiple sclerosis, relapses, oral treatments

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas: an unusual site of relapse from early-stage lung cancer: 12-month postsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Polychronis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and backache, weight loss of 10 kg and irregular bowel movements. He was previously diagnosed with Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of lung and had undergone lobectomy 12 months previously. Investigations including imaging revealed a cystic mass in the body and tail of the pancreas which was biopsied and it was confirmed to be a recurrence of the squamous lung cancer involving the pancreas. He was treated with systemic chemotherapy and has shown a partial response on repeat imaging. This case illustrates a rare and unusual site of relapse in lung cancer after adjuvant therapy and a key message for follow-up surveillance for these patients. PMID:23608858

  9. Early Relapse of Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer after Discontinuation of Gemcitabine Monotherapy Administered for 5 Years in a Patient Who Had Complete Response to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Suyama

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor shrinkage effect of gemcitabine is considered to be limited in cases of advanced gallbladder cancer, and there are few reports of complete response to gemcitabine therapy in patients with this cancer. Therefore, the treatment continuation strategy in these patients, after a complete response has been achieved, still remains to be established. Here, we present the case of a 77-year-old patient with unresectable gallbladder cancer, who after showing complete response to gemcitabine monotherapy administered for 5 years, showed early relapse within only 11 months of discontinuation of the drug. Thus, it is necessary to establish a suitable treatment continuation strategy for patients who show complete response to gemcitabine treatment.

  10. A re-emerging marker for prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma: the add-value of fishing c-myc gene for early relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedica, Federica; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Bagante, Fabio; Capelli, Paola; Cataldo, Ivana; Pedron, Serena; Iacono, Calogero; Chilosi, Marco; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Tomezzoli, Anna; Martignoni, Guido; Guglielmi, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one leading cause of cancer-related death and surgical resection is still one of the major curative therapies. Recently, there has been a major effort to find mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis and early relapse. c-myc gene abnormality is found in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our aim was to analyze the role of c-myc as prognostic factor in terms of overall survival and disease-free survival and to investigate if c-myc may be an important target for therapy. We studied sixty-five hepatocellular carcinomas submitted to surgical resection with curative intent. Size, macro-microvascular invasion, necrosis, number of nodules, grading and serum alfa-fetoprotein level were registered for all cases. We evaluated the c-myc aberrations by using break-apart FISH probes. Probes specific for the centromeric part of chromosome 8 and for the locus specific c-myc gene (8q24) were used to assess disomy, gains of chromosomes (polysomy due to polyploidy) and amplification. c-myc gene amplification was scored as 8q24/CEP8 > 2. Statistical analysis for disease-free survival and overall survival were performed. At molecular level, c-myc was amplified in 19% of hepatocellular carcinoma, whereas showed gains in 55% and set wild in 26% of cases. The 1- and 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival for disomic, polysomic and amplified groups were significantly different (p=0.020 and p=.018 respectively). Multivariate analysis verified that the AFP and c-myc status (amplified vs. not amplified) were significant prognostic factors for overall patients survival. c-myc gene amplification is significantly correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after surgical resection and this model identifies patients with risk of early relapse (≤12 months). We suggest that c-myc assessment may be introduced in the clinical practice for improving prognostication (high and low risk of relapse) routinely and may have

  11. Primary refractory and early-relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma: strategies for therapeutic targeting based on the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Castagna, Luca; Santoro, Armando; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo

    2015-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL), a distinct disease entity with characteristic clinical and pathological features, accounts for approximately 10% of all malignant lymphomas. cHL can be considered a prototype model for how the tumour microenvironment influences cancer pathogenesis. Cellular components of the cHL microenvironment express molecules involved in cancer cell growth and survival, such as CD30L or CD40L. Moreover, several signal transduction pathways that are critical for the proliferation and survival of neoplastic Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, including NF-κB, JAK-STAT, PI3K-AkT and ERK, are deregulated in cHL. Although most patients can be cured with modern treatment strategies, approximately a quarter experience either primary or secondary chemorefractoriness or disease relapse, thus requiring novel treatments. Preclinical and clinical evidence has elucidated a complex crosstalk between malignant HRS cells and the reactive cells of the microenvironment, which suggests that novel therapeutic approaches capable of targeting HRS cells along with reactive cells might overcome chemorefractoriness. In the near future, these novel therapies will also be tested in chemosensitive patients, to reduce the long-term toxicity of chemo-radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Amygdala activity during autobiographical memory recall as a biomarker for residual symptoms in patients remitted from depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kymberly D; Drevets, Wayne C; Bodurka, Jerzy; Preskorn, Sheldon S

    2016-02-28

    We performed a linear regression analysis on demographic, memory performance, and amygdala activity during memory recall on 23 unmedicated participants remitted from major depressive disorder. Amygdala activity during positive memory recall, and the percent of specific positive memories recalled were the variables that explained the most variance in residual depressive symptoms. This model was not significant in control or currently depressed participants. Longitudinal follow up is necessary to assess whether these variables predict relapse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Post-treatment plasma EBV-DNA positivity predicts early relapse and poor prognosis for patients with extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma in the era of asparaginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hua; Wang, Jing-hua; Xia, Zhong-jun; Lu, Yue; Huang, Hui-qiang; Jiang, Wen-qi; Zhang, Yu-jing

    2015-10-06

    Circulating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is a biomarker of EBV-associated malignancies. Its prognostic value in early stage NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) in the era of asparaginase was investigated. 68 patients were treated with a median of 4 cycles of asparaginase-based chemotherapy followed by a median of 54.6 Gy (range 50-60 Gy) radiation. The amount of EBV-DNA was prospectively measured in both pretreatment and post-treatment plasma samples by real-time quantitative PCR. At the end of treatment, complete response (CR) rate was 79.4%, and overall response rate (ORR) was 88.2%. Patients with negative pretreatment EBV-DNA had a higher CR rate (96.0% vs. 69.8%, p = 0.023). The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate and overall survival (OS) rate was 71% and 83%, respectively. In multivariate survival analysis, post-treatment EBV-DNA positivity and treatment response (non-CR) were prognostic factors for both worse PFS and OS (p EBV-DNA positivity correlated with inferior PFS and OS (both p EBV-DNA, negative post-treatment EBV-DNA correlated with better PFS and OS (both p EBV-DNA positivity can predict early relapse and poor prognosis for patients with early stage NKTCL in the era of asparaginase, and may be used as an indicator of minimal residual disease.

  14. Early Phase in the Development of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Addiction: Opioid Relapse Takes Initial Center Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Yasmin L; Yoon, Michelle; Manini, Alex F; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Ostman, Maria; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Multiple cannabinoids derived from the marijuana plant have potential therapeutic benefits but most have not been well investigated, despite the widespread legalization of medical marijuana in the USA and other countries. Therapeutic indications will depend on determinations as to which of the multiple cannabinoids, and other biologically active chemicals that are present in the marijuana plant, can be developed to treat specific symptoms and/or diseases. Such insights are particularly critical for addiction disorders, where different phytocannabinoids appear to induce opposing actions that can confound the development of treatment interventions. Whereas Δ(9)-tetracannabinol has been well documented to be rewarding and to enhance sensitivity to other drugs, cannabidiol (CBD), in contrast, appears to have low reinforcing properties with limited abuse potential and to inhibit drug-seeking behavior. Other considerations such as CBD's anxiolytic properties and minimal adverse side effects also support its potential viability as a treatment option for a variety of symptoms associated with drug addiction. However, significant research is still needed as CBD investigations published to date primarily relate to its effects on opioid drugs, and CBD's efficacy at different phases of the abuse cycle for different classes of addictive substances remain largely understudied. Our paper provides an overview of preclinical animal and human clinical investigations, and presents preliminary clinical data that collectively sets a strong foundation in support of the further exploration of CBD as a therapeutic intervention against opioid relapse. As the legal landscape for medical marijuana unfolds, it is important to distinguish it from "medical CBD" and other specific cannabinoids, that can more appropriately be used to maximize the medicinal potential of the marijuana plant.

  15. Effective Radiotherapy Cured Cauda Equina Syndrome Caused by Remitted Intracranial Germinoma Depositing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Lu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cauda equina syndrome (CES in children is very rare and can permanently disable. A remitted intracranial germinoma depositing on the spinal cord, leading to CES, has never been reported. We discuss the case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with sudden ataxia, low back pain, sensory deficits of the left lower extremity, and difficulty urinating and defecating 7 months after totally remitted intracranial germinoma postintracranial surgery and cranial irradiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain and spine showed multiple intradural extramedullary homogeneous masses from the cervical to lumbar levels, compressing the conus medullaris and cauda equina. After emergent craniospinal irradiation, the patient's neurologic symptoms dramatically subsided. A remitted intracranial germinoma depositing on her spinal cord could be the cause of CES. Early identification and a proper craniospinal irradiation may halt the progression of symptoms.

  16. Assessing changes in relapse rates in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inusah, Seidu; Sormani, Maria P; Cofield, Stacey S; Aban, Inmaculada B; Musani, Solomon K; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Cutter, Gary R

    2010-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) annualized relapse rates (ARRs) in trials may be declining due to changes in diagnostic criteria, MS etiology, study criteria, and selection biases. This review examines if there is a trend in the ARR for relapsing-remitting MS patients (RRMS) over time and if so, why. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Web of Science(®), and the Cochrane Library using electronic searches, screen scraping for abstracts, and hand searching of references for randomized trials conducted between 1960 and 2008. Out of 72 randomized trials, 56 (77.8%) defined relapse. This study uses 32 placebo relapsing-remitting studies out of the 37 (66.1%) with RRMS. The mean ARR for the treatment arms was 0.68 and the one for the placebo groups was 1.002. The year of publication was negatively associated with the ARR (p = 0.0001). The annual reduction amounts to 0.36 relapses over a 10-year period. Age and duration of symptoms were negatively associated with the ARR. Year of publication was significantly negatively associated with ARR after controlling for covariates. ARRs have fallen with relapse definition, entrance criteria remain important, but time exceeds all these variables and reflects two likely sources, selection of patients for trials by clinicians and rescue of patients truncating the number of multiple relapses. The impact of truncating the number of relapses on the falling rates is important, not only on the ARRs, but also on the impact of informative censoring in drop-outs.

  17. Relapsing polychondritis with meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Monica; Hu, Mengjun; Zussman, Jamie; Worswick, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of the cartilaginous structures of the body with many systemic manifestations including meningoencephalitis (ME). We present a case of a man with RP-associated ME that was responsive to steroid treatment. An updated literature review of 7 cases of RP-associated ME also is provided. Early diagnosis of this condition may be of benefit to this select population of patients, and further research regarding the prognosis, mechanisms, and treatment of RP may be necessary in the future.

  18. Relapsing polychondritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln Sakiara Miyasaka

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This article describes a clinically-diagnosed case of relapsing polychondritis (RP, attended at the Hospital São Paulo, and presents a literature review of the subject. SOURCE OF RESEARCH: The literature review was made via Medline (1990-96, Lilacs (1980-96, textbooks of rheumatology, and some articles about the history of the disease. In Medline, 113 articles from 1990 to 1996 were found, and there were 23 articles from 1980 to 1996 in Lilacs. RESEARCH PROCEDURE: We reviewed the articles available at BIREME (Biblioteca Regional de Medicina with the primary focus being on the disease in question. SUMMARY: RP is a rare disease of unknown etiology described initially by Jackson-Wartenhorst in 1923 and characterized by a recurrent and acute inflammatory process that causes the collapse of the cartilaginous structures and their subsequent replacement by fibrous connective tissue. The cartilage most commonly attacked is that of the auricle of the ear and nasal septum, while the cartilage of the trachea, larynx, epiglottis, ribs, and articulations may also be involved. Ocular inflammations and systemic reactions with fever are also described. In 1976, McAdam presented a complete prospective study of 23 patients, reviewed the 136 cases described up until that time, and then proposed diagnostic criteria which were later expanded by Damiani and Levine. Currently, more than 500 cases have been described. CONCLUSION: Although a rare disease, better knowledge of it is needed, as RP may be lethal with tracheal collapse and obstruction of respiratory pathways, making precise diagnosis and adequate therapeutic intervention necessary.

  19. Cortical shape and curvedness analysis of structural deficits in remitting and non-remitting depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Lin Liao

    Full Text Available In morphometric neuroimaging studies, the relationship between brain structural changes and the antidepressant treatment response in patients with major depressive disorder has been explored to search depression-trait biomarkers. Although patients were treated with serotonin-related drugs, whether the same treatment resulted in remission and non-remission in depressed patients is currently under investigation. We recruited 25 depressed patients and 25 healthy controls and acquired volumetric magnetic resonance imaging of each participant. We used the shape index and curvedness to classify cortical shapes and quantify shape complexities, respectively, in studying the pharmacological effect on brain morphology. The results showed that different regions of structural abnormalities emerged between remitting and non-remitting patients when contrasted with healthy controls. In addition to comparing structural metrics in each cortical parcellation, similar to the traditional voxel-based morphometric method, we highlighted the importance of structural integrity along the serotonin pathway in response to medication treatment. We discovered that disrupted serotonin-related cortical regions might cause non-remission to antidepressant treatment from a pharmacological perspective. The anomalous areas manifested in non-remitting patients were mainly in the frontolimbic areas, which can be used to differentiate remitting from non-remitting participants before medication treatment. Because non-remission is the failure to respond to treatment with serotonin-related drugs, our method may help clinicians choose appropriate medications for non-remitting patients.

  20. Patient-reported adverse effects of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone treatment : a prospective web-based multi-center study in multiple sclerosis patients with a relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Stavrakaki, Ioanna; Voet, Bernard; Hoogervorst, Erwin; van Munster, Erik; Linssen, Wim H.; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; Verhagen, Wim I.; Visser, Leo H.; van der Kruijk, Ruud; Verheul, Freek; Boringa, Jan; Heerings, Marco; Gladdines, Werner; Lonnqvist, Fredrik; Gaillard, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    In a prospective multi-center observational study, we evaluated the frequency, severity, and impact on activities of daily living (ADL) of adverse effects (AEs) of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with a relapse. Online self-repo

  1. Time dependence of biomarkers: Non-proportional effects of immunohistochemical panels predicting relapse risk in early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Stephen; G. Murray; D.A. Cameron (David); J. Thomas; I. Kunkler (Ian); W. Jack (W.); G.R. Kerr; M.D. Piper; C.L. Brookes (Cassandra); D.W. Rea; C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); A. Hasenburg (Annette); C. Markopoulos; L.Y. Dirix (Luc); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.M.S. Bartlett (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground:We investigated the impact of follow-up duration to determine whether two immunohistochemical prognostic panels, IHC4 and Mammostrat, provide information on the risk of early or late distant recurrence using the Edinburgh Breast Conservation Series and the Tamoxifen vs Exemest

  2. Cyclin D-1, interleukin-6, HER-2/neu, transforming growth factor receptor-II and prediction of relapse in women with early stage, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muss, Hyman B; Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Crocker, Abigail; Plaut, Karen; Koh, James; Heintz, Nick; Rincon, Mercedes; Weaver, Donald L; Tam, Diane; Beatty, Barbara; Kaufman, Peter; Donovan, Michael; Verbel, David; Weiss, Linda

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that amplification or overexpression of HER-2 (c-erbB-2), the Ki-67 antigen (Mib1), cyclin D-1 (CD1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the transforming growth factor beta II receptor, (TGFbetaRII), would predict relapse in women with early stage, estrogen (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen. Conditional logistic regression models and a new novel analytic method - support vector machines (SVM) were used to assess the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcome. All patients had stage I-IIIa breast cancer (AJCC version 5). We paired 63 patients who were disease-free on or after tamoxifen with 63 patients who had relapsed (total 126); both disease-free and relapsed patients were matched by duration of tamoxifen therapy and time to recurrence. These 126 patients also served as the training set for SVM analysis and 18 other patients used as a validation set for SVM. In a multivariate analysis, larger tumor size, increasing extent of lymph node involvement, and poorer tumor grade were significant predictors of relapse. When HER-2 or CD1 were added to the model both were borderline significant predictors of relapse. The SVM model, after including all of the clinical and marker variables in the 126 patients as a training set, correctly predicted relapse in 78% of the 18 patient validation samples. In this trial, HER-2 and CD1 proved of borderline significance as predictive factors for recurrence on tamoxifen. An SVM model that included all clinical and biologic variables correctly predicted relapse in >75% of patients.

  3. Neuroticism in remitted major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders; Kristoffersen, Marius; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The personality trait of neuroticism is strongly related to depression, but depression is etiologically heterogeneous. Late-onset depression (LOD) may be more closely related to vascular factors, and previous studies of neuroticism in LOD versus early-onset depression (EOD) have not b...

  4. High WT1 expression is an early predictor for relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in first remission with negative PML-RARa after anthracycline-based chemotherapy: a single-center cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1 expression is a well-known predictor for relapse in acute myeloid leukemia. We monitored WT1 decrement along the treatment course to identify its significant role as a marker for residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and tried to suggest its significance for relapse prediction. In this single center retrospective study, we serially measured PML-RARa and WT1 expression from 117 APL patients at diagnosis, at post-induction and post-consolidation chemotherapies, and at every 3 months after starting maintenance therapy. All 117 patients were in molecular remission after treatment of at least 2 consolidation chemotherapies. We used WT1 ProfileQuant™ kit (Ipsogen for WT1 monitoring. High WT1 expression (>120 copies/104 ABL1 after consolidation and at early period (3 months after maintenance therapy significantly predicted subsequent relapse. All paired PML-RARa RQ-PCR were not detected except for one sample with early relapse. Patients with high WT1 expression at 3 months after maintenance therapy (n = 40 showed a significantly higher relapse rate (30.5 vs. 6.9%, P < 0.001 and inferior disease free survival (62.8 vs. 91.4%, P < 0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that high peak leukocyte counts at diagnosis (HR = 6.4, P < 0.001 and high WT1 expression at 3 months after maintenance therapy (HR = 7.1, P < 0.001 were significant factors for prediction of relapse. Our data showed high post-remission WT1 expression was a reliable marker for prediction of subsequent molecular relapse in APL. In this high-risk group, early intervention with ATRA ± ATO, anti-CD33 antibody therapy, and WT1-specific therapy may be used for relapse prevention. Trial registration Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, KCT0002079

  5. Facial emotion recognition in remitted depressed women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyik, Utku; Keskin, Duygu; Oguz, Kaya; Akdeniz, Fisun; Gonul, Ali Saffet

    2015-10-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) is primarily characterized by mood symptoms, depressed patients have impairments in facial emotion recognition in many of the basic emotions (anger, fear, happiness, surprise, disgust and sadness). On the other hand, the data in remitted MDD (rMDD) patients is inconsistent and it is not clear that if those impairments persist in remission. To extend the current findings, we applied facial emotion recognition test to a group of remitted depressed women and compared to those of controls. Analyses of variance results showed a significant emotion and group interaction, and in the post hoc analyses, rMDD patients had higher accuracy rate for recognition of sadness compared to those of controls. There were no differences in the reaction time among the patients and controls across the all the basic emotions. The higher recognition rates for sad faces in rMDD patients might contribute to the impairments in social communication and the prognosis of the disease.

  6. Enhanced Negative Feedback Responses in Remitted Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzagalli, Diego; Meites, Tiffany M.; Deveney, Christen M; Holmes, Avram J.; Bogdan, Ryan; Steele, Katherine T.; Santesso, Diane L.

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD)is characterized by hypersensitivity to negative feedback that might involve frontocingulate dysfunction. MDD patients exhibit enhanced electrophysiological responses to negative internal (errors) and external (feedback) cues. Whether this dysfunction extends to remitted depressed (RD) individuals with a history of MDD is currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the feedback-related negativity in RD and control participants using a probabilistic pun...

