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Sample records for early optical afterglow

  1. RAPTOR Observations of the Early Optical Afterglow from GRB 050319

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, P. R.; Vestrand, W. T.; Wren, J. A.; White, R. R.; Evans, S. M.; Casperson, D.

    2005-07-01

    The RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) system at Los Alamos National Laboratory observed GRB 050319 starting 25.4 s after γ-ray emission triggered the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board the Swift satellite. Our well-sampled light curve of the early optical afterglow is composed of 32 points (derived from 70 exposures) that measure the flux decay during the first hour after the GRB. The GRB 050319 light curve measured by RAPTOR can be described as a relatively gradual flux decline (power-law index α=-0.38) with a transition, at about ~400 s after the GRB, to a faster flux decay (α=-0.91). The addition of other available measurements to the RAPTOR light curve suggests that another emission component emerged after ~104 s. We hypothesize that the early afterglow emission is powered by extended energy injection or delayed reverse-shock emission followed by the emergence of forward-shock emission.

  2. Energy input and response from prompt and early optical afterglow emission in γ-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Wren, J. A.; Wozniak, P. R.; Aptekar, R.; Golentskii, S.; Pal'Shin, V.; Sakamoto, T.; White, R. R.; Evans, S.; Casperson, D.; Fenimore, E.

    2006-07-01

    The taxonomy of optical emission detected during the critical first few minutes after the onset of a γ-ray burst (GRB) defines two broad classes: prompt optical emission correlated with prompt γ-ray emission, and early optical afterglow emission uncorrelated with the γ-ray emission. The standard theoretical interpretation attributes prompt emission to internal shocks in the ultra-relativistic outflow generated by the internal engine; early afterglow emission is attributed to shocks generated by interaction with the surrounding medium. Here we report on observations of a bright GRB that, for the first time, clearly show the temporal relationship and relative strength of the two optical components. The observations indicate that early afterglow emission can be understood as reverberation of the energy input measured by prompt emission. Measurements of the early afterglow reverberations therefore probe the structure of the environment around the burst, whereas the subsequent response to late-time impulsive energy releases reveals how earlier flaring episodes have altered the jet and environment parameters. Many GRBs are generated by the death of massive stars that were born and died before the Universe was ten per cent of its current age, so GRB afterglow reverberations provide clues about the environments around some of the first stars.

  3. POLARIZATION EVOLUTION OF EARLY OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-01-10

    The central engine and jet composition of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain mysterious. Here we suggest that observations on the polarization evolution of early optical afterglows may shed light on these questions. We first study the dynamics of a reverse shock and a forward shock that are generated during the interaction of a relativistic jet and its ambient medium. The jet is likely magnetized with a globally large-scale magnetic field from the central engine. The existence of the reverse shock requires that the magnetization degree of the jet should not be high (σ ≤ 1), so that the jet is mainly composed of baryons and leptons. We then calculate the light curves and polarization evolution of early optical afterglows and find that when the polarization position angle changes by 90° during the early afterglow, the polarization degree is zero for a toroidal magnetic field but is very likely to be nonzero for an aligned magnetic field. This result would be expected to provide a probe for the central engine of GRBs because an aligned field configuration could originate from a magnetar central engine and a toroidal field configuration could be produced from a black hole via the Blandford–Znajek mechanism. Finally, for such two kinds of magnetic field configurations, we fit the observed data of the early optical afterglow of GRB 120308A equally well.

  4. The early X-ray afterglows of optically bright and dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi-Qing

    2006-01-01

    A systematical study on the early X-ray afterglows of both optically bright and dark gamma-ray bursts (B-GRBs and D-GRBs) observed by Swift has been presented. Our sample includes 25 GRBs. Among them 13 are B-GRBs and 12 are D-GRBs. Our results show that the distributions of the X-ray afterglow fluxes ($F_{X}$), the gamma-ray fluxes ($S_{\\gamma}$), and the ratio ($R_{\\gamma, X}$) for both the D-GRBs and B-GRBs are similar. The differences of these distributions for the two kinds of GRBs shoul...

  5. GRB Optical and Infrared Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical and infra-red afterglow observations are reviewed. I will also discuss the indications that long-duration GRBs seem to favour the `collapsar' model. Among these are the debated connection between GRBs and supernovae, and the location of GRB afterglows with respect to their host galaxies. PMV is supported by the NWO Spinoza grant.

  6. The optical afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 000926

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Dall, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate with the case of GRB 000926 how Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) can be used as cosmological lighthouses to identify and study star forming galaxies at high redshifts. The optical afterglow of the burst was located with optical imaging at the Nordic Optical Telescope 20.7 hours...

  7. The bright optical afterglow of the long GRB 001007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, J.M.C.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present optical follow up observations of the long GRB 001007 between 6.14 hours and similar to468 days after the event. An unusually bright optical afterglow (OA) was seen to decline following a steep power law decay with index alpha = -2.03 +/- 0.11, possibly indicating a break in the light ...

  8. THE AFTERGLOWS OF SWIFT-ERA GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. COMPARING PRE-SWIFT AND SWIFT-ERA LONG/SOFT (TYPE II) GRB OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Schulze, S.; Zhang, B.; Malesani, D.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Nakar, E.; Pozanenko, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Wilson, A. C.; Butler, N. R.; Jakobsson, P.; Andreev, M.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Biryukov, V.; Boettcher, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chincarini, G.; Cobb, B. E.

    2010-01-01

    We have gathered optical photometry data from the literature on a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows including GRBs up to 2009 September, for a total of 76 GRBs, and present an additional three pre-Swift GRBs not included in an earlier sample. Furthermore, we publish 840 additional new photometry data points on a total of 42 GRB afterglows, including large data sets for GRBs 050319, 050408, 050802, 050820A, 050922C, 060418, 080413A, and 080810. We analyzed the light curves of all GRBs in the sample and derived spectral energy distributions for the sample with the best data quality, allowing us to estimate the host-galaxy extinction. We transformed the afterglow light curves into an extinction-corrected z = 1 system and compared their luminosities with a sample of pre-Swift afterglows. The results of a former study, which showed that GRB afterglows clustered and exhibited a bimodal distribution in luminosity space, are weakened by the larger sample. We found that the luminosity distribution of the two afterglow samples (Swift-era and pre-Swift) is very similar, and that a subsample for which we were not able to estimate the extinction, which is fainter than the main sample, can be explained by assuming a moderate amount of line-of-sight host extinction. We derived bolometric isotropic energies for all GRBs in our sample, and found only a tentative correlation between the prompt energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at 1 day after the GRB in the z = 1 system. A comparative study of the optical luminosities of GRB afterglows with echelle spectra (which show a high number of foreground absorbing systems) and those without, reveals no indication that the former are statistically significantly more luminous. Furthermore, we propose the existence of an upper ceiling on afterglow luminosities and study the luminosity distribution at early times, which was not accessible before the advent of the Swift satellite. Most GRBs feature

  9. On the optical and X-ray afterglows of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2002-01-01

    We severely criticize the consuetudinary analysis of the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the conical-ejection fireball scenarios. We argue that, instead, recent observations imply that the long-duration GRBs and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets of cannonballs (CBs) emitted in supernova explosions. The CBs are heated by their collision with the supernova shell. The GRB is the boosted surface radiation the CBs emit as they reach the transparent outskirts of the shell. The exiting CBs further decelerate by sweeping up interstellar matter (ISM). The early afterglow is dominated by thermal bremsstrahlung from the cooling CB, the late afterglow by synchrotron radiation from the ISM electrons swept up by the CBs. We show that this model fits simply and remarkably well all the measured optical afterglows of the 15 GRBs with known redshift. We find that the CBs of GRB 970508 were gravitationally lensed by an intervening star, and moved extremely superluminally for kiloparsecs. The aft...

  10. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersema, K; Covino, S; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Götz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; di Serego Alighieri, S; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Fariña, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Willingale, R

    2014-05-08

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.

  11. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiersema, K.; Covino, S.; Toma, K.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of th...

  12. Can optical afterglows be used to discriminate between Type I and Type II GRBs?

    OpenAIRE

    Kann, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    The precise localization of short/hard (Type I) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in recent years has answered many questions but raised even more. I present some results of a systematic study of the optical afterglows of long/soft (Type II) and short/hard (Type I) GRBs, focusing on the optical luminosity as another puzzle piece in the classification of GRBs.

  13. MODELING THE EARLY AFTERGLOW IN THE SHORT AND HARD GRB 090510

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. H. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de México, DF (Mexico); Veres, P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Duran, R. Barniol, E-mail: nifraija@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: wlee@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: pv0004@uah.edu, E-mail: rbarniol@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The bright, short, and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard the Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features to the Fermi -LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray, and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission from the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that the progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.

  14. The afterglow and complex environment of the optically dim burst GRB 980613

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, J.; Thomsen, Bente; Nielsen, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    of the optical afterglow was mainly due to the fairly at spectral shape rather than internal reddening in the host galaxy. We also present late-time Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph images of the field in which GRB 980613 occurred, obtained 799 days after the burst. These images show...

  15. The circumburst environment of a FRED GRB: study of the prompt emission and X-ray/optical afterglow of GRB 051111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidorzi, C.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Rol, E.; Bode, M. F.; Carter, D.; La Parola, V.; Melandri, A.; Monfardini, A.; Mottram, C. J.; O'Brien, P. T.; Page, K. L.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We report a multi-wavelength analysis of the prompt emission and early afterglow of GRB 051111 and discuss its properties in the context of current fireball models. Methods: The detection of GRB 051111 by the Burst Alert Telescope on-board Swift triggered early BVRi' observations with the 2-m robotic Faulkes Telescope North in Hawaii, as well as X-ray observations with the Swift X-Ray Telescope. Results: The prompt γ-ray emission shows a classical FRED profile. The optical afterglow light curves are fitted with a broken power law, with α_1=0.35 to α_2=1.35 and a break time around 12 min after the GRB. Although contemporaneous X-ray observations were not taken, a power law connection between the γ-ray tail of the FRED temporal profile and the late XRT flux decay is feasible. Alternatively, if the X-ray afterglow tracks the optical decay, this would represent one of the first GRBs for which the canonical steep-shallow-normal decay typical of early X-ray afterglows has been monitored optically. We present a detailed analysis of the intrinsic extinction, elemental abundances and spectral energy distribution. From the absorption measured in the low X-ray band we find possible evidence for an overabundance of some α elements such as oxygen, [O/Zn] = 0.7 ± 0.3, or, alternatively, for a significant presence of molecular gas. The IR-to-X-ray Spectral Energy Distribution measured at 80 min after the burst is consistent with the cooling break lying between the optical and X-ray bands. Extensive modelling of the intrinsic extinction suggests dust with big grains or grey extinction profiles. The early optical break is due either to an energy injection episode or, less probably, to a stratified wind environment for the circumburst medium.

  16. The optical afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 000926

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Dall, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    We present the discovery of the Optical Transient (OT) of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000926. The optical transient was detected independently with the Nordic Optical Telescope and at Calar Alto 22.2 hours after the burst. At this time the magnitude of the transient was R = 19.36. The t...

  17. The relation of the colors of the optical afterglow of GRB030329/SN 2003dh to other afterglows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 28, 04-05 (2005), s. 545-548 ISSN 0390-5551. [Gamma-Ray Burst in the Afterglow Era. Roma, 18.10.2004-22.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Keywords : gamma-ray sources * gamma-ray bursts * supernovae Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  18. EARLY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN A STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH A POWER-LAW DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2013-01-01

    A long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) has been widely thought to arise from the collapse of a massive star, and it has been suggested that its ambient medium is a homogenous interstellar medium (ISM) or a stellar wind. There are two shocks when an ultra-relativistic fireball that has been ejected during the prompt gamma-ray emission phase sweeps up the circumburst medium: a reverse shock that propagates into the fireball, and a forward shock that propagates into the ambient medium. In this paper, we investigate the temporal evolution of the dynamics and emission of these two shocks in an environment with a general density distribution of n∝R –k (where R is the radius) by considering thick-shell and thin-shell cases. A GRB afterglow with one smooth onset peak at early times is understood to result from such external shocks. Thus, we can determine the medium density distribution by fitting the onset peak appearing in the light curve of an early optical afterglow. We apply our model to 19 GRBs and find that their k values are in the range of 0.4-1.4, with a typical value of k ∼ 1, implying that this environment is neither a homogenous ISM with k = 0 nor a typical stellar wind with k = 2. This shows that the progenitors of these GRBs might have undergone a new mass-loss evolution

  19. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, H.

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent...... precursor signal 62 s prior to trigger. The afterglow was detected in ESO VLT, NTT, and DK1.54m follow-up observations. Broad-band and spectroscopic observations of the spectral energy distribution reveals a sharp break at optical wavelengths which is interpreted as a Ly alpha absorption edge at 6700...

  20. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. I.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, H.

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent prec...

  1. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.; Jesen, B.L.

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent prec...

  2. On the Polarization of Gamma Ray Bursts and their Optical Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    The polarization of the optical afterglow (AG) of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) has only been measured in a few instances at various times after the GRB. In all cases except the best measured one (GRB 030329) the observed polarization and its evolution are simple and easy to explain in the most naive version of the "Cannonball'' model of GRBs: the "intrinsic" AG polarization is small and the observations reflect the "foreground" effects of the host galaxy and ours. The polarization observed in GRB 030329 behaves chaotically, its understanding requires reasonable but ad-hoc ingredients. The polarization of the gamma rays of a GRB has only been measured in the case of GRB 021206. The result is debated, but similar measurements would be crucial to the determination of the GRB-generating mechanism.

  3. Analysis of the late phase of three optical afterglows of GRBs using color indices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 28, 04-05 (2005), s. 549-552 ISSN 0390-5551. [Gamma-Ray Burst in the Afterglow Era. Roma, 18.10.2004-22.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Keywords : gamma-ray sources * gamma-ray bursts * supernova e Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  4. Complicated variations in the early optical afterglow of GRB 090726

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Polášek, Cyril; Jelínek, M.; Hudec, René; Štrobl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 510, February (2010), A49/1-A49/5 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA102/09/0997; ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma-ray burst * radiation mechanisms * plasmas Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.410, year: 2010

  5. DISCOVERY OF SMOOTHLY EVOLVING BLACKBODIES IN THE EARLY AFTERGLOW OF GRB 090618: EVIDENCE FOR A SPINE–SHEATH JET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai—400005 (India)

    2015-10-20

    GRB 090618 is a bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) with multiple pulses. It shows evidence of thermal emission in the initial pulses as well as in the early afterglow phase. Because high-resolution spectral data from the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) are available for the early afterglow, we investigate the shape and evolution of the thermal component in this phase using data from the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the Swift/XRT, and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors. An independent fit to the BAT and XRT data reveals two correlated blackbodies with monotonically decreasing temperatures. Hence, we investigated the combined data with a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law (2BBPL), a model suggested for several bright GRBs. We elicit the following interesting features of the 2BBPL model: (1) the same model is applicable from the peak of the last pulse in the prompt emission to the afterglow emission, (2) the ratio of temperatures and the fluxes of the two blackbodies remains constant throughout the observations, (3) the blackbody temperatures and fluxes show a monotonic decrease with time, with the BB fluxes dropping about a factor of two faster than that of the power-law (PL) emission, and (4) attributing the blackbody emission to photospheric emissions, we find that the photospheric radii increase very slowly with time, and the lower-temperature blackbody shows a larger emitting radius than that of the higher-temperature blackbody. We find some evidence that the underlying shape of the nonthermal emission is a cutoff power law rather than a PL. We sketch a spine–sheath jet model to explain our observations.

  6. Colour variations in the GRB 120327A afterglow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Zaninoni, E.; Campana, S.; Bolmer, J.; Cobb, B. E.; Gorosabel, J.; Kim, J.W.; Kuindersma, S.; Kuroda, D.; Malesani, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Nappo, F.; Sbarufatti, B.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I.A.; Topinka, M.; Trotter, G.; Virgili, F. J.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Haislip, J.B.; Hanayama, H.; Hanlon, L.; Im, M.; Ivarsen, K.M.; Japelj, J.; Jelínek, Martin; Kawai, N.; Kobayashi, S.; Kopac, D.; LaCluyze, A.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Murphy, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Salvaterra, R.; Salafia, O. S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 607, October (2017), A29/1-A29/5 E-ISSN 1432-0746 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gamma-ray burst * time-dependent photoionization * early optical afterglow Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy , Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.014, year: 2016

  7. Thermal components in the early X-ray afterglows of GRBs: likely cocoon emission and constraints on the progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valan, Vlasta; Larsson, Josefin; Ahlgren, Björn

    2018-02-01

    The early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are usually well described by absorbed power laws. However, in some cases, additional thermal components have been identified. The origin of this emission is debated, with proposed explanations including supernova shock breakout, emission from a cocoon surrounding the jet, as well as emission from the jet itself. A larger sample of detections is needed in order to place constraints on these different models. Here, we present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 74 GRBs observed by Swift X-ray Telescope in a search for thermal components. We report six detections in our sample, and also confirm an additional three cases that were previously reported in the literature. The majority of these bursts have a narrow range of blackbody radii around ˜2 × 1012 cm, despite having a large range of luminosities (Lpeak ˜ 1047-1051 erg s-1). This points to an origin connected to the progenitor stars, and we suggest that emission from a cocoon breaking out from a thick wind may explain the observations. For two of the bursts in the sample, an explanation in terms of late prompt emission from the jet is instead more likely. We also find that these thermal components are preferentially detected when the X-ray luminosity is low, which suggests that they may be hidden by bright afterglows in the majority of GRBs.

  8. Prompt and Afterglow Emission from Short GRB Cocoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsony, Brian; Lazzati, Davide; López-Cámara, Diego; Workman, Jared; Moskal, Jeremiah; Cantiello, Matteo; Perna, Rosalba

    2018-01-01

    We present simulations of short GRB jets that create a wide cocoon of mildly relativistic material surrounding the narrow, highly relativistic jet. We model the prompt and afterglow emission from the jet and cocoon at a range of observer angles relative to the jet axis. Even far off axis, prompt X-ray and gamma-ray emission from the cocoon may be detectable by FERMI GBM out to several 10’s of Mpc. Afterglow emission off-axis is dominated by cocoon material at early times (hours - days). The afterglow should be detectable at a wide range of frequencies (radio, optical, X-ray) for a large fraction of off-axis short GRBs within 200 Mpc, the detection range of aLIGO at design sensitivity. Given recent events, cocoon emission may be very important in the future for localizing LIGO-detected neutron star mergers.

  9. The Early (<1 hr) Multi Colour Afterglow of GRB 050502a with the 2-m Liverpool Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidorzi, C.; Monfardini, A.; Gomboc, A.; Mundell, C. G.; Steele, I. A.; Carter, D.; Bode, M. F.; Smith, R. J.; Mottram, C. J.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.

    2006-12-01

    The 2-m robotic Liverpool Telescope automatically discovered the optical afterglow of the INTEGRAL gamma-ray burst GRB 050502a 3 min after the GRB onset. The automatic identification of a bright optical transient of r'~15.8 triggered for the first time a multi colour observation sequence in the BVr'i' filters during the first hour after a GRB. All the four light curves are fitted by a simple power law with index of 1.2±0.1. We also find evidence for an achromatic bump rising at t~0.02 days. We investigate different scenarios compatible with the data. We find possible evidence for a uniform circumburst medium with clumps in density, as in the case of GRB 021004. The alternative case of a wind environment cannot be ruled out, although it can hardly account for our observations. The alternative interpretation of the bump, as the result of a refreshed shock, appears to be more problematic, although it cannot be ruled out either.

  10. Detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 000630: Implications for dark bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present the discovery of the optical transient of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000630. The optical transient was detected with the Nordic Optical Telescope 21.1 hours after the burst. At the time of discovery the magnitude of the transient was R = 23.04 +/- 0.08. The transient display...

  11. Chameleon Induced Atomic Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  12. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter. (orig.)

  13. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  14. EARLY-TIME VLA OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND AFTERGLOW ANALYSIS OF THE FERMI/LAT DETECTED GRB 130907A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A * ), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock

  15. Detection of the Optical Afterglow of GRB 000630: Implications for Dark Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaria, and with the German- Spanish Astronomical...of ∼1.0, have of the CNAA at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Article published by EDP...taken using ALFOSC, which is owned by the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA) and operated at the Nordic Optical Telescope under agreement

  16. Colour variations in the GRB 120327A afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Zaninoni, E.; Campana, S.; Bolmer, J.; Cobb, B. E.; Gorosabel, J.; Kim, J.-W.; Kuin, P.; Kuroda, D.; Malesani, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Nappo, F.; Sbarufatti, B.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Topinka, M.; Trotter, A. S.; Virgili, F. J.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Haislip, J. B.; Hanayama, H.; Hanlon, L.; Im, M.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Japelj, J.; Jelínek, M.; Kawai, N.; Kobayashi, S.; Kopac, D.; LaCluyzé, A. P.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Murphy, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Salvaterra, R.; Salafia, O. S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long Swift GRB 120327A afterglow data to investigate possible causes of the observed early-time colour variations. Methods: We collected data from various instruments and telescopes in X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared bands, and determined the shapes of the afterglow early-time light curves. We studied the overall temporal behaviour and the spectral energy distributions from early to late times. Results: The ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves can be modelled with a single power-law component between 200 and 2 × 104 s after the burst event. The X-ray light curve shows a canonical steep-shallow-steep behaviour that is typical of long gamma-ray bursts. At early times a colour variation is observed in the ultraviolet/optical bands, while at very late times a hint of a re-brightening is visible. The observed early-time colour change can be explained as a variation in the intrinsic optical spectral index, rather than an evolution of the optical extinction. Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/607/A29

  17. Optical light curve of GRB 121011A: a textbook for the onset of GRB afterglow in a mixture of ISM and wind-type medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wei, Jian-Yan; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Han, Xu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical observations of GRB 121011A by the 0.8m TNT facility at Xinglong observatory, China. The light curve of the optical afterglow shows a smooth and featureless bump during the epoch of ∼130 s and ∼5000 s with a rising index of 1.57 ± 0.28 before the break time of 539 ± 44 s, and a decaying index of about 1.29 ± 0.07 up to the end of our observations. Moreover, the X-ray light curve decays in a single power-law with a slope of about 1.51 ± 0.03 observed by XRT onboard Swift from 100 s to about 10 000 s after the burst trigger. The featureless optical light curve could be understood as an onset process under the external-shock model. The typical frequency has been below or near the optical one before the deceleration time, and the cooling frequency is located between the optical and X-ray wavelengths. The external medium density has a transition from a mixed stage of ISM and wind-type medium before the peak time to the ISM at the later phase. The joint-analysis of X-ray and optical light curves shows that the emissions from both frequencies are consistent with the prediction of the standard afterglow model without any energy injections, indicating that the central engine has stopped its activity and does not restart anymore after the prompt phase. (paper)

  18. Strategies for Prompt Searches for GRB Afterglows: The Discovery of GRB 001011 Optical/Near-Infrared Counterpart Using Colour-Colour Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorosabel, J.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Wolf, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Pedersen, H.; Christensen, L.; Jensen, B. L.; Moller, P.; Afonso, J.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical and near-infrared counterpart to GRB 001011. The GRB 001011 error box determined by Beppo-SAX was simultaneously imaged in the near-infrared by the 3.58-m. New Technology Telescope and in the optical by the 1.54-m Danish Telescope - 8 hr after the gamma-ray event. We implement the colour-colour discrimination technique proposed by Rhoads (2001) and extend it using near-IR data as well. We present the results provided by an automatic colour-colour discrimination pipe-line developed to discern the different populations of objects present in the GRB 001011 error box. Our software revealed three candidates based on single-epoch images. Second-epoch observations carried out approx. 3.2 days after the burst revealed that the most likely candidate had faded thus identifying it with the counterpart to the GRB. In deep R-band images obtained 7 months after the burst a faint (R=25.38 plus or minus 0.25) elongated object, presumably the host galaxy of GRB 001011, was detected at the position of the afterglow. The GRB 001011 afterglow is the first discovered with the assistance of colour-colour diagram techniques. We discuss the advantages of using this method and its application to boxes determined by future missions.

  19. GRB afterglows: optical searches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 80, - (2000), s. 06/141-06/145 ISSN 0920-5632. [ Texas symposium on relativistic astrophysics and cosmology /19./. Paris, 14.12.1998-18.12.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/99/0145 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2000

  20. Multiwavelength detectability of Pop III GRBs from afterglow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D.

    2017-05-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) stars could reveal the formation history and properties of these first generation stars. Through detailed simulation, we predict the prospects of detecting these afterglows with a range of established, existing and upcoming telescopes across the spectrum from radio waves to X-rays. The simulations show that the afterglow light curves of Pop III GRBs at high redshift (≳8) are very similar to those of Pop I/II GRBs at lower redshift (˜2), with the distinction that Lyα absorption at Pop III redshifts removes any optical [and some near-infrared (NIR)] component. We calculate that within a single field of view (FOV) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope there will be on average four detectable Pop III GRB afterglows. This is the product of ASKAP's large FOV and excellent sensitivity at wavelengths where the afterglows are very long-lasting. We show that the exceptional sensitivity of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near-InfraRed Camera will make this the optimal instrument for afterglow follow-up and redshift measurement, while JWST Near-InfraRed Spectrograph will be able to detect the absorption features of Pop III-enriched environments in 70 per cent of directed Pop III GRB afterglows. We also find that the Atacama Large Millimetre Array is very poorly suited to observe these afterglows, and that the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma 4 yr all-sky X-ray survey has a 12 per cent chance of detecting an orphan Pop III GRB afterglow. The optimal strategy for detecting, identifying and studying Pop III GRB afterglows is to have JWST attempt NIR photometry of afterglows with a detected radio component but no detected optical component.

  1. Short GRB afterglows observed with GROND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Rossi, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of 20 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (T90 < 2s) performed in g′r′i′z′JHK s with the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) between mid-2007 and the end of 2010. This is the most homogeneous and comprehensive data set on GRB afterglow observatio...

  2. Gamma-ray Burst Formation Environment: Comparison of Redshift Distributions of GRB Afterglows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Eun Kim

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Since gamma-ray bursts(GRBs have been first known to science societites in 1973, many scientists are involved in their studies. Observations of GRB afterglows provide us with much information on the environment in which the observed GRBs are born. Study of GRB afterglows deals with longer timescale emissions in lower energy bands (e.g., months or even up to years than prompt emissions in gamma-rays. Not all the bursts accompany afterglows in whole ranges of wavelengths. It has been suggested as a reason for that, for instance, that radio and/or X-ray afterglows are not recorded mainly due to lower sensitivity of detectors, and optical afterglows due to extinctions in intergalactic media or self-extinctions within a host galaxy itself. Based on the idea that these facts may also provide information on the GRB environment, we analyze statistical properties of GRB afterglows. We first select samples of the redshift-known GRBs according to the wavelength of afterglow they accompanied. We then compare their distributions as a function of redshift, using statistical methods. As a results, we find that the distribution of the GRBs with X-ray afterglows is consistent with that of the GRBs with optical afterglows. We, therefore, conclude that the lower detection rate of optical afterglows is not due to extinctions in intergalactic media.

  3. Characterization of the flowing afterglows of an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reduced-pressure discharge: setting the operating conditions to achieve a dominant late afterglow and correlating the NO{sub {beta}} UV intensity variation with the N and O atom densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudam, M K [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Saoudi, B [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Moisan, M [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Ricard, A [Centre de Physique Atomique de Toulouse (CPAT), 118, route de Narbonne, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062-Toulouse (France)

    2007-03-21

    The flowing afterglow of an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} discharge in the 0.6-10 Torr range is examined in the perspective of achieving sterilization of medical devices (MDs) under conditions ensuring maximum UV intensity with minimum damage to polymer-based MDs. The early afterglow is shown to be responsible for creating strong erosion damage, requiring that the sterilizer be operated in a dominant late-afterglow mode. These two types of afterglow can be characterized by optical emission spectroscopy: the early afterglow is distinguished by an intense emission from the N{sub 2}{sup +} 1st negative system (band head at 391.4 nm) while the late afterglow yields an overpopulation of the v' = 11 ro-vibrational level of the N{sub 2}(B) state, indicating a reduced contribution from the early afterglow N{sub 2} metastable species. We have studied the influence of operating conditions (pressure, O{sub 2} content in the N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} mixture, distance of the discharge from the entrance to the afterglow (sterilizer) chamber) in order to achieve a dominant late afterglow that also ensures maximum and almost uniform UV intensity in the sterilization chamber. As far as operating conditions are concerned, moving the plasma source sufficiently far from the chamber entrance is shown to be a practical means for significantly reducing the density of the characteristic species of the early afterglow. Using the NO titration method, we obtain the (absolute) densities of N and O atoms in the afterglow at the NO injection inlet, a few cm before the chamber entrance: the N atom density goes through a maximum at approximately 0.3-0.5% O{sub 2} and then decreases, while the O atom density increases regularly with the O{sub 2} percentage. The spatial variation of the N atom (relative) density in the chamber is obtained by recording the emission intensity from the 1st positive system at 580 nm: in the 2-5 Torr range, this density is quite uniform everywhere in the chamber. The (relative

  4. NuSTARobservations of grb 130427a establish a single component synchrotron afterglow origin for the late optical to multi-gev emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Granot, J.; Racusin, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (simil...

  5. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  6. On the anomalous afterglow seen in a chameleon afterglow search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Baumbaugh, Alan; Chou, Aaron S.; Tomlin, Ray; Upadhye, Amol

    2012-01-01

    We present data from our investigation of the anomalous orange-colored afterglow that was seen in the GammeV Chameleon Afterglow Search (CHASE). These data include information about the broadband color of the observed glow, the relationship between the glow and the temperature of the apparatus, and other data taken prior to, and during the science operations of CHASE. While differing in several details, the generic properties of the afterglow from CHASE are similar to luminescence seen in some vacuum compounds. Contamination from this, or similar, luminescent signatures will likely impact the design of implementation of future experiments involving single photon detectors and high intensity light sources in a cryogenic environment.

  7. GRB 030227: The first multiwavelength afterglow of an INTEGRAL GRB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Guziy, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of a gamma-ray burst detected by INTEGRAL (GRB 030227) between 5.3 hours and similar to1.7 days after the event. Here we report the discovery of a dim optical afterglow (OA) that would not have been detected by many previous searches due to its faintess (R ...

  8. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  9. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  10. Exploring short-GRB afterglow parameter space for observations in coincidence with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Resmi, L.; Misra, Kuntal; Pai, Archana; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Short duration Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) and their afterglows are among the most promising electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of Neutron Star (NS) mergers. The afterglow emission is broad-band, visible across the entire electromagnetic window from γ-ray to radio frequencies. The flux evolution in these frequencies is sensitive to the multidimensional afterglow physical parameter space. Observations of gravitational wave (GW) from BNS mergers in spatial and temporal coincidence with SGRB and associated afterglows can provide valuable constraints on afterglow physics. We run simulations of GW-detected BNS events and assuming that all of them are associated with a GRB jet which also produces an afterglow, investigate how detections or non-detections in X-ray, optical and radio frequencies can be influenced by the parameter space. We narrow down the regions of afterglow parameter space for a uniform top-hat jet model, which would result in different detection scenarios. We list inferences which can be drawn on the physics of GRB afterglows from multimessenger astronomy with coincident GW-EM observations.

  11. The ultra-long GRB 111209A. II. Prompt to afterglow and afterglow properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratta, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (OAR/INAF), via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Gendre, B.; Boër, M. [ARTEMIS, UMR 7250 (CNRS/OCA/UNS), boulevard de l' Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex (France); Atteia, J. L. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia (UWA), Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL), University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Klotz, A. [IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Piro, L. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali di Roma (IAPS/INAF), via fosso del cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    The 'ultra-long' gamma-ray burst GRB 111209A at redshift z = 0.677 is the longest GRB ever observed thus far, with a rest frame prompt emission duration of ∼4 hr. In order to explain the burst exceptional longevity, a low-metallicity blue supergiant progenitor was invoked. In this article we further constrain the phenomenology and progenitor properties of this peculiar GRB by performing a multiband temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus WIND, XMM-Newton, and TAROT, as well as from other ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: (1) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410 ± 50 s between the peak time in gamma-rays and the peak time in the optical of a marked multiwavelength flare; (2) multiwavelength prompt emission spectral modeling requires a certain amount of dust in the circumburst environment. The dust produces a rest frame visual extinction of A{sub V} = 0.3-1.5 mag, and may undergo destruction at late times; and (3) we detect the presence of a hard spectral extra power-law component at the end of the X-ray steep steep decay phase and before the start of the X-ray afterglow, which has never been revealed thus far in past GRBs. The optical afterglow shows more usual properties; it has a flux power-law decay with an index of 1.6 ± 0.1 and a late rebrightening feature observed at ∼1.1 the day after the first Burst Alert Telescope trigger. We discuss our findings in the context of several possible interpretations that have been given thus far of the complex multiband GRB phenomenology and propose a binary channel formation for the blue supergiant progenitor.

  12. The very red afterglow of GRB 000418: Further evidence for dust extinction in a gamma-ray burst host galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, S.; Stecklum, B.; Masetti, N.

    2000-01-01

    We report near-infrared and optical follow-up observations of the afterglow of the GRB 000418 starting 2.5 days after the occurrence of the burst and extending over nearly 7 weeks. GRB 000418 represents the second case for which the afterglow was initially identified by observations in the near-i...

  13. Hidden in the light: Magnetically induced afterglow from trapped chameleon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, Holger; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an afterglow phenomenon as a unique trace of chameleon fields in optical experiments. The vacuum interaction of a laser pulse with a magnetic field can lead to a production and subsequent trapping of chameleons in the vacuum chamber, owing to their mass dependence on the ambient matter density. Magnetically induced reconversion of the trapped chameleons into photons creates an afterglow over macroscopic timescales that can conveniently be searched for by current optical experiments. We show that the chameleon parameter range accessible to available laboratory technology is comparable to scales familiar from astrophysical stellar energy-loss arguments. We analyze quantitatively the afterglow properties for various experimental scenarios and discuss the role of potential background and systematic effects. We conclude that afterglow searches represent an ideal tool to aim at the production and detection of cosmologically relevant scalar fields in the laboratory

  14. Modeling the Multi-Band Afterglow of GRB 130831A: Evidence for a Spinning-Down Magnetar Dominated by Gravitational Wave Losses?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, Y. F.; Zong, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an "internal plateau" with a decay slope of $\\sim$ 0.8, followed by a steep drop at around $10^5$ s with a slope of $\\sim$ 6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper...

  15. RXTE ASM Observations of GRB991216 - A One Hour Old X-ray Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, R.; Smith, D. A.

    The Gamma-ray Burst 991216 (the ``Beethoven" burst) was both very bright itself and also had an unusually bright X-ray afterglow. This afterglow was observed and localized by the RXTE PCA 4 hours after the burst occurred (Takeshima et al. 1999). This position determination then enabled an optical afterglow to be found (Uglesich et al 1999). Serendipitously, the RXTE ASM obtained a sequence of 7 observations covering this source in a period of 11 minutes starting just 1 hour after the burst peak. From these 7 dwells, a flux of 32 +/- 8 mCrabs (1 sigma error) was determined which is consistent with a power-law extrapolation of RXTE PCA flux measurements. While GRB afterglows are generally faint and thus difficult for the RXTE ASM to study, due to its modest collecting area and short observation times, we believe that this unusually bright afterglow has indeed been detected. These results indicate that the RXTE ASM has provided a measurement of an X-ray afterglow light curve at times which have previously not been studied.

