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Sample records for early pattern formation

  1. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Margot E.; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mec

  2. Phyllotactic pattern formation in early stages of cactus ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta M. Gola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Representatives of the family Cactaceae are characterized by a wide range of phyllotaxis. To assess the origin of this diversity, early stages of phyllotactic pattern formation were examined in seedlings. The analysis of the sequence of areole initiation revealed intertribal differences. In seedlings from the Trichocereeae (Gymnocalycium, Rebutia and Notocacteae (Parodia tribes, two opposite cotyledonal areoles developed as the first elements of a pattern. Usually, next pair of areoles was initiated perpendicularly to cotyledonal areoles, starting the decussate pattern. This pattern was subsequently transformed into bijugate or into simple spiral phyllotaxis. In seedlings from the Cacteae tribe (Mammillaria and Thelocactus, cotyledonal areoles were never observed and the first areoles always appeared in the space between cotyledons. It was either areole pair (mainly in Mammillaria, starting a decussate pattern, or a single areole (mainly in Thelocactus quickly followed by areoles spirally arranged, usually in accordance with the main Fibonacci phyllotaxis. Differences in the initial stages of pattern formation do not fully explain the phyllotaxis diversity in mature cacti. Only two, the most common phyllotactic patterns occurred in the early development of studied seedlings, i.e. the main Fibonacci and the decussate pattern. Discrepancy in the range of phyllotactic spectra in seedlings and in mature plants suggests that phyllotaxis diversity emerges during further plant growth. Initial phyllotactic transformations, occurring already in the very early stages, indicate great plasticity of cactus growth and seem to support the hypothesis of the ontogenetic increase of phyllotaxis diversity due to transformations.

  3. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Margot E; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-12-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mechanisms interact to generate local auxin accumulation in the early embryo. New auxin-dependent reporters help identifying these sites, while atomic structures of transcriptional response mediators help explain the diverse outputs of auxin signaling. Key auxin outputs are control of cell identity and cell division orientation, and progress has been made towards understanding the cellular basis of each. Importantly, a number of studies have combined computational modeling and experiments to analyze the developmental role, genetic circuitry and molecular mechanisms of auxin-dependent cell division control.

  4. Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  5. Early-warning signs for pattern-formation in stochastic partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Karna; Kuehn, Christian

    2015-05-01

    There have been significant recent advances in our understanding of the potential use and limitations of early-warning signs for predicting drastic changes, so called critical transitions or tipping points, in dynamical systems. A focus of mathematical modeling and analysis has been on stochastic ordinary differential equations, where generic statistical early-warning signs can be identified near bifurcation-induced tipping points. In this paper, we outline some basic steps to extend this theory to stochastic partial differential equations with a focus on analytically characterizing basic scaling laws for linear SPDEs and comparing the results to numerical simulations of fully nonlinear problems. In particular, we study stochastic versions of the Swift-Hohenberg and Ginzburg-Landau equations. We derive a scaling law of the covariance operator in a regime where linearization is expected to be a good approximation for the local fluctuations around deterministic steady states. We compare these results to direct numerical simulation, and study the influence of noise level, noise color, distance to bifurcation and domain size on early-warning signs.

  6. Distinct patterns of notochord mineralization in zebrafish coincide with the localization of Osteocalcin isoform 1 during early vertebral centra formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bensimon-Brito Anabela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In chondrichthyans, basal osteichthyans and tetrapods, vertebral bodies have cartilaginous anlagen that subsequently mineralize (chondrichthyans or ossify (osteichthyans. Chondrocytes that form the vertebral centra derive from somites. In teleost fish, vertebral centrum formation starts in the absence of cartilage, through direct mineralization of the notochord sheath. In a second step, the notochord is surrounded by somite-derived intramembranous bone. In several small teleost species, including zebrafish (Danio rerio, even haemal and neural arches form directly as intramembranous bone and only modified caudalmost arches remain cartilaginous. This study compares initial patterns of mineralization in different regions of the vertebral column in zebrafish. We ask if the absence or presence of cartilaginous arches influences the pattern of notochord sheath mineralization. Results To reveal which cells are involved in mineralization of the notochord sheath we identify proliferating cells, we trace mineralization on the histological level and we analyze cell ultrastructure by TEM. Moreover, we localize proteins and genes that are typically expressed by skeletogenic cells such as Collagen type II, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Osteocalcin (Oc. Mineralization of abdominal and caudal vertebrae starts with a complete ring within the notochord sheath and prior to the formation of the bony arches. In contrast, notochord mineralization of caudal fin centra starts with a broad ventral mineral deposition, associated with the bases of the modified cartilaginous arches. Similar, arch-related, patterns of mineralization occur in teleosts that maintain cartilaginous arches throughout the spine. Throughout the entire vertebral column, we were able to co-localize ALP-positive signal with chordacentrum mineralization sites, as well as Collagen II and Oc protein accumulation in the mineralizing notochord sheath. In the caudal fin region, ALP and

  7. Distinct patterns of notochord mineralization in zebrafish coincide with the localization of Osteocalcin isoform 1 during early vertebral centra formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In chondrichthyans, basal osteichthyans and tetrapods, vertebral bodies have cartilaginous anlagen that subsequently mineralize (chondrichthyans) or ossify (osteichthyans). Chondrocytes that form the vertebral centra derive from somites. In teleost fish, vertebral centrum formation starts in the absence of cartilage, through direct mineralization of the notochord sheath. In a second step, the notochord is surrounded by somite-derived intramembranous bone. In several small teleost species, including zebrafish (Danio rerio), even haemal and neural arches form directly as intramembranous bone and only modified caudalmost arches remain cartilaginous. This study compares initial patterns of mineralization in different regions of the vertebral column in zebrafish. We ask if the absence or presence of cartilaginous arches influences the pattern of notochord sheath mineralization. Results To reveal which cells are involved in mineralization of the notochord sheath we identify proliferating cells, we trace mineralization on the histological level and we analyze cell ultrastructure by TEM. Moreover, we localize proteins and genes that are typically expressed by skeletogenic cells such as Collagen type II, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Osteocalcin (Oc). Mineralization of abdominal and caudal vertebrae starts with a complete ring within the notochord sheath and prior to the formation of the bony arches. In contrast, notochord mineralization of caudal fin centra starts with a broad ventral mineral deposition, associated with the bases of the modified cartilaginous arches. Similar, arch-related, patterns of mineralization occur in teleosts that maintain cartilaginous arches throughout the spine. Throughout the entire vertebral column, we were able to co-localize ALP-positive signal with chordacentrum mineralization sites, as well as Collagen II and Oc protein accumulation in the mineralizing notochord sheath. In the caudal fin region, ALP and Oc signals were clearly

  8. Pattern Formation in Hydrozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Stefan

    The fresh water polyp Hydra is famous for its ability to regenerate missing structures. Even aggregates of single cells transform eventually into normally shaped animals. This indicates a communication within the tissue and within the aggregates which determines the spatial pattern of gene expression. Such pattern-forming systems are thought to play a decisive role in the control of self-organization during embryogenesis. Marine and fresh water hydrozoa appear to allow an access to such a system. Although the molecular components are still mostly unknown, the regulatory properties of the pattern-forming system are increasingly well understood, and this may help eventually to identify the components involved.

  9. Sox17 expression patterns during gastrulation and early neurulation in the rabbit suggest two sources of endoderm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoun, Romia; Püschel, Bernd; Viebahn, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal tract and associated gland epithelia originate from the endoderm germ layer discovered by Pander in 1817. The recent surge in stem cell concepts revived interest in the findings of 30 years ago that the endoderm layer itself originates from the epiblast (which since Pander's time had been held to be the forerunner of the ectoderm and mesoderm germ layers only). However, the question as to which parts of the mammalian gastrulation-stage embryonic disc generate endoderm cells is still unresolved. Therefore, the expression of the gene coding for the transcription factor Sox17, a key transcription factor involved in endoderm formation in mouse, chick, frog, and zebrafish, was analyzed in the rabbit, a model organism for mammalian gastrulation morphology, using whole-mount in situ hybridization and high-resolution histological analysis of embryos at gastrulation and early neurulation stages. Sox17 mRNA in the mesoderm and lower layer (hypoblast) compartments within and adjacent to Hensen's node and the anterior segment of the primitive streak confirmed the validity of this approach, as this region had previously been shown to form endoderm in mouse and chick. However, Sox17 expression in central and posterior epiblast at pregastrulation stages together with a transient expression at the posterior extremity of the primitive streak suggest that endoderm (possibly hindgut) may be formed close to the emerging cloacal membrane, as well.

  10. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  11. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    agreement to open international markets because trade produces security externalities.”131 Gowa explains the necessity to maintain trade among allies by...alone.”135 They present empirical evidence to “ indicate that allies conduct more trade than do non-allies and that the formation of alliances tends to...states to control their trade flows.”138 Morrow et al. indicate that “joint democracy and the 133

  12. Pattern formations and oscillatory phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Patterns and their formations appear throughout nature, and are studied to analyze different problems in science and make predictions across a wide range of disciplines including biology, physics, mathematics, chemistry, material science, and nanoscience. With the emergence of nanoscience and the ability for researchers and scientists to study living systems at the biological level, pattern formation research has become even more essential. This book is an accessible first of its kind guide for scientists, researchers, engineers, and students who require a general introduction to thi

  13. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite.

  14. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  15. Sarcomeric pattern formation by actin cluster coalescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Friedrich

    Full Text Available Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells.

  16. Pattern Formation and Complexity Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    Success of nonlinear modelling of pattern formation and self-organization encourages speculations on informational and number theoretical foundations of complexity emergence. Pythagorean "unreasonable effectiveness of integers" in natural processes is perhaps extrapolatable even to universal emergence "out-of-nothing" (Leibniz, Wheeler). Because rational numbers (R = M/N) are everywhere dense on real axis, any digital string (hence any "book" from "Library of Babel" of J.L.Borges) is "recorded" infinitely many times in arbitrary many rationals. Furthermore, within any arbitrary small interval there are infinitely many Rs for which (either or both) integers (Ms and Ns) "carry" any given string of any given length. Because any iterational process (such as generation of fractal features of Mandelbrot Set) is arbitrary closely approximatable with rational numbers, the infinite pattern of integers expresses itself in generation of complexity of the world, as well as in emergence of the world itself. This "tunnelling" from Platonic World ("Platonia" of J.Barbour) to a real (physical) world is modern recast of Leibniz's motto ("for deriving all from nothing there suffices a single principle").

  17. Anisotropic assembly and pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Brecht, James H.; Uminsky, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of anisotropy in two classes of individual-based models for self-organization, collective behavior and self-assembly. We accomplish this via first-order dynamical systems of pairwise interacting particles that incorporate anisotropic interactions. At a continuum level, these models represent the natural anisotropic variants of the well-known aggregation equation. We leverage this framework to analyze the impact of anisotropic effects upon the self-assembly of co-dimension one equilibrium structures, such as micelles and vesicles. Our analytical results reveal the regularizing effect of anisotropy, and isolate the contexts in which anisotropic effects are necessary to achieve dynamical stability of co-dimension one structures. Our results therefore place theoretical limits on when anisotropic effects can be safely neglected. We also explore whether anisotropic effects suffice to induce pattern formation in such particle systems. We conclude with brief numerical studies that highlight various aspects of the models we introduce, elucidate their phase structure and partially validate the analysis we provide.

  18. Formative Assessment: Guidance for Early Childhood Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Ayers, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This policy report provides a guide and framework to early childhood policymakers considering formative assessment. The report defines formative assessment and outlines its process and application in the context of early childhood. The substance of this document is the issues for consideration in the implementation of the formative assessment…

  19. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge.......-time evolution of the sand ripple pattern, which has the surprising features that it breaks the local sand conservation and has long-range interaction, features that can be underpinned by experiments. Very similar vortex dynamics takes place around oscillating structures such as wings and fins. Here, we present...

  20. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge....

  1. Pattern formation in rotating fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Karl

    2009-06-01

    Flows in nature and technology are often associated with specific structures and pattern. This paper deals with the development and behaviour of such flow pattern. Flow structures are important for the mass, momentum and energy transport. The behaviour of different flow pattern is used by engineers to obtain an efficient mass and energy consumption. Mechanical power is transmitted via the momentum of rotating machine parts. Therefore the physical and mathematical knowledge of these basic concepts is important. Theoretical and experimental investigations of principle experiments are described in the following. We start with the classical problem of the flow between two concentric cylinders where the inner cylinder rotates. Periodic instabilities occur which are called Taylor vortices. The analogy between the cylindrical gap flow, the heat transfer in a horizontal fluid layer exposed to the gravity field and the boundary layer flow along concave boundaries concerning their stability behaviour is addressed. The vortex breakdown phenomenon in a cylinder with rotating cover is also described. A generalization to spherical sectors leads then to investigations with different boundary conditions. The spherical gap flow exhibits interesting phenomena concerning the nonlinear character of the Navier-Stokes equations. Multiple solutions in the nonlinear regime give rise to different routes during the laminar-turbulent transition. The interaction of two rotating spheres results in flow structures with separation and stagnation lines. Experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  2. Measuring early plaque formation clinically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliska, Alessandra N; Weidlich, Patricia; Gomes, Sabrina C; Oppermann, Rui V

    2006-01-01

    To test a system of measuring early plaque formation (EPF) and its subgingival extension as related to the presence or absence of a plaque free zone (PFZ). EPF was measured by three independent examiners following two consecutive 72-hour periods of undisturbed plaque build-up. One of the examiners further measured EPF following a 96-hour period in the presence of chlorhexidine or placebo. The classification system was composed of criterion 0 (plaque-free dental surface), criterion 1 (presence of plaque and PFZ) and criterion 2 (absence of PFZ, subgingival extension of plaque). Intra- and inter-examiner reliability were evaluated by means of the percentage of absolute agreement (c), Kappa (k) and Kendall (kd) coefficients. The third experiment consisted of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial. Plaque build-up in the presence of 0.12% chlorhexidine was assessed by employing the classification system described. The percentage of absolute intra- and inter-examiner agreement ranged from 85.43% to 75.63% and from 77.31% to 75.35% respectively. Chlorhexidine and placebo rinses showed similar percentages of criterion 1 surfaces, 62.6% and 51.5% respectively (p = 0.343). Of the surfaces, 44.3% showed criterion 2 after the use of placebo, while 3.4% of surfaces showed this criterion with the chlorhexidine (p = 0.007). The events associated with EPF can be appropriately scored with this classification system. Chlorhexidine rinses inhibit both the plaque colonization of the dental surfaces as well as its subgingival extension.

  3. Pattern formation with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tony E

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to study collective behavior in a nonlinear medium of trapped ions. Using laser cooling and heating and an anharmonic trap potential, one can turn an ion into a nonlinear van der Pol-Duffing oscillator. A chain of ions interacting electrostatically has stable plane waves for all parameters. The system also behaves like an excitable medium, since a sufficiently large perturbation generates a travelling pulse. Small chains exhibit multistability and limit cycles. We account for noise from spontaneous emission in the amplitude equation and find that the patterns are observable for realistic experimental parameters. The tunability of ion traps makes them an exciting setting to study nonequilibrium statistical physics.

  4. Cellular Automaton Modeling of Pattern Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlijst, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Book review Andreas Deutsch and Sabine Dormann, Cellular Automaton Modeling of Biological Pattern Formation, Characterization, Applications, and Analysis, Birkhäuser (2005) ISBN 0-8176-4281-1 331pp..

  5. Pattern Formation in Driven Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymko, Katherine

    Model colloidal particles of two types, driven in opposite directions, will in two dimensions segregate into lanes, a phenomenon studied extensively by Lowen and co-workers [Dzubiella et al. Phys. Rev. E 65, 021402 (2002)]. We have simulated mixtures of oppositely-driven particles using three numerical protocols. We find that laning results from enhanced diffusion, in the direction perpendicular to the drive, of particles surrounded by particles of the opposite type, consistent with the observation of Vissers et al. [Soft Matter 7, 6, 2352 (2011)]. By comparing protocols we find that enhanced diffusion follows from a simple geometrical constraint: oppositely-driven particles must, in the time taken to encounter each other in the direction of the drive, diffuse in the perpendicular direction by about one particle diameter. This constraint implies that the effective lateral diffusion constant grows linearly with drive speed and as the square root of the packing fraction, a prediction supported by our numerics. By invoking an analogy between hard particles with environment-dependent mobilities and mutually attractive particles we argue that there exists an equilibrium system whose pattern-forming properties are similar to those of the driven system. Katherine Klymko acknowledges support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  6. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis.

  7. Colonic urticaria pattern due to early ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, H.M.; Goldberg, H.I.; Axel, L.

    1981-05-15

    The unusual radiographic pattern of bleb-like mounds on the surface of the colon mucosa, previously described as colonic urticaria, was seen in 3 patients in whom no allergic state was present. This urticaria-like pattern was due to colonic distention in all 3, and represented only submucosal edema on the gross and microscopic specimens. We hypothesize that this pattern is due to early changes of ischemia caused by colon distention.

  8. Emergent pattern formation in an interstitial biofilm

    CERN Document Server

    Zachreson, Cameron; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Toth, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Collective behavior of bacterial colonies plays critical roles in adaptability, survivability, biofilm expansion and infection. We employ an individual-based model of an interstitial biofilm to study emergent pattern formation based on the assumptions that rod-shaped bacteria furrow through a viscous environment, and excrete extracellular polymeric substances which bias their rate of motion. Because the bacteria furrow through their environment, the substratum stiffness is a key control parameter behind the formation of distinct morphological patterns. By systematically varying this property (which we quantify with a stiffness coefficient {\\gamma}), we show that subtle changes in the substratum stiffness can give rise to a stable state characterized by a high degree of local order and long-range pattern formation. The ordered state exhibits characteristics typically associated with bacterial fitness advantages, even though it is induced by changes in environmental conditions rather than changes in biological ...

  9. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  10. Transverse optical and atomic pattern formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L

    2016-01-01

    The study of transverse optical pattern formation has been studied extensively in nonlinear optics, with a recent experimental interest in studying the phenomenon using cold atoms, which can undergo real-space self-organization. Here, we describe our experimental observation of pattern formation in cold atoms, which occurs using less than 1 microWatt of applied power. We show that the optical patterns and the self-organized atomic structures undergo continuous symmetry-breaking, which is characteristic of non-equilibrium phenomena in a multimode system. To theoretically describe pattern formation in cold atoms, we present a self-consistent model that allows for tight atomic bunching in the applied optical lattice. We derive the nonlinear refractive index of a gas of multi-level atoms in an optical lattice, and we derive the threshold conditions under which pattern formation occurs. We show that, by using small detunings and sub-Doppler temperatures, one achieves two orders of magnitude reduced intensity thres...

  11. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  12. Isocurvature fluctuations induce early star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiyama, N; Zaroubi, S; Silk, J

    2004-01-01

    The early reionization of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarization results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star for

  13. Isocurvature fluctuations induce early star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiyama, N; Zaroubi, S; Silk, J

    2004-01-01

    The early reionization of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarization results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star

  14. Chaotic Turing pattern formation in spatiotemporal systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jing-hua; LI Hai-hong; YANG Jun-zhong; HU Gang

    2006-01-01

    The problem of Turing pattern formation has attracted much attention in nonlinear science as well as physics,chemistry and biology.So far spatially ordered Turing patterns have been observed in stationary and oscillatory media only.In this paper we find that spatially ordered Turing patterns exist in chaotic extended systems.And chaotic Turing patterns are strikingly rich and surprisingly beautiful with their space structures.These findings are in sharp contrast with the intuition of pseudo-randomness of chaos.The richness and beauty of the chaotic Turing patterns are attributed to a large variety of symmetry properties realized by various types of self-organizations of partial chaos synchronizations.

  15. Fractals in Spatial Patterns of Vegetation Formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhiyuan; HUANG Daming; Masae Shiyomi; WANG Yusheng; Shigeo Takahashi; Hori Yoshimichi; Yasuo Yamamuru; CHEN Jun

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution patterns of species are always scale-dependent and spatially self-similar in ecological systems. In this work, vegetation distribution data collected from the vegetation map of the Xigazê region was analyzed using a box-counting method. The power law of the box-counting dimension (DB) across a range of scales (5-160 km) confirms the fractal patterns for most vegetation formations, while the fluctuations of the scale-specific DB among the different abundance groups indicate limitations of fractal coherence. The fractal method is shown to be a useful tool for measuring the distribution patterns of vegetation formations across scales, which provides important information for both species and habitat conservation, especially in landscape management.

  16. Pattern Formation in a Dusty Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄峰; 叶茂福; 王龙; 江南

    2004-01-01

    A rich variety of dust patterns have been observed in a capacitively coupled rf discharge dusty plasma system. Dust particles are synthesized through chemical reaction of the filled gas mixture during discharge. Different patterns are formed in different stages of particle growth. In the early stage of particle growth, dust cloud can be formed by a large number of small particles, and its behavior appears to be fluid-like. Such interesting nonlinear phenomena as dust void and complex dust cloud patterns are observed in this stage. As dust particles grow, the particle size and structure can be controlled to follow two different routes. In one of the routes, the particles grow up in a ball-like shape and can be formed into regular lattice and cluster patterns.In the other, the particles grow up in a fractal shape.

  17. Fertilization and early seed formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Christian; Rogowsky, Peter

    2008-10-01

    The double fertilization of flowering plants is a complex process, encompassing multiple steps. From its discovery more than a century ago, many useful descriptive approaches have been employed to better unveil specific steps/mechanisms. More recently, the development of an in vitro assay developed in our laboratory, has allowed a better understanding of this phenomenon. However, in vitro methods may show some limitations. The search for complementary strategies, especially with the search of mutants affected in the fertilization step allowed one to elucidate this critical and unique phenomenon in living organisms. Genes involved in pollen tube guidance or pollen discharge in synergids have been identified, as well as genes exhibiting differential expression in sperm, egg and central cells before and after fertilization. A calcium wave proved to correspond to the first cellular event seen after cytoplasmic fusion in the fertilized egg cell or zygote, which develops into a multi-cellular organism with an elaborate body plan. The development of the fertilized central cell into a nourishing tissue (endosperm) starts with the formation of the coenocyte, a multinuclear single cell unique in the plant kingdom, cellularization occurring later on. The balance of the paternal and maternal genomes, which is under the control of the FIS polycomb group complex, was found to be of the utmost importance for the successful development of the seed.

  18. Pattern formation during C. elegans vulval induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Sternberg, P W

    2001-01-01

    Studies of C. elegans vulval development provide insights into the process of pattern formation during animal development. The invariant pattern of vulval precursor cell fates is specified by the integration of at least two signaling systems. Recent findings suggest that multiple, partially redundant mechanisms are involved in patterning the vulval precursor cells. The inductive signal activates the LET-60/RAS signaling pathway and induces the 1 degree fate, whereas the lateral signal mediated by LIN-12/Notch is required for specification of the 2 degrees fate. Several regulatory pathways antagonize the RAS signaling pathway and specify the non-vulval 3 degrees fate in the absence of induction. The temporal and spatial regulation of VPC competence and production of the inductive and the lateral signal are precisely coordinated to ensure the wild-type vulval pattern.

  19. Pattern formation in superdiffusion Oregonator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Yan, Jia; Liu, Fu-Cheng; He, Ya-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formations in an Oregonator model with superdiffusion are studied in two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations. Stability analyses are performed by applying Fourier and Laplace transforms to the space fractional reaction-diffusion systems. Antispiral, stable turing patterns, and travelling patterns are observed by changing the diffusion index of the activator. Analyses of Floquet multipliers show that the limit cycle solution loses stability at the wave number of the primitive vector of the travelling hexagonal pattern. We also observed a transition between antispiral and spiral by changing the diffusion index of the inhibitor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. Y2012009 and ZD2015025), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  20. Pattern formation and functionality in swarm models

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, E M; Chialvo, D R; Rauch, Erik M; Millonas, Mark M; Chialvo, Dante R

    1995-01-01

    We explore a simplified class of models we call swarms, which are inspired by the collective behavior of social insects. We perform a mean-field stability analysis and perform numerical simulations of the model. Several interesting types of behavior emerge in the vicinity of a second-order phase transition in the model, including the formation of stable lines of traffic flow, and memory reconstitution and bootstrapping. In addition to providing an understanding of certain classes of biological behavior, these models bear a generic resemblance to a number of pattern formation processes in the physical sciences.

  1. Emergent pattern formation in an interstitial biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachreson, Cameron; Wolff, Christian; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Toth, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Collective behavior of bacterial colonies plays critical roles in adaptability, survivability, biofilm expansion and infection. We employ an individual-based model of an interstitial biofilm to study emergent pattern formation based on the assumptions that rod-shaped bacteria furrow through a viscous environment and excrete extracellular polymeric substances which bias their rate of motion. Because the bacteria furrow through their environment, the substratum stiffness is a key control parameter behind the formation of distinct morphological patterns. By systematically varying this property (which we quantify with a stiffness coefficient γ ), we show that subtle changes in the substratum stiffness can give rise to a stable state characterized by a high degree of local order and long-range pattern formation. The ordered state exhibits characteristics typically associated with bacterial fitness advantages, even though it is induced by changes in environmental conditions rather than changes in biological parameters. Our findings are applicable to a broad range of biofilms and provide insights into the relationship between bacterial movement and their environment, and basic mechanisms behind self-organization of biophysical systems.

  2. The Middle Stone Age archaeology of the Lower Omo Valley Kibish Formation: excavations, lithic assemblages, and inferred patterns of early Homo sapiens behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, John J

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the excavation, stratigraphy, and lithic assemblages of Middle Stone Age sites from the Omo Kibish Formation (Lower Omo Valley, southwestern Ethiopia). Three sites were excavated, two in Kibish Member I (KHS and AHS) and one at the base of Member III (BNS). The assemblages are dominated by relatively high-quality raw materials procured as pebbles from local gravels. The principal modes of core preparation are radial/centripetal Levallois and discoidal. Retouched tools are rare. Foliate bifaces are present, as are larger tools, such as handaxes, picks, and lanceolates, but these are more common among surface finds than among excavated assemblages. Middle Stone Age assemblages shed light on the adaptations of the earliest-known Homo sapiens populations in Africa.

  3. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  4. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  5. Pattern formation in nanoporous titania templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C; Wu, Z; Menon, L

    2007-02-01

    We have carried out a systematic investigation into the formation of nanoscaled patterns in titania (TiO2) templates under dc anodization of Ti in HF acid. At lower acid concentrations (around 0.5 wt% HF) either pores or tubes form at the surface of anodized titanium foil. The pores or nanotubes are separated from the bottom Ti layer by a thin barrier layer of TiO2. The critical voltage where the transition from pores to tubes occurs has been determined. It is observed that the transition voltage shift towards higher voltages as acid concentration is increased, with pore formation disappearing altogether at high acid concentrations. We have also carried out a systematic investigation into the dependence of pore and tube parameters on the applied dc anodization voltage. Our results indicate that the barrier layer thickness, pore and tube length increase as a function of applied voltage.

  6. Excitable Pattern Formation in Inhomogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum signal via the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Simultaneously they produce a basal level of Phosphodiesterase, an enzyme that degrades cAMP. Soon a pattern of rotating spiral waves or circular waves is formed at the multi-cellular level. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other pattern are still unclear. Here we report experimental and theoretical investigations of the pattern-formation of mixtures of cells starved for different times. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time due to time dependent gene expressions. Cells starved for longer times are known to exhibit increased excitability. We report phase maps of the patterns for mixtures of different combinations of excitability. Numerical simulations of a modified Kessler-Levine model allow us to explain the experimental results and provide new insights into the dynamical behavior of the system. This work is supported by the Max Planck Society.

  7. Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1985-05-01

    The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classification capabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropy function, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are

  8. An Early Mathematical Patterning Assessment: identifying young Australian Indigenous children's patterning skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papic, Marina

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an Early Mathematical Patterning Assessment (EMPA) tool that provides early childhood educators with a valuable opportunity to identify young children's mathematical thinking and patterning skills through a series of hands-on and drawing tasks. EMPA was administered through one-to-one assessment interviews to children aged 4 to 5 years in the year prior to formal school. Two hundred and seventeen assessments indicated that the young low socioeconomic and predominantly Australian Indigenous children in the study group had varied patterning and counting skills. Three percent of the study group was able to consistently copy and draw an ABABAB pattern made with coloured blocks. Fifty percent could count to six by ones and count out six items with 4 % of the total group able to identify six items presented in regular formations without counting. The integration of patterning into early mathematics learning is critical to the abstraction of mathematical ideas and relationships and to the development of mathematical reasoning in young children. By using the insights into the children's thinking that the EMPA tool provides, early childhood educators can better inform mathematics teaching and learning and so help close the persistent gap in numeracy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children.

  9. Protostar formation in the early universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-08-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass 1% that of the Sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star.

  10. Protostar Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Naoki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the Universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass of just one percent that of the sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star.

  11. Patterns and mechanisms of early Pliocene warmth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A V; Brierley, C M; Lawrence, K T; Liu, Z; Dekens, P S; Ravelo, A C

    2013-04-04

    About five to four million years ago, in the early Pliocene epoch, Earth had a warm, temperate climate. The gradual cooling that followed led to the establishment of modern temperature patterns, possibly in response to a decrease in atmospheric CO2 concentration, of the order of 100 parts per million, towards preindustrial values. Here we synthesize the available geochemical proxy records of sea surface temperature and show that, compared with that of today, the early Pliocene climate had substantially lower meridional and zonal temperature gradients but similar maximum ocean temperatures. Using an Earth system model, we show that none of the mechanisms currently proposed to explain Pliocene warmth can simultaneously reproduce all three crucial features. We suggest that a combination of several dynamical feedbacks underestimated in the models at present, such as those related to ocean mixing and cloud albedo, may have been responsible for these climate conditions.

  12. Leader Election Problem Versus Pattern Formation Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Dieudonné, Yoann; Villain, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Leader election and arbitrary pattern formation are fundammental tasks for a set of autonomous mobile robots. The former consists in distinguishing a unique robot, called the leader. The latter aims in arranging the robots in the plane to form any given pattern. The solvability of both these tasks turns out to be necessary in order to achieve more complex tasks. In this paper, we study the relationship between these two tasks in the semi-synchronous model (SSM), wherein the robots are weak in several aspects. In particular, they have no direct means of communication. They cannot remember any previous observation nor computation performed in any previous step. Such robots are said to be oblivious. The robots are also uniform and anonymous, i.e, they all have the same program using no global parameter (such that an identity) allowing to differentiate any of them. Moreover, none of them share any kind of common coordinate mechanism or common sense of direction, except that they agree on a common handedness (chir...

  13. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  14. Early formation of evolved asteroidal crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M D; Ash, Richard D; Liu, Yang; Bellucci, Jeremy J; Rumble, Douglas; McDonough, William F; Walker, Richard J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2009-01-08

    Mechanisms for the formation of crust on planetary bodies remain poorly understood. It is generally accepted that Earth's andesitic continental crust is the product of plate tectonics, whereas the Moon acquired its feldspar-rich crust by way of plagioclase flotation in a magma ocean. Basaltic meteorites provide evidence that, like the terrestrial planets, some asteroids generated crust and underwent large-scale differentiation processes. Until now, however, no evolved felsic asteroidal crust has been sampled or observed. Here we report age and compositional data for the newly discovered, paired and differentiated meteorites Graves Nunatak (GRA) 06128 and GRA 06129. These meteorites are feldspar-rich, with andesite bulk compositions. Their age of 4.52 +/- 0.06 Gyr demonstrates formation early in Solar System history. The isotopic and elemental compositions, degree of metamorphic re-equilibration and sulphide-rich nature of the meteorites are most consistent with an origin as partial melts from a volatile-rich, oxidized asteroid. GRA 06128 and 06129 are the result of a newly recognized style of evolved crust formation, bearing witness to incomplete differentiation of their parent asteroid and to previously unrecognized diversity of early-formed materials in the Solar System.

  15. Structure Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Miedema, P G

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the perturbations in the energy density and the particle number density in a flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe in the radiation-dominated era and in the epoch after decoupling of matter and radiation is studied. For large-scale perturbations the outcome is in accordance with treatments in the literature. For small-scale perturbations the differences are conspicuous. Firstly, in the radiation-dominated era small-scale perturbations grew proportional to the square root of time. Secondly, perturbations in the Cold Dark Matter particle number density were, due to gravitation, coupled to perturbations in the total energy density. This implies that structure formation has commenced successfully only after decoupling of matter and radiation. Finally, after decoupling density perturbations evolved diabatically, i.e., they exchanged heat with their environment. This heat exchange may have enhanced the growth rate of its mass sufficiently to explain structure formation in the early univ...

  16. Black hole formation in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  17. Chemical Abundance Patterns and the Early Environment of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Corlies, Lauren; Tumlinson, Jason; Bryan, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z=10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can ...

  18. Stability on Adaptive NN Formation Control with Variant Formation Patterns and Interaction Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation task achieved by multiple robots is a tough issue in practice, because of the limitations of the sensing abilities and communicating functions among them. This paper investigates the decentralized formation control in case of parameter uncertainties, bounded disturbances, and variant interactions among robots. To design decentralized controller, a formation description is firstly proposed, which consists of two aspects in terms of formation pattern and interaction topology. Then the formation control using adaptive neural network (ANN is proposed based on the relative error derived from formation description. From the analysis on stability of the formation control under invariant/variant formation pattern and interaction topology, it is concluded that if formation pattern is of class Ck, k ≥1, and interaction graph is connected and changed with finite times, the convergence of the formation control is guaranteed, so that robots must form the formation described by the formation pattern.

  19. Stability on Adaptive NN Formation Control with Variant Formation Patterns and Interaction Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangmin Li

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation task achieved by multiple robots is a tough issue in practice, because of the limitations of the sensing abilities and communicating functions among them. This paper investigates the decentralized formation control in case of parameter uncertainties, bounded disturbances, and variant interactions among robots. To design decentralized controller, a formation description is firstly proposed, which consists of two aspects in terms of formation pattern and interaction topology. Then the formation control using adaptive neural network (ANN is proposed based on the relative error derived from formation description. From the analysis on stability of the formation control under invariant/variant formation pattern and interaction topology, it is concluded that if formation pattern is of class kC, 1k≥ , and interaction graph is connected and changed with finite times, the convergence of the formation control is guaranteed, so that robots must form the formation described by the formation pattern.

  20. Pattern formation in rotating Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, M.; Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    1992-12-01

    Using an extension of the Swift-Hohenberg equation we study pattern formation in the Bénard experiment close to the onset of convection in the case of rotating cylindrical fluid containers. For small Taylor numbers we emphasize the existence of slowly rotating patterns and describe behaviour exhibiting defect motion. Finally, we study pattern formation close to the Küppers-Lortz instability. The instability is nucleated at defects and proceeds through front propagation into the bulk patterns.

  1. Pattern formation by dewetting and evaporating sedimenting suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibi, M.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Rafaï, S.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pattern formation from drying droplets containing sedimenting particles and dewetting of thin films of such suspensions was studied. The dewetting causes the formation of finger-like patterns near the contact line which leave behind a deposit of branches. We find that the strikingly low speed of dew

  2. Regular pattern formation in real ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietkerk, Max; Koppel, Johan van de

    2008-01-01

    Localized ecological interactions can generate striking large-scale spatial patterns in ecosystems through spatial self-organization. Possible mechanisms include oscillating consumer–resource interactions, localized disturbance-recovery processes and scale-dependent feedback. Despite abundant theore

  3. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Jörg, David J; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentatio...

  4. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, David J.; Oates, Andrew C.; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentation between different animal species.

  5. Regular pattern formation in real ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietkerk, M.; Van de Koppel, J.

    2008-01-01

    Localized ecological interactions can generate striking large-scale spatial patterns in ecosystems through spatial self-organization. Possible mechanisms include oscillating consumer–resource interactions, localized disturbance-recovery processes and scale-dependent feedback. Despite abundant

  6. Pattern formations in chaotic spatio-temporal systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying Zhang; Shihong Wang; Jinhua Xiao; Hilda A Cerdeira; S Chen; Gang Hu

    2005-06-01

    Pattern formations in chaotic spatio-temporal systems modelled by coupled chaotic oscillators are investigated. We focus on various symmetry breakings and different kinds of chaos synchronization–desynchronization transitions, which lead to certain types of spontaneous spatial orderings and the emergence of some typical ordered patterns, such as rotating wave patterns with splay phase ordering (orientational symmetry breaking) and partially synchronous standing wave patterns with in-phase ordering (translational symmetry breaking). General pictures of the global behaviors of pattern formations and transitions in coupled chaotic oscillators are provided.

  7. Pattern formation in oscillatory media without lateral inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rehman; Harris, Jeremy; Ermentrout, Bard

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking instabilities are the most common mechanism for how biological, chemical, and physical systems produce spatial patterns. Beginning with Turing's original paper, so-called lateral inhibition—in which negative feedback has greater spread than positive feedback—has been the underlying mechanism for pattern formation in biological models. Despite this, there are many biological systems that exhibit pattern formation but do not have lateral inhibition. In this paper, we present an example of such a system that is able to generate robust patterns emerging from a spatially homogeneous state. In fact, patterns can arise when there is only spatial spread of the activator. Unlike classic Turing pattern formation, these patterns arise from a spatially homogeneous oscillation rather than from a constant steady state.

  8. Pattern formation - Instabilities in sand ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. L.; v. Hecke, M.; Haaning, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sand ripples are seen below shallow wavy water and are formed whenever water oscillates over a bed of sand. Here we analyse the instabilities that can upset this perfect patterning when the ripples are subjected to large changes in driving amplitude or frequency, causing them to deform both...

  9. Comparing investigation of pattern formation in glow and streamer DBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the behaviors of patterns in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in glow and streamer regimes under different operating conditions (driving frequency and voltage) and external electric/magnetic field to explore the similarity and difference of pattern formation. It is found that patterns in both glow and streamer DBDs can be homogenized by decreasing the driving frequency to a low level. But filamentary streamers can still appear at low frequency when the voltage is much higher. With an additional lateral electric field, patterns in both regimes can be homogenized. However, an axial magnetic field makes the glow DBD homogeneous, while the streamer DBD decreases in filamentary size. In both regimes, dynamics and distribution of the space charges, rather than the surface charges, play the predominant role in the formation of DBD patterns. But the surface charges may also play an important role in pattern formation, especially in streamer DBD.

  10. Pattern formation in arrays of chemical oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Kumar Kamal

    2012-05-01

    We describe a simple model mimicking diffusively coupled chemical micro-oscillators. We characterize the rich variety of dynamical states emerging from the model under variation of time delay in coupling, coupling strength and boundary conditions. The spatiotemporal patterns obtained include clustering, mixed dynamics, inhomogeneous steady states and amplitude death. Further, under delay in coupling, the model yields transitions from phase to antiphase oscillations, reminiscent of that observed in experiments [M Toiya et al, J. Chem. Lett. 1, 1241 (2010)].

  11. Embryogenesis, a process of pattern formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Xiang SUN

    2011-01-01

    @@ Plant embryogenesis is traditionally defined as a develop-mental process from zygote to mature embryo, which has the potential to form a complete plant (Bhojwani, 1974; Hu,2005).In dicotyledonous species, the fertilized egg or zygote usually divides according to a stereotyped pattern and gives rise to an embryo that consists of an embryonic shoot,cotyledons, hypocotyls, and an embryonic root.Thus, the basic body plan of the plant is established during the embryogenesis.Interestingly, the shoot-leaf-stem structure,not including the root, is repeatedly photocopied as a basic unit throughout plant vegetative growth (Wolpert et al.,2002).

  12. Labyrinthine Instability and Pattern Formation in Ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Ferrofluids suspended in liquids and constrained in quasi-two dimensional domains were exposed to transverse magnetic fields. The points of elliptical instability of nearly circular drops were measured and compared to the theoretical prediction using a fitting parameter. The data matched the predicted trend well for 3 different liquids used as suspensions; however, at extreme values of drop radius, there was a significant deviation from prediction. The angles at each node of the labyrinthine pattern, formed using high magnetic fields, were measured and compared with the prediction of 120 degrees. For the dense labyrinth the most common angles were between 135 degrees -144 degrees, suggesting interaction between arms were having a repelling effect causing angles to widen. For the less dense labyrinth the most frequent angle category decreased, supporting this hypothesis. In the experiments the area, which theoretically should be constant, was noticed to change and this encouraged an investigation into how the ...

  13. Pattern Formation and Quasicrystal Structure in Azobenzene Polymer Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ze-Da; CAI Zhi-Gang; ZHANG Ling-Zhi; LIU Yan-Fa; YANG Jie; SHE Wei-Long; ZHOU Jian-Ying

    2000-01-01

    Pattern formation in azobenzene polymer film by degenerate four-wave mixing is reported. Island arrays with specific patterns are analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and polarizing optical microscopy. It is demonstrated that the control of photo-induced nanostructure sized micropattern in the nonlinear organic film is possible by using properly polarized writing beams with the total incident power exceeding a certain threshold.

  14. Pattern formation in mutation of "Game of Life"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wen-gao; PAN Zhi-geng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents pattern formation in generalized cellular automata (GCA) by varying parameters of classic “game Experiments show the emergence of the self-organizing patterns that is analogous with life forms at the edge of chaos, which consist of certain nontrivial structure and go through periods of growth, maturity and death. We describe these experiments and discuss their potential as alternative way for creating artificial life and generative art, and as a new method for pattern genesis.

  15. Is Team Formation Gender Neutral? Evidence from Coauthorship Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Boschini, Anne; Sjögren, Anna

    2006-01-01

    We investigate if voluntary team formation is gender neutral. To this end, we model team formation as a random matching process influenced by the agents' preferences for team size and gender composition and derive how team formation depends on the gender ratio in the population of prospective team mates. We then test if the coauthorship pattern in articles published 1991-2002 in three top Economics journals is gender neutral, exploiting the variation in female presence across subfields of Eco...

  16. On pattern formation in ferrocolloid convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozhko, A [Department of Physics, Perm State University, Bukirev Str. 15, 614990 Perm (Russian Federation); Putin, G [Department of Physics, Perm State University, Bukirev Str. 15, 614990 Perm (Russian Federation); Tynjaelae, T [Department of Energy and Environmental Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Meshin, M Dabagh [Department of Energy and Environmental Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Jalali, P [Department of Energy and Environmental Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2007-04-15

    Experimental studies and numerical simulations of stability of buoyancy-driven flows in a ferrocolloid for the cases of horizontal and inclined vertical orientation of a thin cylindrical cavity are performed. The influence of a homogeneous longitudinal magnetic field on convective instability and spatio-temporal patterns were also investigated. In the case of ferrocolloids the gradients of magnetic permeability may arise due to both temperature and particle concentration gradients. The particle mass flux in a classical form is summarized from the translation diffusion coefficient and the thermal diffusion ratio. However, the explanation for the observed self-oscillation regimes in magnetic fluid for the cavities of sufficiently large thickness is conditioned by the competition of density variations originating from the fluid thermal expansion and barometric sedimentation. The results prove that a uniform longitudinal magnetic field allows to control the stability and the shape of secondary convection motions at inclined orientation of layer. In a ferrocolloid the repeated transients involving localized roll convection and pure shear flow took place. Under action of uniform longitudinal magnetic field orientated perpendicular to flux velocity of shear motion on such long-wave transients can lead to complicated types of chaotic localized states or solitary vortices.

  17. Vascular tissue differentiation and pattern formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, are differentiated from meristematic cells, procambium, and vascular cambium. Auxin and cytokinin have been considered essential for vascular tissue differentiation; this is supported by recent molecular and genetic analyses. Xylogenesis has long been used as a model for study of cell differentiation, and many genes involved in late stages of tracheary element formation have been characterized. A number of mutants affecting vascular differentiation and pattern formation have been isolated in Arabidopsis. Studies of some of these mutants have suggested that vascular tissue organization within the bundles and vascular pattern formation at the organ level are regulated by positional information.

  18. Argon ion beam induced surface pattern formation on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsäss, H.; Bobes, O.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    The development of self-organized surface patterns on Si due to noble gas ion irradiation has been studied extensively in the past. In particular, Ar ions are commonly used and the pattern formation was analyzed as function of ion incidence angle, ion fluence, and ion energies between 250 eV and 140 keV. Very few results exist for the energy regime between 1.5 keV and 10 keV and it appears that pattern formation is completely absent for these ion energies. In this work, we present experimental data on pattern formation for Ar ion irradiation between 1 keV and 10 keV and ion incidence angles between 50° and 75°. We confirm the absence of patterns at least for ion fluences up to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using the crater function formalism and Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate curvature coefficients of linear continuum models of pattern formation, taking into account contribution due to ion erosion and recoil redistribution. The calculations consider the recently introduced curvature dependence of the erosion crater function as well as the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer. Only when taking into account these additional contributions to the linear theory, our simulations clearly show that that pattern formation is strongly suppressed between about 1.5 keV and 10 keV, most pronounced at 3 keV. Furthermore, our simulations are now able to predict whether or not parallel oriented ripple patterns are formed, and in case of ripple formation the corresponding critical angles for the whole experimentally studied energies range between 250 eV and 140 keV.

  19. Laser-induced pattern formation from homogeneous polyisoprene solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Dian-Yang; Li Ming; Wang Shu-Jie; Lü Zhi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that the pattern formation in homogeneous solutions of polyisoprene in toluene saturated with C60 induced by a continuous-wave visible laser is observed experimentally. The transmitted beam patterns change with the increase of the laser irradiation time. In the initial phase, the patterns with concentric ring-shaped structure are formed. In the end, the patterns become speckle-shaped. The incubation time of the transmitted beam widening is inversely proportional to the laser power density and solution concentration. The pattern formation results from the optical-field-induced refractive index changes in the solutions, but the mechanism of optical-field-induced refractive index changes in the polymer solutions needs to be further studied.

  20. Syllabic Patterns in the Early Vocalizations of Quichua Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina E.; Davis, Barbara L.; Macneilage, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the interactions between production patterns common to children regardless of language environment and the early appearance of production effects based on perceptual learning from the ambient language requires the study of languages with diverse phonological properties. Few studies have evaluated early phonological acquisition…

  1. Syllabic Patterns in the Early Vocalizations of Quichua Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina E.; Davis, Barbara L.; Macneilage, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the interactions between production patterns common to children regardless of language environment and the early appearance of production effects based on perceptual learning from the ambient language requires the study of languages with diverse phonological properties. Few studies have evaluated early phonological acquisition…

  2. Central Cell-Derived Peptides Regulate Early Embryo Patterning in Flowering Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, L.M.; Marshall, E.; Tesfaye, M.; Silverstein, K.A.T.; Mori, M.; Umetsu, Y.; Otterbach, S.L.; Papareddy, R.; Dickinson, H.G.; Boutilier, K.A.; VandenBosch, K.A.; Ohki, S.; Gutierrez-Marcos, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Plant embryogenesis initiates with the establishment of an apical-basal axis; however, the molecular mechanisms accompanying this early event remain unclear. Here, we show that a small cysteine-rich peptide family is required for formation of the zygotic basal cell lineage and proembryo patterning i

  3. Magnetic fields in early protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    González-Casanova, Diego F; Lazarian, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe". In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M$_\\odot$ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, "reconnection diffusion", removes the magnetic flux from the disk, the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the a...

  4. Simulating Stellar Cluster Formation and Early Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Joshua; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ibañez-Mejia, Juan; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pellegrino, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our current development of a model of stellar cluster formation and evolution in the presence of stellar feedback. We have integrated the MHD code Flash into the Astrophysical Multi-Use Software Environment (AMUSE) and coupled the gas dynamics to an N-body code using a Fujii gravity bridge. Further we have integrated feedback from radiation using the FERVENT module for Flash, supernovae by thermal and kinetic energy injection, and winds by kinetic energy injection. Finally we have developed a method of implementing star formation using the Jeans criterion of the gas. We present initial results from our cluster formation model in a cloud using self-consistent boundary conditions drawn from a model of supernova-driven interstellar turbulence.