  7. Is Ki-67 Expression Prognostic for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy (BCT)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Farhaan [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Neboori, Hanmanth J. [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Harigopal, Malini [Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yang, Qifeng [Department of Breast Surgery, Shandong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Schiff, Devora [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein whose expression is strongly up-regulated in proliferating cells and can be used to determine the growth fraction in clonal cell populations. Although there are some data to suggest that Ki-67 overexpression may be prognostic for endpoints such as survival or postmastectomy recurrence, further elucidation of its prognostic significance is warranted. Specifically after breast conservation therapy (BCT) (defined in this setting as breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy), whether Ki-67 predicts for locoregional recurrence has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess Ki-67 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients to determine whether a significant independent association between Ki-67 and locoregional relapse exists. Methods and Materials: Ki-67 staining was conducted on a tissue microarray of 438 patients previously treated with BCT, and expression was analyzed with clinicopathologic features and outcomes from our database. Results: Ki-67 expression was more prevalent in black patients (37% of black patients vs 17% of white patients, P<.01), younger patients (27% of patients aged ≤50 years vs 15% of patients aged >50 years, P<.01), estrogen receptor (ER)–negative tumors (25% of ER-negative tumors vs 17% of ER-positive tumors, P=.04), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu–positive tumors (35% of HER2-positive tumors vs 18% of HER2-negative tumors, P=.01), and larger tumors (26% of T2 tumors vs 16% of T1 tumors, P=.03). On univariate/multivariate analysis, Ki-67 did not predict for overall survival (74.4% vs 72.6%), cause-specific survival (82.9% vs 82.1%), local relapse-free survival (83.6% vs 88.5%), distant metastasis-free survival (76.1% vs 81.4%), recurrence-free survival (65.5% vs 74.6%), and locoregional recurrence-free survival (81.6% vs 84.7%): P>.05 for all. Conclusions: Ki-67 appears to be a surrogate marker for aggressive disease and

  8. Positive versus negative sentinel nodes in early breast cancer patients: axillary or loco-regional relapse and survival. A study spanning 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Fernández, A; Chabrera, C; García Font, M; Fraile, M; Lain, J M; Barco, I; González, C; Gónzalez, S; Reñe, A; Veloso, E; Cassadó, J; Pessarrodona, A; Giménez, N

    2013-10-01

    Sentinel Node Biopsy (SNB) is a minimally invasive alternative to elective axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for nodal staging in early breast cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate prognostic implications of a negative sentinel node (SN) versus a positive SN (followed by completion ALND) in a closely followed-up sample of early breast cancer patients. We studied 889 consecutive breast cancer patients operated for 908 primaries. Patients received adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy, hormone therapy and eventually trastuzumab. Radiation therapy was based on tangential radiation fields that usually included axillary level I. Median follow-up was 47 months. Axillary recurrence was seen in 1.2% (2/162) of positive SN patients, and 0.8% (5/625) of negative SN patients (p = n.s.). There was an overall 3.2% loco-regional failure rate (29/908). Incidence of distant recurrence was 3.3% (23/693) for negative SN patients, and 4.6% (9/196) for positive SN patients (p = n.s.). Overall mortality rate was 4% (8/198) for positive SN patients, while the corresponding specific mortality rate was 2.5% (5/198). For patients with negative SNs, overall mortality was 4.9% (34/693), and the specific mortality was 1.4% (19/693) (p = n.s.). We did not find significant differences in axillary/loco-regional relapse, distant metastases, disease-free interval or mortality between SN negative and SN positive patients, with a follow-up over 4 years. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ERCC2 2251A>C genetic polymorphism was highly correlated with early relapse in high-risk stage II and stage III colorectal cancer patients: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Chen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early relapse in colorectal cancer (CRC patients is attributed mainly to the higher malignant entity (such as an unfavorable genotype, deeper tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis and advance cancer stage and poor response to chemotherapy. Several investigations have demonstrated that genetic polymorphisms in drug-targeted genes, metabolizing enzymes, and DNA-repairing enzymes are all strongly correlated with inter-individual differences in the efficacy and toxicity of many treatment regimens. This preliminary study attempts to identify the correlation between genetic polymorphisms and clinicopathological features of CRC, and evaluates the relationship between genetic polymorphisms and chemotherapeutic susceptibility of Taiwanese CRC patients. To our knowledge, this study discusses, for the first time, early cancer relapse and its indication by multiple genes. Methods Six gene polymorphisms functional in drug-metabolism – GSTP1 Ile105Val, ABCB1 Ile1145Ile, MTHFR Ala222Val, TYMS double (2R or triple (3R tandem repeat – and DNA-repair genes – ERCC2 Lys751Gln and XRCC1 Arg399Gln – were assessed in 201 CRC patients using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique and DNA sequencing. Patients were diagnosed as either high-risk stage II (T2 and 3 N0 M0 or III (any T N1 and 2 M0 and were administered adjuvant chemotherapy regimens that included 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin (LV. The correlations between genetic polymorphisms and patient clinicopathological features and relapses were investigated. Results In this study, the distributions of GSTP1 (P = 0.003, ABCB1 (P = 0.001, TYMS (P ERCC2 (P XRCC1 (P = 0.006 genotypes in the Asian population, with the exception of MTHFR (P = 0.081, differed significantly from their distributions in a Caucasian population. However, the unfavorable genotype ERCC2 2251A>C (P = 0.006, tumor invasion depth (P = 0.025, lymph node metastasis (P = 0

  10. Two cases of relapses in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after fingolimod withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davion, Jean-Baptiste; Cambron, M; Duhin, E; Chouraki, A; Lacour, A; Labauge, P; Carra, C; Ayrignac, X; Vermersch, P

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) included in the INFORMS cohort, experiencing a relapse related to a single MRI gadolinium-enhancing lesion 3 months after fingolimod withdrawal. These two patients share similarities with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis cases described in the same situation, suggesting that the initiating process of the active demyelinating plaques is also present in PPMS, even without relapses, but may be triggered as fingolimod is withdrawn. Although the results of the INFORMS study suggest that fingolimod may not slow down the progression, some PPMS patients might still benefit from a disease-modifying treatment.

  11. Omitting radiotherapy in early positron emission tomography-negative stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with an increased risk of early relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raemaekers, John M M; André, Marc P E; Federico, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Combined-modality treatment is standard treatment for patients with clinical stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We hypothesized that an early positron emission tomography (PET) scan could be used to adapt treatment. Therefore, we started the randomized EORTC/LYSA/FIL Intergroup H10 trial ...

  12. The neurobiology of relapse in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Gary; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Hahn, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Dopamine's proposed role in psychosis proved a starting point in our understanding of the neurobiology of relapse, fitting given the central role positive symptoms play. This link is reflected in early work examining neurotransmitter metabolite and drug (e.g. amphetamine, methylphenidate) challenge studies as a means of better understanding relapse and predictors. Since, lines of investigation have expanded (e.g. electrophysiological, immunological, hormonal, stress), an important step forward if relapse per se is the question. Arguably, perturbations in dopamine represent the final common pathway in psychosis but it is evident that, like schizophrenia, relapse is heterogeneous and multidimensional. In understanding the neurobiology of relapse, greater gains are likely to be made if these distinctions are acknowledged; for example, efforts to identify trait markers might better be served by distinguishing primary (i.e. idiopathic) and secondary (e.g. substance abuse, medication nonadherence) forms of relapse. Similarly, it has been suggested that relapse is 'neurotoxic', yet individuals do very well on clozapine after multiple relapses and the designation of treatment resistance. An alternative explanation holds that schizophrenia is characterized by different trajectories, at least to some extent biologically and/or structurally distinguishable from the outset, with differential patterns of response and relapse. Just as with schizophrenia, it seems naïve to conceptualize the neurobiology of relapse as a singular process. We propose that it is shaped by the form of illness and in place from the outset, modified by constitutional factors like resilience, as well as treatment, and confounded by secondary forms of relapse.

  13. Can a one-item mood scale do the trick? Predicting relapse over 5.5-years in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Berking, Matthias; Koeter, Maarten W.J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine whether a simple Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) is able to predict time to relapse over 5.5-years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 187 remitted recurrently depressed out-patients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) a

  14. 临床孤立综合征和复发缓解型多发性硬化患者表现正常脑白质及脑灰质的MR扩散张量直方图比较%A comparative study of MR diffusion tensor imaging histogram between clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in normal appearing white matter and grey matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亚欧; 于春水; 李坤成; 林富春; 段云云; 秦文

    2008-01-01

    目的 评价扩散张量成像(DTI)对临床孤立综合征(CIS)的研究价值,了解CIS的病理变化机制及与复发缓解型多发性硬化(RRMS)的关系.方法 选择19例CIS患者(CIS组)、19例RRMS患者(RRMS组)和19例性别、年龄与之匹配的健康志愿者(正常对照组)为研究对象.用1.5 T超导型MR机采集数据,经图像后处理得到表现正常脑白质(NAWM),表现正常脑灰质(NAGM)的平均扩散率(MD)、各向异性分数(FA)直方图,其中提取出下列指标:平均值、直方图峰高和峰位置,进行单因素方差分析和秩和检验,并对3组NAWM、NAGM的MD、FA值与扩展残疾状态量表(EDSS)评分进行Spearman相关分析.结果 RRMS组患者表现正常脑白质MD为(0.83±0.04)×10-3mm2/s,较正常对照组(0.78±0.02)×10-3mm2/s、CIS组(0.79±0.02)×10-3mm2/s均显著增高(F=15.304,P<0.01),但CIS组与正常对照组间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);MD图峰高CIS组明显低于正常对照组(P<0.01);RRMS组平均FA值(0.36±0.03)较正常对照组(0.41±0.01)及CIS组(0.40±0.02)均降低(F=17.965,P<0.01),但CIS组与正常对照组间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),平均FA图峰位置CIS组较正常对照组明显左移.NAGM MD在正常对照组、CIS组、RRMS组分别为(1.03±0.05)、(1.08±0.06)、(1.18±0.12)×10-3mm2/s,依次增高,且差异均有统计学意义(F=15.261,P<0.01).CIS患者的各项DTI指标与EDSS评分均无显著性相关.RRMS患者NAGM的MD与EDSS评分呈正相关(r=0.568,P<0.05).结论 DTI直方图可以敏感的显示及量化CIS及多发性硬化(MS)NAWM、NAGM的异常,作为MS最早期表现的CIS患者NAWM、NAGM均已发生了病理改变,但较MS病变轻.%Objective To investigate whether abnormalities can be detected in normal-appearing white matter(NAWM)and normal-appearing white matter(NAGM)in patients with clinically isolated syndrome(CIS)and comparing them to the abnormalities in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis(RRMS)by using

  15. Early assessment of minimal residual disease identifies patients at very high relapse risk in NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm-Welk, Christine; Mussolin, Lara; Zimmermann, Martin; Pillon, Marta; Klapper, Wolfram; Oschlies, Ilske; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Reiter, Alfred; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Rosolen, Angelo

    2014-01-16

    Detection of minimal disseminated disease (MDD) at diagnosis correlates with relapse risk in children with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). We investigated whether minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by qualitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for Nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK during treatment identifies patients at the highest relapse risk. Blood and/or bone marrow of 180 patients with NPM-ALK-positive ALCL treated with Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-type protocols were screened for NPM-ALK transcripts at diagnosis; 103 were found to be MDD-positive. MRD before the second therapy course could be evaluated in 52 MDD-positive patients. MRD positivity correlated with uncommon histology. The cumulative incidence of relapses (CIR) of 26 MDD-positive/MRD-positive patients (81% ± 8%) was significantly higher than the CIR of 26 MDD-positive/MRD-negative (31% ± 9%) and 77 MDD-negative patients (15% ± 5%) (P NPM-ALK-positive ALCL identifies patients with a very high relapse risk and inferior survival.

  16. Predictors of Relapse in Adult-Onset Nephrotic Minimal Change Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hajeong; Yoo, Kyung Don; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Dong Ki; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Joo, Kwon Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Ahn, Curie; Han, Jin Suk; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-03-01

    Minimal change disease (MCD) is a well-known benign primary glomerulonephritis because of its distinct rare tendency to progress to end-stage renal disease. However, factors associated with relapse in adults are not well known. We aimed to identify predictors of relapse in adult-onset MCD patients.A retrospective cohort of 195 patients with adult-onset primary MCD with nephritic syndrome and disease onset between 1979 and 2013 was followed up for >12 months. The number of relapses was counted and predictors of relapse were analyzed.A total of 195 patients were included. Median age at diagnosis was 38 years (IQR, 23-53 years) and 113 (57.9%) were men. During 81 months (IQR, 44-153 months) of follow-up, 92% of patients achieved remission after initial treatment. However, only 60 (32.8%) did not experience a relapse and 11 patients failed to remit. Among the remaining 124 patients, 65 experienced a relapse once or twice and 59 experienced a relapse more than twice. Younger onset age, increased severity of nephrotic features such as lower serum albumin levels and higher cholesterol level were associated with relapse. Interestingly, the grade of mesangial proliferation was lower in patients who experienced a relapse. Initial combined treatment with corticosteroids (CS) and cyclophosphamide reduced the number of relapses. In addition, patients with shorter treatment duration tended to experience relapse more often. Multivariate analysis showed that younger onset age, combined mesangial proliferation, initial treatment regimen, and treatment duration were independent risk factors for relapse. Progression to end-stage renal disease was developed in only a patient.In conclusion, more than two-thirds of adult-onset nephrotic MCD patients experienced relapse, although their renal progression was rare. Younger onset age, CS without cyclophosphamide treatment, and shorter treatment duration were independent risk factors for relapse in adult-onset MCD patients.

  17. Enhanced Negative Feedback Responses in Remitted Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Diane L.; Steele, Katherine T.; Bogdan, Ryan; Holmes, Avram J.; Deveney, Christen M.; Meites, Tiffany M.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by hypersensitivity to negative feedback that might involve frontocingulate dysfunction. MDD subjects exhibit enhanced electrophysiological responses to negative internal (errors) and external (feedback) cues. Whether this dysfunction extends to remitted depressed (RD) subjects with a history of MDD is currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the feedback-related negativity (FRN) in RD and control subjects using a probabilistic punishment learning task. Despite equivalent behavioral performance, RD subjects showed larger FRNs to negative feedback relative to controls; group differences remained after accounting for residual anxiety and depressive symptoms. The present findings suggest that abnormal responses to negative feedback extend to samples at increased risk for depressive episodes in the absence of current symptoms. PMID:18580576

  18. Biological dysrhythm in remitted bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aishwarya; Palaniappan, Pradeep

    2017-05-17

    Recent treatment guidelines support treatment of biological rhythm abnormalities as a part of treatment of bipolar disorder, but still, literature examining various domains (Sleep, Activity, Social, and Eating) of biological rhythm and its clinical predictors are less. The main aim of our study is to compare various domains of biological rhythm among remitted bipolar I subjects and healthy controls. We also explored for any association between clinical variables and biological rhythm among bipolar subjects. 40 subjects with Bipolar I disorder and 40 healthy controls who met inclusion and exclusion criteria were recruited for the study. Diagnoses were ascertained by a qualified psychiatrist using MINI 5.0. Sociodemographic details, biological rhythm (BRIAN-Biological Rhythm Interview of assessment in Neuropsychiatry) and Sleep functioning (PSQI- Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were assessed in all subjects. Mean age of the Bipolar subjects and controls were 41.25±11.84years and 38.25±11.25 years respectively. Bipolar subjects experienced more biological rhythm disturbance when compared to healthy controls (total BRIAN score being 34.25±9.36 vs 28.2±6.53) (p=0.002). Subsyndromal depressive symptoms (HDRS) had significant positive correlation with BRIAN global scores(r=0.368, p=0.02). Linear regression analysis showed that number of episodes which required hospitalization (β=0.601, t=3.106, P=0.004), PSQI (β=0.394, t=2.609, p=0.014), HDRS (β=0.376, t=2.34, t=0.036) explained 31% of variance in BRIAN scores in remitted bipolar subjects. Biological rhythm disturbances seem to persist even after clinical remission of bipolar illness. More studies to look into the impact of subsyndromal depressive symptoms on biological rhythm are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors for multiple sclerosis relapses after switching from natalizumab to fingolimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepner, Robert; Havla, Joachim; Eienbröker, Christian; Tackenberg, Björn; Hellwig, Kerstin; Meinl, Ingrid; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Gold, Ralf; Kümpfel, Tania; Kleiter, Ingo

    2014-11-01

    Risks of natalizumab (NAT) therapy have to be weighed against disease recurrence after stopping NAT. The objective of this paper is to identify risk factors for recurrence of relapses after switching from NAT to fingolimod (FTY) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Patients (n = 33) were treated with NAT for ≥1 year, and then switched to FTY within 24 weeks (mean follow-up on FTY 81.1 (SD 26.5) weeks). Annual relapse rates (ARR) and Expanded Disability Status Scale scores (EDSS) were assessed. Descriptive statistics, univariate logistic regression analysis, and receiver operating characteristic curves were conducted. Overall, 20 patients (61%) had relapses after discontinuation of NAT and 16 (48%) during FTY therapy. The maximum incidence of relapses occurred between weeks 13-24 post-NAT. The last EDSS during the switching period predicted relapses during subsequent FTY therapy. EDSS >3 separated most powerfully between the groups (sensitivity 64%, specificity 88%) and significantly predicted relapses (relative risk 3.27, 95% CI: 1.5-7.3). Seventy-five percent of patients with EDSS ≤ 3 remained free of relapses, compared to 18% of patients with EDSS >3. There was an increase of the ARR in the first year after switching from NAT to FTY. Last EDSS during the switching period was a predictor of relapses during FTY. © The Author(s), 2014.

  20. Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available h quantifiable data (tlast) may be considered if appropriate.o dextromethorphan t...inal malabsorption conditions or bleeding. History of hypersensitivity to midazolam, caffeine, warfarin, vitamin K, dextromethorphan... be considered if appropriate.o dextromethorphan to dextrorphan urine concentrati

  1. Cellular sources of dysregulated cytokines in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Börnsen, Lars; Hesse, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Numerous cytokines are implicated in the immunopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), but studies are often limited to whole blood (WB) or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), thereby omitting important information about the cellular origin of the cytokines. Knowledge about the relation ...

  2. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Normal Appearing White Matter in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Krakauer, Martin; Skimminge, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    and nine healthy controls (4 females) underwent quantitative T1 measurements at 3 tesla before and after injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent (0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA). Mean T1 values were calculated for NAWM in patients and total cerebral white matter in healthy subjects for the T1 measurements before...

  3. Characterization of Remitting and Relapsing Hyperglycemia in Post-Renal-Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Boloori

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia following solid organ transplant is common among patients without pre-existing diabetes mellitus (DM. Post-transplant hyperglycemia can occur once or multiple times, which if continued, causes new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT.To study if the first and recurrent incidence of hyperglycemia are affected differently by immunosuppressive regimens, demographic and medical-related risk factors, and inpatient hyperglycemic conditions (i.e., an emphasis on the time course of post-transplant complications.We conducted a retrospective analysis of 407 patients who underwent kidney transplantation at Mayo Clinic Arizona. Among these, there were 292 patients with no signs of DM prior to transplant. For this category of patients, we evaluated the impact of (1 immunosuppressive drugs (e.g., tacrolimus, sirolimus, and steroid, (2 demographic and medical-related risk factors, and (3 inpatient hyperglycemic conditions on the first and recurrent incidence of hyperglycemia in one year post-transplant. We employed two versions of Cox regression analyses: (1 a time-dependent model to analyze the recurrent cases of hyperglycemia and (2 a time-independent model to analyze the first incidence of hyperglycemia.Age (P = 0.018, HDL cholesterol (P = 0.010, and the average trough level of tacrolimus (P<0.0001 are significant risk factors associated with the first incidence of hyperglycemia, while age (P<0.0001, non-White race (P = 0.002, BMI (P = 0.002, HDL cholesterol (P = 0.003, uric acid (P = 0.012, and using steroid (P = 0.007 are the significant risk factors for the recurrent cases of hyperglycemia.This study draws attention to the importance of analyzing the risk factors associated with a disease (specially a chronic one with respect to both its first and recurrent incidence, as well as carefully differentiating these two perspectives: a fact that is currently overlooked in the literature.

  4. Retinal nerve fiber layer sector-specific compromise in relapsing and remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette S. Loughran-Fjeldstad

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Quadrant, sector, and PMB RNFL thicknesses are significant individual measures in RR-MS for both affected and unaffected eyes and may prove valuable in future investigations including biomarker and outcomes research.

  5. Time perception and illness acceptance among remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis patients under treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Król

    2015-10-01

    Avoiding contemplation of negative past and concentrating on hedonistic future constitute significant predictors of illness acceptance. These results may be of importance in terms of holistic approach to treatment of RR-MS patients. In the initial stage of the disease progression, patients might benefit from psychological support due to change in temporal orientation.

  6. Prorating WAIS - IV summary scores for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph J; Umfleet, Laura Glass; Gontkovsky, Samuel T

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the utility of prorating appropriate combinations of two, six and eight Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth Edition (WAIS - IV) subtests for estimating the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI), Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) and General Ability Index (GAI) in a sample of individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty-eight outpatients completed the WAIS - IV and Wechsler Memory Scale - Fourth Edition (WMS - IV) as part of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Means for age, education and duration of diagnosis were 42.35, 14.21 and 8.30 years, respectively. Paired t-tests showed no significant differences between prorated and standard means for VCI (93.46 vs. 93.73), PRI (90.19 vs. 89.44), FSIQ (88.53 vs. 88.47) or GAI (90.56 vs. 90.65). Correlations between prorated and standard composites were ≥0.89 in every instance. Correlations between the standard and prorated composites and education, disability status and WMS - IV indexes did not reveal a single contrast, where the correlations were significantly different. The present findings support the use of the two-subtest VCI and PRI composites and the eight-subtest FSIQ and four-subtest GAI in the assessment of patients with MS.

  7. Executive function and memory in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo García, Marta; Martín Plasencia, Pilar; Aladro Benito, Yolanda; Balseiro Gómez, José Jesús; Rueda Marcos, Almudena

    2009-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system very heterogeneous in its characteristics. In contrast to the well known sensitive/motor deficits, the cognitive dysfunction has only been analyzed in the last few decades. Attention, executive function, and memory were assessed in 28 patients with recurrent-remittent MS (RRMS) (duration, median 7 years; EDSS median 2) by means of a specific neuropsychological battery. Depression (BDI), anxiety (STAI) and fatigue (FSS) were also assessed. Twenty-five of these patients were selected for statistical study because they presented deficits in some cognitive areas. Twenty-four percent of the patients displayed memory deficits and 80% showed attention and executive function deficits related to prefrontal lobe function. No global memory difficulties were found, except for immediate visual memory of complex elements (immediate recall of the Rey figure), although the visual reproduction I subtest of the WMS-R was unaffected. In RRMS patients with a relatively short duration and low level of incapacity, cognitive impairments mainly affected prefrontal functions. The difficulties in immediate visual memory of complex elements could also be explained by a failure in these areas, due to the alteration of the organization and strategic use of the material to be encoded.

  8. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Performance in Relapsing-Remitting and Chronic-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Stephen M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), a measure of concept formation and set-shifting capacity, was administered to two groups of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients defined by clinical course. The chronic progressive patients achieved fewer conceptual categories due to significantly more perseverative responses than control patients, whereas the…

  9. Can resistance training impact MRI outcomes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Tue; Siemonsen, Susanne; Wenzel, Damian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by accelerated brain atrophy, which relates to disease progression. Previous research shows that progressive resistance training (PRT) can counteract brain atrophy in other populations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of PRT by magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical measures of disease progression in people with MS. METHODS: This study was a 24-week randomised controlled cross-over trial, including a Training ( n = 18, 24 weeks of PRT followed by self-guided physical activity) and Waitlist group ( n = 17, 24 weeks of habitual...... lifestyle followed by PRT). Assessments included disability measures and MRI (lesion load, global brain volume, percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and cortical thickness). RESULTS: While the MS Functional Composite score improved, Expanded Disability Status Scale, lesion load and global brain volumes did...

  10. Advanced flowcytometric analysis of regulatory T cells: CD127 downregulation early post stem cell transplantation and altered Treg/CD3(+)CD4(+)-ratio in severe GvHD or relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremm, Melanie; Huenecke, Sabine; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Ponstingl, Eva; Mueller, Regine; Heinze, Annekathrin; Bug, Gesine; Quaiser, Andrea; Kapinsky, Michael; Brehm, Claudia; Bader, Peter; Schneider, Gisbert; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koehl, Ulrike

    2011-10-28

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are of crucial importance to suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD) post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), but are also known to impair antitumor immunity. However, Treg longitudinal studies are rare and in this respect advanced flowcytometric approaches for Treg characterization are necessary. To investigate the relation of both the percentage and the absolute numbers of Tregs on GvHD or relapse we measured CD4(+)CD25(+/hi)CD127(lo/-) Tregs in 239 peripheral blood (PB) samples of 16 patients during the first two years post-SCT. A 10-color flowcytometric panel was established to evaluate Treg subpopulations and has been tested in ten healthy individuals. In patients we demonstrated a decrease in CD127 expression on T cells early post-SCT which increases during the first year. Moreover, Tregs reached higher absolute numbers in patients with GvHD≤grade I compared to those with GvHD grades II-IV. In contrast, the percentage of Tregs was significantly higher in patients with GvHD grades II-IV or disease relapse compared to those without GvHD. These patients fit into the range of healthy individuals where a median value of 7.5% and 6.4% of T helper cells were characterized as CD4(+)CD25(+/hi)CD127(lo/-) and CD4(+)CD25(+/hi) Tregs, respectively. Furthermore, Tregs could be further subdivided into 40% naïve, 51% central memory and 9% effector memory Tregs. Our results showed for the first time a downregulation of CD127 expression on T cells including Tregs in patients early post-SCT. Additionally, new insights into the recovery of Tregs regarding GvHD and relapse were provided. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cognitive deficits in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob; Knorr, Ulla; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unipolar depressive disorder may present with cognitive deficits in the remitted state, and the aim of the present study was to investigate whether cognitive deficits within specific cognitive domains are present....