  16. GRB 120815A afterglow spectra [Dataset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruehler, T.; et al., [Unknown; Kaper, L.; Hartoog, O.E.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Flux-calibrated VLT/X-shooter medium resolution spectrum of the GRB 120815A afterglow. Spectroscopic observations of the GRB 120815A afterglow in the wavelength range between 3000 and 24800Å commenced on 2012-08-15 at 03:55 UT (6.06ks after the BAT trigger) with the cross-dispersed echelle

  17. Erratum: "Low-Resolution Spectroscopy of Gamma-Ray Burst Optical Afterglows: Biases in the Swift Sample and Characterization of the Absorbers" (2009, ApJS, 185, 526)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Malesani, D.; Ledoux, C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Nardini, M.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wiersema, K.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Chen, H.-W.; Thöne, C. C.; Björnsson, G.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Christensen, L.; De Cia, A.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gorosabel, J. U.; Graham, J. F.; Jaunsen, A. O.; Jensen, B. L.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A.; Maund, J.; Masetti, N.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Palazzi, E.; Perley, D. A.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Schady, P.; Starling, R.; Tanvir, N.; Watson, D. J.; Xu, D.; Augusteijn, T.; Grundahl, F.; Telting, J.; Quirion, P.-O.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, Figure 14 is incomplete due to an error during production. We here provide the missing sub-figures. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs 275.D-5022, 075.D-0270, 077.D-0661, 077.D-0805, 078.D-0416, 079.D-0429, 080.D-0526, 081.A-0135, 281.D-5002, and 081.A-0856. Also based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Some of the data obtained herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. Detailed afterglow modelling and host galaxy properties of the dark GRB 111215A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, A. J. van der; Levan, A. J.; Pooley, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the Wil...

  19. A Search for Early Optical Emission at Gamma-Ray Burst Locations by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; Buffington, Andrew; Jackson, Bernard V.; Hick, P. Paul; Smith, Aaron C.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) views nearly every point on the sky once every 102 minutes and can detect point sources as faint as R approx. 10th magnitude. Therefore, SMEI can detect or provide upper limits for the optical afterglow from gamma-ray bursts in the tens of minutes after the burst when different shocked regions may emit optically. Here we provide upper limits for 58 bursts between 2003 February and 2005 April.

  20. Investigations on afterglows of neon gas discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenhuysen, L.W.G.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations on afterglows of neon gas discharges are described. The investigated pressure range extends from 0.5 torr to 100 torr; the discharge currents lie between about 1 mA and 100 mA. The decay of the 1s atom densities has been determined experimentally as function of the time elapsed in the afterglow. From the measured decay of metastable 1s 5 atom densities at gas pressure 5 atoms as well as the coefficinets of atomic collisional transfer between the 1s 5 and 1s 4 level are determined. To obtain more insight in the mutual influences of the various loss and production processes of 1s atoms and charge carriers in the afterglow a numerical model has been formed. The behaviour of the afterglow radiation intensity has been measured on discharges with a gas pressure of 1, 10, 20, 50 and 100 torr and a discharge current of 22, 24 and 50 mA. From the results the recombination distribution fractions of the 1s levels are determined and the electron densities at the start of the afterglow of 20, 50 and 100 torr discharges. With the help of the selective excitation spectroscopy the coefficients of atomic transfer between the 2p levels have been measured in the afterglow of discharge with a gas pressure of 1, 10, 20, 50 and 100 torr and a discharge current of 22 mA. From these results and the measured intensities of the various spectral lines in the afterglow the partial recombination coefficients for the 2p levels are calculated. (Auth. )

  1. Burst Alert Robotic Telescope and Optical Afterglows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Polášek, Cyril; Štrobl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2009), s. 374-378 ISSN 1392-0049. [INTEGRAL/BART workshop 2009. Karlovy Vary, 26.03.2009-29.03.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma rays bursts, * observations * robotic telescopes Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2009

  2. Exploring the Behaviour of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts with Intrinsic Afterglow Correlations: log L200s−α>200s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha R. Oates

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In these proceedings, we summarise the exploration so far of the relationship between the afterglow luminosity (measured at rest frame 200s; log L 200 s and average afterglow decay rate (measured from rest frame 200s onwards, α > 200 s of long duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs, first reported in the optical/UV light curves of GRB afterglows. We show that this correlation is also present in the X-ray afterglows of GRBs as observed by Swift-XRT. We explore how the parameters of the correlation observed in both the X-ray and optical/UV light curves relate to each other and the prompt emission phase and whether these correlations are consistent with predictions of the standard afterglow model. We find that the observed correlations are consistent with a common underlying physical mechanism producing GRBs and their afterglows regardless of the detailed temporal behaviour. However, a basic afterglow model has difficulty explaining all the observed correlations. This leads us to briefly discuss alternative more complex models.

  3. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its Extremely Red Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Merrill, Michael; Bergeron, Eddie; Castro Ceron, JosMar a; Masetti, Nicola; Vreeswijk, Paul; Antonelli, Angelo; Bersier, David; Castro-Tirado, Alberto; Fynbo, Johan; Garnavich, Peter; Holland, Stephen; Hjorth, Jens; Nugent, Peter; Pian, Elena; Smette, Alain; Thomsen, Bjarne; Thorsett, Stephen E.; Wijers, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) and optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in an infrared search at Kitt Peak5 hr after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest ever observed in the R band at such an early epoch and exhibits very red colors, with R-K∼6. The optical magnitude of the afterglow of GRB 030115 is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting that without early NIR observations it would have been classified as a 'dark' burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likely due to dust extinction at moderate redshift z>2 and indicate that at least some optical afterglows are very faint due to dust along the line of sight. Multicolor Hubble Space Telescope observations were also taken of the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts imply that the host and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field are at z 2:5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB030115 may have occurred in a rich high-red shift cluster. The host galaxy shows extremely red colors (R-K = 5) and is the first GRB host to be classified as an extremely red object (ERO). Some of the galaxies surrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of the cluster are much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. As it is thought that much of high-redshift star formation occurs in highly obscured environments, it may well be that GRB 030115 represents a transition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen to date and a population of objects that are very heavily extinguished, even in the NIR

  4. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Stephen T.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Taka; Shady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Yi-Zhong, Fan; Zhi-Ping, Jin; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM and ROTSE telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx. 100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 5000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.

  5. Diverse Features of the Multiwavelength Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Natural or Special?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Geng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of optical rebrightenings and X-ray plateaus in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs challenges the generic external shock model. Recently, we have developed a numerical method to calculate the dynamics of the system consisting of a forward shock and a reverse shock. Here, we briefly review the applications of this method in the afterglow theory. By relating these diverse features to the central engines of GRBs, we find that the steep optical rebrightenings would be caused by the fall-back accretion of black holes, while the shallow optical rebrightenings are the consequence of the injection of the electron-positron-pair wind from the central magnetar. These studies provide useful ways to probe the characteristics of GRB central engines.

  6. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; dePasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi -LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust dataset of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT detected GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift -BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi -GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  7. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts; radio astronomy. ... Even though radio band is the least explored of the afterglow spectrum, it has played an important role in the progress of GRB physics, specifically in confirming the hypothesized relativistic effects. ... Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum 695 547, India.

  8. Afterglow of chlorophyll in vivo and photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1962-01-01

    Two pigment systems are involved in the afterglow of chlorophyll a-containing cells. Absorption in only one of these systems (promoting or “p” system) is effective in producing luminescence. If light is absorbed simultaneously by the other (quenching or “q” system), a decrease in luminescence

  9. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... ments on-board high energy missions like BeppoSAX1,. CGRO2, HETE3, Swift4 and Fermi5 have increased ... tion 6 for recent novel conjectures on potential diversity in radio afterglows. We conclude with a note on how ...... challenges are expected to emerge. Acknowledgements. The author thanks the ...

  10. What we learn from the afterglow of GRB 021211

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of the afterglow (AG) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) directly provides, in the cannonball (CB) model, information about the environment of their progenitor stars. The well observed early temporal decline of the AG of GRB 021211 is precisely the one predicted in the presence of a progenitor's ``wind'' which resulted in a density profile $\\propto 1/r^2$ around the star. The subsequent fast fading --which makes this GRB ``quasi-dark''-- is the one anticipated if, further away, the interstellar density is roughly constant and relatively high. The CB-model fit to the AG clearly shows the presence of an associated supernova akin to SN1998bw, and allows even for the determination of the broad-band spectrum of the host galaxy. GRB 990123 and GRB 021004, whose AGs were also measured very early, are also discussed.

  11. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF GRB AFTERGLOW PARAMETERS AS EVIDENCE OF COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Beskin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study of 43 peaked R-band light curves of optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts with known redshifts are presented. The parameters of optical transients were calculated in the comoving frame, and then a search for pair correlations between them was conducted. A statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between the peak luminosity and the redshift both for pure afterglows and for events with residual gamma activity, which cannot be explained as an effect of observational selection.This suggests a cosmological evolution of the parameters of the local interstellar medium around the sources of the gamma-ray burst. In the models of forward and reverse shock waves, a relation between the density of the interstellar medium and the redshift was built for gamma-ray burst afterglows, leading to a power-law dependence of the star-formation rate at regions around GRBs on redshift with a slope of about 6.

  12. Thermal Electrons in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ressler, Sean M.; Laskar, Tanmoy [Department of Astronomy, University of California, 501 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    To date, nearly all multi-wavelength modeling of long-duration γ -ray bursts has ignored synchrotron radiation from the significant population of electrons expected to pass the shock without acceleration into a power-law distribution. We investigate the effect of including the contribution of thermal, non-accelerated electrons to synchrotron absorption and emission in the standard afterglow model, and show that these thermal electrons provide an additional source of opacity to synchrotron self-absorption, and yield an additional emission component at higher energies. The extra opacity results in an increase in the synchrotron self-absorption frequency by factors of 10–100 for fiducial parameters. The nature of the additional emission depends on the details of the thermal population, but is generally observed to yield a spectral peak in the optical brighter than radiation from the nonthermal population by similar factors a few seconds after the burst, remaining detectable at millimeter and radio frequencies several days later.

  13. Ultrahigh energy neutrino afterglows of nearby long duration gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessymol K.; Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur

    2017-11-01

    Detection of ultrahigh energy (UHE, ≳1 PeV ) neutrinos from astrophysical sources will be a major advancement in identifying and understanding the sources of UHE cosmic rays (CRs) in nature. Long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) blast waves have been considered as potential acceleration sites of UHECRs. These CRs are expected to interact with GRB afterglow photons, which are synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons coaccelerated with CRs in the blast wave, and naturally produce UHE neutrinos. Fluxes of these neutrinos are uncertain, however, and crucially depend on the observed afterglow modeling. We have selected a sample of 23 long duration GRBs within redshift 0.5 for which adequate electromagnetic afterglow data are available and which could produce high flux of UHE afterglow neutrinos, being nearby. We fit optical, x-ray, and γ -ray afterglow data with an adiabatic blast wave model in a constant density interstellar medium and in a wind environment where the density of the wind decreases as the inverse square of the radius from the center of the GRB. The blast wave model parameters extracted from these fits are then used for calculating UHECR acceleration and p γ interactions to produce UHE neutrino fluxes from these GRBs. We have also explored the detectability of these neutrinos by currently running and upcoming large area neutrino detectors, such as the Pierre Auger Observatory, IceCube Gen-2, and KM3NeT observatories. We find that our realistic flux models from nearby GRBs will be unconstrained in the foreseeable future.

  14. Extinction of gamma-ray burst afterglows as a diagnostic of the location of cosmic star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Trentham, Neil; Blain, A. W.

    2002-01-01

    The properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows are used to investigate the location of star formation activity through the history of the Universe. This approach is motivated by the following: (i) GRBs are thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars and so the GRB rate ought to follow the formation rate of massive stars; (ii) GRBs are the last phase of the evolution of these stars, which do not live long enough to travel far from their place of birth, and so GRBs are located where the stars formed; and (iii) GRB afterglows occur over both X-ray and optical wavelengths, and so the differential effects of dust extinction between the two wavebands can reveal whether or not large amounts of dust are present in galaxies hosting GRBs. Recent evidence suggests that a significant fraction of stars in the Universe formed in galaxies that are bright at rest-frame submillimetre (submm) and infrared wavelengths rather than at ultraviolet wavelengths; we estimate about three quarters of the star formation in the Universe occurred in the submm-bright mode. High-redshift submm-selected galaxies are thought to have properties similar to local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) such as Arp 220, based on the concordance between their luminosities and spectral energy distributions. If this is the case, then GRBs in submm-bright galaxies should have their optical afterglows extinguished by internal dust absorption, but only very few should have their 2-10keV X-ray afterglows obscured. The value that we quote of three quarters is marginally consistent with observations of GRBs: 60+/-15 per cent of GRBs have no detected optical afterglow, whereas almost all have an X-ray afterglow. A more definitive statement could be made with observations of soft X-ray afterglows (0.5-2keV), in which extinction should be severe for GRBs located in submm-bright galaxies with gas densities similar to those in local ULIGs. If the X-ray afterglows disappear at soft X

  15. THE PROPERTIES OF THE 2175 Å EXTINCTION FEATURE DISCOVERED IN GRB AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Elíasdóttir, Árdís; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Krühler, Thomas; Leloudas, Giorgos; Schady, Patricia; Greiner, Jochen; Jakobsson, Páll; Thöne, Christina C.; Perley, Daniel A.; Morgan, Adam N.; Bloom, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The unequivocal, spectroscopic detection of the 2175 Å bump in extinction curves outside the Local Group is rare. To date, the properties of the bump have been examined in only two gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows (GRB 070802 and GRB 080607). In this work, we analyze in detail the detections of the 2175 Å extinction bump in the optical spectra of two further GRB afterglows: GRB 080605 and 080805. We gather all available optical/near-infrared photometric, spectroscopic, and X-ray data to construct multi-epoch spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for both GRB afterglows. We fit the SEDs with the Fitzpatrick and Massa model with a single or broken power law. We also fit a sample of 38 GRB afterglows, known to prefer a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-type extinction curve, with the same model. We find that the SEDs of GRB 080605 and GRB 080805 at two epochs are fit well with a single power law with a derived extinction of A V = 0.52 +0.13 –0.16 and 0.50 +0.13 –0.10 , and 2.1 +0.7 –0.6 and 1.5 ± 0.2, respectively. While the slope of the extinction curve of GRB 080805 is not well constrained, the extinction curve of GRB 080605 has an unusual very steep far-UV rise together with the 2175 Å bump. Such an extinction curve has previously been found in only a small handful of sightlines in the Milky Way. One possible explanation of such an extinction curve may be dust arising from two different regions with two separate grain populations, however we cannot distinguish the origin of the curve. We finally compare the four 2175 Å bump sightlines to the larger GRB afterglow sample and to Local Group sightlines. We find that while the width and central positions of the bumps are consistent with what is observed in the Local Group, the relative strength of the detected bump (A bump ) for GRB afterglows is weaker for a given A V than for almost any Local Group sightline. Such dilution of the bump strength may offer tentative support to a dual dust-population scenario.

  16. Rates of short-GRB afterglows in association with binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Pai, Archana; Misra, Kuntal; Resmi, L.; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Assuming all binary neutron star (BNS) mergers produce short gamma-ray bursts, we combine the merger rates of BNS from population synthesis studies, the sensitivities of advanced gravitational wave (GW) interferometer networks, and of the electromagnetic (EM) facilities in various wavebands, to compute the detection rate of associated afterglows in these bands. Using the inclination angle measured from GWs as a proxy for the viewing angle and assuming a uniform distribution of jet opening angle between 3° and 30°, we generate light curves of the counterparts using the open access afterglow hydrodynamics package BOXFIT for X-ray, optical, and radio bands. For different EM detectors, we obtain the fraction of EM counterparts detectable in these three bands by imposing appropriate detection thresholds. In association with BNS mergers detected by five (three) detector networks of advanced GW interferometers, assuming a BNS merger rate of 0.6-774 Gpc-3 yr-1 from population synthesis models, we find the afterglow detection rates (per year) to be 0.04-53 (0.02-27), 0.03-36 (0.01-19), and 0.04-47 (0.02-25) in the X-ray, optical, and radio bands, respectively. Our rates represent maximum possible detections for the given BNS rate since we ignore effects of cadence and field of view in EM follow-up observations.

  17. The superluminal motion of Gamma-Ray-Burst sources and the complex afterglow of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    The source of the very bright Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 is close enough to us for there to be a hope to measure or significantly constrain its putative superluminal motion. Such a phenomenon is expected in the ``Cannonball'' (CB) model of GRBs. Recent precise data on the optical and radio afterglow of this GRB --which demonstrated its very complex structure-- allow us to pin down the CB-model's prediction for the afterglow-source position as a function of time. It has been stated that (the unpublished part of) the new radio data ``unequivocably disprove'' the CB model. We show how greatly exaggerated that obituary announcement was, and how precise a refined analysis of the data would have to be, to be still of interest.

  18. On the "canonical behaviour" of the X-ray afterglows of the Gamma Ray Bursts observed with Swift's XRT

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2006-01-01

    The "canonical behaviour" of the early X-ray afterglows of long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) --observed by the X-Ray Telescope of the SWIFT satellite-- is precisely the one predicted by the Cannonball model of GRBs.

  19. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  20. A Large Catalog of Multiwavelength GRB Afterglows. I. Color Evolution and Its Physical Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Yu; Shao, Lang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Huang, Yong-Feng; Zhang, Bing; Ryde, Felix; Yu, Hoi-Fung

    2018-02-01

    The spectrum of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows can be studied with color indices. Here, we present a large comprehensive catalog of 70 GRBs with multiwavelength optical transient data on which we perform a systematic study to find the temporal evolution of color indices. We categorize them into two samples based on how well the color indices are evaluated. The Golden sample includes 25 bursts mostly observed by GROND, and the Silver sample includes 45 bursts observed by other telescopes. For the Golden sample, we find that 96% of the color indices do not vary over time. However, the color indices do vary during short periods in most bursts. The observed variations are consistent with effects of (i) the cooling frequency crossing the studied energy bands in a wind medium (43%) and in a constant-density medium (30%), (ii) early dust extinction (12%), (iii) transition from reverse-shock to forward-shock emission (5%), or (iv) an emergent SN emission (10%). We also study the evolutionary properties of the mean color indices for different emission episodes. We find that 86% of the color indices in the 70 bursts show constancy between consecutive ones. The color index variations occur mainly during the late GRB–SN bump, the flare, and early reverse-shock emission components. We further perform a statistical analysis of various observational properties and model parameters (spectral index {β }o{CI}, electron spectral indices p CI, etc.) using color indices. Overall, we conclude that ∼90% of colors are constant in time and can be accounted for by the simplest external forward-shock model, while the varying color indices call for more detailed modeling.

  1. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, J

    2005-02-17

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most of the

  2. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  3. The afterglow of GRB 130427A from 1 to 10{sup 16} GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Corsi, A. [Physics Department, George Washington University, 725 21st St, NW Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sonbas, E. [Department of Physics, University of Adiyaman, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Zheng, W.; Clubb, K. I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Zhao, X.-H.; Bai, J.-M.; Chang, L. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China); Bremer, M. [Institute de Radioastronomie Millimètrique (IRAM), 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Frail, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fruchter, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı- Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Güver, T., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [Istanbul University Science Faculty, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 34119, University-Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2014-01-20

    We present multiwavelength observations of the afterglow of GRB 130427A, the brightest (in total fluence) gamma-ray burst (GRB) of the past 29 yr. Optical spectroscopy from Gemini-North reveals the redshift of the GRB to be z = 0.340, indicating that its unprecedented brightness is primarily the result of its relatively close proximity to Earth; the intrinsic luminosities of both the GRB and its afterglow are not extreme in comparison to other bright GRBs. We present a large suite of multiwavelength observations spanning from 300 s to 130 days after the burst and demonstrate that the afterglow shows relatively simple, smooth evolution at all frequencies, with no significant late-time flaring or rebrightening activity. The entire data set from 1 GHz to 10 GeV can be modeled as synchrotron emission from a combination of reverse and forward shocks in good agreement with the standard afterglow model, providing strong support to the applicability of the underlying theory and clarifying the nature of the GeV emission observed to last for minutes to hours following other very bright GRBs. A tenuous, wind-stratified circumburst density profile is required by the observations, suggesting a massive-star progenitor with a low mass-loss rate, perhaps due to low metallicity. GRBs similar in nature to GRB 130427A, inhabiting low-density media and exhibiting strong reverse shocks, are probably not uncommon but may have been difficult to recognize in the past owing to their relatively faint late-time radio emission; more such events should be found in abundance by the new generation of sensitive radio and millimeter instruments.

  4. Modeling the Multi-band Afterglow of GRB 130831A: Evidence for a Spinning-down Magnetar Dominated by Gravitational Wave Losses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, Y. F.; Zong, H. S.

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an “internal plateau” with a decay slope of ˜0.8, followed by a steep drop at around 105 s with a slope of ˜6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which the magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.

  5. The influence of the N(2D) and N(2P) states in the ionization of the pink afterglow of the nitrogen flowing DC discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levaton, J.; Klein, A. N.; Binder, C.

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, we extensively discuss the role of N(2D) and N(2P) atoms in the ionization processes of pink afterglow based on optical emission spectroscopy analysis and kinetic numerical modelling. We studied the pink afterglow generated by a nitrogen DC discharge operating at 0.6 Slm-1 flow rate, 45 mA discharge current and pressures ranging from 250 to 1050 Pa. The 391.4 nm nitrogen band was monitored along the afterglow furnishing the relative density of the N2+(B2Σ+u, v = 0) state. A numerical model developed to calculate the nitrogen species densities in the afterglow fits the excited ion density profiles well for the experimental conditions. From the modelling results, we determine the densities of the N+, N2+, N3+, and N4+ ions; the calculations show that the N3+ ion density predominates in the afterglow at the typical residence times of the pink afterglow. This behaviour has been observed experimentally and reported in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate the fractional contribution in the ionization for several physical-chemical mechanisms in the post-discharge. Even with the N3+ ion density being dominant in the afterglow, we find through the calculations that the ionization is dominated by the reactions N(2D) + N(2P) → N2+(X2Σ+g) + e and N2(a'1Σ-u) + N2(X 1Σg+, v > 24) → N4+ + e. The ion conversion mechanisms, or ion transfer reactions, which are responsible for the fact that the N3+ density dominates in the post-discharge, are investigated.

  6. TGF Afterglows: A New Radiation Mechanism From Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutjes, C.; Diniz, G.; Ferreira, I. S.; Ebert, U.

    2017-10-01

    Thunderstorms are known to create terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) which are microsecond-long bursts created by runaway of thermal electrons from propagating lightning leaders, as well as gamma ray glows that possibly are created by relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREA) that can last for minutes or more and are sometimes terminated by a discharge. In this work we predict a new intermediate thunderstorm radiation mechanism, which we call TGF afterglow, as it is caused by the capture of photonuclear neutrons produced by a TGF. TGF afterglows are milliseconds to seconds long; this duration is caused by the thermalization time of the intermediate neutrons. TGF afterglows indicate that the primary TGF has produced photons in the energy range of 10-30 MeV; they are nondirectional in contrast to the primary TGF. Gurevich et al. might have reported TGF afterglows in 2011.

  7. Fireballs and cannonballs confront the afterglow of GRB 991208

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2003-01-01

    Galama et al. have recently reported their follow-up measurements of the radio afterglow (AG) of the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 991208, up to 293 days after burst, and their reanalysis of the broad-band AG, in the framework of standard fireball models. They advocate a serious revision of their prior analysis and conclusions, based on optical data and on their earlier observations during the first two weeks of the AG. We comment on their work and fill a lacuna: these authors have overlooked the possibility of comparing their new data to the available predictions of the cannonball (CB) model, based --like their incorrect predictions-- on the first round of data. The new data are in good agreement with these CB-model predictions. This is in spite of the fact that, in comparison to the fireball models, the CB model is much simpler, much more predictive, has many fewer parameters, practically no free choices... and it describes well --on a universal basis-- all the measured AGs of GRBs of known redshift.

  8. REM observations of GRB060418 and GRB060607A: the onset of the afterglow and the initial fireball Lorentz factor determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, E.; Covino, S.; D' Avanzo, P.; Chincarini, G.; Zerbi, F.M.; Conconi, P.; Malaspina, G.; Campana, S.; Rizzuto, D.; Tagliaferri, G. [Osserv Astron Brera, INAF, I-23807 Merate, LC, (Italy); Vergani, S.D.; Meurs, E.J.A.; Ward, P.A. [DIAS, Dunsink Observ, Dublin 15, (Ireland); Vergani, S.D.; Norci, L. [Dublin City Univ, Sch Phys Sci, NCPST, Dublin 9, (Ireland); Malesani, D. [SISSA, ISAS, I-34014 Trieste, (Italy); Malesani, D. [Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Dark Cosmol Ctr, DK-2100 Copenhagen, (Denmark); D' Avanzo, P. [Univ Insubria, Dipartimento Matemat and Fis, I-22100 Como, (Italy); Chincarini, G.; Rizzuto, D. [Univ Milan, I-20126 Milan, (Italy); Antonelli, L.A.; Testa, V.; Vitali, F.; D' Alessio, F.; Guetta, D.; Piranomonte, S.; Stella, L. [Osserv Astron Roma, INAF, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone, (Italy); Tosti, G. [Univ Perugia, Dipartimento Fis, Osservatorio Astron, I-06123 Perugia, (Italy); Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Masetti, N. [IASF Bologna, INAF, I-40129 Bologna, (Italy); Goldoni, P. [APC, Lab Astroparticule and Cosmol, UMR 7164, F-75231 Paris 05, (France); Goldoni, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM, DAPNIA, Serv Astrophys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is believed to originate in highly relativistic fireballs. Aims. Currently, only lower limits were securely set to the initial fireball Lorentz factor {gamma}{sub 0}. We aim to provide a direct measure of {gamma}{sub 0}. Methods. The early-time afterglow light curve carries information about {gamma}{sub 0}, which determines the time of the afterglow peak. We have obtained early observations of the near-infrared afterglows of GRB060418 and GRB060607A with the REM robotic telescope. Results. For both events, the afterglow peak could be clearly singled out, allowing a firm determination of the fireball Lorentz of {gamma}{sub 0} similar to 400, fully confirming the highly relativistic nature of GRB fireballs. The deceleration radius was inferred to be R-dec approximate to 10{sup 17} cm. This is much larger than the internal shocks radius (believed to power the prompt emission), thus providing further evidence for a different origin of the prompt and afterglow stages of the GRB. (authors)

  9. Influence on the long afterglow properties by the environmental temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Haoyi [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hu Yihua, E-mail: huyh@gdut.edu.c [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang Yinhai; Mou Zhongfei [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Sr{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+}, Dy{sup 3+} (SMED) and Ba{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+}, Dy{sup 3+} (BMED) were synthesized with the solid-state reaction. The SMED shows long afterglow while the afterglow of BMED is not visible at room temperature. When the environmental temperature is 150 deg. C, the afterglow of SMED is not obvious while the BMED shows the long afterglow. The decay curves measured at different temperatures conform to this phenomenon. It ascribes to the different trap depths of different samples. The thermoluminescence (TL) curves of SMED peaks at 80 deg. C. BMED has two TL peaks peaking at about 80 and 175 deg. C respectively. The low temperature peak is weak and its density is small. The high-temperature peak reveals that one trap of BMED is deeper than the one of SMED. The afterglows of the phosphors strongly depend on the environmental temperature since the lifetime of the trapping carriers is temperature-dependence. BMED is a potential optimum long afterglow phosphor for the purpose of high-temperature application.

  10. Electrical characterization of the flowing afterglow of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} microwave plasmas at reduced pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso Ferreira, J.; Stafford, L., E-mail: luc.stafford@umontreal.ca; Leonelli, R. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Ricard, A. [Laboratoire plasma et conversion d’énergie (LAPLACE), Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2014-04-28

    A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to analyze the spatial distribution of the number density of positive ions and electrons as well as the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in the flowing afterglow of a 6 Torr N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} plasma sustained by a propagating electromagnetic surface wave in the microwave regime. In pure N{sub 2} discharges, ion densities were in the mid 10{sup 14} m{sup −3} in the pink afterglow and in the mid 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} early in the late afterglow. In both pink and late afterglows, the ion population was much higher than the electron population, indicating non-macroscopically neutral media. The EEDF was close to a Maxwellian with an electron temperature of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV, except in the pink afterglow where the temperature rose to 1.1 ± 0.2 eV. This latter behavior is ascribed to N{sub 2} vibration-vibration pumping in the pink afterglow that increases the concentration of high N{sub 2} vibrational states and thus rises the electron temperature by vibration-electron collisions. After addition of small amounts of O{sub 2} in the nominally pure N{sub 2} discharge, the charged particles densities and average electron energy first strongly increased and then decreased with increasing O{sub 2} concentration. Based on these data and the evolution of the N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) band emission intensities, it is concluded that a significant change in the positive ion composition of the flowing afterglow occurs, going from N{sub 2}{sup +} in nominally pure N{sub 2} discharges to NO{sup +} after addition of trace amounts of O{sub 2} in N{sub 2}.

  11. Observations of the GRB Afterglow ATLAS17aeu and Its Possible Association with GW 170104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, B.; Tonry, J.; Smartt, S. J.; Coughlin, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Stubbs, C. W.; Chen, T.-W.; Kankare, E.; Smith, K. W.; Denneau, L.; Sherstyuk, A.; Heinze, A.; Weiland, H.; Rest, A.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M. E.; Flewelling, H.; Lowe, T.; Magnier, E. A.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Waters, C.; Wainscoat, R.; Willman, M.; Wright, D. E.; Chu, J.; Sanders, D.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; Kotak, R.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery and multiwavelength data analysis of the peculiar optical transient, ATLAS17aeu. This transient was identified in the sky map of the LIGO gravitational wave event GW 170104 by our ATLAS and Pan-STARRS coverage. ATLAS17aeu was discovered 23.1 hr after GW 170104 and rapidly faded over the next three nights, with a spectrum revealing a blue featureless continuum. The transient was also detected as a fading X-ray source by Swift and in the radio at 6 and 15 GHz. The gamma-ray burst GRB 170105A was detected by three satellites 19.04 hr after GW 170104 and 4.10 hr before our first optical detection. We analyze the multiwavelength fluxes in the context of the known GRB population and discuss the observed sky rates of GRBs and their afterglows. We find it statistically likely that ATLAS17aeu is an afterglow associated with GRB 170105A, with a chance coincidence ruled out at the 99% confidence or 2.6σ. A long, soft GRB within a redshift range of 1≲ z≲ 2.9 would be consistent with all the observed multiwavelength data. The Poisson probability of a chance occurrence of GW 170104 and ATLAS17aeu is p = 0.04. This is the probability of a chance coincidence in 2D sky location and in time. These observations indicate that ATLAS17aeu is plausibly a normal GRB afterglow at significantly higher redshift than the distance constraint for GW 170104 and therefore a chance coincidence. However, if a redshift of the faint host were to place it within the GW 170104 distance range, then physical association with GW 170104 should be considered.

  12. Optical nebulosity in X-ray-selected, early type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an H-alpha + N II forbidden line narrowband imaging survey of X-ray-selected E and S0 galaxies. A novel technique is described for objectively optimizing the removal of stellar continuum light while providing well-defined estimates of systematic errors. The procedure has the additional benefit of eliminating sky contamination, specifically in image regions occupied by galaxy light. Consideration of the measured spectral energy distributions is included in the flux calibration procedure, and emission-line luminosities (or upper limits), corrected for Galactic foreground extinction, are tabulated for metric apertures. No connection is found between the 'boxiness' or 'diskiness' of stellar isophotes and emission-line or far-infrared luminosity. It is suggested that optical nebulosity in early-type galaxies contains a significant multiparameter dependence on active Galactic nuclei behavior, accretion from the hot interstellar medium, and mass injection from external sources.

  13. Spectral Energy Distributions and Light Curves of GRB 990123 and Its Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galama, T. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Wijers,R. A. M. J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Rol, E.; Band, D.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Preece, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to result from the interaction of an extremely relativistic outflow interacting with a small amount of material surrounding the site of the explosion. Multi-wavelength observations covering the gamma-ray to radio wavebands allow investigations of this "fireball" model. On 23 January 1999 optical emission was detected while the gamma-ray burst was still underway. Here we report the results of gamma-ray, optical/infra-red, sub-mm, mm and radio observations of this burst and its afterflow, which indicate that the prompt and afterflow emissions from GRB 990123 are associated with three distinct regions in the fireball. The afterglow one day after the burst has a much lower peak frequency than those of previous bursts; this explains the short-lived nature of the radio emission, which is not expected to reapear. We suggest that such differences reflect variations in the magnetic-field strengths in the afterglow emitting regions.

  14. Multimodal optical device for early childhood caries: a clinical prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    There is currently a need for a safe and effective way to detect and diagnose early childhood caries. We have developed a multimodal optical clinical prototype for testing in vivo. The device can be used to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel by obtaining high-resolution and highcontrast surface images using a 405-nm laser as the illumination source, as well as obtaining autofluorescence and bacterial fluorescence images. Then, when a suspicious region is located, the device can perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitation which is used to compute an autofluorescence ratio. This ratio can be used to quantitatively diagnose enamel health. The device is tested on four in vivo test subjects as well as 17 extracted teeth with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. The device was able to provide detailed images which served to screen for suspected early caries. The autofluorescence ratios obtained from the extracted teeth were able to discriminate between healthy and unhealthy enamel. Therefore, the clinical prototype demonstrates feasibility in screening for and in quantitatively diagnosing healthy from demineralized enamel.

  15. THE NEEDLE IN THE 100 deg{sup 2} HAYSTACK: UNCOVERING AFTERGLOWS OF FERMI GRBs WITH THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Leo P. [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena CA 91101 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley; Cucchiara, Antonino; Gehrels, Neil [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Anderson, Gemma E.; Fender, Rob P. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Arcavi, Iair [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Bhalerao, Varun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bue, Brian D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [Texas Tech University, Physics Department, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Fox, Derek B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Goldstein, Adam [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorosabel, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Horesh, Assaf, E-mail: leo.p.singer@nasa.gov [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); and others

    2015-06-10

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has greatly expanded the number and energy window of observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, the coarse localizations of tens to a hundred square degrees provided by the Fermi GRB Monitor instrument have posed a formidable obstacle to locating the bursts’ host galaxies, measuring their redshifts, and tracking their panchromatic afterglows. We have built a target-of-opportunity mode for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in order to perform targeted searches for Fermi afterglows. Here, we present the results of one year of this program: 8 afterglow discoveries out of 35 searches. Two of the bursts with detected afterglows (GRBs 130702A and 140606B) were at low redshift (z = 0.145 and 0.384, respectively) and had spectroscopically confirmed broad-line Type Ic supernovae. We present our broadband follow-up including spectroscopy as well as X-ray, UV, optical, millimeter, and radio observations. We study possible selection effects in the context of the total Fermi and Swift GRB samples. We identify one new outlier on the Amati relation. We find that two bursts are consistent with a mildly relativistic shock breaking out from the progenitor star rather than the ultra-relativistic internal shock mechanism that powers standard cosmological bursts. Finally, in the context of the Zwicky Transient Facility, we discuss how we will continue to expand this effort to find optical counterparts of binary neutron star mergers that may soon be detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo.