  5. Early Morphology and Recurring Sound Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbæk, Laila; Basbøll, Hans; Lambertsen, Claus

    To enlighten the question how infants and toddlers come to grips with morphological patterns in a language whose sound structure presents great perceptual difficulties, we shall discuss aspects of our work on Danish children's acquisition of noun plurals, including results from The Danish CDI...... such measures. The analysis of the Danish morphological system used is purely sound-based (as against letter-based) and thereby deviates radically from standard accounts. The Danish (native) system of nominal pluralisation consists of the suffixes a-schwa and e-schwa, with or without accompanying stem changes...... (Basbøll 2005, Ravid et al. -schwa, with or without accompanying stem changes (Basbøll 2005, Ravid et al. 2008), as well as zero plurals (only very rarely with stem change). The two overt suffixes are the two neutral vowels in Danish, a category of paramount importance in Danish phonology: it is decisive...

  6. Vegetation pattern formation of a water-biomass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Guohong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model with diffusion and cross-diffusion is proposed to describe the interaction between the vegetation and the soil water. Based on the view of Turing pattern, we discuss the conditions of the diffusion-induced instability and the cross-diffusion-induced instability of a homogenous uniform steady state. We find that either a fast diffusion speed of water or a great hydraulic diffusivity due to the suction of roots may drive the instability of the homogenous steady state. Furthermore, we find that both the rain-fall rate and the infiltration feedback parameter can induce the transitions among the vegetation state, pattern formation and bare soil state. It is also found that the "terrain slope" may cause the instability of the homogenous steady state and drive the formation of periodic stripe pattern. Consequently, the diversity of dryland vegetation in reality can be explained as a result of pattern solutions of the model.

  7. On the mechanical theory for biological pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentil, D. E.; Murray, J. D.

    1993-02-01

    We investigate the pattern-forming potential of mechanical models in embryology proposed by Oster, Murray and their coworkers. We show that the presence of source terms in the tissue extracellular matrix and cell density equations give rise to spatio-temporal oscillations. An extension of one such model to include ‘biologically realistic long range effects induces the formation of stationary spatial patterns. Previous attempts to solve the full system were in one dimension only. We obtain solutions in one dimension and extend our simulations to two dimensions. We show that a single mechanical model alone is capable of generating complex but regular spatial patterns rather than the requirement of model interaction as suggested by Nagorcka et al. and Shaw and Murray. We discuss some biological applications of the models among which are would healing and formation of dermatoglyphic (fingerprint) patterns.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN EARLY PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Santos-Lima, Reinaldo, E-mail: casanova@astro.wisc.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, R. do Matão, 1226, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian and Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M{sub ⊙} protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  9. Monitoring early zeolite formation via in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabants, G; Lieben, S; Breynaert, E; Reichel, E K; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Jakoby, B; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-01

    Hitherto zeolite formation has not been fully understood. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has proven to be a versatile tool for characterizing ionic solutions, it was never used for monitoring zeolite growth. We show here that EIS can quantitatively monitor zeolite formation, especially during crucial early steps where other methods fall short.

  10. Spongiosa Primary Development: A Biochemical Hypothesis by Turing Patterns Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vaca, Oscar Rodrigo; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We propose a biochemical model describing the formation of primary spongiosa architecture through a bioregulatory model by metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is assumed that MMP13 regulates cartilage degradation and the VEGF allows vascularization and advances in the ossification front through the presence of osteoblasts. The coupling of this set of molecules is represented by reaction-diffusion equations with parameters in the Turing space, creating a stable spatiotemporal pattern that leads to the formation of the trabeculae present in the spongy tissue. Experimental evidence has shown that the MMP13 regulates VEGF formation, and it is assumed that VEGF negatively regulates MMP13 formation. Thus, the patterns obtained by ossification may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. Moreover, for the numerical solution, we used the finite element method with the Newton-Raphson method to approximate partial differential nonlinear equations. Ossification patterns obtained may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. PMID:23193429

  11. Spongiosa Primary Development: A Biochemical Hypothesis by Turing Patterns Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rodrigo López-Vaca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a biochemical model describing the formation of primary spongiosa architecture through a bioregulatory model by metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. It is assumed that MMP13 regulates cartilage degradation and the VEGF allows vascularization and advances in the ossification front through the presence of osteoblasts. The coupling of this set of molecules is represented by reaction-diffusion equations with parameters in the Turing space, creating a stable spatiotemporal pattern that leads to the formation of the trabeculae present in the spongy tissue. Experimental evidence has shown that the MMP13 regulates VEGF formation, and it is assumed that VEGF negatively regulates MMP13 formation. Thus, the patterns obtained by ossification may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. Moreover, for the numerical solution, we used the finite element method with the Newton-Raphson method to approximate partial differential nonlinear equations. Ossification patterns obtained may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification.

  12. Temperature Controlled Lateral Pattern Formation in Confined Polymer Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao-li; David G. Bucknall

    2004-01-01

    The thermal induced topography change in a model system consisting of a polymer film on a Si substrate capped by a thin metal layer has been studied by using AFM. Regular lateral patterns over large areas were observed on the surface when the system was heated to a sufficiently high temperature. 2D-FFT analysis to the AFM images indicates that the patterns are isotropic and have well defined periodicities. The periodicities of the characteristic patterns are found to depend strongly on the annealing temperature. The study of the kinetics of the formation reveals that such a topography forms almost instantaneously once the critical temperature is reached. It is suggested that this wave-like surface morphology is driven by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch of the different layers. This method for generating regular wave-like patterns could be used as a general method for patterning various organic materials into micro/nanostructures.

  13. Incremental Mining for Regular Frequent Patterns in Vertical Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the real world database updates continuously in several online applications like super market, network monitoring, web administration, stock market etc. Frequent pattern mining is afundamental and essential area in data mining research. Not only occurrence frequency of a pattern but also occurrence behaviour of a pattern may be treated as important criteria to measure the interestingness of a pattern. A frequent pattern is said to be regular frequent if the occurrence behaviour is less than or equal to the user given regularity threshold. In incremental transactional databases the occurrence frequency and the occurrence behaviour of a pattern changes whenever a small set of new transactions are added to the database. It is undesirable to mine regular frequent patterns from the scratch. Thus proposes a new algorithm called RFPID (Regular Frequent Pattern Mining in Incremental Databases to mine regular frequent patterns in incremental transactional databases using vertical data format which requires only one database scan. The experimental results show our algorithm is efficient in both memory utilization and execution.

  14. In vivo tracking of segmental bone defect healing reveals that callus patterning is related to early mechanical stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mehta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the hypothesis that callus formation, patterning, and mineralisation are impaired during the early phase of critical sized bone defect healing, and may relate to inter-fragmentary tissue strains within the bone defect area. Twenty four 12 week old Sprague Dawley rats were used for this study. They were divided into two groups defined by the femur bone defect size: (i 1 mm resulting in normal healing (NH, and (ii a large sized 5 mm defect resulting in critical healing (CH. Callus formation, patterning, and mineralisation kinetics in both groups were examined in the periosteal and osteotomy gap regions using a novel longitudinal study setup. Finite element analyses on µCT generated tomograms were used to determine inter-fragmentary tissue strain patterns and compared to callus formation and patterning over the course of time. Using a novel longitudinal study technique with µCT, in vivo tracking and computer simulation approaches, this study demonstrates that: (i periosteal bone formation and patterning are significantly influenced by bone defect size as early as 2 weeks; (ii osteotomy gap callus formation and patterning are influenced by bone defect size, and adapt towards a non-union in critical cases by deviating into a medullary formation route as early as 2 weeks after osteotomy; (iii the new bone formation in the osteotomy gap enclosing the medullary cavity in the CH group is highly mineralised; (iv inter-fragmentary strain patterns predicted during the very early soft callus tissue phase (less than 2 weeks are concurrent with callus formation and patterning at later stages. In conclusion, bone defect size influences early onset of critical healing patterns.

  15. Subcutaneous blood flow in early male pattern baldness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemp, P.; Peters, K.; Hansted, B.

    1989-05-01

    The subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) was measured by the /sup 133/Xe washout method in the scalp of 14 patients with early male pattern baldness. Control experiments were performed in 14 normal haired men matched for age. The SBF in the scalp of the normal individuals was about 10 times higher than previously reported SBF values in other anatomical regions. In patients with early male pattern baldness, SBF was 2.6 times lower than the values found in the normal individuals (13.7 +/- 9.6 vs 35.7 +/- 10.5 ml/100 g/min-1). This difference was statistically significant (p much less than 0.001). A reduced nutritive blood flow to the hair follicles might be a significant event in the pathogenesis of early male pattern baldness.

  16. Micron-scale pattern formation in prestressed polygonal films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annabattula, R. K.; Onck, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the spontaneous formation of micropatterns in thin prestressed polygonal films using finite element simulations. We study films with different size, thickness, and shape, including square, rectangular, pentagonal, and hexagonal films. Patterns form when the films release the

  17. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  18. Flow Visualization and Pattern Formation in Vertically Falling Liquid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Malamataris, Nikolaos

    2008-11-01

    Analytical results of a low-dimensional two equation h-q model and results of a direct numerical simulation of the transient two-dimensional Navier Stokes equations are presented for vertically falling liquid films along a solid wall. The numerical study aims at the elucidation of the hydrodynamics of the falling film. The analytical study aims at the calculation of the parameter space where pattern formation occurs for this flow. It has been found that when the wave amplitude exceeds a certain magnitude, flow reversal occurs in the film underneath the minimum of the waves [1]. The instantaneous vortical structures possess two hyperbolic points on the vertical wall and an elliptic point in the film. As the wave amplitude increases further, the elliptic point reaches the free surface of the film and two more hyperbolic points are formed in the free surface that replace the elliptic point. Between the two hyperbolic points on the free surface, the streamwise component of velocity is negative and the film is divided into asymmetric patterns of up and down flows. Depending on the value of the Kapitza number, these patterns are either stationary or oscillatory. Physical reasons for the influence of the Kapitza number on pattern formation are given. Movies are shown where the pattern formation is demonstrated. [1] N.A.Malamataris and V.Balakotaiah (2008), AIChE J., 54(7), p. 1725-1740

  19. Spontaneous pattern formation in broad-area lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krents, Anton; Anchikov, Dmitry; Molevich, Nonna; Pakhomov, Anton

    2016-10-01

    The paper studies the spontaneous formation of nonlinear optical patterns in broad area lasers. Spatiotemporal transverse dynamics of the laser is described by the Maxwell-Bloch equations (MBE). The instability of the steady-state solution leads to pattern formation. Two different types of instabilities were observed analytically (Hopf and wave). 2D numerical simulation of the MBE with the random initial conditions has been performed using a split-step Fourier method and periodic boundary conditions. Hopf instability leads to homogeneous oscillations, spatiotemporal chaos and spiral waves. In the case of wave instability, the direct numerical simulation showed that space-time (periodic, quasi-periodic, or chaotic) modulation of the uniform profile is observed. The characteristic sizes of excited patterns are in good agreement with analytical predictions. The nonlinear interaction of four travelling waves forms a square optical vortex lattice similar to the vortex lattices observed in superconductors and Bose Einstein condensate.

  20. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation inside the coffee ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Ding; Wang, Yuren

    2017-04-01

    The rearrangement of particles in the final stage of droplet evaporation has been investigated by utilizing differential interference contrast microscopy and the formation mechanism of a network pattern inside a coffee ring has been revealed. A tailored substrate with a circular hydrophilic domain is prepared to obtain thin liquid film containing monolayer particles. Real-time bottom-view images show that the evolution of a dry patch could be divided into three stages: rupture initiation, dry patch expansion, and drying of the residual liquid. A growing number of dry patches will repeat these stages to form the network patterns inside the ringlike stain. It can be shown that the suction effect promotes the rupture of the liquid film and the formation of the dry patch. The particle-assembling process is totally controlled by the liquid film dewetting and dominated by the surface tension of the liquid film, which eventually determine the ultimate deposition patterns.

  1. Noise induced pattern formation of oscillation growth in traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Junfang; Treiber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Noise is able to induce diverse patterns in physical and interdisciplinary extended systems. This Letter investigates the role of noise in pattern formation of traffic flow, which is a typical self-driven system far from equilibrium. We demonstrate that noise is necessary to correctly describe the observed spatiotemporal dynamics of growing traffic oscillation in the car following process. A heuristic analysis qualitatively explains the concave growth of the oscillation amplitude along the vehicles of a platoon. Based on this analysis, we propose a simple car-following model containing indifference regions and acceleration noise described by Brownian motion which reproduces well the experimental and empirical observations. Our study indicates that noise might also play an important role in pattern formation in other biological or socio-economic systems that are subject to stochasticity.

  2. Pattern formation in oscillatory complex networks consisting of excitable nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuhong; Xia, Qinzhi; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Lisheng; Hu, Gang; Mi, Yuanyuan

    2011-05-01

    Oscillatory dynamics of complex networks has recently attracted great attention. In this paper we study pattern formation in oscillatory complex networks consisting of excitable nodes. We find that there exist a few center nodes and small skeletons for most oscillations. Complicated and seemingly random oscillatory patterns can be viewed as well-organized target waves propagating from center nodes along the shortest paths, and the shortest loops passing through both the center nodes and their driver nodes play the role of oscillation sources. Analyzing simple skeletons we are able to understand and predict various essential properties of the oscillations and effectively modulate the oscillations. These methods and results will give insights into pattern formation in complex networks and provide suggestive ideas for studying and controlling oscillations in neural networks.

  3. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    István Lagzi

    2005-02-01

    Formation of 1D Liesegang patterns was studied numerically in precipitation and reversible complex formation of precipitate scenarios in an electric field. The Ostwald’s supersaturation model reported by Büki, Kárpáti-Smidróczki and Zrínyi (BKZ model) was extended further. In the presence of an electric field the position of the first and the last bands () measured from the junction point of the outer and the inner electrolytes can be described by the function = 1 $_{}^{1/2}$ + 2 + 3 , where is the time elapsed until the nth band formation, 1, 2 and 3 are constants. The variation of the total number of bands with different electric field strengths () has a maximum. For higher one can observe a moving precipitation zone that becomes wider due to precipitation and reversible complex formation.

  4. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  5. Wavenumber Locking And Pattern Formation In Spatially Forced Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meron, Ehud [BEN-GURION UNIV; Manor, Rotem [BEN-GURION UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that support stationary or traveling stripe patterns in the absence of the forcing, and assume that the one-dimensional forcing is aligned with the direction of the stripe patterns. When the forcing wavenumber is about twice as large as the wavenumber of the unforced system we find that the forcing can either select or stabilize a resonant stripe solution at half the forcing wavenumber, or create a new resonant solution. When the wavenumber mismatch is high we find that the wave-vector component of the pattern in the direction of the forcing can stilI lock at half the forcing wavenumber, but a wave-vector component in the orthogonal direction develops to compensate for the total wavenumber. As a result stationary two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns form. When the unforced system supports traveling waves resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but the oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling-waves.

  6. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-05

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Insular dentin formation pattern in human odontogenesis in relation to the scalloped dentino-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    This study is a first report on the modality of early dentin formation in respect to the scalloped pattern of the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). We applied scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), histological serial sections, and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. TEM and SEM showed scallops and secondary scallops on the DEJ of deciduous dental primordia and on deciduous teeth with the enamel cap removed. This peculiar outline of the DEJ requires a specific dentin formation pattern; histological sections showed that dentin formation began at the brims of the scallops, seen as triangular spikes in serial sections. The dentin formation front was not uniform; instead, it was characterized by multiple, insular forming centers, as revealed by our 3D reconstructions. As thicker dentin layers formed, the islands became confluent. Factors are discussed, which may lead to crimpling of the inner enamel epithelium, and maintained as the scalloped pattern of the DEJ develops. Signaling patterns in accordance with the insular dentin formation are unknown so far.

  8. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  9. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  10. Morphogenesis and pattern formation in biological systems experiments and models

    CERN Document Server

    Noji, Sumihare; Ueno, Naoto; Maini, Philip

    2003-01-01

    A central goal of current biology is to decode the mechanisms that underlie the processes of morphogenesis and pattern formation. Concerned with the analysis of those phenomena, this book covers a broad range of research fields, including developmental biology, molecular biology, plant morphogenesis, ecology, epidemiology, medicine, paleontology, evolutionary biology, mathematical biology, and computational biology. In Morphogenesis and Pattern Formation in Biological Systems: Experiments and Models, experimental and theoretical aspects of biology are integrated for the construction and investigation of models of complex processes. This collection of articles on the latest advances by leading researchers not only brings together work from a wide spectrum of disciplines, but also provides a stepping-stone to the creation of new areas of discovery.

  11. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique Dias; Coatrini, Andrey C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-01-01

    Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion. PMID:27548153

  12. Pattern formation and coexistence domains for a nonlocal population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    da Cunha, J A R; Oliveira, F A

    2011-01-01

    In this communication we propose a most general equation to study pattern formation for one-species population and their limit domains in systems of length L. To accomplish this we include non-locality in the growth and competition terms where the integral kernels are now depend on characteristic length parameters alpha and beta. Therefore, we derived a parameter space (alpha,beta) where it is possible to analyze a coexistence curve alpha*=alpha*(\\beta) which delimits domains for the existence (or not) of pattern formation in population dynamics systems. We show that this curve has an analogy with coexistence curve in classical thermodynamics and critical phenomena physics. We have successfully compared this model with experimental data for diffusion of Escherichia coli populations.

  13. Modelling Global Pattern Formations for Collaborative Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Khaled, Rilla;

    2012-01-01

    We present our research towards the design of a computational framework capable of modelling the formation and evolution of global patterns (i.e. group structures) in a population of social individuals. The framework is intended to be used in collaborative environments, e.g. social serious games...... and computer simulations of artificial societies. The theoretical basis of our research, together with current state of the art and future work, are briefly introduced....

  14. On pattern formation in the Gray-Scott model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui PENG; Ming-xin WANG

    2007-01-01

    In the paper, we investigate an elliptic system well-known as the Gray-Scott model and present some further results for positive solutions of this model. More precisely, we give the refined a priori estimates of positive solutions, and improve some previous results for the non-existence and existence of positive non-constant solutions as the parameters are varied, which imply some certain conditions where the pattern formation occurs or not.

  15. Capillary-mediated interface perturbations: Deterministic pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, Martin E.

    2016-09-01

    Leibniz-Reynolds analysis identifies a 4th-order capillary-mediated energy field that is responsible for shape changes observed during melting, and for interface speed perturbations during crystal growth. Field-theoretic principles also show that capillary-mediated energy distributions cancel over large length scales, but modulate the interface shape on smaller mesoscopic scales. Speed perturbations reverse direction at specific locations where they initiate inflection and branching on unstable interfaces, thereby enhancing pattern complexity. Simulations of pattern formation by several independent groups of investigators using a variety of numerical techniques confirm that shape changes during both melting and growth initiate at locations predicted from interface field theory. Finally, limit cycles occur as an interface and its capillary energy field co-evolve, leading to synchronized branching. Synchronous perturbations produce classical dendritic structures, whereas asynchronous perturbations observed in isotropic and weakly anisotropic systems lead to chaotic-looking patterns that remain nevertheless deterministic.

  16. Langmuir films of chiral lipid molecules and Pattern Formation .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Prem; Mann, Elizabeth; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2009-03-01

    Langmuir films of 1,2-bis(10,12 Tricosadiynoyl)-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine form spiral and target patterns when compressed between two movable barriers in a Langmuir trough above 30^0C, up to the chain-melting transition at ˜37^0C. The critical pressure, at which spirals appear, increases with temperature. The patterns themselves also depend on temperature, with single-armed spirals with many defects forming near 30^0C and defect-free target patterns at higher temperatures. The mechanism of spiral formation could be a competition among elasticity, chirality, and the boundary conditions at the core of the domains. Optical anisotropy and the growth rate of internal structures test this suggested mechanism. .

  17. A Model of Filamentous Cyanobacteria Leading to Reticulate Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tamulonis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these fossils, which are billions of years old, directly to the specific microorganisms that built them. Identifying the physicochemical conditions and microorganism properties that lead microbial mats to form macroscopic structures can lead to a better understanding of the conditions on Earth at the dawn of life. In this article, a cell-based model is used to simulate the formation of reticulate patterns in cultures of Pseudanabaena. A minimal system of long and flexible trichomes capable of gliding motility is shown to be sufficient to produce stable patterns consisting of a network of streams. Varying model parameters indicate that systems with little to no cohesion, high trichome density and persistent movement are conducive to reticulate pattern formation, in conformance with experimental observations.

  18. Pattern Formation and Secondary Instabilities for Convection in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, R. P.; Fiering, J.

    1996-11-01

    In recent work(Howle et al. Nature 362), 230 (1993); JFM to appear we showed that the pattern formation for convection in porous media could be studied by means of a simple shadowgraph if there is a line of sight through the medium which does not encounter curved fluid-medium interfaces. This work focused primarily on pattern formation near onset and was carried out in relatively small aspect ratios, Γ (the ratio of the horizontal dimension of the layer to the height, d). We present new studies with both higher Γ, and at high enough Rayleigh number R to encounter the secondary instabilities for the convection roll patterns. In a Γ = radius/d = 10.7 cylindrical experiment with a medium made from stacked bars, we find well aligned convection rolls with wavelength, λ in good agreement with theory. The alignment direction is determined by the periodic structure of the medium. In two other experiments, also with bar stackings for the medium, we have studied the secondary instabilities. The experiments have Γ = 4 and 8, respectively (with square planform), and consist of 8 and 4 layers of bars. In both cases, the instability is to cross rolls. In the Γ = 8 case, the strong symmetry of the system leads to heteroclinic orbits between different patterns.

  19. Fluctuations and Pattern Formation in Fluids with Competing Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperio, A.; Pini, D.; Reatto, L.

    2007-08-01

    One of the most interesting phenomena in the soft-matter realm consists in the spontaneous formation of super-molecular structures (microphases) in condition of thermodynamic equilibrium. A simple mechanism responsible for this self-organization or pattern formation is based on the competition between attractive and repulsive forces with different length scales in the microscopic potential, typically, a short-range attraction against a longer-range repulsion. We analyse this problem by simulations in 2D fluids. We find that, as the temperature is lowered, liquid-vapor phase separation is inhibited by the competition between attraction and repulsion, and replaced by a transition to non-homogeneous phases. The structure of the fluid shows well defined signatures of the presence of both intra- and inter-cluster correlations. Even when the competition between attraction and repulsion is not so strong as to cause microphase formation, it still induces large density fluctuations in a wide region of the temperature-density plane. In this large-fluctuation regime, pattern formation can be triggered by a weak external modulating field.

  20. How to build transcriptional network models of mammalian pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrissa Kioussi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic regulatory networks of sequence specific transcription factors underlie pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Deciphering and representing the mammalian networks is a central problem in development, neurobiology, and regenerative medicine. Transcriptional networks specify intermingled embryonic cell populations during pattern formation in the vertebrate neural tube. Each embryonic population gives rise to a distinct type of adult neuron. The homeodomain transcription factor Lbx1 is expressed in five such populations and loss of Lbx1 leads to distinct respecifications in each of the five populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have purified normal and respecified pools of these five populations from embryos bearing one or two copies of the null Lbx1(GFP allele, respectively. Microarrays were used to show that expression levels of 8% of all transcription factor genes were altered in the respecified pool. These transcription factor genes constitute 20-30% of the active nodes of the transcriptional network that governs neural tube patterning. Half of the 141 regulated nodes were located in the top 150 clusters of ultraconserved non-coding regions. Generally, Lbx1 repressed genes that have expression patterns outside of the Lbx1-expressing domain and activated genes that have expression patterns inside the Lbx1-expressing domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Constraining epistasis analysis of Lbx1 to only those cells that normally express Lbx1 allowed unprecedented sensitivity in identifying Lbx1 network interactions and allowed the interactions to be assigned to a specific set of cell populations. We call this method ANCEA, or active node constrained epistasis analysis, and think that it will be generally useful in discovering and assigning network interactions to specific populations. We discuss how ANCEA, coupled with population partitioning analysis, can greatly facilitate the systematic dissection of

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation and pattern recognition in the rabbit olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Bill

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model of the process of pattern recognition in the first olfactory sensory cortex of the rabbit is presented. It explains the formation and alteration of spatial patterns in neural activity observed experimentally during classical Pavlovian conditioning. On each inspiration of the animal, a surge of receptor input enters the olfactory bulb. EEG activity recorded at the surface of the bulb undergoes a transition from a low amplitude background state of temporal disorder to coherent oscillation. There is a distinctive spatial pattern of rms amplitude in this oscillation which changes reliably to a second pattern during each successful recognition by the animal of a conditioned stimulus odor. When a new odor is paired as conditioned stimulus, these patterns are replaced by new patterns that stabilize as the animal adapts to the new environment. I will argue that a unification of the theories of pattern formation and associative memory is required to account for these observations. This is achieved in a model of the bulb as a discrete excitable medium with spatially inhomogeneous coupling expressed by a connection matrix. The theory of multiple Hopf bifurcations is employed to find coupled equations for the amplitudes of competing unstable oscillatory modes. These may be created in the system by proper coupling and selectively evoked by specific classes of inputs. This allows a view of limit cycle attractors as “stored” fixed points of a gradient vector field and thereby recovers the more familiar dynamical systems picture of associative memory.

  2. On Early Age Crack Formation in FRC Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The problem of early age crack formation in FRC slabs due to restrained temperature and shrinkage deformations, is given an analytical treatment. A model taking into account the ageing properties of the tensile softening curve and the continued development in the temperature and shrinkage...... deformations after crack initiation, is presented. Based on this model a design strategy for FRC slabs is outlined....

  3. Cell polarity and patterning by PIN trafficking through early endosomal compartments in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Tanaka

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PIN-FORMED (PIN proteins localize asymmetrically at the plasma membrane and mediate intercellular polar transport of the plant hormone auxin that is crucial for a multitude of developmental processes in plants. PIN localization is under extensive control by environmental or developmental cues, but mechanisms regulating PIN localization are not fully understood. Here we show that early endosomal components ARF GEF BEN1 and newly identified Sec1/Munc18 family protein BEN2 are involved in distinct steps of early endosomal trafficking. BEN1 and BEN2 are collectively required for polar PIN localization, for their dynamic repolarization, and consequently for auxin activity gradient formation and auxin-related developmental processes including embryonic patterning, organogenesis, and vasculature venation patterning. These results show that early endosomal trafficking is crucial for cell polarity and auxin-dependent regulation of plant architecture.

  4. Peculiar early-type galaxies with central star formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Ge; Qiu-Sheng Gu

    2012-01-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are very important for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies.Recent observations suggest that ETGs are not simply old stellar spheroids as we previously thought.Widespread recent star formation,cool gas and dust have been detected in a substantial fraction of ETGs.We make use of the radial profiles of g - r color and the concentration index from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database to pick out 31 peculiar ETGs with central blue cores.By analyzing the photometric and spectroscopic data,we suggest that the blue cores are caused by star formation activities rather than the central weak active galactic nucleus.From the results of stellar population synthesis,we find that the stellar population of the blue cores is relatively young,spreading from several Myr to less than one Gyr.In 14 galaxies with H I observations,we find that the average gas fraction of these galaxies is about 0.55.The bluer galaxies show a higher gas fraction,and the total star formation rate (SFR) correlates very well with the H l gas mass.The star formation history of these ETGs is affected by the environment,e.g.in the denser environment the H 1 gas is less and the total SFR is lower.We also discuss the origin of the central star formation of these early-type galaxies.

  5. Was core formation violent enough to homogenize the early mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, S. A.; Kaula, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of iron, its thermal state and its phase in the accreting Earth probably played a major role in the Earth's early thermal evolution. Plausible impact thermal histories make it possible that pure iron was molten in the accreting Earth after it was about 10% grown. Hence, iron eutectic alloys (FeS, FeO) certainly were. Additionally, the initial temperature of the core is an important constraint on the secular cooling of the early Earth and on the strength of the early geodynamo. Whether iron is solid or molten would influence geochemical equilibria in the upper and lower mantle; the mode of core formation, by spherical or near-spherical blobs, stalk-like instabilities, or something more catastrophic would influence the partitioning of siderophiles between silicate and iron phases. Early descent of iron (during accretion) favors partitioning according to low-pressure phase equilibria, whereas late descent favors higher pressure. The later core formation occurs, the greater the heat pulse, due to the strong dependence of gravitational potential energy on planetary radius. The heat may homogenize the mantle if core formation is global; otherwise, heterogeneity of iron differentiation may leave some of the pre-archean mantle unaffected. The larger the chunks of proto-core (and hence smaller surface/volume ratios) the greater the heterogeneity.

  6. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  7. Fractal pattern formation in metallic ink sessile droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Achour, Miloud; Brutin, David

    2014-11-01

    We report a fingering instability that occurs during the spreading and evaporation of a nanosuspension droplet. The patterns has a fractal structure similar to those reported by N. Shahidzadeh-Bonn et al. (2008) for salt crystallisation, during evaporation of saturated Na2SO4 on a hydrophilic surface. The fingering instability has been widely studied for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. However, we describe for the first time that a fingering instability is observed for the spreading of a nanosuspension sessile droplet. We demonstrate that in certain cases, the contact line evolves through different spreading regimes according to J. De Coninck et al. (2001) with an enhancement in the evaporation rate due the formation of the fractal patterns.

  8. Pattern Formation by Electrostatic Self-Organization of Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedec, G.; Jaeger, M.; Homble, F.; Leonetti, M.

    2012-07-01

    The electric activity of biological cells and organs such as heart for example is at the origin of various phenomena of pattern formation. The electric membrane potential appears as the order parameter to characterize these spatiotemporal dynamics. A kind of patterns is characterized by a stationary spatial modulation of membrane potential along the cell, breaking a symmetry of the system. They are associated to transcellular currents. A mechanism proposed in literature is based on the coupling of the electric current produced by membrane proteins and their electrophoretic mobilities. Beyond its classical linear stability analysis, the numerical and theoretical analysis of this model offers a variety of spatiotemporal dynamics. Firstly, the background in the modelization of electric phenomena is recalled. Secondly, the analysis is focused on two nonlinear dynamics.

  9. The theory of pattern formation on directed networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllani, Malbor; Challenger, Joseph D; Pavone, Francesco Saverio; Sacconi, Leonardo; Fanelli, Duccio

    2014-07-31

    Dynamical processes on networks have generated widespread interest in recent years. The theory of pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems defined on symmetric networks has often been investigated, due to its applications in a wide range of disciplines. Here we extend the theory to the case of directed networks, which are found in a number of different fields, such as neuroscience, computer networks and traffic systems. Owing to the structure of the network Laplacian, the dispersion relation has both real and imaginary parts, at variance with the case for a symmetric, undirected network. The homogeneous fixed point can become unstable due to the topology of the network, resulting in a new class of instabilities, which cannot be induced on undirected graphs. Results from a linear stability analysis allow the instability region to be analytically traced. Numerical simulations show travelling waves, or quasi-stationary patterns, depending on the characteristics of the underlying graph.

  10. Flow-Induced Control of Pattern Formation in Chemical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenstein, Igal; Beta, Carsten

    Since Alan Turing's seminal paper in 1952, the study of spatio-temporal patterns that arise in systems of reacting and diffusing components has grown into an immense and vibrant realm of scientific research. This field includes not only chemical systems but spans many areas of science as diverse as cell and developmental biology, ecology, geosciences, or semiconductor physics. For several decades research in this field has concentrated on the vast variety of patterns that can emerge in reaction-diffusion systems and on the underlying instabilities. In the 1990s, stimulated by the pioneering work of Ott, Grebogi and Yorke, control of pattern formation arose as a new topical focus and gradually developed into an entire new field of research. On the one hand, research interests concentrated on control and suppression of undesired dynamical states, in particular on control of chaos. On the other hand, the design and engineering of particular space-time patterns became a major focus in this field that motivates ongoing scientific effort until today...

  11. Building better oscillators using nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M C Cross; Eyal Kenig; John-Mark A Allen

    2015-03-01

    Frequency and time references play an essential role in modern technology and in living systems. The precision of self-sustained oscillations is limited by the effects of noise, which becomes evermore important as the sizes of the devices become smaller. In this paper, we review our recent theoretical results on using nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation to reduce the effects of noise and improve the frequency precision of oscillators, with particular reference to ongoing experiments on oscillators based on nanomechanical resonators. We discuss using resonator nonlinearity, novel oscillator architectures and the synchronization of arrays of oscillators, to improve the frequency precision.

  12. Concept formation: a supportive process for early career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Tracey; West, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    Individuals come to understand abstract constructs such as that of the 'expert' through the formation of concepts. Time and repeated opportunity for observation to support the generalisation and abstraction of the developing concept are essential if the concept is to form successfully. Development of an effective concept of the 'expert nurse' is critical for early career nurses who are attempting to integrate theory, values and beliefs as they develop their clinical practice. This study explores the use of a concept development framework in a grounded theory study of the 'expert nurse'. Qualitative. Using grounded theory methods for data collection and analysis, semi-structured interviews were conducted with registered nurses. The participants were asked to describe their concept of the 'expert nurse' and to discuss their experience of developing this. Participants reported forming their concept of the 'expert nurse', after multiple opportunities to engage with nurses identified as 'expert'. This identification did not necessarily relate to the designated position of the 'expert nurse' or assigned mentors. When the early career nurse does not successfully form a concept of the 'expert nurse', difficulties in personal and professional development including skill/knowledge development may arise. To underpin development of their clinical practice effectively, early career nurses need to be provided with opportunities that facilitate the purposive formation of their own concept of the 'expert nurse'. Formation of this concept is not well supported by the common practice of assigning mentors. Early career nurses must be provided with the time and the opportunity to individually develop and refine their concept of the 'expert nurse'. To achieve this, strategies including providing opportunities to engage with expert nurses and discussion of the process of concept formation and its place in underpinning personal judgments may be of assistance. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing

  13. On the Formation of the Early Territorial Statein Ancient Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at a reinterpretation of the formation of the earlyterritorial state in ancient Egypt from a multi-perspective. In the light ofthe recent studies on the available written material and new excavations,the author seeks to prove that the emergence of the early territorial statewas the result of the interaction of various elements. In the author'sopinion, the strong political ambition of the Upper Egyptian ruling elitesplayed a decisive role in the process of unification.

  14. The paredon, Mexico, obsidian source and early formative exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, T H; Grove, D C; Hopke, P K

    1978-09-01

    In 1975, archeological surface surveys of trade routes located again a pre-Hispanic obsidian source in central Mexico first reported in 1902. Initial trace element studies of the Paredón source through an analysis by neutron activation have been compared with similar studies of the obsidian found at Chalcatzingo 150 kilometers from the source. These comparisons indicate that obsidian from Paredón, rather than Otumba, was of primary importance during the Early Formative in central Mexico.

  15. Principles of branch formation and branch patterning in Hydrozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra produces buds which separate from the parent. Other Hydrozoa produce branches which remain connected to the parent, thus forming a colony. Some Hydrozoa grow by means of an organ that is like a shoot apical meristem. Others display a sympodial type of growth. In this article, I propose that these different types of branches are organized by a common pattern-forming system. This system has self-organizing properties. It causes branch tip formation and is kept active in the tip when the tip finally differentiates into a hypostome of a polyp. The system does not cause structure formation directly but rather, determines a tissue property called positional value, in such a way that a gradient of values forms in the tissue of the bud or branch. The local value determines the local morphodynamic processes, including differentiation of the hypostome (highest positional value), tentacles and basal disc and of the exoskeleton pattern along the shoot. A high positional value favors the onset of a new self-organizing process and by lateral inhibition, such a process prevents the initiation of a further process in its surroundings. Small quantitative differences in the range of the signals involved determine whether a bud or a branch forms and whether monopodial and sympodial growth follows.

  16. Pattern formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    CERN Document Server

    Starruss, Joern; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Baer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of M. xanthus depends on two motility machineries: the S-engine and A-engine. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies depending on their nutritional status. To understand these two pattern formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as cell reversal, we analyze spatial self-organization in 3 strains: i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria due to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemica...

  17. Species differences in early patterning of the avian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Luke; Kuo, Eric; Martin, Arnaud; Monuki, Edwin S; Striedter, Georg

    2011-03-01

    The telencephalon is proportionately larger in parrots than in galliformes (chicken-like birds), whereas the midbrain tectum is proportionately smaller. We here test the hypothesis that the adult species difference in midbrain proportion is due to an evolutionary change in early brain patterning. In particular, we compare the size of the early embryonic midbrain between parakeets (Melopsittacus undulatus) and bobwhite quail (Colinus virgianus) by examining the expression domains of transcription factors Pax6 and Gbx2, which are expressed in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Because these expression domains form rostral and caudal borders with the presumptive midbrain when this region is specified (Hamburger-Hamilton stages 9-11), they allow us to measure and compare the sizes of a molecularly defined presumptive midbrain in the two species. Based on published data from older embryos, we predicted that the molecularly defined midbrain territory is significantly larger in quail than parakeets. Indeed, our data show that normalized midbrain length is 33% greater in quail and that the midbrain to forebrain ratio is 28% greater. This is strong evidence of a significant species difference in early brain patterning.

  18. Paleosol formation during the Early Triassic Biotic Crisis in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Jochen; Müller, Axel; Zwingmann, Horst; Fredin, Ola; Brönner, Marco; Viola, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Fractured and kaolinite weathered basement rocks have been discovered in various wells off the Norwegian coast and inferences on timing, source to sink relationships, and environmental implications have been widely discussed. The reason for the kaolitinization has often been related to intensive chemical weathering during late Triassic to early Jurassic times. Chronological control has primarily been inferred from the overlying late Jurassic/early Cretaceous marine transgression and poorly constrained K-Ar datings from weathered basement onshore as well as climate conditions favourable for kaolinite formation. In this study, we present evidence that the deeply weathered basement off the mid-Norwegian coast represent a complete paleosol profile. Quartz geochemical fingerprinting indicate that transgressional marine inorganic sediments of late Jurassic age are derived from the paleosols. Whole-rock XRD analysis suggests characteristic mineral alteration zones topped with a kaolinite-Fe-oxyhyroxide zones composed of >80% kaolinite. Potassium feldspar is practically absent in the uppermost kaolinitic zones. Mass-balance changes show significant depletion-enrichment trends. Applying potassium/argon (K/Ar) geochronology on authigenic illite clay that grew in-situ at the time of paleosol formation reveals a early Triassic age (~250 Ma). The age corroborates with the Early Triassic biotic crisis and suggest a causal relationship between intense chemical weathering, high atmospheric CO2 concentration, extreme ocean warming, increased riverine flux of nutrients and widespread anoxia/euxinia on adjacent epicontinental seas.

  19. Chemical Pattern Formation in Far-From Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, John Evan

    The diffusive instability was proposed as a mechanism for pattern formation in chemical systems, in the context of biological morphogenesis, by Alan Turing in 1952. The instability gives rise to a chemical pattern with an intrinsic "chemical wavelength" that is independent of the system size. Since 1952, the diffusive instability, or Turing bifurcation, has been invoked to explain pattern formation in a variety of fields. To date there has been no unambiguous observation of such an instability. Model studies of the instability are usually carried out on systems containing two variables. Such works do not address issues that are of fundamental importance in experimental studies. How does one go about finding Turing bifurcations in systems with many parameters and for which the chemical kinetics are only partially known? What is the chemical wavelength? Turing bifurcations cannot occur in systems with all diffusion coefficients exactly equal. How unequal must the diffusion coefficients be for a system to undergo a Turing bifurcation?. Reacting and diffusing systems obey a partial -differential equation which is a sum of a diffusion term and a reaction term. Dropping the diffusion term results in an ordinary differential equation describing the reaction kinetics in a well-mixed system. In this dissertation it is shown that, for systems with an arbitrary number of variables, Turing bifurcations can occur with diffusion coefficients arbitrarily close to equal, provided the corresponding well-mixed system is sufficiently close to a point of coalescence of Hopf and saddle-node bifurcations. Since the bifurcation set can be obtained directly from experiments, one does not need a detailed microscopic theory of the reaction kinetics. Similarly, the chemical wavelength can be estimated from experimental measurements without knowledge of the reaction kinetics.

  20. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  1. Pattern formation and mass transfer under stationary solutal Marangoni instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberger, Karin; Köllner, Thomas; Linde, Hartmut; Boeck, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    According to the seminal theory by Sternling and Scriven, solutal Marangoni convection during mass transfer of surface-active solutes may occur as either oscillatory or stationary instability. With strong support of Manuel G. Velarde, a combined initiative of experimental works, in particular to mention those of Linde, Wierschem and coworkers, and theory has enabled a classification of dominant wave types of the oscillatory mode and their interactions. In this way a rather comprehensive understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the oscillatory instability could be achieved. A comparably advanced state-of-the-art with respect to the stationary counterpart seemed to be out of reach a short time ago. Recent developments on both the numerical and experimental side, in combination with assessing an extensive number of older experiments, now allow one to draw a more unified picture. By reviewing these works, we show that three main building blocks exist during the nonlinear evolution: roll cells, relaxation oscillations and relaxation oscillations waves. What is frequently called interfacial turbulence results from the interaction between these partly coexisting basic patterns which may additionally occur in different hierarchy levels. The second focus of this review lies on the practical importance of such convection patterns concerning their influence on mass transfer characteristics. Particular attention is paid here to the interaction between Marangoni and buoyancy effects which frequently complicates the pattern formation even more. To shed more light on these dependencies, new simulations regarding the limiting case of stabilizing density stratification and vanishing buoyancy are incorporated.

  2. Hydrodynamic approach to surface pattern formation by ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Mario, E-mail: marioc@upcomillas.es [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC) and Grupo de Dinamica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieri a - ICAI, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    On the proper timescale, amorphous solids can flow. Solid flow can be observed macroscopically in glaciers or lead pipes, but it can also be artificially enhanced by creating defects. Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) is a technique in which ions with energies in the 0.110 keV range impact against a solid target inducing defect creation and dynamics, and eroding its surface leading to formation of ordered nanostructures. Despite its technological interest, a basic understanding of nanopattern formation processes occurring under IBS of amorphizable targets has not been clearly established, recent experiments on Si having largely questioned knowledge accumulated during the last two decades. A number of interfacial equations have been proposed in the past to describe these phenomena, typically by adding together different contributions coming from surface diffusion, ion sputtering or mass redistribution, etc. in a non-systematic way. Here, we exploit the general idea of solids flowing due to ion impacts in order to establish a general framework into which different mechanisms (such as viscous flow, stress, diffusion, or sputtering) can be incorporated, under generic physical conservation laws. As opposed to formulating phenomenological interfacial equations, this approach allows to assess systematically the relevance and interplay of different physical mechanisms influencing surface pattern formation by IBS.

  3. Macrofauna associations and formation of shell concentrations in the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinius, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The invertebrate macrofauna (mainly molluscs) of the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain) is reported and classified in seven biofacies associations, representing ecologically related groups of macro-invertebrates of shallow marine fan-delta environments ranging in depth from inter

  4. Macrofauna associations and formation of shell concentrations in the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinius, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The invertebrate macrofauna (mainly molluscs) of the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain) is reported and classified in seven biofacies associations, representing ecologically related groups of macro-invertebrates of shallow marine fan-delta environments ranging in depth from

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Suggests Possible Interaction Patterns at Early Steps of β2-Microglobulin Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Viglino, Paolo; Zuccato, Pierfrancesco; Pieri, Lidia; Faccioli, Pietro; Bellotti, Vittorio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    Early events in aggregation of proteins are not easily accessible by experiments. In this work, we perform a 5-ns molecular dynamics simulation of an ensemble of 27 copies of β2-microglobulin in explicit solvent. During the simulation, the formation of intermolecular contacts is observed. The simulation highlights the importance of apical residues and, in particular, of those at the N-terminus end of the molecule. The most frequently found pattern of interaction involves a head-to-head contact arrangement of molecules. Hydrophobic contacts appear to be important for the establishment of long-lived (on the simulation timescale) contacts. Although early events on the pathway to aggregation and fibril formation are not directly related to the end-state of the process, which is reached on a much longer timescale, simulation results are consistent with experimental data and in general with a parallel arrangement of intermolecular β-strand pairs. PMID:17158575

  6. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of spatiotemporal gene expression patterns during early embryogenesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Yutaka; Sato, Yutaka; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Shimizu-Sato, Sae; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Takehisa, Hinako; Sanguinet, Karen A; Namiki, Nobukazu; Nagamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-04-01

    Embryogenesis in rice is different from that of most dicotolydonous plants in that it shows a non-stereotypic cell division pattern, formation of dorsal-ventral polarity, and endogenous initiation of the radicle. To reveal the transcriptional features associated with developmental events during rice early embryogenesis, we used microarray analysis coupled with laser microdissection to obtain both spatial and temporal transcription profiles. Our results allowed us to determine spatial expression foci for each expressed gene in the globular embryo, which revealed the importance of phytohormone-related genes and a suite of transcription factors to early embryogenesis. Our analysis showed the polarized expression of a small number of genes along the apical-basal and dorsal-ventral axes in the globular embryo, which tended to fluctuate in later developmental stages. We also analyzed gene expression patterns in the early globular embryo and how this relates to expression in embryonic organs at later stages. We confirmed the accuracy of the expression patterns found by microarray analysis of embryo subdomains using in situ hybridization. Our study identified homologous genes from Arabidopsis thaliana with known functions in embryogenesis in addition to unique and uncharacterized genes that show polarized expression patterns during embryogenesis. The results of this study are presented in a database to provide a framework for spatiotemporal gene expression during rice embryogenesis, to serve as a resource for future functional analysis of genes, and as a basis for comparative studies of plant embryogenesis.

  8. The Formation and Early Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven N; Bastian, Nate; Bally, John; Rathborne, Jill; Testi, Leonardo; Stolte, Andrea; Dale, James; Bressert, Eli; Alves, Joao

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and early evolution of the most massive and dense young stellar clusters, focusing on the role they can play in our understanding of star and planet formation as a whole. Young massive cluster (YMC) progenitor clouds in the Galactic Center can accumulate to a high enough density without forming stars that the initial protostellar densities are close to the final stellar density. For this to hold in the disk, the time scale to accumulate the gas to such high densities must be much shorter than the star formation timescale. Otherwise the gas begins forming stars while it is being accumulated to high density. The distinction between the formation regimes in the two environments is consistent with the predictions of environmentally-dependent density thresholds for star formation. This implies that stars in YMCs of similar total mass and radius can have formed at widely different initial protostellar densities. The fact that no systematic variations in fundamental properties are observed be...

  9. Developmental waves in myxobacteria: A distinctive pattern formation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Neu, John; Oster, George

    2004-10-01

    In early stages of their development, starving myxobacteria organize their motion to produce a periodic pattern of traveling cell density waves. These waves arise from coordination of individual cell reversals by contact signaling when they collide. Unlike waves generated by reaction-diffusion instabilities, which annihilate on collision, myxobacteria waves appear to pass through one another unaffected. Here we analyze a mathematical model of these waves developed earlier [Igoshin , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 14 913 (2001)]. The mechanisms which generate and maintain the density waves are clearly revealed by tracing the reversal loci of individual cells. An evolution equation of reversal point density is derived in the weak-signaling limit. Linear stability analysis determines parameters favorable for the development of the waves. Numerical solutions demonstrate the stability of the fully developed nonlinear waves.

  10. Spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for pigment pattern formation in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Georg Frohnhöfer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small poly-cations essential for all cellular life. The main polyamines present in metazoans are putrescine, spermidine and spermine. Their exact functions are still largely unclear; however, they are involved in a wide variety of processes affecting cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and aging. Here we identify idefix, a mutation in the zebrafish gene encoding the enzyme spermidine synthase, leading to a severe reduction in spermidine levels as shown by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. We show that spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for early development, organogenesis and colour pattern formation. Whereas in other vertebrates spermidine deficiency leads to very early embryonic lethality, maternally provided spermidine synthase in zebrafish is sufficient to rescue the early developmental defects. This allows us to uncouple them from events occurring later during colour patterning. Factors involved in the cellular interactions essential for colour patterning, likely targets for spermidine, are the gap junction components Cx41.8, Cx39.4, and Kir7.1, an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, all known to be regulated by polyamines. Thus, zebrafish provide a vertebrate model to study the in vivo effects of polyamines.