  12. Alemtuzumab: evidence for its potential in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown JWL

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available J William L Brown, Alasdair J ColesDepartment of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKAbstract: Alemtuzumab (previously known as Campath® is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the CD52 antigen on mature lymphocytes that results in lymphopenia and subsequent modification of the immune repertoire. Here we explore evidence for its efficacy and safety in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. One Phase II and two Phase III trials of alemtuzumab versus active comparator (interferon beta-1a have been reported. Two of these rater-blinded randomized studies assessed clinical and radiological outcomes in treatment-naïve patients; one explored patients who had relapsed despite first-line therapy. Compared to interferon beta-1a, alemtuzumab reduced the relapse rate by 49%–74% (P < 0.0001, and in two studies it reduced the risk of sustained disability accumulation by 42%–71% (P < 0.01. In one study (Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis; CARE-MS1, there was no significant difference compared to interferon, perhaps reflecting the surprisingly low frequency of disability events in the comparator group. After alemtuzumab, the Expanded Disability Status Scale score improved by 0.14–1.2 points, culminating in a net advantage with alemtuzumab of 0.41–0.77 points over interferon in the CAMMS223 and CARE-MS2 trials (both P < 0.001. Radiological markers of new lesion formation and brain atrophy following alemtuzumab were significantly improved when compared to interferon in all studies. Adverse events were more common following alemtuzumab than interferon beta-1a (7.2–8.66 versus 4.9–5.7 events per person-year. While infusion reactions are the most common, autoimmunity is the most concerning; within Phase III studies, thyroid disorders (17%–18% versus 5%–6% and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (1% versus 0% were reported in patients taking alemtuzumab and interferon beta-1a

  13. Casting-type calcifications on the mammogram suggest a higher probability of early relapse and death among high-risk breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palka, Istvan [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Ormandi, K atalin [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Gaal, Szilvia; Kahan, Zsuzsanna [Dept. of Oncotherapy, Univ. of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Boda, Krisztina [Dept. of Medical Informatics, Univ. of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary)

    2007-11-15

    A retrospective analysis of the relation between the presence of casting-type calcifications on the mammogram and the prognosis of breast cancer was performed. The mammographic tumor features and other characteristics (invasive tumor size, histological tumor type, grade, nodal, hormone receptor and HER2 status, presence of lymphovascular invasion) of 55 high-risk breast cancers were studied. After a median follow-up time of 29.1 months, the median relapse-free survival and overall survival times among breast cancer patients with tumors associated with casting calcifications were 26.6 and 29.6 months, respectively. The corresponding parameters among patients with tumors not accompanied by casting calcifications were 54.4 and >58.5 months, respectively. Significant associations were found between the presence of casting calcifications and the risks of relapse (HR = 3.048, 95% CI: 1.116-8.323, p = 0.030) or death (HR = 3.504, 95% CI: 1.074-11.427, p 0.038). Positive associations were found between casting calcifications and ER/PR negativity (p = 0.015 and p = 0.003, respectively) and HER2 overexpression (p = 0.019). Our findings support the theory that breast tumors associated with casting-type calcifications at mammography comprise a disease entity which exhibits significantly more aggressive behavior and a poorer outcome than do cancers with other mammographic tumor features.

  14. Adverse lipid profile is not associated with relapse risk in MS: results from an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettey, Prudence; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce; Blizzard, Leigh; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Dwyer, Terence; Kostner, Karam; van der Mei, Ingrid

    2014-05-15

    There is increasing evidence that serum lipids and apolipoproteins may be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical course. To investigate the associations between serum lipids, apolipoproteins, body mass index and relapse in MS. A prospective cohort of 141 participants with relapsing-remitting MS was followed from 2002 to 2005. Serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels were measured biannually, and body mass index at baseline. The association with hazard of relapse was assessed using survival analysis. Neither body mass index nor any of the lipid-related measures were associated with the hazard of relapse. Serum lipid profile and body mass index are not associated with the hazard of relapse in MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relapse revisited--again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Kenneth C; Vaden, James L; Harris, Edward F

    2012-08-01

    Long-term changes in the dentitions of orthodontic patients have been studied. However, most studies in the literature report findings after only a few years posttreatment. In this study, we examined records an average of 24 years after active treatment. The purpose was to answer 2 questions: (1) does irregularity increase with time after treatment, and (2) how much relapse can be expected if a conservatively treated sample is recalled 2.5 decades after active treatment? The sample consisted of dental casts of 52 women who were treated in the mid-1970s to the early 1980s with 0.022 × 0.028-in standard edgewise appliances. Each was given a maxillary Hawley retainer and either a mandibular Hawley or a banded canine-to-canine retainer at debanding. Retention lasted 24 to 32 months. The same practitioner treated all the patients. The sample is one of convenience; specifically, inclusion depended only on each patient's willingness to return for a recall examination. Records were collected at 3 examinations for each patient: start of treatment, end of the active phase of treatment, and long-term retention recall. The long-term maxillary and mandibular casts were measured and occluded in maximum intercuspation. Variables were measured, including incisor overjet and overbite, buccal segment relationship of the first molars and canines, and incisor irregularity in each arch. Variables were measured on the casts with digital readout sliding calipers precise to 0.001 mm. Mandibular incisor irregularity at recall was less than 3.5 mm in 77% of the patients examined. Correction of the maxillary incisor irregularity remained relatively stable over the time interval studied. Buccal segment Class II correction remained stable at the recall examination. Orthodontic treatment can yield reasonably good long-term stability in both occlusal correction and tooth alignment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling the effector - regulatory T cell cross-regulation reveals the intrinsic character of relapses in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrealdea Javier

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relapsing-remitting dynamics is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS. Although current understanding of both cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is significant, how their activity generates this prototypical dynamics is not understood yet. In order to gain insight about the mechanisms that drive these relapsing-remitting dynamics, we developed a computational model using such biological knowledge. We hypothesized that the relapsing dynamics in autoimmunity can arise through the failure in the mechanisms controlling cross-regulation between regulatory and effector T cells with the interplay of stochastic events (e.g. failure in central tolerance, activation by pathogens that are able to trigger the immune system. Results The model represents five concepts: central tolerance (T-cell generation by the thymus, T-cell activation, T-cell memory, cross-regulation (negative feedback between regulatory and effector T-cells and tissue damage. We enriched the model with reversible and irreversible tissue damage, which aims to provide a comprehensible link between autoimmune activity and clinical relapses and active lesions in the magnetic resonances studies in patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Our analysis shows that the weakness in this negative feedback between effector and regulatory T-cells, allows the immune system to generate the characteristic relapsing-remitting dynamics of autoimmune diseases, without the need of additional environmental triggers. The simulations show that the timing at which relapses appear is highly unpredictable. We also introduced targeted perturbations into the model that mimicked immunotherapies that modulate effector and regulatory populations. The effects of such therapies happened to be highly dependent on the timing and/or dose, and on the underlying dynamic of the immune system. Conclusion The relapsing dynamic in MS

  17. 18F-FDG PET/CT is an ideal imaging modality for the early diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JianJie; Liu, XiaoFei; Pu, Chaoyu; Chen, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that may affect multiple cartilage throughout the body. We report on a middle-aged man presented with cough, chest tightness, and fever of unknown origin, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) was performed. And the imaging shows multiple increased FDG accumulation in tracheobronchial tree and all intercostal cartilages, as well as in nasal, right auricule, laryngeal cartilage. Based on the findings, the diagnosis of RP was made. Our case demonstrates that FDG PET/CT is an useful diagnostic tool to accurately determine the extent of inflammation throughout the body and to guiding the selection of a biopsy site.

  18. Positron emission tomography has a high negative predictive value for progression or early relapse for patients with residual disease after first-line chemotherapy in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Carsten; Dietlein, Markus; Franklin, Jeremy; Markova, Jana; Lohri, Andreas; Amthauer, Holger; Klutmann, Susanne; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Bockisch, Andreas; Weckesser, Matthias; Lorenz, Reinhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bares, Roland; Eich, Hans T.; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Fuchs, Michael; Borchmann, Peter; Schicha, Harald; Diehl, Volker

    2008-01-01

    In the HD15 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group, the negative predictive value (NPV) of positron emission tomography (PET) using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) was evaluated. A total of 817 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive BEACOPP-based chemotherapy. After completion of chemotherapy, residual disease measuring more than or equal to 2.5 cm in diameter was assessed by PET in 311 patients. The NPV of PET was defined as the proportion of PET− patients without progression, relapse, or irradiation within 12 months after PET review panel. The progression-free survival was 96% for PET− patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 94%-99%) and 86% for PET+ patients (95% CI, 78%-95%, P = .011). The NPV for PET in this analysis was 94% (95% CI, 91%-97%). Thus, consolidation radiotherapy can be omitted in PET− patients with residual disease without increasing the risk for progression or early relapse compared with patients in complete remission. The impact of this finding on the overall survival at 5 years must be awaited. Until then, response adapted therapy guided by PET for HL patients seems to be a promising approach that should be further evaluated in clinical trials. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org study as #ISRCTN32443041. PMID:18757777

  19. Relapsing pityriasis rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Rebora, Alfredo; Parodi, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of relapses of pityriasis rosea (PR), a retrospective cohort study investigated all PR cases diagnosed in Genoa between 2000 and 2013 and followed them up to today. Of 570 cases, 21 (3.7%) relapsed. Most of them had a single episode, but 4 had two episodes and 2 had three episodes. The herald patch was always absent, size and number of the lesions were reduced, and duration was shorter than that of the primary episodes. Constitutional symptoms were present, though less severe than in the primary eruption. Most recurrences occurred within 1 year (16/21, 76.2%). Men outnumbered women and the mean age of the relapsing patients (20.3 years) was higher than that for the primary episode. A pathogenetic hypothesis is provided: since PR is associated with reactivation of human herpesvirus 6/7, a parallelism with other typical reactivating human herpesviruses (varicella zoster virus and Epstein-Barr virus) has been established.

  20. Cognitive Reactivity, Dysfunctional Attitudes, and Depressive Relapse and Recurrence in Cognitive Therapy Responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Borman, Patricia D.; Dunlap, Lauren; Segal, Zindel V.; Kidner, Cindy L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctional attitudes can foreshadow depressive relapse/recurrence. Priming mood, through induction paradigms, is hypothesized to activate dysfunctional attitudes. Cognitive reactivity (CR) refers to mood-linked increases in dysfunctional attitudes after priming. Here we explored the extent to which CR as well as residual, unprimed, dysfunctional attitudes predicted depressive relapse/recurrence among depressed patients who responded to acute phase cognitive therapy (CT). Consenting adults, aged 18–70, with recurrent major depressive disorder (n = 523) participated in a two-site randomized controlled trial examining the durability of continuation phase treatments. Patients received 16–20 sessions of CT. Among the 245 incompletely remitted responders, 213 agreed to undergo a mood induction paradigm. After 8 months of continuation phase treatments, participants were followed an additional 24 months. Although the mood induction significantly lowered mood in 80% of responders, the expected CR was not evident. By contrast, higher unprimed dysfunctional attitudes following CT did predict relapse/recurrence over 20 and 32 months post randomization. The findings of this large longitudinal study of incompletely remitted CT responders challenge the notion that it is necessary to prime mood in order to maximize dysfunctional attitudes’ prediction of relapse and/or recurrence. While findings cannot be generalized beyond CT responders, they emphasize the clinical importance of reducing dysfunctional attitudes in preventing depression. PMID:22445946

  1. Relapsing polychondritis: commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Altman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapsing Polychondritis (RP is a multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by episodic inflammation of cartilage and potentially progressive degeneration of cartilaginous tissue, such as auricular, nasal and laryngotracheobronchial cartilage. However, many other proteoglycan- rich structures may be involved, such as inner ear, eyes, blood vessels, heart and kidneys (1- 4. RP was first described by Jacksh-Wartenhorst in 1923, who named it “polychondropathia” (5. Pearson et al. (6 introduced the term “relapsing polychondritis” in 1960...

  2. Late Relapses in Stage I Testicular Cancer Patients on Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comprehensive data on late relapse (LR) and very LR (VLR) in patients with clinical stage I (CS-1) testicular cancer followed on surveillance are missing. These data are essential for planning optimal follow-up. OBJECTIVE: Assess incidence and outcome of LR (>2 yr) and VLR (>5 yr...... patients with LR(VLR) do not differ significantly from patients with ER. PATIENT SUMMARY: We compared stage I testicular cancer surveillance patients with early relapse (ER) versus late relapse (LR; >2 yr). LR patients as a group did no worse than ER patients, although increased time to relapse......) in a large cohort of CS-1 surveillance patients, and examine differences in the clinical characteristics of patients with early relapse (ER), LR, and VLR. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: CS-1 surveillance patients diagnosed between 1984 and 2007 were identified from the retrospective Danish Testicular...

  3. Early relapse of JAK2 V617F-positive chronic neutrophilic leukemia with central nervous system infiltration after unrelated bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Sato, Tomohiko; Goyama, Susumu; Noda, Naohiro; Shoda, Eriko; Oshima, Kumi; Inoue, Morihiro; Izutsu, Koji; Watanabe, Takuro; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2007-05-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a proliferation mainly of mature neutrophils. The prognosis is generally poor and an optimal therapeutic strategy remains to be determined. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is expected to be the only curative therapy so far. We report a 46-year-old male with progressive CNL who underwent bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-matched unrelated donor. After engraftment was achieved on day 35, relapse of CNL was confirmed on day 50. The progression of CNL was very rapid afterward and infiltration to the central nervous system was observed. The Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F homozygous mutation was detected from the peripheral blood or bone marrow samples throughout the clinical course. From comparison with reports of successful HSCT for CNL in the literature, it was inferred that HSCT should be performed in a stable status before progression. Furthermore, JAK2 V617F-positive CNL may contain an aggressive disease entity in contrast to previous reports. Accumulation of experiences is required to establish a definite role of HSCT in the treatment of CNL and a prognostic significance of JAK2 mutation in CNL.

  4. Mixed-polarization phenotype of ascites-associated macrophages in human ovarian carcinoma: correlation of CD163 expression, cytokine levels and early relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinartz, Silke; Schumann, Tim; Finkernagel, Florian; Wortmann, Annika; Jansen, Julia M; Meissner, Wolfgang; Krause, Michael; Schwörer, Anne-Marie; Wagner, Uwe; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is typically accompanied by the occurrence of malignant ascites containing large number of macrophages. It has been suggested that these tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are skewed to alternative polarization (M2) and thereby play an essential role in therapy resistance and metastatic spread. In our study, we have investigated the nature, regulation and clinical correlations of TAM polarization in serous ovarian cancer. Macrophage polarization markers on TAMs and ascites cytokine levels were analyzed for 30 patients and associated with relapse-free survival (RFS) in a prospective study with 20 evaluable patients. Surface expression of the M2 marker CD163 on TAMs was inversely associated with RFS (p CD163 surface expression also correlated with the ascites levels of IL-6 and IL-10 (p CD163 expression, and their ascites levels showed a clear inverse association with RFS (p CD163 expression, high IL-6 and/or IL-10 levels and poor clinical outcome. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  5. Loss of the p53/p63 Target PERP is an Early Event in Oral Carcinogenesis and Correlates with Higher Rate of Local Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Christina S.; Cao, Hongbin; Kwok, Shirley; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Jordan, Richard C.; Beaudry, Veronica G.; Attardi, Laura D.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND PERP is a p53/p63 regulated gene encoding a desmosomal protein that plays a critical role in cell-cell adhesion and tumor suppression. STUDY DESIGN We evaluated PERP expression in different grades of oral dysplasia (34 cases) and at different stages of invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and correlated the latter with clinical outcome. A tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of non-dysplastic mucosa, carcinoma in situ, SCC and nodal metastases from 33 patients with HPV-negative SCC was stained for PERP and E-cadherin. RESULTS Complete loss of PERP expression was associated with worse local control in patients with SCC. The 5-year local control rate was 91% for patients with partial PERP loss versus 31% for those with complete loss (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS This is the first study to show that loss of PERP expression correlates with the transition to SCC and with increased local relapse in patients with oral cavity SCC. PMID:23217540

  6. Predictors and dynamics of postpartum relapses in women with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Stella E; Spelman, Tim; Gray, Orla M; Boz, Cavit; Trojano, Maria; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Grand'Maison, Francois; Grammond, Pierre; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Hupperts, Raymond; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Giuliani, Giorgio; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Barnett, Michael; Edite Rio, Maria; van Pesch, Vincent; Amato, Maria Pia; Iuliano, Gerardo; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Cristiano, Edgardo; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Poehlau, Dieter; Saladino, Maria Laura; Deri, Norma; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Skromne, Eli; Savino, Aldo; Shaw, Cameron; Moore, Fraser; Vucic, Steve; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; McDonnell, Gavin; Hawkins, Stanley; Kee, Frank; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that pregnancy reduces multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, which increase in the early postpartum period. Postpartum relapse risk has been predicted by pre-pregnancy disease activity in some studies. OBJECTIVE: To re-examine effect of pregnancy on relapses using

  7. Alemtuzumab: a review of its use in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2014-03-01

    Alemtuzumab (Lemtrada™) is a humanized therapeutic monoclonal antibody, which has been approved for use in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia for several years, and has recently become approved in the EU and several other countries for use in adult patients with active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This article reviews the available pharmacological properties of intravenous infusions of alemtuzumab and its clinical efficacy and tolerability in adult patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Alemtuzumab is an effective treatment for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and has a generally acceptable tolerability profile. In phase III trials, it was shown to be more effective than a current first-line treatment, subcutaneous interferon beta-1a, in decreasing relapse rate in treatment-naïve and previously treated patients and in decreasing disability progression in previously treated patients. Of note, these results appear to have extended into the long-term follow-up, despite no further treatment. There was an increased risk of autoimmunity and infection associated with alemtuzumab in these trials; while these adverse events were generally mild to moderate, some were severe. Alemtuzumab is a highly convenient treatment, requiring hospital attendance for an intravenous infusion for a handful of days on two consecutive years, with no treatment required in between; however, this convenience is counterbalanced by the need for regular monitoring for the increased risk of autoimmunity. More investigation is required before final conclusions can be drawn on the correct placement of alemtuzumab in multiple sclerosis treatment; however, it is of a certainty a welcome addition to the treatment options for these patients.

  8. Double localization of neuro lymphomatosis in an early relapse of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and ({sup 18}F)-F.D.G. PET-CT: Case report;Double localisation de neurolymphomatose d'une rechute prcoce d'un lymphome non hodgkinien en TEP-TDM au ({sup 18}F)-FDG: a propos d'un cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaentre, T.; Pascal-ortiz, D. [Hopital Saint-Jean, Service de medecine nucleaire, 66 - Perpignan (France); Sanhes, L.; Vallantin, X. [Hopital Saint-Jean, Service d' hematologie, 66 - Perpignan (France); Cassarini, J.F. [Hopital Saint-Jean, Service de neurologie, 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2010-06-15

    In a patient suffering from left lower limb pain and chin anesthesia, fused PET-CT imaging showed an ({sup 18}F)-F.D.G. uptake along the left sciatic nerve and the mandibular branch of the left trigeminal nerve corresponding to neuro lymphomatosis due to an early relapse of a B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (authors)

  9. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (pvolume. In remitted, but not in acutely ill patients, area IX volume was significantly associated with measures of depression severity, as assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD). In addition, area IX volume in remitted patients was significantly related to the duration of antidepressant treatment. In acutely ill patients, no significant relationships were established using clinical variables, such as HAMD, illness or treatment duration and number of depressive episodes. The data suggest that cerebellar area IX, a non-motor region that belongs to a large-scale brain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well.

  10. The Role of Postpartum Intravenous Corticosteroids in the Prevention of Relapses in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Mirla; Stosic, Milena; Robles, Liliana; Prieto, Pilar Guillermo; Hutton, George J.; Rivera, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is most prevalent in women of childbearing age. It is well established that the relapse rate decreases during pregnancy but increases significantly during the first postpartum trimester. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the administration of 1 g of intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) after delivery in the prevention of MS relapses. The study involved 47 women with one or more documented pregnancies; each pregnancy was treated as a separate case. There were 50 cases with relapsing-remitting MS and 2 with secondary progressive MS. The cases were divided into two groups: the IVMP group (those who received 1 g of IVMP after delivery) and the no-IVMP group (those who did not receive IVMP after delivery). There were 39 cases in the IVMP group and 13 in the no-IVMP group. During the first postpartum trimester, relapses occurred in 17.9% of the IVMP group, compared with 46.2% of the no-IVMP group (P = .0448). The difference in relapse percentage between the two groups during the second and third postpartum trimesters was not statistically significant. Our study shows a statistically significant benefit of postpartum IVMP administration in reducing MS relapses. PMID:24453710

  11. Depression and Cognitive Impairment in Disability-Free Early Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus G. Haase

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive and emotional capabilities were evaluated in 73 female patients with stable relapsing-remitting definite, and/or laboratory-supported multiple sclerosis (MS and were compared with 32 matched healthy controls. Patients were categorized according to their score in the expanded disability status scale (EDSS to either no (EDSS 0, n = 33 or few clinical signs (EDSS 1–2, n = 40 of MS without physical disability. Patients with EDSS > 0 were characterized by significantly (p These results indicate that depression may present as an early sign in MS followed by cognitive impairment, in particular visuo-spatial short-term memory, before physical disability appears. Neuropsychological tests as mentioned here could serve as early diagnostic tools to detect subtle disease progression and to initiate and monitor disease modifying therapies.