  16. Visualisation of Honeypot Data Using Graphviz and Afterglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Valli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This research in progress paper explores the use of Graphviz and Afterglow for the analysis of data emanating from a honeypot system. Honeypot systems gather a wide range of data that is often difficult to readily search for patterns and trends using conventional log file analysis techniques. The data from the honeypots has been statically extracted and processed through Afterglow scripts to produce inputs suitable for use by the DOT graph based tools contained within Graphviz.  This paper explores some of the benefits and drawbacks of currently using this type of approach.

  17. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  18. THE AFTERGLOW AND ULIRG HOST GALAXY OF THE DARK SHORT GRB 120804A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Margutti, R.; Laskar, T.; Fong, W.; Chornock, R.; Dupuy, T. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A.; Tunnicliffe, R. L. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Mangano, V. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Fox, D. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hjorth, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Roth, K. [Gemini Observatory, 670 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present the optical discovery and subarcsecond optical and X-ray localization of the afterglow of the short GRB 120804A, as well as optical, near-IR, and radio detections of its host galaxy. X-ray observations with Swift/XRT, Chandra, and XMM-Newton extending to {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 19 days reveal a single power-law decline. The optical afterglow is faint, and comparison to the X-ray flux indicates that GRB 120804A is ''dark'', with a rest-frame extinction of A {sup host}{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 mag (at z = 1.3). The intrinsic neutral hydrogen column density inferred from the X-ray spectrum, N{sub H,{sub int}}(z = 1.3) Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, is commensurate with the large extinction. The host galaxy exhibits red optical/near-IR colors. Equally important, JVLA observations at Almost-Equal-To 0.9-11 days reveal a constant flux density of F{sub {nu}}(5.8 GHz) = 35 {+-} 4 {mu}Jy and an optically thin spectrum, unprecedented for GRB afterglows, but suggestive instead of emission from the host galaxy. The optical/near-IR and radio fluxes are well fit with the scaled spectral energy distribution of the local ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 at z Almost-Equal-To 1.3, with a resulting star formation rate of x Almost-Equal-To 300 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The inferred extinction and small projected offset (2.2 {+-} 1.2 kpc) are also consistent with the ULIRG scenario, as is the presence of a companion galaxy at the same redshift and with a separation of about 11 kpc. The limits on radio afterglow emission, in conjunction with the observed X-ray and optical emission, require a circumburst density of n {approx} 10{sup -3} cm{sup -3}, an isotropic-equivalent energy scale of E{sub {gamma},{sub iso}} Almost-Equal-To E{sub K,{sub iso}} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, and a jet opening angle of {theta}{sub j} {approx}> 11 Degree-Sign . The expected fraction of luminous infrared

  19. THE UNUSUAL RADIO AFTERGLOW OF THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130925A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horesh, Assaf [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Hallinan, Gregg; Bellm, Eric [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    GRB 130925A is one of the recent additions to the growing family of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; T90 ≳1000 s). While the X-ray emission of ultra-long GRBs have been studied extensively in the past, no comprehensive radio data set has been obtained so far. We report here the early discovery of an unusual radio afterglow associated with the ultra-long GRB 130925A. The radio emission peaks at low-frequencies (∼7 GHz) at early times, only 2.2 days after the burst occurred. More notably, the radio spectrum at frequencies above 10 GHz exhibits a rather steep cut-off, compared to other long GRB radio afterglows. This cut-off can be explained if the emitting electrons are either mono-energetic or originate from a rather steep, dN/dE ∝ E{sup −4}, power-law energy distribution. An alternative electron acceleration mechanism may be required to produce such an electron energy distribution. Furthermore, the radio spectrum exhibits a secondary underlying and slowly varying component. This may hint that the radio emission we observed is comprised of emission from both a reverse and a forward shock. We discuss our results in comparison with previous works that studied the unusual X-ray spectrum of this event and discuss the implications of our findings on progenitor scenarios.

  20. Early Onset Optic Neuritis Following Measles-Rubella Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Moradian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report two cases of optic neuritis with onset less than 24 hours following measles-rubella (MR vaccination. CASE REPORT: Two teenage patients developed acute optic neuritis 6 to 7 hours after MR booster vaccination. The first patient demonstrated bilateral papillitis and severe visual loss but improved significantly with pulse intravenous steroid therapy with methylprednisolone 500 mg/day. The second patient had unilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis and demonstrated excellent visual recovery without intervention. CONCLUSION: Acute optic neuritis is a rare complication of MR vaccination and may occur early after immunization.

  1. The redshift and afterglow of the extremely energetic gamma-ray burst GRB 080916C

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J.; Kruehler, T.; Kienlin, A.v.; Rau, A.; Sari, R.; Fox, Derek B.; Kawai, N.; Afonso, P.; Ajello, M.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S.B.; Cucchiara, A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Yoldas, A.Kuepue; Lichti, G.G.; Loew, S.; McBreen, S.; Nagayama, T.; Rossi, A.; Sato, S.; Szokoly, G.; Yoldas, A.; Zhang, X.-L.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of GeV photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has important consequences for the interpretation and modelling of these most-energetic cosmological explosions. The full exploitation of the high-energy measurements relies, however, on the accurate knowledge of the distance to the events. Here we report on the discovery of the afterglow and subsequent redshift determination of GRB 080916C, the first GRB detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope with high significance detection of photons at >0.1 GeV. Observations were done with 7-channel imager GROND at the 2.2m MPI/ESO telescope, the SIRIUS instrument at the Nagoya-SAAO 1.4m telescope in South Africa, and the GMOS instrument at Gemini-S. The afterglow photometric redshift of z=4.35+-0.15, based on simultaneous 7-filter observations with the Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND), places GRB 080916C among the top 5% most distant GRBs, and makes it the most energetic GRB known to date. The detection of GeV photons from such a dista...

  2. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasil, R.; Korolov, I.; Kotrik, T.; Varju, J.; Dohnal, P.; Donko, Z.; Bano, G.; Glosik, J.

    2009-11-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD+ and H3+ ions.

  3. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plasil, R; Korolov, I; Kotrik, T; Varju, J; Dohnal, P; Glosik, J [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Prague (Czech Republic); Donko, Z; Bano, G, E-mail: radek.plasil@mff.cuni.c [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-11-15

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions.

  4. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasil, R; Korolov, I; Kotrik, T; Varju, J; Dohnal, P; Glosik, J; Donko, Z; Bano, G

    2009-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD + and H 3 + ions.

  5. An early-time infrared and optical study of the type Ia supernovae SN 1994D and 1991T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meikle, WPS; Cumming, RJ; Geballe, TR; Lewis, [No Value; Walton, NA; Balcells, M; Cimatti, A; Croom, SM; Dhillon, VS; Economou, F; Jenkins, CR; Knapen, JH; Lucey, [No Value; Meadows, VS; Morris, PW; PerezFournon, [No Value; Shanks, T; Smith, LJ; Tanvir, NR; Veilleux, S; Vilchez, J; Wall, JV

    1996-01-01

    We present early-time infrared (IR) and optical spectroscopy, and optical photometry, of the Type Ia supernova 1994D. These observations provide the most complete optical-IR spectral coverage ever achieved for a Type Ia at this phase. Optical and IR spectra were obtained as early as 9 d before

  6. THERMAL EMISSIONS SPANNING THE PROMPT AND THE AFTERGLOW PHASES OF THE ULTRA-LONG GRB 130925A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Rupal [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupal@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005, India. (India)

    2015-07-01

    GRB 130925A is an ultra-long gamma-ray burst (GRB), and it shows clear evidence for thermal emission in the soft X-ray data of the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT; ∼0.5 keV), lasting until the X-ray afterglow phase. Due to the long duration of the GRB, the burst could be studied in hard X-rays with high-resolution focusing detectors (NuSTAR). The blackbody temperature, as measured by the Swift/XRT, shows a decreasing trend until the late phase (Piro et al.) whereas the high-energy data reveal a significant blackbody component during the late epochs at an order of magnitude higher temperature (∼5 keV) compared to contemporaneous low energy data (Bellm et al.). We resolve this apparent contradiction by demonstrating that a model with two black bodies and a power law (2BBPL) is consistent with the data right from the late prompt emission to the afterglow phase. Both blackbodies show a similar cooling behavior up to late times. We invoke a structured jet, having a fast spine and a slower sheath layer, to identify the location of these blackbodies. Independent of the physical interpretation, we propose that the 2BBPL model is a generic feature of the prompt emission of all long GRBs, and the thermal emission found in the afterglow phase of different GRBs reflects the lingering thermal component of the prompt emission with different timescales. We strengthen this proposal by pointing out a close similarity between the spectral evolutions of this GRB and GRB 090618, a source with significant wide band data during the early afterglow phase.

  7. The Discovery of a Hyperluminal Source in the Radio Afterglow of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    Taylor, Frail, Berger and Kulkarni have made precise VLBI measurements of the size and position of the source of the radio afterglow of GRB 030329. They report a size evolution compatible with standard fireball models, proper motion limits inconsistent with the cannonball model, and a double source, i.e. "an additional compact component" on day 51 after the GRB, totally unexpected in the standard models. We outline a consistent interpretation of the ensemble of the data in the realm of the cannonball model. The observed double source is a radio image of the two cannonballs required in this model to explain the gamma-ray and optical light curves of this GRB; their separation agrees with the expectation. Thus interpreted, the observation of the two sources --separated by a "hyperluminal" distance-- is a major discovery in astrophysics: it pins down the origin of GRBs.

  8. VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of the GRB 120327A afterglow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, Johan Peter Uldall; Goldoni, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the environment of the Swift long gamma-ray burst GRB 120327A at z ~2.8 through optical spectroscopy of its afterglow. We analyzed medium-resolution, multi-epoch spectroscopic observations (~7000 - 12000, corresponding to ~ 15 - 23 km/s, S/N = 15- 30 and wavelength range 3000...... we used to derive information on the distance between the host absorbing gas and the site of the GRB explosion. The variability of the FeI\\lambda2396 excited line between the two epochs proves that these features are excited by the GRB UV flux. Moreover, the distance of component I is found to be d...

  9. Metastable atomic species in the N{sub 2} flowing afterglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levaton, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE/CNPEM, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Amorim, J., E-mail: jayr.amorim@bioetanol.org.br [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE/CNPEM, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-13

    Graphical abstract: Calculated N({sup 4}S), N({sup 2}D) and N({sup 2}P) absolute densities as a function of the afterglow time. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen flowing post-discharge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N({sup 4}S) and N({sup 2}D) densities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetic numerical model of the nitrogen afterglow. - Abstract: We have studied by optical emission spectroscopy the post-discharge of a pure N{sub 2} DC flowing discharge in such experimental conditions that the pink afterglow and the Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow occur. The emission profiles originated from the N{sub 2}(B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}), N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}) states and the N{sub 2}(B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g},6{<=}v{<=}12) and N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u},0{<=}v{<=}4) vibrational distributions were obtained in the post-discharge region. With basis on the works of Bockel et al. [S. Bockel, A.M. Diamy, A. Ricard, Surf. Coat. Tech. 74 (1995) 474] and Amorim and Kiohara [J. Amorim, V. Kiohara, Chem. Phys. Lett. 385 (2004) 268], we have obtained the experimental N({sup 4}S) and N({sup 2}D) relative densities along the post-discharge. A numerical model, previously developed to describe the neutral atomic, molecular and ionic species in the afterglow, was improved to include the kinetics of N({sup 2}D) and N({sup 2}P) states. Several kinetic mechanisms leading to the production of N({sup 2}D) in the post-discharge have been studied in order to explain the experimental data. We have determined that the dominant one is the reaction N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +},v>8)+N({sup 4}S){yields}N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +})+N({sup 2}D) with an estimated rate constant of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}. Also, the fit of the numerical density profiles of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}) to the experimental ones has provided the rate constant for reaction

  10. Electrons' energy in GRB afterglows implied by radio peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniamini, Paz; van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2017-12-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have been observed across the electromagnetic spectrum, and physical parameters of GRB jets and their surroundings have been derived using broad-band modelling. While well-sampled light curves across the broad-band spectrum are necessary to constrain all the physical parameters, some can be strongly constrained by the right combination of just a few observables, almost independently of the other unknowns. We present a method involving the peaks of radio light curves to constrain the fraction of shock energy that resides in electrons, εe. This parameter is an important ingredient for understanding the microphysics of relativistic shocks. Based on a sample of 36 radio afterglows, we find εe has a narrow distribution centred around 0.13-0.15. Our method is suggested as a diagnostic tool for determining εe, and to help constrain the broad-band modelling of GRB afterglows. Some earlier measurements of the spreads in parameter values for εe, the kinetic energy of the shock and the density of the circumburst medium, based on broad-band modelling across the entire spectrum, are at odds with our analysis of radio peaks. This could be due to different modelling methods and assumptions, and possibly missing ingredients in past and current modelling efforts. Furthermore, we show that observations at ≳10 GHz performed 0.3-30 d after the GRB trigger are best suited for pinpointing the synchrotron peak frequency, and, consequently, εe. At the same time, observations at lower radio frequencies can pin down the synchrotron self-absorption frequency and help constrain the other physical parameters of GRB afterglows.

  11. VLT/X-Shooter spectroscopy of the afterglow of the Swift GRB 130606A. Chemical abundances and reionisation at z ~ 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoog, O. E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Goto, T.; Krühler, T.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; De Cia, A.; Xu, D.; Møller, P.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Flores, H.; Goldoni, P.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Krogager, J.-K.; Kaper, L.; Ledoux, C.; Levan, A. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Sollerman, J.; Sparre, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S. D.; Wiersema, K.; Datson, J.; Salinas, R.; Mikkelsen, K.; Aghanim, N.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The reionisation of the Universe is a process that is thought to have ended around z ~ 6, as inferred from spectroscopy of distant bright background sources, such as quasars (QSO) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Furthermore, spectroscopy of a GRB afterglow provides insight in its host galaxy, which is often too dim and distant to study otherwise. Aims: For the Swift GRB 130606A at z = 5.913 we have obtained a high S/N spectrum covering the full optical and near-IR wavelength region at intermediate spectral resolution with VLT/X-Shooter. We aim to measure the degree of ionisation of the intergalactic medium (IGM) between z = 5.02-5.84 and to study the chemical abundance pattern and dust content of its host galaxy. Methods: We estimated the UV continuum of the GRB afterglow using a power-law extrapolation, then measured the flux decrement due to absorption at Lyα,β, and γ wavelength regions. Furthermore, we fitted the shape of the red damping wing of Lyα. The hydrogen and metal absorption lines formed in the host galaxy were fitted with Voigt profiles to obtain column densities. We investigated whether ionisation corrections needed to be applied. Results: Our measurements of the Lyα-forest optical depth are consistent with previous measurements of QSOs, but have a much smaller uncertainty. The analysis of the red damping wing yields a neutral fraction xH i 5.6. GRBs are useful probes of the ionisation state of the IGM in the early Universe, but because of internal scatter we need a larger statistical sample to draw robust conclusions. The high [Si/Fe] in the host can be due to dust depletion, α-element enhancement, or a combination of both. The very high value of [ Al/Fe ] = 2.40 ± 0.78 might be due to a proton capture process and is probably connected to the stellar population history. We estimate the host metallicity to be -1.7 Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  12. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL...

  13. Prompt Optical Observations of GRB 050319 with the Swift UVOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, K. O.; Blustin, A. J.; Boyd, P.; Holland, S. T.; Page, M. J.; Roming, P.; Still, M.; Zhang, B.; Breeveld, A.; de Pasquale, M.; Gehrels, N.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S.; Ivanushkina, M.; Landsman, W.; McGowan, K.; Nousek, J.; Poole, T.; Rhoads, J.; Rosen, S.; Schady, P.

    2006-03-01

    The UVOT telescope on the Swift observatory has detected optical afterglow emission from GRB 050319. The flux declined with a power-law slope of α=-0.57 between the start of observations some 230 s after the burst onset (90 s after the burst trigger) until it faded below the sensitivity threshold of the instrument after ~5×104 s. There is no evidence for the rapidly declining component in the early light curve that is seen at the same time in the X-ray band. The afterglow is not detected in UVOT shortward of the B band, suggesting a redshift of about 3.5. The optical V-band emission lies on the extension of the X-ray spectrum, with an optical-to-X-ray slope of β=-0.8. The relatively flat decay rate of the burst suggests that the central engine continues to inject energy into the fireball for as long as a few × 104 s after the burst.

  14. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; hide

    2015-01-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous (Mr >> -27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of Rrel = 610/yr (68% confidence interval of 110-2000/yr). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  15. Case report: Importance of optical diagnosis in early gastric cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare form of highly malignant adenocarcinoma. It is an epithelial malignancy characterized by the histologic appearance of more than 50% of cells as signet ring cells filled with mucin. The incidence of SRCC is rising,[1,2] therefore, the diagnosis of these cancers in the early ...

  16. Importance of Optical Diagnosis in Early Gastric Cancer: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare form of highly malignant adenocarcinoma. It is an epithelial malignancy characterized by the histologic appearance of more than 50% of cells as signet ring cells filled with mucin. The incidence of SRCC is rising,[1,2] therefore, the diagnosis of these cancers in the early ...

  17. Recent Advances in Optical Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring and Early Warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zhu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of pollutants requires the development of innovative analytical devices that are precise, sensitive, specific, rapid, and easy-to-use to meet the increasing demand for legislative actions on environmental pollution control and early warning. Optical biosensors, as a powerful alternative to conventional analytical techniques, enable the highly sensitive, real-time, and high-frequency monitoring of pollutants without extensive sample preparation. This article reviews important advances in functional biorecognition materials (e.g., enzymes, aptamers, DNAzymes, antibodies and whole cells that facilitate the increasing application of optical biosensors. This work further examines the significant improvements in optical biosensor instrumentation and their environmental applications. Innovative developments of optical biosensors for environmental pollution control and early warning are also discussed.

  18. The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager catalogue of gamma-ray burst afterglows at 15.7 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Fender, R. P.; Rowlinson, A.; Mooley, K. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array catalogue of 139 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). AMI observes at a central frequency of 15.7 GHz and is equipped with a fully automated rapid-response mode, which enables the telescope to respond to high-energy transients detected by Swift. On receiving a transient alert, AMI can be on-target within 2 min, scheduling later start times if the source is below the horizon. Further AMI observations are manually scheduled for several days following the trigger. The AMI GRB programme probes the early-time (GRBs, and has obtained some of the earliest radio detections (GRB 130427A at 0.36 and GRB 130907A at 0.51 d post-burst). As all Swift GRBs visible to AMI are observed, this catalogue provides the first representative sample of GRB radio properties, unbiased by multiwavelength selection criteria. We report the detection of six GRB radio afterglows that were not previously detected by other radio telescopes, increasing the rate of radio detections by 50 per cent over an 18-month period. The AMI catalogue implies a Swift GRB radio detection rate of ≳ 15 per cent, down to ∼0.2 mJy beam-1. However, scaling this by the fraction of GRBs AMI would have detected in the Chandra & Frail sample (all radio-observed GRBs between 1997 and 2011), it is possible ∼ 44-56 per cent of Swift GRBs are radio bright, down to ∼0.1-0.15 mJy beam-1. This increase from the Chandra & Frail rate (∼30 per cent) is likely due to the AMI rapid-response mode, which allows observations to begin while the reverse-shock is contributing to the radio afterglow.

  19. The Uffo Slewing Mirror Telescope for Early Optical Observation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Jiwoo; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K.

    2013-01-01

    the first 60 seconds of GRBs optical emission. Using fast moving mirrors to redirect our optical path rather than slewing the entire spacecraft, UFFO is utilized to catch early optical emissions from GRB within 1 sec. We have developed the UFFO Pathfinder Telescope which is going to be on board...... of the Lomonosov satellite and launched in middle of 2012. We will discuss about scientific potentials of the UFFO project and present the payload development status, especially for Slewing Mirror Telescope which is the key instrument of the UFFO-pathfinder mission....

  20. The UFFO slewing mirror telescope for early optical observation from gamma ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NAM, JIWOO; AHMAD, S.; AHN, K.

    2013-01-01

    the first 60 seconds of GRBs optical emission. Using fast moving mirrors to redirect our optical path rather than slewing the entire spacecraft, UFFO is utilized to catch early optical emissions from GRB within 1 sec. We have developed the UFFO Pathfinder Telescope which is going to be on board...... of the Lomonosov satellite and launched in middle of 2012. We will discuss about scientific potentials of the UFFO project and present the payload development status, especially for Slewing Mirror Telescope which is the key instrument of the UFFO-pathfinder mission....

  1. Discovery of the optical counterpart and early optical observations of GRB 990712

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahu, K.C.; Vreesvijk, P.; Bakos, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the discovery observations of the optical counterpart of the gamma-ray burst GRB 990712 taken 4.16 hr after the outburst and discuss its light curve observed in the V, R, and I bands during the first similar to 35 days after the outburst. The observed light curves were fitted with a po......We present the discovery observations of the optical counterpart of the gamma-ray burst GRB 990712 taken 4.16 hr after the outburst and discuss its light curve observed in the V, R, and I bands during the first similar to 35 days after the outburst. The observed light curves were fitted...

  2. ON THE AFTERGLOW AND PROGENITOR OF FRB 150418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Keane et al. recently detected a fading radio source following FRB 150418, leading to the identification of a putative host galaxy at z = 0.492 ± 0.008. Assuming that the fading source is the afterglow of FRB 150418, I model the afterglow and constrain the isotropic energy of the explosion to be a few 10{sup 50} erg, comparable to that of a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). The outflow may have a jet opening angle of ∼0.22 rad, so that the beaming-corrected energy is below 10{sup 49} erg. The results rule out most fast radio burst (FRB) progenitor models for this FRB, but may be consistent with either of the following two scenarios. The first scenario invokes a merger of an NS–NS binary, which produced an undetected short GRB and a supra-massive neutron star, which subsequently collapsed into a black hole, probably hundreds of seconds after the short GRB. The second scenario invokes a merger of a compact star binary (BH–BH, NS–NS, or BH–NS) system whose pre-merger dynamical magnetospheric activities made the FRB, which is followed by an undetected short GRB-like transient. The gravitational-wave (GW) event GW 150914 would be a sister of FRB 150418 in this second scenario. In both cases, one expects an exciting prospect of GW/FRB/GRB associations.

  3. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, S.; Nam, J. W.; Ahn, K. B.

    2013-01-01

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror...... of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin2 instantaneous field...

  4. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Ahn, K B; Park, I H; Kim, S W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Cho, M H; Choi, J N; Grossan, B; Huang, M A; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, M B; Kim, Y W; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Na, G W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Yashin, I

    2013-01-28

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin² instantaneous field of view. Technical details of design, construction, the laboratory performance tests in space environments for this unique SMT are described in conjunction with the plan for in-orbit operation onboard the Lomonosov satellite in 2013.

  5. Advances in Bio-Optical Imaging for the Diagnosis of Early Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Keogh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD, laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, optical coherence tomography (OCT and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2–3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness.

  6. Distributed optical fibre sensing for early detection of shallow landslides triggering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenato, Luca; Palmieri, Luca; Camporese, Matteo; Bersan, Silvia; Cola, Simonetta; Pasuto, Alessandro; Galtarossa, Andrea; Salandin, Paolo; Simonini, Paolo

    2017-10-31

    A distributed optical fibre sensing system is used to measure landslide-induced strains on an optical fibre buried in a large scale physical model of a slope. The fibre sensing cable is deployed at the predefined failure surface and interrogated by means of optical frequency domain reflectometry. The strain evolution is measured with centimetre spatial resolution until the occurrence of the slope failure. Standard legacy sensors measuring soil moisture and pore water pressure are installed at different depths and positions along the slope for comparison and validation. The evolution of the strain field is related to landslide dynamics with unprecedented resolution and insight. In fact, the results of the experiment clearly identify several phases within the evolution of the landslide and show that optical fibres can detect precursory signs of failure well before the collapse, paving the way for the development of more effective early warning systems.

  7. The fascinating early history of optics! Archaeological optics 2009: our knowledge of the early history of lenses, mirrors, and artificial eyes!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Jay M.

    2009-08-01

    The early history of optics and vision science (older term: physiological optics) is indeed fascinating. The earliest known true lenses have been found in "eyes" of Egyptian statues which contain superb, complex, and well-polished eye-lens units. The oldest ones known are dated circa 2575 BCE = BC, Dynasty IV, Old Kingdom. These eye-lens units induce a fascinating and powerful visual illusion, but they are just too good to have been the first lenses, or even the first lenses of this design! So saying, no earlier dateable lenses have been found in Egypt or elsewhere. Recently, at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the writer noted a previously undetected lens in this series (a first in the Western Hemisphere). Oddly, dateable simpler magnifying lenses and burning glasses seem to have appeared later in time (?)! Manufactured mirrors are quite a bit older, dating from circa 6000 BCE in atal Hyk, located in south-central modern-day Turkey. Using these ancient mirrors, the image quality obtained is remarkable! Recently discovered ancient artificial eyes, located, in situ, in exhumed corpses, have been dated circa 3000 BCE (one discovered in Iran) 5000 BCE (one found in Spain). On the 3000 BCE artificial eye, there are drawn light rays (the writer believes these to be the oldest known depiction of light rays!) spreading out from (or passing into) the iris/ pupil border! Added interesting aspects associated with the early development of light-rays are considered. Thus, early optics can be readily traced back to the Neolithic era (the new stone age), and in some cases before that time period. We have deep roots indeed!

  8. ZnS:Cu,Co water-soluble afterglow nanoparticles: synthesis, luminescence and potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lun; Chen Wei

    2010-01-01

    Cu 2+ and Co 2+ co-doped zinc sulfide water-soluble nanoparticles (ZnS:Cu,Co) were prepared and their afterglow luminescence was observed and reported for the first time. The nanoparticles have a cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of about 4 nm as determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). In the photoluminescence, two emission peaks are observed at 470 and 510 nm. However, in the afterglow, only one peak is observed at around 525 nm. The blue emission at 470 nm is from surface states and the green emission at 525 nm is from Cu 2+ . This means that Cu 2+ is responsible for the afterglow from the nanoparticles, while the co-doping of Co 2+ is critical for the afterglow because no afterglow could be seen without co-doping with Co 2+ . The successful observation of the afterglow from water-soluble nanoparticles may open up new applications of afterglow phosphors in biological imaging, detection and treatment.

  9. GRB 080503 LATE AFTERGLOW RE-BRIGHTENING: SIGNATURE OF A MAGNETAR-POWERED MERGER-NOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, He; Ding, Xuan; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    GRB 080503 is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift and has been classified as a GRB originating from a compact star merger. The soft extended emission and the simultaneous late re-brightening in both the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves raise interesting questions regarding its physical origin. We show that the broadband data of GRB 080503 can be well explained within the framework of the double neutron star merger model, provided that the merger remnant is a rapidly rotating massive neutron star with an extremely high magnetic field (i.e., a millisecond magnetar). We show that the late optical re-brightening is consistent with the emission from a magnetar-powered “merger-nova.” This adds one more case to the growing sample of merger-novae associated with short GRBs. The soft extended emission and the late X-ray excess emission are well connected through a magnetar dipole spin-down luminosity evolution function, suggesting that direct magnetic dissipation is the mechanism to produce these X-rays. The X-ray emission initially leaks from a hole in the merger ejecta pierced by the short GRB jet. The hole subsequently closes after the magnetar spins down and the magnetic pressure drops below ram pressure. The X-ray photons are then trapped behind the merger-nova ejecta until the ejecta becomes optically thin at a later time. This explains the essentially simultaneous re-brightening in both the optical and X-ray light curves. Within this model, future gravitational-wave sources could be associated with a bright X-ray counterpart along with the merger-nova, even if the short GRB jet beams away from Earth

  10. GRB 080503 LATE AFTERGLOW RE-BRIGHTENING: SIGNATURE OF A MAGNETAR-POWERED MERGER-NOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Ding, Xuan; Wu, Xue-Feng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 2100093 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: hug18@psu.edu, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    GRB 080503 is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift and has been classified as a GRB originating from a compact star merger. The soft extended emission and the simultaneous late re-brightening in both the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves raise interesting questions regarding its physical origin. We show that the broadband data of GRB 080503 can be well explained within the framework of the double neutron star merger model, provided that the merger remnant is a rapidly rotating massive neutron star with an extremely high magnetic field (i.e., a millisecond magnetar). We show that the late optical re-brightening is consistent with the emission from a magnetar-powered “merger-nova.” This adds one more case to the growing sample of merger-novae associated with short GRBs. The soft extended emission and the late X-ray excess emission are well connected through a magnetar dipole spin-down luminosity evolution function, suggesting that direct magnetic dissipation is the mechanism to produce these X-rays. The X-ray emission initially leaks from a hole in the merger ejecta pierced by the short GRB jet. The hole subsequently closes after the magnetar spins down and the magnetic pressure drops below ram pressure. The X-ray photons are then trapped behind the merger-nova ejecta until the ejecta becomes optically thin at a later time. This explains the essentially simultaneous re-brightening in both the optical and X-ray light curves. Within this model, future gravitational-wave sources could be associated with a bright X-ray counterpart along with the merger-nova, even if the short GRB jet beams away from Earth.

  11. Constraining chameleon field theories using the GammeV afterglow experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhye, A.; Steffen, J. H.; Weltman, A.

    2010-01-01

    The GammeV experiment has constrained the couplings of chameleon scalar fields to matter and photons. Here, we present a detailed calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate underlying these constraints. The dependence of GammeV constraints on various assumptions in the calculation is studied. We discuss the GammeV-CHameleon Afterglow SEarch, a second-generation GammeV experiment, which will improve upon GammeV in several major ways. Using our calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate, we forecast model-independent constraints achievable by GammeV-CHameleon Afterglow SEarch. We then apply these constraints to a variety of chameleon models, including quartic chameleons and chameleon dark energy models. The new experiment will be able to probe a large region of parameter space that is beyond the reach of current tests, such as fifth force searches, constraints on the dimming of distant astrophysical objects, and bounds on the variation of the fine structure constant.

  12. Searches for hard X-ray gamma-ray burst afterglows with the BAT on Swift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimm, Hans A.; Ozawa, Hideki; Weidenspointner, Georg; Barbier, Louis M.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil; Parsons, Ann M.; Tueller, Jack; Eftekharzadeh, Ardeshir; Hullinger, Derek D.; Markwardt, Craig; Fenimore, Edward E.; Palmer, David M.

    2003-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift gamma ray burst mission will continue to observe the fields of all detected gamma-ray bursts for several days after the prompt emission has faded. Utilizing first event-by-event data, then one minute and later five minute survey accumulations, the BAT will be extremely sensitive to the hard X-ray afterglow known to be associated with many bursts. This data will cover the crucial transition of the afterglow from rapid variability to the smoothly decaying power law in time and will extend observations of the tails of individual bursts to longer time scales than have been achievable so far. Since Swift is sensitive to short duration GRBs, we will also be able to determine whether hard X-ray afterglows are associated with short GRBs. The BAT will provide high resolution spectra of burst afterglows, allowing us to study in detail the time evolution of GRB spectra

  13. Dust extinction in high-z galaxies with gamma-ray burst afterglow spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elíasdóttir, Á.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.

    2009-01-01

    in a GRB host galaxy, while several tens of optical afterglow spectra without the bump have been recorded in the past decade. The derived extinction curve gives AV = 0.8-1.5 depending on the assumed intrinsic slope. Of the three local extinction laws, a Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) type extinction gives...... the best fit to the extinction curve of the host of GRB 070802. Besides the 2175 Å bump we find that the spectrum of GRB 070802 is characterized by unusually strong low-ionization metal lines and possibly a high metallicity for a GRB sightline ([Si/H] = –0.46 ± 0.38, [Zn/H] = –0.50 ± 0.68). In particular.......4 ± 1.0) × 1021 cm–2 mag–1, which lies between typical Milky Way and LMC values. Our results are in agreement with the tentative conclusion reached by Gordon et al. that the shape of the extinction curve, in particular the presence of the bump, is affected by the UV flux density in the environment...

  14. Neutral and ionic emission from collisionally excited additives to an helium afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taieb, G.; Broida, H.P.

    1977-01-01

    Spatially separated emission from ionic and neutral molecules has been observed when N 2 ,CO,CO 2 ,N 2 O and other gases were added to a flowing helium afterglow. Emission from neutral molecules is probably the result of ion-electron recombination in the plasma of the afterglow. It was observed that neutral molecular emission was decreased when a magnetic field was applied near the glow. (Auth.)

  15. A Study of Electron Decay in Nitrogen Time After-glow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veis, P.; Coitout, H.; Magne, L.; Cernogora, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with electron density measurements in nitrogen time after-glow using hyper frequency resonant cavity. The studied pressures are from the range 9-530 Pa and discharge currents from 20 mA up to 500 mA. Electrons decreases up to the time of 1,4 ms in after-glow depending on pressure, pulse current and pulse duration (Authors)

  16. [Heidelberg retinal tomography of the optic disc in the early diagnosis of glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machekhin, V A; Fabrikantov, O L

    2017-01-01

    To analyze anatomical and topographic optic disc parameters with account to the disc area in glaucoma suspects. The study included 302 patients (408 eyes) aged 25 to 76 years (the mean age of 50.5±12.5 years); men and women roughly equal in number. The eyes were divided into 8 groups depending on the disc area, which ranged from 0.89 to 3.5 mm2. With HRT, 11 global and sector optic disc parameters were examined, 4 of which (disc area, rim area, cup/disc ratio, mean RNFL thickness) are presented in this paper. The study revealed a great variability of disc area values as well as individual morphometric features of the examined optic discs. We have also established high statistical significance of the difference between the above-listed optic disc parameters, both global and sectoral, in groups with different disc areas with the exception of the mean RNFL thickness. For early glaucoma detection with HRT, it is advisable to consider the individual area-dependent anatomical and topographic features of the optic disc.

  17. Enhancing early bladder cancer detection with fluorescence-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. T.; Xie, T. Q.; Du, C. W.; Bastacky, S.; Meyers, S.; Zeidel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the possibility of enhancing early bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). After the intravesical instillation of a 10% solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid, simultaneous fluorescence imaging (excitation of 380-420 nm, emission of 620-700 nm) and OCT are performed on rat bladders to identify the photochemical and morphological changes associated with uroepithelial tumorigenesis. The preliminary results of our ex vivo study reveal that both fluorescence and OCT can identify early uroepithelial cancers, and OCT can detect precancerous lesions (e.g., hyperplasia) that fluorescence may miss. This suggests that a cystoscope combining 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and OCT imaging has the potential to enhance the efficiency and sensitivity of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  18. Early characterization of occlusal overloaded cervical dental hard tissues by en face optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Stoica, Eniko Tunde; Ionita, Ciprian; Florin, Topala; Vasile, Liliana; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2011-06-01

    Early diagnosis of occlusal overload is an important issue in dental medicine. The high occlusal forces can cause irreversible damage to the dental hard tissues. Our study proposes the early microstructural characterization of occlusal overloaded bicuspids, with abnormal crown morphology, by en face optical coherence tomography (eFOCT). The dental samples were investigated using an eFOCT system operating at 1300 nm in B-scan and C-scan mode. The eFOCT images obtained from these teeth visualized cracks, which didn't reach the tooth surface. The μCT and histological images confirmed the microstructural defects identified on eFOCT images. In conclusion, eFOCT is a promising imaging method for the early diagnosis of occlusal overload on bicuspids with normal crown morphology and for the prophylaxis of dental wear.