  11. Spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for pigment pattern formation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Pattky, Martin; Meixner, Martin; Huhn, Carolin; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Geisler, Robert; Gehring, Ines; Maderspacher, Florian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Irion, Uwe

    2016-06-15

    Polyamines are small poly-cations essential for all cellular life. The main polyamines present in metazoans are putrescine, spermidine and spermine. Their exact functions are still largely unclear; however, they are involved in a wide variety of processes affecting cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and aging. Here we identify idefix, a mutation in the zebrafish gene encoding the enzyme spermidine synthase, leading to a severe reduction in spermidine levels as shown by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. We show that spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for early development, organogenesis and colour pattern formation. Whereas in other vertebrates spermidine deficiency leads to very early embryonic lethality, maternally provided spermidine synthase in zebrafish is sufficient to rescue the early developmental defects. This allows us to uncouple them from events occurring later during colour patterning. Factors involved in the cellular interactions essential for colour patterning, likely targets for spermidine, are the gap junction components Cx41.8, Cx39.4, and Kir7.1, an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, all known to be regulated by polyamines. Thus, zebrafish provide a vertebrate model to study the in vivo effects of polyamines.

  12. Spontaneous pattern formation and pinning in the visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tanya I.

    Bifurcation theory and perturbation theory can be combined with a knowledge of the underlying circuitry of the visual cortex to produce an elegant story explaining the phenomenon of visual hallucinations. A key insight is the application of an important set of ideas concerning spontaneous pattern formation introduced by Turing in 1952. The basic mechanism is a diffusion driven linear instability favoring a particular wavelength that determines the size of the ensuing stripe or spot periodicity of the emerging spatial pattern. Competition between short range excitation and longer range inhibition in the connectivity profile of cortical neurons provides the difference in diffusion length scales necessary for the Turing mechanism to occur and has been proven by Ermentrout and Cowan to be sufficient to explain the generation of a subset of reported geometric hallucinations. Incorporating further details of the cortical circuitry, namely that neurons are also weakly connected to other neurons sharing a particular stimulus orientation or spatial frequency preference at even longer ranges and the resulting shift-twist symmetry of the neuronal connectivity, improves the story. We expand this approach in order to be able to include the tuned responses of cortical neurons to additional visual stimulus features such as motion, color and disparity. We apply a study of nonlinear dynamics similar to the analysis of wave propagation in a crystalline lattice to demonstrate how a spatial pattern formed through the Turing instability can be pinned to the geometric layout of various feature preferences. The perturbation analysis is analogous to solving the Schrodinger equation in a weak periodic potential. Competition between the local isotropic connections which produce patterns of activity via the Turing mechanism and the weaker patchy lateral connections that depend on a neuron's particular set of feature preferences create long wavelength affects analogous to commensurate

  13. Quantifying Contributions of Climate Feedbacks to Global Warming Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X.; Zhang, G. J.; Cai, M.

    2013-12-01

    The ';';climate feedback-response analysis method'' (CFRAM) was applied to the NCAR CCSM3.0 simulation to analyze the strength and spatial distribution of climate feedbacks and to quantify their contributions to global and regional surface temperature changes in response to a doubling of CO2. Instead of analyzing the climate sensitivity, the CFRAM directly attributes the temperature change to individual radiative and non-radiative feedbacks. The radiative feedback decomposition is based on hourly model output rather than monthly mean data that are commonly used in climate feedback analysis. This gives a more accurate quantification of the cloud and albedo feedbacks. The process-based decomposition of non-radiative feedback enables us to understand the roles of GCM physical and dynamic processes in climate change. The pattern correlation, the centered root-mean-square (RMS) difference and the ratio of variations (represented by standard deviations) between the partial surface temperature change due to each feedback process and the total surface temperature change in CCSM3.0 simulation are examined to quantify the roles of each feedback process in the global warming pattern formation. The contributions of climate feedbacks to the regional warming are also discussed.

  14. Tree island pattern formation in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, P.; Engel, Victor C.; Redwine, Jed

    2016-01-01

    The Florida Everglades freshwater landscape exhibits a distribution of islands covered by woody vegetation and bordered by marshes and wet prairies. Known as “tree islands”, these ecogeomorphic features can be found in few other low gradient, nutrient limited freshwater wetlands. In the last few decades, however, a large percentage of tree islands have either shrank or disappeared in apparent response to altered water depths and other stressors associated with human impacts on the Everglades. Because the processes determining the formation and spatial organization of tree islands remain poorly understood, it is still unclear what controls the sensitivity of these landscapes to altered conditions. We hypothesize that positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil accretion are crucial to emergence and decline of tree islands. Likewise, positive feedbacks between phosphorus (P) accumulation and trees explain the P enrichment commonly observed in tree island soils. Here, we develop a spatially-explicit model of tree island formation and evolution, which accounts for these positive feedbacks (facilitation) as well as for long range competition and fire dynamics. It is found that tree island patterns form within a range of parameter values consistent with field data. Simulated impacts of reduced water levels, increased intensity of drought, and increased frequency of dry season/soil consuming fires on these feedback mechanisms result in the decline and disappearance of tree islands on the landscape.

  15. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Mohri, Tetsuo [Center for Computational Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gránásy, László, E-mail: granasy.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  16. Formation of Early Water Oceans on Rocky Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial planets, with silicate mantles and metallic cores, are likely to obtain water and carbon compounds during accretion. Here I examine the conditions that allow early formation of a surface water ocean (simultaneous with cooling to clement surface conditions), and the timeline of degassing the planetary interior into the atmosphere. The greatest fraction of a planet's initial volatile budget is degassed into the atmosphere during the end of magma ocean solidification, leaving only a small fraction of the original volatiles to be released into the atmosphere through later volcanism. Rocky planets that accrete with water in their bulk mantle have two mechanisms for producing an early water ocean: First, if they accrete with at least 1 to 3 mass% of water in their bulk composition, liquid water may be extruded onto the planetary surface at the end of magma ocean solidification. Second, at initial water contents as low as 0.01 mass% or lower, during solidification a massive supercritical fluid and steam ...

  17. Alisitos Formation, calcareous facies: Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-07-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of the peninsula of Baja California bounding the Peninsular Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic-breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during the tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic reef barrier, behind an island arc. Such conditions existed south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based upon field observations and petrological analysis of the Alisitos limestone, an attempt is made to recreate the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  18. Early Hierarchical Formation of Massive Galaxies Triggered By Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Poli, F; Vittorini, V

    2004-01-01

    To address the problem concerning the early formation of stars in massive galaxies, we present the results of a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation which includes a physical description of starbursts triggered by galaxy interactions. These originate from the destabilization of cold galactic gas occurring in galaxy encounters, which in part feeds the accretion onto black holes powering quasars, and in part drives circumnuclear starsbursts at redshifts $z\\approx 2-4$, preferentially in massive objects. This speeds up the formation of stars in massive galaxies at high redshifts without altering it in low mass galactic halos. Thus, at intermediate $z\\approx 1.5-2$ we find that a considerable fraction of the stellar content of massive galaxies is already in place, at variance with the predictions of previous hierarchical models. The resulting high-$z$ star formation rate and B-band luminosity functions, and the luminosity and redshift distribution of galaxies in K-band at $z\\lesssim 2$ are all in good agreemen...

  19. Prevalence of Brugada-type ECG pattern and early ventricular repolarization pattern in Tunisian athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouali S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sana Ouali1, Helmi Ben Salem1, Sami Hammas1, Elyes Neffeti1, Fahmi Remedi1, Abdallah Mahdhaoui2, Essia Boughzela1, Rafik Mankai31Department of Cardiology, Sahloul Hospital, Sousse, Tunisia; 2Department of Cardiology, Farhat Hached, Sousse, Tunisia; 3Central Sports Medicine Centre of El Menzah, TunisiaIntroduction: No data regarding the prevalence of the Brugada-type electrocardiogram (ECG pattern and the early ventricular repolarization pattern (ERP in the North African population were available. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of Brugada-type ECG pattern and ERP in Tunisia and to evaluate ECG descriptors of ventricular repolarization in a population of athletes.Methods: Over a 2-year period, resting 12-lead ECG recordings were analyzed from athletes (n = 540; 348 males; age 18.3 ± 2.4 years. Brugada-type ECG pattern was defined as Type 1, 2, or 3, and ERP was characterized by an elevation of the J point in the inferior and/or lateral leads. The population was divided into three groups of athletes: ERP group; Brugada-type ECG pattern group; and control group, with neither ERP nor Brugada ECG pattern. Clinical and electrocardiographic parameters were compared among the study groups.Results: Nine subjects (1.66% had a Brugada-type ECG pattern. None of them had the coved-type, 3 (0.6% had the Type 2, and 6 (1.1% had the Type 3. All subjects were asymptomatic. A Brugada-type ECG pattern was observed in seven males. No female had the Type 2 Brugada ECG pattern. ECG parameters were similar among Brugada-type ECG pattern and control athletes. ERP (119 subjects, 22% was obtained in 98 males. Heart rate was lower, the QRS duration shorter and QT and Tpeak–Tend intervals were longer in ERP than control groups.Conclusion: The results indicate that the frequency of the Brugada-type ECG pattern and ERP were respectively 1.66% and 22.00% in athletes, being more prevalent in males. The ERP group experienced shorter QRS duration and

  20. Ultrastructure of stomatal development in early-divergent angiosperms reveals contrasting patterning and pre-patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudall, Paula J; Knowles, Emma V W

    2013-10-01

    Angiosperm stomata consistently possess a pair of guard cells, but differ between taxa in the patterning and developmental origin of neighbour cells. Developmental studies of phylogenetically pivotal taxa are essential as comparative yardsticks for understanding the evolution of stomatal development. We present a novel ultrastructural study of developing stomata in leaves of Amborella (Amborellales), Nymphaea and Cabomba (Nymphaeales), and Austrobaileya and Schisandra (Austrobaileyales), representing the three earliest-divergent lineages of extant angiosperms (the ANITA-grade). Alternative developmental pathways occur in early-divergent angiosperms, resulting partly from differences in pre-patterning and partly from the presence or absence of highly polarized (asymmetric) mitoses in the stomatal cell lineage. Amplifying divisions are absent from ANITA-grade taxa, indicating that ostensible similarities with the stomatal patterning of Arabidopsis are superficial. In Amborella, 'squared' pre-patterning occurs in intercostal regions, with groups of four protodermal cells typically arranged in a rectangle; most guard-mother cells are formed by asymmetric division of a precursor cell (the mesoperigenous condition) and are typically triangular or trapezoidal. In contrast, water-lily stomata are always perigenous (lacking asymmetric divisions). Austrobaileya has occasional 'giant' stomata. Similar mature stomatal phenotypes can result from contrasting morphogenetic factors, although the results suggest that paracytic stomata are invariably the product of at least one asymmetric division. Loss of asymmetric divisions in stomatal development could be a significant factor in land plant evolution, with implications for the diversity of key structural and physiological pathways.

  1. NFI-C2 temporal-spatial expression and cellular localization pattern during tooth formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamani, Ejvis; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; MacDougall, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Currently, little is known regarding critical signaling pathways during later stages of tooth development, especially those associated with root formation. Nfi-c null mice, lacking molar roots, have implicated the transcription factor NFI-C as having an essential role in root development. Previously, we identified three NFI-C isoforms expressed in dental tissues with NFI-C2 being the major transcript. However, the expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein is not characterized. In this study we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry using isoform specific probes. We show the production of a NFI-C2 peptide antibody, its characterization, the temporal-spatial expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein during odontogenesis and sub-cellular localization in dental cells. Moderate NFI-C2 staining, as early as bud stage, was detected mostly in the condensing dental ectomesenchyme. This staining intensified within the dental pulp at later stages culminating in high expression in the dentin producing odontoblasts. The dental epithelium showed slight staining until cytodifferentiation of enamel organ into ameloblasts and stratum intermedium. During root formation NFI-C2 expression was high in the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath and later was found in the fully developed root and its supporting tissues. NFI-C2 cellular staining was cytosolic, associated with the Golgi, and nuclear. These data suggest a broader role for NFI-C during tooth formation than limited to root and periodontal ligament development. © 2015 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. Pattern Formation in Dewetting Nanoparticle/Polymer Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esker, Alan; Paul, Rituparna; Karabiyik, Ufuk; Swift, Michael; Hottle, John

    2008-03-01

    Comprised of inorganic cores and flexible organic coronae with 1 -- 2 nm diameter monodisperse sizes, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are ideal model nanofillers. Our discovery that one POSS derivative, trisilanolphenyl-POSS (TPP), can form Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films on hydrophobic substrates, allows us to create thin film bilayers of precisely controlled thickness and architecture. Work with poly(t-butylacrylate) (PtBA)/TPP bilayers reveals a two-step dewetting mechanism in which the upper TPP layer dewets first, followed by the formation of isolated holes with intricate, fractal, nanofiller aggregates. Like the PtBA/TPP bilayers, polystyrene (PS)/TPP bilayers also undergo a two-step dewetting mechanism. However, the upper TPP layer initially forms cracks that may arise from mismatches in thermal expansion coefficients. These cracks then serve as nucleation sites for complete dewetting of the entire bilayer. Understanding the rich diversity of surface patterns that can be formed from relatively simple processes is a key feature of this work.

  3. Gradient-driven diffusion and pattern formation in crowded mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Grove, Brandy; Konya, Andrew; Selinger, Robin L. B.

    2017-02-01

    Gradient-driven diffusion in crowded, multicomponent mixtures is a topic of high interest because of its role in biological processes such as transport in cell membranes. In partially phase-separated solutions, gradient-driven diffusion affects microstructure, which in turn affects diffusivity; a key question is how this complex coupling controls both transport and pattern formation. To examine these mechanisms, we study a two-dimensional multicomponent lattice gas model, where "tracer" molecules diffuse between a source and a sink separated by a solution of sticky "crowder" molecules that cluster to form dynamically evolving obstacles. In the high-temperature limit, crowders and tracers are miscible, and transport may be predicted analytically. At intermediate temperatures, crowders phase separate into clusters that drift toward the tracer sink. As a result, steady-state tracer diffusivity depends nonmonotonically on both temperature and crowder density, and we observe a variety of complex microstructures. In the low-temperature limit, crowders rapidly aggregate to form obstacles that are kinetically arrested; if crowder density is near the percolation threshold, resulting tracer diffusivity shows scaling behavior with the same scaling exponent as the random resistor network model. Though highly idealized, this simple model reveals fundamental mechanisms governing coupled gradient-driven diffusion, phase separation, and microstructural evolution in crowded mixtures.

  4. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  5. Early archosauromorph remains from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of north-eastern Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín D. Ezcurra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is crucial to understand the impact of the Permo-Triassic mass extinction on the early evolution of the group and its subsequent dominance in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems. However, the Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is still very poor in most continents and hampers the identification of global macroevolutionary patterns. Here we describe cranial and postcranial bones from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of northeastern Uruguay that contribute to increase the meagre early archosauromorph record from South America. A basioccipital fused to both partial exoccipitals and three cervical vertebrae are assigned to Archosauromorpha based on apomorphies or a unique combination of characters. The archosauromorph remains of the Buena Vista Formation probably represent a multi-taxonomic assemblage composed of non-archosauriform archosauromorphs and a ‘proterosuchid-grade’ animal. This assemblage does not contribute in the discussion of a Late Permian or Early Triassic age for the Buena Vista Formation, but reinforces the broad palaeobiogeographic distribution of ‘proterosuchid grade’ diapsids in Permo-Triassic beds worldwide.

  6. Early archosauromorph remains from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of north-eastern Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Martín D; Velozo, Pablo; Meneghel, Melitta; Piñeiro, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    The Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is crucial to understand the impact of the Permo-Triassic mass extinction on the early evolution of the group and its subsequent dominance in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems. However, the Permo-Triassic archosauromorph record is still very poor in most continents and hampers the identification of global macroevolutionary patterns. Here we describe cranial and postcranial bones from the Permo-Triassic Buena Vista Formation of northeastern Uruguay that contribute to increase the meagre early archosauromorph record from South America. A basioccipital fused to both partial exoccipitals and three cervical vertebrae are assigned to Archosauromorpha based on apomorphies or a unique combination of characters. The archosauromorph remains of the Buena Vista Formation probably represent a multi-taxonomic assemblage composed of non-archosauriform archosauromorphs and a 'proterosuchid-grade' animal. This assemblage does not contribute in the discussion of a Late Permian or Early Triassic age for the Buena Vista Formation, but reinforces the broad palaeobiogeographic distribution of 'proterosuchid grade' diapsids in Permo-Triassic beds worldwide.

  7. Analyses of the early stages of star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintott, Christopher John

    This thesis presents a study of the physical and chemical properties of star forming regions, both in the Milky Way and in the distant Universe, building on the existing astrochem- ical models developed by the group at UCL. Observations of the nearby star-forming region, L134A, which were carried out with the James Clark Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawai'i are compared to the predictions of a model of star formation from gas rich in atomic (rather than molecular) hydrogen. A similar model is used to investigate the effect of non-equilibrium chemistry on the derivation of the cosmic-ray ionization rate, an important parameter in controlling both the chemistry and the physics of star forming clumps. A collapse faster than free-fall is proposed as an explanation for differences be tween the distribution of CS and N2H+ in such regions. Moving beyond the Milky Way, JCMT observations of sulphur-bearing species in the nearby starburst galaxy, M82, are presented and compared with existing molecular observations of similar systems. M82 is a local anlogue for star forming systems in the early Universe, many of which have star formation rates several thousand times that of the Milky Way. A model which treats the molecular gas in such systems as an assembly of 'hot cores' (protostellar cores which have a distinctive chemical signature) has been developed, and is used to predict the abundance of many species. An application of this model is used to explain the observed deviation in the early Universe from the otherwise tight relation between infrared and HCN luminosity via relatively recent star formation from near-primordial gas. Many of the stars formed in the early Universe must now be in massive elliptical systems, and work on the structure of these systems is presented. Data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is analysed to show that such galaxies have cores dominated by baryons rather than dark matter, and the dark matter profile is constrained by adiabatic contraction.

  8. Dynamic coupling of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Picker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation.

  9. Early Paleozoic subduction initiation volcanism of the Iwatsubodani Formation, Hida Gaien belt, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Koshi; Gantumur, Onon; Nuramkhaan, Manchuk

    2017-01-01

    In placing Japanese tectonics in an Asian context, variation in the Paleozoic geological environment is a significant issue. This paper investigates the geochemistry of the lower Paleozoic basalt formation (Iwatsubodani Formation) in the Hida Gaien belt, Japan, to consider its tectonic setting. This formation includes the following two types of rock in ascending order: basalt A with sub-ophitic texture and basalt B with porphyritic texture. Basalt A has a high and uniform FeO*/MgO ratio, moderate TiO2, high V, and low Ti/V. The HFSE and REE are nearly the same as those in MORB, and all the data points to basalt A being the "MORB-like fore-arc tholeiitic basalt (FAB)" reported, for example, from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. By contrast, basalt B has a low FeO*/MgO ratio, low TiO2, and low V and Ti/V. It has an LREE-enriched trend and a distinct negative Nb anomaly in the MORB-normalized multi-element pattern and a moderately high LREE/HREE. All these factors suggest that basalt B is calc-alkaline basalt. It is known that FAB is erupted at the earliest stage of arc formation—namely, subduction initiation—and that boninitic/tholeiitic/calc-alkaline volcanism follows at the supra-subduction zone (SSZ). Thus, the occurrence of basalts A (FAB) and B (calc-alkaline rock) is strong evidence of early Paleozoic arc-formation initiation at an SSZ. Evidence for an early Paleozoic SSZ arc is also recognized from the Oeyama, Hayachine-Miyamori, and Sergeevka ophiolites. Hence, both these ophiolites and the Iwatsubodani Formation probably coexisted in a primitive SSZ system in the early Paleozoic.

  10. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2001-01-01

    In order to derive information on the star formation history in the early universe we observed 6 high-redshift (z=3.4) quasars in the near-infrared to measure the relative iron and \\mgii emission strengths. A detailed comparison of the resulting spectra with those of low-redshift quasars show essentially the same FeII/MgII emission ratios and very similar continuum and line spectral properties, indicating a lack of evolution of the relative iron to magnesium abundance of the gas since z=3.4 in bright quasars. On the basis of current chemical evolution scenarios of galaxies, where magnesium is produced in massive stars ending in type II SNe, while iron is formed predominantly in SNe of type Ia with a delay of ~1 Gyr and assuming as cosmological parameters H_o = 72 km/s Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7$, we conclude that major star formation activity in the host galaxies of our z=3.4 quasars must have started already at an epoch corresponding to z_f ~= 10, when the age of the universe was less than 0....

  11. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Casas

    Full Text Available The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype, those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here. We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation.

  12. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Laura; Szűcs, Réka; Vij, Shubha; Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Németh, Sándor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsényi, Miklós; Orbán, László

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation.

  13. Disappearing scales in carps: Re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura

    2013-12-30

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the \\'S\\' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called \\'N\\' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude x nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov\\'s work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dosedependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. 2013 Casas et al.

  14. The mechanism of pattern formation in the developing drosophila retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN QiCheng

    2007-01-01

    The biological patterning of the drosophila retina in vivo has striking resemblance to liquid bubbles, in which the surface mechanics due to N-cadherin within a sub-group of retina cells can be mimicked by surface tension. In this work, the aggregating patterns were reasonably simplified into 2D clusters consisting of 2-6 identical bubbles confined within a shrinking boundary. By using a hybrid fluid dynamics model proposed for liquid foams, the aggregating process of 2-6 retina cells was studied. Assuming the minimal perimeter for patterning cells to be the condition of stability patterns, the stable converged patterns we simulated in this work are the same as the experimental observations. More importantly, a new pattern of 6 cells was obtained which was found physically more stable than the other two reported by Hayashi and Carthew[1]. Aggregating perimeters of cells, i.e. the surface energy, showed a good linear fit with the cell numbers.

  15. The mechanism of pattern formation in the developing drosophila retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biological patterning of the drosophila retina in vivo has striking resemblance to liquid bubbles, in which the surface mechanics due to N-cadherin within a sub-group of retina cells can be mimicked by surface tension. In this work, the aggregating patterns were reasonably simplified into 2D clusters consisting of 2—6 identical bubbles confined within a shrinking boundary. By using a hybrid fluid dy-namics model proposed for liquid foams, the aggregating process of 2―6 retina cells was studied. Assuming the minimal perimeter for patterning cells to be the condition of stability patterns, the stable converged patterns we simulated in this work are the same as the experimental observations. More importantly, a new pattern of 6 cells was obtained which was found physically more stable than the other two reported by Hayashi and Carthew[1]. Aggregating perimeters of cells, i.e. the surface energy, showed a good linear fit with the cell numbers.

  16. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  17. Stabilization and destabilization effects of the electric field on stochastic precipitate pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagzi, István; Izsák, Ferenc

    2004-01-01

    Stabilization and destabilization effects of an applied electric field on the Liesegang pattern formation in low concentration gradient were studied with numerical model simulations. In the absence of an electric field pattern formation exhibits increasingly stochastic behaviour as the initial conce

  18. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  19. Mathematics and biology: a Kantian view on the history of pattern formation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    Driesch's statement, made around 1900, that the physics and chemistry of his day were unable to explain self-regulation during embryogenesis was correct and could be extended until the year 1972. The emergence of theories of self-organisation required progress in several areas including chemistry, physics, computing and cybernetics. Two parallel lines of development can be distinguished which both culminated in the early 1970s. Firstly, physicochemical theories of self-organisation arose from theoretical (Lotka 1910-1920) and experimental work (Bray 1920; Belousov 1951) on chemical oscillations. However, this research area gained broader acceptance only after thermodynamics was extended to systems far from equilibrium (1922-1967) and the mechanism of the prime example for a chemical oscillator, the Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction, was deciphered in the early 1970s. Secondly, biological theories of self-organisation were rooted in the intellectual environment of artificial intelligence and cybernetics. Turing wrote his The chemical basis of morphogenesis (1952) after working on the construction of one of the first electronic computers. Likewise, Gierer and Meinhardt's theory of local activation and lateral inhibition (1972) was influenced by ideas from cybernetics. The Gierer-Meinhardt theory provided an explanation for the first time of both spontaneous formation of spatial order and of self-regulation that proved to be extremely successful in elucidating a wide range of patterning processes. With the advent of developmental genetics in the 1980s, detailed molecular and functional data became available for complex developmental processes, allowing a new generation of data-driven theoretical approaches. Three examples of such approaches will be discussed. The successes and limitations of mathematical pattern formation theory throughout its history suggest a picture of the organism, which has structural similarity to views of the organic world held by the philosopher

  20. Magnetically self-regulated formation of early protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The formation of protoplanetary discs during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disc radius, $ r \\simeq 18 \\, {\\rm AU} \\, \\left({\\eta_{\\rm AD} / 0.1 \\, {\\rm s}} \\right)^{2/9} \\left({B_z / 0.1\\, {\\rm G}} \\right) ^{-4/9} \\left({M / 0.1 \\msol} \\right) ^{1/3},$ where $M$ is the total disc plus protostar mass, $\\eta_\\mathrm{AD}$ is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and $B_z$ is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is about significantly smaller than the discs that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variation...

  1. Evaluation of the dentogingival area during early plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, P; Lopes de Souza, M A; Oppermann, R V

    2001-07-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate the pattern of supragingival plaque formation in the dentogingival area within 96 hours after abstinence from mechanical plaque control and to clinically analyze the gingival inflammatory response observed. Six male volunteers, 20 to 23 years of age, had their upper incisors and cuspids polished. Four independent periods of no mechanical plaque control--24, 48, 72, and 96 hours--were instituted. In each period, plaque was disclosed and standardized individual photographs were taken. Impressions were taken and replicas were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected at baseline and 96 hours. The height of the gingival papilla was measured at baseline, 24, and 96 hours. Results showed the presence of a plaque-free zone (PFZ) along the gingival margin up to 72 hours. After 96 hours, there was a significant reduction in the presence of PFZ in the proximal thirds of the buccal surface when compared to the other experimental periods. At the end of the study, there was a significant increase in the GCF flow as well as edema of the interdental papilla, when compared to baseline values. The PFZ observed during the initial phase was less apparent at the 96-hour period. At this time, there was an increase in the gingival inflammatory response, represented clinically by increased GCF flow and edema.

  2. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  3. Convection-driven pattern formation in lawn grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sally; Daniels, Karen

    2009-11-01

    Spatial patterns of 'dead' lawn grass have often been ascribed to Turing-type reaction-diffusion processes related to water scarcity. We present an alternative hypothesis: that the air within the grass canopy is unstable to a convective instability, such that chill damage caused by falling cold air is responsible for the creation of brown and green bands of grass. This hypothesis is consistent with several features of small-scale vegetation patterns, including their length scale, rapid onset and transient nature. We find that the predictions of a porous medium convection model based are consistent with measurements made for a particular instance of lawn-patterning in North Carolina.

  4. The role of hydrological transience in peatland pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. J.; Baird, A. J.; Belyea, L. R.

    2013-10-01

    The sloping flanks of peatlands are commonly patterned with non-random, contour-parallel stripes of distinct micro-habitats such as hummocks, lawns and hollows. Patterning seems to be governed by feedbacks among peatland hydrological processes, plant micro-succession, plant litter production and peat decomposition. An improved understanding of peatland patterning may provide important insights into broader aspects of the long-term development of peatlands and their likely response to future climate change. We recreated a cellular simulation model from the literature, as well as three subtle variants of the model, to explore the controls on peatland patterning. Our models each consist of three submodels, which simulate: peatland water tables in a gridded landscape, micro-habitat dynamics in response to water-table depths, and changes in peat hydraulic properties. We found that the strength and nature of simulated patterning was highly dependent on the degree to which water tables had reached a steady state in response to hydrological inputs. Contrary to previous studies, we found that under a true steady state the models predict largely unpatterned landscapes that cycle rapidly between contrasting dry and wet states, dominated by hummocks and hollows, respectively. Realistic patterning only developed when simulated water tables were still transient. Literal interpretation of the degree of hydrological transience required for patterning suggests that the model should be discarded; however, the transient water tables appear to have inadvertently replicated an ecological memory effect that may be important to peatland patterning. Recently buried peat layers may remain hydrologically active despite no longer reflecting current vegetation patterns, thereby highlighting the potential importance of three-dimensional structural complexity in peatlands to understanding the two-dimensional surface-patterning phenomenon. The models were highly sensitive to the assumed values

  5. Estimating dew formation in rice, using seasonally averaged diel patterns of weather variables

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, W.; Goudriaan, J.

    2004-01-01

    If dew formation cannot be measured it has to be estimated. Available simulation models for estimating dew formation require hourly weather data as input. However, such data are not available for places without an automatic weather station. In such cases the diel pattern of weather variables might be used to run the simulation model. To investigate the possibility of using diel patterns of weather variables to estimate dew formation, a field experiment was carried out from February to April 1...

  6. Modular genetic regulatory networks increase organization during pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadlou, Hamid; Podgorski, Gregory J; Flann, Nicholas S

    2016-08-01

    Studies have shown that genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) consist of modules that are densely connected subnetworks that function quasi-autonomously. Modules may be recognized motifs that comprise of two or three genes with particular regulatory functions and connectivity or be purely structural and identified through connection density. It is unclear what evolutionary and developmental advantages modular structure and in particular motifs provide that have led to this enrichment. This study seeks to understand how modules within developmental GRNs influence the complexity of multicellular patterns that emerge from the dynamics of the regulatory networks. We apply an algorithmic complexity to measure the organization of the patterns. A computational study was performed by creating Boolean intracellular networks within a simulated epithelial field of embryonic cells, where each cell contains the same network and communicates with adjacent cells using contact-mediated signaling. Intracellular networks with random connectivity were compared to those with modular connectivity and with motifs. Results show that modularity effects network dynamics and pattern organization significantly. In particular: (1) modular connectivity alone increases complexity in network dynamics and patterns; (2) bistable switch motifs simplify both the pattern and network dynamics; (3) all other motifs with feedback loops increase multicellular pattern complexity while simplifying the network dynamics; (4) negative feedback loops affect the dynamics complexity more significantly than positive feedback loops.

  7. Formation Pattern Based on Modified Cell Decomposition Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iswanto Iswanto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the shortest path algorithm for Quadrotor to make a formation quickly and avoid obstacles in an unknown area. There are three algorithms proposed in this paper namely fuzzy, cell decomposition, and potential field algorithms. Cell decomposition algorithm is an algorithm derived from graph theory used to create maps of robot formations. Fuzzy algorithm is an artificial intelligence control algorithm used for robot navigation. The merger of these two algorithms are not able to form an optimum formation because some Quadrotors which have been hovering should wait for the other Quadrotors which are unable to find the shortest distance to reach the formation quickly. The problem is that the longer time the multi Quadrotors take to make a formation, the more energy they use. It can be overcome by adding potential field algorithm. The algorithm is used to give values of weight to the path planning taken by the Quadrotors. The proposed algorithms have shown that multi Quadrotors can quickly make a formation because they are able to avoid various obstacles and find the shortest path so that the time required to get to the goal position is fast.

  8. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A. J.; Meinhardt, H.

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns? Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of Drosophila and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  9. CDS Simulation and Pattern Formation of Phase Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangjiLIU; MenCHENG; 等

    1998-01-01

    Several properties of the generation and evolution of phase separating patterns for binary material studied by CDS model are proposed.The main conclusions are(1) for alloys spinodal decomposition,the conceptions of “macro-pattern” and “micropattern” are posed by “black-and-white graph”and “gray-scale graph” respectively.We find that though the four forms of map f that represent the self-evolution of order parameter in a cell (lattice)are similar to each other in “macro-pattern”,there are evident differences in their micro-pattern,e.g.,some different fine netted sturctures in the black domain and the white domain are found by the micro-pattern.so that distinct mechanical and physical behaviors shall be obtained.(2) If the two constituteons of block copolymers are not symmetric (i.e.r≠0.5),a pattern called “grain-strip cross pattern is discovered,is the 0.43

  10. A Broad Dynamical Model for Pattern Formation by Lateral Inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Arcak, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Many patterning events in multi-cellular organisms rely on cell-to-cell contact signaling, such as the Notch pathway in metazoans. A particularly interesting phenomenon in this form of communication is lateral inhibition where a cell that adopts a particular fate inhibits its immediate neighbors from doing the same. Dynamical models are of great interest for understanding the circuit topologies involved in lateral inhibition and for predicting the associated patterns. Several simplified models have been employed for Notch signalling pathways in the literature. The objective of this paper is to present an abstract dynamical model that captures the essential features of lateral inhibition and to demonstrate with dynamical systems techniques that these features indeed lead to patterning.

  11. Magnetically Self-regulated Formation of Early Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The formation of protoplanetary disks during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disk radius, r≃ 18 {au} {({η }{AD}/0.1{{s}})}2/9{({B}z/0.1{{G}})}-4/9{(M/0.1{M}⊙ )}1/3, where M is the total disk plus protostar mass, {η }{AD} is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, and B z is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is significantly smaller than the disks that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variations of a factor 100 in core mass, a factor 10 in the level of turbulence, a factor 5 in rotation, and magnetic mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratios 2 and 5. The disk radius estimates are found to agree with the numerical simulations within less than a factor 2. A striking prediction of our analysis is the weak dependence of circumstellar disk radii upon the various relevant quantities, suggesting weak variations among class-0 disk sizes. In some cases, we note the onset of large spiral arms beyond this radius.

  12. Mathematical study on robust tissue pattern formation in growing epididymal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-21

    Tissue pattern formation during development is a reproducible morphogenetic process organized by a series of kinetic cellular activities, leading to the building of functional and stable organs. Recent studies focusing on mechanical aspects have revealed physical mechanisms on how the cellular activities contribute to the formation of reproducible tissue patterns; however, the understanding for what factors achieve the reproducibility of such patterning and how it occurs is far from complete. Here, I focus on a tube pattern formation during murine epididymal development, and show that two factors influencing physical design for the patterning, the proliferative zone within the tubule and the viscosity of tissues surrounding to the tubule, control the reproducibility of epididymal tubule pattern, using a mathematical model based on experimental data. Extensive numerical simulation of the simple mathematical model revealed that a spatially localized proliferative zone within the tubule, observed in experiments, results in more reproducible tubule pattern. Moreover, I found that the viscosity of tissues surrounding to the tubule imposes a trade-off regarding pattern reproducibility and spatial accuracy relating to the region where the tubule pattern is formed. This indicates an existence of optimality in material properties of tissues for the robust patterning of epididymal tubule. The results obtained by numerical analysis based on experimental observations provide a general insight on how physical design realizes robust tissue pattern formation.

  13. Mathematical aspects of pattern formation in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Juncheng

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with the mathematical analysis of patterns which are encountered in biological systems. It summarises, expands and relates results obtained in the field during the last fifteen years. It also links the results to biological applications and highlights their relevance to phenomena in nature. Of particular concern are large-amplitude patterns far from equilibrium in biologically relevant models.The approach adopted in the monograph is based on the following paradigms:• Examine the existence of spiky steady states in reaction-diffusion systems and select as observabl

  14. Viscoelasticity and pattern formations in stock market indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Aydın

    2017-06-01

    The viscoelastic and thermodynamic properties of four stock indices, namely, DJI, Nasdaq-100, Nasdaq-Composite, and S&P were analyzed for a period of 30 years from 1986 to 2015. The asset values (or index) can be placed into Aristotelian `potentiality-actuality' framework by using scattering diagram. Thus, the index values can be transformed into vectorial forms in a scattering diagram, and each vector can be split into its horizontal and vertical components. According to viscoelastic theory, the horizontal component represents the conservative, and the vertical component represents the dissipative behavior. The related storage and the loss modulus of these components are determined and then work-like and heat-like terms are calculated. It is found that the change of storage and loss modulus with Wiener noise (W) exhibit interesting patterns. The loss modulus shows a featherlike pattern, whereas the storage modulus shows figurative man-like pattern. These patterns are formed due to branchings in the system and imply that stock indices do have a kind of `fine-order' which can be detected when the change of modulus values are plotted with respect to Wiener noise. In theoretical calculations it is shown that the tips of the featherlike patterns stay at negative W values, but get closer to W = 0 as the drift in the system increases. The shift of the tip point from W = 0 indicates that the price change involves higher number of positive Wiener number corrections than the negative Wiener. The work-like and heat-like terms also exhibit patterns but with different appearance than modulus patterns. The decisional changes of people are reflected as the arrows in the scattering diagram and the propagation path of these vectors resemble the path of crack propagation. The distribution of the angle between two subsequent vectors shows a peak at 90°, indicating that the path mostly obeys the crack path occurring in hard objects. Entropy mimics the Wiener noise in the evolution

  15. Early life migration patterns of Baltic Sea pike Esox lucius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohtla, M; Vetemaa, M; Urtson, K; Soesoo, A

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the movement patterns of Baltic Sea pike Esox lucius in Matsalu Bay, Estonia, using otolith microchemistry. Migration patterns of E. lucius were remarkably diverse, but distinct groups were evident. Of the E. lucius analysed (n = 28), 82% hatched in fresh water and 74% of them left this biotope during the first growth season.

  16. Pattern formation in the bistable Gray-Scott model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazin, W.; Rasmussen, K.E.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a computer simulation study of a variety of far-from-equilibrium phenomena that can arise in a bistable chemical reaction-diffusion system which also displays Turing and Hopf instabilities. The Turing bifurcation curve and the wave number for the patterns of maximum linear grow...

  17. Pattern formation in the wake of triggered pushed fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Ryan; Scheel, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Pattern-forming fronts are often controlled by an external stimulus which progresses through a stable medium at a fixed speed, rendering it unstable in its wake. By controlling the speed of excitation, such stimuli, or ‘triggers’, can mediate pattern forming fronts which freely invade an unstable equilibrium and control which pattern is selected. In this work, we analytically and numerically study when the trigger perturbs an oscillatory pushed free front. In such a situation, the resulting patterned front, which we call a pushed trigger front, exhibits a variety of phenomenon, including snaking, non-monotonic wave-number selection, and hysteresis. Assuming the existence of a generic oscillatory pushed free front, we use heteroclinic bifurcation techniques to prove the existence of trigger fronts in an abstract setting motivated by the spatial dynamics approach. We then derive a leading order expansion for the selected wave-number in terms of the trigger speed. Furthermore, we show that such a bifurcation curve is governed by the difference of certain strong-stable and weakly-stable spatial eigenvalues associated with the decay of the free pushed front. We also study prototypical examples of these phenomena in the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg Landau equation and a modified Cahn-Hilliard equation.

  18. Size segregated ring pattern formation in particle impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, J. R.; Fredericks, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Typical particle impactors consist of a nozzle that directs a particle laden flow onto a plate, and is designed to capture particles greater than a cutoff diameter. Connected in series as a cascade, with each impactor designed to have a progressively smaller cutoff diameter, the particle size distribution can be measured. Typical impactors utilize a nozzle-to-plate distance S that is on the order of one nozzle diameter W, S / W 1 , and give a nominally Gaussian particle deposition pattern on the plate. We explored conditions where S / W < < 1 and observed deposition patterns consisting of very fine rings. Moreover, we found that the ring diameter increased with decreasing particle diameter and the ring thickness increased with particle diameter. These results suggest a potential method for sizing particles by using the mature technology of impactors in a different way. Potential mechanisms for how these ring patterns are formed will be discussed. We note that prior studies have observed conditions where particle deposition patterns exhibited "halos". These halos appear less distinct than the rings we have observed, and it is unclear whether they are related.

  19. Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Formation in a Surface Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Reichert, Christian; Eiswirth, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation, pulse formation, and propagation failure have been observed experimentally in CO oxidation on Pt(110) at intermediate pressures ($\\approx 10^{-2}$mbar). This phenomenon can be reproduced with a stochastic model which includes temperature effects. Nucleation occurs randomly...

  20. Spontaneous tunable Turing pattern formation for coherent high-power THz radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Shang-Hua; Yu, Mingbin; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Zelevinsky, T; Jarrahi, Mona; Wong, Chee Wei

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous breaking of symmetry and homogeneity through dissipative pattern formation is a fundamental question in developmental biology, molecular biochemistry, mathematics and nonlinear physics. Self-organized patterns arise in nature, such as pigmentation in animals, tree branching fractals, Prigogine non-equilibrium chemical bifurcations, and are postulated by Turing to occur from diffusion-reaction driven instabilities. In spite of the spontaneous nature, these threshold-dependent patterns - when formed - can potentially be remarkably robust in the presence of noise. Here we report the spontaneous Turing pattern formation in chip-scale nonlinear oscillators, developing a precision frequency comb in the solid-state. The stationary Turing pattern is discretely tunable across 430 GHz on a THz carrier, with a sideband non-uniformity measured down to 1 part in 1.5x10^15. Local mode hybridizations in the nonlinear ring oscillator seeds the coherent pattern formation and phase matching, to obtain a record ...

  1. Pigment pattern formation in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, involves the Kita and Csf1ra receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Verena A; Fadeev, Andrey; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2013-07-01

    Males of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) vary tremendously in their ornamental patterns, which are thought to have evolved in response to a complex interplay between natural and sexual selection. Although the selection pressures acting on the color patterns of the guppy have been extensively studied, little is known about the genes that control their ontogeny. Over 50 years ago, two autosomal color loci, blue and golden, were described, both of which play a decisive role in the formation of the guppy color pattern. Orange pigmentation is absent in the skin of guppies with a lesion in blue, suggesting a defect in xanthophore development. In golden mutants, the development of the melanophore pattern during embryogenesis and after birth is affected. Here, we show that blue and golden correspond to guppy orthologs of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor a (csf1ra; previously called fms) and kita. Most excitingly, we found that both genes are required for the development of the black ornaments of guppy males, which in the case of csf1ra might be mediated by xanthophore-melanophore interactions. Furthermore, we provide evidence that two temporally and genetically distinct melanophore populations contribute to the adult camouflage pattern expressed in both sexes: one early appearing and kita-dependent and the other late-developing and kita-independent. The identification of csf1ra and kita mutants provides the first molecular insights into pigment pattern formation in this important model species for ecological and evolutionary genetics.

  2. Quantum properties of transverse pattern formation in second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Scotto, P.; Zambrini, R.;

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the spatial quantum noise properties of the one-dimensional transverse pattern formation instability in intracavity second-harmonic generation. The Q representation of a quasi-probability distribution is implemented in terms of nonlinear stochastic Langevin equations. We study...... these equations through extensive numerical simulations and analytically in the linearized limit. Our study, made below and above the threshold of pattern formation, is guided by a microscopic scheme of photon interaction underlying pattern formation in second-harmonic generation. Close to the threshold...

  3. Direct numerical simulation of pattern formation in subaqueous sediment

    CERN Document Server

    Kidanemariam, Aman G

    2014-01-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulation of incompressible fluid flow over a thick bed of mobile, spherically-shaped particles. The algorithm is based upon the immersed boundary technique for fluid-solid coupling and uses a soft-sphere model for the solid-solid contact. Two parameter points in the laminar flow regime are chosen, leading to the emergence of sediment patterns classified as `small dunes', while one case under turbulent flow conditions leads to `vortex dunes' with significant flow separation on the lee side. Wavelength, amplitude and propagation speed of the patterns extracted from the spanwise-averaged fluid-bed interface are found to be consistent with available experimental data. The particle transport rates are well represented by available empirical models for flow over a plane sediment bed in both the laminar and the turbulent regimes.

  4. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Claus C Hilgetag

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to...

  5. Dynamic array generation and pattern formation for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P.C.; Glückstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast approach is used for the generation of optical arrays of arbitrary beam shape, suitable for applications in optical tweezers for the manipulation of biological specimens. This approach offers numerous advantages over current techniques involving the use of computer......-generated holograms or diffractive optical elements. We demonstrate a low-loss system for generating intensity patterns suitable for the trapping and manipulation of small particles or specimens....

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  7. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler G Moore

    Full Text Available Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic

  8. Early Adhesion of Structural Inequality in the Formation of Collaborative Knowledge, Wikipedia

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    We perform an in-depth analysis on the inequality in 863 Wikimedia projects. We take the complete editing history of 267,304,095 Wikimedia items until 2016, which not only covers every language edition of Wikipedia, but also embraces the complete versions of Wiktionary, Wikisource, Wikivoyage, etc. Our findings of common growth pattern described by the interrelation between four characteristic growth yardsticks suggest a universal law of the communal data formation. In this encyclopedic data set, we observe the interplay between the number of edits and the degree of inequality. In particular, the rapid increasing of the Gini coefficient suggests that this entrenched inequality stems from the nature of such open-editing communal data sets, namely abiogenesis of supereditors' cartel. We show that these groups are created at the early stage of these open-editing media and still alive. Furthermore, our model taking both short-term and long-term memories into account successfully elucidates the underlying mechanis...

  9. Pattern Formation in Predator-Prey Model with Delay and Cross Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the effect of time delay and cross diffusion on the dynamics of a modified Leslie-Gower predator-prey model incorporating a prey refuge. Based on the stability analysis, we demonstrate that delayed feedback may generate Hopf and Turing instability under some conditions, resulting in spatial patterns. One of the most interesting findings is that the model exhibits complex pattern replication: the model dynamics exhibits a delay and diffusion controlled formation growth not only to spots, stripes, and holes, but also to spiral pattern self-replication. The results indicate that time delay and cross diffusion play important roles in pattern formation.

  10. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation in nanoparticle assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.stannard@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-02

    The deposition of nanoparticles from solution onto solid substrates is a diverse subfield of current nanoscience research. Complex physical and chemical processes underpin the self-assembly and self-organization of colloidal nanoparticles at two-phase (solid-liquid, liquid-air) interfaces and three-phase (solid-liquid-air) contact lines. This review discusses key recent advances made in the understanding of nonequilibrium dewetting processes of nanoparticle-containing solutions, detailing how such an apparently simple experimental system can give rise to such a strikingly varied palette of two-dimensional self-organized nanoparticle array morphologies. Patterns discussed include worm-like domains, cellular networks, microscale rings, and fractal-like fingering structures. There remain many unresolved issues regarding the role of the solvent dewetting dynamics in assembly processes of this type, with a significant focus on how dewetting can be coerced to produce nanoparticle arrays with desirable characteristics such as long-range order. In addition to these topics, methods developed to control nanofluid dewetting through routes such as confining the geometries of drying solutions, depositing onto pre-patterned heterogeneous substrates, and post-dewetting pattern evolution via local or global manipulation are covered. (topical review)

  11. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  12. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  13. Influence of phase separation for surfactant driven pattern formation during ion beam erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsaess, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Vetter, Ulrich; Bobes, Omar; Pape, Andre; Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Broetzmann, Marc [II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We will present results on metal surfactant driven self-organized pattern formation on surfaces by ion beam erosion, with a focus on the role of phase separation for the initial steps of pattern formation. Si substrates were irradiated with 5 keV Xe ions at normal incidence and ion fluences up to 5.10{sup 17} Xe/cm{sup 2} under continuous deposition of surfactant atoms. In the absence of such surfactants uniform flat surfaces are obtained, while in the presence of Fe and Mo surfactants pronounced patterns like dots, combinations of dots and ripples with wavelengths around 100 nm are generated. The surfactant coverage and deposition direction determine the pattern type and the pattern orientation, respectively. A critical steady-state coverage for onset of dot formation and onset of ripple formation is in the range of 10{sup 15} and 5.10{sup 15} Xe/cm{sup 2}. The steady-state surface region consists of a thin amorphous metal silicide layer with high metal concentration in the ripple and dot regions. Pattern formation is explained by ion induced diffusion and phase separation of the initially flat amorphous silicide layer and subsequent ion beam erosion with composition dependent sputter yield. To investigate the role of initial phase separation we additionally compare the pattern formation for different other metal surfactants.