  12. Can we change the natural history of Crohn's disease with early immunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, James

    2014-01-01

    In both children and adults, the natural history of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by relapsing and remitting bouts of intestinal inflammation, often associated with a progressive shift from inflammatory to complicated stricturing or penetrating disease behavior. The past 2 decades have seen a dramatic shift in therapeutic approach with the increasingly common use of early thiopurine immunomodulation. These maintenance medications were initially introduced primarily as corticosteroid-sparing agents capable of minimizing recurrent flares of inflammatory disease and have proven to be quite efficacious. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that thiopurines may only delay rather than prevent the development of complicated disease behavior. Data from both adult and pediatric CD populations from around the world are reviewed in terms of the effect of early immunomodulation on progression to complicated disease behavior, need for surgery, and prevention of recurrent disease after resection. The effect of thiopurines on the growth of children is also reviewed.

  13. The scars of childhood adversity: minor stress sensitivity and depressive symptoms in remitted recurrently depressed adult patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Kok

    Full Text Available Childhood adversity may lead to depressive relapse through its long-lasting influence on stress sensitivity. In line with the stress sensitization hypothesis, minor (daily stress is associated with depressive relapse. Therefore, we examine the impact of childhood adversity on daily stress and its predictive value on prospectively assessed depressive symptoms in recurrently depressed patients.Daily stress was assessed in recurrently depressed adult patients, enrolled into two randomized trials while remitted. The reported intensity and frequency of dependent and independent daily stress was assessed at baseline. Independent stress is externally generated, for example an accident happening to a friend, while dependent stress is internally generated, for example getting into a fight with a neighbor. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed with childhood adversity, independent and dependent daily stress as predictor variables of prospectively measured depressive symptoms after three months of follow-up (n = 138.We found that childhood adversity was not significantly associated with a higher frequency and intensity of daily stress. The intensity of both independent and dependent daily stress was predictive of depressive symptom levels at follow-up (unadjusted models respectively: B = 0.47, t = 2.05, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 0.02-0.92; B = 0.29, t = 2.20, p = 0.028, 95% CI = 0.03-0.55. No associations were found between childhood adversity and depressive symptoms at follow-up.No evidence was found supporting stress sensitization due to the experience of childhood adversity in this recurrently depressed but remitted patient group. Nevertheless, our research indicates that daily stress might be a target for preventive treatment.Trial A: Nederlands Trial Register NTR1907 Trial B: Nederlands Trial Register NTR2503.

  14. Sera from remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Shimizu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathological destruction of blood-brain barrier (BBB has been thought to be the initial key event in the process of developing multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the malfunction of BBB by sera from relapse-remitting MS (RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS patients. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of sera from the patients in the relapse phase of RRMS (RRMS-R, stable phase of RRMS (RRMS-S and SPMS on the expression of tight junction proteins and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1, and on the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. RESULTS: Sera from the RRMS-R or SPMS patients decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. In RRMS-R, this effect was restored after adding an MMP inhibitor, and the MMP-2/9 secretion by BMECs was significantly increased after the application of patients' sera. In SPMS, the immunoglobulin G (IgG purified from patients' sera also decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. The sera and purified IgG from all MS patients increased the VCAM-1 protein expression in BMECs. CONCLUSIONS: The up-regulation of autocrine MMP-2/9 by BMECs after exposure to sera from RRMS-R patients or the autoantibodies against BMECs from SPMS patients can compromise the BBB. Both RRMS-S and SPMS sera increased the VCAM-1 expression in the BBB, thus indicating that targeting the VCAM-1 in the BBB could represent a possible therapeutic strategy for even the stable phase of MS and SPMS.

  15. Relapses in inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas J. Larrauri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most studies about treatment of inflammatory myopathies consist of cross-sectional analyses that do not assess long-term efficacy. In the present study we describe the follow-up of seven patients with inflammatory myopathies, 5 polymyositis and 2 dermatomyositis. We describe their clinical features, follow-up, muscle enzyme levels, and treatment responses. We define the latter as treatment cycles, every one of which end when steroid doses need to be increased or a new immunosuppressive drug has to be added because of clinical worsening or sustained increases in muscle enzyme levels. Treatment can cause remission, partially control, or fail in achieving myositis improvement when it normalizes, stabilizes, or does not affect muscle enzymes or clinical features, respectively. We analyzed 20 cycles, in which remission was achieved in 14 cases, partial control in 5 instances, and treatment failure in one case. Remission occurred after an average of 139 ± 98 days, whereas partial control took place in 160 ± 100 days. Except in one case, all treatment cycles controlled or remitted the symptoms. However, in all patients the illness recurred with time.

  16. Lapse and relapse following inpatient treatment of opiate dependence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, B P

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a prospective follow-up study of consecutive opiate dependent patients admitted to a residential addiction treatment service for detoxification. We measured the rate of relapse following discharge, and sought to identify factors that were associated with early relapse (i.e., a return to daily opiate use). Follow-up interviews were conducted with 109 patients, of whom, 99 (91%) reported a relapse. The initial relapse occurred within one week in 64 (59%) cases. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that earlier relapse was significantly predicted by younger age, greater heroin use prior to treatment, history of injecting, and a failure to enter aftercare. Unexpectedly, those who were in a relationship with an opiate user had significantly delayed relapse. Those who completed the entire six-week inpatient treatment programme also had a significantly delayed relapse. In order to reduce relapse and the associated increased risk of fatal overdose, services providing residential opiate detoxification should prepare people for admission, strive to retain them in treatment for the full admission period and actively support their entry into planned aftercare in order to improve outcome.

  17. Determination of soluble ICAM-1 and TNFalphaR in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum levels in a population of Brazilian patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis Determinação dos níveis de ICAM-1 e TNFalfaR solúvel no líquido cefalorraqueano e soro numa população de pacientes brasileiros com esclerose múltipla forma surto-remissão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soniza Vieira Alves-Leon

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines and adhesion molecules have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. In this study we analyzed intrathecal (CSF and serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and TNFalphaR (60kD from 20 patients with clinically definite MS during acute relapse or stable disease. Comparing to control groups of healthy individuals and patients with intervertebral herniated disc, MS patients showed increased levels (pCitocinas e moléculas de adesão estão implicadas na patogênese da esclerose múltipla (EM, uma doença inflamatória crônica do sistema nervoso central. Neste estudo, nós determinamos os níveis solúveis da molécula de adesão intercelular (sICAM-1 e TNFalfaR (60kD no soro e líquido cefalorraqueano (LCR de 20 pacientes com EM clinicamente definida durante surto ou remissão. Os pacientes com EM apresentaram, em comparação com os grupos controle formados por indivíduos sadios e com hérnia de disco intervertebral submetidos a mielografia, níveis significativamente (p< 0.001 elevados de sICAM-1 e TNFalfaR tanto no soro como no LCR. Independente do estágio da doença, nenhuma diferença significativa foi encontrada entre os pacientes durante o surto (657±124.9 ng/ml ou na remissão (627±36.2 ng/ml. Um aumento consistente dos níveis de TNFalfaR no soro e LCR, apontam para a existência de processo inflamatório continuado no tecido cerebral dos pacientes com EM, a despeito da ausência de sinais clínicos de doença em atividade.

  18. Testicular relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: The challenges and lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K P Kulkarni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Relapse of disease is documented in 15-20% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Although testicular relapse is rare with modern risk-adapted treatment protocols, earlier, the testes were a frequently encountered site of relapse and were designated as "drug sanctuaries". Purpose : This descriptive study was designed to assess the pattern of testicular relapse and to identify high-risk factors. Materials and Methods : Data obtained from case records of 407 boys with ALL were analyzed. Fine needle aspiration cytology was carried out in children presenting with painless enlargement of testi(es. Bone marrow aspiration and cerebrospinal fluid examination were performed concomitantly to confirm or exclude disease at these sites. Results : Testicular relapse was documented in 30 boys. It was isolated in 17 patients and associated with bone marrow and/or central nervous system relapse in 13. At relapse, nine boys were over the age of 10 years. The majority were very early and early relapsers. Hyperleucocytosis was documented in five of 30 and seven of 137 relapsers and nonrelapsers, respectively (P = 0.04. Twelve of the 30 boys with testicular relapse were treated with testicular irradiation, reinduction and maintenance therapy. The estimated median overall survival was 33 months. Conclusion : Testicular relapse, which depends on the therapy administered, may manifest several months/years after completion of treatment. The high incidence of testicular relapse in our series implicates the need of revaluation of our protocol and incorporation of high/intermediate dose methotrexate therapy upfront.

  19. Neural correlates of rumination in adolescents with remitted major depressive disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie L; Jacobs, Rachel H; Peters, Amy T; Ajilore, Olu; Watkins, Edward R; Langenecker, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to use fMRI to examine the neural correlates of engaging in rumination among a sample of remitted depressed adolescents, a population at high risk for future depressive relapse. A rumination induction task was used to assess differences in the patterns of neural activation during rumination versus a distraction condition among 26 adolescents in remission from major depressive disorder (rMDD) and in 15 healthy control adolescents. Self-report depression and rumination, as well as clinician-rated depression, were also assessed among all participants. All of the participants recruited regions in the default mode network (DMN), including the posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and medial temporal gyrus, during rumination. Increased activation in these regions during rumination was correlated with increased self-report rumination and symptoms of depression across all participants. Adolescents with rMDD also exhibited greater activation in regions involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing than did healthy peers. The present findings suggest that during ruminative thought, adolescents with rMDD are characterized by increased recruitment of regions within the DMN and in areas involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing.

  20. Dynamics of intraocular IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-10-producing cell populations during relapsing and monophasic rat experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Kaufmann

    Full Text Available A major limitation of most animal models of autoimmune diseases is that they do not reproduce the chronic or relapsing-remitting pattern characteristic of many human autoimmune diseases. This problem has been overcome in our rat models of experimentally induced monophasic or relapsing-remitting autoimmune uveitis (EAU, which depend on the inducing antigen peptides from retinal S-Antigen (monophasic EAU or interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (relapsing EAU. These models enable us to compare autoreactive and regulatory T cell populations. Intraocular, but not peripheral T cells differ in their cytokine profiles (IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-10 at distinct time points during monophasic or relapsing EAU. Only intraocular T cells concomitantly produced IFN-γ, IL-17 and/or IL-10. Monophasic EAU presented rising numbers of cells expressing IFN-γ and IL-17 (Th1/Th17 and cells expressing IL-10 or Foxp3. During relapsing uveitis an increase of intraocular IFN-γ+ cells and a concomitant decrease of IL-17+ cells was detected, while IL-10+ populations remained stable. Foxp3+ cells and cells expressing IL-10, even in combination with IFN-γ or IL-17, increased during the resolution of monophasic EAU, suggesting a regulatory role for these T cells. In general, cells producing multiple cytokines increased in monophasic and decreased in relapsing EAU. The distinct appearance of certain intraocular populations with characteristics of regulatory cells points to a differential influence of the ocular environment on T cells that induce acute and monophasic or relapsing disease. Here we provide evidence that different autoantigens can elicit distinct and differently regulated immune responses. IFN-γ, but not IL-17 seems to be the key player in relapsing-remitting uveitis, as shown by increased, synchronized relapses after intraocular application of IFN-γ. We demonstrated dynamic changes of the cytokine pattern during monophasic and relapsing-remitting disease

  1. Discrete neurocognitive subgroups in fully or partially remitted bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johan Høy; Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurocognitive impairment in remitted patients with bipolar disorder contributes to functional disabilities. However, the pattern and impact of these deficits are unclear. METHODS: We pooled data from 193 fully or partially remitted patients with bipolar disorder and 110 healthy...... controls. Hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted to determine whether there are discrete neurocognitive subgroups in bipolar disorder. The pattern of the cognitive deficits and the characteristics of patients in these neurocognitive subgroups were examined with analyses of covariance and least...... significance difference pairwise comparison. RESULTS: Three discrete neurocognitive subgroups were detected: one that was cognitively intact (46.1%), one that was selectively impaired with deficits in processing speed (32.6%), and one that was globally impaired across verbal learning, working memory...

  2. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Late Relapse in Stage I Testicular Seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, A; Warde, P; Jewett, M; Bedard, P; Hamilton, R; Moore, M; Nayan, M; Huang, R; Atenafu, E G; O'Malley, M; Sweet, J; Chung, P

    2016-10-01

    To identify the characteristics and outcomes associated with late relapse in stage I seminoma. A retrospective review was carried out of all patients with stage I seminoma managed at our institution between 1981 and 2011. Data were obtained from a prospectively maintained database. Late relapse was defined as tumour recurrence > 2 years after orchiectomy. Overall, 1060 stage I seminoma patients were managed with active surveillance (n=766) or adjuvant radiotherapy (n=294). At a median follow-up of 10.6 years (range 1.2-30), 142 patients relapsed at a median (range) of 14 (3-129) months; 128 on active surveillance and 14 after adjuvant radiotherapy. The late relapse rate for the active surveillance and adjuvant radiotherapy groups was 4% and 1%, respectively. There was no specific clinicopathological factor associated with late relapse. Isolated para-aortic node(s) was the most common relapse site in active surveillance patients either in late (88%) or early relapse (82%). Among the active surveillance group, no patients with late relapse subsequently developed a second relapse after either salvage radiotherapy (n=25) or chemotherapy (n=6), whereas in early relapse patients a second relapse was reported in seven (10%) of 72 patients treated with salvage radiotherapy and one (4%) of 23 patients who received chemotherapy; all second relapses were subsequently salvaged with chemotherapy. No patient in the adjuvant radiotherapy group developed a second relapse after salvage chemotherapy (n=10) or inguinal radiotherapy/surgery (n=4). Of seven deaths, only one was related to seminoma. Among active surveillance patients, the 10 year overall survival for late and early relapse groups were 100% and 96% (P = 0.2), whereas the 10 year cancer-specific survival rates were 100% and 99% (P = 0.3), respectively. In stage I seminoma, the extent and pattern of late relapse is similar to that for early relapse. For active surveillance patients, selective use of salvage

  3. Reduced level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in chronic/relapsing Alopecia Areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, Roberto; Vessio, Margherita; d'Ovidio, Francesco Domenico

    2013-04-01

    Current observations link vitamin D deficiency to many autoimmune diseases. There are limited data on vitamin D in Alopecia Areata, an autoimmune disease which in our experience shows seasonality in most of its remitting-relapsing forms. Our results demonstrate the presence of insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OH-D) in many patients with various clinical forms, correlated with the expected increase of the values of Parathyroid Hormone (PTH). This could suggest the possible clinical use of vitamin D in the management of this frustrating disease.

  4. Relapsing Polychondritis Following Alopecia Areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Starr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of alopecia areata followed by relapsing polychondritis is presented. Similar cases from the literature are reviewed and speculation about the relationship of these diseases is offered. Although the occurrence of these diseases together could be coincidental, an association seems immunologically plausible. Thus, relapsing polychondritis might be an unusual systemic manifestation of alopecia areata.

  5. Integrated genomic analysis of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Laura E; Meyer, Julia A; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Wong, Nicholas; Yang, Wenjian; Condos, Gregory; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth; Saffery, Richard; Relling, Mary V; Bhojwani, Deepa; Morrison, Debra J; Carroll, William L

    2011-11-10

    Despite an increase in survival for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the outcome after relapse is poor. To understand the genetic events that contribute to relapse and chemoresistance and identify novel targets of therapy, 3 high-throughput assays were used to identify genetic and epigenetic changes at relapse. Using matched diagnosis/relapse bone marrow samples from children with relapsed B-precursor ALL, we evaluated gene expression, copy number abnormalities (CNAs), and DNA methylation. Gene expression analysis revealed a signature of differentially expressed genes from diagnosis to relapse that is different for early (diversity of genetic changes are seen at relapse, integration of gene expression, CNA, and methylation data suggest a possible convergence on the WNT and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

  6. 复发性多软骨炎气道受累的临床特征及其早期诊断%Clinical characteristics and early diagnosis of patients with relapsing polychondritis with airway involvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈楠; 王振刚; 崔莉; 高圆; 王艳妮

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics and early diagnosis of patients with relapsing polychondritis(RP) with airway involvement.MethodAccording to the presenting symptom, seventy RP patients with airway involvement were divided into two groups, airway-onset group and non-airway-onset group. The clinical characteristics and necessity of assistant examinations were discussed. Result Dyspnea and stridor was the most common symptom of airway involvement in 55 patients(78.6%), followed by hoarseness in 40 patients(57.1%), cough and sputum in 40 patients(57.1%). Larynx, trachea and main bronchi were affected simultaneously in 24 patients(34.3%), being the most common pattern. Larynx involvement was more frequent in airway-onset group, with a higher tracheostomy rate before diagnosis. Airway chondritis was evident on CT scan characterized by tracheobronchial wall thickening or calcification in 10.0% of the patients despite the absence of airway symptoms. Asymptomatic hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction were seen in 40.0% and 51.4% of the patients respectively.Conclusion Airway involvement is common in RP. Airway chondritis may be asymptomatic in some patients. More widespread airway involvement and aggressive disease course are seen in those who presenting with airway chondritis. Asymptomatic airway involvement and inner ear damage are frequent.Radiological examination and functional evaluation are essential for the early recognition of RP.%目的:探讨复发性多软骨炎(relapsing polychondritis,RP)气道受累的临床特征及早期诊断。方法将2010年1月至2016年2月于本院就诊的累及气道的70例RP患者分为气道首发组及非气道首发组,分析其临床特点及辅助检查的必要性。结果前三位气道表现为呼吸困难或喘憋55例(78.6%)、声嘶40例(57.1%)、咳嗽咳痰40例(57.1%)。喉、气管、主支气管同时受累最常见(24例,34.3%)。气道首发组喉部受累及

  7. Prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in patients with early stage prostate cancer after brachytherapy%前列腺癌近距离照射治疗后生化复发的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严维刚; 陈健; 周毅; 周智恩; 麦智鹏; 纪志刚; 李汉忠

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in patients with early stage prostate cancer after brachytherapy.Methods From December 2003 to December 2007,117 patients (age 51-84 years,median 73 years) with early stage prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy at our hospital.The PSA ranged from 0.4 to 47.6 μg/L (median,14.7 g/L),in which 75 cases with PSA< 20.0 μg/L and 42 cases with PSA≥20.0 μg/L.Clinical stage ranged from T1b to T2c.The prostate volume ranged from 13 to 69 ml (average,31 ml),and the percentage of positive biopsy cores was 8% to 100% (average,45%),in which 69 cases with a positivity<50% and 48 cases with a positivity≥50%.The D90 ranged from 106 to 170 Gy (average,142 Gy).And 6 patients were treated with external beam radiation in combination.The biochemical no evidence of disease (bNED) rate was recorded.And possible prognostic factors,including risk stratification,PSA,clinical stage,prostate volume,biopsy positivity and D90,were analyzed by using SPSS 19.0 software.Results The patients were followed up for 19 to 114 months (average,84 months; median,82 months).And biochemical relapse was observed in 33 cases (bNED rate,72%).The bNED rates in low-risk,intermediate-risk and high-risk groups were 86%,79% and 64%,respectively and significant correlations were found between bNED rate and risk stratification (P=0.040).Moreover,the bNED rate was significantly higher in patients with the following factors,namely PSA<20.0 μg/L (P =0.028),percentage of positive biopsy cores<50% (P =0.006) and high-dose implants (D90 ≥ 140 Gy) (P=0.009).Conclusions The long-term efficacy of brachytherapy in early stage prostate cancer is definite.Significant associations are found between bNED rate and risk stratification.And higher rates of biochemical relapse could be found in patients with PSA ≥ 20.0 μg/L,percentage of positive biopsy cores ≥ 50% or D90< 140 Gy groups.%目的 探讨早期前列腺癌

  8. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  9. Relapsing Polychondritis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Türkmen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old man presented with a seven-month history of recurrent swelling, pain and warmth of bilateral ears and a four month history of coughing, tenderness over trachea. Dermatological examination revealed redness, swelling and tenderness of the cartilaginous portion of the ears. A biopsy showed perichondrial lymphocytes and neutrophilic infiltration and fibrosis. According to clinical, histological and radyologic findings, he was diagnosed as “relapsing polychondritis”. Relapsing polychondritis is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent inflamation of articular and non-articular cartilaginous tissue. Antibodies to type II collagen in cartilage are found. Here, a case of relapsing polychondritis

  10. Brain differences between persistent and remitted attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattfeld, Aaron T; Gabrieli, John D E; Biederman, Joseph; Spencer, Thomas; Brown, Ariel; Kotte, Amelia; Kagan, Elana; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Previous resting state studies examining the brain basis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have not distinguished between patients who persist versus those who remit from the diagnosis as adults. To characterize the neurobiological differences and similarities of persistence and remittance, we performed resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in individuals who had been longitudinally and uniformly characterized as having or not having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in childhood and again in adulthood (16 years after baseline assessment). Intrinsic functional brain organization was measured in patients who had a persistent diagnosis in childhood and adulthood (n = 13), in patients who met diagnosis in childhood but not in adulthood (n = 22), and in control participants who never had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 17). A positive functional correlation between posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices, major components of the default-mode network, was reduced only in patients whose diagnosis persisted into adulthood. A negative functional correlation between medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was reduced in both persistent and remitted patients. The neurobiological dissociation between the persistence and remittance of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may provide a framework for the relation between the clinical diagnosis, which indicates the need for treatment, and additional deficits that are common, such as executive dysfunctions.

  11. Negative cognitive styles, dysfunctional attitudes, and the remitted depression paradigm: a search for the elusive cognitive vulnerability to depression factor among remitted depressives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffel, Gerald J; Abramson, Lyn Y; Voelz, Zachary R; Metalsky, Gerald I; Halberstadt, Lisa; Dykman, Benjamin M; Donovan, Patricia; Hogan, Michael E; Hankin, Benjamin L; Alloy, Lauren B

    2005-09-01

    Results from studies using a behavioral high-risk design and approximations to it generally have corroborated the cognitive vulnerability hypothesis of depression, whereas results from remitted depression studies typically have not. Suspecting that design features of previously conducted remitted designs likely precluded them from detecting maladaptive cognitive patterns, the authors conducted a study featuring the remitted design that has been successful in studies of a biological vulnerability for depression. Participants' current depressive symptoms, negative cognitive styles (hopelessness theory), dysfunctional attitudes (Beck's theory), and lifetime prevalence of clinically significant depression were assessed. Participants who had remitted from an episode of clinically significant depression had more negative cognitive styles, but not greater levels of dysfunctional attitudes, than did never depressed individuals. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Deoxyspergualin in relapsing and refractory Wegener's granulomatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flossmann, O; Baslund, B; Bruchfeld, A

    2008-01-01

    at entry and prednisolone doses adjusted according to clinical status. Deoxyspergualin, 0.5 mg/kg per day, was self-administered by subcutaneous injection in six cycles of 21 days with a 7-day washout between cycles. Cycles were stopped early for white blood count less than 4000 cells/mm(3). The primary......-threatening (> or = grade 3) treatment-related adverse events occurred in 24 (53%) patients mostly due to leucopaenias. CONCLUSIONS: Deoxyspergualin achieved a high rate of disease remission and permitted prednisolone reduction in refractory or relapsing Wegener's granulomatosis. Adverse events were common but rarely led...