  19. A New Era of Submillimeter GRB Afterglow Follow-Ups with the Greenland Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Urata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Planned rapid submillimeter (submm gamma-ray-bursts (GRBs follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT are presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high altitude and dry weather porvide excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1 systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS in the early afterglow phase, (2 characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3 detections of GRBs at a high redshift as a result of the explosion of first generation stars through systematic rapid follow-ups. The light curves and spectra calculated by available theoretical models clearly show that the GLT could play a crucial role in these studies.

  20. The VLT/X-shooter GRB afterglow legacy survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Lex; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Pugliese, Vanna; van Rest, Daan

    2017-11-01

    The Swift satellite allows us to use gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to peer through the hearts of star forming galaxies through cosmic time. Our open collaboration, representing most of the active European researchers in this field, builds a public legacy sample of GRB X-shooter spectroscopy while Swift continues to fly. To date, our spectroscopy of more than 100 GRB afterglows covers a redshift range from 0.059 to about 8 (Tanvir et al. 2009, Nature 461, 1254), with more than 20 robust afterglow-based metallicity measurements (over a redshift range from 1.7 to 5.9). With afterglow spectroscopy (throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X-rays to the sub-mm) we can hence characterize the properties of star-forming galaxies over cosmic history in terms of redshift, metallicity, molecular content, ISM temperature, UV-flux density, etc.. These observations provide key information on the final evolution of the most massive stars collapsing into black holes, with the potential of probing the epoch of the formation of the first (very massive) stars. VLT/X-shooter (Vernet et al. 2011, A&A 536, A105) is in many ways the ideal GRB follow-up instrument and indeed GRB follow-up was one of the primary science cases behind the instrument design and implementation. Due to the wide wavelength coverage of X-shooter, in the same observation one can detect molecular H2 absorption near the atmospheric cut-off and many strong emission lines from the host galaxy in the near-infrared (e.g., Friis et al. 2015, MNRAS 451, 167). For example, we have measured a metallicity of 0.1 Z ⊙ for GRB 100219A at z = 4.67 (Thöne et al. 2013, MNRAS 428, 3590), 0.02 Z ⊙ for GRB 111008A at z = 4.99 (Sparre et al. 2014, ApJ 785, 150) and 0.05 Z ⊙ for GRB 130606A at z = 5.91 (Hartoog et al. 2015, A&A 580, 139). In the latter, the very high value of [Al/Fe]=2.40 +/- 0.78 might be due to a proton capture process and may be a signature of a previous generation of massive (perhaps even the first) stars

  1. LIMITS ON OPTICAL POLARIZATION DURING THE PROMPT PHASE OF GRB 140430A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopac, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Arnold, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Kobayashi, S.; Lamb, G. P.; Smith, R. J.; Virgili, F. J.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Harrison, R. M.; Melandri, A.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Oates, S. R.; Järvinen, A.; Jelínek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst GRB 140430A was detected by the Swift satellite and observed promptly with the imaging polarimeter RINGO3 mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, with observations beginning while the prompt γ-ray emission was still ongoing. In this paper, we present densely sampled (10-s temporal resolution) early optical light curves (LCs) in 3 optical bands and limits to the degree of optical polarization. We compare optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray properties and present an analysis of the optical emission during a period of high-energy flaring. The complex optical LC cannot be explained merely with a combination of forward and reverse shock emission from a standard external shock, implying additional contribution of emission from internal shock dissipation. We estimate an upper limit for time averaged optical polarization during the prompt phase to be as low as P < 12% (1σ). This suggests that the optical flares and early afterglow emission in this GRB are not highly polarized. Alternatively, time averaging could mask the presence of otherwise polarized components of distinct origin at different polarization position angles

  2. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves

  3. MODELING EXTRAGALACTIC EXTINCTION THROUGH GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, Alberto; Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Aresu, Giambattista [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare, E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: gmulas@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: garesu@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: cecchi-pestellini@astropa.inaf.it [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-09-20

    We analyze extragalactic extinction profiles derived through gamma-ray burst afterglows, using a dust model specifically constructed on the assumption that dust grains are not immutable but respond, time-dependently, to the local physics. Such a model includes core-mantle spherical particles of mixed chemical composition (silicate core, sp{sup 2}, and sp{sup 3} carbonaceous layers), and an additional molecular component in the form of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We fit most of the observed extinction profiles. Failures occur for lines of sight, presenting remarkable rises blueward of the bump. We find a tendency for the carbon chemical structure to become more aliphatic with the galactic activity, and to some extent with increasing redshifts. Moreover, the contribution of the molecular component to the total extinction is more important in younger objects. The results of the fitting procedure (either successes and failures) may be naturally interpreted through an evolutionary prescription based on the carbon cycle in the interstellar medium of galaxies.

  4. Short Hard Gamma Ray Bursts And Their Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    Long duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) are produced by highly- relativistic jets ejected in core-collapse supernova explosions. The origin of short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) has not been established. They may be produced by highly relativistic jets ejected in various processes: mergers of compact stellar objects; large-mass accretion episodes onto compact stars in close binaries or onto intermediate-mass black holes in dense stellar regions; phase transition of compact stars. Natural environments of such events are the dense cores of globular clusters, superstar clusters and young supernova remnants. We have used the cannonball model of GRBs to analyze all Swift SHBs with a well-sampled X-ray afterglow. We show that their prompt gamma-ray emission can be explained by inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of the progenitor's glory light, and their extended soft emission component by ICS of high density light or synchrotron radiation (SR) in a high density interstellar medium within the cl...

  5. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  6. The early-stage diagnosis of albinic embryos by applying optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Yu-Yen; Cai, Jyun-Jhang; Chang, Chung-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Albinism is a kind of congenital disease of abnormal metabolism. Poecilia reticulata (guppy fish) is chosen as the model to study the development of albinic embryos as it is albinic, ovoviviparous and with short life period. This study proposed an imaging method for penetrative embryo investigation using optical coherence tomography. By imaging through guppy mother’s reproduction purse, we found the embryo’s eyes were the early-developed albinism features. As human’s ocular albinism typically appear at about four weeks old, it is the time to determine if an embryo will grow into an albino.

  7. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  8. Closing in on a Short-Hard Burst Progenitor: Constraints From Early-Time Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of a Possible Host Galaxy of GRB 050509b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Prochaska, J.X.; Pooley, D.; Blake, C.W.; Foley, R.J.; Jha, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Granot, J.; Filippenko, A.V.; Sigurdsson, S.; Barth, A.J.; Chen,; Cooper, M.C.; Falco, E.E.; Gal, R.R.; Gerke, B.F.; Gladders, M.D.; Greene, J.E.; Hennanwi, J.; Ho, L.C.; Hurley, K.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ.

    2005-06-07

    The localization of the short-duration, hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst GRB050509b by the Swift satellite was a watershed event. Never before had a member of this mysterious subclass of classic GRBs been rapidly and precisely positioned in a sky accessible to the bevy of ground-based follow-up facilities. Thanks to the nearly immediate relay of the GRB position by Swift, we began imaging the GRB field 8 minutes after the burst and have continued during the 8 days since. Though the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) discovered an X-ray afterglow of GRB050509b, the first ever of a short-hard burst, thus far no convincing optical/infrared candidate afterglow or supernova has been found for the object. We present a re-analysis of the XRT afterglow and find an absolute position of R.A. = 12h36m13.59s, Decl. = +28{sup o}59'04.9'' (J2000), with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 3.68'' in R.A., 3.52'' in Decl.; this is about 4'' to the west of the XRT position reported previously. Close to this position is a bright elliptical galaxy with redshift z = 0.2248 {+-} 0.0002, about 1' from the center of a rich cluster of galaxies. This cluster has detectable diffuse emission, with a temperature of kT = 5.25{sub -1.68}{sup +3.36} keV. We also find several ({approx}11) much fainter galaxies consistent with the XRT position from deep Keck imaging and have obtained Gemini spectra of several of these sources. Nevertheless we argue, based on positional coincidences, that the GRB and the bright elliptical are likely to be physically related. We thus have discovered reasonable evidence that at least some short-duration, hard-spectra GRBs are at cosmological distances. We also explore the connection of the properties of the burst and the afterglow, finding that GRB050509b was underluminous in both of these relative to long-duration GRBs. However, we also demonstrate that the ratio of the blast-wave energy to the {gamma}-ray energy is consistent with that

  9. Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics: Absorption by Host Galaxy Gas and Dust, Circumburst Media and the Distribution of P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Wijers, R. a. M. J.; Curran, P.; Rol, E.; Wiersema, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanderHorst, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We use a new approach to obtain limits on the absorbing columns towards a sample of 10 Gamma-ray Bursts observed by BeppoSAX from simultaneous fits to X-ray, optical and IR data, in counts space and including the effects of metallicity. For half the afterglows the best-fitting model to the SED includes SMC-like extinction (as opposed to LMC or MW) and in one LMC-like extinction, and in no cases is there a preference for MW-like extinction. Gas-to-dust ratios generally do not match those of the 3 standard and most well-known extinction models of SMC, LMC and MW, but tend to be higher. We compare the results from this method to those of previous works using other methods. We constrain the jet models for a subsample of the bursts by constraining the cooling break position and power law spectral slopes, allowing the injected electron energy index to be measured. We derive secure values of p from our spectral fits and comparison with the temporal optical and X-ray slopes for 4 afterglows. The mean of these single value, suggesting that either external factors such as circumburst medium play a strong role or that the microphysics is not identical for each GRB. For GRB 971214 we find that the circumburst medium has a wind-like density profile and the cooling frequency appears to be moving to higher frequencies.

  10. The afterglow of the short/intermediate-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000301C: A jet at z=2.04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.L.; Fynbo, J.U.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    was subsequently discovered with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) about 42 h after the burst. The GRB lies at the border between the long-soft and the short-hard classes of GRBs. If GRB 000301C belongs to the latter class, this would be the first detection of an afterglow to a short-hard burst. We present UBRI...... the burst. The optical light curve is consistent with bring achromatic from 2 to 11 days after the burst and exhibits a break. A broken power-law fit yields a shallow pre-break decay power-law slope of alpha (1) = -0.72 +/- 0.06, a break time of t(break) = 4.39 +/- 0.26 days after the burst, and a post.......0404 +/- 0.0008. We find evidence for a curved shape of the spectral energy distribution of the observed afterglow. It is best fitted with a power-law spectral distribution with index beta similar to -0.7 reddened by an SMC-like extinction law with A(v) similar to 0.1 mag. Based on the Ly alpha absorption...

  11. MODELING THE AFTERGLOW OF THE POSSIBLE FERMI -GBM EVENT ASSOCIATED WITH GW150914

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.; Ryan, Dominic M.

    2016-01-01

    We model the possible afterglow of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) event associated with LIGO detection GW150914, under the assumption that the gamma-rays are produced by a short GRB-like relativistic outflow. We model GW150914-GBM as both a weak, on-axis short GRB and normal short GRB seen far off-axis. Given the large uncertainty in the position of GW150914, we determine that the best chance of finding the afterglow is with ASKAP or possibly the Murchinson Widefield Array (MWA), with the flux from an off-axis short GRB reaching 0.2–4 mJy (0.12–16 mJy) at 150 MHz (863.5 MHz) by 1–12 months after the initial event. At low frequencies, the source would evolve from a hard to soft spectrum over several months. The radio afterglow would be detectable for several months to years after it peaks, meaning the afterglow may still be detectable and increasing in brightness NOW (2016 mid-July). With a localization from the MWA or ASKAP, the afterglow would be detectable at higher radio frequencies with the ATCA and in X-rays with Chandra or XMM .

  12. Distributed Fiber Optic Sensor for Early Detection of Rocky Slopes Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minardo, Aldo; Picarelli, Luciano; Coscetta, Agnese; Zeni, Giovanni; Esposito, Giuseppe; Sacchi, Marco; Matano, Fabio; Caccavale, Mauro; Luigi, Zeni

    2014-05-01

    sensor, no preliminary information about the possible displacement locations of rocks are required in advance. The sensing cable can be simply deployed in a zig-zag pattern path along the slope, for hundreds of meters, and the system will remotely detect and locate any displacements wherever they occur along the fiber cable path, so representing a powerful tool for early warning against possible rock slides. [1] J. M. López-Higuera, L. R. Cobo, A. Q. Incera, A. Cobo, " Fiber Optic Sensors in Structural Health Monitoring", Journal of Lightwave Technology, Vol. 29, pp.586-608, 2011. [2] A. Minardo, R. Bernini, L. Zeni, "Numerical analysis of single pulse and differential pulse-width pair BOTDA systems in the high spatial resolution regime", Optics Express, vol. 19, pp. 19233-19244, 2011. [3] A. Minardo, R. Bernini, L. Amato, L. Zeni, "Bridge monitoring using Brillouin fiber-optic sensors", IEEE Sensor Journal, Vol. 12 (1), pp. 145-150, 2012. [4] R. Bernini, A. Minardo, S. Ciaramella, V. Minutolo, L. Zeni, "Distributed strain measurement along a concrete beam via stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers", International Journal of Geophysics, Vol. 2011, pp. 1-5, doi:10.1155/2011/710941, 2011.

  13. Crack Risk Evaluation of Early Age Concrete Based on the Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks often appear in concrete arch dams, due to the thermal stress and low tensile strength of early age concrete. There are three commonly used temperature controlling measures: controlling the casting temperature, burying cooling pipe, and protecting the surface. However, because of the difficulty to obtain accurate temperature and thermal stress field of the concrete, the rationality and economy of these measures are not assessed validly before and after construction. In this paper, a crack risk evaluation system for early age concrete is established, including distributed optical fiber temperature sensing (DTS, prediction of temperature and stress fields, and crack risk evaluation. Based on the DTS temperature data, the back-analysis method is applied to retrieve the thermal parameters of concrete. Then, the temperature and thermal stress of early age concrete are predicted using the reversed thermal parameters, as well as the laboratory test parameters. Finally, under the proposed cracking risk evaluation principle, the cracking risk level of each concrete block is given; the preliminary and later temperature controlling measures were recommended, respectively. The application of the proposed system in Xiluodu super high arch dam shows that this system works effectively for preventing cracks of early age concrete.

  14. Clinical monitoring of early caries lesions using cross polarization optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Pelzner, Roger B.

    New methods are needed for the nondestructive measurement of tooth demineralization and remineralization and to monitor the progression of incipient caries lesions (tooth decay) for effective nonsurgical intervention and to evaluate the performance of anti-caries treatments such as chemical treatments or laser irradiation. Studies have shown that optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential to fulfill this role, since it can be used to measure the depth and severity of early lesions with an axial resolution exceeding 10-μm. It is easy to apply in vivo and it can be used to image the convoluted topography of tooth occlusal surfaces. In this paper we present early results from two clinical studies underway to measure the effect of fluoride intervention on early lesions. CP-OCT was used to monitor early lesions on enamel and root surfaces before and after intervention with fluoride varnish. The lesion depth and internal structure were resolved for all the lesions examined and some lesions had well defined surface zones of lower reflectivity that may be indicative of arrested lesions. Changes were also noted in the structure of some of the lesions after fluoride intervention.

  15. Stimuli-disassembling gold nanoclusters for diagnosis of early stage oral cancer by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Soo; Ingato, Dominique; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Chen, Zhongping; Kwon, Young Jik

    2018-01-01

    A key design consideration in developing contrast agents is obtaining distinct, multiple signal changes in diseased tissue. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been developed as contrast agents due to their strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR). This study aims to demonstrate that stimuli-responsive plasmonic Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) can be used as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting early-stage cancer. Au NPs were clustered via acid-cleavable linkers to synthesize Au NCs that disassemble under mildly acidic conditions into individual Au NPs, simultaneously diminishing SPR effect (quantified by scattering intensity) and increasing Brownian motion (quantified by Doppler variance). The acid-triggered morphological and accompanying optico-physical property changes of the acid-disassembling Au NCs were confirmed by TEM, DLS, UV/Vis, and OCT. Stimuli-responsive Au NCs were applied in a hamster check pouch model carrying early-stage squamous carcinoma tissue. The tissue was visualized by OCT imaging, which showed reduced scattering intensity and increased Doppler variance in the dysplastic tissue. This study demonstrates the promise of diagnosing early-stage cancer using molecularly programmable, inorganic nanomaterial-based contrast agents that are capable of generating multiple, stimuli-triggered diagnostic signals in early-stage cancer.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D A; Kirk, K J; Sampathkumar, A; Longbottom, C

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (<100μm) of the lesion. A fine-resolution (600 nm) ultra-broadband (200 MHz) all-optical photoacoustic microscopy system was is used to image the early signs of tooth decay. Ex-vivo tooth samples exhibiting white spot lesions were scanned and were found to generate a larger (one order of magnitude) photoacoustic (PA) signal in the lesion regions compared to healthy enamel. The high contrast in the PA images potentially allows lesions to be imaged and measured at a much earlier stage than current clinical techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system

  17. Relativistic simulations of long-lived reverse shocks in stratified ejecta: the origin of flares in GRB afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, A.; Daigne, F.

    2018-02-01

    The X-ray light curves of the early afterglow phase from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) present a puzzling variability, including flares. The origin of these flares is still debated, and often associated with a late activity of the central engine. We discuss an alternative scenario where the central engine remains short-lived and flares are produced by the propagation of a long-lived reverse shock in a stratified ejecta. Here we focus on the hydrodynamics of the shock interactions. We perform one-dimensional ultrarelativistic hydrodynamic simulations with different initial internal structure in the GRB ejecta. We use them to extract bolometric light curves and compare with a previous study based on a simplified ballistic model. We find a good agreement between both approaches, with similar slopes and variability in the light curves, but identify several weaknesses in the ballistic model: the density is underestimated in the shocked regions, and more importantly, late shock reflections are not captured. With accurate dynamics provided by our hydrodynamic simulations, we confirm that internal shocks in the ejecta lead to the formation of dense shells. The interaction of the long-lived reverse shock with a dense shell then produces a fast and intense increase of the dissipated power. Assuming that the emission is due to the synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated electrons, and that the external forward shock is radiatively inefficient, we find that this results in a bright flare in the X-ray light curve, with arrival times, shapes, and duration in agreement with the observed properties of X-ray flares in GRB afterglows.

  18. Study on the Influence Factors of the Luminous Intensity of the Long Afterglow Luminous Paints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to extend the time afterglow luminous powder, enhancement the brightness of luminous paint, this study explore affect long afterglow energy storage luminous paints brightness of the main factors. Luminous paints were prepared with rare earth aluminate long afterglow luminescent powder, first is luminous powder surface modification, then investigate the influence of light emitting powder content, calcium carbonate, titanium dioxide, nano alumina and other fillers on the luminescent properties of the paints. It was concluded that the water resistance of the luminescent powder is better and the brightness can be improved after the modification of anhydrous alcohol. The addition of nano-alumina can improve the brightness of the system, and can effectively enhance the hardness of the paints. In the paints, the two kinds of components of carbonate and titanium dioxide have little effect on the luminescent brightness of the painting.

  19. Controlled growth of copper oxide nanostructures by atmospheric pressure micro-afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaweel, A.; Filipič, G.; Gries, T.; Belmonte, T.

    2014-12-01

    A large variety of copper oxide nanostructures encompassing nanodots, nanowires and nanowalls, sometimes organized in ;cabbage-like; architectures, are grown locally by direct oxidation of copper thin films using the micro-afterglow of an Ar-O2 microwave plasma operating at atmospheric pressure. Morphology, structure and composition of the oxidized copper thin films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The concentric areas where each kind of nanostructures is found are defined by both their radial position with respect to the afterglow centre and by experimental conditions. A growth mechanism is proposed, based on stress-induced outward migration of copper ions. The development of stress gradients is caused by the formation of a copper oxide scale layer. If copper oxide nanowires can be grown as in thermal oxidation processes, micro-afterglow conditions offer novel nanostructures and nano-architectures.

  20. Electron energy probability function in the temporal afterglow of a dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Ostrikov, K.; Yu, M. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The kinetic description of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) in a dusty afterglow plasma is considered for two typical cases: when the rate of electron-neutral momentum-transfer collisions is independent of the electron energy and when it is a power function of the electron energy. The electron Boltzmann equation is solved using the method of characteristics and analytical expressions for the EEPF are obtained for different initial EEPFs (including both Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions) at electron energies larger than the dust-surface potential. The analytical EEPF functions are then used to analyze several experimental parameter regimes of the dust radius and density, the dust-charge decay time, the afterglow duration, etc. It is also found that absorption of electrons by the dust particles plays an important role in determining the EEPF in a dusty afterglow.

  1. Population distribution of atomic uranium in the afterglow of a pulsed hollow-cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demers, Yves; Gagne, J.-M.; Pianarosa, Piero

    1987-01-01

    From laser absorption measurements we have deduced the time evolution of the population distribution of atomic uranium in the afterglow of a pulsed hollow-cathode type discharge. The vapour generator operates with xenon as the discharge sustaining gas at a pressure of 280 Pa (2.1 Torr). The current pulse characteristics are width 250 μs and height 1.5 A. The pulse repetition frequency is 100 Hz. It is shown that the populations in the three metastable levels at 6249, 3868 and 3800 cm -1 decrease almost exponentially in a time interval between 150 and 300 μs. From 400 μs onwards in the afterglow, the atom population is essentially shared between the ground and the first metastable (620 cm -1 ) levels. Furthermore, starting from 9 ms in the afterglow more than 80% of the U atoms are found in the ground level. (author)

  2. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.; Hebner, Greg A.

    2006-01-01

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75 Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6 eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as A 3 Σ u +

  3. The γ-ray afterglows of tidal disruption events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian; Gómez-Vargas, Germán Arturo; Guillochon, James

    2016-05-21

    A star wandering too close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) will be tidally disrupted. Previous studies of such 'tidal disruption event' (TDE) mostly focus on the stellar debris that are bound to the system, because they give rise to luminous flares. On the other hand, half of the stellar debris in principle are unbound and can stream to a great distance, but so far there is no clear evidence that this 'unbound debris stream' (UDS) exists. Motivated by the fact that the circum-nuclear region around SMBHs is usually filled with dense molecular clouds (MCs), here we investigate the observational signatures resulting from the collision between an UDS and an MC, which is likely to happen hundreds of years after a TDE. We focus on γ-ray emission (0.1-10 5 GeV), which comes from the encounter of shock-accelerated cosmic rays with background protons and, more importantly, is not subject to extinction. We show that because of the high proton density inside an MC, the peak γ-ray luminosity, about 10 39  erg s -1 , is at least 100 times greater than that in the case without an MC (only with a smooth interstellar medium). The luminosity decays on a time-scale of decades, depending on the distance of the MC, and about a dozen of these 'TDE afterglows' could be detected within a distance of about 16 Mpc by the future Cherenkov Telescope Array. Without careful discrimination, these sources potentially could contaminate the searches for starburst galaxies, galactic nuclei containing millisecond pulsars or dark matter annihilation signals.

  4. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  5. Observations of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Edo

    2011-09-01

    The study of short gamma-ray bursts has been revolutionized by the discovery of afterglows and host galaxies. In this talk I will review observations of the prompt emission, afterglows, and host galaxies, primarily as they pertain to the nature of the progenitor systems. The bulk of the evidence points to the merger of compact objects (NS-NS or NS-BH) making short GRBs the prime candidate for gravitational wave detections with the next generation detectors. This work is partially supported by funds from NASA (through the Swift and Chandra GO programs) and the NSF through an AAG grant.

  6. Radio afterglow of the jetted tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimica P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent transient event Swift J1644+57 has been interpreted as resulting from a relativistic outflow, powered by the accretion of a tidally disrupted star onto a supermassive black hole. This discovery of a new class of relativistic transients opens new windows into the study of tidal disruption events (TDEs and offers a unique probe of the physics of relativistic jet formation and the conditions in the centers of distant quiescent galaxies. Unlike the rapidly-varying γ/X-ray emission from Swift J1644+57, the radio emission varies more slowly and is well modeled as synchrotron radiation from the shock interaction between the jet and the gaseous circumnuclear medium (CNM. Early after the onset of the jet, a reverse shock propagates through and decelerates the ejecta released during the first few days of activity, while at much later times the outflow approaches the self-similar evolution of Blandford and McKee. The point at which the reverse shock entirely crosses the earliest ejecta is clearly observed as an achromatic break in the radio light curve at t ≈ 10 days. The flux and break frequencies of the afterglow constrain the properties of the jet and the CNM, including providing robust evidence for a narrowly collimated jet. I briefly discuss the implications of Swift J1644+57 for the fraction of TDEs accompanied by relativistic jets; the physics of jet formation more broadly; and the prospects for detecting off-axis TDE radio emission, either via follow-up observations of TDE candidates discovered at other wavelengths or blindly with upcoming wide-field radio surveys. The radio rebrightening observed months after the onset of the jet remains a major unsolved mystery, the resolution of which may require considering a jet with more complex (temporal or angular structure.

  7. All-optical photoacoustic imaging and detection of early-stage dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Hughes, David A.; Longbottom, Chris; Kirk, Katherine J.

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries remain one of the most common oral diseases in the world. Current detection methods, such as dental explorer and X-ray radiography, suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease because of the small size (tooth decay. This AOPAI system provides a non-contact, non-invasive and non-ionizing means of detecting early-stage dental caries. Ex-vivo teeth exhibiting early-stage, white-spot lesions were imaged using AOPAI. Experimental scans targeted each early-stage lesion and a reference healthy enamel region. Photoacoustic (PA) signals were generated in the tooth using a 532-nm pulsed laser and the light-induced broadband ultrasound signal was detected at the surface of the tooth with an optical path-stabilized Michelson interferometer operating at 532 nm. The measured time-domain signal was spatially resolved and back-projected to form 2D and 3D maps of the lesion using k-wave reconstruction methods. Experimental data collected from areas of healthy and diseased enamel indicate that the lesion generated a larger PA response compared to healthy enamel. The PA-signal amplitude alone was able to detect a lesion on the surface of the tooth. However, time- reversal reconstructions of the PA scans also quantitatively depicted the depth of the lesion. 3D PA reconstruction of the diseased tooth indicated a sub-surface lesion at a depth of 0.6 mm, in addition to the surface lesion. These results suggest that our AOPAI system is well suited for rapid clinical assessment of early-stage dental caries. An overview of the AOPAI system, fine-resolution PA and histology results of diseased and healthy teeth will be presented.

  8. Design and performance of optical endoscopes for the early detection of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Maureen Molly

    Cancer is a multistage, heterogeneous disease that develops through a series of genetic mutations. Early stage cancer is most responsive to treatment but can be the hardest to detect due to its small size, lack of definitive symptoms and potential location deep in the body. Whole body imaging methods, MRI/CT/PET, lack the necessary resolution to detect cellular level abnormalities. Optical methods, which have sufficient resolution, can be miniaturized into endoscopes, which are necessary to overcome limited penetration of light into tissue. By combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence imaging methods it is possible to create endoscopes sensitive to molecular and structural changes. I applied a dual-modality 2mm diameter rigid endoscope to the study of the natural history of colon cancer in a mouse model, and later applied this knowledge to the design and characterization of a 0.8 mm dual-modality flexible probe for use in human fallopian tubes. By using this endoscope, which is introduced through the natural orifice and is compatible with existing hysteroscopes, high-risk women could be screened in a procedure at a similar level of invasiveness as a colonoscopy. Therefore, the endoscope fills this gap in clinical care for women at high-risk for ovarian cancer.

  9. Enriched Environment Protects the Optic Nerve from Early Diabetes-Induced Damage in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Axoglial alterations of the distal (close to the chiasm) optic nerve (ON) could be the first structural change of the visual pathway in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on axoglial alterations of the ON provoked by experimental diabetes. For this purpose, three days after vehicle or STZ injection, animals were housed in enriched environment (EE) or remained in a standard environment (SE) for 6 weeks. Anterograde transport, retinal morphology, optic nerve axons (toluidine blue staining and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy immunoreactivity), microglia/macrophages (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) immunoreactivity), astrocyte reactivity (glial fibrillary acid protein-immunostaining), myelin (myelin basic protein immunoreactivity), ultrastructure, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were assessed in non-diabetic and diabetic animals housed in SE or EE. No differences in retinal morphology or retinal ganglion cell number were observed among groups. EE housing which did not affect the STZ-induced weight loss and hyperglycemia, prevented a decrease in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, ON axon number, and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy immunoreactivity. Moreover, EE housing prevented an increase in Iba-1 immunoreactivity, and astrocyte reactivity, as well as ultrastructural myelin alterations in the ON distal portion at early stages of diabetes. In addition, EE housing avoided a decrease in BDNF levels induced by experimental diabetes. These results suggest that EE induced neuroprotection in the diabetic visual pathway.

  10. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  11. Revisiting gamma-ray burst afterglows with time-dependent parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Chen, Wei; Liao, Bin; Lei, Wei-Hua; Liu, Yu

    2018-02-01

    The relativistic external shock model of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows has been established with five free parameters, i.e., the total kinetic energy E, the equipartition parameters for electrons {{ε }}{{e}} and for the magnetic field {{ε }}{{B}}, the number density of the environment n and the index of the power-law distribution of shocked electrons p. A lot of modified models have been constructed to consider the variety of GRB afterglows, such as: the wind medium environment by letting n change with radius, the energy injection model by letting kinetic energy change with time and so on. In this paper, by assuming all four parameters (except p) change with time, we obtain a set of formulas for the dynamics and radiation, which can be used as a reference for modeling GRB afterglows. Some interesting results are obtained. For example, in some spectral segments, the radiated flux density does not depend on the number density or the profile of the environment. As an application, through modeling the afterglow of GRB 060607A, we find that it can be interpreted in the framework of the time dependent parameter model within a reasonable range.

  12. X-ray spectral components observed in the afterglow of GRB 130925A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at >4σ significance, and its spectral shape varies between...

  13. The afterglow, redshift and extreme energetics of the gamma-ray burst of 23 January 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, [No Value; Djorgovski, SG; Odewahn, SC; Bloom, JS; Gal, RR; Koresko, CD; Harrison, FA; Lubin, LM; Armus, L; Sari, R; Illingworth, GD; Kelson, DD; Magee, DK; van Dokkum, PG; Frail, DA; Mulchaey, JS; Malkan, MA; McClean, IS; Teplitz, HI; Koerner, D; Kirkpatrick, D; Kobayashi, N; Yadigaroglu, IA; Halpern, J; Piran, T; Goodrich, RW; Chaffee, FH; Feroci, M; Costa, E

    1999-01-01

    Long-lived emission, known as afterglow, has now been detected from about a dozen gamma-ray bursts. Distance determinations place the bursts at cosmological distances, with redshifts,z, ranging from similar to 1 to 3, The energy required to produce these bright gamma-ray flashes is enormous: up to

  14. Multimodality approach to optical early detection and mapping of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Chung, Jungrae; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-07-01

    Early detection of cancer remains the best way to ensure patient survival and quality of life. Squamous cell carcinoma is usually preceded by dysplasia presenting as white, red, or mixed red and white epithelial lesions on the oral mucosa (leukoplakia, erythroplakia). Dysplastic lesions in the form of erythroplakia can carry a risk for malignant conversion of 90%. A noninvasive diagnostic modality would enable monitoring of these lesions at regular intervals and detection of treatment needs at a very early, relatively harmless stage. The specific aim of this work was to test a multimodality approach [three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarimetry] to noninvasive diagnosis of oral premalignancy and malignancy using the hamster cheek pouch model (nine hamsters). The results were compared to tissue histopathology. During carcinogenesis, epithelial down grow, eventual loss of basement membrane integrity, and subepithelial invasion were clearly visible with OCT. Polarimetry techniques identified a four to five times increased retardance in sites with squamous cell carcinoma, and two to three times greater retardance in dysplastic sites than in normal tissues. These techniques were particularly useful for mapping areas of field cancerization with multiple lesions, as well as lesion margins.

  15. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  16. Expansions of the Neurovascular Scleral Canal and Contained Optic Nerve Occur Early in the Hypertonic Saline Rat Experimental Glaucoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Marta; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Cepurna, W.O.; Johnson, E.C.; Morrison, J.C.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize early optic nerve head (ONH) structural change in rat experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods Unilateral intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation was induced in Brown Norway rats by hypertonic saline injection into the episcleral veins and animals were sacrificed 4 weeks later by perfusion fixation. Optic nerve cross-sections were graded from 1 (normal) to 5 (extensive injury) by 5 masked observers. ONH’s with peripapillary retina and sclera were embedded, serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall and animal-specific EG versus Control eye ONH parameter differences were assessed globally and regionally by linear mixed effect models with significance criteria adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results Expansions of the optic nerve and surrounding anterior scleral canal opening achieved statistical significance overall (p<.0022), and in 7 of 8 EG eyes (p<.005). In at least 5 EG eyes, significant expansions (p<.005) in Bruch’s membrane opening (range 3–10%), the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (8–21% and 5–21%, respectively), and the optic nerve at the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (11–30% and 8–41%, respectively) were detected. Optic nerve expansion was greatest within the superior and inferior quadrants. Optic nerve expansion at the posterior scleral canal opening was significantly correlated to optic nerve damage (R= 0.768, P=.042). Conclusion In the rat ONH, the optic nerve and surrounding Bruch’s membrane opening and neurovascular scleral canal expand early in their response to chronic experimental IOP elevation. These findings provide phenotypic landmarks and imaging targets for detecting the development of experimental glaucomatous optic neuropathy in the rat eye. PMID:26500195

  17. Expansions of the neurovascular scleral canal and contained optic nerve occur early in the hypertonic saline rat experimental glaucoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Marta; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K; Cepurna, William O; Johnson, Elaine C; Morrison, John C; Burgoyne, Claude F

    2016-04-01

    To characterize early optic nerve head (ONH) structural change in rat experimental glaucoma (EG). Unilateral intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation was induced in Brown Norway rats by hypertonic saline injection into the episcleral veins and animals were sacrificed 4 weeks later by perfusion fixation. Optic nerve cross-sections were graded from 1 (normal) to 5 (extensive injury) by 5 masked observers. ONHs with peripapillary retina and sclera were embedded, serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall and animal-specific EG versus Control eye ONH parameter differences were assessed globally and regionally by linear mixed effect models with significance criteria adjusted for multiple comparisons. Expansions of the optic nerve and surrounding anterior scleral canal opening achieved statistical significance overall (p < 0.0022), and in 7 of 8 EG eyes (p < 0.005). In at least 5 EG eyes, significant expansions (p < 0.005) in Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) (range 3-10%), the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (8-21% and 5-21%, respectively), and the optic nerve at the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (11-30% and 8-41%, respectively) were detected. Optic nerve expansion was greatest within the superior and inferior quadrants. Optic nerve expansion at the posterior scleral canal opening was significantly correlated to optic nerve damage (R = 0.768, p = 0.042). In the rat ONH, the optic nerve and surrounding BMO and neurovascular scleral canal expand early in their response to chronic experimental IOP elevation. These findings provide phenotypic landmarks and imaging targets for detecting the development of experimental glaucomatous optic neuropathy in the rat eye. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The mass distribution in early-type disc galaxies : declining rotation curves and correlations with optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, E.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Sancisi, R.; Swaters, R. S.; van Albada, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    We present rotation curves for 19 early-type disc galaxies (S0-Sab). The galaxies span a B-band absolute magnitude range from -17.5 to -22, but the majority have a high luminosity with M-B <-20. Rotation velocities are measured from a combination of H I velocity fields and long-slit optical emission

  19. Fiber optic probe enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering for early diagnosis of potential acute rejection of kidney transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jingmao; Chen, Hui; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have explored the use of a fiber-optic probe with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing modality for early, noninvasive and, rapid diagnosis of potential renal acute rejection (AR) and other renal graft dysfunction of kidney transplant patients. Multimode silica optical fiber immobilized with colloidal Ag nanoparticles at the distal end was used for SERS measurements of as-collected urine samples at 632.8 nm excitation wavelength. All patients with abnormal renal graft function (3 AR episodes and 2 graft failure episodes) who were clinically diagnosed independently show common unique SERS spectral features in the urines collected just one day after transplant. SERS-based fiber-optic probe has excellent potential to be a bedside tool for early diagnosis of kidney transplant patients for timely medical intervention of patients at high risk of transplant dysfunction.