  14. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  15. On Pattern Formation Mechanisms for Lepidopteran Wing Patterns and Mammalian Coat Markings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. D.

    1981-10-01

    The patterns on wings of Lepidoptera can be generated with a few pattern elements, but no mechanism has been suggested for producing them. I consider two of the basic patterns, namely, central symmetry and dependent patterns. A biochemically plausible model mechanism is proposed for generating major aspects of these patterns, based on a diffusing morphogen that activates a gene or colour-specific enzyme in a threshold manner to generate a stable heterogeneous spatial pattern. The model is applied to the determination stream hypothesis of Kuhn & von Engelhardt (Wilhelm Roux Arch. Entw Mech. Org. 130, 660 (1933)), and results from the model compared with their microcautery experiments on the pupal wing of Ephestia kuhniella. In the case of dependent patterns, results are compared with patterns on specific Papilionidae. For the same mechanism and a fixed set of parameters I demonstrate the important roles of geometry and scale on the spatial patterns obtained. The results and evidence presented here suggest the existence of diffusion fields of the order of several millimetres, which are very much larger than most embryonic fields. The existence of zones of polarizing activity is also indicated. Colour patterns on animals are considered to be genetically determined, but the mechanism is not known. I have previously suggested that a single mechanism that can exhibit an infinite variety of patterns is a candidate for that mechanism, and proposed that a reaction-diffusion system that can be diffusively driven unstable could be responsible for the laying down of the spacing patterns that generates the prepattern for animal coat markings. For illustrative purposes I consider a practical reaction mechanism, which exhibits substrate inhibition, and show that the geometry and scale of the domain (part of the epidermis) play a crucial role in the structural patterns that result. Patterns are obtained for a selection of geometries, and general features are related to the coat

  16. Jamming and pattern formation in models of segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the Schelling model of social segregation, formulated as an intrinsically nonequilibrium system, in which the agents occupy districts (or patches) rather than sites on a grid. We show that this allows the equations governing the dynamical behavior of the model to be derived. Analysis of these equations reveals a jamming transition in the regime of low-vacancy density, and inclusion of a spatial dimension in the model leads to a pattern forming instability. Both of these phenomena exhibit unusual characteristics which may be studied through our approach.

  17. Pattern formation in a complex plasma in high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, M; Konopka, U; Bandyopadhyay, P; Morfill, G E

    2011-05-27

    Low-pressure room-temperature neon, argon, krypton, and air plasmas were studied in magnetic fields up to flux densities of 2.3 T. Filaments appeared parallel to the magnetic field lines, and patterns such as spirals and concentric circles formed in the perpendicular direction. We link these effects to the magnetization of the ions. We also used a layer of embedded microparticles as probes in the plasma. Their motion changed dramatically from a collective rotation of the whole ensemble in moderate magnetic fields to a rotation in several small vortices centered at the filaments. © 2011 American Physical Society

  18. Pattern Formation and Continuation in a Trineuron Ring with Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Jiang GUO; Li Hong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a single-directional ring of three neurons with delays. First, linear stability of the model is investigated by analyzing the associated characteristic transcendental equation. Next, we studied the local Hopf bifurcations and the spatio-temporal patterns of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits. Basing on the normal form approach and the center manifold theory, we derive the formula for determining the properties of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbit, such as the direction of Hopf bifurcation. Finally, global existence conditions for Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits are derived by using degree theory methods.

  19. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  20. Automated numerical simulation of biological pattern formation based on visual feedback simulation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhu; Xu, Hui; Zeng, Xingjuan; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    There are various fantastic biological phenomena in biological pattern formation. Mathematical modeling using reaction-diffusion partial differential equation systems is employed to study the mechanism of pattern formation. However, model parameter selection is both difficult and time consuming. In this paper, a visual feedback simulation framework is proposed to calculate the parameters of a mathematical model automatically based on the basic principle of feedback control. In the simulation framework, the simulation results are visualized, and the image features are extracted as the system feedback. Then, the unknown model parameters are obtained by comparing the image features of the simulation image and the target biological pattern. Considering two typical applications, the visual feedback simulation framework is applied to fulfill pattern formation simulations for vascular mesenchymal cells and lung development. In the simulation framework, the spot, stripe, labyrinthine patterns of vascular mesenchymal cells, the normal branching pattern and the branching pattern lacking side branching for lung branching are obtained in a finite number of iterations. The simulation results indicate that it is easy to achieve the simulation targets, especially when the simulation patterns are sensitive to the model parameters. Moreover, this simulation framework can expand to other types of biological pattern formation. PMID:28225811

  1. Dynamics of Surfactants Spreading on Gel-like Materials: Cracking and Pattern Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Spandagos, Constantine; Matar, Omar

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics of surfactants spreading on gels, paying particular attention to the pattern formation accompanying the flow. The latter results from gel-cracking, promoted by Marangoni stresses, and resemble starbursts.

  2. Pattern formation by temperature-gradient driven film instabilities in laterally confined geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedelcu, M; Morariu, MD; Harkema, S; Voicu, NE; Steiner, U

    2005-01-01

    Film break-up driven by an electric field or temperature gradient typically exhibit a characteristic length scale. The presence of a lateral confinement significantly alters this pattern formation process.

  3. A survey on pattern formation of autonomous mobile robots: asynchrony, obliviousness and visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yukiko

    2013-12-01

    A robot system consists of autonomous mobile robots each of which repeats Look-Compute-Move cycles, where the robot observes the positions of other robots (Look phase), computes the track to the next location (Compute phase), and moves along the track (Move phase). In this survey, we focus on self-organization of mobile robots, especially their power of forming patterns. The formation power of a robot system is the class of patterns that the robots can form, and existing results show that the robot system's formation power is determined by their asynchrony, obliviousness, and visibility. We briefly survey existing results, with impossibilities and pattern formation algorithms. Finally, we present several open problems related to the pattern formation problem of mobile robots.

  4. [Family formation in Flanders: new patterns, different timing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H Y; Rajulton, F; Wijewickrema, S; Lesthaeghe, R

    1987-01-01

    "The article presents a statistical study of the starting age and the speed of transitions in the process of family formation in Flanders. It contrasts two sets of generations, three groups according to educational achievement and three groups with differing religious practice. The methodology of shifted proportional hazard models is used and transition probabilities are fed into a semi-Markovian chain. Higher educational achievement results in later starting points, but not in a differing pace once started. By contrast, lower religious involvement speeds up the transitions to first sexual contact and premarital cohabitation, while it considerably retards the transition to parenthood among the generations born after 1950." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE)

  5. Living Arrangements and Family Formation Attitudes in Early Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinn, William G.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the impact of nonfamily living arrangements and cohabitation on changes in family formation attitudes at the individual level. Results indicate that both the experience and duration of cohabiting arrangements have significant effects on family formation attitudes but fail to show significant consequences of premarital, nonfamily living…

  6. Pattern formation and firing synchronization in networks of map neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qingyun [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Duan Zhisheng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Huang Lin [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Chen Guanrong [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lu Qishao [School of Science, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-10-15

    Patterns and collective phenomena such as firing synchronization are studied in networks of nonhomogeneous oscillatory neurons and mixtures of oscillatory and excitable neurons, with dynamics of each neuron described by a two-dimensional (2D) Rulkov map neuron. It is shown that as the coupling strength is increased, typical patterns emerge spatially, which propagate through the networks in the form of beautiful target waves or parallel ones depending on the size of networks. Furthermore, we investigate the transitions of firing synchronization characterized by the rate of firing when the coupling strength is increased. It is found that there exists an intermediate coupling strength; firing synchronization is minimal simultaneously irrespective of the size of networks. For further increasing the coupling strength, synchronization is enhanced. Since noise is inevitable in real neurons, we also investigate the effects of white noise on firing synchronization for different networks. For the networks of oscillatory neurons, it is shown that firing synchronization decreases when the noise level increases. For the missed networks, firing synchronization is robust under the noise conditions considered in this paper. Results presented in this paper should prove to be valuable for understanding the properties of collective dynamics in real neuronal networks.

  7. Radial-pattern formation in the polycarbonate substratum of recordable compact disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, M.; Ishikawa, I.; Tachibana, M.; Shinozaki, K.; Kojima, K.

    2001-09-01

    A radial pattern is found to form in the polycarbonate (PC) substratum of a recordable compact disk. Characteristic features of the pattern are that it is composed of about 80 needle-like regions, the shape of which closely resembles a thin film. In addition, white light is found to scatter at the needle-like region/matrix boundaries. This suggests that the PC substratum may have inferior transparency due to the formation of this pattern. Thus, it is important to understand the bifurcation of the radial-pattern formation from the viewpoint of materials science and engineering. Based on the mechanics of the PC viscous fluid, it has been found that the bifurcation of the pattern formation has a Reynolds number of about 10-3.

  8. New discoveries of early Paleocene (Torrejonian) primates from the Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silcox, Mary T; Williamson, Thomas E

    2012-12-01

    Primates underwent a period of diversification following the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs. Although the Order first appeared near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, it is not until the Torrejonian (the second North American Land Mammal Age of the Paleocene) that a diversity of families began to emerge. One of the lithological units critical to understanding this first primate adaptive radiation is the early Paleocene Nacimiento Formation of the San Juan Basin (SJB; New Mexico). Primates previously described from this formation comprise six species of palaechthonid and paromomyid plesiadapiforms, all known from very limited material. Collecting has increased the sample of primate specimens more than fivefold. Included in the new sample is the first specimen of a picrodontid plesiadapiform from the Torrejonian of the SJB, referable to Picrodus calgariensis, and the first paromomyid specimen complete enough to allow for a species level taxonomic assignment, representing a new species of Paromomys. With respect to the 'Palaechthonidae', the current report describes large collections of Torrejonia wilsoni and Palaechthon woodi, and the first new specimens attributed to Plesiolestes nacimienti and Anasazia williamsoni since 1972 and 1994, respectively. These collections demonstrate previously unknown morphological variants, including the presence of a metaconid on the p4 of some specimens of T. wilsoni, a discovery that supports previous inferences about a close relationship between Torrejonia and Plesiolestes problematicus. This new sample considerably improves our knowledge of the poorly understood 'Palaechthonidae', and about the biostratigraphy, biogeography, and early evolution of North American primates. In particular, the rarity of paromomyids, the continuing absence of plesiadapid and carpolestid plesiadapiforms, and the presence of a number of endemic palaechthonid species in the SJB contrast with plesiadapiform samples from contemporaneous deposits to the

  9. Pattern formation in particle systems driven by color field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The structural evolution of systems with two kinds of particles driven in opposite directions, i.e., driven by a color field, is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Gaussian thermostat,a common treatment to restrict the thermal velocity of the particles in the systems, has been used so as to account for the dissipation of heat and allow the system to reach a steady state. It has been found that with the increase of the strngth of driving force (F), the system undergoes an obvious structural transition from an initially random mixing state to a state characterized by separate lanes and in each lane only one kind of particles exists. The analysis shows that the reason for the formation of lane structure is not only the increase of F but also the variation of particle friction coefficient. While using Ganssian thermostat the particle friction coefficient becomes a function of F. Increasing F leads to high particle friction coefficient and inevitably results in lane formation for strong enough driving force. When lifting the effect of F on friction coefficient and choosing a constant friction coefficient,our results show that for a given F there always exists a critical value of friction coefficient higher than which the system will develop into lane structure.

  10. Formation of ordered microphase-separated pattern during spin coating of ABC triblock copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weihuan; Luo, Chunxia; Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2007-03-14

    In this paper, the authors have systematically studied the microphase separation and crystallization during spin coating of an ABC triblock copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO). The microphase separation of PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO and the crystallization of PEO blocks can be modulated by the types of the solvent and the substrate, the spinning speed, and the copolymer concentration. Ordered microphase-separated pattern, where PEO and P2VP blocks adsorbed to the substrate and PS blocks protrusions formed hexagonal dots above the P2VP domains, can only be obtained when PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO is dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide and the films are spin coated onto the polar substrate, silicon wafers or mica. The mechanism of the formation of regular pattern by microphase separation is found to be mainly related to the inducement of the substrate (middle block P2VP wetting the polar substrate), the quick vanishment of the solvent during the early stage of the spin coating, and the slow evaporation of the remaining solvent during the subsequent stage. On the other hand, the probability of the crystallization of PEO blocks during spin coating decreases with the reduced film thickness. When the film thickness reaches a certain value (3.0 nm), the extensive crystallization of PEO is effectively prohibited and ordered microphase-separated pattern over large areas can be routinely prepared. When the film thickness exceeds another definite value (12.0 nm), the crystallization of PEO dominates the surface morphology. For films with thickness between these two values, microphase separation and crystallization can simultaneously occur.

  11. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning.

  12. Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2014-09-01

    Biological evolution is analyzed as a process of continuous measurement in which biosystems interpret themselves in the environment resulting in changes of both. This leads to rescaling of internal time (heterochrony) followed by spatial reconstructions of morphology (heterotopy). The logical precondition of evolution is the incompleteness of biosystem's internal description, while the physical precondition is the uncertainty of quantum measurement. The process of evolution is based on perpetual changes in interpretation of information in the changing world. In this interpretation the external biospheric gradients are used for establishment of new features of organization. It is concluded that biological evolution involves the anticipatory epigenetic changes in the interpretation of genetic symbolism which cannot generally be forecasted but can provide canalization of structural transformations defined by the existing organization and leading to predictable patterns of form generation.

  13. Pattern formation due to non-linear vortex diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Einfeld, J.; Wördenweber, R.; Griessen, R.

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconducting thin films in an external magnetic field is visualized using a magneto-optic technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex diffusion is observed: (1) Roughening of the flux front with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper including two distinct regimes where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. (2) Fractal penetration of flux with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. (3) Penetration as ‘flux-rivers’. (4) The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori. It is shown that most of the observed behavior is related to the non-linear diffusion of vortices by comparison with simulations of the non-linear diffusion equation appropriate for vortices.

  14. Contraceptive Patterns of College Students Who Experienced Early Coitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Murray L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated the coital behavior, contraceptive use, and attitudes of 20-year-old male and female college students who experienced sexual intercourse early in adolescence (at 16 or younger) as contrasted to those who experienced coitus in late adolescence. Results indicate that older adolescents were more likely to use contraceptives and,…

  15. Genetic oscillations. A Doppler effect in embryonic pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroldoni, Daniele; Jörg, David J; Morelli, Luis G; Richmond, David L; Schindelin, Johannes; Jülicher, Frank; Oates, Andrew C

    2014-07-11

    During embryonic development, temporal and spatial cues are coordinated to generate a segmented body axis. In sequentially segmenting animals, the rhythm of segmentation is reported to be controlled by the time scale of genetic oscillations that periodically trigger new segment formation. However, we present real-time measurements of genetic oscillations in zebrafish embryos showing that their time scale is not sufficient to explain the temporal period of segmentation. A second time scale, the rate of tissue shortening, contributes to the period of segmentation through a Doppler effect. This contribution is modulated by a gradual change in the oscillation profile across the tissue. We conclude that the rhythm of segmentation is an emergent property controlled by the time scale of genetic oscillations, the change of oscillation profile, and tissue shortening.

  16. Pattern formation during electrodeposition of copper-antimony alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil S. Kostov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present study is to establish the conditions of the electrolysis for the preparation of structured and unstressed purple-pink coatings of copper-antimony alloys, including their phase characterization. Also the task of the present investigation is, by changing drastically the metal content in the methanesulfonic electrolyte to find out the conditions of electrolysis where the self-organization of the different phases is expressed by higher-order structures - not only waves but also spirals and targets. The possibility to obtain copper-antimony alloy with up to 80 wt. % Sb from methanesulfonic acid is shown. The deposition rate, morphology and the phase composition of the obtained coatings are established. The phenomena of formation of spatio-temporal structures in this alloy are described.It is determined that the observed structures consist of Cu2Sb and Cu11Sb3 intermetallic phases.

  17. Overweight patterns throughout childhood and cardiometabolic markers in early adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentzen, N. E.; van Rossem, L.; Gehring, U.; Koppelman, G. H.; Postma, D. S.; de Jongste, J. C.; Smit, H. A.; Wijga, A. H.

    BACKGROUND: Risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease is higher in adults who were relatively thin at birth and had subsequent accelerated weight gain. This specific pattern of weight gain may relate to unfavorable cardiometabolic markers already in childhood. We prospectively assessed whether

  18. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  19. Estimating dew formation in rice, using seasonally averaged diel patterns of weather variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, W.; Goudriaan, J.

    2004-01-01

    If dew formation cannot be measured it has to be estimated. Available simulation models for estimating dew formation require hourly weather data as input. However, such data are not available for places without an automatic weather station. In such cases the diel pattern of weather variables might

  20. Exploring Formative E-Assessment: Using Case Stories and Design Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Caroline; Pachler, Norbert; Mor, Yishay; Mellar, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    This article presents key findings from a Joint Information Systems Committee-funded project, which aimed to identify existing practices where technologies contribute to formative assessment and identify processes that take place around formative assessment where technologies play a significant role. Using a design pattern methodology, the project…

  1. Unc45b is essential for early myofibrillogenesis and costamere formation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, J Layne; Hills, Jordan A; Jean, Francesca; Pilgrim, Dave B

    2014-06-01

    Despite the prevalence of developmental myopathies resulting from muscle fiber defects, the earliest stages of myogenesis remain poorly understood. Unc45b is a molecular chaperone that mediates the folding of thick-filament myosin during sarcomere formation; however, Unc45b may also mediate specific functions of non-muscle myosins (NMMs). unc45b Mutants have specific defects in striated muscle development, which include myocyte detachment indicative of dysfunctional adhesion complex formation. Given the necessity for non-muscle myosin function in the formation of adhesion complexes and premyofibril templates, we tested the hypothesis that the unc45b mutant phenotype is not mediated solely by interaction with muscle myosin heavy chain (mMHC). We used the advantages of a transparent zebrafish embryo to determine the temporal and spatial patterns of expression for unc45b, non-muscle myosins and mMHC in developing somites. We also examined the formation of myocyte attachment complexes (costameres) in wild-type and unc45b mutant embryos. Our results demonstrate co-expression and co-regulation of Unc45b and NMM in myogenic tissue several hours before any muscle myosin heavy chain is expressed. We also note deficiencies in the localization of costamere components and NMM in unc45b mutants that is consistent with an NMM-mediated role for Unc45b during early myogenesis. This represents a novel role for Unc45b in the earliest stages of muscle development that is independent of muscle mMHC folding.

  2. Pattern formation induced by cross-diffusion in a predator-prey system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Gui-Quan; Jin Zhen; Liu Quan-Xing; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the Holling-Tanner model for predator-prey with self and cross-diffusion.From the Turing theory,it is believed that there is no Turing pattern formation for the equal self-diffusion coefficients.However,combined with cross-diffusion,it shows that the system will exhibit spotted pattern by both mathematical analysis and numerical simulations.Furthermore,nsynchrony of the predator and the prey in the space.The obtained results show that cross-diffusion plays an important role on the pattern formation of the predator-prey system.

  3. Formation of Self-Organized Anode Patterns in Arc Discharge Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are phenomena commonly observed experimentally in diverse types of plasma systems, including atmospheric-pressure electric arc discharges. However, numerical simulations reproducing anode pattern formation in arc discharges have proven exceedingly elusive. Time-dependent three-dimensional thermodynamic nonequilibrium simulations reveal the spontaneous formation of self-organized patterns of anode attachment spots in the free-burning arc, a canonical thermal plasma flow established by a constant DC current between an axi-symmetric electrodes configuration in the absence of external forcing. The number of spots, their size, and distribution within the pattern depend on the applied total current and on the resolution of the spatial discretization, whereas the main properties of the plasma flow, such as maximum temperatures, velocity, and voltage drop, depend only on the former. The sensibility of the solution to the spatial discretization stresses the computational require...

  4. Pattern formation in vibrated beds of dry and wet granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan Lim, Eldin Wee

    2014-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method was coupled with a capillary liquid bridge force model for computational studies of pattern formation in vibrated granular beds containing dry or wet granular materials. Depending on the vibration conditions applied, hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was observed in the dry vibrated granular bed. In each of these cases, the same hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was also observed in the spatial distribution of the magnitudes of particle-particle collision forces prior to the formation of the corresponding actual pattern in physical distributions of the particles. This seemed to suggest that the pattern formation phenomenon of vibrated granular bed systems might be the result of a two-dimensional Newton's cradle effect. In the presence of a small amount of wetness, these patterns were no longer formed in the vibrated granular beds under the same corresponding set of vibration conditions. Despite the relatively much weaker capillary forces arising from the simulated liquid bridges between particles compared with particle-particle collision forces, the spatial distributions of these collision forces, physical distributions of particles, as well as time profiles of average collision forces were altered significantly in comparison with the corresponding distributions and profiles observed for the dry vibrated granular beds. This seemed to suggest the presence of a two-dimensional Stokes' cradle effect in these wet vibrated granular bed systems which disrupted the formation of patterns in the wet granular materials that would have been observed in their dry counterparts.

  5. Early stage hot spot analysis through standard cell base random pattern generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joong-Won; Song, Jaewan; Kim, Jeong-Lim; Park, Seongyul; Yang, Seung-Hune; Lee, Sooryong; Kang, Hokyu; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Lee, SeungJo; Kwan, Joe

    2017-04-01

    Due to limited availability of DRC clean patterns during the process and RET recipe development, OPC recipes are not tested with high pattern coverage. Various kinds of pattern can help OPC engineer to detect sensitive patterns to lithographic effects. Random pattern generation is needed to secure robust OPC recipe. However, simple random patterns without considering real product layout style can't cover patterning hotspot in production levels. It is not effective to use them for OPC optimization thus it is important to generate random patterns similar to real product patterns. This paper presents a strategy for generating random patterns based on design architecture information and preventing hotspot in early process development stage through a tool called Layout Schema Generator (LSG). Using LSG, we generate standard cell based on random patterns reflecting real design cell structure - fin pitch, gate pitch and cell height. The output standard cells from LSG are applied to an analysis methodology to assess their hotspot severity by assigning a score according to their optical image parameters - NILS, MEEF, %PV band and thus potential hotspots can be defined by determining their ranking. This flow is demonstrated on Samsung 7nm technology optimizing OPC recipe and early enough in the process avoiding using problematic patterns.

  6. Intracardiac flow patterns in early embryonic life. A reexamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Manasek, F; Arcilla, R A

    1983-09-01

    Microangiography, using methylene blue injected at eight vitelline vein sites, was performed on 156 developing chick embryos at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 14-22. Two stream patterns were observed. Type A coursed sequentially through the dorsal portion of the sinus venosus, the cranial segments of the primitive atrium and atrioventricular canal, the ventral parts of the primitive ventricle and conus cordis, and, finally, the left branchial arches. Type B coursed through the ventral portion of the sinus venosus, the caudal segments of the primitive atrium and atrioventricular canal, the dorsal parts of the primitive ventricle and conus cordis, and, finally, the right branchial arches. Both streams flowed in parallel fashion in the conus cordis. At Hamburger-Hamilton stages 17-18, the dye stream from the right lateral vitelline vein was chiefly type A, whereas that from the left lateral vitelline vein was type B. At Hamburger-Hamilton stages 19-22, those patterns reversed, i.e., the right lateral vitelline vein stream ran as type B, whereas the left lateral vitelline vein stream assumed type A pattern. The cranial-caudal relationship of the two streams at the primitive atrium and atrioventricular canal is not consistent with the hypothesis that these streams separately expand the future right atrium and left atrium. Their parallel direction at the conus cordis does not support the theory that spiral septation is initiated by two spiral streams. The longitudinal separation of the two streams at and beyond the branchial arches also argues against aortico-pulmonary septation as a consequence of flow streaming. Our observations do not support the traditional flow-molding theory.

  7. Gait pattern in the early recovery period after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Quervain, I A; Simon, S R; Leurgans, S; Pease, W S; McAllister, D

    1996-10-01

    The gait patterns of eighteen patients who had had a single infarct due to obstruction of the middle cerebral artery were evaluated within one week after the patients had resumed independent walking and before a gait rehabilitation program had been initiated. Gait was analyzed with use of motion analysis, force-plate recordings, and dynamic surface electromyographic studies of the muscles of the lower extremities. The patterns of motion of the lower extremity on the hemiplegic side had a stronger association with the clinical severity of muscle weakness than with the degree of spasticity, balance control, or phasic muscle activity. There was a delay in the initiation of flexion of the hip during the pre-swing phase, and flexion of the hip and knee as well as dorsiflexion of the ankle progressed only slightly during the swing phase. During the stance phase, there was decreased extension of the hip that was related to decreased muscle effort and a coupling between flexion of the knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle. The abnormal patterns of motion altered the velocity, the length of the stride, the cadence, and all phases of the gait cycle. The duration of the pre-swing phase was prolonged for the patients who had the slowest gait velocities. There also were abnormal movements of the upper extremity, the trunk, the pelvis, and the lower extremity on the unaffected side in an effort to compensate for the decreased velocity on the hemiplegic side. As velocity improved, these abnormal movements decreased. Therefore, the goal of therapy should be to improve muscle strength and coordination on the hemiplegic side, especially during the pre-swing phase.

  8. Do AGN suppress star formation in early-type galaxies?

    OpenAIRE

    Schawinski, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The observation that AGN host galaxies preferentially inhabit the "green valley" between the blue cloud and the red sequence has significant consequences for our understanding of the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes via accretion events. I discuss the interpretation of green valley AGN host galaxy colours with particular focus on early-type galaxies.

  9. Cortical instability drives periodic supracellular actin pattern formation in epithelial tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Dong, Bo; Recho, Pierre; Joanny, Jean-François; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-14

    An essential question of morphogenesis is how patterns arise without preexisting positional information, as inspired by Turing. In the past few years, cytoskeletal flows in the cell cortex have been identified as a key mechanism of molecular patterning at the subcellular level. Theoretical and in vitro studies have suggested that biological polymers such as actomyosin gels have the property to self-organize, but the applicability of this concept in an in vivo setting remains unclear. Here, we report that the regular spacing pattern of supracellular actin rings in the Drosophila tracheal tubule is governed by a self-organizing principle. We propose a simple biophysical model where pattern formation arises from the interplay of myosin contractility and actin turnover. We validate the hypotheses of the model using photobleaching experiments and report that the formation of actin rings is contractility dependent. Moreover, genetic and pharmacological perturbations of the physical properties of the actomyosin gel modify the spacing of the pattern, as the model predicted. In addition, our model posited a role of cortical friction in stabilizing the spacing pattern of actin rings. Consistently, genetic depletion of apical extracellular matrix caused strikingly dynamic movements of actin rings, mirroring our model prediction of a transition from steady to chaotic actin patterns at low cortical friction. Our results therefore demonstrate quantitatively that a hydrodynamical instability of the actin cortex can trigger regular pattern formation and drive morphogenesis in an in vivo setting.

  10. Mining disease risk patterns from nationwide clinical databases for the assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997-2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease.

  11. Early stages of spindle formation and independence of chromosome and microtubule cycles in Haemanthus endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, E A; Bajer, A S

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed transformation of the interphase microtubular cytoskeleton into the prophase spindle and followed the pattern of spindle axis determination. Microtubules in endosperm of the higher plant Haemanthus (Scadoxus) were stained by the immunogold and immunogold silver-enhanced methods. Basic structural units involved in spindle morphogenesis were "microtubule converging centers." We emphasized the importance of relative independence of chromosomal and microtubular cycles, and the influence of these cycles on the progress of mitosis. Cells with moderately desynchronized cycles were functional, but extreme desynchronization led to aberrant mitosis. There were three distinct phases of spindle development. The first one comprised interphase and early to mid-prophase. During this phase, the interphase microtubule meshwork radiating from the nuclear surface into the cytoplasm rearranged and formed a dense microtubule cage around the nucleus. The second phase comprised mid to late prophase, and resulted in the formation of normal (bipolar) or transitory aberrant (apolar or multipolar) prophase spindles. The third phase comprised late prophase with prometaphase. The onset of prometaphase was accompanied by a rapid association of microtubule converging centers with kinetochores. In this stage aberrant spindles transformed invariably into bipolar ones. Lateral association of a few bipolar kinetochore fibers at early prometaphase established the core of the bipolar spindle and its alignment. We concluded that (1) spindle formation is a largely independent microtubular process modified by the chromosomal/kinetochore cycle; and (2) the initial polarity of the spindle is established by microtubule converging centers, which are a functional substitute of the centrosome/MTOC. We believe that the dynamics of microtubule converging centers is an expression of microtubule self-organization driven by motor proteins as proposed by Mitchison [1992: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B

  12. Dorsoventral patterning in hemichordates: insights into early chordate evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lowe

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We have compared the dorsoventral development of hemichordates and chordates to deduce the organization of their common ancestor, and hence to identify the evolutionary modifications of the chordate body axis after the lineages split. In the hemichordate embryo, genes encoding bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmp 2/4 and 5/8, as well as several genes for modulators of Bmp activity, are expressed in a thin stripe of ectoderm on one midline, historically called "dorsal." On the opposite midline, the genes encoding Chordin and Anti-dorsalizing morphogenetic protein (Admp are expressed. Thus, we find a Bmp-Chordin developmental axis preceding and underlying the anatomical dorsoventral axis of hemichordates, adding to the evidence from Drosophila and chordates that this axis may be at least as ancient as the first bilateral animals. Numerous genes encoding transcription factors and signaling ligands are expressed in the three germ layers of hemichordate embryos in distinct dorsoventral domains, such as pox neuro, pituitary homeobox, distalless, and tbx2/3 on the Bmp side and netrin, mnx, mox, and single-minded on the Chordin-Admp side. When we expose the embryo to excess Bmp protein, or when we deplete endogenous Bmp by small interfering RNA injections, these expression domains expand or contract, reflecting their activation or repression by Bmp, and the embryos develop as dorsalized or ventralized limit forms. Dorsoventral patterning is independent of anterior/posterior patterning, as in Drosophila but not chordates. Unlike both chordates and Drosophila, neural gene expression in hemichordates is not repressed by high Bmp levels, consistent with their development of a diffuse rather than centralized nervous system. We suggest that the common ancestor of hemichordates and chordates did not use its Bmp-Chordin axis to segregate epidermal and neural ectoderm but to pattern many other dorsoventral aspects of the germ layers, including neural cell fates

  13. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  14. Social Class, Family Formation, and Delinquency in Early Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhl, Danielle C.; Chavez, Jorge M.; Swisher, Raymond R.; Wilczak, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests increasing heterogeneity in the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. This study considers how this heterogeneity may influence delinquency between these two developmental periods. We focus on the role of family transitions, educational attainment, and employment in predicting risk of nonviolent delinquency and substance use, as well as disparities in transitions across socioeconomic status subgroups. Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolesce...

  15. Hypothetical way of pollen aperture patterning. 2. Formation of polycolpate patterns and pseudoaperture geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev

    2000-05-01

    Deviant forms of polycolpate pollen, differing from the typical pattern in the number and arrangement of apertures, are found to be similar in distantly related dicotyledon taxa. The range of variation of common and deviant aperture patterns may be arranged as a continuous series, which may be described as a gradual and geometrically regular transformation of the deviant form with a meridional circular colpus to one of the common polycolpate conditions. Similar series have been observed in the taxa with colporate and pseudocolpate pollen. All possible spatial isomers and their mirror symmetrical variants of the deviant polycolpate and polypseudocolpate pollen have been predicted in terms of the suggested regularities of aperture multiplication. Some of them have been identified in the samples studied.

  16. Effect of substrate temperature on pattern formation of nanoparticles from volatile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Maryam; Harmand, Souad; Sefiane, Khellil; Bigerelle, Maxence; Deltombe, Raphaël

    2015-03-24

    This study investigates pattern formation during evaporation of water-based nanofluid sessile droplets placed on a smooth silicon surface at various temperatures. An infrared thermography technique was employed to observe the temperature distribution along the air-liquid interface of evaporating droplets. In addition, an optical interferometry technique is used to quantify and characterize the deposited patterns. Depending on the substrate temperature, three distinctive deposition patterns are observed: a nearly uniform coverage pattern, a "dual-ring" pattern, and multiple rings corresponding to "stick-slip" pattern. At all substrate temperatures, the internal flow within the drop builds a ringlike cluster of the solute on the top region of drying droplets, which is found essential for the formation of the secondary ring deposition onto the substrate for the deposits with the "dual-ring" pattern. The size of the secondary ring is found to be dependent on the substrate temperature. For the deposits with the rather uniform coverage pattern, the ringlike cluster of the solute does not deposit as a distinct secondary ring; instead, it is deformed by the contact line depinning. In the case of the "stick-slip" pattern, the internal flow behavior is complex and found to be vigorous with rapid circulating flow which appears near the edge of the drop.

  17. Pattern formation and self-organization in plasmas interacting with surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are fascinating phenomena commonly observed in diverse types of biological, chemical and physical systems, including plasmas. These phenomena are often responsible for the occurrence of coherent structures found in nature, such as recirculation cells and spot arrangements; and their understanding and control can have important implications in technology, e.g. from determining the uniformity of plasma surface treatments to electrode erosion rates. This review comprises theoretical, computational and experimental investigations of the formation of spatiotemporal patterns that result from self-organization events due to the interaction of low-temperature plasmas in contact with confining or intervening surfaces, particularly electrodes. The basic definitions associated to pattern formation and self-organization are provided, as well as some of the characteristics of these phenomena within natural and technological contexts, especially those specific to plasmas. Phenomenological aspects of pattern formation include the competition between production/forcing and dissipation/transport processes, as well as nonequilibrium, stability, bifurcation and nonlinear interactions. The mathematical modeling of pattern formation in plasmas has encompassed from theoretical approaches and canonical models, such as reaction-diffusion systems, to drift-diffusion and nonequilibrium fluid flow models. The computational simulation of pattern formation phenomena imposes distinct challenges to numerical methods, such as high sensitivity to numerical approximations and the occurrence of multiple solutions. Representative experimental and numerical investigations of pattern formation and self-organization in diverse types of low-temperature electrical discharges (low and high pressure glow, dielectric barrier and arc discharges, etc) in contact with solid and liquid electrodes are reviewed. Notably, plasmas in contact with liquids, found in diverse

  18. Late Tharsis formation and implications for early Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Sylvain; Baratoux, David; Matsuyama, Isamu; Forget, Francois; Séjourné, Antoine; Turbet, Martin; Costard, Francois

    2016-03-17

    The Tharsis region is the largest volcanic complex on Mars and in the Solar System. Young lava flows cover its surface (from the Amazonian period, less than 3 billion years ago) but its growth started during the Noachian era (more than 3.7 billion years ago). Its position has induced a reorientation of the planet with respect to its spin axis (true polar wander, TPW), which is responsible for the present equatorial position of the volcanic province. It has been suggested that the Tharsis load on the lithosphere influenced the orientation of the Noachian/Early Hesperian (more than 3.5 billion years ago) valley networks and therefore that most of the topography of Tharsis was completed before fluvial incision. Here we calculate the rotational figure of Mars (that is, its equilibrium shape) and its surface topography before Tharsis formed, when the spin axis of the planet was controlled by the difference in elevation between the northern and southern hemispheres (hemispheric dichotomy). We show that the observed directions of valley networks are also consistent with topographic gradients in this configuration and thus do not require the presence of the Tharsis load. Furthermore, the distribution of the valleys along a small circle tilted with respect to the equator is found to correspond to a southern-hemisphere latitudinal band in the pre-TPW geographical frame. Preferential accumulation of ice or water in a south tropical band is predicted by climate model simulations of early Mars applied to the pre-TPW topography. A late growth of Tharsis, contemporaneous with valley incision, has several implications for the early geological history of Mars, including the existence of glacial environments near the locations of the pre-TPW poles of rotation, and a possible link between volcanic outgassing from Tharsis and the stability of liquid water at the surface of Mars.

  19. Late Tharsis Formation and New Perspesctives for Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Sylvain; Baratoux, David; Matsuyama, Isamu; Forget, Francois; Séjourné, Antoine; Turbet, Martin; Costard, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The Tharsis bulge is the largest volcanic complex on Mars and the associated excess of Mars has likely driven a True Polar Wander which has moved the province close to the present equator [1,2]. It has been suggested that the Tharsis load on the lithosphere influenced the orientation of the Noachian/Early Hesperian (>3.5 Ga) valley networks and therefore that most of its topography was completed before their incision during the Noachian era (> 3.7 Ga) [3]. We calculated the rotational figure of Mars and its surface topography before Tharsis, when the spin-axis of the planet was controlled by the hemispheric dichotomy. We show that the observed directions of valley networks are consistent with topographic gradients in this configuration and thus do not require the presence of the Tharsis load. Furthermore, their distribution along a small circle tilted with respect to the equator is found to correspond to a regular south tropical band in the pre-TPW geographic frame. Preferential accumulation of ice or water in a south tropical band is predicted by Early Mars climate model simulations applied to the pre-TPW topography [2,4]. This study implies a major overhaul of the relative chronology of the main events affecting the Mars geological and climatic history during the Noachian and Hesperian periods. A late rise of Tharsis, contemporaneous with fluvial activity, argues for a causal link between volcanic outgassing and the stability of superficial liquid water. The revised chronology, the topography and planet's configuration before Tharsis offers new perspectives to examine the surface conditions with respect to Early Mars habitability. References: [1] Matsuyama, I. & Manga (2010), JGR Planets, 115, 12020. [2] Bouley et al., accepted for publication In Nature. [3] Phillips, R.J. et al. (2001), Science, 291, 2587-2591. [4] Wordsworth et al. (2015), JGR Planets, 120, 1201-1219.

  20. Enhancing Research and Practice in Early Childhood through Formative and Design Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Barbara A.; Reinking, David

    2011-01-01

    This article describes formative and design experiments and how they can advance research and instructional practices in early childhood education. We argue that this relatively new approach to education research closes the gap between research and practice, and it addresses limitations that have been identified in early childhood research. We…

  1. Zebrafish Craniofacial Development: A Window into Early Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Lindsey; Crump, Gage

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the face and skull involves a complex series of developmental events mediated by cells derived from the neural crest, endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although vertebrates boast an enormous diversity of adult facial morphologies, the fundamental signaling pathways and cellular events that sculpt the nascent craniofacial skeleton in the embryo have proven to be highly conserved from fish to man. The zebrafish Danio rerio, a small freshwater cyprinid fish from eastern India, has served as a popular model of craniofacial development since the 1990s. Unique strengths of the zebrafish model include a simplified skeleton during larval stages, access to rapidly developing embryos for live imaging, and amenability to transgenesis and complex genetics. In this chapter, we describe the anatomy of the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton; its applications as models for the mammalian jaw, middle ear, palate, and cranial sutures; the superior imaging technology available in fish that has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of facial morphogenesis; the use of the zebrafish to decipher the genetic underpinnings of craniofacial biology; and finally a glimpse into the most promising future applications of zebrafish craniofacial research.

  2. Bomber: The Formation and Early Years of Strategic Air Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    18 Mitchell, Winged Defense, 215. 19 Two days after the Navy’s airship Shenandoah went down in a storm on 3 September 1925, Mitchell called a press...of crucial impor- tance. Most early aircraft engineers simply did not understand the principles of aerodynamics , which is why most aircraft designed...structure—which would be 14 Maurer, Aviation in the U.S. Army, 246–53, 323–25. 15 The US-based GHQ Air Force consisted of 38 airplane plus two airship

  3. USANS investigation of early stages of metal foam formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bellmann, D; Banhart, J

    2002-01-01

    Metallic foams are on the verge of being used in industrial applications. However, the mechanism of foam creation, especially the early stages, are still unexplored. Ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS), performed with the double-crystal diffractometer (DCD) at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF), is a promising method for obtaining a three-dimensional average of a pore size distribution in a wide size range from about 100 nm to about 20 mu m. Analysis of the neutron scattering curves yielded pore size distributions which conformed with the results obtained by microscopy. (orig.)

  4. Interfacial wave theory of pattern formation in solidification dendrites, fingers, cells and free boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive work explores interfacial instability and pattern formation in dynamic systems away from the equilibrium state in solidification and crystal growth. Further, this significantly expanded 2nd edition introduces and reviews the progress made during the last two decades. In particular, it describes the most prominent pattern formation phenomena commonly observed in material processing and crystal growth in the framework of the previously established interfacial wave theory, including free dendritic growth from undercooled melt, cellular growth and eutectic growth in directional solidification, as well as viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw flow. It elucidates the key problems, systematically derives their mathematical solutions by pursuing a unified, asymptotic approach, and finally carefully examines these results by comparing them with the available experimental results. The asymptotic approach described here will be useful for the investigation of pattern formation phenomena occurring in a much b...

  5. Impact of degree mixing pattern on consensus formation in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Fan; Tse, Chi Kong

    The consensus formation process in a social network is affected by a number of factors. This paper studies how the degree mixing pattern of a social network affects the consensus formation process. A social network of more than 50,000 nodes was sampled from the online social services website Twitter. Nodes in the Twitter user network are grouped by their in-degrees and out-degrees. A degree mixing correlation is proposed to measure the randomness of the mixing pattern for each degree group. The DeGroot model is used to simulate the consensus formation processes in the network. Simulation suggests that the non-random degree mixing pattern of social networks can slow down the rate of consensus.

  6. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo.

  7. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls. PMID:27025405

  8. Wavelength Analysis of Interface between Two Miscible Solutions Observed in Formation of Fractal Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Takami, Toshiya

    2014-04-01

    When a droplet of a higher-density solution (HDS) is placed on top of a lower-density solution (LDS), the HDS draws a fractal pattern on the surface of the LDS. Before the fractal pattern is formed, a stick-like pattern with a periodic structure emerges in a region surrounding the surface pattern due to interfacial instability. We experimentally measure the wavelength of this stick-like pattern. The wavelength increases with the volume of the HDS and is independent of the viscosities of the two solutions. To understand the stick generation, we propose a model of miscible viscous fingering whose boundary conditions are similar to those of the experiments. The wavelength obtained from the model agrees with the experimentally obtained wavelength. The formation of the fractal pattern is discussed by comparing it with the viscous fingering.

  9. Biogenicity of an Early Quaternary iron formation, Milos Island, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, E; Ivarsson, M; Kilias, S P; Frings, P J; Hemmingsson, C; Broman, C; Bengtson, S; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2015-05-01

    A ~2.0-million-year-old shallow-submarine sedimentary deposit on Milos Island, Greece, harbours an unmetamorphosed fossiliferous iron formation (IF) comparable to Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). This Milos IF holds the potential to provide clues to the origin of Precambrian BIFs, relative to biotic and abiotic processes. Here, we combine field stratigraphic observations, stable isotopes of C, S and Si, rock petrography and microfossil evidence from a ~5-m-thick outcrop to track potential biogeochemical processes that may have contributed to the formation of the BIF-type rocks and the abrupt transition to an overlying conglomerate-hosted IF (CIF). Bulk δ(13) C isotopic compositions lower than -25‰ provide evidence for biological contribution by the Calvin and reductive acetyl-CoA carbon fixation cycles to the origin of both the BIF-type and CIF strata. Low S levels of ~0.04 wt.% combined with δ(34) S estimates of up to ~18‰ point to a non-sulphidic depository. Positive δ(30) Si records of up to +0.53‰ in the finely laminated BIF-type rocks indicate chemical deposition on the seafloor during weak periods of arc magmatism. Negative δ(30) Si data are consistent with geological observations suggesting a sudden change to intense arc volcanism potentially terminated the deposition of the BIF-type layer. The typical Precambrian rhythmic rocks of alternating Fe- and Si-rich bands are associated with abundant and spatially distinct microbial fossil assemblages. Together with previously proposed anoxygenic photoferrotrophic iron cycling and low sedimentary N and C potentially connected to diagenetic denitrification, the Milos IF is a biogenic submarine volcano-sedimentary IF showing depositional conditions analogous to Archaean Algoma-type BIFs.

  10. Establishment of an Early Vascular Network Promotes the Formation of Ectopic Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eman, Rhandy M.; Meijer, Henriette A W; Öner, F. Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization is crucial for the induction of bone formation. In this study, we investigated the application of two subtypes of peripheral blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to stimulate vessel formation in ectopic bone constructs. Early and late outgrowth EPCs (E-EPC and L-EPC, res

  11. Assessment of activated porous granules on implant fixation and early bone formation in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ding

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, despite nice bone formation and implant fixation in all groups, bioreactor activated graft material did not convincingly induce early implant fixation similar to allograft, and neither bioreactor nor by adding BMA credited additional benefit for bone formation in this model.

  12. Formation of multiple winding topological defects in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, T; Okabe, Takahiro; Nagasawa, Michiyasu

    1999-01-01

    The formation probability of multiple winding topological defects is calculated by phase and flux distribution analysis based on the Kibble mechanism. The core size of defects is taken into account so that when it is much larger than the correlation length of the Higgs field, high winding configuration can be realized. For example, if the self coupling constant of the Higgs field is smaller than $4\\times10^{-4}$, the topological inflation may occur at the grand unification energy scale by the multiple winding string produced during the GUT phase transition.

  13. Circumnuclear Regions of Star Formation in Early Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, Angeles I; Hagele, Guillermo F; Castellanos, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Circumnuclear star forming regions, also called hotspots, are often found in the inner regions of some spiral galaxies where intense processes of star formation are taking place. In the UV, massive stars dominate the observed circumnuclear emission even in the presence of an active nucleus, contributing between 30 and 50% to the H$\\beta$ total emission of the nuclear zone. Spectrophotometric data of moderate resolution (3000 < R < 11000) are presented from which the physical properties of the ionized gas: electron density, oxygen abundances, ionization structure etc. have been derived.

  14. Acquisition of English word stress patterns in early and late bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guion, Susan G.

    2004-05-01

    Given early acquisition of prosodic knowledge as demonstrated by infants' sensitivity to native language accentual patterns, the question of whether learners can acquire new prosodic patterns across the life span arises. Acquisition of English stress by early and late Spanish-English and Korean-English bilinguals was investigated. In a production task, two-syllable nonwords were produced in noun and verb sentence frames. In a perception task, preference for first or last syllable stress on the nonwords was indicated. Also, real words that were phonologically similar to the nonwords were collected. Logistic regression analyses and ANOVAs were conducted to determine the effect of three factors (syllable structure, lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words) on the production and perception responses. In all three groups, stress patterns of phonologically similar real words predicted stress on nonwords. For the two other factors, early bilinguals patterned similarly to the native-English participants. Late Spanish-English bilinguals demonstrated less learning of stress patterns based on syllabic structure, and late Korean-English bilinguals demonstrated less learning of stress patterns based on lexical class than native-English speakers. Thus, compared to native speakers, late bilinguals' ability to abstract stress patterns is reduced and affected by the first language. [Work supported by NIH.

  15. Early work patterns for gynaecological cancer survivors in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachreiner, N M; Ghebre, R G; Virnig, B A; Shanley, R

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the balance between work demands and treatment plans for >4.3 million working-age cancer survivors in the USA. To describe changes in work status for gynaecological cancer survivors during the first 6 months following diagnosis and their experience with their employers' programmes and policies. One hundred and ten gynaecological cancer survivors who were working at the time of their cancer diagnosis completed a survey. Case record reviews documented their clinical characteristics and treatment details. Ninety-five women (86%) had surgery; 81 (74%) received chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both in addition to surgery. Nine per cent of women said that they changed their treatment plan because of their jobs; in contrast, 62% of women said that they changed their work situation to accommodate their treatment plan. Overall, the most common month for women to stop working was Month 1 (41%), to decrease hours was Month 2 (32%) and to increase hours was Month 6 (8%). Twenty-eight per cent of women were aware of employer policies that assisted the return to work process; 70% of women were familiar with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and 56% with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Only 26% completed a formal request for work accommodations. After 6 months, 56 of 83 women (67%) remained working or had returned to work. Work patterns varied for these gynaecological cancer survivors over the first 6 months following diagnosis. Opportunities exist to improve communication about work and treatment expectations between cancer survivors, occupational health professionals, employers and treating clinicians.