  13. Financial effects of the international migration in Europe: Modelling the decision to remit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Monica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the behavior of Central and Eastern European migrants regarding money remitting to their country of origin and is based on data provided by the National Immigrant Survey of Spain. In order to analyze the impacts of migrants’ demographic and economic characteristics on remitting behavior, the variables employed in the econometric model referred to individual factors, factors that evaluate the migrant’s links with the native country and those that account for the degree of migrant’s integration in Spain. The factors showing a stronger attachment to relatives and the country of origin have a positive impact on the decision to remit and on the remitted amounts, while the factors that point to the integration of the migrant into Spanish society have a negative and smaller impact on the remitting decision.

  14. Frequency of circulating autoreactive T cells committed to myelin determinants in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elong Ngono, Annie; Pettré, Ségolène; Salou, Marion; Bahbouhi, Bouchaib; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie; Laplaud, David-Axel

    2012-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered as an autoimmune disease in which T cell reactivity to self-antigens expressed in the brain, particularly myelin antigens, plays a pivotal role. Various myelin-derived peptides, including peptides of myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein (PLP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) have been studied as putative target in MS. However, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognizing autoantigens from brain have been detected in the blood of MS patients as well as the blood of normal individuals. Here we review and discuss studies focused on the assessment of the frequency of autoreactive T cells responding to a given antigen using different assays including LDA, IFNγ-ELISPOT and TRAP (T cell Recognition of Antigen Presenting Cells by Protein transfer) in MS.

  15. Persistence of neutralizing antibodies after discontinuation of IFNbeta therapy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bodil; Bendtzen, Klaus; Koch-Henriksen, Nils;

    2006-01-01

    The main objective was to follow serum levels of neutralizing antibodies (NABs) against interferon-beta (IFNbeta) after discontinuation of IFNbeta therapy.......The main objective was to follow serum levels of neutralizing antibodies (NABs) against interferon-beta (IFNbeta) after discontinuation of IFNbeta therapy....

  16. GLATIRAMER ACETATE IS A FIRST-LINE DUAL-ACTION DRUG FOR THE TREATMENT OF RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Shmidt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common and potentially disabling disease of the central nervous system in young people. Not only inflammatory, but also neurodegenerative processes are involved in the pathogenesis of MS. The use of MS-modifying drugs (MSMDs  has led to a substantial reduction in the frequency of MS exacerbations and to the slower development of irreversible neurological deficit. Glatiramer acetate is one of the MSMDs of first choice and has a dual (anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective action. The drug has proven to be effective and safe if administered long-term. Therapy with glatiramer acetate has been established to promote the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors, which prevent the development of a degenerative process and stimulate remyelination, and to slow the progression of cerebral atrophy. Experimental findings suggest that the drug improves the processes of neurogenesis.The efficiency of treatment is known to be associated with patient medication adherence. This largely depends on the frequency and route of drug administration and on the development of adverse events (AEs. To improve treatment adherence to glatiramer acetate, its new 40-mg formulation has been designed, which allows it to be administered only thrice weekly. The use of the formulation has demonstrated its efficacy and safety and resulted in a considerable reduction in the incidence rate of AEs.

  17. Giving meaning to illness: An investigation of self-defining memories in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltzenlogel, Virginie; Ernst, Alexandra; de Sèze, Jérôme; Brassat, David; Manning, Liliann; Berna, Fabrice

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are often unable to adequately fulfill their established roles due to physical disabilities and cognitive changes, making this chronic illness particularly threatening to personal identity. Twenty-five MS patients and 25 healthy controls were asked to recall five self-defining memories (SDM). Overall characteristics of SDM did not differ between patients and controls; MS patients displayed preserved capacity to draw meaning upon past events. Moreover, almost two-thirds of MS patients mentioned at least one illness related SDM and about 25% of patients' SDM referred to MS. These memories were experienced as more negative and associated with more tension than other SDM but led toward more positive emotion and less negative emotion over time; they were also more central and more integrated to the personal identity. We concluded that self-challenging events due to MS may trigger both cognitive and emotional processes enabling the integration of illness in patients' self-representations.

  18. [Impact of pharmaceutical intervention in preventing relapses in depression in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Valera, María; Peñarrubia-María, M Teresa; Fernández-Vergel, Rita; Carvajal Tejadillo, Andrea Cecilia; Fernández Sánchez, Ana; Aznar-Lou, Ignacio; March-Pujol, Marian; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the long-term impact of a brief pharmacist intervention (PI) compared with usual care (UC) on prevention of depression relapse. randomised controlled clinical trial Primary Care Of the 179 depressed patients initiating antidepressants, the 113 whose clinical symptoms had remitted (main definition) at 6 months assessment were selected for this secondary study (PI=58; UC=55). PI was an interview to promote medication adherence when patients get antidepressants from pharmacy. Baseline, 3 months, and six-months follow-up assessments were made. The severity of depressive symptoms was evaluated with PHQ9. Patients presenting a remission of symptoms were selected. The patient medical records were reviewed to identify a relapse in the following 12 months by using 4 indicators. There was a lower proportion of patients that relapsed in the PI group than in the UC group 18 months after initiation of treatment, but the difference was not statistically significant either in the intent-to-treat analysis (OR=0.734 [95%CI; 0.273-1.975]) or the per-protocol analysis (OR=0.615 [95%CI; 0.183 -2.060]). All the sensitivity analyses showed consistent results. The sample size and adherence to the protocol in the intervention group were low. PI group showed a non-statistically significant tendency towards presenting fewer relapses. This could be related to the improvement in adherence among patients that received the intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. A Predictive Model for Corticosteroid Response in Individual Patients with MS Relapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusa, Martin; Cano, Stefan J.; Porter, Bernadette; Riazi, Afsane; Thompson, Alan J.; Chataway, Jeremy; Hardy, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To derive a simple predictive model to guide the use of corticosteroids in patients with relapsing remitting MS suffering an acute relapse. Materials and Methods We analysed individual patient randomised controlled trial data (n=98) using a binary logistic regression model based on age, gender, baseline disability scores [physician-observed: expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and patient reported: multiple sclerosis impact scale 29 (MSIS-29)], and the time intervals between symptom onset or referral and treatment. Results Based on two a priori selected cut-off points (improvement in EDSS ≥ 0.5 and ≥ 1.0), we found that variables which predicted better response to corticosteroids after 6 weeks were younger age and lower MSIS-29 physical score at the time of relapse (model fit 71.2% - 73.1%). Conclusions This pilot study suggests two clinical variables which may predict the majority of the response to corticosteroid treatment in patients undergoing an MS relapse. The study is limited in being able to clearly distinguish factors associated with treatment response or spontaneous recovery and needs to be replicated in a larger prospective study. PMID:25785460

  20. Prediction of acute multiple sclerosis relapses by transcription levels of peripheral blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or-Bach Rotem

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to predict the spatial frequency of relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS would enable physicians to decide when to intervene more aggressively and to plan clinical trials more accurately. Methods In the current study our objective was to determine if subsets of genes can predict the time to the next acute relapse in patients with MS. Data-mining and predictive modeling tools were utilized to analyze a gene-expression dataset of 94 non-treated patients; 62 patients with definite MS and 32 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS. The dataset included the expression levels of 10,594 genes and annotated sequences corresponding to 22,215 gene-transcripts that appear in the microarray. Results We designed a two stage predictor. The first stage predictor was based on the expression level of 10 genes, and predicted the time to next relapse with a resolution of 500 days (error rate 0.079, p Conclusion We conclude that gene expression analysis is a valuable tool that can be used in clinical practice to predict future MS disease activity. Similar approach can be also useful for dealing with other autoimmune diseases that characterized by relapsing-remitting nature.

  1. Classification of relapse pattern in clubfoot treated with Ponseti technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    In the bilateral group, 21 children (38 feet, 28% had Grade IA relapse. Twenty four children (46 feet, 34% had dynamic intoeing (Grade IB on walking. Thirteen children (22 feet, 16% had true ankle equinus of varying degress (Grade IIA; eight children (13 feet, 9.7% had fixed adduction deformity of the forefoot (Grade IIB and seven children (14 feet, 10.7% had two or more fixed deformities. In the unilateral group seven cases (38% had reduced dorsiflexion (Grade IA, six (33% had dynamic adduction (Grade IB, two (11% had fixed equinus and adduction respectively (Grade IIA and IIB and one (5% child had fixed equinus and adduction deformity (Grade III. The relapses were treated by full time splint application, re-casting, tibialis anterior transfer, posterior release, corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy and a comprehensive subtalar release. Splint compliance was compromised in both groups. Conclusion: Relapse pattern in clubfeet can be broadly classified into three distinct subsets. Early identification of relapses and early intervention will prevent major soft tissue surgery. A universal language of relapse pattern will allow comparison of results of intervention.

  2. Relapse prevention for addictive behaviors

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    George William H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Relapse Prevention (RP model has been a mainstay of addictions theory and treatment since its introduction three decades ago. This paper provides an overview and update of RP for addictive behaviors with a focus on developments over the last decade (2000-2010. Major treatment outcome studies and meta-analyses are summarized, as are selected empirical findings relevant to the tenets of the RP model. Notable advances in RP in the last decade include the introduction of a reformulated cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, the application of advanced statistical methods to model relapse in large randomized trials, and the development of mindfulness-based relapse prevention. We also review the emergent literature on genetic correlates of relapse following pharmacological and behavioral treatments. The continued influence of RP is evidenced by its integration in most cognitive-behavioral substance use interventions. However, the tendency to subsume RP within other treatment modalities has posed a barrier to systematic evaluation of the RP model. Overall, RP remains an influential cognitive-behavioral framework that can inform both theoretical and clinical approaches to understanding and facilitating behavior change.

  3. Cognitive and psychosocial impairment in remitted bipolar patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Moreira Lima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence showing that bipolar disorder is associated with persistent cognitive deficits. However, the exact meaning and impact of cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder is still not entirely known, even though they have been associated with poor psychosocial functioning. This study aims to summarize cognitive and psychosocial functioning findings of remitted bipolar patients. We conducted an extensive Medline search of the published English literature for the period January 2000– March 2014 using a variety of search terms to find relevant articles. Bibliographies of retrieved papers were further analysed for publications of interest. Our results showed that: (1 all mood states of bipolar disorder are associated with cognitive impairment. However, the euthymic state is associated with less impairment than the other states; (2 there is a strong association between clinical factors (i.e, duration of illness, number of episodes, residual mood symptoms, comorbidities and cognitive impairment in euthymic bipolar patients, although these factors do not account fully for these deficits; (3 cognitive deficits, in particular, verbal learning and executive dysfunctions may contribute to poor functioning. In conclusion, our review suggests that cognitive deficits are strongly associated with mood episodes; such deficits persist, in lower degree, during remission. Impairment on cognitive performance may explain, in part, poor long–term functioning in remitted bipolar patients. It highlights that psychosocial interventions in combination with pharmacotherapy should be considered to improve cognition and enhance the level of functioning. Therefore, studies assessing the efficacy of novel strategies focused on cognitive and functional status are an important area of future investigation in bipolar disorder.

  4. Increased amygdala response to shame in remitted major depressive disorder.

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    Erdem Pulcu

    Full Text Available Proneness to self-blaming moral emotions such as shame and guilt is increased in major depressive disorder (MDD, and may play an important role in vulnerability even after symptoms have subsided. Social psychologists have argued that shame-proneness is relevant for depression vulnerability and is distinct from guilt. Shame depends on the imagined critical perception of others, whereas guilt results from one's own judgement. The neuroanatomy of shame in MDD is unknown. Using fMRI, we compared 21 participants with MDD remitted from symptoms with no current co-morbid axis-I disorders, and 18 control participants with no personal or family history of MDD. The MDD group exhibited higher activation of the right amygdala and posterior insula for shame relative to guilt (SPM8. This neural difference was observed despite equal levels of rated negative emotional valence and frequencies of induced shame and guilt experience across groups. These same results were found in the medication-free MDD subgroup (N = 15. Increased amygdala and posterior insula activations, known to be related to sensory perception of emotional stimuli, distinguish shame from guilt responses in remitted MDD. People with MDD thus exhibit changes in the neural response to shame after symptoms have subsided. This supports the hypothesis that shame and guilt play at least partly distinct roles in vulnerability to MDD. Shame-induction may be a more sensitive probe of residual amygdala hypersensitivity in MDD compared with facial emotion-evoked responses previously found to normalize on remission.

  5. Advances in the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: the role of pegylated interferon β-1a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furber KL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kendra L Furber,1–3 Marina Van Agten,1–3 Charity Evans,2,4 Azita Haddadi,2 J Ronald Doucette,3–5,† Adil J Nazarali1–4 1Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, 2College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, 3Neuroscience Research Cluster, University of Saskatchewan, 4Cameco Multiple Sclerosis Neuroscience Research Center, City Hospital, 5Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada †Dr. J Ronald Doucette passed away on May 15, 2016 Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with unpredictable phases of relapse and remission. The cause of MS is unknown, but the pathology is characterized by infiltration of auto-reactive immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS resulting in widespread neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Immunomodulatory-based therapies emerged in the 1990s and have been a cornerstone of disease management ever since. Interferon β (IFNβ was the first biologic approved after demonstrating decreased relapse rates, disease activity and progression of disability in clinical trials. However, frequent dosing schedules have limited patient acceptance for long-term therapy. Pegylation, the process by which molecules of polyethylene glycol are covalently linked to a compound, has been utilized to increase the half-life of IFNβ and decrease the frequency of administration required. To date, there has been one clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of pegylated IFN. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of IFN in the treatment of MS and evaluate the available evidence for pegylated IFN therapy in MS. Keywords: interferon, pegylation, multiple sclerosis, relapsing–remitting, disease-modifying therapy

  6. [Relapse and insomnia in unipolar major depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falussy, Linda; Balla, Petra; Frecska, Ede

    2014-09-01

    The connection between mood and sleep disorders is highly complex and can be studied and interpreted in many respects. Epidemiologic data show that the co-occurrence of the two disorders is quite frequent. Thus an approach regarding them as a unit promotes biological psychiatric research by revealing new pathophysiological and therapeutic conclusions. Chronobiological results related to mood disorders have recently been described in excellent reviews including Hungarian ones. In the present review, the necessity of treatment of sleep disorders is evaluated in the context of relapse/remission/recurrence. Scientific data suggest that patients with insomnia have a ten-fold risk of developing depression, and insomnia plays an important role in depression relapses, recurrence of depressive episodes and becoming depression chronic. From neurobiological point of view, mood and sleep disorders have many features in common. Research has revealed decreased levels of melatonin and advanced sleep phases (shifted earlier) in depression, and altered and imbalanced monoaminergic pathways, and REM abnormalities in sleep disorders. Some authors suggest that REM abnormalities disappear along with the mood improvement, and the sleep structure can completely restore after remission. However, persistent abnormalities of REM sleep and slow wave sleep have also been found in remission, which increased the risk of the relapse and recurrence. Recently, there is an agreement as to the early treatment of insomnia can prevent the development of mood abnormalities. Alterations of cascades related to neural plasticity can also be a link between sleep and mood disorders. Neural plasticity is closely related to learning, sleeping, and cortisol regulation (coping with stress), and this draws the attention to comorbidity with further disorders (anxiety, dementia).

  7. Carfilzomib boosted combination therapy for relapsed multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Raphael E; Manasanch, Elisabet E

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a proteasome inhibitor that binds selectively and irreversibly to the 20S proteasome, the proteolytic core particle within the 26S proteasome, resulting in the accumulation of proteasome substrates and ultimately growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. The development and ultimate approval of this medication by regulatory agencies has been an important step toward improving clinical outcomes in multiple myeloma. Although initially approved as a single agent for the treatment of multiply relapsed and/or refractory myeloma, in the USA, it is now widely used in the early relapse setting in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Carfilzomib has also been studied in combination with second-generation immunomodulatory drugs, histone deacetylase inhibitors, alkylating agents and other novel medications. In this review article, we will discuss the efficacy, safety, tolerability and quality of life of carfilzomib-based combination therapies, as well as novel agents, for relapsed multiple myeloma. PMID:28243125

  8. Cerebral metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive dysfunction in early multiple sclerosis: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Mathiesen, Henrik K; Tscherning, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    and neurological disability. METHODS: We studied 20 recently diagnosed, clinically definite, relapsing-remitting MS patients. Global and cortical CMRglc was estimated using PET with 18-F-deoxyglucose and NAA/Cr ratio was measured using multislice echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. All subjects were neuro...

  9. Hemicrania continua: a second case in which the remitting form evolved from the chronic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Lisa A; Newman, Lawrence C

    2010-09-01

    We report the case of a woman with a 15-year history of chronic hemicrania continua, which over time evolved to remitting hemicrania continua. This is the second reported case in the literature documenting this transition.

  10. Cognitive Deficits as a Mediator of Poor Occupational Function in Remitted Major Depressive Disorder Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Young Sup; Rosenblat, Joshua D.; Kakar, Ron; Bahk, Won-Myong; McIntyre, Roger S.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients have been described in numerous studies. However, few reports have aimed to describe cognitive deficits in the remitted state of MDD and the mediational effect of cognitive deficits on occupational outcome. The aim of the current review is to synthesize the literature on the mediating and moderating effects of specific domains of cognition on occupational impairment among people with remitted MDD. In addition, predictors of cognit...

  11. Relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: management strategies and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wudhikarn, Kitsada; Brunstein, Claudio G; Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    The outcome and management of relapsed lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is difficult. Therapeutic options may include donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), reduction of immunosuppression (RIS), chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, second HCT, and experimental treatments, but reported data contrasting the response and efficacy of these salvage treatments are limited. We describe the treatments, response, prognosis, and long-term survival of 72 patients with relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic HCT. Between 1991 and 2007, 227 lymphoma patients underwent allogeneic HCT. Of these, 72 (32%) developed relapse/progression after their HCT at a median of 99 days (0-1898 days); 37 had early (100 days) post-HCT. Three-year survival after HCT was significantly better in late than early relapse (53%; 95% confidence interval [CI] [34%-69%] versus 36%, [20%-52%], P = .02). Of 72 relapsed patients, 29 (40%) survived at a median of 34 (3-148) months posttransplant. The most common cause of death was underlying lymphoma (79%). The overall prognosis of relapsed/progressive lymphoma after allogeneic HCT is disappointing, yet half of patients respond to withdrawal of immunosuppression and additional therapies. Novel treatments can control lymphoma with acceptable morbidity. Particularly for patients with later relapse, ongoing treatment after relapse can yield meaningful benefit and prolonged survival.

  12. RALLE pilot: response-guided therapy for marrow relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Békàssy, Albert N; Glomstein, Anders; Möttönen, Merja

    2012-05-01

    Despite improved treatment results of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 20% to 30% have a relapse, and then the outcome is very poor. We studied 40 children with ALL marrow relapse piloting an ALL relapse protocol with well-known drugs and drug combinations by using a concept of response-guided design. We also measured response in logarithmic fashion. Our primary end points were achievement of M1 marrow status, minimal residual disease status below 10, and second remission. The remission induction rate was 90% with 10% induction mortality. After the A blocks (dexamethasone, vincristine, idarubicin and pegylated L-asparaginase), 85% had M1 status, 39% had minimal residual disease ≤1×10, and 66% had 2 to 3 log response. After B1 block (cyclo, VP-16) the figures were 92%, 58%, and 83%, respectively. Twenty-five of 40 patients received allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three-year event-free survival of the whole cohort was 37%, and the relapse rate was 38%. Three-year event-free survival by risk group was 53% for late, 34% for early, and 21% for very early relapses. An ALL marrow relapse nonresponsive to steroids, vincristine, asparaginase, anthracyclines, and alkylating agents is uncommon, and these classic drugs can still be advocated for induction of ALL relapse. The problems lie in creating a consolidation capable of preventing particularly posttransplant relapses.

  13. Determinants of Relapse Following Smoking Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul M.

    Although research has been conducted on who will relapse after having quit smoking in clinics, little has been done to determine the immediate precipitants of recidivism. A telephone hotline, manned by four experienced interviewers, was set up to receive calls from ex-smokers who had relapsed or who felt at high risk for relapse. A structured…

  14. Pituitary gland volume in currently depressed and remitted depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Valentina; Allen, Nicholas B; Fornito, Alex; Pantelis, Christos; De Plato, Giovanni; Ang, Anthony; Yücel, Murat

    2009-04-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with increased pituitary gland volume (PGV), which is thought to reflect stress-related dysregulation related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. However, it is unclear whether PGV alteration reflects a "dynamic" change related to current mood instability or if it is a stable marker of illness vulnerability. In this study we investigated PGV in currently depressed patients (cMDD) (n=31), remitted depressed patients (rMDD) (n=31) and healthy controls (n=33), using 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The groups were matched for age and gender. We found no significant PGV, intra-cranial volume (ICV) or whole brain volume (WBV) differences between cMDD patients, rMDD patients and healthy controls. Furthermore, PGV was not correlated with clinical features of depression (e.g., age of onset; number of episodes; and scores on subscales of the Beck Depression Inventory, the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, and the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire). In conclusion, PGV does not appear to be a marker of current or past MDD in adult patients.