  20. Enriched Environment Protects the Optic Nerve from Early Diabetes-Induced Damage in Adult Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián Dorfman

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Axoglial alterations of the distal (close to the chiasm optic nerve (ON could be the first structural change of the visual pathway in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes in rats. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on axoglial alterations of the ON provoked by experimental diabetes. For this purpose, three days after vehicle or STZ injection, animals were housed in enriched environment (EE or remained in a standard environment (SE for 6 weeks. Anterograde transport, retinal morphology, optic nerve axons (toluidine blue staining and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy immunoreactivity, microglia/macrophages (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1 immunoreactivity, astrocyte reactivity (glial fibrillary acid protein-immunostaining, myelin (myelin basic protein immunoreactivity, ultrastructure, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels were assessed in non-diabetic and diabetic animals housed in SE or EE. No differences in retinal morphology or retinal ganglion cell number were observed among groups. EE housing which did not affect the STZ-induced weight loss and hyperglycemia, prevented a decrease in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, ON axon number, and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy immunoreactivity. Moreover, EE housing prevented an increase in Iba-1 immunoreactivity, and astrocyte reactivity, as well as ultrastructural myelin alterations in the ON distal portion at early stages of diabetes. In addition, EE housing avoided a decrease in BDNF levels induced by experimental diabetes. These results suggest that EE induced neuroprotection in the diabetic visual pathway.

  1. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  2. Understanding Alterations in Cell Nano-architecture during Early Carcinogenesis using Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil

    Carcinogenesis is a complex multi-step process which eventually results in a malignant phenotype that often progresses into a fatal metastatic stage. There are several molecular changes (e.g. DNA methylation, activation of proto-oncogenes, loss of tumor-suppressor genes, histone acetylation) that occur in cells prior to the microscopically detectable morphological alterations. Hence, it is intuitive that these molecular changes should impact various biochemical, biophysical and transport processes within the cell and therefore its nanoscale morphology. Furthermore, recent studies have established that apparently `normal' cells (i.e., away from the actual tumor location) undergo similar genetic/epigenetic changes as the actual cancer cells, giving rise to the phenomenon of field carcinogenesis. Unfortunately, traditional microscopy or histopathology cannot resolve structures below 300 nm due to diffraction-limited resolution. Hence, we developed a novel optical imaging technique, partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy or optical nanocytology which quantifies the nanoscale refractive-index fluctuations (i.e. mass-density variations such as chromatin compaction) in an optically measured biomarker, disorder strength (Ld). This dissertation proves the nanoscale sensitivity of PWS nanocytology and shows that increase in Ld parallels neoplastic potential of a cell by using standardized cell-lines and animal-models. Based on concept of field carcinogenesis, we employ PWS nanocytology in a multi-center clinical study on approximately 450 patients in four different cancer-types (colon, ovarian, thyroid and lung) and we illustrate that nanoscale disorder increase is a ubiquitous phenomenon across different organs. We further demonstrate the potential of PWS nanocytology in predicting risk for developing future neoplasia. Biologically, we prove that cytoskeletal organization in both nucleus and cytoplasm plays a crucial role in governing L d-differences. Moreover, we

  3. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A Similarity Ratio Analysis (SRA) method is proposed for early-stage Fault Detection (FD) in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES) data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process. The method processes spectrum scans at successive time points and uses a windowing mechanism over the time series to alleviate problems with timing uncertainties due to process shift from one process run to another. A SRA library is first built to capture features of a healthy etching process. By comparing with the SRA library, a Similarity Ratio (SR) statistic is then calculated for each spectrum scan as the monitored process progresses. A fault detection mechanism, named 3-Warning-1-Alarm (3W1A), takes the SR values as inputs and triggers a system alarm when certain conditions are satisfied. This design reduces the chance of false alarm, and provides a reliable fault reporting service. The SRA method is demonstrated on a real semiconductor manufacturing dataset. The effectiveness of SRA-based fault detection is evaluated using a time-series SR test and also using a post-process SR test. The time-series SR provides an early-stage fault detection service, so less energy and materials will be wasted by faulty processing. The post-process SR provides a fault detection service with higher reliability than the time-series SR, but with fault testing conducted only after each process run completes.

  4. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available A Similarity Ratio Analysis (SRA method is proposed for early-stage Fault Detection (FD in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process. The method processes spectrum scans at successive time points and uses a windowing mechanism over the time series to alleviate problems with timing uncertainties due to process shift from one process run to another. A SRA library is first built to capture features of a healthy etching process. By comparing with the SRA library, a Similarity Ratio (SR statistic is then calculated for each spectrum scan as the monitored process progresses. A fault detection mechanism, named 3-Warning-1-Alarm (3W1A, takes the SR values as inputs and triggers a system alarm when certain conditions are satisfied. This design reduces the chance of false alarm, and provides a reliable fault reporting service. The SRA method is demonstrated on a real semiconductor manufacturing dataset. The effectiveness of SRA-based fault detection is evaluated using a time-series SR test and also using a post-process SR test. The time-series SR provides an early-stage fault detection service, so less energy and materials will be wasted by faulty processing. The post-process SR provides a fault detection service with higher reliability than the time-series SR, but with fault testing conducted only after each process run completes.

  5. Optics measurements and corrections at the early commissioning of SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnishi, Y; Morita, A; Koiso, H; Oide, K; Ohmi, K; Zhou, D; Funakoshi, Y; Carmignani, N; Liuzzo, S M; Biagini, M E; Boscolo, M; Guiducci, S

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental results of measurements and corrections for the optics at the early Phase-1 commissioning of SuperKEKB. The aim of SuperKEKB is a positron-electron collider built to achieve the target luminosity of 8x10^35 cm^−2s^−1. We have three stages; Phase-1 is the commissioning of the machine without the final focus magnets and detector solenoid(no collision); the collision with the final focus system and the Belle II detector will be performed at Phase-2 and Phase-3. The strategy for the luminosity upgrade is a novel "nano-beam” scheme found elsewhere[1]. In order to achieve the target luminosity, the vertical emittance has to be reduced by corrections of machine error measured with an orbit response. The vertical emittance should be achieved to be less than 10pm(∼0.2% coupling) during Phase-1 by fully utilizing correction tools of skew quadrupole-likecoils wound on sextupole magnets and power supplies for each correction coil in quadrupole magnets.

  6. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D. A.; Sampathkumar, A.; Longbottom, C.; Kirk, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (tooth decay. Ex-vivo tooth samples exhibiting white spot lesions were scanned and were found to generate a larger (one order of magnitude) photoacoustic (PA) signal in the lesion regions compared to healthy enamel. The high contrast in the PA images potentially allows lesions to be imaged and measured at a much earlier stage than current clinical techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system.

  7. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  8. Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis in Ocular Hypertension and Early-Stage Glucoma Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Copernicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluation of structural alterations of the optic nerve head (ONH and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT and early-stage glaucoma and assessment of the discriminatory diagnostic performance of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT Copernicus (Optopol Technology S.A.. Materials and Methods: This study included 59 eyes of a total of 59 patients, 29 of whom were diagnosed with OHT (Group 1 and 30 with early-stage glaucoma (Group 2. The differentiation of early-stage glaucoma and OHT was carried out on the basis of standard achromatic visual field test results. Analysis of the ONH and RNFL thickness of all cases was made using SD-OCT. Group 1 and Group 2 were compared with respect to the ONH parameters and RNFL thickness. The diagnostic sensitivity of the OCT parameters was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC. Results: The average, superior, inferior, and nasal RNFL thicknesses in early-stage glaucoma cases were approximately 10% (12-14 µm less compared to the OHT eyes, with differences being highly significant (p≤0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the temporal RNFL thicknesses. The most sensitive parameter in the early diagnosis of glaucoma was average RNFL thickness corresponding to AUC: 0.852, followed by AUC: 0.816 and AUC: 0.773 values in superior and inferior RNFL thickness, respectively. In localized RNFL defects, the highest sensitivity corresponded to superior and superonasal quadrants (ACU: 0.805 and ACU: 0.781, respectively. There were not any statistically significant differences between the ONH morphological parameters of the two groups. Conclusion: RNFL analysis obtained using SD-OCT Copernicus is able to discriminate early-stage glaucoma eyes from those with OHT. However, ONH morphological parameters do not have the same diagnostic sensitivity. Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 35-41

  9. The Design and Capabilities of the EXIST Optical and Infra-Red Telescope (IRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrev, A S.; Moseley, S. H.; Golisano, C.; Gong, Q.; Allen, B. T.; Gehrels, N.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J. S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Infra-Red Telescope is a critical element of the EXIST (Energetic X-Ray Imaging Survey Telescope) observatory. The primary goal of the IRT is to obtain photometric and spectroscopic measurements of high redshift (> or =6) gamma ray reaching to the epoque of reionization. The photometric and spectral capabilities of the IRT will allow to use GRB afterglow as probes of the composition and ionization state of the intergalactic medium of the young universe. A prompt follow up (within three minutes) of the transient discovered by the EXIST makes IRT a unique tool for detection and study of these events in the infrared and optical wavelength, which is particularly valuable at wavelengths unavailable to the ground based observatories. We present the results of the mission study development on the IRT as part of the EXIST observatory. Keywords: infrared spectroscopy, space telescope, gamma ray bursts, early universe

  10. Excess Optical Enhancement Observed with ARCONS for Early Crab Giant Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, M. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Mazin, B. A.; Spiro Jaeger, G. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; van Eyken, J. C.; Marsden, D.; O'Brien, K.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G.; Stoughton, C.; Bumble, B.

    2013-12-01

    We observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument backend. We see an 11.3% ± 2.5% increase in peak optical flux for pulses that have an accompanying giant radio pulse arriving near the peak of the optical main pulse, in contrast to a 3.2% ± 0.5% increase when an accompanying giant radio pulse arrives soon after the optical peak. We also observe that the peak of the optical main pulse is 2.8% ± 0.8% enhanced when there is a giant radio pulse accompanying the optical interpulse. We observe no statistically significant spectral differences between optical pulses accompanied by and not accompanied by giant radio pulses. Our results extend previous observations of optical-radio correlation to the time and spectral domains. Our refined temporal correlation suggests that optical and radio emission are indeed causally linked, and the lack of spectral differences suggests that the same mechanism is responsible for all optical emission.

  11. EXCESS OPTICAL ENHANCEMENT OBSERVED WITH ARCONS FOR EARLY CRAB GIANT PULSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strader, M. J.; Mazin, B. A.; Spiro Jaeger, G. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; Van Eyken, J. C.; Marsden, D.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Johnson, M. D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); O' Brien, K. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Stoughton, C. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bumble, B. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument backend. We see an 11.3% ± 2.5% increase in peak optical flux for pulses that have an accompanying giant radio pulse arriving near the peak of the optical main pulse, in contrast to a 3.2% ± 0.5% increase when an accompanying giant radio pulse arrives soon after the optical peak. We also observe that the peak of the optical main pulse is 2.8% ± 0.8% enhanced when there is a giant radio pulse accompanying the optical interpulse. We observe no statistically significant spectral differences between optical pulses accompanied by and not accompanied by giant radio pulses. Our results extend previous observations of optical-radio correlation to the time and spectral domains. Our refined temporal correlation suggests that optical and radio emission are indeed causally linked, and the lack of spectral differences suggests that the same mechanism is responsible for all optical emission.

  12. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ∼1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  13. SITHON: A Wireless Network of in Situ Optical Cameras Applied to the Early Detection-Notification-Monitoring of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiourlis, Georgios; Andreadakis, Stamatis; Konstantinidis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    The SITHON system, a fully wireless optical imaging system, integrating a network of in-situ optical cameras linking to a multi-layer GIS database operated by Control Operating Centres, has been developed in response to the need for early detection, notification and monitoring of forest fires. This article presents in detail the architecture and the components of SITHON, and demonstrates the first encouraging results of an experimental test with small controlled fires over Sithonia Peninsula in Northern Greece. The system has already been scheduled to be installed in some fire prone areas of Greece. PMID:22408536

  14. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  15. Implications of the Measured Image Size for the Radio Afterglow of GRB 030329

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, J.

    2005-01-05

    We use data on the image size of the radio afterglow of GRB 030329 (Taylor et al. 2004) to constrain the physical parameters of this explosion. Together with the observed broad band spectrum, this data over-constrains the physical parameters, thus enabling to test different GRB jet models for consistency. We consider two extreme models for the lateral spreading of the jet: model 1 with relativistic expansion in the local rest frame, and model 2 with little lateral expansion as long as the jet is highly relativistic. We find that both models are consistent with the data for a uniform external medium, while for a stellar wind environment model 1 is consistent with the data but model 2 is disfavored by the data. Our derivations can be used to place tighter constraints on the dynamics and structure of GRB jets in future afterglows, following a denser monitoring campaign for the temporal evolution of their image size.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GRB 120815A afterglow spectra (Kruehler+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruehler, T.; Ledoux, C.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Schmidl, S.; Malesani, D.; Christensen, L.; De Cia, A.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kann, D. A.; Kaper, L.; Vergani, S. D.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Covino, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; D'Elia, V.; Filgas, R.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hartoog, O. E.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Nardini, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Rossi, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Schady, P.; Schulze, S.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tanvir, N. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Watson, D. J.; Wiersema, K.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Xu, D.

    2013-07-01

    Flux-calibrated VLT/X-shooter medium resolution spectrum of the GRB 120815A afterglow. Spectroscopic observations of the GRB 120815A afterglow in the wavelength range between 3000 and 24800Å commenced on 2012-08-15 at 03:55 UT (6.06ks after the BAT trigger) with the cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph Xshooter mounted at ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) UT2. They consisted of four nodded exposures in the sequence ABBA with exposure times of 600s each, taken simultaneously in X-shooter's ultraviolet/blue (UVB - 3150-5900Å), visible (VIS - 5600-10080Å) and near-infrared (NIR - 10200-24080Å) arms with R~6000, 10400, 6200 for the UVB/VIS and NIR arm, respectively. (3 data files).

  17. Constraining chameleon field theories using the GammeV afterglow experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhye, A.; Steffen, J.H.; Weltman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The GammeV experiment has constrained the couplings of chameleon scalar fields to matter and photons. Here we present a detailed calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate underlying these constraints. The dependence of GammeV constraints on various assumptions in the calculation is studied. We discuss GammeV-CHASE, a second-generation GammeV experiment, which will improve upon GammeV in several major ways. Using our calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate, we forecast model-independent constraints achievable by GammeV-CHASE. We then apply these constraints to a variety of chameleon models, including quartic chameleons and chameleon dark energy models. The new experiment will be able to probe a large region of parameter space that is beyond the reach of current tests, such as fifth force searches, constraints on the dimming of distant astrophysical objects, and bounds on the variation of the fine structure constant.

  18. JET BREAKS AND ENERGETICS OF Swift GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Burrows, D. N.; Falcone, A.; Liang, E. W.; Zhang, B. B.; Zhang, B.; Sakamoto, T.; Evans, P.; Osborne, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a systematic temporal and spectral study of all Swift-X-ray Telescope observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows discovered between 2005 January and 2007 December. After constructing and fitting all light curves and spectra to power-law models, we classify the components of each afterglow in terms of the canonical X-ray afterglow and test them against the closure relations of the forward shock models for a variety of parameter combinations. The closure relations are used to identify potential jet breaks with characteristics including the uniform jet model with and without lateral spreading and energy injection, and a power-law structured jet model, all with a range of parameters. With this technique, we survey the X-ray afterglows with strong evidence for jet breaks (∼12% of our sample), and reveal cases of potential jet breaks that do not appear plainly from the light curve alone (another ∼30%), leading to insight into the missing jet break problem. Those X-ray light curves that do not show breaks or have breaks that are not consistent with one of the jet models are explored to place limits on the times of unseen jet breaks. The distribution of jet break times ranges from a few hours to a few weeks with a median of ∼1 day, similar to what was found pre-Swift. On average, Swift GRBs have lower isotropic equivalent γ-ray energies, which in turn result in lower collimation corrected γ-ray energies than those of pre-Swift GRBs. Finally, we explore the implications for GRB jet geometry and energetics.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Charged Species in the Afterglow of Plasmas Containing Negative Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor

    2000-10-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of charged species densities and wall fluxes during the afterglow of an electronegative discharge have been investigated. It was found that the decay of a plasma with negative ions is quite different than that of an electropositive plasma. Decay of a plasma with negative ions consists of two stages. During the first stage, electrons dominate plasma diffusion and negative ions are trapped inside the vessel by the static electric field; the flux of negative ions to the walls is nearly zero. During the second stage of the afterglow, electrons have disappeared, and positive and negative ions diffuse to the walls with the ion-ion ambipolar diffusion coefficient. The transition time between two stages depends greatly on ratio of ion (T_i) and electron (T_e) temperatures. Theories for plasma decay have been developed for equal and strongly different ion and electron temperatures. In the case T_i=T_e, the species spatial profiles are similar and an analytic solution exists. When detachment is important in the afterglow the plasma decay crucially depends on the product of negative ion detachment frequency and diffusion time. If this factor is larger than two, negative ions convert to electrons during their diffusion towards the walls. The presence of detached electrons results in ``self-trapping" of the negative ions, due to emerging electric fields, and the negative ion flux to the walls is extremely small. Thus, negative ions can be extracted in the afterglow only if detachment is small. In case T_inew type of nonlinear structure, different from conventional hydrodynamic nonlinear waves.

  20. Preparation and properties of silicone fouling release coatings with long-life afterglow fluorescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhanping

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on polydimethylsiloxane, three-component coatings were prepared with different content of luminescence powder. The results showed that the illuminance of coatings increases with the content of luminescence powder, decays exponentially with the afterglow time, increases exponentially with the increase of exposure time. The afterglow illuminance augments with irradiated light illuminance. All coatings are hydrophobic and oleophilic. Surface free energy decreases with the increase of luminescence powder. They have highest impact-resistance and bend flexibility. The luminescence powder does not change obviously the shore hardness, tensile breaking strength, breaking elongation rate, elastic modular and roughness of coatings. The static test panels in sea generally could be covered obviously by biofouling including sponges, bryophytes and mussels, hydra, kelp, green algae after 2 months of immersion during growing season. But it never found that the barnacle attached on the coating surface during 4 years of immersion test. The static anti-fouling ability of the coatings is very limited. In addition, the sea creatures attached on the coating surface can be easily removed; even attached organisms will fall off and expose again the smooth coating surface. Consequently, all coatings with long-life afterglow fluorescent have a significant effect on preventing adhesion of barnacle and fouling-release performance.

  1. Electron energy and vibrational distribution functions of carbon monoxide in nanosecond atmospheric discharges and microsecond afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2017-12-01

    Nanopulse atmospheric carbon monoxide discharges and corresponding afterglows have been investigated in a wide range of applied reduced electric field (130 The results have been obtained by solving an appropriate Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) coupled to the kinetics of vibrational and electronic excited states as well as to a simplified plasma chemistry for the different species formed during the activation of CO. The molar fraction of electronically excited states generated in the discharge is sufficient to create structures in the EEDF in the afterglow regime. On the other hand, only for long duration pulses (i.e. 50 ns), non-equilibrium vibrational distributions can be observed especially in the afterglow. The trend of the results for the case study E/N = 200 Td, \\text{pulse}=2$ ns is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the corresponding case for CO2 implying that the activation of CO2 by cold plasmas should take into account the kinetics of formed CO with the same accuracy as the CO2 itself.

  2. Mass spectrometer diagnostic technique in the study of stationary afterglow plasmas in helium, argon and krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenwalter, M.

    1979-01-01

    Since some years the method of massspectrometric monitoring has become an important tool in the analysis of time resolved (or stationary) afterglow plasmas. The present thesis reports the construction and testing of a new fully bakeable UHV-stationary-afterglow-apparatus using a hollow cathode discharge as plasma source for the first time. The hollow cathode is moveable perpendicular to its axis relative to the sampling orifice (i.e. a very small hole at the centre of the plasma container's boundary), so that the radical distribution of the charged particle density can be studied. Several specific extraction conditions for ions from the plasma especially the sampling probe potential have been systematically investigated. Results are illustrated and discussed. The new apparatus has been tested by determining the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of the molecular ion He 2 + in a pure Helium-plasma in thermal equilibrium. The present result (Dsub(a2) = 603 +- 38 / P 0 cm 2 s -1 ) is in agreement with results reported by other workers. Finally an example for the radial behaviour of the Ar + -sampling current in an Argon-discharge for several different times in the afterglow period is given. The shown behaviour agrees relatively well with the theoretically predicted radial ion density distribution, i.e. the zero-order Ressel'function. (Author)

  3. Looking inside jets: optical polarimetry as a probe of Gamma-Ray Bursts physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, D.; Mundell, C.

    2015-07-01

    It is broadly accepted that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered by accretion of matter by black holes, formed during massive stellar collapse, which launch ultra-relativistic, collimated outflows or jets. The nature of the progenitor star, the structure of the jet, and thus the underlying mechanisms that drive the explosion and provide collimation, remain some of the key unanswered questions. To approach these problems, and in particular the role of magnetic fields in GRBs, early time-resolved polarimetry is the key, because it is the only direct probe of the magnetic fields structure. Using novel fast RINGO polarimeter developed for use on the 2-m robotic optical Liverpool Telescope, we have made the first measurements of optical linear polarization of the early optical afterglows of GRBs, finding linear percentage polarization as high as 30% and, for the first time, making time-resolved polarization measurements. I will present the past 8 years of RINGO observations, discuss how the results fit into the GRB theoretical picture, and highlight recent data, in particular high-time resolution multi-colour optical photometry performed during the prompt GRB phase, which also provides some limits on polarization.

  4. Excess Optical Enhancement Observed with ARCONS for Early Crab Giant Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Strader, M. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Mazin, B. A.; Jaeger, G. V. Spiro; Gwinn, C. R.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; van Eyken, J. C.; Marsden, D.; O'Brien, K.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G.; Stoughton, C.; Bumble, B.

    2013-01-01

    We observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultim...

  5. Chemical abundances associated with gamma-ray bursts: nucleosynthesis in afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta carries huge amounts of energy expanding into the surrounding medium and heats up these materials, making it possible that nucleosynthesis can take place in such hot sites in afterglow stage. Here, we study possible changes in chemical abundances in the GRB afterglow processes of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star wind environments (Case A) and constant density surroundings (Case B). We find that the light element of lithium-beryllium-boron could occur in the afterglows via He+He process and spallation reactions. Some isotopes of F, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, P, S and Fe-group elements are also new species formed in the afterglows via proton-, neutron- and α-capture. The results show that the nucleosynthetic yields might be a diagnostic of the GRB's ambient environment. Our calculations indicate that Mg, Al, Si, P, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co have trended to appear in Case A, while Ne, Ti and Ni trend to occur in Case B. Furthermore, although some species have occurred both in Cases A and B, their mass fractions are quite different in these two cases. Here, we show that the mass fractions of 7Li, 7Be, 24Mg and 30Si are higher in Case A than that in Case B, but 18F gives an opposite conclusion. Nucleosynthetic outputs might also be an indice to estimate the luminosity-temperature relation factor β. In this study, when β reduces, the mass abundances of 11B and 20Ne are higher in Case B than that in Case A; in contrast, as the β becomes larger, this trend would be reversed; therefore, perhaps we could select the above elements as the indicators to estimate the properties of the surroundings around the GRBs. We also suggest that the spectroscopic observations of a GRB afterglow could only reveal the nucleosynthetic outputs from the interaction site between the GRB jet and its ambient matter, but could not represent the original composition of the pre-GRB surrounding medium.

  6. A reddish La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S-based long-afterglow phosphor with effective absorption in the visible light region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Guodong; Zhang Qinghong [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang Hongzhi, E-mail: wanghz@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Li Yaogang, E-mail: yaogang_li@dhu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2012-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Y{sub 2-x}Sm{sub x}O{sub 2}S long afterglow phosphors were synthesized via a solid-state method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphors have a mixture of four emissions (569, 605, 645 and 656 nm). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparing to Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu{sup 3+}, the vis-absorbance properties of La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors are stronger. - Abstract: Sm{sup 3+}-activated La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S phosphors with good crystallinity were prepared by solid-state reaction. The formation mechanism of La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S formation was assumed and the phase change with different temperatures was discussed. The luminescence properties of phosphors with different sintering temperatures and different doping concentrations of Sm{sup 3+}were investigated. The emission peak at 605 nm showed a well intensity can be attributed to the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} {yields} {sup 6}H{sub 7/2} transition of Sm{sup 3+}. The optical absorption of La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S phosphors showed a stronger intensity in UV-vis region comparing with the Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S phosphors. The long afterglow properties were investigated after the phosphors were excited with a fluorescent lamp. Phosphorescence lasted for about 3 min in the limit of light perception of the dark-adapted human eye (0.32 mcdm{sup -2}).

  7. Synthesis of ZnS:Ag,Co water-soluble blue afterglow nanoparticles and application in photodynamic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lun; Zou, Xiaoju; Hossu, Marius; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-05

    Silver and cobalt co-doped ZnS (ZnS:Ag,Co) water-soluble afterglow nanoparticles were synthesized using a wet chemistry method followed by aging at room temperature. The nanoparticles had a cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of approximately 4 nm and emitted a blue fluorescence emission centered at 441 nm due to radiative transitions from surface defects to Ag(+) luminescent centers. Intense afterglow emission peaking at 475 nm from the obtained nanoparticles was observed and was red-shifted compared to the fluorescence emission peak. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a large increase of O/S ratio, indicating a surface oxidation process during aging. The S vacancies produced accordingly may contribute to form more electron traps and enhance afterglow. The ZnS:Ag,Co afterglow nanoparticles have a very low dark-toxicity and are applied as a light source for photodynamic therapy activation by conjugating with protoporphyrin together. Our preliminary study has shown that the ZnS:Ag,Co afterglow nanoparticles can significantly reduce the x-ray dosage used in activation and thus may be a very promising candidate for future x-ray excited photodynamic therapy in deep cancer treatment.

  8. Different roles for Pax6 in the optic vesicle and facial epithelium mediate early morphogenesis of the murine eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, J M; Hill, R E; West, J D

    2000-03-01

    Chimaeric mice were made by aggregating Pax6(-/-) and wild-type mouse embryos, in order to study the interaction between the optic vesicle and the prospective lens epithelium during early stages of eye development. Histological analysis of the distribution of homozygous mutant cells in the chimaeras showed that the cell-autonomous removal of Pax6(-/-) cells from the lens, shown previously at E12.5, is nearly complete by E9.5. Most mutant cells are eliminated from an area of facial epithelium wider than, but including, the developing lens placode. This result suggests a role for Pax6 in maintaining a region of the facial epithelium that has the tissue competence to undergo lens differentiation. Segregation of wild-type and Pax6(-/-) cells occurs in the optic vesicle at E9.5 and is most likely a result of different adhesive properties of wild-type and mutant cells. Also, proximo-distal specification of the optic vesicle (as assayed by the elimination of Pax6(-/-) cells distally), is disrupted in the presence of a high proportion of mutant cells. This suggests that Pax6 operates during the establishment of patterning along the proximo-distal axis of the vesicle. Examination of chimaeras with a high proportion of mutant cells showed that Pax6 is required in the optic vesicle for maintenance of contact with the overlying lens epithelium. This may explain why Pax6(-/-) optic vesicles are inefficient at inducing a lens placode. Contact is preferentially maintained when the lens epithelium is also wild-type. Together, these results demonstrate requirements for functional Pax6 in both the optic vesicle and surface epithelia in order to mediate the interactions between the two tissues during the earliest stages of eye development.

  9. Significant and variable linear polarization during the prompt optical flash of GRB 160625B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E; Lipunov, V M; Mundell, C G; Butler, N R; Watson, A M; Kobayashi, S; Cenko, S B; Marshall, F E; Ricci, R; Fruchter, A; Wieringa, M H; Gorbovskoy, E S; Kornilov, V; Kutyrev, A; Lee, W H; Toy, V; Tyurina, N V; Budnev, N M; Buckley, D A H; González, J; Gress, O; Horesh, A; Panasyuk, M I; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Lopez, R Rebolo; Richer, M G; Román-Zúñiga, C; Serra-Ricart, M; Yurkov, V; Gehrels, N

    2017-07-26

    Newly formed black holes of stellar mass launch collimated outflows (jets) of ionized matter that approach the speed of light. These outflows power prompt, brief and intense flashes of γ-rays known as γ-ray bursts (GRBs), followed by longer-lived afterglow radiation that is detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. Measuring the polarization of the observed GRB radiation provides a direct probe of the magnetic fields in the collimated jets. Rapid-response polarimetric observations of newly discovered bursts have probed the initial afterglow phase, and show that, minutes after the prompt emission has ended, the degree of linear polarization can be as high as 30 per cent-consistent with the idea that a stable, globally ordered magnetic field permeates the jet at large distances from the central source. By contrast, optical and γ-ray observations during the prompt phase have led to discordant and often controversial results, and no definitive conclusions have been reached regarding the origin of the prompt radiation or the configuration of the magnetic field. Here we report the detection of substantial (8.3 ± 0.8 per cent from our most conservative simulation), variable linear polarization of a prompt optical flash that accompanied the extremely energetic and long-lived prompt γ-ray emission from GRB 160625B. Our measurements probe the structure of the magnetic field at an early stage of the jet, closer to its central black hole, and show that the prompt phase is produced via fast-cooling synchrotron radiation in a large-scale magnetic field that is advected from the black hole and distorted by dissipation processes within the jet.

  10. The extraordinarily bright optical afterglow of GRB 991208 and its host galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Sokolov, V.V.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    that GRB 991208 is at 3.7 Gpc (for H-0 = 60 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), Omega (0) = 1 and Lambda (0) = 0), implying an isotropic energy release of 1.15 10(53) erg which may. be relaxed by beaming by a factor >10(2). Precise astrometry indicates that the GRB coincides within 0.2" with the host galaxy, thus supporting...... a massive star origin. The absolute magnitude of the galaxy is M-B = -18.2, well below the knee of the galaxy luminosity function and we derive a star-forming rate of (11.5 +/- 7.1) M-circle dot yr(-1), which is much larger than the present-day rate in our Galaxy. The quasi simultaneous broad...

  11. Colors and luminosities of the optical afterglows of the gamma-ray bursts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.; Masetti, N.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 377, č. 2 (2001), s. 450-461 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1048102; GA MŠk ME 137; GA MŠk ME 002; GA ČR GA205/99/0145 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : gamma rays * bursts * radiation mechanisms Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.790, year: 2000

  12. Colors and absolute magnitudes of the optical afterglow of GRB060218

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Pizzichini, G.; Hudec, René

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 12 (2006), s. 1585-1587 ISSN 1594-9982. [Swift and GRBs: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe. Venezia, 05.06.2006-09.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; EU(XE) ESA PRODEX INTEGRAL 90108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : gamma-ray bursts * radiation mechanisms * supernovae Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.351, year: 2006

  13. Colors and absolute magnitudes of the optical afterglows of X-ray flashes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 12 (2006), s. 1579-1581 ISSN 1594-9982. [Swift and GRBs: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe. Venezia, 05.06.2006-09.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; EU(XE) ESA PRODEX INTEGRAL 90108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : gamma-ray bursts * supernovae * radiation mechanisms Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.351, year: 2006

  14. What the colors of optical afterglows tell us about their spektra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 12 (2006), s. 1583-1584 ISSN 1594-9982. [Swift and GRBs: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe. Venezia, 05.06.2006-09.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; EU(XE) ESA PRODEX INTEGRAL 90108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : gamma-ray bursts * radiation mechanisms Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.351, year: 2006

  15. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  16. Effect of lithium ion addition on afterglow time of green-emitting Ce3+ and Pr3+ codoped CaS phosphor by black light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Aoyagi, Kenichi; Yasue, Tamotsu

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the effect of lithium ion addition on the afterglow time of green-emitting Ce 3+ and Pr 3+ codoped CaS phosphor by black light irradiation. CaS:Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , irradiated with black light, emitted in the green region and showed afterglow. The afterglow time of CaS:Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ was relatively short (about 10 min). When a Li + invades the free space in a CaS crystal lattice, new cation vacancy is formed for the charge compensation in the Ca 2+ site. The afterglow intensity of CaS:Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , with Li + incorporated in the host, increased to three times that of the original sample (CaS:Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ ). The afterglow time of CaS:Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , with Li + incorporated was extended to 40 min

  17. Violet-blue afterglow luminescence properties of non-doped SrZrO{sub 3} material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhilong, E-mail: wzl197707@sina.com [Institute of Medical Nano Material, Gansu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Jiachi, E-mail: zhangjch@lzu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zheng, Guisen; Peng, Xuejing; Dai, Hongxia [Institute of Medical Nano Material, Gansu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Non-doped SrZrO{sub 3} material is synthesized by solid state reaction at 1300 °C in air. The violet-blue afterglow luminescence of SrZrO{sub 3} centered at 395 nm is firstly observed. The afterglow emission band (300–550 nm) of SrZrO{sub 3} partly overlaps the absorption (200–400 nm) of commercial photocatalyst TiO{sub 2} (P25). Thus, the SrZrO{sub 3} shows potential application to support photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} even at night. The decay curve indicates that the afterglow luminescence of the present SrZrO{sub 3} can last less than 100 s (0.32 mcd/m{sup 2}) and thus the present SrZrO{sub 3} still needs further improvement for practical application. The thermoluminescence indicates that at least two types of deep traps exist in the SrZrO{sub 3} and the depths of traps are roughly calculated to be as deep as 0.98 eV and 1.76 eV. It reveals that the short afterglow time of the SrZrO{sub 3} is not due to the lack of enough traps but the traps in SrZrO{sub 3} being too deep. Therefore, decreasing the depth of traps in SrZrO{sub 3} is our following emergency work. -- Highlights: • Violet-blue afterglow luminescence is first observed in non-doped SrZrO{sub 3}. • Afterglow of SrZrO{sub 3} partly overlaps absorption of commercial photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}. • SrZrO{sub 3} may be applied to keep photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} at night.