  16. Pattern formation in directional solidification under shear flow. I. Linear stability analysis and basic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietti, Y; Debierre, J M; Bock, T M; Kassner, K

    2001-06-01

    An asymptotic interface equation for directional solidification near the absolute stability limit is extended by a nonlocal term describing a shear flow parallel to the interface. In the long-wave limit considered, the flow acts destabilizing on a planar interface. Moreover, linear stability analysis suggests that the morphology diagram is modified by the flow near onset of the Mullins-Sekerka instability. Via numerical analysis, the bifurcation structure of the system is shown to change. Besides the known hexagonal cells, structures consisting of stripes arise. Due to its symmetry-breaking properties, the flow term induces a lateral drift of the whole pattern, once the instability has become active. The drift velocity is measured numerically and described analytically in the framework of a linear analysis. At large flow strength, the linear description breaks down, which is accompanied by a transition to flow-dominated morphologies which is described in the following paper. Small and intermediate flows lead to increased order in the lattice structure of the pattern, facilitating the elimination of defects. Locally oscillating structures appear closer to the instability threshold with flow than without.

  17. The Intersection of Theory and Application in Elucidating Pattern Formation in Developmental Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmer, Hans G; Painter, Kevin; Umulis, David; Xue, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to three distinct developmental systems that illustrate how theory can influence experimental work and vice-versa. The chosen systems - Drosophila melanogaster, bacterial pattern formation, and pigmentation patterns - illustrate the fundamental physical processes of signaling, growth and cell division, and cell movement involved in pattern formation and development. These systems exemplify the current state of theoretical and experimental understanding of how these processes produce the observed patterns, and illustrate how theoretical and experimental approaches can interact to lead to a better understanding of development. As John Bonner said long ago'We have arrived at the stage where models are useful to suggest experiments, and the facts of the experiments in turn lead to new and improved models that suggest new experiments. By this rocking back and forth between the reality of experimental facts and the dream world of hypotheses, we can move slowly toward a satisfactory solution of the major problems of developmental biology.'

  18. The mechanism of Turing pattern formation in a positive feedback system with cross diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiyan; Liu, Tuoqi; Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze a reaction-diffusion (R-D) system with a double negative feedback loop and find cases where self diffusion alone cannot lead to Turing pattern formation but cross diffusion can. Specifically, we first derive a set of sufficient conditions for Turing instability by performing linear stability analysis, then plot two bifurcation diagrams that specifically identify Turing regions in the parameter phase plane, and finally numerically demonstrate representative Turing patterns according to the theoretical predictions. Our analysis combined with previous studies actually implies an interesting fact that Turing patterns can be generated not only in a class of monostable R-D systems where cross diffusion is not necessary but also in a class of bistable R-D systems where cross diffusion is necessary. In addition, our model would be a good candidate for experimentally testing Turing pattern formation from the viewpoint of synthetic biology.

  19. Performance analysis and optimal design for well patterns in anisotropic formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yuetian

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of the effects of anisotropic permeability on well patterns and reservoir development are investigated by coordinate transformation,fluid flow analysis,and reservoir development concepts.Anisotropy of permeability has reconstructive effects on well patterns.The originally designed flooding units are broken up,and new pattern units are made up of the wells that belong to different original units.The behavior possesses strong randomness,and leads to a complicated relationship among the injection and production wells,and unpredictable productivity of the formations.To prevent the break-up of well patterns,well lines should be either parallel or perpendicular to the maximum principal direction of the anisotropic permeability(i.e.the fracture direction).To optimize the development effects of anisotropic formations,the latitudinal and longitudinal well spacing of the well network are calculated from the principal values of the anisotropic permeability.

  20. Hardware format pattern banks for the Associative memory boards in the ATLAS Fast Tracker Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Grewcoe, Clay James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project is to streamline and update the process of encoding the pattern bank to hardware format in the Associative memory board (AM) of the Fast Tracker (FTK) for the ATLAS detector. The encoding is also adapted to Gray code to eliminate possible misreadings in high frequency devices such as this one, ROOT files are used to store the pattern banks because of the compression utilized in ROOT.

  1. Topological analysis of the formation of Jet-Wake flow pattern in centrifugal impeller channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Qun; LIU Shun-long

    2004-01-01

    Topological analyses are carried out for the numerical results of internal flow field in centrifugal impeller. Topological rules of the singular point characteristics of the limiting streamline are derived and used to determine three dimensional separation patterns in centrifugal impeller and to verify the numerical results. The results reveal that the wake is saddle to nodal closed separation and the formation, its onset point and its developing process of Jet-Wake Flow pattern in centrifugal impeller are presented in this paper.

  2. Pattern Formation in a Vibrated Granular Layer on an Inclined Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Dong; MIAO Guo-Qing

    2008-01-01

    We carry out the simulations of pattern formation in a two-dimensional vibrated granular layer on an inclined base by molecular dynamics.It is found that the maximum amplitude of the pattern is greater at the lower part than at the higher part of the base,and is proportional to the thickness of the layer.Meanwhile,the wavelength varies non-monotonically as the inclined angle of the base is increased.

  3. Skeletal Morphogenesis of Microbrachis and Hyloplesion (Tetrapoda: Lepospondyli, and Implications for the Developmental Patterns of Extinct, Early Tetrapods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Olori

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of extant amphibians often is used as a model for that of extinct early tetrapods, despite evidence for a spectrum of developmental modes in temnospondyls and a paucity of ontogenetic data for lepospondyls. I describe the skeletal morphogenesis of the extinct lepospondyls Microbrachis pelikani and Hyloplesion longicostatum using the largest samples examined for either taxon. Nearly all known specimens were re-examined, allowing for substantial anatomical revisions that affect the scoring of characters commonly used in phylogenetic analyses of early tetrapods. The palate of H. longicostatum is re-interpreted and suggested to be more similar to that of M. pelikani, especially in the nature of the contact between the pterygoids. Both taxa possess lateral lines, and M. pelikani additionally exhibits branchial plates. However, early and rapid ossification of the postcranial skeleton, including a well-developed pubis and ossified epipodials, suggests that neither taxon metamorphosed nor were they neotenic in the sense of branchiosaurids and salamanders. Morphogenetic patterns in the foot suggest that digit 5 was developmentally delayed and the final digit to ossify in M. pelikani and H. longicostatum. Overall patterns of postcranial ossification may indicate postaxial dominance in limb and digit formation, but also more developmental variation in early tetrapods than has been appreciated. The phylogenetic position and developmental patterns of M. pelikani and H. longicostatum are congruent with the hypothesis that early tetrapods lacked metamorphosis ancestrally and that stem-amniotes exhibited derived features of development, such as rapid and complete ossification of the skeleton, potentially prior to the evolution of the amniotic egg.

  4. Pattern Formation inside a Rotating Cylinder Partially Filled with Liquid and Granular Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Dyakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental study of the dynamics of liquid and granular medium in a rapidly rotating horizontal cylinder. In the cavity frame gravity field performs rotation and produces oscillatory liquid flow, which is responsible for the series of novel effects; the problem corresponds to “vibrational mechanics”—generation of steady flows and patterns by oscillating force field. The paper presents the initial results of experimental study of a novel pattern formation effect which is observed at the interface between fluid and sand and which takes the form of ripples extended along the axis of rotation. The initial results of experimental research of a novel effect of pattern formation at the interface between fluid and sand in the form of ripples extended along the axis of rotation are presented. The spatial period of the patterns is studied in dependence on liquid volume, viscosity, and rotation rate. The experimental study of long time dynamics of pattern formation manifests that regular ripples transform into a series of dunes within a few minutes or dozens of minutes. The variety of patterns is determined by the interaction of two types of liquid flows induced by gravity: oscillatory and steady azimuthal flows near the sand surface.

  5. Pattern Formation in a Predator-Prey Model with Both Cross Diffusion and Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boli Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A predator-prey model with both cross diffusion and time delay is considered. We give the conditions for emerging Turing instability in detail. Furthermore, we illustrate the spatial patterns via numerical simulations, which show that the model dynamics exhibits a delay and diffusion controlled formation growth not only of spots and stripe-like patterns, but also of the two coexist. The obtained results show that this system has rich dynamics; these patterns show that it is useful for the diffusive predation model with a delay effect to reveal the spatial dynamics in the real model.

  6. Design of a diffractive optical element for pattern formation in a bilingual virtual keyboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouchehri, Sohrab; Rahimi, Mojtaba; Oboudiat, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Pattern formation is one of the many applications of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for display. Since DOEs have lightweight and slim nature compared to other optical devices, using them as image projection device in virtual keyboards is suggested. In this paper, we present an approach to designing elements that produce distinct intensity patterns, in the far field, for two wavelengths. These two patterns are images of bilingual virtual keyboard. To achieve this with DOEs is not simple, as they are inherently wavelength specific. Our technique is based on phase periodic characteristic of wavefront using iterative algorithm to design the phase profiles.

  7. The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto's history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Stern, S. A.; Moore, J. M.; Young, L. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Ennico, K.; Grundy, W. M.; Linscott, I. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Olkin, C. B.; Reitsema, H. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Schenk, P.; Showalter, M. R.; Spencer, J. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Weaver, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto's Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would naturally have accumulated there. Then, provided that the basin was a positive gravity anomaly (with or without the ocean), true polar wander could have moved the feature towards the Pluto-Charon tidal axis, on the far side of Pluto from Charon. Here we report modelling that shows that ice quickly accumulates on Pluto near latitudes of 30 degrees north and south, even in the absence of a basin, because, averaged over its orbital period, those are Pluto's coldest regions. Within a million years of Charon's formation, ice deposits on Pluto concentrate into a single cap centred near a latitude of 30 degrees, owing to the runaway albedo effect. This accumulation of ice causes a positive gravity signature that locks, as Pluto's rotation slows, to a longitude directly opposite Charon. Once locked, Charon raises a permanent tidal bulge on Pluto, which greatly enhances the gravity signature of the ice cap. Meanwhile, the weight of the ice in Sputnik Planitia causes the crust under it to slump, creating its own basin (as has happened on Earth in Greenland). Even if the feature is now a modest negative gravity anomaly, it remains locked in place because of the permanent tidal bulge raised by Charon. Any movement of the feature away from 30 degrees latitude is countered by the preferential recondensation of ices near the coldest extremities of the cap. Therefore, our modelling suggests that Sputnik Planitia formed shortly after Charon did and has been stable, albeit gradually losing

  8. The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto's history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P; Stern, S A; Moore, J M; Young, L A

    2016-11-30

    Pluto's Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would naturally have accumulated there. Then, provided that the basin was a positive gravity anomaly (with or without the ocean), true polar wander could have moved the feature towards the Pluto-Charon tidal axis, on the far side of Pluto from Charon. Here we report modelling that shows that ice quickly accumulates on Pluto near latitudes of 30 degrees north and south, even in the absence of a basin, because, averaged over its orbital period, those are Pluto's coldest regions. Within a million years of Charon's formation, ice deposits on Pluto concentrate into a single cap centred near a latitude of 30 degrees, owing to the runaway albedo effect. This accumulation of ice causes a positive gravity signature that locks, as Pluto's rotation slows, to a longitude directly opposite Charon. Once locked, Charon raises a permanent tidal bulge on Pluto, which greatly enhances the gravity signature of the ice cap. Meanwhile, the weight of the ice in Sputnik Planitia causes the crust under it to slump, creating its own basin (as has happened on Earth in Greenland). Even if the feature is now a modest negative gravity anomaly, it remains locked in place because of the permanent tidal bulge raised by Charon. Any movement of the feature away from 30 degrees latitude is countered by the preferential recondensation of ices near the coldest extremities of the cap. Therefore, our modelling suggests that Sputnik Planitia formed shortly after Charon did and has been stable, albeit gradually losing

  9. Formation and early evolution of massive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero

    2007-04-01

    I review scenarios for the assembly of massive black holes (MBHs) at the center of galaxies that trace their hierarchical build-up far up in the dark halo merger tree. The first active galactic nuclei likely formed 150 Myr after the big bang in 1e6 Msun minihaloes. X-ray photons from such miniquasars may have permeated the universe more uniformly than EUV radiation, made the low-density diffuse intergalactic medium shine at 21-cm prior to the epoch of reionization, and changed the chemistry of primordial gas. I'll discuss the conditions under which massive black holes become incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, form a binary system, and eventually coalesce. The spin distribution of MBHs is determined by gas accretion, and is predicted to be heavily skewed towards fast-rotating Kerr holes, already in place at early epochs, and not to change significantly below redshift 5. Decaying MBH binaries may shape the innermost central regions of galaxies and should be detected in significant numbers by LISA.

  10. Fossil Microorganisms and Formation of Early Precambrian Weathering Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, A. Yu; Astafieva, M. M.; Vrevsky, A. B.; Alfimova, N. A.; Matrenichev, V. A.; Hoover, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Weathering crusts are the only reliable evidences of the existence of continental conditions. Often they are the only source of information about exogenous processes and subsequently about conditions under which the development of the biosphere occurred. A complex of diverse fossil microorganisms was discovered as a result of Scanning Electron Microscope investigations. The chemical composition of the discovered fossils is identical to that of the host rocks and is represented by Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg. Probably, the microorganisms fixed in rocks played the role of catalyst. The decomposition of minerals comprising the rocks and their transformation into clayey (argillaceous) minerals, most likely occurred under the influence of microorganisms. And may be unique weathering crusts of Early Precambrian were formed due to interaction between specific composition of microorganism assemblage and conditions of hypergene transformations. So it is possible to speak about colonization of land by microbes already at that time and about existence of single raw from weathering crusts (Primitive soils) to real soils.

  11. Dual Halos and Formation of Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Hong Soo

    2013-01-01

    We present a determination of the two-dimensional shape parameters of the blue and red globular cluster systems (GCSs) in a large number of elliptical galaxies and lenticular galaxies (early-type galaxies, called ETGs). We use a homogeneous data set of the globular clusters in 23 ETGs obtained from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. The position angles of both blue and red GCSs show a correlation with those of the stellar light distribution, showing that the major axes of the GCSs are well aligned with those of their host galaxies. However, the shapes of the red GCSs show a tight correlation with the stellar light distribution as well as with the rotation property of their host galaxies, while the shapes of the blue GCSs do much less. These provide clear geometric evidence that the origins of the blue and red globular clusters are distinct and that ETGs may have dual halos: a blue (metal-poor) halo and a red (metal-rich) halo. These two halos show significant differences in metallicity, structure, and kinemati...

  12. Continental crust formation on early Earth controlled by intrusive magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozel, A. B.; Golabek, G. J.; Jain, C.; Tackley, P. J.; Gerya, T.

    2017-05-01

    The global geodynamic regime of early Earth, which operated before the onset of plate tectonics, remains contentious. As geological and geochemical data suggest hotter Archean mantle temperature and more intense juvenile magmatism than in the present-day Earth, two crust-mantle interaction modes differing in melt eruption efficiency have been proposed: the Io-like heat-pipe tectonics regime dominated by volcanism and the “Plutonic squishy lid” tectonics regime governed by intrusive magmatism, which is thought to apply to the dynamics of Venus. Both tectonics regimes are capable of producing primordial tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) continental crust but lithospheric geotherms and crust production rates as well as proportions of various TTG compositions differ greatly, which implies that the heat-pipe and Plutonic squishy lid hypotheses can be tested using natural data. Here we investigate the creation of primordial TTG-like continental crust using self-consistent numerical models of global thermochemical convection associated with magmatic processes. We show that the volcanism-dominated heat-pipe tectonics model results in cold crustal geotherms and is not able to produce Earth-like primordial continental crust. In contrast, the Plutonic squishy lid tectonics regime dominated by intrusive magmatism results in hotter crustal geotherms and is capable of reproducing the observed proportions of various TTG rocks. Using a systematic parameter study, we show that the typical modern eruption efficiency of less than 40 per cent leads to the production of the expected amounts of the three main primordial crustal compositions previously reported from field data (low-, medium- and high-pressure TTG). Our study thus suggests that the pre-plate-tectonics Archean Earth operated globally in the Plutonic squishy lid regime rather than in an Io-like heat-pipe regime.

  13. Continental crust formation on early Earth controlled by intrusive magmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozel, A B; Golabek, G J; Jain, C; Tackley, P J; Gerya, T

    2017-05-18

    The global geodynamic regime of early Earth, which operated before the onset of plate tectonics, remains contentious. As geological and geochemical data suggest hotter Archean mantle temperature and more intense juvenile magmatism than in the present-day Earth, two crust-mantle interaction modes differing in melt eruption efficiency have been proposed: the Io-like heat-pipe tectonics regime dominated by volcanism and the "Plutonic squishy lid" tectonics regime governed by intrusive magmatism, which is thought to apply to the dynamics of Venus. Both tectonics regimes are capable of producing primordial tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) continental crust but lithospheric geotherms and crust production rates as well as proportions of various TTG compositions differ greatly, which implies that the heat-pipe and Plutonic squishy lid hypotheses can be tested using natural data. Here we investigate the creation of primordial TTG-like continental crust using self-consistent numerical models of global thermochemical convection associated with magmatic processes. We show that the volcanism-dominated heat-pipe tectonics model results in cold crustal geotherms and is not able to produce Earth-like primordial continental crust. In contrast, the Plutonic squishy lid tectonics regime dominated by intrusive magmatism results in hotter crustal geotherms and is capable of reproducing the observed proportions of various TTG rocks. Using a systematic parameter study, we show that the typical modern eruption efficiency of less than 40 per cent leads to the production of the expected amounts of the three main primordial crustal compositions previously reported from field data (low-, medium- and high-pressure TTG). Our study thus suggests that the pre-plate-tectonics Archean Earth operated globally in the Plutonic squishy lid regime rather than in an Io-like heat-pipe regime.

  14. Multi-target trapping in constrained environments using gene regulatory network-based pattern formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguang Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the morphogenesis of biological organisms, gene regulatory network-based methods have been used in complex pattern formation of swarm robotic systems. In this article, obstacle information was embedded into the gene regulatory network model to make the robots trap targets with an expected pattern while avoiding obstacles in a distributed manner. Based on the modified gene regulatory network model, an implicit function method was adopted to represent the expected pattern which is easily adjusted by adding extra feature points. Considering environmental constraints (e.g. tunnels or gaps in which robots must adjust their pattern to conduct trapping task, a pattern adaptation strategy was proposed for the pattern modeler to adaptively adjust the expected pattern. Also to trap multiple targets, a splitting pattern adaptation strategy was proposed for diffusively moving targets so that the robots can trap each target separately with split sub-patterns. The proposed model and strategies were verified through a set of simulation with complex environmental constraints and non-consensus movements of targets.

  15. Asymptotic Analysis in a Gas-Solid Combustion Model with Pattern Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claude-Michel BRAUNER; Lina HU; Luca LORENZI

    2013-01-01

    The authors consider a free interface problem which stems from a gas-solid model in combustion with pattern formation.A third-order,fully nonlinear,self-consistent equation for the flame front is derived.Asymptotic methods reveal that the interface approaches a solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation.Numerical results which illustrate the dynamics are presented.

  16. Phase-field modeling of microstructural pattern formation in alloys and geological veins

    OpenAIRE

    Ankit, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of high performance computing, the application areas of the phase-field method, traditionally used to numerically model the phase transformation in metals and alloys, have now spanned into geoscience. A systematic investigation of the two distinct scientific problems in consideration suggest a strong influence of interfacial energy on the natural and induced pattern formation in diffusion-controlled regime.

  17. Global bifurcation analysis and pattern formation in homogeneous diffusive predator-prey systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Wei, Junjie; Shi, Junping

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a general diffusive predator-prey system is considered. Existence and nonexistence of non-constant positive steady state solutions are shown to identify the ranges of parameters of spatial pattern formation. Bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions as well as non-constant steady state solutions are studied.

  18. Patterned electrospun nanofiber matrices via localized dissolution: potential for guided tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chao; Yu, Dou; Lamarre, Marven; Leopold, Philip L; Teng, Yang D; Wang, Hongjun

    2014-12-23

    With the assistance of an ink-jet printer, solvent (the "ink") can be controllably and reproducibly printed onto electrospun nanofiber meshes (the "paper") to generate various micropatterns and subsequently guide distinct cellular organization and phenotype expression. In combination with the nanofiber-assisted layer-by-layer cell assembly, the patterned electrospun meshes will define an instructive microenvironment for guided tissue formation.

  19. Transverse Mode Structure and Pattern Formation in Oxide Confined Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hegarty, S.P.; Hou, H.Q.; Huyet, G.; McInerney, J.G.; Porta, P.

    1999-07-06

    We analyze the transverse profiles of oxide-confined vertical cavity laser diodes as a function of aperture size. For small apertures we demonstrate that thermal lensing can be the dominant effect in determining the transverse resonator properties. We also analyze pattern formation in lasers with large apertures where we observe the appearance of tilted waves.

  20. Variation in brachial plexus formation, branching pattern and relation with major vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Anwer Khan

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The present study carried out on adult human cadavers revealed some rare variations in the formation, branching pattern and relations of the brachial plexus. These variations are of clinical significance for the surgeons, radiologists and the anesthesiologists. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1591-1594

  1. Diagnostic Proteomics: Serum Proteomic Patterns for the Detection of Early Stage Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Yu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interrogate thousands of proteins found in complex biological samples using proteomic technologies has brought the hope of discovering novel disease-specific biomarkers. While most proteomic technologies used to discover diagnostic biomarkers are quite sophisticated, "proteomic pattern analysis" has emerged as a simple, yet potentially revolutionary, method for the early diagnosis of diseases. Utilizing this technology, hundreds of clinical samples can be analyzed per day and several preliminary studies suggest proteomic pattern analysis has the potential to be a novel, highly sensitive diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer.

  2. Function and dynamics of slam in furrow formation in early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sreemukta; Laupsien, Philip; Wenzl, Christian; Yan, Shuling; Großhans, Jörg

    2014-02-15

    The Drosophila embryo undergoes a developmental transition in the blastoderm stage switching from syncytial to cellular development. The cleavage furrow, which encloses nuclei into cells, is a prominent morphological feature of this transition. It is not clear how the pattern of the furrow array is defined and how zygotic genes trigger the formation and invagination of interphase furrows. A key to these questions is provided by the gene slam, which has been previously implicated in controlling furrow invagination. Here we investigate the null phenotype of slam, the dynamics of Slam protein, and its control by the recycling endosome. We find that slam is essential for furrow invagination during cellularisation and together with nullo, for specification of the furrow. During cellularisation, Slam marks first the furrow, which is derived from the metaphase furrow of the previous mitosis. Slightly later, Slam accumulates at new furrows between daughter cells early in interphase. Slam is stably associated with the furrow canal except for the onset of cellularisation as revealed by FRAP experiments. Restriction of Slam to the furrow canal and Slam mobility during cellularisation is controlled by the recycling endosome and centrosomes. We propose a three step model. The retracting metaphase furrow leaves an initial mark. This mark and the border between corresponding daughter nuclei are refined by vesicular transport away from pericentrosomal recycling endosome towards the margins of the somatic buds. Following the onset of zygotic gene expression, Slam and Nullo together stabilise this mark and Slam triggers invagination of the cleavage furrow.

  3. Collective motion of cells mediates segregation and pattern formation in co-cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elod Méhes

    Full Text Available Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion.

  4. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina G. Sobel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines, and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red; their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe3+ with colorless SCN− to form the blood-red Fe(SCN2+ complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe(NO33 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.

  5. Gut Microbiome Developmental Patterns in Early Life of Preterm Infants: Impacts of Feeding and Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomei Cong; Wanli Xu; Susan Janton; Henderson, Wendy A.; Adam Matson; McGrath, Jacqueline M.; Kendra Maas; Joerg Graf

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in multiple aspects of human health and disease, particularly in early life. Distortions of the gut microbiota have been found to correlate with fatal diseases in preterm infants, however, developmental patterns of gut microbiome and factors affecting the colonization progress in preterm infants remain unclear. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to explore day-to-day gut microbiome patterns in preterm infants during their first 30 days of li...

  6. Alkali element depletion by core formation and vaporization on the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The depletion of Na, K, Rb, and Cs in the Earth's upper mantle and crust relative to their abundances in chondrites is a long standing problem in geochemistry. Here we consider two commonly invoked mechanisms, namely core formation, and vaporization, for producing the observed depletions. Our models predict that a significant percentage of the Earth's bulk alkali element inventory is in the core (30 percent for Na, 52 percent for K, 74 percent for Rb, and 92 percent for Cs). These predictions agree with independent estimates from nebular volatility trends and (for K) from terrestrial heat flow data. Our models also predict that vaporization and thermal escape during planetary accretion are unlikely to produce the observed alkali element depletion pattern. However, loss during the putative giant impact which formed the Moon cannot be ruled out. Experimental, observational, and theoretical tests of our predictions are also described. Alkali element partitioning into the Earth's core was modeled by assuming that alkali element partitioning during core formation on the aubrite parent body (APB) is analogous to that on the early Earth. The analogy is reasonable for three reasons. First, the enstatite meteorites are the only known meteorites with the same oxygen isotope systematics as the Earth-Moon system. Second, the large core size of the Earth and the V depletion in the mantle requires accretion from planetesimals as reduced as the enstatite chondrites. Third, experimental studies of K partitioning between silicate and metal plus sulfide show that more K goes into the metal plus sulfide at higher pressures than at one atmosphere pressure. Thus partitioning in the relatively low pressure natural laboratory of the APB is a good guide to alkali elemental partitioning during the growth of the Earth.

  7. SIMULATION OF ELECTRICAL FIELD FOR THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF BIRD'S NEST PATTERNED STRUCTURES BY ELECTROSPINNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yu Ye; Yi-ning Jin; Xiao-jun Huang; Lei Luo; Zhi-kang Xu

    2013-01-01

    In our previous work,it was found that large Bird's Nest patterned nanofibrous membranes can be simply electrospun from chlorinated polypropylene solution doped with an ionic liquid,and a plausible formation mechanism of Bird's Nest patterned architectures was proposed.Here,we use Ansoft Maxwell version 12 software (3D,electrostatic solver) to simulate the electrical field distribution of the electrospirming setup,and to clarify the rationality of proposed formation mechanism.Calculation results clearly show that the introduction of charged nanofibrous bundles would produce a similar patterned electrical field distribution,which definitely confirms the important role of surface residual charges.The proposed mechanism can be well extended to other polymer systems including polystyrene,poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) and chitosan/poly(ethvlene oxide).

  8. The effect of the signalling scheme on the robustness of pattern formation in development

    KAUST Repository

    Kang, H.-W.

    2012-03-21

    Pattern formation in development is a complex process which involves spatially distributed signals called morphogens that influence gene expression and thus the phenotypic identity of cells. Usually different cell types are spatially segregated, and the boundary between them may be determined by a threshold value of some state variable. The question arises as to how sensitive the location of such a boundary is to variations in properties, such as parameter values, that characterize the system. Here, we analyse both deterministic and stochastic reaction-diffusion models of pattern formation with a view towards understanding how the signalling scheme used for patterning affects the variability of boundary determination between cell types in a developing tissue.

  9. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-02-05

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  10. Block Co-Polymers for Nanolithography: Rapid Microwave Annealing for Pattern Formation on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipu Borah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration of block copolymer (BCP self-assembled nanopattern formation as an alternative lithographic tool for nanoelectronic device fabrication faces a number of challenges such as defect densities, feature size, pattern transfer, etc. Key barriers are the nanopattern process times and pattern formation on current substrate stack layers such as hard masks (e.g., silicon nitride, Si3N4. We report a rapid microwave assisted solvothermal (in toluene environments self-assembly and directed self-assembly of a polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS BCP thin films on planar and topographically patterned Si3N4 substrates. Hexagonally arranged, cylindrical structures were obtained and good pattern ordering was achieved. Factors affecting BCP self-assembly, notably anneal time and temperature, were studied and seen to have significant effects. Graphoepitaxy within the topographical structures provided long range, translational alignment of the patterns. The effect of surface topography feature size and spacing was investigated. The solvothermal microwave based technique used to provide periodic order in the BCP patterns showed significant promise and ordering was achieved in much shorter periods than more conventional thermal and solvent annealing methods. The implications of the work in terms of manufacturing technologies are discussed.

  11. Vowel reduction patterns of early Spanish- English bilinguals receiving continuous L1 and L2 input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byers Emily

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the production of three morphophonetic variations of schwa in American English: the plural allomorph {-s} as in watches, the possessive allomorph {-s} as in Sasha’s, and word-finally as in Russia. The production of these three allomorphs were examined in Miami’s English monolingual and early Spanish-English bilingual populations. Our purpose was to determine how native-like early Spanish-English bilinguals′ spectral qualities and reduced vowel durations were compared to Miami English monolinguals during a reading task. Results indicate that early bilinguals′ reduced vowels followed the same overall pattern as monolinguals, but had different acoustic properties.

  12. The Developmental Genetics of Vertebrate Color Pattern Formation: Lessons from Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Uwe; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Color patterns are prominent features of many animals; they are highly variable and evolve rapidly leading to large diversities even within a single genus. As targets for natural as well as sexual selection, they are of high evolutionary significance. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an important model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research in general, and it is the model organism to study color pattern formation in vertebrates. The fish display a conspicuous pattern of alternating blue and golden stripes on the body and on the anal and tail fins. This pattern is produced by three different types of pigment cells (chromatophores) arranged in precise layers in the hypodermis of the fish. In this essay, we will summarize the recent advances in understanding the developmental and genetic basis for stripe formation in the zebrafish. We will describe the cellular events leading to the formation of stripes during metamorphosis based on long-term lineage imaging. Mutant analysis has revealed that a number of signaling pathways are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the individual pigment cells. However, the striped pattern itself is generated by self-organizing mechanisms requiring interactions between all three pigment cell types. The involvement of integral membrane proteins, including connexins and potassium channels, suggests that direct physical contacts between chromatophores are involved, and that the directed transport of small molecules or bioelectrical coupling is important for these interactions. This mode of patterning by transmitting spatial information between adjacent tissues within three superimposed cell layers is unprecedented in other developmental systems. We propose that variations in the patterns among Danio species are caused by allelic differences in the genes responsible for these interactions.

  13. Palaeogeography and palaeoecology of early Floian (Early Ordovician cephalopods from the Upper Fezouata Formation, Anti-Atlas, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kröger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the central Anti-Atlas (Morocco, the Early Ordovician succession consists of about 1000 m of fossiliferous argillites and siltstones. The Upper Fezouata Formation (Floian contains a comparatively rich and abundant cephalopod association. A small collection of these cephalopods is described herein for the first time. The cephalopods are interpreted as autochthonous or parautochthonous, representing a fauna, which originally lived nektobenthically in the open water above the sediments or related to the sea bottom. The cephalopod associations of the Upper Fezouata Formation are similar to other contemporaneous assemblages known from higher palaeolatitudes and associated with deeper depositional settings and in siliciclastically dominated deposits. They are composed almost exclusively of slender orthocones, in this case predominantly of Destombesiceras zagorense n. gen., n. sp., which is interpreted as an early discosorid. Bathmoceras australe Teichert, 1939 and Bathmoceras taichoutense n. sp. from the Upper Fezouata Formation are at present the earliest unambiguous occurrences of bathmocerid cephalopods. Epizoans on the shell of a specimen of Rioceras are the earliest evidence of bryozoans growing as potential hitchhikers on cephalopod shells, indicating an early exploitation of a pseudoplanktonic lifestyle in this phylum. doi:10.1002/mmng.201200004

  14. Formation mechanism of ordered stress-relief patterns in a free sustained Cu film system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Miao-Gen; Xie Jian-Ping; Jin Jin-Sheng; Xia A-Gen; Ye Gao-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    A nearly free sustained copper (Cu) film system has been successfully fabricated by thermal evaporation deposition of Cu atoms on silicone oil surfaces,and a characteristic ordered pattern has been systematically studied.The ordered pattern,namely,band,is composed of a large number of parallel key-formed domains with different width w but nearly uniform length L;its characteristic values of ω and L are very susceptible to the growth period,deposition rate and nominal film thickness.The formation mechanism of the ordered patterns is well explained in terms of the relaxation of the internal stress in the films,which is related to the nearly zero adhesion of the solid-liquid interface.By using a two-time deposition method,it is confirmed that the ordered patterns really form in the vacuum chamber.

  15. Patterns of recurrence and survival after surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage NSCLC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Liseth L.; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Widder, Joachim

    Introduction: Surgery is the standard treatment for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For medically inoperable patients, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has emerged as widely used standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze survival and patterns of tumor

  16. Whole Language versus Code-Based Skills and Interactional Patterns in Singapore's Early Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes whole language and code-based skills approaches in early literacy and the specific patterns of interaction present in both approaches. Nineteen hours of video data were coded to analyze the nature of whole language versus code-based skills instruction and document the allocation of time spent on each approach in a reading…

  17. Patterns of recurrence and survival after surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage NSCLC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Liseth L.; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Widder, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Surgery is the standard treatment for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For medically inoperable patients, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has emerged as widely used standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze survival and patterns of tumor recurren

  18. The Alliance in Couple Therapy: Partner Influence, Early Change, and Alliance Patterns in a Naturalistic Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Morten G.; Owen, Jesse; Duncan, Barry L.; Sparks, Jacqueline A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the alliance and outcome in couple therapy and examine whether the alliance predicted outcomes over and above early change. The authors also investigated partner influence and gender and sought to identify couple alliance patterns that predicted couple outcomes. Method:…

  19. Digging for Formational Clues in the Halos of Early-type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Romanowsky, Aaron J

    2010-01-01

    Many of the fundamental properties of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars) can only be accessed by venturing beyond their oft-studied centers into their large-radius halo regions. Advances in observations of kinematical tracers allow early-type halos to be increasingly well probed. This review focuses on recent findings on angular momentum and dark matter content, and discusses some possible implications for galaxy structure and formation.

  20. Simultaneous formation of fine and large-area electrode patterns using screen-offset printing and its application to the patterning on adhesive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Sato, Junya; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Arai, Masahiro; Kurata, Yuji; Iwata, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    Additive-type printing techniques such as gravure-offset printing and screen printing are effective for low-cost and ecofriendly electrode pattern formation. Gravure-offset printing is effective for fine pattern formation with widths on the order of 10-20 µm, whereas screen printing is effective for the formation of large-area patterns. However, it is difficult to simultaneously form fine and large-area patterns using these printing techniques. In this study, we demonstrate that fine (minimum width of 15 µm) and medium- as well as large-area patterns can be formed simultaneously using our developed screen-offset printing technique, which is a combination of screen printing on a silicone blanket and transfer printing from the blanket to a substrate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our method to printing on adhesive materials, which allows electrode formation without applying heat to the film substrate.

  1. Formation and characteristics of patterns in atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Mao, Zhiguo; Li, Sen; Chen, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The patterns in radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (RF DBD) are studied at atmospheric pressure of argon (Ar) or helium (He) mixed with nitrogen (N2) gas. When a small amount of N2 is mixed with He or Ar gas, discharge patterns are formed. In a N2/He gas mixture, besides the filament discharge that forms patterns, a glow background discharge is also observed, whereas only the filament discharge forms patterns in a N2/Ar gas mixture. The resolution of the hexagonal pattern as a function of applied power and gas flow rate is then explored. On the basis of spatial-temporal images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), we find that there is no interleaving of two transient hexagon sublattices in N2/Ar or N2/He plasma in RF DBD patterns, which are totally different from those in which surface charges dominated in the mid-frequency DBD plasma. This supports our hypothesis that the bulk charges dominate the pattern formation in RF DBD.

  2. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  3. First union formation in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania: patterns across countries and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luule Sakkeus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the transformation of first union formation in the Baltic countries between the late 1960s and early 1990s, in the context of societal and family-level gender relations. The analyses employ microdata from the European Family and Fertility Surveys program. Our results on the trends indicate that in Estonia and Latvia the shift from direct marriage to cohabitation started well before the fall of socialist regime. Event-history models provide support for a hypothesised association between union formation and gender system, with Lithuania showing more traditional features in both respect, plausibly embedded in long-standing cultural differences between the countries.

  4. A new computational approach to simulate pattern formation in Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura Jane

    Under the harsh conditions of limited nutrient and hard growth surface, Paenibacillus dendritiformis in agar plates form two classes of patterns (morphotypes). The first class, called the dendritic morphotype, has radially directed branches. The second class, called the chiral morphotype, exhibits uniform handedness. The dendritic morphotype has been modeled successfully using a continuum model on a regular lattice; however, a suitable computational approach was not known to solve a continuum chiral model. This work details a new computational approach to solving the chiral continuum model of pattern formation in P. dendritiformis. The approach utilizes a random computational lattice and new methods for calculating certain derivative terms found in the model.

  5. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, H; Redinger, A.; Messlinger, S.; Stoian, G.; Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Linke, U.; Michely, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar+ grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10(20) ions/m(2). A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for rippl...

  6. Rhythmic pattern formations in gels and Matalon–Packter law: A fresh perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jacob George; Issac Paul; P A Varughese; George Varghese

    2003-06-01

    The periodic precipitation pattern formation in gelatinous media is interpreted as a moving boundary problem. The time law, spacing law and width law are revisited on the basis of the new scenario. The explicit dependence of the geometric structure on the initial concentrations of the reactants is derived. Matalon–Packter law, which relates the spacing coefficient with the initial concentrations is reformulated removing many ambiguities and impractical parameters. Experimental results are discussed to establish the significance of moving boundary concept in the diffusion controlled pattern forming systems.

  7. Buckling patterns of gold thin films on silicon substrates: Formation of superimposed blisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, J.; Coupeau, C.; Durinck, J.; Grilhé, J.

    2009-06-01

    Buckling phenomena leading to the formation of superimposed blisters have been experimentally observed with the help of a confocal interferometric microscope onto the surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Assuming that residual folding effects resulting from plastic deformation mechanisms take place in the film during its morphological evolution, different probable scenarios for the formation of the observed buckling patterns are elaborated in the framework of the Föppl-von Karman's theory of thin plates. Multi-step buckling with growing interface delamination is considered for the first scenario while a single or multi-step buckling at a given delamination width is assumed for the other ones.

  8. Sponge fossil assemblage from the Early Cambrian Hetang Formation in southern Anhui

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe; HU Jie; ZHOU Chuanming; XIAO Shuhai; YUAN Xunlai

    2004-01-01

    Abundant well-preserved large articulated sponge fossils and isolated spicules have been reported from the Early Cambrian Hetang Formation, southern Anhui Province. This unique epifaunal fossil assemblage dominated by articulated sponge fossils is called the Xidi Sponge Fauna.The sponge fauna lived in a quiet oxygenic environment below the storm wave base. Bloom of phytoplankton and rapid sedimentation rate resulted in the deposition of the black shales. Sufficient food supply, lack of other competitors,abundant ecological niches, and demand for oxygen during early Cambrian were in favor of the diversification and evolution of large sponges in the Early Cambrian.

  9. Early Black Hole Formation by Accretion of Gas and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken; Tsuruta, Sachiko; Sasaki, Mei; Ohkubo, Takuya

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model in which intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with mass of ~10000 Msun are formed in early dark matter halos. We carry out detailed stellar evolution calculations for accreting primordial stars including annihilation energy of dark matter particles. We follow the stellar core evolution consistently up to gravitational collapse. We show that very massive stars, as massive as 10000 Msun, can be formed in an early dark matter halo. Such stars are extremely bright with Log L/Lsun > 8.2. They gravitationally collapse to form IMBHs. These black holes could have seeded the formation of early super-massive blackholes.

  10. Molecular Hydrogen Formation in the Early Universe: New Implications From Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Kreckel, H.; Bruhns, H.; Savin, D. W.; Urbain, X.; Čížek, M.; Glover, S. C. O.

    2011-05-01

    We have performed the first energy-resolved measurement of the associative detachment (AD) reaction H\\oline + H → H2 + e\\oline: This reaction is the dominant formation pathway for H2 during the epoch of first star formation in the early universe. Despite being the most fundamental anion-neutral chemical reaction, experiment and theory have failed to converge in both magnitude and energy dependence. The uncertainty in this rate coefficient severely limits our under- standing of the formation of the first stars and protogalaxies.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL INTELLIGENCE DURING PERSONALITY FORMATION IN EARLY ADOLESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga PLATON

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results of experimental-formative study regarding the social intelligence development during early adolescence, which was performed to understand the human behavior in terms of adaptability and functionality, in the context of contemporary. Within the formative experiment, we intend to develop the level of social intelligence that determines the appropriateness understanding of the ability of behavioral and communicative knowledge in the process of formation and establishment of adolescent personality, which will consequently facilitate adolescents’ adaptation to the new conditions and requirements of interrelation and efficient operation during its maturity.

  12. Pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems: Toward a foundation for meaning in symbolic forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaris, David

    1998-07-01

    This paper brings together observations from a variety of fields to point toward what the author believes to be the most promising computational approach to the modeling of brain-like symbol formation, unifying perceptual and linguistic domains under a common computational physics. It brings Cassirer's Gestalt era evolutionary theory of language and symbolic thought to the attention of the situated cognition community, and describes how recent observations in experimental brain dynamics and computational approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. Research by the author and others in oscillatory network models of ambiguous perception with an attentional component is emphasised as a starting point for exploring increasingly complex pattern formation processes leading to simple forms of linguistic performance. These forms occupy a space between iconic representations and grammar. The dynamic pattern network framework suggests that to separate perception, representation or models and action in a realistic biophysics of situated organisms may be problematic.

  13. Turing Bifurcation and Pattern Formation of Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianiqian Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is ubiquitous in a system and can induce some spontaneous pattern formations on a spatially homogeneous domain. In comparison to the Reaction-Diffusion System (RDS, Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion System (SRDS is more complex and it is very difficult to deal with the noise function. In this paper, we have presented a method to solve it and obtained the conditions of how the Turing bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation arise through linear stability analysis of local equilibrium. In addition, we have developed the amplitude equation with a pair of wave vector by using Taylor series expansion, multiscaling, and further expansion in powers of small parameter. Our analysis facilitates finding regions of bifurcations and understanding the pattern formation mechanism of SRDS. Finally, the simulation shows that the analytical results agree with numerical simulation.

  14. Late Archaic–Early Formative period microbotanical evidence for potato at Jiskairumoko in the Titicaca Basin of southern Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rumold, Claudia Ursula; Aldenderfer, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    ...) within its botanical locus of origin in the high south-central Andes. The data derive from Jiskairumoko, an early village site in the western Titicaca Basin dating to the Late Archaic to Early Formative periods...

  15. Effect of Formative and Ability Test Results on Early Learning of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Abdul; Ardi, Muhammad; Nurhayati, B.; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of formative tests to early learning ability of students in the science learning style. This research used an experimental method with a 2 x 2 factorial design. The participants comprised all the students in class VII of the Islamic Junior High School State of Kolaka, a total of 343…

  16. Parents' Marital Distress, Divorce, and Remarriage: Links with Daughters' Early Family Formation Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Paul R.; Kane, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used data from the Add Health study to estimate the effects of parents' marital status and relationship distress on daughters' early family formation transitions. Outcomes included traditional transitions (marriage and marital births) and nontraditional transitions (cohabitation and nonmarital births). Relationship distress among…

  17. Early Pubertal Timing and the Union Formation Behaviors of Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Shannon E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether the transition into adolescence, proxied by pubertal timing, shaped the transition into adulthood, proxied by union formation behaviors, among contemporary American women. In a sample drawn from Add Health (n = 7,523), early maturing girls reported an accelerated transition to marriage and cohabitation in young…

  18. Formation mechanism of dot-line square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang, E-mail: donglfhbu@163.com, E-mail: pyy1616@163.com; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Xinpu [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Pan, Yuyang, E-mail: donglfhbu@163.com, E-mail: pyy1616@163.com [College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the formation mechanism of the dot-line square superlattice pattern (DLSSP) in dielectric barrier discharge. The spatio-temporal structure studied by using the intensified-charge coupled device camera shows that the DLSSP is an interleaving of three different subpatterns in one half voltage cycle. The dot square lattice discharges first and, then, the two kinds of line square lattices, which form square grid structures discharge twice. When the gas pressure is varied, DLSSP can transform from square superlattice pattern (SSP). The spectral line profile method is used to compare the electron densities, which represent the amounts of surface charges qualitatively. It is found that the amount of surface charges accumulated by the first discharge of DLSSP is less than that of SSP, leading to a bigger discharge area of the following discharge (lines of DLSSP instead of halos of SSP). The spatial distribution of the electric field of the surface charges is simulated to explain the formation of DLSSP. This paper may provide a deeper understanding for the formation mechanism of complex superlattice patterns in DBD.

  19. Modeling and interpreting speckle pattern formation in swept-source optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I. Alex; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-03-01

    We report on the development of a unified Monte-Carlo based computational model for exploring speckle pattern formation in swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is a well-established optical imaging modality capable of acquiring cross-sectional images of turbid media, including biological tissues, utilizing back scattered low coherence light. The obtained OCT images include characteristic features known as speckles. Currently, there is a growing interest to the OCT speckle patterns due to their potential application for quantitative analysis of medium's optical properties. Here we consider the mechanisms of OCT speckle patterns formation for swept-source OCT approaches and introduce further developments of a Monte-Carlo based model for simulation of OCT signals and images. The model takes into account polarization and coherent properties of light, mutual interference of back-scattering waves, and their interference with the reference waves. We present a corresponding detailed description of the algorithm for modeling these light-medium interactions. The developed model is employed for generation of swept-source OCT images, analysis of OCT speckle formation and interpretation of the experimental results. The obtained simulation results are compared with selected analytical solutions and experimental studies utilizing various sizes / concentrations of scattering microspheres.

  20. Steady states and linear stability analysis of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pak Yuen; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2007-10-01

    A dynamical theory of geophysical precipitation pattern formation is presented and applied to irreversible calcium carbonate (travertine) deposition. Specific systems studied here are the terraces and domes observed at geothermal hot springs, such as those at Yellowstone National Park, and speleothems, particularly stalactites and stalagmites. The theory couples the precipitation front dynamics with shallow water flow, including corrections for turbulent drag and curvature effects. In the absence of capillarity and with a laminar flow profile, the theory predicts a one-parameter family of steady state solutions to the moving boundary problem describing the precipitation front. These shapes match the measured shapes near the vent at the top of observed travertine domes well. Closer to the base of the dome, the solutions deviate from observations and circular symmetry is broken by a fluting pattern, which we show is associated with capillary forces causing thin film break-up. We relate our model to that recently proposed for stalactite growth, and calculate the linear stability spectrum of both travertine domes and stalactites. Lastly, we apply the theory to the problem of precipitation pattern formation arising from turbulent flow down an inclined plane and identify a linear instability that underlies scale-invariant travertine terrace formation at geothermal hot springs.

  1. Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2006-01-01

    Nano-science and nano-technology are rapidly developing scientific and technological areas that deal with physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on nano-meter scale – one millionth of a millimeter. Self-organization and pattern formation play crucial role on nano-scales and promise new, effective routes to control various nano-scales processes. This book contains lecture notes written by the lecturers of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems" that took place in St Etienne de Tinee, France, in the fall 2004. They give examples of self-organization phenomena on micro- and nano-scale as well as examples of the interplay between phenomena on nano- and macro-scales leading to complex behavior in various physical, chemical and biological systems. They discuss such fascinating nano-scale self-organization phenomena as self-assembly of quantum dots in thin solid films, pattern formation in liquid crystals caused by light, self-organi...

  2. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Biofilm Formation Ability of Clinically Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemmahdi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria with biofilm formation ability may be a major threat to public health and food safety and sanitation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and biofilm production characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from different species of birds. Materials and Methods: The antibiotic resistance patterns of 38 pre-identified isolates were screened by standard Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method performed on Mueller–Hinton agar to a panel of 17 antibiotics. The extent of biofilm formation was measured by Microtiter plate (MTP-based systems. Results: The highest antimicrobial resistance was detected against nalidixic acid (97%, followed by doxycycline (86%, colistin (84%, streptomycin (84% and tetracycline (84%. All isolates were sensitive to amikacin (100% and 97% and 95% of the isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, respectively. Twenty one different antibiotic resistance patterns were observed among S. typhimurium isolates. According to the results of the microtitre plate biofilm assay, there was a wide variation in biofilm forming ability among S. typhimurium isolates. Most of the isolates (60.52% were not capable of producing biofilm, while 26.31%, 7.89%, and 5.26% isolates were weak, strong and moderate biofilm producers, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that nearly all S. typhimurium isolates revealed a high multiple antibiotic resistant with low biofilm forming capabilities which proposed low association between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance of a major food important pathogen.