  15. Implicit and explicit self-esteem in remitted depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeijers, Danique; Vrijsen, Janna N; van Oostrom, Iris; Isaac, Linda; Speckens, Anne; Becker, Eni S; Rinck, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Low self-esteem is a symptom of depression and depression vulnerability. Prior research on self-esteem has largely focused on implicit (ISE) and explicit self-esteem (ESE) as two separate constructs, missing their interaction. Therefore, the current study investigated the interaction between ISE and ESE in a depression-vulnerable group (remitted depressed patients; RDs), compared to never-depressed controls (ND). Seventy-five RDs and 75 NDs participated in the study. To measure ESE, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) was used. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) and the Name Letter Preference Task (NLPT) were used to assess ISE. RDs reported lower ESE than NDs. However, the two groups did not differ on ISE. RDs exhibited a damaged self-esteem or a low-congruent self-esteem, similar to what has been found in currently depressed patients. Moreover, damaged self-esteem was associated with residual depressive symptoms. The results need to be interpreted with care because the IAT and NLPT did not reveal the same associations with the clinical measures. Implicit and explicit self-esteem may be different constructs in depression and studying the combination is important. The present study provides evidence indicating that damaged self-esteem may be more detrimental than low congruent self-esteem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurocognitive predictors of social cognition in remitted schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Bhagyavathi, Haralahalli D; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Kumar, Keshav J; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2014-10-30

    Knowledge of how specific neurocognition (NC) abilities predict social cognition (SC) in schizophrenia has potential to guide novel integrated cognitive-remediation therapies. The scope of studies conducted in this field is limited as they have not examined a comprehensive set of SC domains and they employ small sample sizes of heterogeneous patient groups. We studied a broad range of NC (sustained attention, processing speed, verbal/visual memory and visual processing/encoding, cognitive flexibility and planning) and SC [different levels of theory of mind (ToM)], attributional bias, emotion recognition and social perception] abilities in 170 remitted schizophrenia patients. Multivariate regression analyses revealed attention and planning as predictors of 1st order ToM. Memory encoding was the strongest predictor of 2nd order ToM. Faux-pas recognition, social perception and emotion recognition were influenced by a combination of cognitive flexibility and memory encoding abilities. Overall, NC predicted anywhere between ~4% and 40% of variance observed in specific SC sub-dimensions of attributional bias (4%), 1st order (19%) and 2nd order (12%) theory of mind, faux-pas recognition (28%), social perception (29%) and emotion recognition (39%). Individual SC abilities are predicted by distinctive as well as shared NC abilities. These findings have important implications for integrated cognitive remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tick-borne relapsing fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, C T

    1980-12-01

    Three cases of tick-borne fever diagnosed during the summer of 1979 are reported and the ecoepidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of this infection are reviewed. Although challenging, the diagnosis can be made easily if specific historical clues are sought and the patient's blood smear is carefully examined. The diagnosis of this condition early in its course can save clinicians and patients the anxiety and cost of the work-up of a "fever of unknown origin." Since vacationing in the national parks and forests has become increasingly popular among many American families, tick-borne relapsing fever should be considered in any patient with an acute or recurrent fever of unknown origin who exhibits nonspecific symptoms of an undifferentiated "viral illness," and who gives a history of sleeping overnight in log cabins in the coniferous forests of the Western mountains of the United States.

  18. The Regulation Market Integrity and Transparency in the Energy Sector (remit). The wholesale markets for energy fully in sight; De Verordening Marktintegriteit en Transparantie in de Energiesector (Remit). De groothandelsmarkten voor energie volledig in het vizier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bruijne, B.B. [Bird and Bird LLP, Den Haag (Netherlands); Van Haersma Buma, W.H.A. [Public and Regulatory Affairs, APX-Endex, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    The European REMIT regulation entered into force on 28 December 2011, comprising drastic measures to prevent market manipulation and insider trading on wholesale markets for electricity and gas. Nevertheless, the scope and meaning of REMIT are still partly uncertain for market parties. This article aims to explore REMIT by paying attention to the coherence with regulations in neighboring areas (MAD, MiFID, EMIR). [Dutch] De Europese titel verordening Remit is op 28 december 2011 van kracht geworden en omvat ingrijpende maatregelen om marktmanipulatie en handel met voorwetenschap op de groothandelsmarkten voor elektriciteit en gas te voorkomen. Toch zijn de strekking en betekenis van Remit voor marktpartijen nog deels ongewis. Dit artikel is bedoeld als een verkenning van Remit waarbij aandacht wordt besteed aan de samenhang met regelingen op aangrenzende terreinen (MAD, MiFID, EMIR)

  19. Natalizumab reduces relapse clinical severity and improves relapse recovery in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublin, Fred D; Cutter, Gary; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pace, Amy; Campbell, Nolan R; Belachew, Shibeshih

    2014-11-01

    Compare relapse clinical severity, post-relapse residual disability, and the probability of confirmed complete recovery from relapse between patients who relapsed during natalizumab (n=183/627 [29%]) and placebo (n=176/315 [56%]) treatments in the AFFIRM trial. In this post-hoc analysis, relapse clinical severity and residual disability were defined by change in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score occurring between pre-relapse and at-relapse assessment and between pre-relapse and post-relapse assessment, respectively. Patients were considered completely recovered from relapse when their post-relapse EDSS score was less than or equal to their pre-relapse EDSS score, and this was maintained for 12 or 24 weeks. At relapse, an increase in EDSS score of ≥0.5 points occurred in 71% of natalizumab and 84% of placebo patients (P=0.0088); an increase of ≥1.0 point occurred in 49% of natalizumab and 61% of placebo patients (P=0.0349) (mean increase in EDSS at relapse: natalizumab=0.77; placebo=1.09; P=0.0044). After relapse, residual disability of ≥0.5 EDSS points remained in 31% of natalizumab and 45% of placebo patients (P=0.0136) (mean post-relapse residual EDSS increase: natalizumab=0.06; placebo=0.28; P=0.0170). In patients with an increase in EDSS of ≥0.5 or ≥1.0 during relapse, natalizumab increased the probability of 12-week confirmed complete recovery from relapse by 55% (hazard ratio [HR]=1.554; P=0.0161) and 67% (HR=1.673; P=0.0319) compared to placebo, respectively. In AFFIRM, natalizumab treatment decreased the clinical severity of relapses and improved recovery from disability induced by relapses. These beneficial effects would limit the step-wise accumulation of disability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Continued Effectiveness of Relapse Prevention Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Following Fluoxetine Treatment in Youth With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Graham J; Kennard, Betsy D; Mayes, Taryn L; Nakonezny, Paul A; Moore, Jarrette; Jones, Jessica M; Foxwell, Aleksandra A; King, Jessica

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the continued effect of a sequential treatment strategy (fluoxetine followed by continued medication plus relapse prevention cognitive-behavioral therapy [RP-CBT]) on relapse prevention beyond the treatment phase. Youth (aged 8-17 years) with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with fluoxetine for 6 weeks. Responders (≥50% reduction on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised [CDRS-R]) were randomized to continued medication management alone (MM) or continued medication management plus RP-CBT (MM+CBT) for an additional 6 months. Long-term follow-up assessments were conducted at weeks 52 and 78. Of 144 youth randomized to MM (n = 69) or MM+CBT (n = 75), 67% had at least 1 follow-up assessment, with equal rates in the 2 groups. Remission rates were high, although most had remitted during the 30-week treatment period. Only 6 additional participants remitted during long-term follow-up, and there were no differences on time to remission between MM+CBT and MM. The MM+CBT group had a significantly lower risk of relapse than the MM group throughout the 78-week follow-up period (hazard ratio = 0.467, 95% CI = 0.264 to 0.823; χ(2) = 6.852, p = .009). The estimated probability of relapse during the 78-week period was lower with MM+CBT than MM only (36% versus 62%). Mean time to relapse was also significantly longer with MM+CBT compared to MM alone by approximately 3 months (p = .007). The addition of RP-CBT after acute response to medication management had a continued effect on reducing risk of relapse even after the end of treatment. Clinical trial registration information-Sequential Treatment of Pediatric MDD to Increase Remission and Prevent Relapse; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00612313. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Analysis of Relapse Rates and Predictors of Relapse in 2 Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Desvenlafaxine for Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad, Rana S.; Guico-Pabia, Christine J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate relapse rates and predictors of relapse in 2 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of desvenlafaxine for major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Study 1: week 8 responders to open-label desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d entered a 12-week open-label stability phase. Patients with a continuing, stable response at week 20 were randomly assigned to 6-month, double-blind treatment (desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d or placebo). Study 1 was conducted between June 2009 and March 2011 at 87 sites worldwide. Study 2: week 12 responders to open-label desvenlafaxine 200 or 400 mg/d were randomly assigned to 6-month, double-blind treatment (desvenlafaxine 200 mg/d, 400 mg/d, or placebo). Study 2 was conducted between June 2003 and August 2005 at 49 sites in Europe, the United States, and Taiwan. Relapse was assessed separately by study with log-rank test using protocol definitions of relapse and with 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) score ≥ 16 at any time during the double-blind phase. Kaplan-Meier estimates evaluated time to relapse, censoring data at months 1, 2, and 3 and overall; treatments were compared using hazard ratios. Cox proportional hazards models assessed relapse predictors. Results: Overall relapse rates for all definitions were significantly lower for desvenlafaxine versus placebo for both studies (all P ≤ .002). In study 1, rates were significantly lower for desvenlafaxine versus placebo at month 2 (P = .016) and month 3 (P = .007) using the protocol definition. In study 2, relapse rates were significantly lower for desvenlafaxine versus placebo at months 1, 2, and 3 for both definitions (P Desvenlafaxine 50 to 400 mg/d effectively prevented relapse at 6 months. Desvenlafaxine significantly prevented relapse early (month 1) versus placebo only in study 2. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers:NCT00887224 and NCT00075257 PMID:26137355

  2. Character pathology and neuropsychological test performance in remitted opiate dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinfeld Matthew

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive deficits and personality pathology are prevalent in opiate dependence, even during periods of remission, and likely contribute to relapse. Understanding the relationship between the two in vulnerable, opiate-addicted patients may contribute to the design of better treatment and relapse prevention strategies. Methods The Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory (MCMI and a series of neuropsychological tests were administered to three subject groups: 29 subjects receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MM, 27 subjects in protracted abstinence from methadone maintenance treatment (PA, and 29 healthy non-dependent comparison subjects. Relationships between MCMI scores, neuropsychological test results, and measures of substance use and treatment were examined using bivariate correlation and regression analysis. Results MCMI scores were greater in subjects with a history of opiate dependence than in comparison subjects. A significant negative correlation between MCMI scores and neuropsychological test performance was identified in all subjects. MCMI scores were stronger predictors of neuropsychological test performance than measures of drug use. Conclusion Formerly methadone-treated opiate dependent individuals in protracted opiate abstinence demonstrate a strong relationship between personality pathology and cognitive deficits. The cause of these deficits is unclear and most likely multi-factorial. This finding may be important in understanding and interpreting neuropsychological testing deficiencies in opiate-dependent subjects.

  3. Injectable interferon beta-1b for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan M Jankovic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Slobodan M JankovicPharmacology Department, Medical Faculty, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, SerbiaAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease with either a progressive (10%–15% or relapsing-remitting (85%–90% course. The pathological hallmarks of MS are lesions of both white and grey matter in the central nervous system. The onset of the disease is usually around 30 years of age. The patients experience an acute focal neurologic dysfunction which is not characteristic, followed by partial or complete recovery. Acute episodes of neurologic dysfunction with diverse signs and symptoms will then recur throughout the life of a patient, with periods of partial or complete remission and clinical stability in between. Currently, there are several therapeutic options for MS with disease-modifying properties. Immunomodulatory therapy with interferon beta-1b (IFN-β1b or -1a, glatiramer and natalizumab shows similar efficacy; in a resistant or intolerant patient, the most recently approved therapeutic option is mitoxantrone. IFN-β1b in patients with MS binds to specific receptors on surface of immune cells, changing the expression of several genes and leading to a decrease in quantity of cell-associated adhesion molecules, inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class II expression and reduction in inflammatory cells migration into the central nervous system. After 2 years of treatment, IFN-β1b reduces the risk of development of clinically defined MS from 45% (with placebo to 28% (with IFN-β1b. It also reduces relapses for 34% (1.31 exacerbations annually with placebo and 0.9 with higher dose of IFN-β1b and makes 31% more patients relapse-free. In secondary-progressive disease annual rate of progression is 3% lower with IFN-β1b. In recommended doses IFN-β1b causes the following frequent adverse effects: injection site reactions (redness, discoloration, inflammation, pain, necrosis and non

  4. Time to relapse and remission of bipolar disorder: findings from a 1-year prospective study in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelahanaj T

    2013-08-01

    median time to remission was 67.5 days (72.5 days for depressive episodes versus 58.0 days for manic episodes, log rank P = 0.014. Conclusions: The 1-year relapse rate in Thai patients with BD was 21.7% or 0.31 episodes per person-year. About one-fifth of recovered patients had mood relapses within 371 days. On average, a mood episode would remit in 67.5 days. Keywords: bipolar disorder, course, outcome, relapse, remission, Thai

  5. Carfilzomib boosted combination therapy for relapsed multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiner RE

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Raphael E Steiner, Elisabet E Manasanch Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Carfilzomib is a proteasome inhibitor that binds selectively and irreversibly to the 20S proteasome, the proteolytic core particle within the 26S proteasome, resulting in the accumulation of proteasome substrates and ultimately growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. The development and ultimate approval of this medication by regulatory agencies has been an important step toward improving clinical outcomes in multiple myeloma. Although initially approved as a single agent for the treatment of multiply relapsed and/or refractory myeloma, in the USA, it is now widely used in the early relapse setting in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Carfilzomib has also been studied in combination with second-generation immunomodulatory drugs, histone deacetylase inhibitors, alkylating agents and other novel medications. In this review article, we will discuss the efficacy, safety, tolerability and quality of life of carfilzomib-based combination therapies, as well as novel agents, for relapsed multiple myeloma. Keywords: multiple myeloma, relapsed and refractory myeloma, carfilzomib, novel drugs, salvage chemotherapy

  6. Multimodal Hazard Rate for Relapse in Breast Cancer: Quality of Data and Calibration of Computer Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Retsky

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much has occurred since our 2010 report in Cancers. In the past few years we published several extensive reviews of our research so a brief review is all that will be provided here. We proposed in the earlier reports that most relapses in breast cancer occur within 5 years of surgery and seem to be associated with some unspecified manner of surgery-induced metastatic initiation. These events can be identified in relapse data and are correlated with clinical data. In the last few years an unexpected mechanism has become apparent. Retrospective analysis of relapse events by a Brussels anesthesiology group reported that a perioperative NSAID analgesic seems to reduce early relapses five-fold. We then proposed that primary surgery produces a transient period of systemic inflammation. This has now been identified by inflammatory markers in serum post mastectomy. That could explain the early relapses. It is possible that an inexpensive and non-toxic NSAID can reduce breast cancer relapses significantly. We want to take this opportunity to discuss database quality issues and our relapse hazard data in some detail. We also present a demonstration that the computer simulation can be calibrated with Adjuvant-on-line, an often used clinical tool for prognosis in breast cancer.

  7. Ibrutinib for previously untreated and relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia with TP53 aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Valdez, Janet; Martyr, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) with TP53 aberrations respond poorly to first-line chemoimmunotherapy, resulting in early relapse and short survival. We investigated the safety and activity of ibrutinib in previously untreated and relapsed or refractory CLL with TP53...

  8. Opposite roles of NMDA receptors in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

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    Silvia Rossi

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission and plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs could modulate the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS. Here the role of NMDARs in MS was first explored in 691 subjects carrying specific allelic variants of the NR1 subunit gene or of the NR2B subunit gene of this glutamate receptor. The analysis was replicated for significant SNPs in an independent sample of 1548 MS subjects. The C allele of rs4880213 was found to be associated with reduced NMDAR-mediated cortical excitability, and with increased probability of having more disability than the CT/TT MS subjects. MS severity was higher in the CC group among relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS patients, while primary progressive MS (PP-MS subjects homozygous for the T allele had more pronounced clinical worsening. Mean time to first relapse, but not to an active MRI scan, was lower in the CC group of RR-MS patients, and the number of subjects with two or more clinical relapses in the first two years of the disease was higher in CC compared to CT/TT group. Furthermore, the percentage of relapses associated with residual disability was lower in subjects carrying the T allele. Lesion load at the MRI was conversely unaffected by the C or T allele of this SNP in RR-MS patients. Axonal and neuronal degeneration at the optical coherence tomography was more severe in the TT group of PP-MS patients, while reduced retinal nerve fiber thickness had less consequences on visual acuity in RR-MS patients bearing the T allele. Finally, the T allele was associated with preserved cognitive abilities at the Rao's brief repeatable neuropsychological battery in RR-MS. Signaling through glutamate NMDARs enhances both compensatory synaptic plasticity and excitotoxic neurodegeneration, impacting in opposite ways on RR-MS and PP-MS pathophysiological mechanisms.

  9. Cigarette Smoking Is Associated With Increased Risk of Substance Use Disorder Relapse: A Nationally Representative, Prospective Longitudinal Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Andrea H; Platt, Jonathan; Esan, Hannah; Galea, Sandro; Erlich, Debra; Goodwin, Renee D

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking and long-term outcomes for substance use disorder (SUD). The current study examined the association between smoking and SUD relapse among adults with remitted SUDs. Analyses were conducted on respondents who completed Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and met DSM-IV criteria for substance abuse and dependence prior to but not during the year before the Wave 1 interview (n = 5,515). Relationships between smoking status (Wave 2 smoking vs nonsmoking among Wave 1 smokers; Wave 2 smoking vs nonsmoking among Wave 1 nonsmokers) and Wave 2 substance use and SUD relapse were examined using logistic regression analyses. Analyses were adjusted for demographics, psychiatric and alcohol use disorders, nicotine dependence, and SUD severity. In the fully adjusted models, continued smoking at Wave 2 among Wave 1 smokers was associated with significantly greater odds of substance use (OR = 1.56, 95% CI, 1.10-2.20) and SUD relapse (OR = 2.02, 95% CI, 1.65-2.47) compared to Wave 2 nonsmoking. In the fully adjusted model, smoking at Wave 2 among Wave 1 nonsmokers was associated with significantly greater odds of SUD relapse compared to Wave 2 nonsmoking (OR = 4.86, 95% CI, 3.11-7.58). Continued smoking among smokers and smoking initiation among nonsmokers were associated with greater odds of SUD relapse. More research is needed to examine the timing of SUD relapse in relation to smoking behaviors. Incorporating smoking cessation and prevention efforts into substance abuse treatment may improve long-term substance use outcomes for adult smokers with SUDs.

  10. Early and Degressive Putamen Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Krämer; Meuth, Sven G.; Jan-Gerd Tenberge; Patrick Schiffler; Heinz Wiendl; Michael Deppe

    2015-01-01

    Putamen atrophy and its long-term progress during disease course were recently shown in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we investigated retrospectively the time point of atrophy onset in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). 68 patients with RRMS and 26 healthy controls (HC) were admitted to 3T MRI in a cross-sectional study. We quantitatively analyzed the putamen volume of individual patients in relation to disease duration by correcting for age and intracranial volume (IC...

  11. Cognitive impairment in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Bo Jacob; Knorr, Ulla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2010-01-01

    the association to prior course of illness, i.e. the number, duration and severity of prior depressive episodes. METHOD: Systematic search on existing on-line databases and hand-search of original published papers. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in the review......BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether cognitive impairment is prevalent in the remitted state of unipolar disorder. AIM: To evaluate whether cognitive function is impaired in the remitted state in patients with unipolar depression compared with healthy control individuals, and to investigate......, including a total of 500 patients remitted from unipolar depression and 471 healthy control individuals. In nine of the eleven studies performance on neuropsychological tests was found to be decreased in patients compared to healthy control individuals in at least one of the tests. Methodological drawbacks...

  12. A tool to measure the attributes of receiving IV therapy in a home versus hospital setting: the Multiple Sclerosis Relapse Management Scale (MSRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chataway Jeremy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravenous steroids are routinely used to treat disabling relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS. Theoretically, the infusion could take place at home, rather than in hospital. Findings from other patient populations suggest that patients may find the experiences of home relapse management more desirable. However, formal comparison of these two settings, from the patients' point of view, was prevented by the lack of a clinical scale. We report the development of a rating scale to measure patient's experiences of relapse management that allowed this question to be answered confidently. Methods Scale development had three stages. First, in-depth interviews of 21 MS patients generated a conceptual model and pool of potential scale items. Second, these items were administered to 160 people with relapsing-remitting MS. Standard psychometric techniques were used to develop a scale. Third, the psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated in a randomised controlled trial of 138 patients whose relapses were managed either at home or hospital. Results A preliminary conceptual model with eight dimensions, and a pool of 154 items was generated. From this we developed the MS Relapse Management Scale (MSRMS, a 42-item with four subscales: access to care (6 items, coordination of care (11 items, information (7 items, interpersonal care (18 items. The MSRMS subscales satisfied most psychometric criteria but had notable floor effects. Conclusions The MSRMS is a reliable and valid measure of patients' experiences of MS relapse management. The high floor effects suggest most respondents had positive care experiences. Results demonstrate that patients' experiences of relapse management can be measured, and that the MSRMS is a powerful tool for determining which services to develop, support and ultimately commission.

  13. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE syndrome

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    Neslihan Gokcen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema is a rare rheumatological disorder that presents with symmetrical hand and/or foot edema resembling rheumatoid arthritis. It is generally seen in male patients in older age, but atypical cases in different age groups have been documented. Although no clear mechanism has been described, certain genetic and environmental factors have been suggested for etiopathogenesis. Medical treatment is mainly focused on glucocorticoid therapy. This article aims to discuss the Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema syndrome and to review the current literature. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 147-154

  14. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  15. Relating relapse and T2 lesion changes to disability progression in multiple sclerosis: a systematic literature review and regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), the most important therapeutic aim of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) is to prevent or postpone long-term disability. Given the typically slow progression observed in the majority of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients, the primary endpoint for most randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is a reduction in relapse rate. It is widely assumed that reducing relapse rate will slow disability progression. Similarly, MRI studies suggest that reducing T2 lesions will be associated with slowing long-term disability in MS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between treatment effects on relapse rates and active T2 lesions to differences in disease progression (as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS]) in trials evaluating patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), RRMS, and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Methods A systematic literature review was conducted in Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, and PsycINFO to identify randomized trials published in English from January 1, 1993-June 3, 2013 evaluating DMTs in adult MS patients using keywords for CIS, RRMS, and SPMS combined with keywords for relapse and recurrence. Eligible studies were required to report outcomes of relapse and T2 lesion changes or disease progression in CIS, RRMS, or SPMS patients receiving DMTs and have a follow-up duration of at least 22 months. Ultimately, 40 studies satisfied these criteria for inclusion. Regression analyses were conducted on RCTs to relate differences between the effect of treatments on relapse rates and on active T2 lesions to differences between the effects of treatments on disease progression (as measured by EDSS). Results Regression analysis determined there is a substantive clinically and statistically significant association between concurrent treatment effects in relapse rate and EDSS; p EDSS measures also were found (p < 0.05), with some suggestion that the strength of

  16. [Relapsing polychondritis: report of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olival Costa, H; Alcantara Maia, R; Sakano, Y

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of Relapsing Polychondritis followed in the Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual de Sao Paulo, since 1985, are reported and discussed. Relapsing Polychondritis, an auto-immune disease that destroys the pinnal and nasal cartilage has been observed occasionally around the world. Since it was first defined and described, in 1923, about 250 cases have been reported.