  18. Nitric oxide kinetics in the afterglow of a diffuse plasma filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, D; Montello, A; Adamovich, I V; Lempert, W R

    2014-01-01

    A suite of laser diagnostics is used to study kinetics of vibrational energy transfer and plasma chemical reactions in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge and afterglow in N 2 and dry air at 100 Torr. Laser-induced fluorescence of NO and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of O and N atoms are used to measure absolute, time-resolved number densities of these species after the discharge pulse, and picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is used to measure time-resolved rotational temperature and ground electronic state N 2 (v = 0–4) vibrational level populations. The plasma filament diameter, determined from plasma emission and NO planar laser-induced fluorescence images, remains nearly constant after the discharge pulse, over a few hundred microseconds, and does not exhibit expansion on microsecond time scale. Peak temperature in the discharge and the afterglow is low, T ≈ 370 K, in spite of significant vibrational nonequilibrium, with peak N 2 vibrational temperature of T v  ≈ 2000 K. Significant vibrational temperature rise in the afterglow is likely caused by the downward N 2 –N 2 vibration–vibration (V–V) energy transfer. Simple kinetic modeling of time-resolved N, O, and NO number densities in the afterglow, on the time scale longer compared to relaxation and quenching time of excited species generated in the plasma, is in good agreement with the data. In nitrogen, the N atom density after the discharge pulse is controlled by three-body recombination and radial diffusion. In air, N, NO and O concentrations are dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, N + NO → N 2  + O, and ozone formation reaction, O + O 2  + M → O 3  + M, respectively. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules and excited N atoms on NO formation kinetics is estimated to be negligible. The results suggest that NO formation in the nanosecond pulse discharge is dominated by reactions of

  19. Nitric oxide kinetics in the afterglow of a diffuse plasma filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, D.; Montello, A.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2014-08-01

    A suite of laser diagnostics is used to study kinetics of vibrational energy transfer and plasma chemical reactions in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge and afterglow in N2 and dry air at 100 Torr. Laser-induced fluorescence of NO and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of O and N atoms are used to measure absolute, time-resolved number densities of these species after the discharge pulse, and picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is used to measure time-resolved rotational temperature and ground electronic state N2(v = 0-4) vibrational level populations. The plasma filament diameter, determined from plasma emission and NO planar laser-induced fluorescence images, remains nearly constant after the discharge pulse, over a few hundred microseconds, and does not exhibit expansion on microsecond time scale. Peak temperature in the discharge and the afterglow is low, T ≈ 370 K, in spite of significant vibrational nonequilibrium, with peak N2 vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K. Significant vibrational temperature rise in the afterglow is likely caused by the downward N2-N2 vibration-vibration (V-V) energy transfer. Simple kinetic modeling of time-resolved N, O, and NO number densities in the afterglow, on the time scale longer compared to relaxation and quenching time of excited species generated in the plasma, is in good agreement with the data. In nitrogen, the N atom density after the discharge pulse is controlled by three-body recombination and radial diffusion. In air, N, NO and O concentrations are dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, N + NO → N2 + O, and ozone formation reaction, O + O2 + M → O3 + M, respectively. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules and excited N atoms on NO formation kinetics is estimated to be negligible. The results suggest that NO formation in the nanosecond pulse discharge is dominated by reactions of excited electronic states of nitrogen, occurring on

  20. Recombination of KrD+ and KrH+ ions in afterglow plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolov, I; Kotrik, T; Plasil, R; Hejduk, M; Varju, J; Dohnal, P; Glosik, J

    2009-01-01

    Reported is flowing afterglow (FALP) study of recombination of KrH + and KrD + ions with electrons at 250 K in mixtures of He/Kr/H 2 and He/Kr/D 2 , respectively. The influence of fast recombining cluster ions formation on apparent effective recombination rate coefficients (α eff ) was measured and used in data analysis. The obtained binary rate coefficients for recombination of KrH + and KrD + are α KrH+ = 2x10 -8 cm 3 s -1 and α KrD+ = 1x10 -8 cm 3 s -1 .

  1. Recombination of KrD+ and KrH+ ions in afterglow plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolov, I.; Kotrik, T.; Plasil, R.; Hejduk, M.; Varju, J.; Dohnal, P.; Glosik, J.

    2009-11-01

    Reported is flowing afterglow (FALP) study of recombination of KrH+ and KrD+ ions with electrons at 250 K in mixtures of He/Kr/H2 and He/Kr/D2, respectively. The influence of fast recombining cluster ions formation on apparent effective recombination rate coefficients (αeff) was measured and used in data analysis. The obtained binary rate coefficients for recombination of KrH+ and KrD+ are αKrH+ = 2×10-8 cm3s-1 and αKrD+ = 1×10-8 cm3s-1.

  2. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows from GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities {e.g., the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.-/

  3. New Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows from GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Zhang, B.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D.; Fishman, J. F.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  4. Ability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements to identify early glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarannum Mansoori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the ability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT parameters to distinguish normal eyes from those with early glaucoma in Asian Indian eyes. Design : Observational cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods : One hundred and seventy eight eyes (83 glaucoma patients and 95 age matched healthy subjects of subjects more than 40 years of age were included in the study. All subjects underwent RNFLT measurement with spectral OCT/ scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO after dilatation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AROC were calculated for various OCT peripapillary RNFL parameters. Results: The mean RNFLT in healthy subjects and patients with early glaucoma were 105.7 ± 5.1 μm and 90.7 ± 7.5 μm, respectively. The largest AROC was found for 12 o′clock- hour (0.98, average (0.96 and superior quadrant RNFLT (0.9. When target specificity was set at ≥ 90% and ≥ 80%, the parameters with highest sensitivity were 12 o′clock -hour (91.6%, average RNFLT (85.3% and 12 o′ clock- hour (96.8 %, average RNFLT (94.7% respectively. Conclusion : Our study showed good ability of spectral OCT/ SLO to differentiate normal eyes from patients with early glaucoma and hence it may serve as an useful adjunct for early diagnosis of glaucoma.

  5. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaš, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Klotz, A.; Boer, M.; Le Van Suu, A.; Akerlof, C.; Zheng, W.; Evans, P.; Gehrels, N.; Kennea, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Coward, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  6. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Ageron, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.-J.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert

  7. Optical and X-Ray Early Follow-Up of ANTARES Neutrino Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; Andre, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrinosource has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifyinga neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROTand ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or Xraycounterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations areanalysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analyzed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  8. The host galaxy and optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, S.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Hjorth, J.

    2001-01-01

    980703 with any special features in the host. The host galaxy appears to be a typical example of a compact star forming galaxy similar to those found in the Hubble Deep Field North. The R-band light curve of the optical afterglow associated with this gamma-ray burst is consistent with a single power...

  9. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blast Wave Physics. II. The Distribution of rho and Structure of the Circumburst Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, R. L. C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Weltervrede, P.

    2008-01-01

    We constrain blast wave parameters and the circumburst media ofa subsample of 10 BeppoSAX gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical, and NIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects ofmetallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behavior. Using the blast wave model and some assumptions which include on-axis viewing and standard jet structure, constant blast wave energy, and no evolution of the microphysical parameters, we find a mean value ofp for the sample as a whole of 9.... oa -0.003.0" 2 a_ statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p-values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value forp at the 3 _ level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution ofcircumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k ----0 (homogeneous) and k - 2 (windlike). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly windlike. The fifth source has a value of 0 medium.

  10. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: The Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, R. L. C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Weltevrede, P.

    2007-01-01

    We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Assuming the fireball model, we can find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.035. A statistical analysis Of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3sigma level or greater. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k = 0 (homogeneous) and k = 2 (wind-like). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly wind-like. The fifth source has a value of 0 less than or equal to k less than or equal to 1, consistent with a homogeneous circumburst medium.

  11. MR and optical imaging of early micrometastases in lymph nodes: triple labeling with nano-sized agents yielding distinct signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Bernardo, Marcelino; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2012-01-01

    Few imaging methods are available for depicting in vivo cancer cell migration within the lymphatic system. Detection of such early micrometastases requires extremely high target to background. In this study, we dual-labeled human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB468) with a small particle of iron oxide (SPIO) and a quantum dot (QD), and tracked these cells in the lymphatic system in mice using in vivo MRI and optical imaging. A generation-6 gadolinium-dendrimer-based MRI contrast agent (Gd-G6) was employed for visualizing regional lymphatic channels and nodes. Since Gd-G6 shortened T(1) leading to high signal, whereas SPIO-labeled cancer cells greatly lowered signal, a small number of cells were simultaneously visualized within the draining lymphatic basins. One million dual-labeled cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into the paws of mice 24 h prior to imaging. Then whole body images were acquired pre- and post-intracutaneous injection of Gd-G6 with 3D-T(1) w-FFE and balanced-FFE sequences for cancer cell tracking and MR lymphangiography. In vivo MRI clearly visualized labeled cancer cells migrating from the paw to the axillary lymph nodes using draining lymphatics. In vivo optical imaging using a fluorescence surgical microscope demonstrated tiny cancer cell clusters in the axillary lymph node with high spatial resolution. Thus, using a combination of MRI and optical imaging, it is possible to depict macro- and early micrometastases within the lymphatic system. This platform offers a versatile research tool for investigating and treating lymphatic metastases in animal models. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Very Strong TeV Emission as $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, T

    1998-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and following afterglows are considered to be produced by dissipation of kinetic energy of a relativistic fireball and radiation process is widely believed as synchrotron radiation or inverse Compton scattering of electrons. We argue that the transfer of kinetic energy of ejecta into electrons may be inefficient process and hence the total energy released by a GRB event is much larger than that emitted in soft gamma-rays, by a factor of \\sim (m_p/m_e). We show that, in this case, very strong emission of TeV gamma-rays is possible due to synchrotron radiation of protons accelerated up to \\sim 10^{21} eV, which are trapped in the magnetic field of afterglow shock and radiate their energy on an observational time scale of \\sim day. This suggests a possibility that GRBs are most energetic in TeV range and such TeV gamma-rays may be detectable from GRBs even at cosmological distances, i.e., z gives a quantitative explanation for the famous long-duration GeV photons detected from GRB940217. ...

  13. New after-glow color images from some rock slices irradiated with γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Sakaue, Shuei; Kojima, Motoshi; Sakai, Tadashi

    1991-01-01

    A new observation method of colored luminescence or after-glow (phosphorescence), emitted from rock slices immediately after γ-ray irradiation, has been developed using a normal color-film. The film was directly faced to the irradiated slices for a relatively short period like 2-5 min in a black bag. According to this simple procedure, the resultant photographs showed unexpectedly colorful images depending on the mineral constituents in slices. The intensities of the after-glow color images (referred to as AGCI) were found to be dependent on the dose rates rather than total doses. In the AGCI, the apparent variations of emission intensity were observed even within individual minerals as well as color changes affected by thermal metamorphism. A qualitative decay behavior has been clearly seen in the successive AGCI results. The proposed conventional AGCI technique is considered to become a promising tool applicable to varieties of mineralogical investigations as well as the additional information concerning the intrinsic physical properties of other solid materials. (author)

  14. Modification of polypropylene in the afterglow of the atmospheric pressure discharges in air and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkin, D. P.; Shikova, T. G.; Titov, V. A.; Smirnov, S. A.; Khomyakova, N. S.

    2017-11-01

    Polypropylene films were modified in the flowing afterglow of the atmospheric pressure DC discharge in argon and in air. The modification was carried out at a discharge current of 15 mA, a gas flow rate of 24 and 105 m/s and a treatment time of 3 - 30 s. Polymer samples were placed on the distance of 5 - 15 mm downstream the plasma Contact angles for water and ATR-FTIR spectra were used for the film surface characterization. Concentrations of oxygen containing groups in modified polymer layer were estimated on the base of ATR-FTIR data. Modification in the both plasma forming gases results in the decrease of the contact angles and in the formation of oxygen containing groups in the polymer surface layer. Dependencies of contact angles on treatment time, gas flow rate and plasma - polymer distance were obtained. Increasing the treatment time and the gas flow rate results in a higher oxidation degree of the PP. Treatment in the afterglow of the argon plasma has been shown to give the less water contact angles and more densities of oxygen containing groups in polypropilene at the gas flow rate of 105 m/s and the treatment time of 30 s.

  15. Molecular Diffuse Optical Tomography for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    subcontractor or subcontractor asserting the restriction is notified of such release, disclosure or use. This legend, together with the indications of...Specific examples are tumor Table 2: Peptide substrates synthesized in our lab (The dots indicate lysosomal endopeptidases that recognize the... Oleary , D. A. Boas, B. Chance et al., "Experimental Images of Heterogeneous Turbid Media By Frequency- Domain Diffusing-Photon Tomography," Optics Letters

  16. Phenotype analysis of early risk factors from electronic medical records improves image-derived diagnostic classifiers for optic nerve pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nabar, Kunal P.; Nelson, Katrina M.; Mawn, Louise A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-03-01

    We examine imaging and electronic medical records (EMR) of 588 subjects over five major disease groups that affect optic nerve function. An objective evaluation of the role of imaging and EMR data in diagnosis of these conditions would improve understanding of these diseases and help in early intervention. We developed an automated image processing pipeline that identifies the orbital structures within the human eyes from computed tomography (CT) scans, calculates structural size, and performs volume measurements. We customized the EMR-based phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) to derive diagnostic EMR phenotypes that occur at least two years prior to the onset of the conditions of interest from a separate cohort of 28,411 ophthalmology patients. We used random forest classifiers to evaluate the predictive power of image-derived markers, EMR phenotypes, and clinical visual assessments in identifying disease cohorts from a control group of 763 patients without optic nerve disease. Image-derived markers showed more predictive power than clinical visual assessments or EMR phenotypes. However, the addition of EMR phenotypes to the imaging markers improves the classification accuracy against controls: the AUC improved from 0.67 to 0.88 for glaucoma, 0.73 to 0.78 for intrinsic optic nerve disease, 0.72 to 0.76 for optic nerve edema, 0.72 to 0.77 for orbital inflammation, and 0.81 to 0.85 for thyroid eye disease. This study illustrates the importance of diagnostic context for interpretation of image-derived markers and the proposed PheWAS technique provides a flexible approach for learning salient features of patient history and incorporating these data into traditional machine learning analyses.

  17. Intense source of spin-polarized electrons using laser-induced optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.G.; Giberson, K.W.; Cheng, C.; Keiffer, R.S.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K.

    1983-01-01

    A source of spin-polarized electrons based on a laser-pumped flowing helium afterglow is described. He(2 3 S) atoms contained in the afterglow are optically pumped using circularly polarized 1.08-μm (2 3 S→2 3 P) radiation provided by a NaF (F 2+ )( color-center laser. Spin angular momentum conservation in subsequent chemi-ionization reactions with CO 2 produces polarized electrons that are extracted from the afterglow. At low currents, < or approx. =1 μA, polarizations of approx.70%--80% are achieved. At higher currents the polarization decreases, falling to approx.40% at 50 μA. The spin polarization can be simply reversed (P→-P) and the source is suitable for use in the majority of low-energy spin-dependent scattering experiments proposed to date

  18. Production of Highly Charged Heavy Ions by Means of a Hybrid Source in DC Mode and in Afterglow Mode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, L.; Celona, L.; Andó, L.; Manciagli, S.; Consoli, F.; Galatá, A.; Picciotto, A.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.; Parys, P.; Shirkov, G. D.; Hitz, D.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 6 (2005), s. 458-463 ISSN 1612-8850 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : afterglow plasma processes * electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) * ion beams * laser ablation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.846, year: 2005

  19. CsI:Tl.sup.+./sup.,Yb.sup.2+./sup.: ultra-high light yield scintillator with reduced afterglow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, Y.; Ren, G.; Nikl, Martin; Chen, X.; Ding, D.; Li, H.; Pan, S.; Yang, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 16 (2014), s. 3312-3317 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12185 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * CsI:Tb, Yb codoping * afterglow Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.034, year: 2014

  20. ON THE LATE-TIME SPECTRAL SOFTENING FOUND IN X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Zu-Jia [GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhao, Yinan [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Shao, Lang, E-mail: lshao@hebtu.edu.cn [Department of Space Sciences and Astronomy, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2016-02-20

    Strong spectral softening has been revealed in the late X-ray afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The scenario of X-ray scattering around the circumburst dusty medium has been supported by previous works due to its overall successful prediction of both the temporal and spectral evolution of some X-ray afterglows. To further investigate the observed feature of spectral softening we now systematically search the X-ray afterglows detected by the X-ray telescope aboard Swift and collect 12 GRBs with significant late-time spectral softening. We find that dust scattering could be the dominant radiative mechanism for these X-ray afterglows regarding their temporal and spectral features. For some well-observed bursts with high-quality data, the time-resolved spectra could be well-produced within the scattering scenario by taking into account the X-ray absorption from the circumburst medium. We also find that during spectral softening the power-law index in the high-energy end of the spectra does not vary much. The spectral softening is mainly manifested by the spectral peak energy continually moving to the soft end.

  1. The Growth, Polarization, and Motion of the Radio Afterglow from the Giant Flare from SGR 1806-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G

    2005-04-20

    The extraordinary giant flare (GF) of 2004 December 27 from the soft gamma repeater (SGR) 1806-20 was followed by a bright radio afterglow. We present an analysis of VLA observations of this radio afterglow from SGR1806-20, consisting of previously reported 8.5 GHz data covering days 7 to 20 after the GF, plus new observations at 8.5 and 22 GHz from day 24 to 81. For a symmetric outflow, we find a deceleration in the expansion, from {approx}4.5 mas/day to <2.5 mas/day. The time of deceleration is roughly coincident with the rebrightening in the radio light curve, as expected to result when the ejecta from the GF sweeps up enough of the external medium, and transitions from a coasting phase to the Sedov-Taylor regime. The radio afterglow is elongated and maintains a 2:1 axis ratio with an average position angle of -40{sup o} (north through east), oriented perpendicular to the average intrinsic linear polarization angle. We also report on the discovery of motion in the flux centroid of the afterglow, at an average velocity of 0.26 {+-} 0.03 c (assuming a distance of 15 kpc) at a position angle of -45{sup o}. This motion, in combination with the growth and polarization measurements, suggests an initially asymmetric outflow, mainly from one side of the magnetar.

  2. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms are activated early in optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakiri, A; Ravanidis, S; Lagoudaki, R

    2015-01-01

    data indicate that both immuno-regulatory and neuroprotective mechanisms may potentially take place relatively early in the course of the ON. The presence of neurotrophic factors in healthy CSF and their overexpression already during the acute phase of ON supports the alertness of CNS defence...

  3. Torpedo Maculopathy in a 6-Month-Old Infant: Early Clinical and Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Caner; Petriçli, İkbal Seza

    2017-08-24

    A 6-month-old male infant presented for routine ophthalmologic examination. Indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed a flat, oval, hypopigmented lesion located in the temporal macula in the right eye with the tip pointing toward the fovea, which was compatible with torpedo maculopathy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed at the time of diagnosis. OCT scans of the lesion revealed slight retinal pigment epithelium hyperreflectivity. This case serves as the earliest OCT finding of the youngest patient diagnosed as having torpedo maculopathy in the literature. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54:e54-e57.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Biallelic CACNA1A mutations cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy with progressive cerebral, cerebellar, and optic nerve atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Karit; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Talvik, Inga; Vaher, Ulvi; Õunapuu, Anne; Ennok, Margus; Teek, Rita; Pajusalu, Sander; Murumets, Ülle; Tomberg, Tiiu; Puusepp, Sanna; Piirsoo, Andres; Reimand, Tiia; Õunap, Katrin

    2016-08-01

    The CACNA1A gene encodes the transmembrane pore-forming alpha-1A subunit of the Cav 2.1 P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Several heterozygous mutations within this gene, including nonsense mutations, missense mutations, and expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine repeats, are known to cause three allelic autosomal dominant conditions-episodic ataxia type 2, familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. An association with epilepsy and CACNA1A mutations has also been described. However, the link with epileptic encephalopathies has emerged only recently. Here we describe two patients, sister and brother, with compound heterozygous mutations in CACNA1A. Exome sequencing detected biallelic mutations in CACNA1A: A missense mutation c.4315T>A (p.Trp1439Arg) in exon 27, and a seven base pair deletion c.472_478delGCCTTCC (p.Ala158Thrfs*6) in exon 3. Both patients were normal at birth, but developed daily recurrent seizures in early infancy with concomitant extreme muscular hypotonia, hypokinesia, and global developmental delay. The brain MRI images showed progressive cerebral, cerebellar, and optic nerve atrophy. At the age of 5, both patients were blind and bedridden with a profound developmental delay. The elder sister died at that age. Their parents and two siblings were heterozygotes for one of those pathogenic mutations and expressed a milder phenotype. Both of them have intellectual disability and in addition the mother has adult onset cerebellar ataxia with a slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy. Compound heterozygous mutations in the CACNA1A gene presumably cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy, and progressive cerebral, cerebellar and optic nerve atrophy with reduced lifespan. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (p<0.0001) and in vivo tumors (p<0.0001) versus controls. Subpopulation analyses revealed a homogeneous response to combined therapy in both cultured organoids and in vivo tumors, while single agent treatment with XL147 alone or paclitaxel alone elicited heterogeneous responses in organoids. Tumor volume decreased with combination treatment through treatment day 30. These results indicate that OMI of organoids generated from PyVmT tumors can accurately reflect drug response in heterogeneous allografts with both innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  6. e-VLBI observations of GRB 080409 afterglow with an Australasian radio telescope network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Aquib; Edwards, Philip G.; Tingay, Steven J.; Phillips, Chris J.; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Amy, Shaun W.; An, Tao; Sekido, Mamoru; Wang, Zhong-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Transcontinental e-VLBI observations were conducted in June 2008 with telescopes in Australia, China and Japan. Detections were made of the radio-loud quasar PKS B0727-115, which shows superluminal motion, and the intra-day variable quasar PKS B0524+034. The latter source was used as a phase reference calibrator for observations at the position of the gamma-ray burst GRB 080409, for which an upper limit to the radio emission is set. Australia Telescope Compact Array data were also used to derive a limit on the radio flux density of the GRB afterglow. These observations demonstrate the capability to form a large Australasian radio telescope network for e-VLBI, with data transported and processed in realtime over high capacity networks. This campaign represents the first step towards more regular e-VLBI observations in this region.

  7. Recombination of KrD{sup +} and KrH{sup +} ions in afterglow plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolov, I; Kotrik, T; Plasil, R; Hejduk, M; Varju, J; Dohnal, P; Glosik, J, E-mail: juraj.glosik@mff.cuni.c [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-11-15

    Reported is flowing afterglow (FALP) study of recombination of KrH{sup +} and KrD{sup +} ions with electrons at 250 K in mixtures of He/Kr/H{sub 2} and He/Kr/D{sub 2}, respectively. The influence of fast recombining cluster ions formation on apparent effective recombination rate coefficients ({alpha}{sub eff}) was measured and used in data analysis. The obtained binary rate coefficients for recombination of KrH{sup +} and KrD{sup +} are {alpha}{sub KrH+} = 2x10{sup -8} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} and {alpha}{sub KrD+} = 1x10{sup -8} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}.

  8. The Giant Flare From SGR 1806-20 And Its Radio Afterglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.B.; /New Mexico U. /NRAO, Socorro; Granot, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-09-26

    The multi-wavelength observations of the 2004 December 27 Giant Flare (GF) from SGR 1806-20 and its long-lived radio afterglow are briefly reviewed. The GF appears to have been produced by a dramatic reconfiguration of the magnetic field near the surface of the neutron star, possibly accompanied by fractures in the crust. The explosive release of over 10{sup 46} erg (isotropic equivalent) powered a one-sided mildly relativistic outflow. The outflow produced a new expanding radio nebula, that is still visible over a year after the GF. Also considered are the constraints on the total energy in the GF, the energy and mass in the outflow, and on the external density, as well as possible implications for short {gamma}-ray bursts and potential signatures in high energy neutrinos, photons, or cosmic rays. Some possible future observations of this and other GFs are briefly discussed.

  9. Early Medieval ceramics from the Viile Tecii archaeological site (Romania: an optical and XRD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Ionescu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical and petrographic studies of Early Medieval potshards exhumed in the Viile Tecii archaeological site (North Transylvania, Romania show a ceramic body composed of a microcrystalline to amorphous matrix, various clasts and voids. The microscopical features and XRD patterns indicate that illitic-kaolinitic clays were used as raw materials, together with quartzitic sands as tempering material. The ceramic vessels were obtained with the potter’s wheel, but the fabric is only slightly oriented, due either to the fast modeling or to the coarseness of the clayish paste. The thermal alteration of mineral phases points to relatively high firing-temperatures, between 800 and 900°C.

  10. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lopez-Camara, Diego, E-mail: fabio@ucolick.org [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-02-20

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the

  11. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  12. Roles of doping ions in afterglow properties of blue CaAl2O4:Eu2+,Nd3+ phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, A. H.; Dejene, B. F.; Swart, H. C.

    2014-04-01

    Eu2+ doped and Nd3+ co-doped calcium aluminate (CaAl2O4:Eu2+,Nd3+) phosphor was prepared by a urea-nitrate solution combustion method at furnace temperatures as low as 500 °C. The produced CaAl2O4:Eu2+,Nd3+ powder was investigated in terms of phase composition, morphology and luminescence by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Photoluminescence (PL) techniques respectively. XRD analysis depicts a dominant monoclinic phase that indicates no change in the crystalline structure of the phosphor with varying concentration of Eu2+ and Nd3+. SEM results show agglomerates with non-uniform shapes and sizes with a number of irregular network structures having lots of voids and pores. The Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and (FTIR) spectra confirm the expected chemical components of the phosphor. PL measurements indicated one broadband excitation spectra from 200 to 300 nm centered around 240 nm corresponding to the crystal field splitting of the Eu2+ d-orbital and an emission spectrum in the blue region with a maximum on 440 nm. This is a strong indication that there was dominantly one luminescence center, Eu2+ which represents emission from transitions between the 4f7 ground state and the 4f6-5d1 excited state configuration. High concentrations of Eu2+ and Nd3+ generally reduce both intensity and lifetime of the phosphor powders. The optimized content of Eu2+ is 1 mol% and for Nd3+ is 1 mol% for the obtained phosphors with excellent optical properties. The phosphor also emits visible light at around 587 and 616 nm. Such emissions can be ascribed to the 5D0-7F1 and 5D0-7F2 intrinsic transition of Eu3+ respectively. The decay characteristics exhibit a significant rise in initial intensity with increasing Eu2+ doping concentration while the decay time increased with Nd3+ co-doping. The observed afterglow can be ascribed to the generation of suitable traps due to the presence of the Nd3

  13. HAPPY BIRTHDAY SWIFT: ULTRA-LONG GRB 141121A AND ITS BROADBAND AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucchiara, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Veres, P. [The George Washington University, Department of Physics, 725 21st, NW Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Corsi, A. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Cenko, S. B.; Marshall, F. E.; Kutyrev, A. S. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lien, A. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pagani, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Toy, V. L.; Capone, J. I. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box 0. Socorro, NM (United States); Modjaz, M. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Butler, N. R.; Littlejohns, O. M. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, AZ 85287 (United States); Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F., México (Mexico); Klein, C. R., E-mail: antonino.cucchiara@nasa.gov [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); and others

    2015-10-20

    We present our extensive observational campaign on the Swift-discovered GRB 141121A, almost 10 years after its launch. Our observations cover radio through X-rays and extend for more than 30 days after discovery. The prompt phase of GRB 141121A lasted 1410 s and, at the derived redshift of z = 1.469, the isotropic energy is E{sub γ,iso} = 8.0 × 10{sup 52} erg. Due to the long prompt duration, GRB 141121A falls into the recently discovered class of ultra-long GRBs (UL-GRBs). Peculiar features of this burst are (1) a flat early-time optical light curve and (2) a radio-to-X-ray rebrightening around three days after the burst. The latter is followed by a steep optical-to-X-ray decay and a much shallower radio fading. We analyze GRB 141121A in the context of the standard forward–reverse shock (FS, RS) scenario and we disentangle the FS and RS contributions. Finally, we comment on the puzzling early-time (t ≲ 3 days) behavior of GRB 141121A, and suggest that its interpretation may require a two-component jet model. Overall, our analysis confirms that the class of UL-GRBs represents our best opportunity to firmly establish the prominent emission mechanisms in action during powerful gamma-ray burst explosions, and future missions (like SVOM, XTiDE, or ISS-Lobster) will provide many more of such objects.

  14. The retinal pigment epithelium undergoes massive apoptosis during early differentiation and pigmentation of the optic cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pequignot, M O; Provost, A C; Sallé, S; Menasche, M; Saule, S; Jaïs, J-P; Abitbol, M

    2011-04-20

    The aim of our work was to study apoptosis during the development of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in mice between embryonic day (E) 10.5 and E12.5 and to examine a possible link between apoptosis and pigmentation. We collected mouse embryos at E10.5, E11.5, and E12.5 and labeled apoptotic cells in 5-µm paraffin sections, using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling technique. We counted the total number of cells and the number of apoptotic cells in the early developing RPE and calculated the percentage of apoptosis at each stage. In the C57BL/6J mouse, 17% of the RPE cells were apoptotic at E10.5 compared to 0.9% at E12.5. At E11.5, three-quarters of the RPE cells began to pigment, and apoptotic cells were located mostly in the nonpigmented part. In contrast, in the BALB/c mouse (tyrosinase-deficient) and pJ mouse (carrying mutations in the p gene) hypopigmented strains, the RPE contained significantly fewer apoptotic cells (7.5% and 10.1%, respectively) at E10.5 than controls. Subsequently at E11.5 and E12.5, the two hypopigmented strains displayed different apoptotic patterns; the BALB/c RPE had a similar percentage of apoptotic cells to controls (1.5% and 1.1%, respectively, for BALB/c versus 3.0% and 0.9%, respectively, for C57BL/6J), whereas the pJ RPE contained significantly more apoptosis (7.5% and 3.5%, respectively). Overall we observed differences in the evolution of the relative total number of RPE cells between the three strains. Apoptosis is a main event during the first stages of normal RPE development, indicating an essential role during RPE differentiation. Moreover, the early apoptotic pattern and possibly the whole early development of the RPE is different between hypopigmented and pigmented strains, as well as between BALB/c and pJ mice. This suggests the existence of regulatory and developmental differences with a more complex origin than just differing pigmentation levels.

  15. Nonlinear optical microscopy and microspectroscopy of oral precancers and early cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Gracie; Edward, Kert

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM) offers the ability to assess morphometry similar to that of pathologic evaluation as well as biochemical information from endogenous fluorophores which are altered with neoplastic transformation. In this study the spectroscopic properties of normal and neoplastic oral epithelium were evaluated toward the goal of identifying image/spectroscopic based indicators of neoplastic transformation using nonlinear optical microscopy. Results indicated measureable differences between normal, dysplasia, and SCC that could be helpful in delineating between the three conditions. In particular, a blue shift in autofluorescence emission was experienced for dysplasia relative to normal. However, in the case of SCC the epithelial emission experienced a significant red shift relative to both dysplasia and normal and displayed in an additional red peak that was not present in either normal or dysplastic mucosa. Results were consistent with published results for SCC in the single-photon literature. The study demonstrates that multiphoton autofluorescence spectroscopy may reveal features of oral mucosa that can be useful for differentiating normal and neoplastic mucosa. When combined with morphometry provided by MPAM, a potentially powerful technique for imaging of the oral cavity could be developed which provides both morphometric and spectroscopic information.

  16. Optical elastic scattering for early label-free identification of clinical pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuer, Valentin; Gal, Olivier; Méteau, Jérémy; Marcoux, Pierre; Schultz, Emmanuelle; Lacot, Éric; Maurin, Max; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    We report here on the ability of elastic light scattering in discriminating Gram+, Gram- and yeasts at an early stage of growth (6h). Our technique is non-invasive, low cost and does require neither skilled operators nor reagents. Therefore it is compatible with automation. It is based on the analysis of the scattering pattern (scatterogram) generated by a bacterial microcolony growing on agar, when placed in the path of a laser beam. Measurements are directly performed on closed Petri dishes. The characteristic features of a given scatterogram are first computed by projecting the pattern onto the Zernike orthogonal basis. Then the obtained data are compared to a database so that machine learning can yield identification result. A 10-fold cross-validation was performed on a database over 8 species (15 strains, 1906 scatterograms), at 6h of incubation. It yielded a 94% correct classification rate between Gram+, Gram- and yeasts. Results can be improved by using a more relevant function basis for projections, such as Fourier-Bessel functions. A fully integrated instrument has been installed at the Grenoble hospital's laboratory of bacteriology and a validation campaign has been started for the early screening of MSSA and MRSA (Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus) carriers. Up to now, all the published studies about elastic scattering were performed in a forward mode, which is restricted to transparent media. However, in clinical diagnostics, most of media are opaque, such as blood-supplemented agar. That is why we propose a novel scheme capable of collecting back-scattered light which provides comparable results.

  17. OXYGEN METALLICITY DETERMINATIONS FROM OPTICAL EMISSION LINES IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athey, Alex E.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the oxygen abundances of the warm (T ∼ 10 4 K) phase of gas in seven early-type galaxies through long-slit observations. A template spectra was constructed from galaxies void of warm gas and subtracted from the emission-line galaxies, allowing for a clean measurement of the nebular lines. The ratios of the emission lines are consistent with photoionization, which likely originates from the ultraviolet flux of postasymototic giant branch stars. We employ H II region photoionization models to determine a mean oxygen metallicity of 1.01 ± 0.50 solar for the warm interstellar medium (ISM) in this sample. This warm ISM 0.5-1.5 solar metallicity is consistent with modern determinations of the metallicity in the hot (T ∼ 10 6 -10 7 K) ISM and the upper range of this warm ISM metallicity is consistent with stellar population metallicity determinations. A solar metallicity of the warm ISM favors an internal origin for the warm ISM such as asymptotic giant branch mass loss within the galaxy.

  18. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. I. SURVEY DESIGN AND CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjorth, Jens; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Krühler, Thomas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Watson, Darach; Jakobsson, Páll; Schulze, Steve; Jaunsen, Andreas O.; Gorosabel, Javier; Levan, Andrew J.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Møller, Palle; Tanvir, Nial R.