  3. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  4. ARGONAUTE1 acts in Arabidopsis root radial pattern formation independently of the SHR/SCR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashima, Shunsuke; Hashimoto, Takashi; Nakajima, Keiji

    2009-03-01

    The formation of radially symmetric tissue patterns is one of the most basic processes in the development of vascular plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, plant-specific GRAS-type transcription factors, SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR), are required for asymmetric cell divisions that separate two ground tissue cell layers, the endodermis and cortex, as well as for endodermal cell fate specification. While loss of SHR or SCR results in a single-layered ground tissue, radially symmetric cellular patterns are still maintained, suggesting that unknown regulatory mechanisms act independently of the SHR/SCR-dependent pathway. In this study, we identified a novel root radial pattern mutant and found that it is a new argonaute1 (ago1) allele. Multiple ago1 mutant alleles contained supernumerary ground tissue cell layers lacking a concentric organization, while expression patterns of SHR and SCR were not affected, revealing a previously unreported role for AGO1 in root ground tissue patterning. Analyses of ago1 scr double mutants demonstrated that the simultaneous loss of the two pathways caused a dramatic reduction in cellular organization and ground tissue identity as compared with the single mutants. Based on these results, we propose that highly symmetric root ground tissue patterns are maintained by the actions of two independent pathways, one using post-transcriptional regulation mediated by AGO1 and the other using the SHR/SCR transcriptional regulator.

  5. New Eoenantiornithid Bird from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Western Liaoning, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Enantionithine birds are the most blooming branch of early birds and have distinct diversities. A large number of enantionithine birds have been reported from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation in western Liaoning, China. Recently, we discovered a new eoenantiornithid bird from the Jiufotang Formation in Dapingfang Town, western Liaoning. A new eoenantiornithid bird,Dapingfangornis sentisorhinus gen. et sp. nov., is erected based on this complete skeleton with a skull.The new bird is distinguished from other known Mesozoic birds in a medium to small size, a distinct thorn-like process on the nasals, a sternum with a long and a short lateral processes. The thorn-like process on the nasal has not been discovered among known fossil birds, thus the discovery also provides new materials on the diversities of early birds.

  6. Localization and Pattern Formation in Quantum Physics. II. Waveletons in Quantum Ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorova, A N; Fedorova, Antonina N.; Zeitlin, Michael G.

    2005-01-01

    In this second part we present a set of methods, analytical and numerical, which can describe behaviour in (non) equilibrium ensembles, both classical and quantum, especially in the complex systems, where the standard approaches cannot be applied. The key points demonstrating advantages of this approach are: (i) effects of localization of possible quantum states; (ii) effects of non-perturbative multiscales which cannot be calculated by means of perturbation approaches; (iii) effects of formation of complex/collective quantum patterns from localized modes and classification and possible control of the full zoo of quantum states, including (meta) stable localized patterns (waveletons). We demonstrate the appearance of nontrivial localized (meta) stable states/patterns in a number of collective models covered by the (quantum)/(master) hierarchy of Wigner-von Neumann-Moyal-Lindblad equations, which are the result of ``wignerization'' procedure (Weyl-Wigner-Moyal quantization) of classical BBGKY kinetic hierarchy...

  7. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  8. An Integrative Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Heterocyst Pattern Formation in Cyanobacteria Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Falo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model. PMID:25816286

  9. Evaluation of the walking pattern in clubfoot patients who received early intensive treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Pedersen, E N; Simonsen, E B

    2000-01-01

    joint in the clubfeet could possibly be owing to weaker plantar flexors. In conclusion, gait analysis can be an important tool when evaluating treatment for clubfoot. However, further investigation is needed to determine whether the higher hip and knee joint moments observed in subjects with clubfoot......The walking pattern in a group of nine adult male subjects who had received early intensive treatment for congenital clubfoot was evaluated and compared to the walking pattern in a control group of 15 adult healthy male subjects. All subjects were filmed with a five-camera video system...

  10. Early Stage of Origin of Earth (interval after Emergence of Sun, Formation of Liquid Core, Formation of Solid Core)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Sergeev, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational collapse of interstellar molecular cloud fragment has led to the formation of the Sun and its surrounding protoplanetary disk, consisting of 5 × 10^5 dust and gas. The collapse continued (1 years. Age of solar system (about 4.57×10^9 years) determine by age calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI) which are present at samples of some meteorites (chondrites). Subsidence of dust to the central plane of a protoplanetary disk has led to formation of a dust subdisk which as a result of gravitational instability has broken up to condensations. In the process of collisional evolution they turned into dense planetesimals from which the planets formed. The accounting of a role of large bodies in evolution of a protoplanetary swarm in the field of terrestrial planets has allowed to define times of formation of the massive bodies permitting their early differentiation at the expense of short-lived isotopes heating and impacts to the melting temperature of the depths. The total time of Earth's growth is estimated about 10^8 years. Hf geochronometer showed that the core of the Earth has existed for Using W about 3×10^7 Hf geohronometer years since the formation of the CAI. Thus data W point to the formation of the Earth's core during its accretion. The paleomagnetic data indicate the existence of Earth's magnetic field past 3.5×10^9 years. But the age of the solid core, estimated by heat flow at the core-mantle boundary is 1.7×10^9 (0.5 years). Measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron under the conditions that exist in the Earth's core, indicate the absence of the need for a solid core of existence to support the work geodynamo, although electrical resistivity measurements yield the opposite result.

  11. Patterns of variability in early-life traits of fishes depend on spatial scale of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Antonio; Guidetti, Paolo

    2011-06-23

    Estimates of early-life traits of fishes (e.g. pelagic larval duration (PLD) and spawning date) are essential for investigating and assessing patterns of population connectivity. Such estimates are available for a large number of both tropical and temperate fish species, but few studies have assessed their variability in space, especially across multiple scales. The present study, where a Mediterranean fish (i.e. the white seabream Diplodus sargus sargus) was used as a model, shows that spawning date and PLD are spatially more variable at a scale of kilometres than at a scale of tens to hundreds of kilometres. This study indicates the importance of considering spatial variability of early-life traits of fishes in order to properly delineate connectivity patterns at larval stages (e.g. by means of Lagrangian simulations), thus providing strategically useful information on connectivity and relevant management goals (e.g. the creation of networks of marine reserves).

  12. Early-stage tumor detection using photoacoustic microscopy: a pattern recognition approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Wang, Liang; Liang, Jinyang; Zhou, Yong; Hu, Song; Sohn, Rebecca E.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    We report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of arteriovenous (AV) shunts in early stage tumors in vivo, and develop a pattern recognition framework for computerized tumor detection. Here, using a high-resolution photoacoustic microscope, we implement a new blood oxygenation (sO2)-based disease marker induced by the AV shunt effect in tumor angiogenesis. We discovered a striking biological phenomenon: There can be two dramatically different sO2 values in bloodstreams flowing side-by-side in a single vessel. By tracing abnormal sO2 values in the blood vessels, we can identify a tumor region at an early stage. To further automate tumor detection based on our findings, we adopt widely used pattern recognition methods and develop an efficient computerized classification framework. The test result shows over 80% averaged detection accuracy with false positive contributing 18.52% of error test samples on a 50 PAM image dataset.

  13. Early Obstacle Detection and Avoidance for All to All Traffic Pattern in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huc, Florian; Jarry, Aubin; Leone, Pierre; Moraru, Luminita; Nikoletseas, Sotiris; Rolim, Jose

    This paper deals with early obstacles recognition in wireless sensor networks under various traffic patterns. In the presence of obstacles, the efficiency of routing algorithms is increased by voluntarily avoiding some regions in the vicinity of obstacles, areas which we call dead-ends. In this paper, we first propose a fast convergent routing algorithm with proactive dead-end detection together with a formal definition and description of dead-ends. Secondly, we present a generalization of this algorithm which improves performances in all to many and all to all traffic patterns. In a third part we prove that this algorithm produces paths that are optimal up to a constant factor of 2π + 1. In a fourth part we consider the reactive version of the algorithm which is an extension of a previously known early obstacle detection algorithm. Finally we give experimental results to illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms in different scenarios.

  14. Temporal patterns and behavioral characteristics of aggregation formation and spawning in the Bermuda chub ( Kyphosus sectatrix)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Richard S.; Kadison, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Reef fish spawning aggregations are important life history events that occur at specific times and locations and represent the primary mode of reproduction for many species. This paper provides detailed descriptions of aggregation formation and mass spawning of the Bermuda chub ( Kyphosus sectatrix). Spawning coloration and gamete release of K. sectatrix were observed and filmed at the Grammanik Bank, a deep spawning aggregation site used by many different species located on the southern edge of the Puerto Rican shelf 10 km south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Underwater visual surveys using technical Nitrox and closed circuit re-breathers were conducted from December 2002 to March 2013 and documented spatial and temporal patterns of movement and aggregation formation along 1.5 km of mesophotic reef. The largest aggregations of K. sectatrix (>200 fish) were observed on the Grammanik Bank January to March from 0 to 11 d after the full moon with peak abundance from 60 to 80 d after the winter solstice across all survey years. Aggregation formation of K. sectatrix coincided with the spawning season of Nassau ( Epinephelus striatus) and yellowfin ( Mycteroperca venenosa) groupers. These spatial and temporal patterns of aggregation formation and spawning suggest that K. sectatrix, an herbivore, may also be a transient aggregating species. On several occasions, chubs were observed both pair spawning and mass spawning. Color patterns and behaviors associated with aggregation and spawning are described and compared to spawning characteristics observed in other species, many of which are similar but others that appear unique to K. sectatrix. This represents the first report of a kyphosid species aggregating to spawn and illuminates a portion of the poorly understood life history of the Bermuda chub.

  15. ALFALFA HI Content and Star Formation in Virgo Cluster Early-Type Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A; Haynes, M P; Brosch, N

    2009-01-01

    The ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) blind survey is providing a census of HI in galaxies of all types in a range of environments. Here we report on ALFALFA results for Virgo Cluster early-type dwarfs between declinations of 4 and 16 degrees. Less than 2% of the Virgo early-type dwarf population is detected, compared to 70-80% of the Im/BCD dwarf population. Most of the dwarfs detected in HI show evidence for ongoing or recent star formation. Early-type galaxies with HI tend to be located in the outer regions of the cluster and to be brighter. Early-type dwarfs with HI may be undergoing morphological transition due to cluster environmental effects.

  16. Dynamics of fast pattern formation in porous silicon by laser interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peláez, Ramón J.; Kuhn, Timo; Afonso, Carmen N. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vega, Fidel [Departament d' Òptica i Optometria, UPC, Violinista Vellsolà 37, 08222 Terrasa (Spain)

    2014-10-20

    Patterns are fabricated on 290 nm thick nanostructured porous silicon layers by phase-mask laser interference using single pulses of an excimer laser (193 nm, 20 ns pulse duration). The dynamics of pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 at 633 nm. The results show that a transient pattern is formed upon melting at intensity maxima sites within a time <30 ns leading to a permanent pattern in a time <100 ns upon solidification at these sites. This fast process is compared to the longer one (>1 μs) upon melting induced by homogeneous beam exposure and related to the different scenario for releasing the heat from hot regions. The diffraction efficiency of the pattern is finally controlled by a combination of laser fluence and initial thickness of the nanostructured porous silicon layer and the present results open perspectives on heat release management upon laser exposure as well as have potential for alternative routes for switching applications.

  17. The expansion of neighborhood and pattern formation on spatial prisoner's dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaolan; Xu, Fangqian; Yang, Junzhong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The prisoner's dilemma (PD), in which players can either cooperate or defect, is considered a paradigm for studying the evolution of cooperation in spatially structured populations. There the compact cooperator cluster is identified as a characteristic pattern and the probability of forming such pattern in turn depends on the features of the networks. In this paper, we investigate the influence of expansion of neighborhood on pattern formation by taking a weak PD game with one free parameter T, the temptation to defect. Two different expansion methods of neighborhood are considered. One is based on a square lattice and expanses along four directions generating networks with degree increasing with K = 4 m . The other is based on a lattice with Moore neighborhood and expanses along eight directions, generating networks with degree of K = 8 m . Individuals are placed on the nodes of the networks, interact with their neighbors and learn from the better one. We find that cooperator can survive for a broad degree 4 ≤ K ≤ 70 by taking a loose type of cooperator clusters. The former simple corresponding relationship between macroscopic patterns and the microscopic PD interactions is broken. Under a condition that is unfavorable for cooperators such as large T and K, systems prefer to evolve to a loose type of cooperator clusters to support cooperation. However, compared to the well-known compact pattern, it is a suboptimal strategy because it cannot help cooperators dominating the population and always corresponding to a low cooperation level.

  18. Mesoscopic study of the effects of gel concentration and materials on the formation of precipitation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; He, Ya-Ling; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2012-08-14

    A mesoscopic model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed to simulate the formation of Liesegang precipitation patterns and investigate the effects of gel on the morphology of the precipitates. In this model, nucleation is introduced on the basis of Ostwald's supersaturation theory, and subsequent crystal growth on the precipitate surface is simulated using a crystal growth model by taking into account the heterogeneous reaction on the surface of the precipitate. This model can capture the porous structures of the precipitates and can take into account the effects of the gel concentration and material by adjusting the gel porosity and nucleation threshold. The density of the precipitate nodes in the model is limited. A wide range of precipitation patterns is predicted under different gel concentrations, including regular bands, treelike patterns, and for the first time with numerical models, transition patterns between regular bands and treelike patterns. Both the spacing law and the width law are carefully investigated with different gel concentrations and gel materials, and the obtained α in the width law (w(n) ≈ x(n)(α), where x(n) and w(n) are the position and the width of the nth band, respectively) is in the range of 0.58-0.67, sandwiched by previously predicted ranges.

  19. On island landscape pattern of forests in Helan Mountain and its cause of formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; Hongbing; WANG; Yingming; ZHANG; Qiaoxian

    2006-01-01

    Based on the spatial information techniques such as RS, GIS, and GPS, the forest landscape patterns in the Helan Mountain, western China, were studied. The Landsat 5 TM data were used to classify the forest landscapes through RS digital cartography, and then, the landscape characteristics and landscape pattern were analyzed quantificationally. Furthermore, through spatial data collection and spatial analysis of the main disturbances in this area, the cause of landscape formation was studied. The results showed that the total 1177 forest landscape patches could be classified into 21 landscape types, and the forest landscape in the Helan Mountain was island pattern, which was encircled by deserta as matrix. The values of landscape diversity index and landscape fragmentation index were 2.61 and 0.43, respectively. In this area, the landscape pattern was clearly formed and continuously changed in response to geological processes, climate, activities of organisms, forest fire, desertification, human activities and so on. This landscape pattern had an obviously negative effect on the stability and ecosystem services of forests. So, scientific landscape planning and protection should be adopted to improve the sustainability of forest management in this area.

  20. One of early maladaptive schemas’ causal relationship through metacognitive beliefs with borderline and antisocial personality patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Zirakbash, Amin; Naderi, Farah; Enayati, Mir Salahedin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed at determining the causal relationship of metacognitive beliefs as a mediator between one of early maladaptive schemas including (emotional deprivation, abandonment, mistrust/abuse, social isolation/alienation and defectiveness/shame) and borderline and antisocial personality patterns. Materials and Methods: The study type has been relational and seeking causal modeling of path analysis has been used. The population used in this study included outpatients in cou...

  1. The effects of expectancy violations on early attention to race in an impression-formation paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickter, Cheryl; Gyurovski, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that early attentional components of the event-related potential (ERP) reflect differential attention to race during person perception. There is also evidence that inconsistency between stereotypic information following impression formation leads to greater neural processing in later ERP components. However, research has not examined how expectancy violations following impression formation affect the early attentional processing of race. The current study examined this issue by leading White participants to form impressions of targets based on positive or negative behaviors associated with stereotypes about Blacks or Whites, with the purpose of creating an expectation of Black or White targets. Following each impression formation trial, a target face whose race either violated or confirmed this expectancy was displayed. Participants indicated whether this target could have performed the previous behavior. Results demonstrated that reaction times and early attentional components of the ERP varied as a function of the match between expectancy and the race of target faces, with stereotypic expectancy violating trials yielding longer reaction times and greater N1 and N2 amplitudes than expectancy-confirming trials. Implications for impression formation and person perception are discussed.

  2. In vitro prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation with antibiotics used in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Maiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    The ability of antibiotics used in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation was studied using a biofilm microtitre assay with 57 non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates (44 first colonisers and 13 recovered during the initial intermittent colonisation stage) obtained from 35 CF patients. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (BICs) of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, ceftazidime, tobramycin, colistin and azithromycin were determined by placing a peg lid with a formed biofilm onto microplates containing antibiotics. A modification of this protocol consisting of antibiotic challenge during biofilm formation was implemented in order to determine the biofilm prevention concentration (BPC), i.e. the minimum concentration able to prevent biofilm formation. The lowest BPCs were for fluoroquinolones, tobramycin and colistin and the highest for ceftazidime and imipenem. The former antibiotics had BPCs identical to or only slightly higher than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution and were also active on formed biofilms as reflected by their low BIC values. In contrast, ceftazidime and imipenem were less effective for prevention of biofilm formation and on formed biofilms. In conclusion, the new BPC parameter determined in non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates recovered during early colonisation stages in CF patients supports early aggressive antimicrobial treatment guidelines in first P. aeruginosa-colonised CF patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Transference patterns and working alliance during the early phase of psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzić, Ljiljana; Nikolić, Gordana

    2014-02-01

    Working alliance, as a collaborative part of the therapeutic relationship has been proven to be one of the most powerful therapeutic factors in psychotherapy in general, regardless many technical differences between numerous psychotherapeutic modalities. On the other hand, transference is the basic concept of psychodynamic psychotherapy, and, according to the psychoanalytic theory and practice, it forms a major part of the therapeutic relationship. The aim of our paper was to determine the differences between the groups of patients with low, middle, and high working alliance scores and the dropout group in transference patterns, sociodemographic and clinical parameters, during the early phase of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Our sample consisted of 61 non-psychotic patients, randomly selected by the method of consecutive admissions and treated with psychoanalytic psychotherapy in the outpatient clinical setting. The patients were prospectively followed during 5 initial sessions of the therapeutic process. The working alliance inventory and Core conflictual relationship theme method were used for the estimation of working alliance and transference patterns, respectively. According to the Working Alliance Inventory scores, four groups of patients were formed and than compared. Our results show a significant difference between the groups of patients with low, middle, and high working alliance inventory scores and the dropout group on the variable--transference patterns in the therapeutic relationship. Disharmonious transference patterns are more frequent in patients who form poor quality working alliance in the early phase of psychotherapy, or early dropout psychotherapy. It is of great importance to recognize transference patterns of a patient at the beginning of the psychotherapeutic process, because of their potentially harmful influence on the quality of working alliance.

  4. Patterns of Early Rejection in Renal Retransplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that kidney retransplant patients had high rates of early acute rejection due to previous sensitization. In addition to the acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR that has received widespread attention, the early acute T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR may be another important issue in renal retransplantation. In the current single-center retrospective study, we included 33 retransplant patients and 90 first transplant patients with similar protocols of induction and maintenance therapy. Analysis focused particularly on the incidence and patterns of early acute rejection episodes, as well as one-year graft and patient survival. Excellent short-term clinical outcomes were obtained in both groups, with one-year graft and patient survival rates of 93.9%/100% in the retransplant group and 92.2%/95.6% in the first transplant group. Impressively, with our strict immunological selection and desensitization criteria, the retransplant patients had a very low incidence of early acute ABMR (6.1%, which was similar to that in the first transplant patients (4.4%. However, a much higher rate of early acute TCMR was observed in the retransplant group than in the first transplant group (30.3% versus 5.6%, P<0.001. Acute TCMR that develops early after retransplantation should be monitored in order to obtain better transplant outcomes.

  5. One of early maladaptive schemas' causal relationship through metacognitive beliefs with borderline and antisocial personality patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirakbash, Amin; Naderi, Farah; Enayati, Mir Salahedin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the causal relationship of metacognitive beliefs as a mediator between one of early maladaptive schemas including (emotional deprivation, abandonment, mistrust/abuse, social isolation/alienation and defectiveness/shame) and borderline and antisocial personality patterns. The study type has been relational and seeking causal modeling of path analysis has been used. The population used in this study included outpatients in counseling, psychological and psychiatric centers in 2012-2013. We randomly distributed 350 questionnaires in five centers out of three parts in Isfahan, and finally 230 valid questionnaires were evaluated and analyzed. Data collection tool has been Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III's (MCMI-III's) personality questionnaire, Yang's schema questionnaire (75 items), Metacognition Questionnaire-30 (30 items). Reliability of the Yang's Schema Questionnaire in this study was calculated by Cronbach's alpha (α =96%), and that of metacognition was calculated the same way (α =87%). Data analysis has been done using MCMI-III's software for Millon's personality questionnaire, and SPSS-16 and AMOS-18 software. We used path analysis method for testing each model in statistical data analysis. The results of this study suggest a possible causal relationship between the number of one of the early maladaptive schemas and the patterns of anti-social and borderline personalities through some metacognitive beliefs. This study showed that cognitive beliefs can be activators of the early schema and continuation's coping behaviors in personality patterns.

  6. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  7. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  8. Two-dimensional pattern formation in ionic liquids confined between graphene walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Campos, Hadrián; Otero-Mato, José Manuel; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Cabeza, Oscar; Gallego, Luis J; Ciach, Alina; Varela, Luis M

    2017-09-20

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of ionic liquids confined between graphene walls under a large variety of conditions (pure ionic liquids, mixtures with water and alcohols, mixtures with lithium salts and defective graphene walls). Our results show that the formation of striped and hexagonal patterns in the Stern layer can be considered as a general feature of ionic liquids at electrochemical interfaces, the transition between patterns being controlled by the net balance of charge in the innermost layer of adsorbed molecules. This explains previously reported experimental and computational results and, for the first time, why these pattern changes are triggered by any perturbation of the charge density at the innermost layer of the electric double layer (voltage and composition changes, and vacancies at the electrode walls, among others), which may help tuning electrode-ionic liquid interfaces. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that such structures can be reproduced by a simple two-dimensional lattice model with only nearest-neighbour interactions, governed by highly screened ionic interactions and short-range and excluded volume interactions. We also show that the results of our simulations are consistent with those inferred from the Landau-Brazovskii theory of pattern formation in self-assembling systems. The presence of these patterns at the ionic liquid graphene-electrode interfaces may have a strong impact on the process of ionic transfer from the bulk mixtures to the electrodes, on the differential capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte double layer or on the rates of redox reactions at the electrodes, among other physicochemical properties, and is therefore an effect of great technological interest.

  9. How the Propagation of Heat-Flux Modulations Triggers E × B Flow Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuga, Yusuke

    2013-10-01

    Recently, a new class of E × B flow pattern, called an `` E × B staircase,'' was observed in a simulation study using the full- f flux driven GYSELA code. Here, E × B staircases are quasi-regular steady patterns of localized shear layers and temperature profile corrugations. The shear layers are interspaced between regions of turbulent avalanching of the size of several correlation length (~ 10Δc). In this work, a theory to describe the formation of such E × B staircases from a bath of stochastic avalanches is presented, based on analogy of staircase formation to jam formation in traffic flow. Namely, staircase formation is viewed as a heat flux ``jam'' that causes profile corrugation, which is analogous to a traffic jam that causes corrugations in the local car density in a traffic flow. To model such an effect in plasmas, a finite response time τ is introduced, during which instantaneous heat flux relaxes to the mean heat flux, determined by symmetry constraints. The response time introduced here is an analogue of drivers' response time in traffic flow dynamics. It is shown that the extended model describes a heat flux ``jam'' and profile corrugation, which appears as an instability, in analogy to the way a clustering instability leads to a traffic jam. Such local amplification of heat and profile corrugations can lead to the formation of E × B staircases. The scale length that gives the maximum growth rate falls in the mesoscale range and is comparable to the staircase step spacing. Present address: IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Japan.

  10. Pattern formation by a cell surface-associated morphogen in Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2002-02-01

    In response to starvation, an unstructured population of identical Myxococcus xanthus cells rearranges into an asymmetric, stable pattern of multicellular fruiting bodies. Central to this pattern formation process are changes in organized cell movements from swarming to aggregation. Aggregation is induced by the cell surface-associated C-signal. To understand how aggregation is accomplished, we have analyzed how C-signal modulates cell behavior. We show that C-signal induces a motility response that includes increases in transient gliding speeds and in the duration of gliding intervals and decreases in stop and reversal frequencies. This response results in a switch in cell behavior from an oscillatory to a unidirectional type of behavior in which the net-distance traveled by a cell per minute is increased. We propose that the C-signal-dependent regulation of the reversal frequency is essential for aggregation and that the remaining C-signal-dependent changes in motility parameters contribute to aggregation by increasing the net-distance traveled by starving cells per minute. In our model for symmetry-breaking and aggregation, C-signal transmission is a local event involving direct contacts between cells that results in a global organization of cells. This pattern formation mechanism does not require a diffusible substance or other actions at a distance. Rather it depends on contact-induced changes in motility behavior to direct cells appropriately

  11. Clastic patterned ground in Lomonosov crater, Mars: examining fracture controlled formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Alexander M.; Balme, Matthew R.; Patel, Manish R.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-10-01

    The area surrounding Lomonosov crater on Mars has a high density of seemingly organised boulder patterns. These form seemingly sorted polygons and stripes within kilometre scale blockfields, patches of boulder strewn ground which are common across the Martian high latitudes. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the formation of clastic patterned ground on Mars. It has been proposed that these structures could have formed through freeze-thaw sorting, or conversely by the interaction of boulders with underlying fracture polygons. In this investigation a series of sites were examined to evaluate whether boulder patterns appear to be controlled by the distribution of underlying fractures and test the fracture control hypotheses for their formation. It was decided to focus on this suite of mechanisms as they are characterised by a clear morphological relationship, namely the presence of an underlying fracture network which can easily be evaluated over a large area. It was found that in the majority of examples at these sites did not exhibit fracture control. Although fractures were present at many sites there were very few sites where the fracture network appeared to be controlling the boulder distribution. In general these were not the sites with the best examples of organization, suggesting that the fracture control mechanisms are not the dominant geomorphic process organising the boulders in this area.

  12. Exploring the formation of focal adhesions on patterned surfaces using super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Yang, Zong-Han; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2011-10-17

    The formation of focal adhesions on various sizes of fibronectin patterns, ranging from 200 μm to 250 nm, was systematically investigated by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and super-resolution imaging. It was found that cells adhered to and spread on these micro/nanopatterns, forming focal adhesions. On a micrometer scale the shape of the focal adhesions was elongated. However, on the nanometer scale, the shape of focal adhesions became dotlike. To further explore the distribution of focal adhesion proteins formed on surfaces, a localization-based super-resolution imaging technique was employed in order to determine the position and density of vinculin proteins. A characteristic distance of 50 nm was found between vinculin molecules in the focal adhesions, which did not depend on the size of the fibronectin nanopatterns. This distance was found to be crucial for the formation of focal adhesions. In addition, the density of vinculin at the focal adhesions formed on the nanopatterns increased as the pattern size decreased. The density of the protein was found to be 425 ± 247, 584 ± 302, and 703 ± 305 proteins μm(-2) on the 600, 400, and 250 nm fibronectin patterns respectively. Whereas 226 ± 77 proteins μm(-2) was measured for the matured focal adhesions on homogeneous fibronectin coated substrates. The increase in vinculin density implies that an increase in mechanical load was applied to the focal adhesions formed on the smaller nanopatterns.

  13. Dissipative parametric modulation instability and pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present the essential features of the dissipative parametric instability, in the universal complex Ginzburg- Landau equation. Dissipative parametric instability is excited through a parametric modulation of frequency dependent losses in a zig-zag fashion in the spectral domain. Such damping is introduced respectively for spectral components in the +ΔF and in the -ΔF region in alternating fashion, where F can represent wavenumber or temporal frequency depending on the applications. Such a spectral modulation can destabilize the homogeneous stationary solution of the system leading to growth of spectral sidebands and to the consequent pattern formation: both stable and unstable patterns in one- and in two-dimensional systems can be excited. The dissipative parametric instability provides an useful and interesting tool for the control of pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems with potentially interesting applications in technological applications, like the design of mode- locked lasers emitting pulse trains with tunable repetition rate; but it could also find realizations in nanophotonics circuits or in dissipative polaritonic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  14. Molecular dynamics of single-particle impacts predicts phase diagrams for large scale pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Scott A; Samela, Juha; Bukonte, Laura; Backman, Marie; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Madi, Charbel S; Brenner, Michael P; Aziz, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Energetic particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothening, self-organized nanoscale pattern formation or degradation of the structural integrity of nuclear reactor components. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms governing the selection among these outcomes has been elusive. Here we predict the mechanism governing the transition from pattern formation to flatness using only parameter-free molecular dynamics simulations of single-ion impacts as input into a multiscale analysis, obtaining good agreement with experiment. Our results overturn the paradigm attributing these phenomena to the removal of target atoms via sputter erosion: the mechanism dominating both stability and instability is the impact-induced redistribution of target atoms that are not sputtered away, with erosive effects being essentially irrelevant. We discuss the potential implications for the formation of a mysterious nanoscale topography, leading to surface degradation, of tungsten plasma-facing fusion reactor walls. Consideration of impact-induced redistribution processes may lead to a new design criterion for stability under irradiation.

  15. Ordered nano-scale dimple pattern formation on a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the many applications of nanostructured surfaces – including in biomaterials – there is a strong interest in cost- and time-efficient methods for their fabrication. Previously, our group established a simple electrochemical method generating nanoscale patterns on large areas of a number of different metal surfaces. They consist of dimples that are around 6-10 nm deep and hexagonally closed packed with a tunable periodicity of around 50 nm. Ordering requires careful tuning of the surface chemistry, which makes the translation of these findings to multi-component alloys non-obvious. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that such a pattern can also be achieved on the surface of an alloy, namely Ti-6Al-4V. This alloy is of particular interest for biomedical implants. While dimple formation on the main component metals titanium and aluminum has previously been reported (albeit under conditions that differ from each other, we now also report dimple formation on pure vanadium surfaces to occur under very different conditions. Dimple formation occurs preferentially on the (dominant α-phase grains of the alloy. The size of dimples of the alloy material is subject to the electropolishing potential, electrolyte concentration and surface chemical composition, which gives us the opportunity to control the surface features. Since a main application of this alloy are biomedical implants, this level of control will be an important tool for accommodating cell growth.

  16. How the propagation of heat-flux modulations triggers E × B flow pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuga, Y; Diamond, P H; Gürcan, O D

    2013-03-08

    We propose a novel mechanism to describe E×B flow pattern formation based upon the dynamics of propagation of heat-flux modulations. The E × B flows of interest are staircases, which are quasiregular patterns of strong, localized shear layers and profile corrugations interspersed between regions of avalanching. An analogy of staircase formation to jam formation in traffic flow is used to develop an extended model of heat avalanche dynamics. The extension includes a flux response time, during which the instantaneous heat flux relaxes to the mean heat flux, determined by symmetry constraints. The response time introduced here is the counterpart of the drivers' response time in traffic, during which drivers adjust their speed to match the background traffic flow. The finite response time causes the growth of mesoscale temperature perturbations, which evolve to form profile corrugations. The length scale associated with the maximum growth rate scales as Δ(2) ~ (v(thi)/λT(i))ρ(i)sqrt[χ(neo)τ], where λT(i) is a typical heat pulse speed, χ(neo) is the neoclassical thermal diffusivity, and τ is the response time of the heat flux. The connection between the scale length Δ(2) and the staircase interstep scale is discussed.

  17. The geographic and phylogenetic position of sauropod dinosaurs from the Kota formation (Early Jurassic) of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, David D.

    2003-03-01

    The earliest sauropods are the Late Triassic Isanosaurus from Thailand, the Early Jurassic Barapasaurus and Kotasaurus from the Kota Formation of the Pranhita-Godavari Basin of India and Vulcanodon from Zimbabwe, and a variety of Middle Jurassic genera from many localities in Gondwana and Laurasia except North America. These early sauropod genera are related, but their phylogenetic positions remain unresolved. Sauropods originated in Laurasia (Thailand and vicinity) or Pangea (broadly, Thailand, China, India), with at least three additional steps involving expansion and diversification through the Middle Jurassic.

  18. Transcriptional inhibition of the bacteriophage T7 early promoter region by oligonucleotide triple helix formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C; Samuel, M; Broitman, S L

    1992-12-30

    We have identified a purine-rich triplex binding sequence overlapping a -35 transcriptional early promoter region of the bacteriophage T7. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide designed to bind this target was annealed to T7 templates and introduced into in vitro transcription systems under conditions favoring specific initiation from this promoter. These templates demonstrated significant transcriptional inhibition relative to naked genomic templates and templates mixed with non-triplex-forming oligonucleotide. It is suggested that triplex formation along this target interferes with transcriptional initiation, and this mechanism may hold potential to disrupt bacteriophage T7 early transcription in vivo.

  19. Vermicular fossils in the Early Cambrian Xidashan Formation in the Quruqtagh region of Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ruidong; ZHANG Chuanlin; SONG Guoqi; LUO Xinrong

    2006-01-01

    Large amounts of vermicular fossils and a minor amount of sponge animal fossils have been found in the Early Cambrian Xidashan Formation in the region of Quruqtagh, Xinjiang. Vermicular fossils are generally more than 50 mm long and 0.3-1.4 mm wide; their wrinkled lamellae are microfine with 3-10 pieces within the length of every each millimeter. The fossils are considered to be Sabellidites cambriensis Sokolov (1965). The Xidashan Formation is the highest stratum in which Sabellidites occur, as has been so far reported.

  20. Cosmic Ray Production of $^6$Li by Structure Formation Shocks in the Early Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Inoue, Susumu; Suzuki, Takeru Ken

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the production of the element $^6$Li in the early Galaxy by cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks, driven by the hierarchical merging of sub-Galactic halos during Galaxy formation. The salient features of this scenario are discussed and compared with observations of $^6$Li in metal-poor halo stars, including a recent Subaru HDS result on the star HD140283. Some unique predictions of the model are clearly testable by future observations and may also provide important insight into how the Galaxy formed.

  1. Cultural and Chronological Horizons and the Problem of the Early Sarmatian Culture Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yablonsky Leonid Teodorovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On the materials of Eurasian early nomads’ archaeology we highlight the South Ural cultural and historical area (UCHA. Geographically it includes steppe regions of West Kazakhstan, Chelyabinsk and Orenburg regions, steppe and forest steppe zones of the Republic of Bashkortostan. There were similar cultural processes that led to the Early Sarmatian archaeological culture formation in the Early Iron Age. Under the cultural and chronological horizon we understand the geographic region that is significantly larger than UCHA. Practically it has no geographic boundaries. Specificity of the horizon is that at a certain chronological stage (phase artifacts and their complexes, signs of spiritual culture are widely distributed that will mark the horizon – the horizon markers such as well known Scythian triad. Global chronological scheme of the Southern Trans-Urals cultural and historical area can be represented as follows: “Sauromatian” cultural and chronological horizon – the second half of the 6th – the end of the 4th (3rd centuries B.C. – Phase “A” – the second half of the 6th – the middle of the 5th centuries B.C. – Phase “B” – the second half of the 5th – the third quarter of the 4th centuries B.C. – Phase “C” – the third quarter of the 4th – the 3rd century B.C. Typologically the burial grounds like Filippovka I and Perevolochan can be attributed to the Early-Sarmatian archaeological culture, i.e. to the time of the ethnic consciousness formation of suspected archaeological Early Sarmatians. In this period ordinary mounds and graves appear along with the elite ones. It is advisable to consider the sites of the “Sauromatian” and Early-Sarmatian cultures of the South Urals of the end of the 5th-3rd centuries B.C. as a single culture of the early nomads.

  2. Developmentally regulated epitopes of cell surface arabinogalactan proteins and their relation to root tissue pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J P; Linstead, P J; Peart, J; Cooper, C; Roberts, K

    1991-11-01

    Two polymorphic forms of an extracellular arabinogalactan protein (AGP1 and AGP2), obtained from the conditioned media of two carrot suspension-cultured cell lines, have been identified in terms of binding of the anti-plasma membrane antibodies JIM4 and MAC207. AGP1 and AGP2 have been used as immunogens to generate further anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies. JIM14 identified an epitope carried by AGP2 and also by glycoproteins of low molecular weight localized to the plant cell wall. In addition, further antibodies (JIM13 and JIM15) identified carbohydrate epitopes of the AGPs that also occur on plasma membrane glycoproteins and are expressed by patterns of cells that reflect cell position at the carrot root apex. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that JIM13 recognized the surface of cells forming the epidermis and cells marking the region and axis of the future xylem. JIM15 recognized a pattern of cells directly complementary to the JIM13 pattern. The panel of anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies now available indicates groups of cells within the root meristem that may reflect an early pre-pattern of the tissues of the mature root structure and suggests extensive modulation of cell surface AGPs during cell development and the positioning of cells within the apex.

  3. Loss of vascular early response gene reduces edema formation after experimental stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Fudong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vascular Early Response Gene (Verge is an immediate early gene (IEG that is up-regulated in endothelial cells in response to a number of stressors, including ischemic stroke. Endothelial cell lines that stably express Verge show enhanced permeability. Increased Verge expression has also been associated with blood brain barrier breakdown. In this study we investigated the role of Verge in ischemic injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in both Verge knockout (KO and wild type (WT mice. Verge KO mice had significantly less cerebral edema formation after MCAO compared to WT mice. However, stroke outcome (infarct size and neurological deficit scores evaluated at either 24 or 72 hours after stroke showed no differences between the two genotypes. Verge deletion leads to decreased edema formation after ischemia; however acute stroke outcomes were unchanged.

  4. The formation and early evolution of stars from dust to stars and planets

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Norbert S

    2012-01-01

    Starburst regions in nearby and distant galaxies have a profound impact on our understanding of the early universe. This new, substantially updated and extended edition of Norbert Schulz’s unique book "From Dust to Stars" describes complex physical processes involved in the creation and early evolution of stars. It illustrates how these processes reveal themselves from radio wavelengths to high energy X-rays and gamma–rays, with special reference towards high energy signatures. Several sections devoted to key analysis techniques demonstrate how modern research in this field is pursued and new chapters are introduced on massive star formation, proto-planetary disks and observations of young exoplanets. Recent advances and contemporary research on the theory of star formation are explained, as are new observations, specifically from the three great observatories of the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory which all now operate at the same time and make high r...

  5. Pattern formation during the evaporation of a colloidal nanoliter drop: a numerical and experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An efficient way to precisely pattern particles on solid surfaces is to dispense and evaporate colloidal drops, as for bioassays. The dried deposits often exhibit complex structures exemplified by the coffee ring pattern, where most particles have accumulated at the periphery of the deposit. In this work, the formation of deposits during the drying of nanoliter colloidal drops on a flat substrate is investigated numerically and experimentally. A finite-element numerical model is developed that solves the Navier-Stokes, heat and mass transport equations in a Lagrangian framework. The diffusion of vapor in the atmosphere is solved numerically, providing an exact boundary condition for the evaporative flux at the droplet-air interface. Laplace stresses and thermal Marangoni stresses are accounted for. The particle concentration is tracked by solving a continuum advection-diffusion equation. Wetting line motion and the interaction of the free surface of the drop with the growing deposit are modeled based on crite...

  6. Polymer Wall Formation Using Liquid-Crystal/Polymer Phase Separation Induced on Patterned Polyimide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    We could form lattice-shaped polymer walls in a liquid crystal (LC) layer through the thermal phase separation of an LC/polystyrene solution between substrates with polyimide films etched by short-wavelength ultraviolet irradiation using a photomask. The LC wetting difference between the polyimide and substrate surfaces caused the coalescence of growing LC droplets on patterned polyimide films with the progress of phase separation. Consequently, polymer walls were formed on substrate surface areas without polyimide films. The shape of the polymer wall formed became sharp with the use of rubbed polyimide films because the nucleation of growing LC droplets concentrated on the patterned polyimide films. It is thought that the increase in the alignment order of LC molecules in the solution near the rubbed polyimide films promotes the formation of LC molecular aggregation, which becomes the growth nuclei of LC droplets.

  7. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourtzanidis, K., E-mail: Konstantinos.Kourtzanidis@onera.fr; Boeuf, J. P. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Rogier, F. [ONERA - The French Aerospace Lab, 2 Avenue édouard Belin, 31000 Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  8. Pattern Formation in a Cross-Diffusive Ratio-Dependent Predator-Prey Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis of evolutionary process that involves organisms distribution and their interaction of spatial distribution of the species with self- and cross-diffusion in a Holling-III ratio-dependent predator-prey model. The diffusion instability of the positive equilibrium of the model with Neumann boundary conditions is discussed. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by self- and cross-diffusion in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibits a cross-diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, stripes, and spiral wave pattern replication, which show that reaction-diffusion model is useful to reveal the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  9. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  10. Patterns formations in a diffusive ratio-dependent predator-prey model of interacting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, B. I.; Haque, M.; Mokrani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The present investigation deals with the analysis of the spatial pattern formation of a diffusive predator-prey system with ratio-dependent functional response involving the influence of intra-species competition among predators within two-dimensional space. The appropriate condition of Turing instability around the interior equilibrium point of the present model has been determined. The emergence of complex patterns in the diffusive predator-prey model is illustrated through numerical simulations. These results are based on the existence of bifurcations of higher codimension such as Turing-Hopf, Turing-Saddle-node, Turing-Transcritical bifurcation, and the codimension- 3 ​Turing-Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation. The paper concludes with discussions of our results in ecology.

  11. Continuous fine pattern formation by screen-offset printing using a silicone blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Iwata, Shiro

    2014-09-01

    Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern’s shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes.

  12. Statistical analysis and modeling of collective cell motion and pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras; Szabo, Andras

    2009-03-01

    Cell motility and its guidance through cell-cell contacts is instrumental in vasculogenesis and in several other morphogenic processes as well. During vasculogenesis multicellular sprouts invade rapidly into avascular areas, eventually creating an interconnected network pattern. Epithelial cell sheets migrate during organogenesis or wound healing. These phenomena were studied with time-lapse microscopy both in vivo and in vitro. Statistical analysis of cell trajectories reveals that motile confluent cultures may behave either as vortical fluids or as deforming elastic sheets. The observed flow fields and pattern formation can be explained by our generalized cellular Potts model -- representing cell polarization and self-propulsion, links between the cytoskeleton of adjacent cells as well as an asymmetric preferential attraction to the surface of adjacent cells.

  13. Mechanisms for spatio-temporal pattern formation in highway traffic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R Eddie

    2008-06-13

    A key qualitative requirement for highway traffic models is the ability to replicate a type of traffic jam popularly referred to as a phantom jam, shock wave or stop-and-go wave. Despite over 50 years of modelling, the precise mechanisms for the generation and propagation of stop-and-go waves and the associated spatio-temporal patterns are in dispute. However, the increasing availability of empirical datasets, such as those collected from motorway incident detection and automatic signalling system (MIDAS) inductance loops in the UK or the next-generation simulation trajectory data (NGSIM) project in the USA, means that we can expect to resolve these questions definitively in the next few years. This paper will survey the essence of the competing explanations of highway traffic pattern formation and introduce and analyse a new mechanism, based on dynamical systems theory and bistability, which can help resolve the conflict.

  14. Pattern formation in a complex Swift-Hohenberg equation with phase bistability

    CERN Document Server

    de Valcárcel, Manuel Martínez-Quesada Germán J

    2016-01-01

    We study pattern formation in a complex Swift Hohenberg equation with phase-sensitive (parametric) gain. Such an equation serves as a universal order parameter equation describing the onset of spontaneous oscillations in extended systems submitted to a kind of forcing dubbed rocking when the instability is towards long wavelengths. Applications include two-level lasers and photorefractive oscillators. Under rocking, the original continuous phase symmetry of the system is replaced by a discrete one, so that phase bistability emerges. This leads to the spontaneous formation of phase-locked spatial structures like phase domains and dark-ring (phase-) cavity solitons. Stability of the homogeneous solutions is studied and numerical simulations are made covering all the dynamical regimes of the model, which turn out to be very rich. Formal derivations of the rocked complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, using multiple scale techniques, are given for the two-level laser and the photorefractive oscillator.

  15. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CASS and CMTFO, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gürcan, Ö. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-05-15

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  16. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux wavesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuga, Y.; Diamond, P. H.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Gürcan, Ã.-. D.

    2014-05-01

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E ×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E ×B staircase is discussed.

  17. Pattern formation in polymerising actin flocks: spirals, spots and waves without nonlinear chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Goff, Thomas Le; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model solely based on actin treadmilling and polymerisation which describes many characteristic states of actin wave formation: spots, spirals and travelling waves. In our model, as in experiments on cell recovering motility following actin depolymerisation, we choose an isotropic low density initial condition; polymerisation of actin filaments then raises the density towards the Onsager threshold where they align. We show that this alignment, in turn, destabilizes the isotropic phase and generically induces transient actin spots or spirals as part of the dynamical pathway towards a polarized phase which can either be uniform or consist of a series of actin-wave trains (flocks). Our results uncover a universal route to actin wave formation in the absence of any system specific nonlinear biochemistry, and it may help understand the mechanism underlying the observation of actin spots and waves in vivo. They also suggest a minimal setup to design similar patterns in vitro.

  18. Instability and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems: a higher order analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Syed Shahed; Sharma, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, S P; Ray, D S

    2007-08-14

    We analyze the condition for instability and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems beyond the usual linear regime. The approach is based on taking into account perturbations of higher orders. Our analysis reveals that nonlinearity present in the system can be instrumental in determining the stability of a system, even to the extent of destabilizing one in a linearly stable parameter regime. The analysis is also successful to account for the observed effect of additive noise in modifying the instability threshold of a system. The analytical study is corroborated by numerical simulation in a standard reaction-diffusion system.

  19. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...... obtained by means of a single short and intensive carbon plasma deposition pulse. The deposited DLC coating was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The DLC coating process gave rise to wide potential possibilities in micro-devices manufacturing productions....

  20. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuga, Y; Diamond, PH; Dif-Pradalier, G; Gürcan, OD

    2014-01-01

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing...

  1. Formation and removal of multi-layered fluorescence patterns in gold-ion doped glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jongho; Jang, Kyungsik [BK21 Physics Program and Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Ki-Soo, E-mail: kslim@chungbuk.ac.kr [BK21 Physics Program and Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youn-Shil; Lee, You-Lee; Choi, Jung-Hyun [BK21 Physics Program and Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Ik-Bu; Lee, Jongmin [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myeongkyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-30

    We report the formation of fluorescence patterns inside gold-doped glass medium by femtosecond-laser fabrication. Strong fluorescence images appeared from the irradiated multi-layered region after low temperature annealing. We removed the images by exposing the glass to an electric furnace or a CO{sub 2} laser beam for high temperature annealing. The method was also applied to recording, reading, and erasing of fluorescence data by a femtosecond laser, a 405-nm laser diode, and a CO{sub 2} laser respectively.