  17. Relapsing Urinary Tract Infection Due to Rectourethral Fistula in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül ORUÇ KOÇ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common cause of bacterial infection in renal transplant recipients. It occurs frequently in the early period because of the high-dose immunosuppressive agents and urethral catheterizations. Relapsing UTI may lead to graft dysfunction and further evaluations have to be performed for predisposing factors. We report the case of a renal transplant recipient who presented with relapsing bacterial UTI due to a rectourethral fistula. Case: A 24-year-old male patient underwent a successful renal transplantation from a living donor on May 2008. He had a history of surgical intervention for anal atresia and rectourethral fistula. He was hospitalized five times because of relapsing bacterial UTI after transplantation. We investigated the presence of an anatomical abnormality and found a rectourethral fistula. After the surgical repair of the fistula the UTI did not relapse. Conclusion: Relapsing infections are not uncommon and anatomical abnormalities can lead to relapsing UTI in transplant recipients. Further investigations must be performed regarding the factors that might contribute to the development of UTIs in the presence of relapsing UTI.

  18. Early and Degressive Putamen Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Julia; Meuth, Sven G; Tenberge, Jan-Gerd; Schiffler, Patrick; Wiendl, Heinz; Deppe, Michael

    2015-09-25

    Putamen atrophy and its long-term progress during disease course were recently shown in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we investigated retrospectively the time point of atrophy onset in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). 68 patients with RRMS and 26 healthy controls (HC) were admitted to 3T MRI in a cross-sectional study. We quantitatively analyzed the putamen volume of individual patients in relation to disease duration by correcting for age and intracranial volume (ICV). Patient's relative putamen volume (RPV), expressed in percent of ICV, was significantly reduced compared to HC. Based on the correlation between RPV and age, we computed the age-corrected RPV deviation (ΔRPV) from HC. Patients showed significantly negative ΔRPV. Interestingly, the age-corrected ΔRPV depended logarithmically on disease duration: Directly after first symptom manifestation, patients already showed a reduced RPV followed by a further degressive volumetric decline. This means that atrophy progression was stronger in the first than in later years of disease. Putamen atrophy starts directly after initial symptom manifestation or even years before, and progresses in a degressive manner. Due to its important role in neurological functions, early detection of putamen atrophy seems necessary. High-resolution structural MRI allows monitoring of disease course.

  19. Early and Degressive Putamen Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Krämer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Putamen atrophy and its long-term progress during disease course were recently shown in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Here we investigated retrospectively the time point of atrophy onset in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS. 68 patients with RRMS and 26 healthy controls (HC were admitted to 3T MRI in a cross-sectional study. We quantitatively analyzed the putamen volume of individual patients in relation to disease duration by correcting for age and intracranial volume (ICV. Patient’s relative putamen volume (RPV, expressed in percent of ICV, was significantly reduced compared to HC. Based on the correlation between RPV and age, we computed the age-corrected RPV deviation (ΔRPV from HC. Patients showed significantly negative ΔRPV. Interestingly, the age-corrected ΔRPV depended logarithmically on disease duration: Directly after first symptom manifestation, patients already showed a reduced RPV followed by a further degressive volumetric decline. This means that atrophy progression was stronger in the first than in later years of disease. Putamen atrophy starts directly after initial symptom manifestation or even years before, and progresses in a degressive manner. Due to its important role in neurological functions, early detection of putamen atrophy seems necessary. High-resolution structural MRI allows monitoring of disease course.

  20. Predicting relapse among young adults: psychometric validation of the Advanced WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Urbanoski, Karen A; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2011-10-01

    Failure to maintain abstinence despite incurring severe harm is perhaps the key defining feature of addiction. Relapse prevention strategies have been developed to attenuate this propensity to relapse, but predicting who will, and who will not, relapse has stymied attempts to more efficiently tailor treatments according to relapse risk profile. Here we examine the psychometric properties of a promising relapse risk measure-the Advance WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale (Miller & Harris, 2000) in an understudied but clinically important sample of young adults. Inpatient youth (N=303; Ages 18-24; 26% female) completed the AWARE scale and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI) at the end of residential treatment, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months following discharge. Internal and convergent validity was tested for each of these four timepoints using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations (with BSI scores). Predictive validity was tested for relapse 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge, as was incremental utility, where AWARE scores were used as predictors of any substance use while controlling for treatment entry substance use severity and having spent time in a controlled environment following treatment. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a single, internally consistent, 25-item factor that demonstrated convergent validity and predicted subsequent relapse alone and when controlling for other important relapse risk predictors. The AWARE scale may be a useful and efficient clinical tool for assessing short-term relapse risk among young people and, thus, could serve to enhance the effectiveness of relapse prevention efforts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Current and Remitted Depression and Anxiety Disorders as Risk Factors for Medication Nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bet, Pierre M.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Laer, Stag D.; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of current and remitted depression and anxiety disorders and sociodemographic and other related factors on medication nonadherence in a large cohort study. Method: The Medication Adherence Rating Scale was used to assess medication nonadherence of 1,890 medicatio

  2. A randomized controlled trial to prevent glycemic relapse in longitudinal diabetes care: Study protocol (NCT00362193

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Dianne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a common disease with self-management a key aspect of care. Large prospective trials have shown that maintaining glycated hemoglobin less than 7% greatly reduces complications but translating this level of control into everyday clinical practice can be difficult. Intensive improvement programs are successful in attaining control in patients with type 2 diabetes, however, many patients experience glycemic relapse once returned to routine care. This early relapse is, in part, due to decreased adherence in self-management behaviors. Objective This paper describes the design of the Glycemic Relapse Prevention study. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal frequency of maintenance intervention needed to prevent glycemic relapse. The primary endpoint is glycemic relapse, which is defined as glycated hemoglobin greater than 8% and an increase of 1% from baseline. Methods The intervention consists of telephonic contact by a nurse practitioner with a referral to a dietitian if indicated. This intervention was designed to provide early identification of self-care problems, understanding the rationale behind the self-care lapse and problem solve to find a negotiated solution. A total of 164 patients were randomized to routine care (least intensive, routine care with phone contact every three months (moderate intensity or routine care with phone contact every month (most intensive. Conclusion The baseline patient characteristics are similar across the treatment arms. Intervention fidelity analysis showed excellent reproducibility. This study will provide insight into the important but poorly understood area of glycemic relapse prevention.

  3. A pilot study on factors involved with work participation in the early stages of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Van der Hiele

    Full Text Available Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation.To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job.Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years.Patients with a paid job (57% reported better physical functioning (p<0.001, better memory functioning (p = 0.01 and a lower physical impact of fatigue (p = 0.018 than patients without a paid job. Physical functioning was the main predictor of employment status in a logistic regression model. In those with a paid job better memory functioning (r = 0.54, p = 0.005 and a lower social impact of fatigue (r =  -0.46, p = 0.029 correlated with an increased number of working hours.Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS.

  4. Stress Enhancement of Craving During Sobriety: A Risk for Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breese, George R.; Chu, Kathleen; Dayas, Christopher V.; Funk, Douglas; Knapp, Darin J.; Koob, George F.; Lê, Dzung Anh; O'Dell, Laura E.; Overstreet, David H.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sinha, Rajita; Valdez, Glenn R.; Weiss, Friedbert

    2010-01-01

    This report of the proceedings of a symposium presented at the 2004 Research Society on Alcoholism Meeting provides evidence linking stress during sobriety to craving that increases the risk for relapse. The initial presentation by Rajita Sinha summarized clinical evidence for the hypothesis that there is an increased sensitivity to stress-induced craving in alcoholics. During early abstinence, alcoholics who were confronted with stressful circumstances showed increased susceptibility for relapse. George Breese presented data demonstrating that stress could substitute for repeated withdrawals from chronic ethanol to induce anxiety-like behavior. This persistent adaptive change induced by multiple withdrawals allowed stress to induce an anxiety-like response that was absent in animals that were not previously exposed to chronic ethanol. Subsequently, Amanda Roberts reviewed evidence that increased drinking induced by stress was dependent on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). In addition, rats that were stressed during protracted abstinence exhibited anxiety-like behavior that was also dependent on CRF. Christopher Dayas indicated that stress increases the reinstatement of an alcohol-related cue. Moreover, this effect was enhanced by previous alcohol dependence. These interactive effects between stress and alcohol-related environmental stimuli depended on concurrent activation of endogenous opioid and CRF systems. A.D. Lê covered information that indicated that stress facilitated reinstatement to alcohol responding and summarized the influence of multiple deprivations on this interaction. David Overstreet provided evidence that restraint stress during repeated alcohol deprivations increases voluntary drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats that results in withdrawal-induced anxiety that is not observed in the absence of stress. Testing of drugs on the stress-induced voluntary drinking implicated serotonin and CRF involvement in the sensitized response

  5. Factors associated with relapse in schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depression in schizophrenia has been associated with higher rates of relapse ..... of efficacy, discontinuation rates, adverse effects or quality of life, compared with the ..... medications in middle-aged and older patients with psychotic disorders.

  6. Intracranial aneurysm associated with relapsing polychondritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coumbaras, M.; Boulin, A.; Pierot, L. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Foch, Suresnes (France); Piette, A.M.; Bletry, O. [Dept. of Medicine, Hopital Foch, Suresnes (France); Graveleau, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Foch, Suresnes (France)

    2001-07-01

    We describe a 50-year-old man with relapsing polychondritis (RP) involving auricular cartilage, uveitis and hearing loss, who had an aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery. Intracranial aneurysm is a rare manifestation of RP. (orig.)

  7. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a contingency management intervention compared to treatment as usual for reduction of cannabis use and of relapse in early psychosis (CIRCLE): a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonia; Sheridan Rains, Luke; Marwaha, Steven; Strang, John; Craig, Thomas; Weaver, Tim; McCrone, Paul; King, Michael; Fowler, David; Pilling, Stephen; Marston, Louise; Omar, Rumana Z; Craig, Meghan; Hinton, Mark

    2016-10-22

    Around 35-45 % of people in contact with services for a first episode of psychosis are using cannabis. Cannabis use is associated with delays in remission, poorer clinical outcomes, significant increases in the risk of relapse, and lower engagement in work or education. While there is a clear need for effective interventions, so far only very limited benefits have been achieved from psychological interventions. Contingency management (CM) is a behavioural intervention in which specified desired behavioural change is reinforced through financial rewards. CM is now recognised to have a substantial evidence base in some contexts and its adoption in the UK is advocated by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance as a treatment for substance or alcohol misuse. However, there is currently little published data testing its effectiveness for reducing cannabis use in early psychosis. CIRCLE is a two-arm, rater-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a CM intervention for reducing cannabis use among young people receiving treatment from UK Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) services. EIP service users (n = 544) with a recent history of cannabis use will be recruited. The experimental group will receive 12 once-weekly CM sessions, and a voucher reward if urinalysis shows that they have not used cannabis in the previous week. Both the experimental and the control groups will be offered an Optimised Treatment as Usual (OTAU) psychoeducational package targeting cannabis use. Assessment interviews will be performed at consent, at 3 months, and at 18 months. The primary outcome is time to relapse, defined as admission to an acute mental health service. Secondary outcomes include proportion of cannabis-free urine samples during the intervention period, severity of positive psychotic symptoms, quality-adjusted life years, and engagement in work or education. CIRCLE is a RCT of CM for

  8. Prognostic relevance of DHAP dose-density in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma: an analysis of the German Hodgkin-Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Stephanie; Alram, Magdalena; Müller, Horst; Smardová, Lenka; Metzner, Bernd; Doehner, Hartmut; Fischer, Thomas; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Schmitz, Norbert; Schäfer-Eckart, Kerstin; Raemaekers, John M M; Schmalz, Oliver; Tresckow, Bastian V; Engert, Andreas; Borchmann, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Only 50% of patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) can be cured with intensive induction chemotherapy, followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Based on the results of the HDR2 trial two courses of DHAP and subsequent HDCT/ASCT are the current standard of care in relapsed HL. In order to assess the prognostic relevance of DHAP dose density, we performed a retrospective multivariate analysis of the HDR2 trial (N=266). In addition to four risk factors (early or multiple relapse, stage IV disease or anemia at relapse, and grade IV hematotoxicity during the first cycle of DHAP) a delayed start of the second cycle of DHAP>day 22 predicted a significantly poorer progression-free survival (PFS, p=0.0356) and overall survival (OS, p=0.0025). In conclusion, our analysis strongly suggests that dose density of DHAP has a relevant impact on the outcome of relapsed HL patients.

  9. Agreeableness and neuroticism as predictors of relapse after first-episode psychosis: a prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, John F; Rawlings, David; Jackson, Henry J; McGorry, Patrick D

    2005-03-01

    Cross-sectional investigations, using the five-factor model of personality have evinced relationships among neuroticism, agreeableness, and psychotic symptoms. The current study examined these relationships via a prospective follow-up study with remitted first-episode psychosis patients. Baseline five-factor model personality profiles, diagnoses, symptom ratings, and premorbid adjustment ratings were followed by nine monthly ratings on Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale psychosis items in 60 first-episode patients. Valid baseline personality profiles were completed by 40 patients. Patients who had a return of symptoms scored higher on baseline neuroticism and agreeableness than those who remained in remission. Premorbid adjustment also predicted return of symptoms. After premorbid adjustment was controlled for, the agreeableness differences remained significant, but the neuroticism scores were no longer significantly different. It is concluded that lower agreeableness acts as a mediating variable in relapse. Further studies should clarify whether agreeableness is associated with specific biases in processing interpersonal information, and interpersonal behaviors.

  10. Relapsing catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome potential role of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia in disease relapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Gerard; Rodríguez-Pintó, Ignasi; Gomez-Puerta, José A; Pons-Estel, Guillermo; Cervera, Ricard

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who suffer relapses. We analyzed the Web site--based international registry of patients with catastrophic APS ("CAPS Registry") http://infmed.fcrb.es/es/web/caps and selected those cases that relapsed. Relapses were reported in 9 of 282 (3.2%) patients with catastrophic APS. A total of 35 episodes of catastrophic APS were found: 6 patients presented 2 relapses, 2 patients suffered 3 relapses, and 1 patient developed 17 relapses. However, the last patient was not included in the statistical analysis because his clinical and immunologic characteristics were not fully described. Therefore, a total of 18 episodes were analyzed. In 9 (50%) episodes, a precipitating factor was identified. The most frequent precipitating factor, found in 5 (28%) episodes, was infection. Brain, kidney, heart, and lung were the most common organs involved. Laboratory features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MHA) were present in 13 of 18 (72%) episodes (definitive in 9, corresponding to 4 patients, and probable in 4, corresponding to 2 patients). Three relapses did not present with features of MHA and in the remaining 2 these data were not reported. The mortality rate was 38%. Although relapses are rare in patients with catastrophic APS, these results support the hypothesis that an association between MHA and relapsing of catastrophic APS could be present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictors of rapid relapse in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Marion P; MacDonald, Danielle E; McFarlane, Traci; Trottier, Kathryn; Colton, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Relapse remains a significant concern in bulimia nervosa, with some patients relapsing within months of treatment completion. The purpose of the study was to identify predictors of relapse within the first 6 months following treatment. The 116 participants were bingeing and/or vomiting ≥ 8 times per month before day hospital (DH), and had ≤ 2 episodes per month in the last month of DH and the first month after DH. Rapid relapse was defined as ≥ 8 episodes per month for 3 months starting within 6 months. The rate of rapid relapse was 27.6%. Patients who relapsed soon after DH had higher frequencies of bingeing and vomiting before treatment, engaged in less body avoidance before treatment and were more likely to be slow responders to treatment. Weight and shape concerns and body checking were not significant predictors. More frequent bulimic symptoms accompanied by less body avoidance may indicate an entrenchment in the illness which in turn augurs a labored and transient response to DH treatment that is difficult to sustain after intensive treatment ends. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. High rates of relapse in adolescents crack users after inpatient clinic discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeri Siqueira Pedroso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The objective of the present study was to evaluate 88 adolescent crack users referred to hospitalization and to follow them up after discharge to investigate relapse and factors associated with treatment. Methods Cohort (30 and 90 days after discharge from a psychiatric hospital and a rehab clinic for treatment for chemical dependency in Porto Alegre between 2011 and 2012. Instruments: Semi-structured interview, conducted to evaluate the sociodemographic profile of the sample and describe the pattern of psychoactive substance use; Crack Use Relapse Scale/CURS; Questionnaire Tracking Users to Crack/QTUC; K-SADS-PL. Results In the first follow-up period (30 days after discharge, 65.9% of participants had relapsed. In the second follow-up period (90 days after discharge, 86.4% of participants had relapsed. Conclusion This is one of the first studies that show the extremely high prevalence of early relapse in adolescent crack users after discharge, questioning the cost/benefit of inpatient treatment for this population. Moreover, these results corroborate studies which suggested, young psychostimulants users might need tailored intensive outpatient treatment with contingency management and other behavioral strategies, in order to increase compliance and reduce drug or crime relapse, but this specific therapeutic modality is still scarce and must be developed in Brazil.

  13. Role of routine imaging in detecting recurrent lymphoma: A review of 258 patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Galaly, T C; Mylam, Karen Juul; Bøgsted, Martin; Brown, Peter; Rossing, Maria; Gang, Anne Ortved; Haglund, Anne; Arboe, Bente; Clausen, Michael Roost; Jensen, Paw; Pedersen, Michael; Bukh, Anne; Jensen, Bo Amdi; Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; d'Amore, Francesco; Hutchings, Martin

    2014-06-01

    After first-line therapy, patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and aggressive non-HL are followed up closely for early signs of relapse. The current follow-up practice with frequent use of surveillance imaging is highly controversial and warrants a critical evaluation. Therefore, a retrospective multicenter study of relapsed HL and aggressive non-HL (nodal T-cell and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas) was conducted. All included patients had been diagnosed during the period 2002-2011 and relapsed after achieving complete remission on first-line therapy. Characteristics and outcome of imaging-detected relapses were compared with other relapses. A total of 258 patients with recurrent lymphoma were included in the study. Relapse investigations were initiated outside preplanned visits in 52% of the patients. Relapse detection could be attributed to patient-reported symptoms alone or in combination with abnormal blood tests or physical examination in 64% of the patients. Routine imaging prompted relapse investigations in 27% of the patients. The estimated number of routine scans per relapse was 91-255 depending on the lymphoma subtype. Patients with imaging-detected relapse had lower disease burden (P = 0.045) and reduced risk of death following relapse (hazard ratio = 0.62, P = 0.02 in multivariate analysis). Patient-reported symptoms are still the most common factor for detecting lymphoma relapse and the high number of scans per relapse calls for improved criteria for use of surveillance imaging. However, imaging-detected relapse was associated with lower disease burden and a possible survival advantage. The future role of routine surveillance imaging should be defined in a randomized trial.

  14. Blunted responses to reward in remitted post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalebasi, Nilufer; Kuelen, Eveline; Schnyder, Ulrich; Schumacher, Sonja; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Wilhelm, Frank H; Athilingam, Jegath; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Martin-Soelch, Chantal

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests blunted responses to rewarding stimuli in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is not clear whether these alterations in reward processing normalize in remitted PTSD patients. We tested behavioral and physiological responses to monetary reward in a spatial memory task in 13 accident survivors with remitted PTSD, 14 accident survivors who never had PTSD, and 16 nontrauma-exposed subjects. All accident survivors were recruited from two samples of severely physically injured patients, who had participated in previous prospective studies on the incidence of PTSD after accidental injury approximately 10 years ago. Reaction time, accuracy, skin conductance responses, and self-reported mood were assessed during the task. Accident survivors who never had PTSD and nontrauma exposed controls reported significantly higher positive mood in the reinforced versus nonreinforced condition (P factor for the development of PTSD after a traumatic event.

  15. Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Myeloid and Lymphoid Leukemia in Children: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Young Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Extramedullary relapse (EMR is a recurrence of leukemia in sites other than the bone marrow, and it exhibits a relatively rare presentation of relapse of acute leukemia. However, EMR is an important cause of treatment failure among patients with acute leukemia. Therefore, early detection of these relapses may improve the prognosis. Objectives To describe the disease-related demographic and clinical features and radiologic findings for children diagnosed with EMR in acute leukemia. Patients and Methods The study was based on 22 children (M: F = 14: 8; mean age 7.30 (2.1 - 15.7 years with 8 acute myeloid leukemia (AML and 14 acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL who had experienced an EMR. Age, gender, clinical symptoms, initial extramedullary disease (EMD, French-American-British (FAB morphology, cytogenetics, time to and site of EMR, concurrent bone marrow relapse (BMR, radiologic findings, and outcomes were evaluated. Results No definite relationship was found between initial EMD and EMR. A predilection for AML to relapse in the central nervous system (CNS, except for the CSF and bone, and for ALL to relapse in the CSF and kidney seemed to occur. Patients with EMR had a significantly higher incidence of t(8: 21 cytogenetics and FAB M2 and L1 morphologies. EMR accompanied with concurrent BMR occurred in 31.8% of the patients, who exhibited a relatively grave clinical course. Radiologic findings were nonspecific and had a great variety of structure involved, including bulging enhancing mass in the CT scan, hypoechoic mass in the US, and enhanced mass-like lesion in the MRI. Conclusions Knowledge of the potential sites of EMR, their risk factors, and their clinical and radiologic features may be helpful in the early diagnosis of relapse and planning for therapy.

  16. Subjective symptoms in euthymic bipolar disorder and remitted schizophrenia patients: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subjective experience means subtle, not yet psychotic abnormalities of experience that might be present during remitted phase and also in prodromal phase of schizophrenia and might be accurately efficient in identifying individuals at risk of eminent psychosis (Parnas et al., 2003. Apart from schizophrenic patients, bipolar patients also experience certain subjective symptoms in their euthymic state. They often experience subtle cognitive impairment and functional disturbances during their euthymic states. These subjective experiences may be related to distorted cognitive functions in these patients. These experiences include a great variety of cognitive dysfunction complaints about attention, perception, memory, thinking, language, movement, and emotion. Objective: To measure the experience of subjective symptoms and compare them between euthymic bipolar and remitted schizophrenia patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty euthymic bipolar patients and 30 remitted schizophrenia patients as per International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision were selected for the purpose of the study. At first, sociodemographic data were collected. And then, the patients were assessed using the scales; positive and negative syndrome scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, and Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire-24. Results: Both the groups showed significant differences in terms of subjective symptoms. However, no significant correlation has been found between the objective psychopathology and subjective experience in the two groups. Conclusion: It can be suggested that the patients with schizophrenia show significantly higher subjective experience when compared with the patients of bipolar disorder.