    2012-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful tracers of star-forming galaxies. We have defined a homogeneous subsample of 69 Swift GRB-selected galaxies spanning a very wide redshift range. Special attention has been devoted to making the sample optically unbiased through simple and well-defined selection criteria based on the high-energy properties of the bursts and their positions on the sky. Thanks to our extensive follow-up observations, this sample has now achieved a comparatively high degree of redshift completeness, and thus provides a legacy sample, useful for statistical studies of GRBs and their host galaxies. In this paper, we present the survey design and summarize the results of our observing program conducted at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) aimed at obtaining the most basic properties of galaxies in this sample, including a catalog of R and K s magnitudes and redshifts. We detect the host galaxies for 80% of the GRBs in the sample, although only 42% have K s -band detections, which confirms that GRB-selected host galaxies are generally blue. The sample is not uniformly blue, however, with two extremely red objects detected. Moreover, galaxies hosting GRBs with no optical/NIR afterglows, whose identification therefore relies on X-ray localizations, are significantly brighter and redder than those with an optical/NIR afterglow. This supports a scenario where GRBs occurring in more massive and dusty galaxies frequently suffer high optical obscuration. Our spectroscopic campaign has resulted in 77% now having redshift measurements, with a median redshift of 2.14 ± 0.18. TOUGH alone includes 17 detected z > 2 Swift GRB host galaxies suitable for individual and statistical studies—a substantial increase over previous samples. Seven hosts have detections of the Lyα emission line and we can exclude an early indication that Lyα emission is ubiquitous among GRB hosts, but confirm that Lyα is stronger in GRB-selected galaxies than in flux

  19. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. I. SURVEY DESIGN AND CATALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjorth, Jens; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Kruehler, Thomas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Watson, Darach [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Jakobsson, Pall; Schulze, Steve [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 3, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Jaunsen, Andreas O. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Gorosabel, Javier [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Michalowski, Michal J. [SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Moller, Palle [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching by Muenchen (Germany); Tanvir, Nial R., E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-10

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful tracers of star-forming galaxies. We have defined a homogeneous subsample of 69 Swift GRB-selected galaxies spanning a very wide redshift range. Special attention has been devoted to making the sample optically unbiased through simple and well-defined selection criteria based on the high-energy properties of the bursts and their positions on the sky. Thanks to our extensive follow-up observations, this sample has now achieved a comparatively high degree of redshift completeness, and thus provides a legacy sample, useful for statistical studies of GRBs and their host galaxies. In this paper, we present the survey design and summarize the results of our observing program conducted at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) aimed at obtaining the most basic properties of galaxies in this sample, including a catalog of R and K{sub s} magnitudes and redshifts. We detect the host galaxies for 80% of the GRBs in the sample, although only 42% have K{sub s} -band detections, which confirms that GRB-selected host galaxies are generally blue. The sample is not uniformly blue, however, with two extremely red objects detected. Moreover, galaxies hosting GRBs with no optical/NIR afterglows, whose identification therefore relies on X-ray localizations, are significantly brighter and redder than those with an optical/NIR afterglow. This supports a scenario where GRBs occurring in more massive and dusty galaxies frequently suffer high optical obscuration. Our spectroscopic campaign has resulted in 77% now having redshift measurements, with a median redshift of 2.14 {+-} 0.18. TOUGH alone includes 17 detected z > 2 Swift GRB host galaxies suitable for individual and statistical studies-a substantial increase over previous samples. Seven hosts have detections of the Ly{alpha} emission line and we can exclude an early indication that Ly{alpha} emission is ubiquitous among GRB hosts, but confirm that Ly{alpha} is stronger in GRB

  20. Lifetime and quenching of CO /a super 3 pi/ produced by recombination of CO2 ions in a helium afterglow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauchop, T. S.; Broida, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that rapid dissociative recombination of CO2(+) in a flowing, helium afterglow is an efficient source of CO in the a super 3 pi metastable state. Ions produced by mixing CO2 with He(2 super 3 S) recombine to produce a CO metastable afterglow with a number density as great as 10 to the 9th per sq cm. Monitoring of the (a super 3 pi-X super 1 sigma) Cameron transition in CO was used to study the lifetime and quenching of CO (a super 3 pi) by CO2, N2, NO, and He. Recombination of CO2(+) also produces CO in the d super 3 delta and a' super 3 sigma states.

  1. Observation of visible emission from the molecular helium ion in the afterglow of a dense helium Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present the results of axial and radial time resolved visible emission spectroscopy from the afterglow of a dense helium Z-pinch. These results show that the visible emissions in the pinch afterglow are dominated by line emissions from molecular helium and He II. Axial spectroscopy measurements show the occurrence of several absorption bands which cannot be identified as molecular or atomic helium nor impurities from the discharge chamber materials. The authors believe that these absorption bands are attributable to the molecular helium ion which is present in the discharge. The molecular ion has been observed by others in low pressure and temperature helium discharges directly by means of mass spectrometry and indirectly by the presence of helium atoms in the 2/sup 3/S state, (the He 2/sup 3/S state is believed to result from molecular helium ion recombination). However, the molecular helium ion has not previously been observed spectroscopically

  2. SIMULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS IN A STRATIFIED EXTERNAL MEDIUM: DYNAMICS, AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES, JET BREAKS, AND RADIO CALORIMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [TASC, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lopez-Camara, Diego, E-mail: fabio@ucolick.org [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-05-20

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with {rho}{sub ext}{proportional_to}r{sup -k} for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle {theta}{sub 0} = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor {Gamma} drops below {theta}{sup -1}{sub 0}. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when {Gamma} > {theta}{sup -1}{sub 0}) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for {theta}{sub obs} {<=} {theta}{sub 0}) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 {<=} k {<=} 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results

  3. Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Jets in a Stratified External Medium: Dynamics, Afterglow Light Curves, Jet Breaks, and Radio Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with ρextvpropr -k for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle θ0 = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor Γ drops below θ-1 0. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when Γ > θ-1 0) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for θobs <= θ0) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 <= k <= 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results in a clear bump-like feature in the light curve. However, for larger k values the jet decelerates more

  4. Luminescent Afterglow Behavior in the M2Si5N8: Eu Family (M = Ca, Sr, Ba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Van den Eeckhout

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Persistent luminescent materials are able to emit light for hours after being excited. The majority of persistent phosphors emit in the blue or green region of the visible spectrum. Orange- or red-emitting phosphors, strongly desired for emergency signage and medical imaging, are scarce. We prepared the nitrido-silicates Ca2Si5N8:Eu (orange, Sr2Si5N8:Eu (reddish, Ba2Si5N8:Eu (yellowish orange, and their rare-earth codoped variants (R = Nd, Dy, Sm, Tm through a solid state reaction, and investigated their luminescence and afterglow properties. In this paper, we describe how the persistent luminescence is affected by the type of codopant and the choice and ratio of the starting products. All the materials exhibit some form of persistent luminescence, but for Sr2Si5N8:Eu,R this is very weak. In Ba2Si5N8:Eu the afterglow remains visible for about 400 s, and Ca2Si5N8:Eu,Tm shows the brightest and longest afterglow, lasting about 2,500 s. For optimal persistent luminescence, the dopant and codopant should be added in their fluoride form, in concentrations below 1 mol%. A Ca3N2 deficiency of about 5% triples the afterglow intensity. Our results show that Ba2Si5N8:Eu(,R and Ca2Si5N8:Eu(,R are promising persistent phosphors for applications requiring orange or red light.

  5. Measurement of early changes in anterior chamber morphology after cataract extraction measured by anterior segment optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kozue; Takahashi, Genichiro; Kumegawa, Koichi; Dogru, Murat

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the serial changes in anterior chamber depth (ACD) and angle parameters early after cataract surgery using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT). This was a retrospective chart review, case-control study; 150 eyes of 106 patients who underwent cataract surgery. Based on ACD and angle findings, the eyes were classified into two groups, open-angle eyes (87 eyes) and narrow-angle eyes (63 eyes). ASOCT was used to measure ACD and angle parameters (angle opening distance, angle recess area, trabecular iris space area, and trabecular iris angle (TIA [1]). Serial changes in each group were measured before and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after cataract surgery, and the differences between the two groups were compared. ACD and all angle parameters in both groups at each examination time after cataract surgery were significantly different from the preoperative values (p < 0.01). In addition, all angle parameters significantly differed between the two groups at each examination time after cataract surgery (p < 0.001). However, ACD after surgery was not significantly different, irrespective of ACD before surgery. ACD and TIA500 both showed significantly greater changes from before surgery to 1 day after surgery in narrow-angle eyes compared to open-angle eyes (p < 0.001). Cataract surgery increases ACD and all angle parameters early after the surgery. However, the degree of angle widening in narrow-angle eyes was not as much as that in open-angle eyes, suggesting that factors other than the lens influence the angle closure.

  6. Connectivity Reveals Sources of Predictive Coding Signals in Early Visual Cortex During Processing of Visual Optic Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Andreas; Bartels, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Superimposed on the visual feed-forward pathway, feedback connections convey higher level information to cortical areas lower in the hierarchy. A prominent framework for these connections is the theory of predictive coding where high-level areas send stimulus interpretations to lower level areas that compare them with sensory input. Along these lines, a growing body of neuroimaging studies shows that predictable stimuli lead to reduced blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses compared with matched nonpredictable counterparts, especially in early visual cortex (EVC) including areas V1-V3. The sources of these modulatory feedback signals are largely unknown. Here, we re-examined the robust finding of relative BOLD suppression in EVC evident during processing of coherent compared with random motion. Using functional connectivity analysis, we show an optic flow-dependent increase of functional connectivity between BOLD suppressed EVC and a network of visual motion areas including MST, V3A, V6, the cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv), and precuneus (Pc). Connectivity decreased between EVC and 2 areas known to encode heading direction: entorhinal cortex (EC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC). Our results provide first evidence that BOLD suppression in EVC for predictable stimuli is indeed mediated by specific high-level areas, in accord with the theory of predictive coding. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Sensitive optical detection of an early metastatic tumor using a new cell line with enhanced luminescent and fluorescent signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Joo Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal models using cell lines that are dual-labeled with luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP are powerful tools for performing simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of metastatic tumors. However, the applications of such dual-labeled tumor models have been limited due to the technical challenges associated with low bioluminescent signaling from tumor cells. Here, we used lentiviral vector (LV encoding firefly luciferase and GFP and engineered a more sensitive and highly metastatic prostate cancer cell line (MLL-Luc/GFP cells, which allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. The light emission of MLL-Luc/GFP cells was 33.5 fold higher than that of PC-3-luc2-GFP prostate cancer cells which showed 750 p/s light emission per cell. Furthermore, the MLL-Luc/GFP cells showed 3.9 fold higher luciferase activities than did 4T1-luc2, which was previously recognized as exhibiting the highest luciferase activity. An in vivo evaluation with optical imaging showed pinpoint localization of GFP-positive cells in a metastatic lung as well as easy detection of early metastatic spreading. The newly engineered MLL-Luc/GFP cells provide an appropriate metastatic animal model system for future studies of metastasis and the testing of anti-metastatic therapies specifically aimed at prostatic cancer.

  8. Probe measurements of penning electron spectra in the afterglow of nonlocal helium microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Belskiy, Denis; Gutsev, Sergey; Kosykh, Nikolay; Kryukov, Anton

    2012-10-01

    Method PLES [Blagoev A.B., Kolokolov, N.B., Kudryavtsev. Physica Scripta, 1994, v.50, p.371] is based on identification of atoms and molecules of impurities M by selective registration of groups of fast electrons e(f) created in Penning ionization: He(m) + M -> He +M+ + e(f). The electron energy spectrum e(f) contains discrete peaks corresponding to the difference between the energy 19.8 eV of metastable helium atoms He(m) and the ionization energies Ei of impurities M. Since the ionization potential Ei of each type of atom or molecule is a well-known, it is possible to identify the atoms or molecules M of the unknown impurity by their ionization potential Ei. Probe registration of the energy spectra of penning electrons is carried out in the nonlocal afterglow plasma of pulsed microdischarge in helium and its mixtures with argon, krypton and air. In helium, the non-local plasma condition corresponds to p xL < 5 Torr x cm, where p is the gas pressure and L is the plasma volume size. It is demonstrated that the obtained maxima appear at the characteristic energies corresponding exactly to the expected maxima for penning electrons of the known gas impurities used.

  9. 'Jet breaks' and 'missing breaks' in the X-Ray afterglow of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray afterglows (AGs) of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and X-Ray Flashes (XRFs) have, after the fast decline phase of their prompt emission, a temporal behaviour varying between two extremes. A large fraction of these AGs has a 'canonical' light curve which, after an initial shallow-decay 'plateau' phase, 'breaks smoothly' into a fast power-law decline. Very energetic GRBs, contrariwise, appear not to have a 'break', their AG declines like a power-law from the start of the observations. Breaks and 'missing breaks' are intimately related to the geometry and deceleration of the jets responsible for GRBs. In the frame of the 'cannonball' (CB) model of GRBs and XRFs, we analyze the cited extreme behaviours (canonical and pure power-law) and intermediate cases spanning the observed range of X-ray AG shapes. We show that the entire panoply of X-ray light-curve shapes --measured with Swift and other satellites-- are as anticipated, on very limpid grounds, by the CB model. We test the expected correlations between the...

  10. The 'Supercritical Pile' GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\, \\gamma \\rightarrow p \\, e circumflex + e circumflex -$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e circumflex +e circumflex- - $pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi-) thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which this transition is accompanied by a significant drop in the flux and could thus account for several puzzling, recent observations. Finally, we indicate that the same mechanism applied to the late stages of the GRB evolution leads to a decrease in \\Ep $\\propto \\Gamma circumflex 2(t)\\propto t circumflex {-3/4}$, a feature amenable to future observational tests.

  11. The effect of a direct current field on the microparticle charge in the plasma afterglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wörner, L. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany); Groupe de Recherches sur l' Energétique des Milieux Ionisés, UMR7344, CNRS, Univ. Orléans, F-45067 Orléans (France); Ivlev, A. V.; Huber, P.; Hagl, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany); Couëdel, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille-Université, Laboiratoire de Physique des Intéractions Ioniques et Moléculaires, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France); Schwabe, M. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr., 85741 Garching (Germany); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L. [Groupe de Recherches sur l' Energétique des Milieux Ionisés, UMR7344, CNRS, Univ. Orléans, F-45067 Orléans (France); Skvortsov, A. [Yuri Gagarin Cosmonauts Training Center, RU-141160 Star City (Russian Federation); Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RU-125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    Residual charges of individual microparticles forming dense clouds were measured in a RF discharge afterglow. Experiments were performed under microgravity conditions on board the International Space Station, which ensured particle levitation inside the gas volume after the plasma switch-off. The distribution of residual charges as well as the spatial distribution of charged particles across the cloud were analyzed by applying a low-frequency voltage to the electrodes and measuring amplitudes of the resulting particle oscillations. Upon “free decharging” conditions, the charge distribution had a sharp peak at zero and was rather symmetric (with charges concentrated between −10e and +10e), yet positively and negatively charged particles were homogeneously distributed over the cloud. However, when decharging evolved in the presence of an external DC field (applied shortly before the plasma switch-off) practically all residual charges were positive. In this case, the overall charge distribution had a sharp peak at about +15e and was highly asymmetric, while the spatial distribution exhibited a significant charge gradient along the direction of the applied DC field.

  12. Ag/BiOBr Film in a Rotating-Disk Reactor Containing Long-Afterglow Phosphor for Round-the-Clock Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haibo; Chen, Xiaofang; Hou, Rujing; Zhu, Huijuan; Li, Shiqing; Huo, Yuning; Li, Hexing

    2015-09-16

    Ag/BiOBr film coated on the glass substrate was synthesized by a solvothermal method and a subsequent photoreduction process. Such a Ag/BiOBr film was then adhered to a hollow rotating disk filled with long-afterglow phosphor inside the chamber. The Ag/BiOBr film exhibited high photocatalytic activity for organic pollutant degradation owing to the improved visible-light harvesting and the separation of photoinduced charges. The long-afterglow phosphor could absorb the excessive daylight and emit light around 488 nm, activating the Ag/BiOBr film to realize round-the-clock photocatalysis. Because the Ag nanoparticles could extend the light absorbance of the Ag/BiOBr film to wavelengths of around 500 nm via a surface plasma resonance effect, they played a key role in realizing photocatalysis induced by long-afterglow phosphor.

  13. Flowing afterglow: construction of an apparatus, measurement of rate constants, and consideration of the diffusive behavior of charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Shingo; Nakamura, Hirone; Tamura, Takaaki; Fujii, Toshihiro.

    1984-01-01

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was constructed and the operation of the afterglow system including data analysis was tested by measuring the rate constants for the reactions N + + NO, N 2 + + NO, He + + N 2 , and SF 6 + e; the results were 5.8 x 10 -10 , 3.9 x 10 -10 , 1.20 x 10 -9 , and 2.1 x 10 -7 cm 3 s -1 respectively. In the measurements an extraction voltage for ion sampling was not applied to the nose cone in order not to introduce an electric field into the reaction region. A ''non-ambipolar'' model developed by us was used for the data analysis of the ion/molecule reactions. For the data analysis of the electron attachment, a typical curve fit mehtod to the product ion signal was used. However, no theoretical curves fit the experimental points. This disagreement is attributed to a change of the ion-sampling efficiency through the nose-cone aperture arising from a change of the electron-dominated plasma to a negative-ion-dominated plasma with an increasing flow rate of SF 6 . Nevertheless, the attachment rate could be determined by fitting the theoretical and experimantal curves in the limited region of the SF 6 flow rate where the negative-ion-dominated plasma is established at the sampling aperture. All the rate constants obtained here agree reasonably well with literature values. Next, errors in the positive ion/molecule reaction rate constants, which would occur if the diffusion coefficients of the ions and neutrals each have a + 10 % error were calculated for the flow model to be -0.4 and +1.2 % respectively, demonstrating that these parameters are not important in the analysis of data. This insensitivity explains why the nose-cone voltage applied in a typical flowing afterglow operation has not caused a significant error in the published rate constants although it disturbs the ion diffusive behavior. (author)

  14. Characterization of the chlorophyll thermoluminescence afterglow in dark-adapted or far-red-illuminated plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, T.; Ducruet, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Far red illumination of photosynthetic material induces a delayed luminescence rise, or afterglow, which has been reported in plant leaves, protoplasts or intact chloroplasts and in algal cells. but does not occur in isolated thylakoids. The rise kinetics is accelerated by increasing temperature and we show, by slowly heating a leaf sample after a far-red illumination, that the afterglow emission can be optimally resolved as a sharp thermoluminescence band. Plant material was mainly pea (Pisum sativum L., cv Kazar and Merveille de Kelvedon) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L., cv Marketer). Comparisons were done with rape, spinach, tobacco, avocado and maize. A 0.2 degree C-1s to 0.5 degree C-1s temperature gradient, started above 0 degree C after a far red illumination, revealed a new thermoluminescence AG band, peaking between 40 degree C and 50 degree C. It exhibited the characteristic properties of the luminescence afterglow recorded at a constant temperature. The AG band was very sensitive to short incubations at both freezing and moderately warm temperatures. Increasing duration of far red illumination caused two kinetically distinct effects on the AG band and on the B band (S-2S-3 Q-B- recombination), which can be ascribed to different behaviors of proton gradients in stroma and in grana lamellae, respectively. The induction of an afterglow by far red light lasted for several minutes in the dark, at 10 degree C. Flash sequences fired in these conditions confirmed the presence of S-2 and S-3 states stable in the dark, producing luminescence by recombination with back-transferred electrons. In some plant batches, an AG band could be induced by 2 or 3 flashes in the absence of far red light, which demonstrates that a metabolic state leading to AG emission may arise spontaneously in plant leaves. The strong temperature dependence of the AG emission is discussed in terms of heat-induced conformational changes in the thylakoid membrane. We conclude that

  15. EARLY SIMULTANEOUS FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY FEATURES AFTER PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY FOR PRIMARY RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellʼomo, Roberto; Mura, Marco; Lesnik Oberstein, Sarit Y.; Bijl, Heico; Tan, H. Stevie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography (OCT) features of the macula after pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Methods: Thirty-three eyes of 33 consecutive patients with repaired rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with or without the

  16. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  17. Microplasma-based flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source for ambient desorption-ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiri, Offer M.; Storey, Andrew P.; Ray, Steven J., E-mail: sjray2@buffalo.edu; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2017-02-01

    A new direct-current microplasma-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was developed for use in ambient desorption-ionization mass spectrometry. The annular-shaped microplasma is formed in helium between two concentric stainless-steel capillaries that are separated by an alumina tube. Current-voltage characterization of the source shows that this version of the FAPA operates in the normal glow-discharge regime. A glass surface placed in the path of the helium afterglow reaches temperatures of up to approximately 400 °C; the temperature varies with distance from the source and helium flow rate through the source. Solid, liquid, and vapor samples were examined by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Results suggest that ionization occurs mainly through protonation, with only a small amount of fragmentation and adduct formation. The mass range of the source was shown to extend up to at least m/z 2722 for singly charged species. Limits of detection for several small organic molecules were in the sub-picomole range. Examination of competitive ionization revealed that signal suppression occurs only at high (mM) concentrations of competing substances. - Highlights: • The first microplasma version of the FAPA source. • Current-voltage behavior reflects the behavior of a normal glow discharge. • Detection limits below 1 pmol for the classes of organic compounds studied over a wide mass range. • Mass spectra show limited fragmentation.

  18. Rapid formation of red long afterglow phosphor Sr3Al2O6:Eu2+, Dy3+ by microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ping; Xu Mingxia; Zheng Zhentai; Sun Bo; Zhang Yanhui

    2007-01-01

    A new red long afterglow phosphor Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ , Dy 3+ nanocrystalline particles were prepared using a microwave oven operated at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and a power of 680 W in a weak reductive atmosphere. The phosphor nanocrystalline particles were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence spectrophotometer. The results reveal that the samples are composed of single Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 phase. The obtained nanocrystalline particles show small size (80-100 nm) and spherical shape. The excitation and emission spectra indicate that excitation broadband chiefly lies in visible range and the nanocrystalline particles emit strong light at 612 nm under around 473 nm excitation. The effect of Eu 2+ doping concentrations of the samples on the emission intensity is studied systematically. Furthermore, comparing with conventional heating method, the microwave method has the advantages such as short heating time and low energy consumption. However, the decay speed of the afterglow for Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ , Dy 3+ nanocrystalline particles is faster than that obtained by the conventional heating method

  19. Electron energy distribution function, effective electron temperature, and dust charge in the temporal afterglow of a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A. [School of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody sq. 4, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kersten, H. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Leibnizstr. 19, Kiel D-24098 (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Analytical expressions describing the variation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an afterglow of a plasma are obtained. Especially, the case when the electron energy loss is mainly due to momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is considered. The study is carried out for different EEDFs in the steady state, including Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions. The analytical results are not only obtained for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy but also for the case when the collisions are a power function of electron energy. Using analytical expressions for the EEDF, the effective electron temperature and charge of the dust particles, which are assumed to be present in plasma, are calculated for different afterglow durations. An analytical expression for the rate describing collection of electrons by dust particles for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy is also derived. The EEDF profile and, as a result, the effective electron temperature and dust charge are sufficiently different in the cases when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy and when the rate is a power function of electron energy.

  20. Layered host-guest long-afterglow ultrathin nanosheets: high-efficiency phosphorescence energy transfer at 2D confined interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Yan, Dongpeng

    2017-01-01

    Tuning and optimizing the efficiency of light energy transfer play an important role in meeting modern challenges of minimizing energy loss and developing high-performance optoelectronic materials. However, attempts to fabricate systems giving highly efficient energy transfer between luminescent donor and acceptor have achieved limited success to date. Herein, we present a strategy towards phosphorescence energy transfer at a 2D orderly crystalline interface. We first show that new ultrathin nanosheet materials giving long-afterglow luminescence can be obtained by assembling aromatic guests into a layered double hydroxide host. Furthermore, we demonstrate that co-assembly of these long-lived energy donors with an energy acceptor in the same host generates an ordered arrangement of phosphorescent donor-acceptor pairs spatially confined within the 2D nanogallery, which affords energy transfer efficiency as high as 99.7%. Therefore, this work offers an alternative route to develop new types of long-afterglow nanohybrids and efficient light transfer systems with potential energy, illumination and sensor applications.

  1. Film formation from HMDSO: comparison of direct plasma injection with afterglow injection using an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallimann, Roger; Oberbossel, Gina; Butscher, Denis; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    The afterglow of a dielectric barrier discharge plasma was used for the film formation from Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) on silicon wafers. The process gas was argon with varying admixtures of HMDSO and oxygen. The silicon wafers were analyzed using white light interferometry and ATR-FTIR to characterize film volume and composition, respectively. The topology of deposited films was compared to a flow model to link the film thickness to flow velocity. Results show that deposition only occurs where flow velocity is low. Maximum film volume was observed at an oxygen admixture of 0.05 vol.%, while oxygen depletion for lower admixtures and plasma quenching at higher oxygen contents reduce the film formation. Additionally, film deposition depends on the residence time in the region where active species promote dissociation and on the density of active species in this region. Afterglow injection of HMDSO yields film deposition comparable to direct plasma injection with respect to volume and composition, eliminating the need of direct plasma treatment and preventing unwanted reactor deposition. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  2. Perspectives of observing the color indices of optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with ESA Gaia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, R.; Pizzichini, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2017), s. 129-146 ISSN 0922-6435 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-33324S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : radiation mechanisms * astronomical instrumentation * methods and techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy , Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.313, year: 2016

  3. The color evolution of the optical afterglow of GRB 030329 and the implications for the underlying supernova SN 2003dh

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Vojtěch; Hudec, René; Pizzichini, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 427, č. 3 (2004), s. 901-905 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : gamma rays bursts * galaxies * supernova e Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.694, year: 2004

  4. GRB 050509b: the elusive optical/nIR/mm afterglow of a short-duration GRB

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Sokolov, V. V.; Brener, M.; Márquez, I.; Marín, A.; Guziy, S.; Jelínek, Martin; Kubánek, Petr; Hudec, René; Vítek, S.; Mateo Sanguino, T. J.; Eigenbrod, A.; Pérez-Ramírez, M.D.; Sota, A.; Masegosa, J.; Prada, F.; Moles, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 439, č. 2 (2005), L15-L18 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma ray bursts Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.223, year: 2005

  5. Preparation and optical properties of afterglow Sr_2MgSi_2O_7:Eu"2"+, Dy"3"+ electrospun nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Ling; Jia, Baolan; Che, Lianyu; Li, Wensheng; Sun, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional Sr_2MgSi_2O_7:Eu"2"+, Dy"3"+ nanofibers were synthesized by a simple and cost-effective electrospinning technique. The samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, TG-DTA, SEM, TEM and PL. The XRD and SEM results show single crystal nanofibers of Sr_2MgSi_2O_7:Eu"2"+, Dy"3"+ with an average diameter of 200 nm were obtained by electrospinning preparation and heat treatment at 1150 °C for 5 h. The single crystal structure of Sr_2MgSi_2O_7:Eu"2"+ nanofiber was discussed. The luminescent properties, long lasting performance and formation mechanism are also investigated.

  6. The creation and early implementation of a high speed fiber optic network for a university health sciences center.

    OpenAIRE

    Schueler, J. D.; Mitchell, J. A.; Forbes, S. M.; Neely, R. C.; Goodman, R. J.; Branson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989 the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center began the process of creating an extensive fiber optic network throughout its facilities, with the intent to provide networked computer access to anyone in the Center desiring such access, regardless of geographic location or organizational affiliation. A committee representing all disciplines within the Center produced and, in conjunction with independent consultants, approved a comprehensive design for the network. Installation ...

  7. FAST RADIO BURSTS AND THEIR GAMMA-RAY OR RADIO AFTERGLOWS AS KERR–NEWMAN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Li, Ang [Department of Astronomy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Romero, Gustavo E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR, CCT La Plata, CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Liu, Mo-Lin, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: romero@iar.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: mlliu@xynu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang, Henan 464000 (China)

    2016-07-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are radio transients lasting only about a few milliseconds. They seem to occur at cosmological distances. We propose that these events can originate in the collapse of the magnetospheres of Kerr–Newman black holes (KNBHs). We show that the closed orbits of charged particles in the magnetospheres of these objects are unstable. After examining the dependencies on the specific charge of the particle and the spin and charge of the KNBH, we conclude that the resulting timescale and radiation mechanism fit well with extant observations of FRBs. Furthermore, we argue that the merger of a KNBH binary is a plausible central engine for the potential gamma-ray or radio afterglow following certain FRBs and can also account for gravitational wave (GW) events like GW 150914. Our model leads to predictions that can be tested by combined multi-wavelength electromagnetic and GW observations.

  8. Inactivation of Candida glabrata by a humid DC argon discharge afterglow: dominant contributions of short-lived aqueous active species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qing; Liu, Hongbin; Lu, Weiping; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Le; Wang, Xia; Zhu, Qunlin; Zeng, Xue; Yi, Ping

    2017-05-01

    Plasma medicine applications are currently attracting significant interest all over the world. Bactericidal treatments of Candida glabrata cultured in saline suspension are performed in this study by a room-temperature reactive afterglow of a DC-driven argon discharge. Water vapor was added to the discharge to study the inactivation contributions of reactive hydrolytic species including OH and H2O2 transporting along the gas flow to the treated solutions. The inactivation results indicate that the dominant roles in the bactericidal treatments are played by the short-lived aqueous active species, but not the stable species like H2O2aq (aq indicates an aqueous species). Further analysis shows that the ·OHaq radicals play an important role in the inactivation process. The ·OHaq radicals in the suspension are mostly produced from the direct dissolution of the OH species in the reactive afterglow. With the increase of added water vapor content, the ·OHaq production increases and enhances the inactivation efficiency of C. glabrata. Furthermore, it is found that the ambient air diffusion shows essential effects on the bactericidal activity of the remote humid argon discharge. Higher bactericidal effects can be obtained in open-space treatments compared to in a controlled Ar + H2O gas atmosphere. Key active air-byproduct species are believed to be generated in the suspension during the treatments and contributing to the inactivation process. Based on chemical analysis, the peroxynitrous acid ONOOHaq is considered as the key antimicrobial air-byproduct species. These results indicate the important dependence of plasma biomedical effects on the processing environment, which finally relates to the critical contributions of the key reactive species formed therein.

  9. Inactivation of Candida glabrata by a humid DC argon discharge afterglow: dominant contributions of short-lived aqueous active species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Qing; Liu, Hongbin; Xu, Le; Wang, Xia; Zhu, Qunlin; Lu, Weiping; Chen, Qiang; Zeng, Xue; Yi, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Plasma medicine applications are currently attracting significant interest all over the world. Bactericidal treatments of Candida glabrata cultured in saline suspension are performed in this study by a room-temperature reactive afterglow of a DC-driven argon discharge. Water vapor was added to the discharge to study the inactivation contributions of reactive hydrolytic species including OH and H 2 O 2 transporting along the gas flow to the treated solutions. The inactivation results indicate that the dominant roles in the bactericidal treatments are played by the short-lived aqueous active species, but not the stable species like H 2 O 2aq (aq indicates an aqueous species). Further analysis shows that the ·OH aq radicals play an important role in the inactivation process. The ·OH aq radicals in the suspension are mostly produced from the direct dissolution of the OH species in the reactive afterglow. With the increase of added water vapor content, the ·OH aq production increases and enhances the inactivation efficiency of C. glabrata . Furthermore, it is found that the ambient air diffusion shows essential effects on the bactericidal activity of the remote humid argon discharge. Higher bactericidal effects can be obtained in open-space treatments compared to in a controlled Ar + H 2 O gas atmosphere. Key active air-byproduct species are believed to be generated in the suspension during the treatments and contributing to the inactivation process. Based on chemical analysis, the peroxynitrous acid ONOOH aq is considered as the key antimicrobial air-byproduct species. These results indicate the important dependence of plasma biomedical effects on the processing environment, which finally relates to the critical contributions of the key reactive species formed therein. (paper)

  10. Computational study of the afterglow in single and sequential pulsing of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. I.; Bradley, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial distribution of charged species in the afterglow of a helium plasma jet impinging atmospheric air has been computed using a 2D axisymmetric fluid model. The model is solved for two consecutive pulse periods of a rectangular voltage waveform (duration of 60 ns) and for two different frequencies (25 and 50 kHz). The most abundant ionic species in the afterglow are found to be \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}2- with their concentrations increasing by about an order of magnitude (up to about 1018 m-3 and 1017 m-3 respectively) in the initial 1 μs. In the first pulse, these species form a halo around the diffusing He+ and electron rich central channel, the shape of the former being strongly correlated with the shape of He-air mixing layer computed using a hydrodynamic model. In the next pulse, this general configuration is also observed; however \\text{O}2+ is more concentrated on the axis of the jet, this being due to influence of residual electrons in the central channel. For \\text{O}2- there is little difference in their spatial distribution compared to the initial pulse. For higher frequency pulsing, the higher concentration of residual electrons lowers the necessary ignition electric field reducing the concentrations (by 25%) of charged species in a period of the applied waveform. This work provides new information on the concentration and distribution of ionic species generated by atmospheric-pressure capillary discharges of interest to those developing such sources for range of applications, particularly in the field of plasma medicine.

  11. Optical or mechanical aids to drawing in the early Renaissance? A geometric analysis of the trellis work in Robert Campin's Mérode Altarpiece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh; Stork, David G.

    2009-02-01

    A recent theory claims that some Renaissance artists, as early as 1425, secretly traced optically projected images during the execution of some passages in some of their works, nearly a quarter millennium before historians of art and of optics have secure evidence anyone recorded an image this way. Key evidence adduced by the theory's proponents includes the trelliswork in the right panel of Robert Campin's Merode altarpiece triptych (c. 1425-28). If their claim were verified for this work, such a discovery would be extremely important to the history of art and of image making more generally: the Altarpiece would be the earliest surviving image believed to record the projected image of an illuminated object, the first step towards photography, over 400 years later. The projection theory proponents point to teeny "kinks" in the depicted slats of one orientation in the Altarpiece as evidence that Campin refocussed a projector twice and traced images of physically straight slats in his studio. However, the proponents rotated the digital images of each slat individually, rather than the full trelliswork as a whole, and thereby disrupted the relative alignment between the images of the kinks and thus confounded their analysis. We found that when properly rotated, the kinks line up nearly perfectly and are consistent with Campin using a subtly kinked straightedge repeatedly, once for each of the slats. Moreover, the proponents did not report any analysis of the other set of slats-the ones nearly perpendicular to the first set. These perpendicular slats are straight across the break line of the first set-an unlikely scenario in the optical explanation. Finally, whereas it would have been difficult for Campin to draw the middle portions of the slats perfectly straight by tracing a projected image, it would have been trivially simple had he used a straightedge. Our results and the lack of any contemporaneous documentary evidence for the projection technique imply that

  12. Airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties related to early spring transport of mid-latitude sources into the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. de Villiers

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne lidar and in-situ measurements of the aerosol properties were conducted between Svalbard Island and Scandinavia in April 2008. Evidence of aerosol transport from Europe and Asia is given. The analysis of the aerosol optical properties based on a multiwavelength lidar (355, 532, 1064 nm including volume depolarization at 355 nm aims at distinguishing the role of the different aerosol sources (Siberian wild fires, Eastern Asia and European anthropogenic emissions. Combining, first aircraft measurements, second FLEXPART simulations with a calculation of the PBL air fraction originating from the three different mid-latitude source regions, and third level-2 CALIPSO data products (i.e. backscatter coefficient 532 nm,volume depolarization and color ratio between 1064 and 532 nm in aerosol layers along the transport pathways, appears a valuable approach to identify the role of the different aerosol sources even after a transport time larger than 4 days. Optical depth of the aerosol layers are always rather small (<4% while transported over the Arctic and ratio of the total attenuated backscatter (i.e. including molecular contribution provide more stable result than conventional aerosol backscatter ratio. Above Asia, CALIPSO data indicate more depolarization (up to 15% and largest color ratio (>0.5 for the northeastern Asia emissions (i.e. an expected mixture of Asian pollution and dust, while low depolarization together with smaller and quasi constant color ratio (≈0.3 are observed for the Siberian biomass burning emissions. A similar difference is visible between two layers observed by the aircraft above Scandinavia. The analysis of the time evolution of the aerosol optical properties revealed by CALIPSO between Asia and Scandinavia shows a gradual decrease of the aerosol backscatter, depolarization ratio and color ratio which suggests the removal of the largest particles in the accumulation mode. A similar study conducted for a European

  13. Early changes in macular optical coherence tomography parameters after Ranibizumab intravitreal injection in patients with exsudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Nicole Antunes; de Souza, Osias Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Evaluation of the impact of different macular optical coherence parameters on visual acuity as early as 1 day after injection of ranibizumab in patients with subfoveal exsudative age-related macular degeneration. This was an interventional, non randomized, open label prospective study, where we evaluated 20 eyes of 20 patients affected by exudative age-related macular degeneration. These patients were treated with injections of ranibizumab between February 2013 and January 2015. The primary endpoint of this study was to evaluate the early changes in optical coherence tomography parameters (retinal thickness, central and total retinal volume) and impact on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) obtained by logarithm of minimum resolution using ETDRS protocol in patients treated with a single dose intravitreal injection of ranibizumab (0.5 mg/0.05 mL) during the first month of follow. The patients were evaluated on the first day, them at 7 and 30 days after the treatment. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire was applied during the study period to assess early perception of ranibizumab injection effectiveness. The adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Central retinal thickness values at 1 (464.0 ± 97.8 µm), 7 (379.9 ± 107.8 µm) and 30 days (365.5 ± 95.1 µm) after ranibizumab injection showed a statically significant reduction when compared with baseline results ( P  = 0.01, P  = 0.001, P  = 0.001, respectively). Similar alterations were observed in central and total retinal volume, which were detected early on the first day of evaluation, after the measurement at baseline (central: 0.36 ± 0.07 vs. 0.40 ± 0.10 mm 3 , P  = 0.01; total: 9.62 ± 1.10 vs. 9.99 ± 2.56 mm 3 , P  = 0.002) and remained steady at 7 ( P  = 0.001, P  = 0.002, respectively) and 30 days ( P  = 0.001, P  = 0.004, respectively) with slight variations without losing their gains in these parameters. The best

  14. Preparation of SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors using propylene oxide as gel agent and its optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Hongyi; Xu, Dong; Hai, Ou; Yang, Ting

    2018-01-01

    The SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors were prepared by sol–gel method using propylene oxide as gel agent. The precursors and phosphors were characterized by multiple techniques including Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectrometer, long afterglow material optical test system, etc. The results indicate that the excitation and emission spectra intensity of phosphors firstly increase and then decrease with the addition of propylene oxide, and sample S3 reach maximum value. The maximum initial brightness can reach 7.28 cd m‑2, and the afterglow time achieve to 253 min, but the initial brightness, afterglow time and decay rate are always declining. These phenomena can be explained on the basis of sample’s crystallization property, the change of aggregates size and increase of liquid phase content. What’s more, this sol–gel method is more advantageous than traditional sol–gel method of NH4HCO3 as gel agent, not only because the gel time is adjustable, but also the afterglow performance is enhanced remarkably.