  2. DSA patterning options for FinFET formation at 7nm node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi-Chun C.; Franke, Elliott; Lie, Fee Li; Sieg, Stuart; Tsai, Hsinyu; Lai, Kafai; Truong, Hoa; Farrell, Richard; Somervell, Mark; Sanders, Daniel; Felix, Nelson; Guillorn, Michael; Burns, Sean; Hetzer, David; Ko, Akiteru; Arnold, John; Colburn, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Several 27nm-pitch directed self-assembly (DSA) processes targeting fin formation for FinFET device fabrication are studied in a 300mm pilot line environment, including chemoepitaxy for a conventional Fin arrays, graphoepitaxy for a customization approach and a hybrid approach for self-aligned Fin cut. The trade-off between each DSA flow is discussed in terms of placement error, Fin CD/profile uniformity, and restricted design. Challenges in pattern transfer are observed and process optimization are discussed. Finally, silicon Fins with 100nm depth and on-target CD using different DSA options with either lithographic or self-aligned customization approach are demonstrated.

  3. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation: Merging Jets and the Ultimate Jet Length Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey B. Parker and John A. Krommes

    2013-01-30

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. It is shown that for statisti- cally averaged equations of quasigeostrophic turbulence on a beta plane, zonal flows and inhomoge- neous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  4. Turing pattern formation on the sphere for a morphochemical reaction-diffusion model for electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Bozzini, Benedetto; Frittelli, Massimo; Sgura, Ivonne

    2017-07-01

    The present paper deals with the pattern formation properties of a specific morpho-electrochemical reaction-diffusion model on a sphere. The physico-chemical background to this study is the morphological control of material electrodeposited onto spherical particles. The particular experimental case of interest refers to the optimization of novel metal-air flow batteries and addresses the electrodeposition of zinc onto inert spherical supports. Morphological control in this step of the high-energy battery operation is crucial to the energetic efficiency of the recharge process and to the durability of the whole energy-storage device. To rationalise this technological challenge within a mathematical modeling perspective, we consider the reaction-diffusion system for metal electrodeposition introduced in [Bozzini et al., J. Solid State Electr.17, 467-479 (2013)] and extend its study to spherical domains. Conditions are derived for the occurrence of the Turing instability phenomenon and the steady patterns emerging at the onset of Turing instability are investigated. The reaction-diffusion system on spherical domains is solved numerically by means of the Lumped Surface Finite Element Method (LSFEM) in space combined with the IMEX Euler method in time. The effect on pattern formation of variations in the domain size is investigated both qualitatively, by means of systematic numerical simulations, and quantitatively by introducing suitable indicators that allow to assign each pattern to a given morphological class. An experimental validation of the obtained results is finally presented for the case of zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solutions onto copper spheres.

  5. Maternal Dietary Patterns during Third Trimester in Association with Birthweight Characteristics and Early Infant Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Poon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our analysis examined the impact of maternal dietary patterns and lifestyle factors on markers of fetal growth, specifically birthweight and size for gestational age (small- (SGA or large-for-gestational age (LGA. The Infant Feeding Practices Study II, a prospective cohort study, surveyed pregnant women during their 3rd trimester, of which a subgroup (n=893 completed a food frequency questionnaire. Maternal dietary patterns were evaluated by diet scores (Alternative Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy and alternate Mediterranean diet and by carbohydrate quality (glycemic index and glycemic load. Poisson regression with robust standard errors was used to examine the relative risk of SGA and separately LGA, with dietary patterns and other lifestyle factors. Linear regression was used to determine the association of birthweight and early infant growth with better dietary patterns. Relative risk of SGA and LGA was not associated with dietary patterns. Birthweight and infant growth were not associated with maternal diet. Smoking, however, increased the risk of delivering an SGA infant (RR = 2.92, 95% CI: 1.58–5.39, while higher prepregnancy BMI increased the risk of delivering an LGA infant (RR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.03–1.09. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether deficiencies in more specific maternal dietary nutrients play a role in fetal growth.

  6. Early Heparin Administration Reduces Risk for Left Atrial Thrombus Formation during Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Asbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite the use of anticoagulation during left atrial (LA ablation procedures, ischemic cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs are recognized as a serious complication. Heparin is usually given after safe transseptal access has been obtained, resulting in a short unprotected dwell time of catheters within the LA, which may account for CVAs. We investigated the frequency of CVAs and LA thrombus formation as detected by intracardiac ultrasound (ICE depending on the timing of heparin administration. Methods and Results. Sixty LA ablation procedures with the use of ICE were performed in 55 patients. Patients were grouped by heparin administration after (Group I, =13 and before (Group II, =47 transseptal access. Group I patients were younger (56.6±13.7 versus 65.9±9.9 years, =.01; other clinical and echocardiographic characteristics did not differ between groups. Early thrombus formation was observed in 2 (15.4% of group I patients as compared to 0% of group II patients (=.04. One CVA (2.1% occurred in one group II patient without prior thrombus detection, and none occurred in group I patients (=ns. Conclusion. Early administration of heparin reduces the risk of early intracardiac thrombus formation during LA ablation procedures. This did not result in reduced rate of CVAs.

  7. The effect of obesity on recurrence pattern in early breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ozan; Aksoy, Sercan; Sendur, Mehmet An; Babacan, Taner; Ozdemir, Nuriye; Ozisik, Yavuz; Zengin, Nurullah; Altundag, Kadri

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a well known risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and poor prognosis. We studied the effect of body mass index (BMI) on recurrence pattern in early breast cancer patients. This retrospective cross-sectional study analyzed the data of 2731 early stage breast cancer patients. Patients who had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis and with unknown BMI values were excluded from study (N=276). Patients were classified into three BMI categories: normal body weight, overweight, and obese. The recurrent/metastatic sites of patients were grouped in 8 categories: local, contralateral, lymph node, bone, lung, liver, brain and others. The association between first relapse site of early breast cancer patients and BMI categories were evaluated. The median patient age was 48 years (range 18-92). The median follow up time was 40 months (range 1-284). During follow-up, 469 (17.1%) patients developed recurrence and/or metastasis. Of 2455 total patients, 853 (34.6%) were classified as having normal weight, 898 (36.2%) were overweighted and 704 (29.2%) were obese. In the whole patient group no relation between metastatic sites and BMI groups was noticed. The first primary metastatic sites were also not associated with BMI groups in pre and postmenopausal subpopulations. In obese patients, disease free survival (DFS) was shorter compared to normal weighted patients, but the difference was not significant. There was no significant difference between site-specific DFS in relation to BMI categorization. Obese and overweighted patients had significantly shorter overall survival (OS) compared to the normal-weight group (p=0.003). Although obesity had no effect on recurrence pattern of early breast cancer patients, obese early breast cancer patients had shorter OS compared to their normal-weight counterparts.

  8. Early growth patterns are associated with intelligence quotient scores in children born small-for-gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Marcia H; Moss, William J

    2015-08-01

    To assess whether patterns of growth trajectory during infancy are associated with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores at 4 years of age in children born small-for-gestational age (SGA). Children in the Collaborative Perinatal Project born SGA were eligible for analysis. The primary outcome was the Stanford-Binet IQ score at 4 years of age. Growth patterns were defined based on changes in weight-for-age z-scores from birth to 4 months and 4 to 12 months of age and consisted of steady, early catch-up, late catch-up, constant catch-up, early catch-down, late catch-down, constant catch-down, early catch-up & late catch-down, and early catch-down & late catch-up. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess associations between patterns of growth and IQ. We evaluated patterns of growth and IQ in 5640 children. Compared with children with steady growth, IQ scores were 2.9 [standard deviation (SD)=0.54], 1.5 (SD=0.63), and 2.2 (SD=0.9) higher in children with early catch-up, early catch-up and later catch-down, and constant catch-up growth patterns, respectively, and 4.4 (SD=1.4) and 3.9 (SD=1.5) lower in children with early catch-down & late catch-up, and early catch-down growth patterns, respectively. Patterns in weight gain before 4 months of age were associated with differences in IQ scores at 4 years of age, with children with early catch-up having slightly higher IQ scores than children with steady growth and children with early catch-down having slightly lower IQ scores. These findings have implications for early infant nutrition in children born SGA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Romantic Relationship Patterns from Adolescence to Emerging Adulthood: Associations with Family and Peer Experiences in Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Stéphanie; Poulin, François

    2016-05-01

    The present study identifies and describes romantic relationship patterns from adolescence to adulthood and examines their associations with family and peer experiences in early adolescence. In a 13-year longitudinal study, 281 youth (58 % girls) identified all their romantic partners each year from the ages of 16-24. Dimensions of family relationships (family cohesion, parent-child conflict) and peer relationships (peer likeability, social withdrawal, close friendships, other-sex friendships) were assessed at age 12. Latent class analyses brought out five distinct romantic relationship patterns and significant associations were found with family and peer relationships in early adolescence. These five romantic relationship patterns appeared to follow a continuum of romantic involvement, with romantic relationship patterns situated a both ends of this continuum (later involvement pattern and intense involvement pattern) being associated with more interpersonal experiences in early adolescence.

  10. Magnetic fields during the early stages of massive star formation I: Accretion and disk evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D; Klessen, R S; Duffin, D; Pudritz, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present simulations of collapsing 100 M_\\sun mass cores in the context of massive star formation. The effect of variable initial rotational and magnetic energies on the formation of massive stars is studied in detail. We focus on accretion rates and on the question under which conditions massive Keplerian disks can form in the very early evolutionary stage of massive protostars. For this purpose, we perform 12 simulations with different initial conditions extending over a wide range in parameter space. The equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are solved under the assumption of ideal MHD. We find that the formation of Keplerian disks in the very early stages is suppressed for a mass-to-flux ratio normalised to the critical value \\mu below 10, in agreement with a series of low-mass star formation simulations. This is caused by very efficient magnetic braking resulting in a nearly instantaneous removal of angular momentum from the disk. For weak magnetic fields, corresponding to \\mu > 10, large-scale, cent...

  11. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-07

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  12. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Naku Ghartey Jnr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76% breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46% participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56% were premenopausal (<46.6 years with 7 (0.23% being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana.

  13. Experimental evaluation of early patterns of colonisation of space on rocky shores and seawalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulleri, Fabio

    2005-09-01

    The introduction of artificial structures in coastal areas can cause fragmentation and loss of natural habitats. Previous studies found that variation in colonisation of space at mid-shore levels could account for differences in mature assemblages between seawalls and vertical surfaces on adjacent rocky shores in Sydney Harbour (Australia). This study tests the model that the nature of the substratum is responsible for different patterns of early colonisation between vertical ledges of rocky shores and seawalls. According to this model, patterns in early colonisation would differ between cleared areas created on vertical surfaces on rocky shores and seawalls, but not between standard surfaces (panels) installed on each structure. Early colonisation of space differed between seawalls and rocky shores, regardless of the type of substratum (clearings versus panels). Differences in relative abundances between structures were evident on both types of substrata for some taxa, while they varied between substrata for others. No taxa, however, showed consistent differences between structures in only the clearings. In addition, the abundance of some taxa differed between panels on the different structures, suggesting that the effects of the substratum were modulated by factors operating differentially between rocky shores and seawalls.

  14. Conditional deletion of epithelial IKKβ impairs alveolar formation through apoptosis and decreased VEGF expression during early mouse lung morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Changgong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar septation marks the beginning of the transition from the saccular to alveolar stage of lung development. Inflammation can disrupt this process and permanently impair alveolar formation resulting in alveolar hypoplasia as seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm newborns. NF-κB is a transcription factor central to multiple inflammatory and developmental pathways including dorsal-ventral patterning in fruit flies; limb, mammary and submandibular gland development in mice; and branching morphogenesis in chick lungs. We have previously shown that epithelial overexpression of NF-κB accelerates lung maturity using transgenic mice. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that targeted deletion of NF-κB signaling in lung epithelium would impair alveolar formation. Methods We generated double transgenic mice with lung epithelium-specific deletion of IKKβ, a known activating kinase upstream of NF-κB, using a cre-loxP transgenic recombination strategy. Lungs of resulting progeny were analyzed at embryonic and early postnatal stages to determine specific effects on lung histology, and mRNA and protein expression of relevant lung morphoreulatory genes. Lastly, results measuring expression of the angiogenic factor, VEGF, were confirmed in vitro using a siRNA-knockdown strategy in cultured mouse lung epithelial cells. Results Our results showed that IKKβ deletion in the lung epithelium transiently decreased alveolar type I and type II cells and myofibroblasts and delayed alveolar formation. These effects were mediated through increased alveolar type II cell apoptosis and decreased epithelial VEGF expression. Conclusions These results suggest that epithelial NF-κB plays a critical role in early alveolar development possibly through regulation of VEGF.

  15. B1 SOX coordinate cell specification with patterning and morphogenesis in the early zebrafish embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Okuda

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The B1 SOX transcription factors SOX1/2/3/19 have been implicated in various processes of early embryogenesis. However, their regulatory functions in stages from the blastula to early neurula remain largely unknown, primarily because loss-of-function studies have not been informative to date. In our present study, we systematically knocked down the B1 sox genes in zebrafish. Only the quadruple knockdown of the four B1 sox genes sox2/3/19a/19b resulted in very severe developmental abnormalities, confirming that the B1 sox genes are functionally redundant. We characterized the sox2/3/19a/19b quadruple knockdown embryos in detail by examining the changes in gene expression through in situ hybridization, RT-PCR, and microarray analyses. Importantly, these phenotypic analyses revealed that the B1 SOX proteins regulate the following distinct processes: (1 early dorsoventral patterning by controlling bmp2b/7; (2 gastrulation movements via the regulation of pcdh18a/18b and wnt11, a non-canonical Wnt ligand gene; (3 neural differentiation by regulating the Hes-class bHLH gene her3 and the proneural-class bHLH genes neurog1 (positively and ascl1a (negatively, and regional transcription factor genes, e.g., hesx1, zic1, and rx3; and (4 neural patterning by regulating signaling pathway genes, cyp26a1 in RA signaling, oep in Nodal signaling, shh, and mdkb. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the her3, hesx1, neurog1, pcdh18a, and cyp26a1 genes further suggests a direct regulation of these genes by B1 SOX. We also found an interesting overlap between the early phenotypes of the B1 sox quadruple knockdown embryos and the maternal-zygotic spg embryos that are devoid of pou5f1 activity. These findings indicate that the B1 SOX proteins control a wide range of developmental regulators in the early embryo through partnering in part with Pou5f1 and possibly with other factors, and suggest that the B1 sox functions are central to coordinating cell fate

  16. The Formation and Early Evolution of a CME and the Associated Shock on 2014 January 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Linfeng; Cheng, Xin; Shi, Tong; Su, Wei; Ding, Mingde

    2017-08-01

    We study the formation and early evolution of a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) and its associated shock wave that occurred on 2014 January 8. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by AIA on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} disclose that the CME first appears as a bubble-like structure. Subsequently, its expansion forms the CME and causes a quasi-circular EUV wave. Both the CME and the wave front are clearly visible at all of the AIA EUV passbands. Through a detailed kinematical analysis, it is found that the expansion of the CME undergoes two phases: a first phase with a strong but transient lateral over-expansion followed by a second phase with a self-similar expansion. The temporal evolution of the expansion velocity coincides very well with the variation of the 25--50 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux of the associated flare, which indicates that magnetic reconnection most likely plays an important role in driving the expansion. Moreover, we find that, when the velocity of the CME reaches $\\sim$600 km s$^{-1}$, the EUV wave starts to evolve into a shock wave, which is evidenced by the appearance of a type II radio burst. Interestingly, we also notice an unusual solar radio signal at $\\sim$4 GHz that is similar to the pattern of a type II radio burst but drifts to higher frequencies at a rate of $\\sim$0.3 MHz per second during about 7 minutes. Its derived density is $\\sim$5$\\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ and increases slowly with time. Joint imaging observations of HXR and EUV help to locate the loop-top region and calculate its thermal proprieties, including slowly increasing densities ($\\sim$5$\\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$) and temperatures ($\\sim$14 MK). The similar results obtained from two different ways above imply the possibility of this scenario: plasma blobs that are ejected along the current sheet via magnetic reconnection collide with underlying flare loops that are undergoing chromospheric evaporation. Finally, we also study the thermal

  17. Quantifying Star Formation in Early-Type Galaxies using Spatially-Resolved UV-Optical Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, Sugata

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of star formation in nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) has evolved rapidly in recent years, due to new UV data from GALEX and HST. Contrary to the classical notion of them being old, passively-evolving systems, recent work has demonstrated widespread late-epoch star formation in ETGs, which builds ~20% of their stellar mass after 1, via minor mergers between ETGs and gas-rich dwarfs. While survey data from GALEX has indicated the average properties of star formation in the ETG population as a whole, I demonstrate how spatially-resolved UV studies can offer detailed insights into the star formation histories of individual galaxies, using an HST-WFC3 case study of NGC 4150. Using a pixel-by-pixel analysis in 5 WFC3 filters, spanning UV to i-band, reveals a central 0.9 Gyr old young stellar population, with a median metallicity of 0.5 solar, that contributes around 3% of the stellar mass and coincides spatially with a small, kinematically-decoupled core (indicating a recent minor merger). Assuming that the metallicity of the young stars traces the gas-phase metallicity of the satellite that fuels the star formation, we use the mass-metallicity relation to estimate the mass ratio of the merger to be ~1:20. An WFC3 study of globular clusters reveals a substantial population of young star clusters coincident with the central region of star formation and indicates that the bulk of the stellar mass in this galaxy probably formed 6-8 Gyrs in the past. This study demonstrates the utility of high-resolution imaging from future instruments such as the extremely large telescopes. (Based on Early Release Science observations by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program.)

  18. Depositional Architecture of Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician Siliciclastic Barik Formation; Al Huqf Area, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Iftikhar Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Early Paleozoic siliciclastics sediments of the Haima Supergroup are subdivided into a number of formations and members based on lithological characteristics of various rock sequences. One of the distinct sandstone sequence, the Barik Formation (Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician) of the Andam Group is a major deep gas reservoir in central Oman. The sandstone bodies are prospective reservoir rocks while thick shale and clay interbeds act as effective seal. Part of the Barik Formation (lower and middle part) is exposed in isolated outcrops in Al Huqf area as interbedded multistoried sandstone, and green and red shale. The sandstone bodies are up to 2 meters thick and can be traced laterally for 300 m to over 1 km. Most of sandstone bodies show both lateral and vertical stacking. Two types of sandstone lithofacies are identified on the basis of field characteristics; a plane-bedded sandstone lithofacies capping thick red and green color shale beds, and a cross-bedded sandstone lithofacies overlying the plane-bedded sandstone defining coarsening upward sequences. The plane-bedded sandstone at places contains Cruziana ichnofacies and bivalve fragments indicating deposition by shoreface processes. Thick cross-bedded sandstone is interpreted to be deposited by the fluvial dominated deltaic processes. Load-casts, climbing ripples and flaser-bedding in siltstone and red shale indicate influence of tidal processes at times during the deposition of the formation. This paper summarizes results of a study carried out in Al Huqf area outcrops to analyze the characteristics of the sandstone-body geometry, internal architecture, provenance and diagenetic changes in the lower and middle part of the formation. The study shows build-up of a delta complex and its progradation over a broad, low-angle shelf where fluvial processes operate beside shoreface processes in a vegetation free setting. Keywords: Andam Group, Barik Formation, Ordovician sandstone, Al Huqf, Central Oman,

  19. Formation and reverberation of sequential neural activity patterns evoked by sensory stimulation are enhanced during cortical desynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez Contreras, Edgar J; Schjetnan, Andrea Gomez Palacio; Muhammad, Arif; Bartho, Peter; McNaughton, Bruce L; Kolb, Bryan; Gruber, Aaron J; Luczak, Artur

    2013-08-07

    Memory formation is hypothesized to involve the generation of event-specific neural activity patterns during learning and the subsequent spontaneous reactivation of these patterns. Here, we present evidence that these processes can also be observed in urethane-anesthetized rats and are enhanced by desynchronized brain state evoked by tail pinch, subcortical carbachol infusion, or systemic amphetamine administration. During desynchronization, we found that repeated tactile or auditory stimulation evoked unique sequential patterns of neural firing in somatosensory and auditory cortex and that these patterns then reoccurred during subsequent spontaneous activity, similar to what we have observed in awake animals. Furthermore, the formation of these patterns was blocked by an NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting that the phenomenon depends on synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that anesthetized animals with a desynchronized brain state could serve as a convenient model for studying stimulus-induced plasticity to improve our understanding of memory formation and replay in the brain.

  20. The tomato SlSHINE3 transcription factor regulates fruit cuticle formation and epidermal patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian Xin; Adato, Avital; Alkan, Noam; He, Yonghua; Lashbrooke, Justin; Matas, Antonio J; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Isaacson, Tal; Prusky, Dov; Leshkowitz, Dena; Schreiber, Lukas; Granell, Antonio R; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Rogachev, Ilana; Rothan, Christophe; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-01-01

    Fleshy tomato fruit typically lacks stomata; therefore, a proper cuticle is particularly vital for fruit development and interaction with the surroundings. Here, we characterized the tomato SlSHINE3 (SlSHN3) transcription factor to extend our limited knowledge regarding the regulation of cuticle formation in fleshy fruits. We created SlSHN3 overexpressing and silenced plants, and used them for detailed analysis of cuticular lipid compositions, phenotypic characterization, and the study on the mode of SlSHN3 action. Heterologous expression of SlSHN3 in Arabidopsis phenocopied overexpression of the Arabidopsis SHNs. Silencing of SlSHN3 results in profound morphological alterations of the fruit epidermis and significant reduction in cuticular lipids. We demonstrated that SlSHN3 activity is mediated by control of genes associated with cutin metabolism and epidermal cell patterning. As with SlSHN3 RNAi lines, mutation in the SlSHN3 target gene, SlCYP86A69, resulted in severe cutin deficiency and altered fruit surface architecture. In vitro activity assays demonstrated that SlCYP86A69 possesses NADPH-dependent ω-hydroxylation activity, particularly of C18:1 fatty acid to the 18-hydroxyoleic acid cutin monomer. This study provided insights into transcriptional mechanisms mediating fleshy fruit cuticle formation and highlighted the link between cutin metabolism and the process of fruit epidermal cell patterning.

  1. Metamorphic pattern of the Cretaceous Celica Formation, SW Ecuador, and its geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis

    1992-04-01

    The volcanic rocks of the Cretaceous Celica Formation of southern Ecuador are affected by a weak although widespread alteration. The chemical study of the secondary chemical phases present in andesitic and basaltic lava flows reveals that this alteration corresponds to very low-grade metamorphism comprising the zeolite and the prehnite-pumpellyite facies. Main features of this metamorphism are: weak lithostatic pressure, moderate to steep thermal gradient, high ƒ O2, low value of the seawater/rock ratio and total absence of deformation. These characteristics are typically present in other volcanic suites of similar age and composition along the Andes and correspond to the pattern of metamorphism developed in extensional settings (diastathermal metamorphism) linked to various degrees of thinning of the continental crust. Based on this metamorphic pattern, a geodynamic model is proposed in which the Celica Formation is interpreted as an ensialic, aborted, marginal basin developed on strongly attenuated continental crust at the border of the South American plate. The relationship between the Ecuadorian and Colombian volcanic suites of Cretaceous age present along the Western Cordillera is discussed in the light of the model suggested.

  2. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: Stability and pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christdoss Pushpam, Sam David; Basavaraj, Madivala G.; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2015-11-01

    A binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interaction between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square, and hexagonal arrangements of particles on the emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. The distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for the rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous shells derived thereof.

  3. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Hedenström, Mattias; Moritz, Thomas; Niittylä, Totte

    2015-06-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a (13)CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of (13)C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on (13)C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No (13)C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique (13)C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees.

  4. The Influence of Gene Expression Time Delays on Gierer–Meinhardt Pattern Formation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    There are numerous examples of morphogen gradients controlling long range signalling in developmental and cellular systems. The prospect of two such interacting morphogens instigating long range self-organisation in biological systems via a Turing bifurcation has been explored, postulated, or implicated in the context of numerous developmental processes. However, modelling investigations of cellular systems typically neglect the influence of gene expression on such dynamics, even though transcription and translation are observed to be important in morphogenetic systems. In particular, the influence of gene expression on a large class of Turing bifurcation models, namely those with pure kinetics such as the Gierer-Meinhardt system, is unexplored. Our investigations demonstrate that the behaviour of the Gierer-Meinhardt model profoundly changes on the inclusion of gene expression dynamics and is sensitive to the sub-cellular details of gene expression. Features such as concentration blow up, morphogen oscillations and radical sensitivities to the duration of gene expression are observed and, at best, severely restrict the possible parameter spaces for feasible biological behaviour. These results also indicate that the behaviour of Turing pattern formation systems on the inclusion of gene expression time delays may provide a means of distinguishing between possible forms of interaction kinetics. Finally, this study also emphasises that sub-cellular and gene expression dynamics should not be simply neglected in models of long range biological pattern formation via morphogens. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  5. Energy approach to rivalry dynamics, soliton stability, and pattern formation in neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxley, P. N.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    Hopfield’s Lyapunov function is used to view the stability and topology of equilibria in neuronal networks for visual rivalry and pattern formation. For two neural populations with reciprocal inhibition and slow adaptation, the dynamics of neural activity is found to include a pair of limit cycles: one for oscillations between states where one population has high activity and the other has low activity, as in rivalry, and one for oscillations between states where both populations have the same activity. Hopfield’s Lyapunov function is used to find the dynamical mechanism for oscillations and the basin of attraction of each limit cycle. For a spatially continuous population with lateral inhibition, stable equilibria are found for local regions of high activity (solitons) and for bound states of two or more solitons. Bound states become stable when moving two solitons together minimizes the Lyapunov function, a result of decreasing activity in regions between peaks of high activity when the firing rate is described by a sigmoid function. Lowering the barrier to soliton formation leads to a pattern-forming instability, and a nonlinear solution to the dynamical equations is found to be given by a soliton lattice, which is completely characterized by the soliton width and the spacing between neighboring solitons. Fluctuations due to noise create lattice vacancies analogous to point defects in crystals, leading to activity which is spatially inhomogeneous.

  6. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  7. Spatial patterns of substantial climate impact from anthropogenic aerosols in the early instrumental period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undorf, Sabine; Bollasina, Massimo; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    While many aspects of climate variation in the early instrumental period (1860-1950) are still unexplained, for instance the early twentieth-century warming from the 1910s to the 1940s, the role of anthropogenic aerosols in this period has been overlooked. Yet, the period is also an interesting case study to isolate aerosol impacts since it is characterised by the increase of North American and especially European aerosol emissions concurrently with negligible Asian emissions and relatively low carbon dioxide concentrations. We thus analyse the spatial and temporal patterns of aerosol impact for this period in available observations (NOAA 20th-century reanalysis, etc.) and historical single-forcing and all-forcing experiments with state-of-the-art CMIP5 models. We make use of coupled empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) applied to surface temperature -the most reliable variable in observations- and different aerosol indicating variables such as aerosol optical depth and short-wave downward radiation, some of which include aerosol indirect effects. The principal components of the most important EOFs are then regressed onto sea level pressure, winds, and other variables to identify associated circulation patterns. A decomposition into multi-decadal and longer time scales is performed by filtering the data prior to the analysis. Our analysis reveals both statistically significant local and non-local aerosol impact and identifies circulation states associated with the temperature response. The results are consistent across different aerosol variables, and show a strong non-local response as well as specific differences between time scales. We find a distinctive circulation pattern which strongly resembles observations and might explain the observed early twentieth century warming in the Arctic.

  8. In vitro biofilm formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coliand their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Poovendran Ponnusamy; Vidhya Natarajan; Murugan Sevanan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To detect in vitro biofilm formation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli(E. coli)(UPEC) strains isolated from urine specimens and also to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern using 13 commonly used antibiotics.Methods: The present study comprised of166 urine specimens collected from tertiary care hospitals in and around Coimbatore, South India. All the specimens were subjected to gram staining, bacterial culture and theE. coli strains were screened for biofilm formation using Tube Method(TM), Congo Red Agar(CRA) and Tissue Culture Plate method(TCP) respectively. Subsequently, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by Kirby Bauer-disk diffusion method for the biofilm and non-biofilm producingE. colistrains.Results: Of the100 (60.2 %)E. coli strains,72 strains displayed a biofilm positive phenotype under the optimized conditions in the Tube Method and the strains were classified as highly positive(17, 23.6%), moderate positive(19, 26.3 %) and weakly positive(36, 50.0 %), similarly under the optimized conditions on Congo Red agar medium, biofilm positive phenotype strains were classified as highly positive(23, 23 %), moderate positive(37, 37 %)and weakly positive (40, 40%). While inTCP method, the biofilm positive phenotype strains were also classified as highly positive(6, 6 %), moderate positive (80, 80 %)and weakly positive(14, 14 %), it didn’t not correlate well with the tube method for detecting biofilm formation in E. coli. The rates of antibiotic resistance of biofilm producingE. coliwere found to be 100 % for chloramphenicol and amoxyclav (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid),86% for gentamicin and cefotaxime,84% for ceftazidime,83% for cotrimoxazole and piperacillin/tazobactam,75% for tetracycline and70% for amikacin.Conclusions: This study reveals the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of biofilm and non-biofilm producing uropathogenic E. coli strains.

  9. Stability and pattern formation for competing populations with asymmetric nonlocal coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzy, M C; Volpert, V A; Bayliss, A; Nehrkorn, M E

    2013-11-01

    We consider a model of two competing species with asymmetric nonlocal coupling in a competition for resources. The nonlocal coupling is via convolution integrals and the asymmetry is via convolution kernel functions which are not even functions of their arguments. The nonlocality is due to species mobility, so that at any fixed point in space the competition for resources depends not just on the populations at that point but on a suitably weighted average of the populations. We introduce two parameters, δ, describing the extent of the coupling, with δ=0 corresponding to local coupling, and α, describing the extent of the asymmetry, with α=0 corresponding to symmetric nonlocal interactions. We consider the case where the model admits a stable coexistence equilibrium solution. We perform a linear stability analysis and show that this solution can be destabilized by sufficient nonlocality, i.e., when δ increases beyond a critical value. We consider two specific kernel functions, (i) an asymmetric Gaussian and (ii) an asymmetric stepfunction. We compute the stability boundary as a function of α, and for δ beyond the stability boundary we determine unstable wavenumber bands. We compute nonlinear patterns for δ significantly beyond the stability boundary. Patterns consist of arrays of islands, regions of nonzero population, separated by either near-deadzones where the populations are small, but nonzero, or by deadzones where populations are exponentially small and essentially extinct. We find solutions consisting of propagating traveling waves of islands, solutions exhibiting colony formation, where a colony is formed just ahead of an island and eventually grows as the parent island decays, and modulated traveling waves, where competition between the two species allows propagation and inhibits colony formation. We explain colony formation and the modulated traveling waves as due to a positive feedback mechanism associated with small variations in the amplitude of

  10. Application of a Computational Method for the Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer Using Proteomic Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzenir Montes,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method based on the recognition of proteomic patterns for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, using computational techniques, applied in the database of SELDI-TOF proteomic patterns. The method is based on classifying the individual as to the portability stage of prostate cancer. To do so, the Independent Component Analysis (ICA technique is used to extract the characteristics, after which are utilized the algorithm of Maximum Relevance and Minimum Redundancy to reduce the computational cost, and finally the Support Vector Machine to obtain the classification. The best result of the method was obtained with a vector of 27 characteristics, achieving accuracy, specificity and sensitivity, respectively of 89.21%, 83.68% and 95.08%.

  11. Dynamic Pattern Formation for Wings of Pterygota in an Eclosion ---Pattern Analysis for Wings with the Imago---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, M.; Kakazu, Y.

    The vein and cell patterns for the fore and hind wing of Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Odonata are analyzed and discussed. For vein patterns of them, the fractal properties are shown and the inequality between four orders is obtained. The nature of wings observed by mass distributions for fractal dimensions of the vein pattern is presented.

  12. A possible formation mechanism of rampart-like ejecta pattern in a laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A.; Kadono, T.; Nakamura, A. M.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-12-01

    The ejecta morphologies around impact craters represent highly diverse appearance on the surface of solid bodies in our Solar System. It is considered that the varied ejecta morphologies result from the environments such as the atmospheric pressure, the volatile content in the subsurface, because they affect the emplacement process of the ejecta. Clarifying the relationships between the ejecta morphologies and the formation processes and environments could constrain the ancient surface environment and the evolution of the planets. We have investigated the ejecta patterns around the impact craters which formed on a glass beads layer in a laboratory, and found that the patterns depend on impact velocity, atmospheric pressure, and initial state of packing of the target [Suzuki et al., 2010, JpGU abstract]. Now, we focus on one of the ejecta patterns which has a petal-like (or sometimes concentric) ridges on the distal edge of the continuous ejecta. This ejecta pattern looks very similar to the rampart ejecta morphology observed around Martian impact craters [e.g. Barlow et al., 2000]. The experiments are conducted with the small light gas gun placed in Kobe University, Japan. The projectile is a cylinder with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 10 mm, and is made of aluminum, nylon, or stainless. The target is a layer of glass beads (nearly uniform diameter) in a tub with ~28 cm in diameter. The bulk density is about 1.7 g/cm^3. The following three parameters are varied: 1) the diameter of the target glass beads (50, 100, 420 microns), 2) the ambient atmospheric pressure in the chamber (from ~500 Pa to atmospheric pressure), 3) the impact velocity of the projectile (from a few to ~120 m/s). In our experiments, the rampart-like ridged patterns are observed within the following conditions: 1) the diameter of the target glass beads is 50 and 100 microns, 2) the ambient pressure in the chamber is higher than ~10^4 Pa, and 3) the impact velocity is higher than 16 m

  13. Novel developmental analyses identify longitudinal patterns of early gut microbiota that affect infant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A White

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that some obesity trajectories are set early in life, and that rapid weight gain in infancy is a risk factor for later development of obesity. Identifying modifiable factors associated with early rapid weight gain is a prerequisite for curtailing the growing worldwide obesity epidemic. Recently, much attention has been given to findings indicating that gut microbiota may play a role in obesity development. We aim at identifying how the development of early gut microbiota is associated with expected infant growth. We developed a novel procedure that allows for the identification of longitudinal gut microbiota patterns (corresponding to the gut ecosystem developing, which are associated with an outcome of interest, while appropriately controlling for the false discovery rate. Our method identified developmental pathways of Staphylococcus species and Escherichia coli that were associated with expected growth, and traditional methods indicated that the detection of Bacteroides species at day 30 was associated with growth. Our method should have wide future applicability for studying gut microbiota, and is particularly important for translational considerations, as it is critical to understand the timing of microbiome transitions prior to attempting to manipulate gut microbiota in early life.

  14. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Jia

    Full Text Available Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined.

  15. Determining Star Formation Timescale and Pattern Speed in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Egusa, Fumi; Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Komugi, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    We present a revised method for simultaneous determination of the pattern speed and star formation timescale of spiral galaxies, its application, and results for CO and Ha images of nearby spiral galaxies. Out of 13 galaxies, we were able to derive the 2 parameters for 5 galaxies. We categorize them as "C" galaxies, and find (1) The corotation radius is close to the edge of the CO data, and is about half of the optical radius for 3 galaxies. (2) The star formation timescale is roughly consistent with the free-fall time of typical molecular clouds, which indicates that the gravitational instability is the dominant mechanism triggering star formation in spiral arms. (3) The timescale is found to be almost independent of surface density of molecular gas, metallicity, or spiral arm strengths. The number of "C" galaxies and the quality of CO data, however, are not enough to confirm these relationships. We also find that 2 other galaxies show no offsets between CO and Ha, although their arms are clearly traced, and...

  16. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, 65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD.

  17. Stable, precise, and reproducible patterning of bicoid and hunchback molecules in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Okabe-Oho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise patterning of morphogen molecules and their accurate reading out are of key importance in embryonic development. Recent experiments have visualized distributions of proteins in developing embryos and shown that the gradient of concentration of Bicoid morphogen in Drosophila embryos is established rapidly after fertilization and remains stable through syncytial mitoses. This stable Bicoid gradient is read out in a precise way to distribute Hunchback with small fluctuations in each embryo and in a reproducible way, with small embryo-to-embryo fluctuation. The mechanisms of such stable, precise, and reproducible patterning through noisy cellular processes, however, still remain mysterious. To address these issues, here we develop the one- and three-dimensional stochastic models of the early Drosophila embryo. The simulated results show that the fluctuation in expression of the hunchback gene is dominated by the random arrival of Bicoid at the hunchback enhancer. Slow diffusion of Hunchback protein, however, averages out this intense fluctuation, leading to the precise patterning of distribution of Hunchback without loss of sharpness of the boundary of its distribution. The coordinated rates of diffusion and transport of input Bicoid and output Hunchback play decisive roles in suppressing fluctuations arising from the dynamical structure change in embryos and those arising from the random diffusion of molecules, and give rise to the stable, precise, and reproducible patterning of Bicoid and Hunchback distributions.

  18. Early Developmental and Evolutionary Origins of Gene Body DNA Methylation Patterns in Mammalian Placentas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane I Schroeder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20-80 million years the mammalian placenta has taken on a variety of morphologies through both divergent and convergent evolution. Recently we have shown that the human placenta genome has a unique epigenetic pattern of large partially methylated domains (PMDs and highly methylated domains (HMDs with gene body DNA methylation positively correlating with level of gene expression. In order to determine the evolutionary conservation of DNA methylation patterns and transcriptional regulatory programs in the placenta, we performed a genome-wide methylome (MethylC-seq analysis of human, rhesus macaque, squirrel monkey, mouse, dog, horse, and cow placentas as well as opossum extraembryonic membrane. We found that, similar to human placenta, mammalian placentas and opossum extraembryonic membrane have globally lower levels of methylation compared to somatic tissues. Higher relative gene body methylation was the conserved feature across all mammalian placentas, despite differences in PMD/HMDs and absolute methylation levels. Specifically, higher methylation over the bodies of genes involved in mitosis, vesicle-mediated transport, protein phosphorylation, and chromatin modification was observed compared with the rest of the genome. As in human placenta, higher methylation is associated with higher gene expression and is predictive of genic location across species. Analysis of DNA methylation in oocytes and preimplantation embryos shows a conserved pattern of gene body methylation similar to the placenta. Intriguingly, mouse and cow oocytes and mouse early embryos have PMD/HMDs but their placentas do not, suggesting that PMD/HMDs are a feature of early preimplantation methylation patterns that become lost during placental development in some species and following implantation of the embryo.

  19. Mass spectrometry-based serum proteome pattern analysis in molecular diagnostics of early stage breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stobiecki Maciej

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometric analysis of the blood proteome is an emerging method of clinical proteomics. The approach exploiting multi-protein/peptide sets (fingerprints detected by mass spectrometry that reflect overall features of a specimen's proteome, termed proteome pattern analysis, have been already shown in several studies to have applicability in cancer diagnostics. We aimed to identify serum proteome patterns specific for early stage breast cancer patients using MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. Methods Blood samples were collected before the start of therapy in a group of 92 patients diagnosed at stages I and II of the disease, and in a group of age-matched healthy controls (104 women. Serum specimens were purified and the low-molecular-weight proteome fraction was examined using MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry after removal of albumin and other high-molecular-weight serum proteins. Protein ions registered in a mass range between 2,000 and 10,000 Da were analyzed using a new bioinformatic tool created in our group, which included modeling spectra as a sum of Gaussian bell-shaped curves. Results We have identified features of serum proteome patterns that were significantly different between blood samples of healthy individuals and early stage breast cancer patients. The classifier built of three spectral components that differentiated controls and cancer patients had 83% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Spectral components (i.e., protein ions that were the most frequent in such classifiers had approximate m/z values of 2303, 2866 and 3579 Da (a biomarker built from these three components showed 88% sensitivity and 78% specificity. Of note, we did not find a significant correlation between features of serum proteome patterns and established prognostic or predictive factors like tumor size, nodal involvement, histopathological grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor expression. In addition, we observed a significantly (p = 0

  20. Early Structure Formation from Primordial Density Fluctuations with a Blue, Tilted Power Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Zhu, Nick; Yoshida, Naoki; Spergel, David; Yorke, Harold W.

    2015-11-01

    While observations of large-scale structure and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide strong constraints on the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) on scales larger than 10 Mpc, the amplitude of the power spectrum on sub-galactic length scales is much more poorly constrained. We study early structure formation in a cosmological model with a blue-tilted PPS. We assume that the standard scale-invariant PPS is modified at small length scales as P(k)∼ {k}{m{{s}}} with ms > 1. We run a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to examine the dependence of the formation epoch and the characteristic mass of primordial stars on the tilt of the PPS. In models with ms > 1, star-forming gas clouds are formed at z > 100 when the formation of hydrogen molecules is inefficient because the intense CMB radiation destroys chemical intermediates. Without efficient coolant, the gas clouds gravitationally contract while retaining a high temperature. The protostars formed in such “hot” clouds grow very rapidly through accretion to become extremely massive stars that may leave massive black holes with a few hundred solar masses at z > 100. The shape of the PPS critically affects the properties and the formation epoch of the first generation of stars. Future experiments on CMB polarization and spectrum distortion may provide important information on the nature of the first stars and their formation epoch, and hence on the shape of the small-scale power spectrum.

  1. Maternal Mga is required for Wnt signaling and organizer formation in the early Xenopus embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Gu; Huijuan Shi; Li Gao; Haiyan Zhang; Qinghua Tao

    2012-01-01

    Maternal Wnt11 is both necessary and sufficient for the formation of Spemann organizer in Xenopus embryo.Xnr3 and Siamois have been identified as the direct target genes of maternal Wnt11/β-catenin during organizer induction.The depletion of maternal XTcf3 resulted in the ectopic expression of Xnr3 and Siamois,suggesting the activity of β-catenin/XTcf3 is strictly regulated in the early Xenopus embryos.Here,we show that Xenopus mga (Xmga) is a maternal gene required for dorsal axis formation.Overexpression experiments indicate that mouse Mga potentiates the activity of β-catenin in the induction of organizer-specific genes.Depletion of maternal Xmga results in the dramatic decrease of the expression of organizer genes and ventralization phenotype,indicating that Xmga is required for β-catenin function and organizer formation.Depletion of XTcf3 cannot rescue organizer gene expression and axis formation in Xmga-depleted embryos,suggesting Xmga is downstream of XTcf3 during organizer induction.We conclude that maternal Xmga is critical for the function of β-catenin during organizer formation and dorsal development of Xenopus embryo.To our knowledge,this is a report for the first time to implicate Mga in regulating Wnt signaling.

  2. Early Acheulean technology in the Rietputs Formation, South Africa, dated with cosmogenic nuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Ryan J; Granger, Darryl E; Kuman, Kathleen; Partridge, Timothy C

    2009-02-01

    An absolute dating technique based on the build-up and decay of (26)Al and (10)Be in the mineral quartz provides crucial evidence regarding early Acheulean hominid distribution in South Africa. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of an ancient alluvial deposit of the Vaal River (Rietputs Formation) in the western interior of South Africa shows that coarse gravel and sand aggradation there occurred ca 1.57+/-0.22Ma, with individual ages of samples ranging from 1.89+/-0.19 to 1.34+/-0.22Ma. This was followed by aggradation of laminated and cross-bedded fine alluvium at ca 1.26+/-0.10Ma. The Rietputs Formation provides an ideal situation for the use of the cosmogenic nuclide burial dating method, as samples could be obtained from deep mining pits at depths ranging from 7 to 16 meters. Individual dates provide only a minimum age for the stone tool technology preserved within the deposits. Each assemblage represents a time averaged collection. Bifacial tools distributed throughout the coarse gravel and sand unit can be assigned to an early phase of the Acheulean. This is the first absolute radiometric dated evidence for early Acheulean artefacts in South Africa that have been found outside of the early hominid sites of the Gauteng Province. These absolute dates also indicate that handaxe-using hominids inhabited southern Africa as early as their counterparts in East Africa. The simultaneous appearance of the Acheulean in different parts of the continent implies relatively rapid technology development and the widespread use of large cutting tools in the African continent by ca 1.6Ma.

  3. Macrophages are essential for the early wound healing response and the formation of a fibrovascular scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lizhi; Marneros, Alexander G

    2013-06-01

    After wounding, multiple cell types interact to form a fibrovascular scar; the formation and cellular origins of these scars are incompletely understood. We used a laser-injury wound model of choroidal neovascularization in the eye to determine the spatiotemporal cellular events that lead to formation of a fibrovascular scar. After laser injury, F4/80(+) myeloid cells infiltrate the wound site and induce smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression in adjacent retinal pigment epithelial cells, with subsequent formation of a SMA(+)NG2(+) myofibroblastic scaffold, into which endothelial cells then infiltrate to form a fibrovascular lesion. Cells of the fibrovascular scaffold express the proangiogenic factor IL-1β strongly, whereas retinal pigment epithelial cells are the main source of VEGF-A. Subsequent choroidal neovascularization is limited to the area demarcated by this myofibroblastic scaffold and occurs independently of epithelial- or myeloid-derived VEGF-A. The SMA(+)NG2(+) myofibroblastic cells, F4/80(+) macrophages, and adjacent epithelial cells actively proliferate in the early phase of the wound healing response. Cell-lineage tracing experiments suggest that the SMA(+)NG2(+) myofibroblastic scaffold originates from choroidal pericyte-like cells. Targeted ablation of macrophages inhibits the formation of this fibrovascular scaffold, and expression analysis reveals that these macrophages are Arg1(+)YM1(+)F4/80(+) alternatively activated M2-like macrophages, which do not require IL-4/STAT6 or IL-10 signaling for their activation. Thus, macrophages are essential for the early wound healing response and the formation of a fibrovascular scar.

  4. Minerogenic System of Magnesian Nonmetallic Deposits in Early Proterozoic Mg-rich Carbonate Formations in Eastern Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the early Proterozoic the Liryu Formation and Dashiqiao Formation of eastern Liaoning province, China, there are distributed Mg-rich carbonate rock formations, in which large to superlarge deposits of boron, magnesite, talc, Xiuyan jade etc. occur. The formation of these magnesian nonmetallic deposits was related to early Proterozoic evaporates; then these deposits underwent reworking of regional metamorphism and hydrothermal metasomatism during the Lüliang orogeny and tectono-magmatism during the Indosinian-Yanshanian. Among other things, the Mg-rich carbonates formations, minerogenetic structures and ore-forming fluids played a controlling role in the formation of the mineral deposits. The refore, it can be concluded that the mineral deposits are products of combined processes of the coupling of ore source field, fluid field, thermal field (energy field) and stress field under certain time-space conditions in the early Proterozoic and the late-stage superimposed reworking of tectono-magmatism.

  5. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  6. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then "large" carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  7. Hystricognath rodents from the Pinturas Formation, Early Middle Miocene of Patagonia, biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarz, Alejandro G.; Bellosi, Eduardo S.

    2005-01-01

    The Pinturas Formation is a continental succession, characterized by eolian sediments (mainly tuffaceous) and paleosols, originated in an upland setting of west central Patagonia. The main intraformational erosive surfaces and lithological changes define three sequences. The Formation bears a rich mammalian association (Florentino Ameghino's Astrapothericulan fauna), whose age in relation to the Santacrucian SALMA (middle Miocene) is still controversial. Recent collections from the Pinturas Formation, performed with stratigraphic control, allow differentiation of two distinct hystricognath rodent associations. The lower and middle sequences bear a particular combination of Colhuehuapian (early Miocene) and Santacrucian genera, mostly represented by species exclusively known to the Pinturas Formation ('Pinturan' association). The upper sequence bears typical Santacrucian species, more derived than its Pinturan counterparts. According to the rodent record, the lower and middle sequences of the Pinturas Formation are older than the base of the Santa Cruz Formation exposed at Monte Observación and Monte León, and the upper sequence may be correlated with the lowermost levels of the Santa Cruz Formation and deposits exposed at Karaiken that bear Ameghino's 'Notohippidian' fauna. These correlations agree with more recent radiometric dates and other biostratigraphic evidence, supporting Ameghino's original hypothesis. The Pinturan rodent assemblage of the lower and middle sequences suggests the presence of humid forests, in accordance with other faunal components and palynological data. Sedimentologic, paleopedologic, and ichnologic evidence, however, suggest environments dominated by herbaceous vegetation. This seeming contradiction is interpreted as the result of a marked environmental gradient due to the paleotopography and/or climatic fluctuations. The mammal record corresponds to the more humid intervals, which have less representation in the sedimentary record

  8. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Local Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bureau, M; Alatalo, K; Crocker, A F; Blitz, L; Young, L M; Combes, F; Bois, M; Bournaud, F; Cappellari, M; Davies, R L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, P -A; Emsellem, E; Khochfar, S; Krajnovic, D; Kuntschner, H; Lablanche, P -Y; McDermid, R M; Morganti, R; Naab, T; Oosterloo, T; Sarzi, M; Scott, N; Serra, P; Weijmans, A

    2011-01-01

    The molecular gas content of local early-type galaxies is constrained and discussed in relation to their evolution. First, as part of the Atlas3D survey, we present the first complete, large (260 objects), volume-limited single-dish survey of CO in normal local early-type galaxies. We find a surprisingly high detection rate of 22%, independent of luminosity and at best weakly dependent on environment. Second, the extent of the molecular gas is constrained with CO synthesis imaging, and a variety of morphologies is revealed. The kinematics of the molecular gas and stars are often misaligned, implying an external gas origin in over a third of the systems, although this behaviour is drastically diffferent between field and cluster environments. Third, many objects appear to be in the process of forming regular kpc-size decoupled disks, and a star formation sequence can be sketched by piecing together multi-wavelength information on the molecular gas, current star formation, and young stars. Last, early-type gala...