  17. Aberrant Cerebral Blood Flow in Response to Hunger and Satiety in Women Remitted from Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E. Wierenga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of pathological eating in anorexia nervosa (AN remains poorly understood. Cerebral blood flow (CBF is an indirect marker of neuronal function. In healthy adults, fasting increases CBF, reflecting increased delivery of oxygen and glucose to support brain metabolism. This study investigated whether women remitted from restricting-type AN (RAN have altered CBF in response to hunger that may indicate homeostatic dysregulation contributing to their ability to restrict food. We compared resting CBF measured with pulsed arterial spin labeling in 21 RAN and 16 healthy comparison women (CW when hungry (after a 16-h fast and after a meal. Only remitted subjects were examined to avoid the confounding effects of malnutrition on brain function. Compared to CW, RAN demonstrated a reduced difference in the Hungry − Fed CBF contrast in the right ventral striatum, right subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (pcorr < 0.05 and left posterior insula (punc < 0.05; RAN had decreased CBF when hungry versus fed, whereas CW had increased CBF when hungry versus fed. Moreover, decreased CBF when hungry in the left insula was associated with greater hunger ratings on the fasted day for RAN. This represents the first study to show that women remitted from AN have aberrant resting neurovascular function in homeostatic neural circuitry in response to hunger. Regions involved in homeostatic regulation showed group differences in the Hungry − Fed contrast, suggesting altered cellular energy metabolism in this circuitry that may reduce motivation to eat.

  18. Aberrant Cerebral Blood Flow in Response to Hunger and Satiety in Women Remitted from Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierenga, Christina E; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Rasmusson, Grace; Bailer, Ursula F; Berner, Laura A; Liu, Thomas T; Kaye, Walter H

    2017-01-01

    The etiology of pathological eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) remains poorly understood. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is an indirect marker of neuronal function. In healthy adults, fasting increases CBF, reflecting increased delivery of oxygen and glucose to support brain metabolism. This study investigated whether women remitted from restricting-type AN (RAN) have altered CBF in response to hunger that may indicate homeostatic dysregulation contributing to their ability to restrict food. We compared resting CBF measured with pulsed arterial spin labeling in 21 RAN and 16 healthy comparison women (CW) when hungry (after a 16-h fast) and after a meal. Only remitted subjects were examined to avoid the confounding effects of malnutrition on brain function. Compared to CW, RAN demonstrated a reduced difference in the Hungry - Fed CBF contrast in the right ventral striatum, right subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (pcorr < 0.05) and left posterior insula (punc < 0.05); RAN had decreased CBF when hungry versus fed, whereas CW had increased CBF when hungry versus fed. Moreover, decreased CBF when hungry in the left insula was associated with greater hunger ratings on the fasted day for RAN. This represents the first study to show that women remitted from AN have aberrant resting neurovascular function in homeostatic neural circuitry in response to hunger. Regions involved in homeostatic regulation showed group differences in the Hungry - Fed contrast, suggesting altered cellular energy metabolism in this circuitry that may reduce motivation to eat.

  19. Early detection, early symptom progression and symptomatic remission after ten years in a first episode of psychosis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Haahr, Ulrik Helt

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor symptom outcome remains a challenge in psychosis: At least 50% of first-episode patients continue to have positive and/or negative symptoms after ten years. Objective: To investigate rates, early predictors and early symptom progression of long-term non-remitted psychosis in an e...

  20. Microbial, metabolomic, and immunologic dynamics in a relapsing genetic mouse model of colitis induced by T-synthase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Lin, Lin; Goudarzi, Maryam; Ruegger, Paul; McGovern, Dermot P B; Fornace, Albert J; Borneman, James; Xia, Lijun; Braun, Jonathan

    2017-01-02

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to confer susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unknown whether dynamic changes in the microbiome contribute to fluctuations in disease activity. We explored this question using mice with intestine-specific deletion of C1galt1 (also known as T-synthase) (Tsyn mice). These mice develop spontaneous microbiota-dependent colitis with a remitting/relapsing course due to loss of mucin core-1 derived O-glycans. 16S rRNA sequencing and untargeted metabolomics demonstrated age-specific perturbations in the intestinal microbiome and metabolome of Tsyn mice compare with littermate controls at weeks 3 (disease onset), 5 (during remission), and 9 (after relapse). Colitis remission corresponded to increased levels of FoxP3+RORγt+CD4+ T cells in the colonic lamina propria that were positively correlated with operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the S24-7 family and negatively correlated with OTUs in the Clostridiales order. Relapse was characterized by marked expansion of FoxP3-RORγt+CD4+ T cells expressing IFNγ and IL17A, which were associated with Clostridiales OTUs distinct from those negatively correlated with FoxP3+RORγt+CD4+ T cells. Our findings suggest that colitis remission and relapse in the Tsyn model may reflect alterations in the microbiome due to reduced core-1 O-glycosylation that shift the balance of regulatory and pro-inflammatory T cell subsets. We investigated whether genetic variation in C1galt1 correlated with the microbiome in a cohort of 78 Crohn's disease patients and 101 healthy controls. Polymorphisms near C1galt1 (rs10486157) and its molecular chaperone, Cosmc (rs4825729), were associated with altered composition of the colonic mucosal microbiota, supporting the relevance of core-1 O-glycosylation to host regulation of the microbiome.

  1. The impact of neutralizing antibodies on the risk of disease worsening in interferon β-treated relapsing multiple sclerosis: a 5 year post-marketing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicelli, D; D'Onghia, M; Pellegrini, F; Direnzo, V; Iaffaldano, P; Lavolpe, V; Trojano, M

    2013-06-01

    The impact of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) on interferon β (IFNβ) efficacy in MS patients is still an object of controversy. To evaluate the clinical response to IFNβ during NAb-positive (NAb+) and NAb-negative (NAb-) statuses on a large population of relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients were followed up to 5 years. Sera from 567 RR MS patients treated with IFNβ for 2-5 years were collected every 6-12 months and evaluated for NAb presence by a cytopathic effect assay. The relapse rate and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score were assessed at baseline and every 6 months for each patient. A NAb+ status was defined after two consecutive positive titers of NAbs >/= 20 neutralizing units (NU)/mL. Multivariate models were used to analyze the relapse rate, the time to first relapse, the time to confirmed EDSS score 4 during NAb+ and NAb- statuses. A propensity score (PS) matching analysis was performed to assess the robustness of the multivariate models. Fourteen percent of patients became NAb+ during the follow-up. A significant increase of the relapse rate (IRR = 1.38; p = 0.0247) and decrease of the time to 1st relapse (IRR = 1.51; p = 0.0111) were found during NAb+ periods. The PS matching analysis, in a selected cohort of patients, demonstrated a negative trend of NAbs on the time to reach the milestone EDSS 4 (IRR = 2.94; p = 0.0879). This long-term post-marketing observational study further confirms that the occurrence of NAbs significantly affects the risk of disease worsening in IFNβ- treated RRMS.

  2. Late relapse of testicular tumour at 23 years invading the ischium with pulmonary involvement and thoracic - abdominal adenopathy. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stauros Touloupidis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY. Late relapse of testicular germ cell tumour is uncommon, especially with skeletal metastases. It appears that late relapse of non-seminomatous germ cell tumours presents with more aggressive biological features and is clinically distinct from early relapse. This report describes the case of a non-seminomatous germ cell tumour which recurred 23 years after the initial diagnosis and treatment. A 52-year-old man developed an ischial bone osteolytic mass which was discovered during investigation of severe pain in the hip joint. Pneumon 2010, 23(1:103-110.

  3. Pathological gambling: understanding relapses and dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragay, Núria; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Ramos-Grille, Irene; Cardona, Sara; Garrido, Gemma; Anisul Islam, Mohammed; Menchón, José M; Vallès, Vicenç

    2015-02-01

    There is little available information on the factors that influence relapses and dropouts during therapy for pathological gambling (PG). The aim of this study was to determine socio-demographic, clinical, personality, and psychopathological predictors of relapse and dropout in a sample of pathological gamblers seeking treatment. A total of 566 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with PG according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were included. All patients underwent an individualized cognitive-behavioral treatment program. We analyzed predictors of relapse during 6months of treatment and during the subsequent 6months of follow-up, and predictors of dropout over the entire therapeutic program. Eighty patients (14.1%) experienced at least one relapse during the entire follow-up of the study: 50 (8.8%) within the treatment period and 12 (2.1%) during the subsequent 6-month follow-up period. The main predictors of relapse were single marital status, spending less than 100euros/week on gambling, active gambling behavior at treatment inclusion, and high scores on the TCI-R Harm Avoidance personality dimension. One hundred fifty-seven patients (27.8%) missed 3 or more therapeutic sessions over the entire therapeutic program. The main predictors of dropout were single marital status, younger age, and high scores on the TCI-R Novelty Seeking personality dimension. The presence of these factors at inclusion should be taken into account by physicians dealing with PG patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis in patient of relapse of ulcerative colitis:report of a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajat Agarwal; Anuradha Batra; Ish Anand; Davinder Singh Rana; Samir Patel

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the various systemic complications of ulcerative colitis, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon and serious neurological complication mainly associated during episodes of relapse of ulcerative colitis. CVT is suspected to be a consequence of hypercoagulable state occurring during the disease in genetic predisposed persons. Most patients present with rapid neurological deterioration. This devastating intracranial complication requires immediate medical intervention to avoid potentially life threatening consequences. The outcome is good, provided the disease is diagnosed on time and the treatment is started early. The authors present a patient of CVT, a rare complication seen during relapse of ulcerative colitis.

  5. Early Signs of Memory Impairment among Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Panou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates primary and secondary verbal memory and motor/executive functions (response inhibition and strategy shifting ability in multiple sclerosis (MS patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS. We studied 44 CIS patients and compared them to 49 patients with relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS displaying mild disability and to a large cohort of age- and education level-matched healthy volunteers (n = 230. Results showed that both CIS and RR-MS patients evidenced a disproportionate impairment in the immediate and delayed recall of the second (as compared to the first of two short narratives of the Logical Memory WMS-III subtest, and reduced performance on the Memory for Digits-Forward. Performance of either group on the executive tasks was not impaired, showing evidence of a reversed speed-accuracy trade-off. Illness duration emerged as a significant predictor of memory and executive task performance. Clinical, psychoemotional, and brain imaging findings were also examined as potential correlates of memory deficits and disease progression among CIS patients. These findings may signify early-onset decline of specific cognitive functions in CIS, which merits regular follow-up assessments and monitoring of psychoemotional adaptation and everyday functioning.

  6. Structural brain network characteristics can differentiate CIS from early RRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraman eMuthuraman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Focal demyelinated lesions, diffuse white matter (WM damage and grey matter (GM atrophy influence directly the disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify specific characteristics of GM and WM structural networks in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS in comparison to patients with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS.Twenty patients with CIS, thirty three with RRMS and forty healthy subjects were investigated using 3 T-MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied, together with probabilistic tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA maps for WM and cortical thickness correlation analysis for GM, to determine the structural connectivity patterns. A network topology analysis with the aid of graph theoretical approaches was used to characterize the network at different community levels (modularity, clustering coefficient, global and local efficiencies. Finally, we applied support vector machines (SVM to automatically discriminate the two groups. .In comparison to CIS subjects, patients with RRMS were found to have increased modular connectivity and higher local clustering, highlighting increased local processing in both GM and WM. Both groups presented increased modularity and clustering coefficients in comparison to healthy controls. SVM algorithms achieved 97% accuracy using the clustering coefficient as classifier derived from GM and 65% using WM from probabilistic tractography and 67 % from modularity of FA maps to differentiate between CIS and RRMS patients. We demonstrate a clear increase of modular and local connectivity in patients with early RRMS in comparison to CIS and healthy subjects. Based only on a single anatomic scan and without a priori information, we developed an automated and investigator-independent paradigm that can accurately discriminate between patients with these clinically similar disease entities, and could thus complement the current

  7. Voxel-Wise Time-Series Analysis of Quantitative MRI in Relapsing-Remitting MS: Dynamic Imaging Metrics of Disease Activity Including Prelesional Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden...for the project, summarized as follows: (1) myelin water mapping based on the mcDESPOT pulse sequence as originally reported by Deoni et al [1] and

  8. Medication therapy of remit-relapse multiple sclerosis%复发缓解型多发性硬化的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许贤豪

    2009-01-01

    @@ 一、药物介绍 (一)疾病修正性药物(DMD) DMD是以针对多发性硬化(MS)发病机制中起关键性致病作用的分子为靶点,能减轻复发缓解型MS(RRMS)疾病活性,修正其疾病进程的药物.

  9. Voxel-Wise Time-Series Analysis of Quantitative MRI in Relapsing-Remitting MS: Dynamic Imaging Metrics of Disease Activity Including Pre-Lesional Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    promisi M 2003; 49:515. l. Radiology 200 o ISMRM 2012. RM 2005; 54:63 ig. 4: In vivo T1 m and constr b Falues vs. s f and k. ip Angle T1 M Pouria...the eff arly with f for typ itivity of T1 to T2B d f for the propose to the fixed param ation of the constr values obtained w A-MT provide ex ith...simulations in ith on-resonance FA underestimate proposed VFA-M f ROI T1 measure rements) to constr with results in [7] FA measurement col developed in

  10. Characteristics of lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: A magnetisation transfer and diffusion tensor imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Yaldizli, Ö.; Pardini, M; V. Sethi; Muhlert, N.; Liu, Z.; Tozer, D J; Samson, R. S.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.; Yousry, T. A.; Miller, D. H.; Chard, D. T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In multiple sclerosis (MS), diffusion tensor and magnetisation transfer imaging are both abnormal in lesional and extra-lesional cortical grey matter, but differences between clinical subtypes and associations with clinical outcomes have only been partly assessed. OBJECTIVE: To compare mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) in cortical grey matter lesions (detected using phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) imaging) and extra-lesiona...

  11. Therapeutic strategies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a special focus on reduction of grey matter damage as measured by brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Massimiliano; Gajofatto, Alberto; Benedetti, Maria Donata

    2014-12-01

    In the past two decades, several pathological and radiological findings convincingly demonstrated that damage of the cortical and deep grey matter is a key issue in multiple sclerosis with a significant impact on physical and cognitive disability. Moreover, it has become increasingly evident that the effect of available therapies on the inflammatory white matter damage is not a guarantee of a meaningful effect on the neurodegenerative process mainly affecting the grey matter. Despite the efficacy of all approved disease-modifying drugs should be measured considering such a relevant aspect of the disease, data from clinical trials are few, scattered and heterogeneous. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence so far acquired on the effect of reducing grey matter damage produced by current and emerging disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis.

  12. Persistant hiccups due to the use of intravenous metilprednisolone in a patient wit relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız Değirmenci1; Ayhan Öztürk; Burçin Çamuşoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Hiccups can be defined as the sudden, uncontrolled contractions of the diaphragm, followed by immediate inspiration and closure of the glottis over the trachea. Various etiologies are responsible for this reflex action such as instrumentations, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, toxic-metabolic factors, and drugs. Most common drugs that may trigger hiccups are opioids, barbiturates, some antibiotics, chemotherapeutic agents, and steroids. Since steroids are one of the most common drugs in neur...

  13. Randomized control trial evaluation of a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Amanda K Irish,1 Constance M Erickson,1 Terry L Wahls,2,3 Linda G Snetselaar,4 Warren G Darling1 1Motor Control Laboratories, Department of Health and Human Physiology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The University of Iowa, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Carver College of Medicine, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Background/objective: A Paleolithic diet may improve fatigue and quality...

  14. Cognitive functioning and subjective quality of life in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Pasquale C

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Concetta De Pasquale,1,2 Maria Luisa Pistorio,1 Massimiliano Veroux,2 Alessia Giaquinta,2 Pierfrancesco Veroux,2 Michele Fornaro11Department of Education Science, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 2Vascular Surgery and Organ Transplant Unit, Department of Surgery Transplantation and Advanced Technologies, University Hospital of Catania, Catania, ItalyBackground: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease of the nervous system that has profound effects on everyday functioning and quality of life of not only the person who is diagnosed, but also her/his family and acquaintances. Despite this, the uncertainties of the actual etiological basis of MS make it difficult to reach a conclusive statement about the optimal therapeutic management of the disease, which may differ depending on the given case and phase of illness. This has led to an interest in potential novel therapeutic avenues, including percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA. Yet, evidence in support of PTA in the management of MS is scarce and contradictory. The aim of the present study was to provide a preliminary assessment as to whether PTA may impact subjective quality of life and cognitive functioning in severe MS. Method: Ninety-five MS outpatients were followed-up for 24 months on a scheduled basis using the Milan Overall Dementia Assessment and the short-form 36-item scales, and were clinically evaluated by an appointed neurologist and psychiatrist. Results: At end point (month 24, only a minority of patients were still active in the study (n=33 or 34.74%. Among other measures, those who remained in the study until completion showed a significantly better Expanded Disability Status Scale and Milan Overall Dementia Assessment autonomy profile at study entrance compared to those patients who did not remain in the study until completion. Limitations were: a lack of any active control group; small sample size; Berkson’s bias; and selection by indication biases.Conclusion: Given the burden of MS and its high attrition rate, additional studies, including bigger samples, active control groups, and Cox’s regression and survival analysis in case of randomization, should shed further light on the actual usefulness of PTA for the most severe cases of MS.Keywords: CCSVI, chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, PTA

  15. The MS@Work study : a 3-year prospective observational study on factors involved with work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis A. M.; Heerings, Marco A. P.; van Lieshout, Irma; Jongen, Peter J.; Reneman, Michiel F.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Vosman, Frans; Middelkoop, Huub A. M.; Visser, Leo H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults. At this stage in life most people are in the midst of their working career. The majority of MS patients are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Leading

  16. Increasing Incidence in Relapsing-Remitting MS and High Rates among Young Women in Finland: A Thirty-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja-Liisa Sumelahti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. Gender and disease course specific incidences were studied in high- and medium-risk regions of MS in Finland. Methods. Age- and gender-specific incidences with 95% CIs were calculated in 10-year periods from 1981 to 2010. Poser diagnostic criteria were used and compared with the McDonald criteria from 2001 to 2010. Association between age and diagnostic delay over time was assessed by using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results. 1419 (89% RRMS and 198 (11% PPMS cases were included. RRMS incidence increased with the female to male ratio (F/M from 4,2/105 (F/M 1.9 to 9,7 (2.3, while that of PPMS decreased from 1,2 (1.6 to 0,7 (1.2. The use of McDonald criteria did not change the conclusion. The decreasing diagnostic delay and age at diagnosis in RRMS were associated within the 10-year periods and contrasted those in PPMS. Increasing female risk in RRMS was observed in the high-risk region. Conclusion. Increasing RRMS incidence and high female ratios shown in each age group indicate gender-specific influences acting already from childhood. A more precise definition of the risk factors and their action in MS is needed to provide a better understanding of underlying pathological processes and a rationale for the development of new preventive and treatment strategies.

  17. Reduction in Healthcare and Societal Resource Utilization Associated with Cladribine Tablets in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Economic Data from the CLARITY Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Shehzad; Paracha, Noman; Cook, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common, chronic, neurodegenerative condition associated with substantial healthcare and societal economic burden. Disease-modifying MS treatments have the potential to reduce health resource utilization (HRU), thereby reducing the attendant socioeconomic b...

  18. Persistent activation of microglia is associated with neuronal dysfunction of callosal projecting pathways and multiple sclerosis-like lesions in relapsing--remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine; Wang, Yue; Kivisäkk, Pia

    2007-01-01

    callosal projecting neurons. There was significant impairment of retrograde labeling of NeuN-positive callosal projecting neurons and reduction in the labelling of their transcallosal axons. These data demonstrate a novel paradigm of cortical and callosal neuropathology in a mouse model of MS, perpetuated...

  19. Transplantation of umbilical cord and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zong-liu; Liu, Ying; Mao, Xi-Hong; Wei, Chuan-yu; Meng, Ming-yao; Liu, Yun-hong; Zhuyun Yang, Zara; Zhu, Hongmei; Short, Martin; Bernard, Claude; Xiao, Zhi-cheng

    2013-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapy for multiple sclerosis with potential to both ameliorate inflammatory processes as well as improve regeneration and repair. Although most clinical studies have used autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, other sources such as allogeneic umbilical cord-derived cells may provide a more accessible and practical supply of cells for transplantation. In this case report we present the treatment of aggressive multiple sclerosis with multiple allogenic human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell and autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells over a 4 y period. The treatments were tolerated well with no significant adverse events. Clinical and radiological disease appeared to be suppressed following the treatments and support the expansion of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation into clinical trials as a potential novel therapy for patients with aggressive multiple sclerosis.

  20. Neuromyelitis optica relapses: Race and rate, immunosuppression and impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, George; O'Brien, Fanny; Rocha, João; Woodhall, Mark; Waters, Patrick; Chandratre, Saleel; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hemingway, Cheryl; Wassmer, Evangeline; Wasiewski, Warren; Leite, Maria Isabel; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare antibody-mediated CNS disease characterised by disabling relapses leading to high morbidity and mortality. Understanding relapse activity and severity is important for treatment decisions and clinical trial design. We assessed (1) whether clinical and demographic factors associate with different relapse rates and (2) the relative impact of immunosuppressive treatments on relapse rates and on attack-related residual disability. Clinical, demographic and treatment data were prospectively collected from 79 consecutive aquaporin 4 antibody positive patients seen in the nationally commissioned Oxford NMO service. The influence of clinical features on annualised relapse rates (using multiple regression) and the effect of immunosuppression on relapse-associated residual disability for transverse myelitis and optic neuritis attacks (using a mixed effect model) were analysed. The mean annualised relapse rate was 0.93. Relapse rates were significantly higher in Afro-Caribbeans, children and in those of shorter disease duration. Relapse rates reduced on treatment (from 0.87 to 0.42). Delay to first treatment did not influence eventual on-treatment relapse rate. Immunosuppressive treatment significantly reduced the residual disability from ON (p<0.01), and TM (p=0.029) attacks. Relapse rates in NMO are influenced by multiple factors, including age, ethnicity and disease duration. Current immunosuppressive treatments reduce but do not abolish relapses, however, they appear to additionally lessen the chronic disabling effect of a relapse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.