  10. Constraints on Feedback Processes during the Formation of Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, M.; Ferreras, I.; de La Rosa, I. G.; La Barbera, F.; de Carvalho, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this Letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.025, covering a stellar mass interval from 109 to 3 × 1011 M ⊙. Our sample features the characteristic "knee" in the surface brightness versus mass distribution at M sstarf ~ 3 × 1010 M ⊙ . We find a clear difference between the age and metallicity distributions of the stellar populations above and beyond this knee, which suggests a sudden transition from a constant, highly efficient mode of star formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing toward the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content at early times in comparison to the general population of galaxies, with half of the stars already in place by redshift z ~ 2 for all masses. The metallicity-age trend in low-mass galaxies is not compatible with infall of metal-poor gas, suggesting instead an outflow-driven relation.

  11. CONSTRAINTS ON FEEDBACK PROCESSES DURING THE FORMATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevisan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo/IAG, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferreras, I. [MSSL, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); De La Rosa, I. G. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); La Barbera, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); De Carvalho, R. R., E-mail: trevisan@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/MCT, S. J. dos Campos (Brazil)

    2012-06-20

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this Letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.025, covering a stellar mass interval from 10{sup 9} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Our sample features the characteristic 'knee' in the surface brightness versus mass distribution at M{sub *} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} . We find a clear difference between the age and metallicity distributions of the stellar populations above and beyond this knee, which suggests a sudden transition from a constant, highly efficient mode of star formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing toward the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content at early times in comparison to the general population of galaxies, with half of the stars already in place by redshift z {approx} 2 for all masses. The metallicity-age trend in low-mass galaxies is not compatible with infall of metal-poor gas, suggesting instead an outflow-driven relation.

  12. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramanarao Parasa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  13. Cosmological Simulations of Early Blackhole Formation: Halo Mergers, Tidal Disruption, and the Conditions for Direct Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Sunmyon; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is thought to be a promising path for the formation of supermassive blackholes in the early universe. We study conditions for the so-called direct collapse (DC) blackhole formation in a fully cosmological context. We combine a semi-analytic model of early galaxy formation with halo merger trees constructed from dark matter $N$-body simulations. We locate a total of 68 possible DC sites in a volume of $20\\;h^{-1}\\;\\mathrm{Mpc}$ on a side. We then perform hydrodynamics simulations for 42 selected halos to study in detail the evolution of the massive clouds within them. We find only two successful cases where the gas clouds rapidly collapse to form stars. In the other cases, gravitational collapse is prevented by the tidal force exerted by a nearby massive halo, which otherwise should serve as a radiation source necessary for DC. Ram pressure stripping disturbs the cloud approaching the source. In many cases, a DC halo and its nearby light source halo merg...

  14. Gastrointestinal migrating motor complex during early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ling; Bai Wenyuan; Ma Yongzhi; Gu Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the changes of gastrointestinal migrating motor complex (MMC) during the early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation. Methods: Totally 45 healthy adult guinea pigs were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups, that is, normal control, group B (1% cholesterol diet for 2 weeks) and group C (1% cholesterol diet for 4 weeks). Three pairs of silver electrodes were inserted into the gastric antrum, duodenum and jejunum of every animal respectively. Record of gastrointestinal MMC of these guinea pigs were recorded and analyzed.Gallbladder bile was taken to detect the formation of cholesterol gallstone. Results: There were only 29 guineapigs living. The MMC cycle time and the duration of phase Ⅱ were prolonged significantly and gradually compared with the control group (P<0.01), but the duration of phase Ⅲ became significantly and gradually shorter. Conclusion:During the early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation, the MMC cycle time and the duration of phase Ⅱ are prolonged and the duration of phase Ⅲ is shortened

  15. PREVALENCE AND SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF E. COLI IN LOW BIRTH WEIGHT NEONATES OF EARLY ONSET SEPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Singh et al.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal sepsis is one of the commonest cause of neonatal mortality in the developing world which can be classified into early onset sepsis (EOS which occurs in the first 7 days of life and late onset sepsis (LOS which occurs ≥7 days of life. E. coli has been reported to be one of the significant and most common nosocomial pathogen which may cause septicemia, pneumonia and meningitis in the newborn. Most of the antibiotics which have been used extensively as life saving are rendered useless because of the emergence of resistant strains of bacterias. Therefore for determining the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of E. coli which is responsible for EOS and LOS and to establish the relationship with birth weight, a total of 229 blood samples were obtained from the neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU who showed the clinical signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis and sent for culture and sensitivity. Out of these 229, 102 showed the positive culture, among which early onset sepsis was found in 80 neonates while late onset sepsis was diagnosed in 22 neonates. The most frequent pathogen isolated from positive blood culture was E. coli (66.66% and it was also the most common pathogen in low birth weight and preterm neonates of both early (59 cases- 57.84% and late-onset (9 cases- 8.82% sepsis and the incidence was found higher in early onset sepsis. The isolate was completely resistant to vancomycin and the resistance was higher for monotherapy of semi-synthetic penicillin group of antibiotics than their combination therapy with sulbactum. Imepenam and gatifloxacin showed the highest sensitivity (100%, followed by Piperacillin - tazobactum and ciprofloxacin, however the frequency of resistance was more common in low birth weight neonates of early onset sepsis.

  16. The influence of environmental factors on early life history patterns of flounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John Selden; Ueno, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yousuke; Walsh, Harvey; Maeda, Tsuneo; Kinoshita, Izumi; Seikai, Tadahisa; Hoss, Donald E.; Tanaka, Masaru

    1998-09-01

    The near-shore migration and settlement phases of Japanese and American flounders of the genus Paralichthys are compared and discussed relative to differences in coastal environments. Field sampling was conducted in Wakasa Bay, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, where the shelf is narrow, estuarine habitat limited and tidal range slight, and in Onslow Bay, North Carolina, USA, where the shelf is broad, estuarine habitat extensive and tide relatively strong. Distribution of larvae and juveniles suggests Japanese flounder spawn in close proximity to nursery grounds relative to flounder in Onslow Bay. Sampling of planktonic and benthic flounder just seaward of nursery grounds resulted in capture of a wide range of developmental stages in Wakasa Bay (early planktonic to juvenile), but was limited to metamorphosing larvae in Onslow Bay. Vertical distribution of larvae during the night also differed between the Bays. At night most larvae in Wakasa Bay remained near the bottom regardless of tidal stage. In contrast, larvae in Onslow Bay exhibited selective tidal stream transport. Laboratory experiments conducted to examine the behaviour of recently captured wild and laboratory-reared larvae indicated that wild flounder from Onslow Bay had an endogenous rhythm of activity that corresponded to the tide at the time of capture. In contrast, wild flounder from Wakasa Bay and laboratory-reared larvae showed no distinct activity pattern. These results suggest that physical characteristics of the environment influence the early life history patterns of flounders by modifying behaviour of migrating larvae.

  17. Patterns of Early-Life Gut Microbial Colonization during Human Immune Development: An Ecological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Laforest-Lapointe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbial colonization during early life have been reported in infants that later developed asthma, allergies, type 1 diabetes, as well as in inflammatory bowel disease patients, previous to disease flares. Mechanistic studies in animal models have established that microbial alterations influence disease pathogenesis via changes in immune system maturation. Strong evidence points to the presence of a window of opportunity in early life, during which changes in gut microbial colonization can result in immune dysregulation that predisposes susceptible hosts to disease. Although the ecological patterns of microbial succession in the first year of life have been partly defined in specific human cohorts, the taxonomic and functional features, and diversity thresholds that characterize these microbial alterations are, for the most part, unknown. In this review, we summarize the most important links between the temporal mosaics of gut microbial colonization and the age-dependent immune functions that rely on them. We also highlight the importance of applying ecology theory to design studies that explore the interactions between this complex ecosystem and the host immune system. Focusing research efforts on understanding the importance of temporally structured patterns of diversity, keystone groups, and inter-kingdom microbial interactions for ecosystem functions has great potential to enable the development of biologically sound interventions aimed at maintaining and/or improving immune system development and preventing disease.

  18. Daily Physical Activity Patterns During the Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Vijay R; Watts, Amber

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that results in severe disability. Very few studies have explored changes in daily physical activity patterns during early stages of AD when components of physical function and mobility may be preserved. Our study explored differences in daily physical activity profiles, independent of the effects of non-cognitive factors including physical function and age, among individuals with mild AD compared to controls. Patients with mild AD and controls (n = 92) recruited from the University of Kansas Alzheimer's Disease Center Registry, wore the Actigraph GT3X+ for seven days, and provided objective physical function (VO2 max) and mobility data. Using multivariate linear regression, we explored whether individuals with mild AD had different daily average and diurnal physical activity patterns compared to controls independent of non-cognitive factors that may affect physical activity, including physical function and mobility. We found that mild AD was associated with less moderate-intensity physical activity (p testing time-of-day specific physical activity interventions targeting individuals in the early stages of AD, prior to significant declines in mobility and physical function.

  19. Stages of development and injury patterns in the early years: a population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Kelly

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, there are many formal public health programs under development that aim to prevent injuries in the early years (e.g. 0–6. There are paradoxically no population-based studies that have examined patterns of injury by developmental stage among these young children. This represents a gap in the Canadian biomedical literature. The current population-based analysis explores external causes and consequences of injuries experienced by young children who present to the emergency department for assessment and treatment. This provides objective evidence about prevention priorities to be considered in anticipatory counseling and public health planning. Methods Four complete years of data (1999–2002; n = 5876 cases were reviewed from the Kingston sites of the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP, an ongoing injury surveillance initiative. Epidemiological analyses were used to characterize injury patterns within and across age groups (0–6 years that corresponded to normative developmental stages. Results The average annual rate of emergency department-attended childhood injury was 107 per 1000 (95% CI 91–123, with boys experiencing higher annual rates of injury than girls (122 vs. 91 per 1000; p Conclusion This population-based injury surveillance analysis provides a strong evidence-base to inform and enhance anticipatory counseling and other public health efforts aimed at the prevention of childhood injury during the early years.

  20. Spontaneous formation of 10-μm-scale periodic patterns in transverse-scanning femtosecond laser processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Shuichi

    2015-01-12

    We report spontaneous formation of 10-μm-scale periodic patterns in transverse-scanning femtosecond (fs) laser processing inside a glass substrate. The formation of the periodic patterns was critically dependent on the distance of the focus from the back surface; they formed only when fs pulses were focused slightly inside (∼ a few micrometers) from the back surface. The periods ranged from 7 to 16 μm, which is much longer than the distance between neighboring irradiation spots (0.1-1 μm in the present experiments), the diameter of the individual modified spots (about 2 μm), and the wavelength (0.8 μm). The patterns formed without any intentional modulation; just by scanning the sample at a constant speed during irradiation of fs laser pulses. The dependence on scanning speed and repetition rate of the laser were also investigated, and a possible formation scenario for this "long" periodic pattern was described.

  1. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  2. CdiGMP signaling at early stages of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Xian, Wujing; Utada, Andrew; Wong, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm communities on surfaces constitute an important physiological state of bacteria. CdiGMP is a secondary messenger that has recently emerged as a master regulator of biofilm behavior. It has been shown that cdiGMP can affect bacterial adhesion, motility and exopolysaccharides production, which are important in regulating biofilm formation. However, at a single cell level, the details of how cdiGMP regulate bacterial behavior are largely unknown. Here we examine the dynamics of intracellular cdiGMP levels at early stages of biofilm in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, by using cell tracking techniques. We show that cells with different cdiGMP levels play different roles in the microcolony development at early stages of biofilm. The correlation between Psl and cdiGMP levels is also investigated.

  3. Sponge spicules in phosphorites of the Early Cambrian Gezhongwu Formation, Zhijin, Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ruidong; QIAN Yi; ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Weihua; JIANG Lijun; GAO Hui

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorites occurring at the bottom of the Cambrian system contain abundant small shelly fossils, which are the product of the first episode of life explosion in the Cambrian. It was previously reported that the small shelly fossils are dominated by hyolithids, olivooids, zhijinitids, conodontomorphs, yubelichitids, camenitids and algae, with minor amounts of sponge fossils. Large amounts of sponge spicules, diverse in form, have been found for the first time in the Gezhongwu Formation phosphorites at Shixing, Zhijin County, Guizhou Province, of which such spicules as diaxon-triactins, diaxon-tetractins, pentaxon-pentactins and hexon-hexactins account for 30%. These spicules constitute the sponge clastic phosphorites made up of sponge clastics. Meanwhile, it is also expected that the radiation and diversity of sponge animals started as early as in the earliest Early Cambrian. Habit and burying environment of sponge animal are discussed in the paper.

  4. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ivankov, Olexandr I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskiy per. 9, Dolgoprudniy 141700 (Russian Federation); Feoktystov, Artem [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Technical University of Košice, Letná 9, 04200 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  5. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  6. Multidimensional Pattern Formation Has an Infinite Number of Constants of Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Mineev-Weinstein, M B

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: Extending our previous work on 2D growth for the Laplace equation we study here {\\it multidimensional} growth for {\\it arbitrary elliptic} equations, describing inhomogeneous and anisotropic pattern formations processes. We find that these nonlinear processes are governed by an infinite number of conservation laws. Moreover, in many cases {\\it all dynamics of the interface can be reduced to the linear time--dependence of only one ``moment" $M_0$} which corresponds to the changing volume while {\\it all higher moments, $M_l$, are constant in time. These moments have a purely geometrical nature}, and thus carry information about the moving shape. These conserved quantities (eqs.~(7) and (8) of this article) are interpreted as coefficients of the multipole expansion of the Newtonian potential created by the mass uniformly occupying the domain enclosing the moving interface. Thus the question of how to recover the moving shape using these conserved quantities is reduced to the classical inverse potential...

  7. From pattern formation to material computation multi-agent modelling of physarum polycephalum

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses topics of mobile multi-agent systems, pattern formation, biological modelling, artificial life, unconventional computation, and robotics. The behaviour of a simple organism which is capable of remarkable biological and computational feats that seem to transcend its simple component parts is examined and modelled. In this book the following question is asked: How can something as simple as Physarum polycephalum - a giant amoeboid single-celled organism which does not possess any neural tissue, fixed skeleton or organised musculature - can approximate complex computational behaviour during its foraging, growth and adaptation of its amorphous body plan, and with such limited resources? To answer this question the same apparent limitations as faced by the organism are applied: using only simple components with local interactions. A synthesis approach is adopted and a mobile multi-agent system with very simple individual behaviours is employed. It is shown their interactions yield emergent beha...

  8. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: pattern formation and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, K; Acker, M; Tadmouri, R; Pimienta, V

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  9. FORMATION MECHANISM AND SPATIAL PATTERN OF URBAN AGGLOMERATION IN CENTRAL JILIN OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Gan; ZHANG Ping-yu; JIAO Bin

    2006-01-01

    Urban agglomeration is made up of cities with different sizes to be linked by traffic network in a given area, and it is an inevitable result when urbanization reaches a certain level. Taking urban agglomerationin central Jilin(UACJ) as an example, this article analyzes the formation mechanism and spatial pattern of urban agglomeration in the less-developed area. First, the dynamics of UACJ has been analyzed from the aspects of geographical condition, economic foundation, policy background, and traffic condition. Then the development process is divided into three stages-single city, city group and city cluster. Secondly, the central cities are identified from the aspects of city centrality, and the development axes are classified based on economic communication capacity. Finally, the urban agglomeration is divided into five urban economic regions in order to establish the reasonable distribution of industries.

  10. A reaction diffusion model of pattern formation in clustering of adatoms on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trilochan Bagarti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study a reaction diffusion model which describes the formation of patterns on surfaces having defects. Through this model, the primary goal is to study the growth process of Ge on Si surface. We consider a two species reaction diffusion process where the reacting species are assumed to diffuse on the two dimensional surface with first order interconversion reaction occuring at various defect sites which we call reaction centers. Two models of defects, namely a ring defect and a point defect are considered separately. As reaction centers are assumed to be strongly localized in space, the proposed reaction-diffusion model is found to be exactly solvable. We use Green's function method to study the dynamics of reaction diffusion processes. Further we explore this model through Monte Carlo (MC simulations to study the growth processes in the presence of a large number of defects. The first passage time statistics has been studied numerically.

  11. Radiative feedback on early molecular gas and implications for primordial structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Petkova, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    We present results from self-consistent simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multi-frequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H_2, H_2+, D, D+, HD, HeH+, performed by using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static density field around a central radiative source; cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation; cosmological simulations of early structure formation with radiative feedback. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. The contributions from the detailed chemical network affect at a ~10% level the determination of the Stroemgren radius of an ionized bubble, and additional processes from the different species considered allows the gas to recombine slightly later, with respect to the H-only approximation. Moreover, we find that radiative effects from the cosmic microwave background are negl...

  12. Suppression of star formation in early-type galaxies by feedback from supermassive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kaviraj, Sugata; Yi, Sukyoung K; Boselli, Alessandro; Barlow, Tom; Conrow, Tim; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Chris; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Tim; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, Alex

    2006-08-24

    Detailed high-resolution observations of the innermost regions of nearby galaxies have revealed the presence of supermassive black holes. These black holes may interact with their host galaxies by means of 'feedback' in the form of energy and material jets; this feedback affects the evolution of the host and gives rise to observed relations between the black hole and the host. Here we report observations of the ultraviolet emissions of massive early-type galaxies. We derive an empirical relation for a critical black-hole mass (as a function of velocity dispersion) above which the outflows from these black holes suppress star formation in their hosts by heating and expelling all available cold gas. Supermassive black holes are negligible in mass compared to their hosts but nevertheless seem to play a critical role in the star formation history of galaxies.

  13. Berkeley Prize: Mapping the Fuel for Star Formation in Early Universe Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas, which is relatively rare in galaxies like the Milky Way, which form only a few new stars per year. Massive galaxies in the distant universe formed stars much more rapidly. Was star formation more efficient in the past, and/or were early galaxies richer in molecular gas? The answer was elusive when our instruments could probe molecules only in the most luminous and rare objects such as mergers and quasars. But a new survey of molecular gas in typical massive star-forming galaxies at redshifts from about 1.2 to 2.3 (corresponding to when the universe was 24% to 40% of its current age) reveals that distant star-forming galaxies were indeed molecular-gas rich and that the star-formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch.

  14. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, S; Ciotti, L

    2015-01-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae and the thermalization of stellar motions. High resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. In a recent numerical investigation we found that subsequent generations of stars are formed in this cold disc; this process consumes most of the cold gas, leaving at the present epoch cold masses comparable to those observed. Most of the new stellar mass formed a few Gyrs ago, and resides in a disc.

  15. Serum microRNA expression patterns that predict early treatment failure in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant K.; Preus, Leah; Hu, Qiang; Yan, Li; Long, Mark D.; Morrison, Carl D.; Nesline, Mary; Johnson, Candace S.; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Kohli, Manish; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns in the serum of prostate cancer (CaP) patients that predict the risk of early treatment failure following radical prostatectomy (RP). Microarray and Q-RT-PCR analyses identified 43 miRNAs as differentiating disease stages within 14 prostate cell lines and reflectedpublically available patient data. 34 of these miRNA were detectable in the serum of CaP patients. Association with time to biochemical progression was examined in a cohort of CaP patients following RP. A greater than two-fold increase in hazard of biochemical progression associated with altered expression of miR-103, miR-125b and miR-222 (p <.0008) in the serum of CaP patients. Prediction models based on penalized regression analyses showed that the levels of the miRNAs and PSA together were better at detecting false positives than models without miRNAs, for similar level of sensitivity. Analyses of publically available data revealed significant and reciprocal relationships between changes in CpG methylation and miRNA expression patterns suggesting a role for CpG methylation to regulate miRNA. Exploratory validation supported roles for miR-222 and miR-125b to predict progression risk in CaP. The current study established that expression patterns of serum-detectable miRNAs taken at the time of RP are prognostic for men who are at risk of experiencing subsequent early biochemical progression. These non-invasive approaches could be used to augment treatment decisions. PMID:24583788

  16. Gut Microbiome Developmental Patterns in Early Life of Preterm Infants: Impacts of Feeding and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Janton, Susan; Henderson, Wendy A; Matson, Adam; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Maas, Kendra; Graf, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in multiple aspects of human health and disease, particularly in early life. Distortions of the gut microbiota have been found to correlate with fatal diseases in preterm infants, however, developmental patterns of gut microbiome and factors affecting the colonization progress in preterm infants remain unclear. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to explore day-to-day gut microbiome patterns in preterm infants during their first 30 days of life in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and investigate potential factors related to the development of the infant gut microbiome. A total of 378 stool samples were collected daily from 29 stable/healthy preterm infants. DNA extracted from stool was used to sequence the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene region for community analysis. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and α-diversity of the community were determined using QIIME software. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum, accounting for 54.3% of the total reads. Result showed shift patterns of increasing Clostridium and Bacteroides, and decreasing Staphylococcus and Haemophilus over time during early life. Alpha-diversity significantly increased daily in preterm infants after birth and linear mixed-effects models showed that postnatal days, feeding types and gender were associated with the α-diversity, pgut microbiome and significantly higher abundance in Clostridiales and Lactobacillales than infants fed non-MBM. Permanova also showed that bacterial compositions were different between males and females and between MBM and non-MBM feeding types. In conclusion, infant postnatal age, gender and feeding type significantly contribute to the dynamic development of the gut microbiome in preterm infants.

  17. Essential function of the transcription factor Rax in the early patterning of the mammalian hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orquera, Daniela P; Nasif, Sofia; Low, Malcolm J; Rubinstein, Marcelo; de Souza, Flávio S J

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamus is a region of the anterior forebrain that controls basic aspects of vertebrate physiology, but the genes involved in its development are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate the function of the homeobox gene Rax/Rx in early hypothalamic development using a conditional targeted inactivation strategy in the mouse. We found that lack of Rax expression prior to embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) caused a general underdevelopment of the hypothalamic neuroepithelium, while inactivation at later timepoints had little effect. The early absence of Rax impaired neurogenesis and prevented the expression of molecular markers of the dorsomedial hypothalamus, including neuropeptides Proopiomelanocortin and Somatostatin. Interestingly, the expression domains of genes expressed in the ventromedial hypothalamus and infundibulum invaded dorsal hypothalamic territory, showing that Rax is needed for the proper dorsoventral patterning of the developing medial hypothalamus. The phenotypes caused by the early loss of Rax are similar to those of eliminating the expression of the morphogen Sonic hedgehog (Shh) specifically from the hypothalamus. Consistent with this similarity in phenotypes, we observed that Shh and Rax are coexpressed in the rostral forebrain at late head fold stages and that loss of Rax caused a downregulation of Shh expression in the dorsomedial portion of the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in Laminin Expression Pattern during Early Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pook

    Full Text Available Laminin isoforms laminin-511 and -521 are expressed by human embryonic stem cells (hESC and can be used as a growth matrix to culture these cells under pluripotent conditions. However, the expression of these laminins during the induction of hESC differentiation has not been studied in detail. Furthermore, the data regarding the expression pattern of laminin chains in differentiating hESC is scarce. In the current study we aimed to fill this gap and investigated the potential changes in laminin expression during early hESC differentiation induced by retinoic acid (RA. We found that laminin-511 but not -521 accumulates in the committed cells during early steps of hESC differentiation. We also performed a comprehensive analysis of the laminin chain repertoire and found that pluripotent hESC express a more diverse range of laminin chains than shown previously. In particular, we provide the evidence that in addition to α1, α5, β1, β2 and γ1 chains, hESC express α2, α3, β3, γ2 and γ3 chain proteins and mRNA. Additionally, we found that a variant of laminin α3 chain-145 kDa-accumulated in RA-treated hESC showing that these cells produce prevalently specifically modified version of α3 chain in early phase of differentiation.

  19. Changes in Laminin Expression Pattern during Early Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pook, Martin; Teino, Indrek; Kallas, Ade; Maimets, Toivo; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Jaks, Viljar

    2015-01-01

    Laminin isoforms laminin-511 and -521 are expressed by human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and can be used as a growth matrix to culture these cells under pluripotent conditions. However, the expression of these laminins during the induction of hESC differentiation has not been studied in detail. Furthermore, the data regarding the expression pattern of laminin chains in differentiating hESC is scarce. In the current study we aimed to fill this gap and investigated the potential changes in laminin expression during early hESC differentiation induced by retinoic acid (RA). We found that laminin-511 but not -521 accumulates in the committed cells during early steps of hESC differentiation. We also performed a comprehensive analysis of the laminin chain repertoire and found that pluripotent hESC express a more diverse range of laminin chains than shown previously. In particular, we provide the evidence that in addition to α1, α5, β1, β2 and γ1 chains, hESC express α2, α3, β3, γ2 and γ3 chain proteins and mRNA. Additionally, we found that a variant of laminin α3 chain-145 kDa-accumulated in RA-treated hESC showing that these cells produce prevalently specifically modified version of α3 chain in early phase of differentiation.

  20. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C. [CASA, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cyganowski, C. J., E-mail: kendrew@mpia.de [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ∼10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ∼10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  1. Mid- to Far-IR Emission and Star Formation in Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, L M; Lucero, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Many early-type galaxies have been detected at wavelengths of 24 to 160 micron, but the emission is usually dominated by heating from an AGN or from the evolved stellar population. Here we present Spitzer MIPS observations of a sample of elliptical and lenticular galaxies that are rich in cold molecular gas, and we investigate whether the MIR to FIR emission could be associated with star formation activity. The 24 micron images show a rich variety of structures, including nuclear point sources, rings, disks, and smooth extended emission. Comparisons to matched-resolution CO and radio continuum images suggest that the bulk of the 24 micron emission can be traced to star formation with some notable exceptions. The 24 micron luminosities of the CO-rich galaxies are typically a factor of 15 larger than what would be expected from the dust associated with their evolved stars. In addition, FIR/radio flux density ratios are consistent with star formation. We conclude that the star formation rates in z=0 elliptical a...

  2. Cyclic architecture of a carbonate sequence, early Aptian Shuaiba formation, Al Huwaisah field, Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetsch, J. (Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    1993-09-01

    Sequence stratigraphy of carbonates is a topic of ongoing controversy. In particular, small-scale shallowing-upward cycles can provide some key information needed for interpretation of carbonate sequences and/or third-order sea level changes. The early Aptian Shuaiba Formation in the Al Huwaisah field consists of about 90 m of shallow-water limestones. Throughout the formation, an overall decreasing influx of fine detritus is notable toward the top. The sequence can be subdivided into a basal unit and an overlying unit. Both units are composed of meter-scale shallowing-upward cycles of different composition, which can be recognized in core and well logs. Fourier analysis of the first principle component of a set of well logs (GR, FDC, CNL, Sonic) revealed an abrupt change in spectral behavior between the two units. Toward the top, the spectra are [open quotes]cleaning upward[close quotes] with an increasing pronunciation of a peak grouping of 1: 2: 5, suggesting a better preservation of orbital variations in the upper unit. Preservation of orbital forcing in shallowing-upward cycles requires rapid rates of sedimentation. In addition, increased shallow-water carbonate production on the platform is indicated by the appearance of reefal organisms. Hence, a higher rate of sedimentation and therefore a faster aggradation of the platform is inferred for the upper unit, which could have resulted from an increased rate of relative sea level rise. The sudden facies differentiation on the broad Arabian shelf in the upper part of the early Aptian reflects the development of an intrashelf basin. Changes in rate of relative sea level rise on the Arabian shelf might explain the repeated alternation from an easily correlatable ramp-type sedimentation, with slightly higher input of fine terrigenous sediment (e.g., lower unit of Shuaiba Formation) and a differentiation into platform and intrashelf basin facies due to faster aggradation (e.g., upper unit of Shuaiba Formation).

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species in Planarian Regeneration: An Upstream Necessity for Correct Patterning and Brain Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky Pirotte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research highlighted the impact of ROS as upstream regulators of tissue regeneration. We investigated their role and targeted processes during the regeneration of different body structures using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, an organism capable of regenerating its entire body, including its brain. The amputation of head and tail compartments induces a ROS burst at the wound site independently of the orientation. Inhibition of ROS production by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI or apocynin (APO causes regeneration defaults at both the anterior and posterior wound sites, resulting in reduced regeneration sites (blastemas and improper tissue homeostasis. ROS signaling is necessary for early differentiation and inhibition of the ROS burst results in defects on the regeneration of the nervous system and on the patterning process. Stem cell proliferation was not affected, as indicated by histone H3-P immunostaining, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, in situ hybridization of smedwi-1, and transcript levels of proliferation-related genes. We showed for the first time that ROS modulate both anterior and posterior regeneration in a context where regeneration is not limited to certain body structures. Our results indicate that ROS are key players in neuroregeneration through interference with the differentiation and patterning processes.

  4. Nanoscale pattern formation at surfaces under ion-beam sputtering: A perspective from continuum models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuerno, Rodolfo, E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.e [Departamento de Matematicas and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Castro, Mario [GISC and Grupo de Dinamica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Garcia, Javier [Systems Biology Ireland and GISC, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gago, Raul; Vazquez, Luis [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    Although reports on surface nanostructuring of solid targets by low to medium energy ion irradiation date back to the 1960s, only with the advent of high resolution tools for surface/interface characterization has the high potential of this procedure been recognized as a method for efficient production of surface patterns. Such morphologies are made up of periodic arrangements of nanometric sized features, like ripples and dots, with interest for technological applications due to their electronic, magnetic, and optical properties. Thus, roughly for the last ten years large efforts have been directed towards harnessing this nanofabrication technique. However, and particularly in view of recent experimental developments, we can say that the basic mechanisms controlling these pattern formation processes remain poorly understood. The lack of nanostructuring at low angles of incidence on some pure monoelemental targets, the role of impurities in the surface dynamics and other recent observations are challenging the classic view on the phenomenon as the mere interplay between the curvature dependence of the sputtering yield and surface diffusion. We review the main attempts at a theoretical (continuum) description of these systems, with emphasis on recent developments. Strong hints already exist that the nature of the morphological instability has to be rethought as originating in the material flow that is induced by the ion beam.

  5. Pattern formation, synchronization, and outbreak of biodiversity in cyclically competing games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Ni, Xuan; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Species in nature are typically mobile over diverse distance scales, examples of which range from bacteria run to long-distance animal migrations. These behaviors can have a significant impact on biodiversity. Addressing the role of migration in biodiversity microscopically is fundamental but remains a challenging problem in interdisciplinary science. We incorporate both intra- and inter-patch migrations in stochastic games of cyclic competitions and find that the interplay between the migrations at the local and global scales can lead to robust species coexistence characterized dynamically by the occurrence of remarkable target-wave patterns in the absence of any external control. The waves can emerge from either mixed populations or isolated species in different patches, regardless of the size and the location of the migration target. We also find that, even in a single-species system, target waves can arise from rare mutations, leading to an outbreak of biodiversity. A surprising phenomenon is that target waves in different patches can exhibit synchronization and time-delayed synchronization, where the latter potentially enables the prediction of future evolutionary dynamics. We provide a physical theory based on the spatiotemporal organization of the target waves to explain the synchronization phenomena. We also investigate the basins of coexistence and extinction to establish the robustness of biodiversity through migrations. Our results are relevant to issues of general and broader interest such as pattern formation, control in excitable systems, and the origin of order arising from self-organization in social and natural systems.

  6. Northern-Hemisphere snow cover patterns and formation conditions in winter 2007 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongyan; Qiao, Fangli; Shu, Qi; Yu, Long

    2016-06-01

    The Arctic sea ice minimum records appeared in the Septembers of 2007 and 2012, followed by high snow cover areas in the Northern Hemisphere winters. The snow cover distributions show different spatial patterns in these two years: increased snow cover in Central Asia and Central North America in 2007, while increased snow cover in East Asia and northwestern Europe in 2012. The high snow cover anomaly shifted to higher latitudes in winter of 2012 compared to 2007. It is noticed that the snow cover had positive anomaly in 2007 and 2012 with the following conditions: the negative geopotential height and the related cyclonic wind anomaly were favorable for upwelling, and, with the above conditions, the low troposphere and surface air temperature anomaly and water vapor anomaly were favorable for the formation and maintenance of snowfalls. The negative geopotential height, cyclonic wind and low air temperature conditions were satisfied in different locations in 2007 and 2012, resulting in different spatial snow cover patterns. The cross section of lower air temperature move to higher latitudes in winter of 2012 compared to 2007.

  7. Pattern formation, synchronization, and outbreak of biodiversity in cyclically competing games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Ni, Xuan; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Species in nature are typically mobile over diverse distance scales, examples of which range from bacteria run to long-distance animal migrations. These behaviors can have a significant impact on biodiversity. Addressing the role of migration in biodiversity microscopically is fundamental but remains a challenging problem in interdisciplinary science. We incorporate both intra- and inter-patch migrations in stochastic games of cyclic competitions and find that the interplay between the migrations at the local and global scales can lead to robust species coexistence characterized dynamically by the occurrence of remarkable target-wave patterns in the absence of any external control. The waves can emerge from either mixed populations or isolated species in different patches, regardless of the size and the location of the migration target. We also find that, even in a single-species system, target waves can arise from rare mutations, leading to an outbreak of biodiversity. A surprising phenomenon is that target waves in different patches can exhibit synchronization and time-delayed synchronization, where the latter potentially enables the prediction of future evolutionary dynamics. We provide a physical theory based on the spatiotemporal organization of the target waves to explain the synchronization phenomena. We also investigate the basins of coexistence and extinction to establish the robustness of biodiversity through migrations. Our results are relevant to issues of general and broader interest such as pattern formation, control in excitable systems, and the origin of order arising from self-organization in social and natural systems.

  8. Pattern Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis via Droplet Evaporation on Micropillars Arrays at a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarrey-Arce, A; Marin, A; Massey, A; Oknianska, A; Díaz-Fernandez, Y; Hernández-Sánchez, J F; Griffiths, E; Gardeniers, J G E; Snoeijer, J H; Lohse, Detlef; Raval, R

    2016-07-19

    We evaluate the effect of epoxy surface structuring on the evaporation of water droplets containing Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). During evaporation, droplets with S. epidermidis cells yield to complex wetting patterns such as the zipping-wetting1-3 and the coffee-stain effects. Depending on the height of the microstructure, the wetting fronts propagate circularly or in a stepwise manner, leading to the formation of octagonal or square-shaped deposition patterns.4,5 We observed that the shape of the dried droplets has considerable influence on the local spatial distribution of S. epidermidis deposited between micropillars. These changes are attributed to an unexplored interplay between the zipping-wetting1 and the coffee-stain6 effects in polygonally shaped droplets containing S. epidermidis. Induced capillary flows during evaporation of S. epidermidis are modeled with polystyrene particles. Bacterial viability measurements for S. epidermidis show high viability of planktonic cells, but low biomass deposition on the microstructured surfaces. Our findings provide insights into design criteria for the development of microstructured surfaces on which bacterial propagation could be controlled, limiting the use of biocides.

  9. In Vitro Biofilm Formation by Uropathogenic Bacteria and their Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somya Verma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uropathogens have an ability to form biofilm in urinary tract. Microorganisms growing in biofilm are associated with chronic and recurrent UTI. They are highly resistant to a variety of antimicrobial agents. There are different phenotypic methods to detect biofilm production like Tube Adherence Method (TAM, Congo Red Agar Method (CRAM, Tissue Culture Plate Method (TCPM, etc. Aim and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to observe biofilm formation by uropathogens, their antibiotic resistance pattern and to correlate biofilm formation with drug resistance. Material and Methods: Total 168 isolates were collected from urine over six months. They were subjected to AST by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Detection of biofilm production was done by TAM, CRAM, and TCPM. Results: Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate. Of the 68 clinical isolates, 54% were positive for biofilm production by TAM, 58% by CRAM, and 66% by TCPM. Compared to non-biofilm producers higher antibiotic resistance was observed among biofilm producers. TCPM was found to be more accurate. Conclusion: E. coli was the most frequent isolate. Biofilm producers were found to be resistant for multiple drugs. TCPM was found to be more quantitative and reliable

  10. Determination of density pattern of fracture in Asmari Formation in Marun oilfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheyrollah Noraeinezhad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Marun oilfield is located in the middle part of Dezful Embayment and is situated along the Aghajari, Ahvaz and Ramin anticline. Given the important role of fracture characteristics for improving production, so the aim of this research is to investigate the density pattern of fracture in Asmari formation in Marun oilfield. For this purpose, results of image log, core data, graphic well log, methods of inscribed circle analysis and curvature changes geometry of anticline were analyzed. Asmari formation is the main reservoir rock in Marun oilfield that divided into five zones. Limestone and dolomite are the main lithology of zones 1, 2 and 3 which has a high density of fractures (especially in zones with 90% dolomite. Also there is less fracture density (micro fracture in the 4 and 5 Asmari zone due to an increase of shale and marl layers and due to less break ablity has a less distribution of fractures. The result show that there are a good conformity existed between the results of inscribed circle analysis, image log, core data, curvature and the presence of fractures in Marun anticline. The data indicate that highest density of fracture density concentrates in the southern limb in the central region of anticline and also in the north limb in the northeast region of the anticline. So, finally using these parameters, it is recommended that further development and production wells be drilled in the north eastern part of the oil filed as well as center part of southern flank of the anticline.

  11. Modeling the PbI2 formation in perovskite solar cells using XRD/XPS patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Elyasi, Majid; Aldosari, Marouf; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of prolonged irradiation and air humidity on the stability of perovskite solar cells is modeled using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy patterns reported in the literature. Light or air-moisture causes the formation of a thin PbI2 or oxide defective layers (in nanoscale) at the interface of perovskite/hole-transport-layer or at the junction with metallic back contact. This thin layer blocks the carrier transport/passivation at the interfaces and cause degradation of device parameters. Variation in thickness of defective layers, changes the XRD and XPS peaks. This allows detection and estimation of the type, crystallinity and thickness of the defective layer. A simple model is developed here to extract the thickness of such thin defective layers formed in nanometer scale at the back region of several perovskite devices. Based on this information, corrected energy band diagram of every device before and after degradation/aging is drawn and discussed in order to obtain insight into the carrier transport and charge collection at the barrier region. In addition, graphene contacted perovskite devices are investigated showing that honey-comb network of graphene contact reduces the effect of aging leading to formation of a thinner defective layer at the perovskite surface compared to perovskite devices with conventional inorganic contacts i.e. Au, Al.

  12. Formation of proximal and anterior limb skeleton requires early function of Irx3 and Irx5 and is negatively regulated by Shh signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danyi; Sakuma, Rui; Vakili, Niki A; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Deimling, Steven; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Hopyan, Sevan; Hui, Chi-chung

    2014-04-28

    Limb skeletal pattern relies heavily on graded Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. As a morphogen and growth cue, Shh regulates identities of posterior limb elements, including the ulna/fibula and digits 2 through 5. In contrast, proximal and anterior structures, including the humerus/femur, radius/tibia, and digit 1, are regarded as Shh independent, and mechanisms governing their specification are unclear. Here, we show that patterning of the proximal and anterior limb skeleton involves two phases. Irx3 and Irx5 (Irx3/5) are essential in the initiating limb bud to specify progenitors of the femur, tibia, and digit 1. However, these skeletal elements can be restored in Irx3/5 null mice when Shh signaling is diminished, indicating that Shh negatively regulates their formation after initiation. Our data provide genetic evidence supporting the concept of early specification and progressive determination of anterior limb pattern.

  13. Seasonal and temporal patterns of NDMA formation potentials in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Habibullah; Kim, Daekyun; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-02-01

    The seasonal and temporal patterns of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potentials (FPs) were examined with water samples collected monthly for 21 month period in 12 surface waters. This long term study allowed monitoring the patterns of NDMA FPs under dynamic weather conditions (e.g., rainy and dry periods) covering several seasons. Anthropogenically impacted waters which were determined by high sucralose levels (>100 ng/L) had higher NDMA FPs than limited impacted sources (spring months, while seasonal mean values remained relatively consistent. The study also showed that watershed characteristics played an important role in the seasonal and temporal patterns. In the two dam-controlled river systems (SW A and G), the NDMA FP levels at the downstream sampling locations were controlled by the NDMA levels in the dams independent of either the increases in discharge rates due to water releases from the dams prior to or during the heavy rain events or intermittent high NDMA FP levels observed at the upstream of dams. The large reservoirs and impoundments on rivers examined in this study appeared serving as an equalization basin for NDMA precursors. On the other hand, in a river without an upstream reservoir (SW E), the NDMA levels were influenced by the ratio of an upstream wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent discharge to the river discharge rate. The impact of WWTP effluent decreased during the high river flow periods due to rain events. Linear regression with independent variables DOC, DON, and sucralose yielded poor correlations with NDMA FP (R(2) < 0.27). Multiple linear regression analysis using DOC and log [sucralose] yielded a better correlation with NDMA FP (R(2) = 0.53).

  14. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  15. Integrated borehole and outcrop study for documentation of sea level cycles within the Early Eocene Naredi Formation,western Kutch,India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Urbashi; Sarkar; Santanu; Banerjee; P.K.Saraswati

    2012-01-01

    A combined micropalaeontological and sedimentological investigation of the Early Eocene Naredi Formation (thickness varying between 20 m and 60 m) reveals a complete third-order cycle and six fourth-order sea level cycles. Within the third-order cycle the foraminiferal abundance and diversity gradually increase upwards and reach their maximum values at about 41 m thickness above the base of the formation and subsequently decrease upward and finally give way upward to an unfossiliferous zone at the topmost part. Within a fourth-order cycle foraminiferal abundance and diversity exhibit a similar increasing and decreasing pattern. Bounded between two unconformities the Naredi Formation represents a sequence. A highly fossiliferous Assilinabearing limestone interval represents the maximum flooding zone which separates the transgressive systems tract at the base from the highstand systems tract at the top.

  16. A generic model of pattern formation in Mississippi Valley-Type deposits based on analytical findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Veveakis, Manolis; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Poulet, Thomas; Koehn, Daniel; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Chung, Peter; Berndt, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Rhythmically banded dolomites (zebra dolomite) are found worldwide, and are frequently associated with mineralization of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT). These rocks consist of dark fine grained and impurity-rich layers alternating with light coarse grained and virtually impurity-free layers. The texture of the light layers is similar to the one of tectonic syntaxial veins where crystals grow towards a median line. We present petrographic and chemical analysis of zebra dolomite samples from the San Vicente mine, Central Peru. The applied methods are petrographic microscopy, SEM, EBSD, EMP and LA-ICP-MS. The findings influence the development of a generic model of pattern formation. We found the density and the distribution of second-phase material to be one striking feature. The impurities are accumulated in the dark layers, which show an even higher density of second-phase material than the surrounding impurity-rich dolomite. With CL, it was possible to detect a luminescent structure in the center of the light bands which seems to be present independent of the thickness and spacing of the respective layers. This structure was analysed in more detail with EMP. We further found that the dolomite crystals in the dark and light layers are chemically similar but show a variation in some trace elements. Based on the analytical findings, we put forward a mathematical model of zebra dolomite formation based on Cnoidal waves. We believe that the light coarse grained layers represent hydromechanical instabilities arising during the diagenetic compaction of a fluid saturated, impurity-rich dolomite. Our approach is based on the extension of the classical compaction bands theory to a viscose, non-linear rheology. In the model, the spacing between two light coarse grained layers is linked to the compaction length during the pattern formation. With the formulation of a 1D steady-state solution we can relate the genesis of the structure to physical parameter, such as

  17. Gut Microbiome Developmental Patterns in Early Life of Preterm Infants: Impacts of Feeding and Gender.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Cong

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota plays a key role in multiple aspects of human health and disease, particularly in early life. Distortions of the gut microbiota have been found to correlate with fatal diseases in preterm infants, however, developmental patterns of gut microbiome and factors affecting the colonization progress in preterm infants remain unclear. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to explore day-to-day gut microbiome patterns in preterm infants during their first 30 days of life in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU and investigate potential factors related to the development of the infant gut microbiome. A total of 378 stool samples were collected daily from 29 stable/healthy preterm infants. DNA extracted from stool was used to sequence the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene region for community analysis. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs and α-diversity of the community were determined using QIIME software. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum, accounting for 54.3% of the total reads. Result showed shift patterns of increasing Clostridium and Bacteroides, and decreasing Staphylococcus and Haemophilus over time during early life. Alpha-diversity significantly increased daily in preterm infants after birth and linear mixed-effects models showed that postnatal days, feeding types and gender were associated with the α-diversity, p< 0.05-0.01. Male infants were found to begin with a low α-diversity, whereas females tended to have a higher diversity shortly after birth. Female infants were more likely to have higher abundance of Clostridiates, and lower abundance of Enterobacteriales than males during early life. Infants fed mother's own breastmilk (MBM had a higher diversity of gut microbiome and significantly higher abundance in Clostridiales and Lactobacillales than infants fed non-MBM. Permanova also showed that bacterial compositions were different between males and females and between MBM and non-MBM feeding types

  18. The educative prevention of the early stage of educationist’s formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Alfonso Nazco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a characterization of the educative prevention stage at the early professional formation process of educacionist in Sancti Spìritus province. The study is done by the indication analysis of assistant, learning, permanence and behavior at youths who course pedagogical carrers, and haven’t expressed a desire stage yet. The main shown results dealt with the assumption of the searching variables and its indicators, the construction of instruments and the definition of aspects concerning the educative prevention at the early stage of educationist’s formation in the selected choosing. Theoretical, empirical and statistical- math, methods were used which were helped by the constructed instruments and the triangulations among them thus arriving to generalizations for the caracterization. The results have better the work at the area project of the educative prevention in adolescents and youths in the territory, witch mainly concern the desing and implementation of actions withing the pedagogical process, foccuse in the integration of institutions, socializer and educative agents functioning to eductive prevention.

  19. Constraints on feedback processes during the formation of early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, Marina; de la Rosa, Ignacio; La Barbera, Francesco; de Carvalho, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and the high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from SDSS-DR7 over the redshift range 0.01formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing towards the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content...

  20. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits: the Hardeberga Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Pedersen, Gunver K.

    2017-09-01

    During the early Cambrian, the Danish island Bornholm was situated on the northern edge of the continent Baltica with palaeolatitudes of about 35°S. An early Cambrian (Terreneuvian) transgression inundated large areas of Baltica including Bornholm creating shallow marine and coastline environments. During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well-preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal structures (medusoids) are present in the quarry, but due to the relative poor preservation of their fine-scale structures it is difficult to determine if the discoids represent true medusae imprints or inorganic structures. The preservation of the shallow-water bedforms as well as the possible medusae imprints is related to either the formation of thin mud layers, formed during a period of calm water when winds blew offshore for a longer period, or to the growth of bacterial mats. The orientation of the wave-formed bedforms indicates a local palaeoshoreline trending NE-SW and facing a large ocean to the north.