  15. Ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer measured by fourier-domain optical coherence tomography for early detection of structural damage in patients with preperimetric glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolle T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Rolle, Cristina Briamonte, Daniela Curto, Federico Maria GrignoloEye Clinic, Section of Ophthalmology, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Torino, Torino, ItalyAims: To evaluate the capability of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT to detect structural damage in patients with preperimetric glaucoma.Methods: A total of 178 Caucasian subjects were enrolled in this cohort study: 116 preperimetric glaucoma patients and 52 healthy subjects. Using three-dimensional FD-OCT, the participants underwent imaging of the ganglion cell complex (GCC and the optic nerve head. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and predictive values were calculated for all parameters at the first and fifth percentiles. Areas under the curves (AUCs were generated for all parameters and were compared (Delong test. For both the GCC and the optic nerve head protocols, the OR logical disjunction (Boolean logic operator was calculated.Results: The AUCs didn’t significantly differ. Macular global loss volume had the largest AUC (0.81. Specificities were high at both the fifth and first percentiles (up to 97%, but sensitivities were low, especially at the first percentile (55%–27%.Conclusion: Macular and papillary diagnostic accuracies did not differ significantly based on the 95% confidence interval. The computation of the Boolean OR operator has been found to boost diagnostic accuracy. Using the software-provided classification, sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy were low for both the retinal nerve fiber layer and the GCC scans. FD-OCT does not seem to be decisive for early detection of structural damage in patients with no functional impairment. This suggests that there is a need for analysis software to be further refined to enhance glaucoma diagnostic capability.Keywords: OCT, RNFL, GCC, diagnostic accuracy 

  16. Visual outcome after fronto-temporo-orbito-zygomatic approach combined with early extradural and intradural optic nerve decompression in tuberculum and diaphragma sellae meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortini, Pietro; Barzaghi, Lina Raffaella; Serra, Carlo; Orlandi, Vittoria; Bianchi, Stefania; Losa, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The surgical challenge of the treatment of tuberculum (TSMs) and diaphragma sellae meningiomas (DSMs) is to preserve or improve the visual function. Extradural and intradural optic nerve decompression should reduce surgical trauma of the nerve achieving a good visual result. We reported 37 consecutive TSMs and DSMs operated through fronto-temporo-orbito-zygomatic approach with extradural unroofing of the optical canal and early intradural incision of the dural sheath. Visual data were recorded measuring the visual impairment score (VIS), the visual acuity (VA), the visual field (VF) and the postoperative improvement. A good visual outcome (VIS improved or unchanged) was obtained in 97.2% of patients (35/36). The evaluation of 72 eyes showed a good outcome (VA and VF unchanged or improved) in 98.6% (71/72 eyes). The degree of preoperative VA and VF impairment was the only factor correlating with the postoperative improvement of VA (P<.001 and P=.018) and VF defect (P<.001). Worsening of visual function occurred in 1/37 patient (2.7%). Using this surgical technique we achieved a high improvement rate of visual defects and a low frequency of worsening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  18. Increased steroidogenesis promotes early-onset and severe vision loss in females with OPA1 dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Seveno, Marie; Angebault, Claire

    2016-01-01

    OPA1 mutations are responsible for autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA), a progressive blinding disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration and large phenotypic variations, the underlying mechanisms of which are poorly understood. OPA1 encodes a mitochondrial protein...... with essential biological functions, its main roles residing in the control of mitochondrial membrane dynamics as a pro-fusion protein and prevention of apoptosis. Considering recent findings showing the importance of the mitochondrial fusion process and the involvement of OPA1 in controlling steroidogenesis, we...... tested the hypothesis of deregulated steroid production in retina due to a disease-causing OPA1 mutation and its contribution to the visual phenotypic variations. Using the mouse model carrying the human recurrent OPA1 mutation, we disclosed that Opa1 haploinsufficiency leads to very high circulating...

  19. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. V. VLT/X-SHOOTER EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS FOR SWIFT GRBs AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruehler, Thomas; Malesani, Daniele; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Sparre, Martin; Watson, Darach J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Jakobsson, Pall [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, Nial R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10

    We present simultaneous optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 19 Swift {gamma}-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies observed with the VLT/X-shooter with the aim of measuring their redshifts. Galaxies were selected from The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) survey (15 of the 19 galaxies) or because they hosted GRBs without a bright optical afterglow. Here we provide emission-line redshifts for 13 of the observed galaxies with brightnesses between F606W > 27 mag and R = 22.9 mag (median R-tilde =24.6 mag). The median redshift is z-tilde =2.1 for all hosts and z-tilde =2.3 for the TOUGH hosts. Our new data significantly improve the redshift completeness of the TOUGH survey, which now stands at 77% (53 out of 69 GRBs). They furthermore provide accurate redshifts for nine prototype dark GRBs (e.g., GRB 071021 at z = 2.452 and GRB 080207 at z = 2.086), which are exemplary of GRBs where redshifts are challenging to obtain via afterglow spectroscopy. This establishes X-shooter spectroscopy as an efficient tool for redshift determination of faint, star-forming, high-redshift galaxies such as GRB hosts. It is hence a further step toward removing the bias in GRB samples that is caused by optically dark events, and provides the basis for a better understanding of the conditions in which GRBs form. The distribution of column densities as measured from X-ray data (N{sub H,X}), for example, is closely related to the darkness of the afterglow and skewed toward low N{sub H,X} values in samples that are dominated by bursts with bright optical afterglows.

  20. On-line Determination of the Deuterium Abundance in Breath Water Vapour by Flowing Afterglow Mass Spectrometry with Applications to Measurements of Total Body Water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2001), s. 25-32 ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Project s: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Grant - others:Royal Society(GB) Joint project Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : flowing afterglow * mass spectrometry * stable isotopes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.478, year: 2001

  1. Optical observations of the Phoenicid meteor shower in 2014 and activity of comet 289P/Blanpain in the early 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasunori; Nakamura, Takuji; Uehara, Satoshi; Sagayama, Toru; Toda, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    Optical observations of the Phoenicid meteor shower were made in North Carolina, USA, with seven video cameras and two digital cameras over a period of about 5 hr between 22:30 UT on 2014 December 1 and 04:00 UT on December 2. Activity of the Phoenicids was confirmed during this period, including the predicted maximum around 00 h UT on December 2. The activity level was not high, considering that 29 Phoenicid meteors and 109 non-Phoenicid meteors were detected. A gentle peak in the activity was recognized between 01:00 UT and 03:00 UT on December 2. The compact radiant of the Phoenicids agreed well with what was predicted. A comparison of the observed and predicted peak times, radiant position, bright meteors' dominance, and radiants' spread revealed that the observed meteors originated from the dust trails formed by comet 289P/Blanpain at the perihelion passage in the early 20th century. This indicates that the parent body of the Phoenicids, comet 289P/Blanpain, was still active as a comet in the early 20th century and provided meteoroids, although its activity level was significantly weaker than that at the beginning of the 19th century.

  2. Absolute ground-state nitrogen atom density in a N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} late afterglow: TALIF experiments and modelling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es-sebbar, Et; C-Gazeau, M; Benilan, Y; Jolly, A [LISA, Universites Paris-Est Creteil Val de Marne (UPEC) and Paris Denis Diderot, CNRS-UMR 7583, 61, avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Pintassilgo, C D, E-mail: essebbar@lisa.univ-paris12.f [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-08-25

    Following a first study on a late afterglow in flowing pure nitrogen post discharge, we report new two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of the absolute ground-state atomic nitrogen density N({sup 4}S) and investigate the influence of methane introduced downstream from the discharge by varying the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio from 0% up to 50%. The N ({sup 4}S) maximum density is about 2.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} in pure N{sub 2} for a residence time of 22 ms and does not change significantly for methane mixing ratio up to {approx}15%, while above, a drastic decrease is observed. The influence of the residence time has been studied. A kinetic model has been developed to determine the elementary processes responsible for the evolution of the N ({sup 4}S) density in N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} late afterglow. This model shows the same decrease as the experimental results even though absolute density values are always larger by about a factor of 3. In the late afterglow three-body recombination dominates the loss of N ({sup 4}S) atoms whatever the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio. For high CH{sub 4} mixing ratio, the destruction process through collisions with CH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}CN and NH becomes important and is responsible for the observed decrease of the N ({sup 4}S) density.

  3. Modeling the Multiband Afterglows of GRB 060614 and GRB 060908: Further Evidence for a Double Power-law Hard Electron Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Xiong, S. L.; Song, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    Electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shocks are usually assumed to follow a power-law energy distribution with an index of p. Observationally, although most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have afterglows that are consistent with p > 2, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard (p power-law hard electron energy (DPLH) spectrum with 1 2 and an “injection break” assumed as γ b ∝ γ q in the highly relativistic regime, where γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. In this paper, we show that GRB 060614 and GRB 060908 provide further evidence for such a DPLH spectrum. We interpret the multiband afterglow of GRB 060614 with the DPLH model in a homogeneous interstellar medium by taking into account a continuous energy injection process, while, for GRB 060908, a wind-like circumburst density profile is used. The two bursts, along with GRB 091127, suggest a similar behavior in the evolution of the injection break, with q ∼ 0.5. Whether this represents a universal law of the injection break remains uncertain and more afterglow observations such as these are needed to test this conjecture.

  4. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Shively, John E [Arcadia, CA; Li, Lin [Monrovia, CA

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  5. Early simultaneous fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography features after pars plana vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mura, Marco; Lesnik Oberstein, Sarit Y; Bijl, Heico; Tan, H Stevie

    2012-04-01

    To describe fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography (OCT) features of the macula after pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Thirty-three eyes of 33 consecutive patients with repaired rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with or without the involvement of the macula were prospectively investigated with simultaneous fundus autofluorescence and OCT imaging using the Spectralis HRA+OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) within a few weeks after the operation. Fundus autofluorescence imaging of the macula showed lines of increased and decreased autofluorescence in 19 cases (57.6%). On OCT, these lines corresponded to the following abnormalities: outer retinal folds, inner retinal folds, and skip reflectivity abnormalities of the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment band. Other OCT findings, not related to abnormal lines on fundus autofluorescence, consisted of disruption of photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment band and collection of intraretinal or subretinal fluid. The presence of outer retinal folds significantly related to metamorphopsia but did not relate to poor postoperative visual acuity. Partial-thickness retinal folds occur commonly after vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair and may represent an important anatomical substrate for postoperative metamorphopsia. Fundus autofluorescence and OCT are both sensitive techniques for the detection of these abnormalities.

  6. Development and Application of Optical Coherence Elastography for Detection of Mechanical Property Changes Occurring in Early Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Koji

    We demonstrate a computationally-efficient method for optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on fringe washout method for a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. By sending short pulses of mechanical perturbation with ultrasound or shock wave during the image acquisition of alternating depth profiles, we can extract cross-sectional mechanical assessment of tissue in real-time. This was achieved through a simple comparison of the intensity in adjacent depth profiles acquired during the states of perturbation and non-perturbation in order to quantify the degree of induced fringe washout. Although the results indicate that our OCE technique based on the fringe washout effect is sensitive enough to detect mechanical property changes in biological samples, there is some loss of sensitivity in comparison to previous techniques in order to achieve computationally efficiency and minimum modification in both hardware and software in the OCT system. The tissue phantom study was carried with various agar density samples to characterize our OCE technique. Young's modulus measurements were achieved with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to correlate to our OCE assessment. Knee cartilage samples of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) rat models were utilized to replicate cartilage damage of a human model. Our proposed OCE technique along with intensity and AFM measurements were applied to the MIA models to assess the damage. The results from both the phantom study and MIA model study demonstrated the strong capability to assess the changes in mechanical properties of the OCE technique. The correlation between the OCE measurements and the Young's modulus values demonstrated in the OCE data that the stiffer material had less magnitude of fringe washout effect. This result is attributed to the fringe washout effect caused by axial motion that the displacement of the scatterers in the stiffer samples in response to the external perturbation induces less fringe washout effect.

  7. Optical diagnostics of early flame development in a DISI (direct injection spark ignition) engine fueled with n-butanol and gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, Simona Silvia; Tornatore, Cinzia; Irimescu, Adrian; Marchitto, Luca; Valentino, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Given the instability in supply and finite nature of fossil fuels, alternative renewable energy sources are continuously investigated throughout the production–distribution-use chain. Within this context, the research presented in this work is focused on using butanol as gasoline replacement in a Direct Injection Spark Ignition engine. The impact of this fuel on the combustion processes was investigated using optical diagnostics and conventional methods in a transparent single cylinder engine. Three different load settings were investigated at fixed engine speed, with combined throttling and mixture strength control. The engine was operated in homogenous charge mode, with commercial gasoline and pure n-butanol fueling. High spatial and temporal resolution visualization was applied in the first phase of the combustion process in order to follow the early flame development for the two fuels. The optical data were completed with conventional measurements of thermodynamic data and pollutants emission at the exhaust. Improved performance was obtained in throttled stoichiometric mode when using the alternative fuel, while at wide open throttle, gasoline featured higher indicated mean effective pressure at both air–fuel ratio settings. These overall findings were correlated to flame characteristics; the alcohol was found to feature more distorted flame contour compared to gasoline, especially in lean conditions. Differences were reduced during throttled stoichiometric operation, confirming that mass transfer processes, along with fuel chemistry and physical properties, exert a significant influence on local phenomena during combustion. - Highlights: • Butanol can replace gasoline without performance penalties in throttled, stoichiometric operation. • Butanol induces higher flame contour distortion than gasoline, especially in lean case. • Fuel chemical–physical properties strongly influence local phenomena during combustion. • Butanol ensured lower smoke

  8. Ultrasensitive Ambient Mass Spectrometric Analysis with a Pin-to-Capillary Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Jacob T.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry has resulted in a strong interest in ionization sources that are capable of direct analyte sampling and ionization. One source that has enjoyed increasing interest is the Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow (FAPA). FAPA has been proven capable of directly desorbing/ionizing samples in any phase (solid, liquid, or gas) and with impressive limits of detection (analytes, which ultimately compromised analyte identification and quantification. In the present study, a change in the FAPA configuration from a pin-to-plate to a pin-to-capillary geometry was found to vastly improve performance. Background signals in positive- and negative-ionization modes were reduced by 89% and 99%, respectively. Additionally, the capillary anode strongly reduced the amount of atomic oxygen that could cause oxidation of analytes. Temperatures of the gas stream that interacts with the sample, which heavily influences desorption capabilities, were compared between the two sources by means of IR thermography. The performance of the new FAPA configuration is evaluated through the determination of a variety of compounds in positive- and negative-ion mode, including agrochemicals and explosives. A detection limit of 4 amol was found for the direct determination of the agrochemical ametryn, and appears to be spectrometer-limited. The ability to quickly screen for analytes in bulk liquid samples with the pin-to-capillary FAPA is also shown. PMID:21627097

  9. 50 years of nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yuanrang

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the birth and early investigations of nonlinear optics, such as second harmonic generation,sum and difference frequency generation, stimulated Raman scattering,and self-action of light etc. Several important research achievements and applications of nonlinear optics are presented as well, including nonlinear optical spectroscopy, phase conjugation and adaptive optics, coherent nonlinear optics, and high-order harmonic generation. In the end, current and future research topics in nonlinear optics are summarized. (authors)

  10. Can optical coherence tomography predict early retinal microvascular pathology in type 1 diabetic adolescents without minimal diabetic retinopathy? A single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabashy, Safinaz Adel; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Nageb, Karim Magdy; Mohammed, Mai Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proven useful in measuring retinal thickness and volumes in patients with diabetes. To test whether OCT is able to identify early retinal changes and its potential correlations with metabolic parameters and other microvascular complications. Thirty patients with type 1 diabetes without minimal diabetic retinopathy (MDR) (17 males, 13 females, aged 14.3±2.4 years) compared with age-matched healthy volunteers were examined with OCT. Diabetes duration, anthropometric measurements, HbA1c, other microvascular complications (nephropathy, autonomic and peripheral neuropathy) and total serum cholesterol were determined. No statistically significant differences were found between patients with (n=15) and without microvascular complications (n=15) compared to controls regarding retinal volume, nerve fibre layer volume (temporal and nasal quadrants) and ganglion cell layer area in both eyes. No correlation was found between the ganglion cell layer area and the clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients, except a negative correlation with total serum cholesterol (r=-0.369, p=0.049). The best cut-off value of ganglion cell layer area to detect the level at which thinning of this layer occurs was >1900 pixels. Our study suggests that there is no advantage in performing OCT routinely in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus without MDR. OCT did not show changes in retinal thickness in those patients compared to control. So OCT did not seem to be useful in the preclinical stages of diabetic retinopathy. Therefore, the conventional diagnostic methods are mandatory to detect early diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Early vascular healing with rapid breakdown biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting versus durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents assessed by optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomohisa@dhm.mhn.de [Deutsches Herzzentrum, Technische Universität, München (Germany); Byrne, Robert A. [Deutsches Herzzentrum, Technische Universität, München (Germany); Schuster, Tibor [Institut für Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie, München (Germany); Cuni, Rezarta [Deutsches Herzzentrum, Technische Universität, München (Germany); Kitabata, Hironori [Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Tiroch, Klaus [Deutsches Herzzentrum, Technische Universität, München (Germany); Dirninger, Alfred; Gratze, Franz; Kaspar, Klaus; Zenker, Gerald [Landeskrankenhaus Bruck/Mur (Austria); Joner, Michael; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan [Deutsches Herzzentrum, Technische Universität, München (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Differences in early arterial healing patterns after stent implantation between biodegradable and durable polymer based new generation drug-eluting stents are not well understood. The aim of this study was to compare the healing patterns of a novel rapid breakdown (≤ 8 weeks) biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (BP-SES) with a durable polymer everolimus-eluting stent (EES) using intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) at 4 months. Methods: A total of 20 patients were randomly assigned to stenting with BP-SES (n = 11) or EES (n = 9). Overall intravascular imaging was available for 15 (75%) patients. The primary endpoint was the difference in rate of uncovered struts between BP-SES and EES. To account for strut-level clustering, the results in both treatment groups were compared using a generalized linear mixed model approach. Results: Regarding the primary endpoint, BP-SES as compared to EES showed similar rates of uncovered struts (37 [6.8%] versus 167 [17.5%], odds ratio (OR) 0.45 (95% CI 0.09-2.24), p = 0.33). There were no malapposed struts in BP-SES group and 14 malapposed struts in EES group (p = 0.97). No difference in percent neointimal volume (14.1 ± 8.2% vs. 11.4 ± 6.4%, p = 0.56) was observed. Conclusions: Although rapid-breakdown BP-SES as compared to EES showed signs of improved early tissue coverage, after adjustment for strut-level clustering these differences were not statistically significant. No differences in ability to suppress neointimal hyperplasia after stent implantation between 2 stents were observed.

  12. 3D Histomorphometry of the Normal and Early Glaucomatous Monkey Optic Nerve Head: Lamina Cribrosa and Peripapillary Scleral Position and Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Downs, J. Crawford; Girkin, Christopher; Sakata, Lisandro; Bellezza, Anthony; Thompson, Hilary; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To three-dimensionally delineate the anterior and posterior surface of the lamina cribrosa, scleral flange and peripapillary sclera so as to determine the position and thickness of these structures within digital three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the monkey optic nerve head (ONH). Methods The trephinated ONH and peripapillary sclera from both eyes of three early glaucoma (EG) monkeys (one eye Normal, one eye given laser-induced EG) were serial-sectioned at 3-μm thickness, with the embedded tissue block face stained and imaged after each cut. Images were aligned and stacked to create 3D reconstructions, within which Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) and the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lamina cribrosa and peripapillary sclera were delineated in 40 serial, radial (4.5° interval), digital, sagittal sections. For each eye, a BMO zero reference plane was fit to the 80 BMO points, which served as the reference from which all position measurements were made. Regional laminar, scleral flange, and peripapillary scleral position and thickness were compared between the Normal and EG eyes of each monkey and between treatment groups by analysis of variance. Results Laminar thickness varies substantially within the Normal eyes and is profoundly thicker within the three EG eyes. Laminar position is permanently posteriorly deformed in all three EG eyes, with substantial differences in the magnitude and extent of deformation among them. Scleral flange and peripapillary scleral thickness vary regionally within each Normal ONH with the scleral flange and peripapillary sclera thinnest nasally. Overall, the scleral flange and peripapillary sclera immediately surrounding the ONH are posteriorly displaced relative to the more peripheral sclera. Conclusion Profound fixed posterior deformation and thickening of the lamina is accompanied by mild posterior deformation and thinning of the scleral flange and peripapillary sclera at the onset of confocal scanning laser

  13. Ocean optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinard, R.W.; Carder, K.L.; Perry, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    This volume is the twenty fifth in the series of Oxford Monographs in Geology and Geophysics. The propagation off light in the hydra-atmosphere systems is governed by the integral-differential Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). Closure and inversion are the most common techniques in optical oceanography to understand the most basic principles of natural variability. Three types of closure are dealt with: scale closure, experimental closure, and instrument closure. The subject is well introduced by Spinard et al. in the Preface while Howard Gordon in Chapter 1 provides an in-depth introduction to the RTE and its inherent problems. Inherent and apparent optical properties are dealt with in Chapter 2 by John Kirk and the realities of optical closure are presented in the following chapter by Ronald Zaneveld. The balance of the papers in this volume is quite varied. The early papers deal in a very mathematical manner with the basics of radiative transfer and the relationship between inherent and optical properties. Polarization of sea water is discussed in a chapter that contains a chronological listing of discoveries in polarization, starting at about 1000 AD with the discovery of dichroic properties of crystals by the Vikings and ending with the demonstration of polarotaxis in certain marine organisms by Waterman in 1972. Chapter 12 on Raman scattering in pure water and the pattern recognition techniques presented in Chapter 13 on the optical effects of large particles may be of relevance to fields outside ocean optics.

  14. iPTF Archival Search for Fast Optical Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anna Y. Q.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Zhao, Weijie; Rusu, Florin; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ravi, Vikram; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Perley, Daniel A.; Adams, Scott M.; Bellm, Eric C.; Brady, Patrick; Fremling, Christoffer; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kann, David Alexander; Kaplan, David; Laher, Russ R.; Masci, Frank; Ofek, Eran O.; Sollerman, Jesper; Urban, Alex

    2018-02-01

    There has been speculation about a class of relativistic explosions with an initial Lorentz factor Γinit smaller than that of classical gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). These “dirty fireballs” would lack prompt GRB emission but could be pursued via their optical afterglow, appearing as transients that fade overnight. Here we report a search for such transients (that fade by 5-σ in magnitude overnight) in four years of archival photometric data from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). Our search criteria yielded 50 candidates. Of these, two were afterglows to GRBs that had been found in dedicated follow-up observations to triggers from the Fermi GRB Monitor. Another (iPTF14yb) was a GRB afterglow discovered serendipitously. Eight were spurious artifacts of reference image subtraction, and one was an asteroid. The remaining 38 candidates have red stellar counterparts in external catalogs. The photometric and spectroscopic properties of the counterparts identify these transients as strong flares from M dwarfs of spectral type M3–M7 at distances of d ≈ 0.15–2.1 kpc; three counterparts were already spectroscopically classified as late-type M stars. With iPTF14yb as the only confirmed relativistic outflow discovered independently of a high-energy trigger, we constrain the all-sky rate of transients that peak at m = 18 and fade by Δm = 2 mag in Δt = 3 hr to be 680 {{yr}}-1, with a 68% confidence interval of 119{--}2236 {{yr}}-1. This implies that the rate of visible dirty fireballs is at most comparable to that of the known population of long-duration GRBs.

  15. Cyclic electron flow around PSI monitored by afterglow luminescence in leaves of maize inbred lines (Zea mays L.): correlation with chilling tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducruet, Jean-Marc; Roman, Miruna; Havaux, Michel; Janda, Tibor; Gallais, André

    2005-06-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines of contrasting chilling sensitivity (three tolerant, three sensitive lines) were acclimated to 280 mumol photons m(-2) s(-1) white light at a 17 degrees C sub-optimal temperature. They showed no symptoms of photoinhibition, despite slight changes in photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence and thermoluminescence properties in two tolerant lines. A luminescence "afterglow" emission [Bertsch and Azzi (1965) Biochim Biophys Acta 94:15-26], inducible by a far-red (FR) illumination of unfrozen leaf discs, was detected either as a bounce in decay kinetics at constant temperatures or as a sharp thermoluminescence afterglow band at about 45 degrees C, in dark-adapted leaves. This band reflects the induction by warming of an electron pathway from stromal reductants to plastoquinones and to the Q(B) secondary acceptor of PSII, resulting in a luminescence-emitting charge recombination in the fraction of centres that were initially in the S(2/3)Q(B) non-luminescent state. A 5-h exposure of plants to growth chamber light shifted this luminescence emission towards shorter times and lower temperatures for several hours in the three chilling-tolerant lines. This downshift was not observed, or only transiently, in the three sensitive lines. In darkness, the downshifted afterglow band relaxed within hours to resume its dark-adapted location, similar for all maize lines. A faster dark re-reduction of P700(+) oxidized by FR light (monitored by 820-nm absorbance) and an increase of photochemical energy storage under FR excitation (determined by photoacoustic spectroscopy) confirmed that a cyclic pathway induced by white actinic light remained activated for several hours in the tolerant maize lines.

  16. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Sunil P.; Ratcliff, Tyree D.; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M.; Shelley, Jacob T.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O2 +·, NO+, etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O2-FAPA, a unique (M + 3)+ ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3)+ ions correspond to (M - CH + O)+, with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3)+ ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O3 +·), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO2 · radical. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Pian, E. [INAF, Trieste Astronomical Observatory, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Mazzali, P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2 Liverpool Science Park 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cano, Z. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Pe' er, A. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Misra, K., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital-263 002 (India)

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  19. Early in-flight detection of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy: a feasible aviation safety measure to prevent potential encounters with volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash constitutes a risk to aviation, mainly due to its ability to cause jet engines to fail. Other risks include the possibility of abrasion of windshields and potentially serious damage to avionic systems. These hazards have been widely recognized since the early 1980s, when volcanic ash provoked several incidents of engine failure in commercial aircraft. In addition to volcanic ash, volcanic gases also pose a threat. Prolonged and/or cumulative exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2 or sulphuric acid (H2SO4 aerosols potentially affects e.g. windows, air frame and may cause permanent damage to engines. SO2 receives most attention among the gas species commonly found in volcanic plumes because its presence above the lower troposphere is a clear proxy for a volcanic cloud and indicates that fine ash could also be present. Up to now, remote sensing of SO2 via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS in the ultraviolet spectral region has been used to measure volcanic clouds from ground based, airborne and satellite platforms. Attention has been given to volcanic emission strength, chemistry inside volcanic clouds and measurement procedures were adapted accordingly. Here we present a set of experimental and model results, highlighting the feasibility of DOAS to be used as an airborne early detection system of SO2 in two spatial dimensions. In order to prove our new concept, simultaneous airborne and ground-based measurements of the plume of Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico, were conducted in April 2010. The plume extended at an altitude around 5250 m above sea level and was approached and traversed at the same altitude with several forward looking DOAS systems aboard an airplane. These DOAS systems measured SO2 in the flight direction and at ±40 mrad (2.3° angles relative to it in both, horizontal and vertical directions. The approaches started at up to 25 km distance to the plume and SO2 was measured at all times well above the

  20. Nonlinear Optics and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A. (Editor); Frazier, Donald O. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear optics is the result of laser beam interaction with materials and started with the advent of lasers in the early 1960s. The field is growing daily and plays a major role in emerging photonic technology. Nonlinear optics play a major role in many of the optical applications such as optical signal processing, optical computers, ultrafast switches, ultra-short pulsed lasers, sensors, laser amplifiers, and many others. This special review volume on Nonlinear Optics and Applications is intended for those who want to be aware of the most recent technology. This book presents a survey of the recent advances of nonlinear optical applications. Emphasis will be on novel devices and materials, switching technology, optical computing, and important experimental results. Recent developments in topics which are of historical interest to researchers, and in the same time of potential use in the fields of all-optical communication and computing technologies, are also included. Additionally, a few new related topics which might provoke discussion are presented. The book includes chapters on nonlinear optics and applications; the nonlinear Schrodinger and associated equations that model spatio-temporal propagation; the supercontinuum light source; wideband ultrashort pulse fiber laser sources; lattice fabrication as well as their linear and nonlinear light guiding properties; the second-order EO effect (Pockels), the third-order (Kerr) and thermo-optical effects in optical waveguides and their applications in optical communication; and, the effect of magnetic field and its role in nonlinear optics, among other chapters.

  1. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Swift observations of prompt and afterglow emission to classify GRBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul T; Willingale, Richard

    2007-05-15

    We present an analysis of early Burst Alert Telescope and X-ray Telescope data for 107 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite. We use these data to examine the behaviour of the X-ray light curve and propose a classification scheme for GRBs based on this behaviour. As found for previous smaller samples, the earliest X-ray light curve can be well described by an exponential, which relaxes into a power-law, often with flares superimposed. The later emission is well fit using a similar functional form and we find that these two functions provide a good description of the entire X-ray light curve. For the prompt emission, the transition time between the exponential and the power-law gives a well-defined time-scale, Tp, for the burst duration. We use Tp, the spectral index of the prompt emission, betap, and the prompt power-law decay index, alphap, to define four classes of burst: short, slow, fast and soft. Bursts with slowly declining emission have spectral and temporal properties similar to the short bursts despite having longer durations. Some of these GRBs may therefore arise from similar progenitors including several types of binary system. Short bursts tend to decline more gradually than longer duration bursts and hence emit a significant fraction of their total energy at times greater than Tp. This may be due to differences in the environment or the progenitor for long, fast bursts.

  3. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-06-01

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H] + was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C 5 -C 19 ) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Comparison of radiation-induced colouration images, thermoluminescence, and after-glow colour images with aluminium impurity distribution in Japanese twin quartzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Ojima, Tetsu; Takahashi, Eishi; Konishi, Masayoshi; Kanemaki, Motoko.

    1995-01-01

    After-glow colour images (AGCI) and thermoluminescence (TL) from Japanese twin quartz slices have been successfully photographed by means of a commercially available negative colour film after the irradiation of X-rays. After-glow colour images (AGCI) offered very interesting distinction of colour images; the core part showed the colour changed from sky blue with zonal orange to blue with increasing absorbed doses, whereas the outer parts maintained orange AG colour giving clear boundary. On the other hand, the radiation-induced colour (blackish or brownish) center image (CCI) appeared at the core portion, while thermoluminescence colour images (TLCI) also consisted of two portions distinguishable into stripe and zonal bluish core and faint TL emission part in outer ones. These luminescence colour images, probably reflecting the formation mechanism of Japanese twin quartzes, are evidently correlated with the concentration patterns of aluminium impurity obtained by an EPMA (electron probe microanalyzer) method. From these radiation-induced images, it was assumed that the conditions of crystal formation should be greatly different between the core and the outer parts; the outer parts were secondarily started to grow from hydrothermal solution with higher Al-concentration after the initial formation of single core. (author)

  5. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-06-01

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H]+ was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C5-C19) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Temporal Evolution of the Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Spectrum for an Observer: GeV–TeV Synchrotron Self-Compton Light Curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Takuma; Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); To, Sho; Asano, Katsuaki, E-mail: fukushima@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tosho@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results show that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.

  7. Optic neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  8. The early history of the closed loop fiber optic gyro and derivative sensors at McDonnell Douglas, Blue Road Research and Columbia Gorge Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric

    2016-05-01

    On September 29, 1977 the first written disclosure of a closed loop fiber optic gyro was witnessed and signed off by four people at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company in Huntington Beach, California. Over the next ten years a breadboard demonstration unit, and several prototypes were built. In 1987 the fundamental patent for closed loop operation began a McDonnell Douglas worldwide licensing process. Internal fiber optic efforts were redirected to derivative sensors and inventions. This included development of acoustic, strain and distributed sensors as well as a Sagnac interferometer based secure fiber optic communication system and the new field of fiber optic smart structures. This paper provides an overview of these activities and transitions.

  9. Optics and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Manuel F M; De Campos, J Ayres; Lira, Madalena; Franco, Sandra; Vazquez-Dorrio, Jose B

    2011-01-01

    Light and Optics are subjects that 'naturally' attracts the interest and sympathy of children even from very early ages. In this communication, we present a series of experiments and support material designed in this hands-on perspective, to be used to introduce the study of light and optics to kindergarten and early basic school students. Our hands-on investigative approach leads the students, aged 4 to 10 years, to observe the experiment and discover themselves, in a critical and active way, different aspects of light and optics. Preparing funny eye catching situations and experiments predispose the children to work, effectively, enjoying themselves while building up their self-confidence.

  10. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND EVOLUTION OF EARLY-TYPE CLUSTER GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS FROM OPTICAL IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF z = 0.5–0.9 GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jørgensen, Inger; Chiboucas, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of stellar populations and evolutionary history of galaxies in three similarly rich galaxy clusters MS0451.6–0305 (z = 0.54), RXJ0152.7–1357 (z = 0.83), and RXJ1226.9+3332 (z = 0.89). Our analysis is based on high signal-to-noise ground-based optical spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope imaging for a total of 17-34 members in each cluster. Using the dynamical masses together with the effective radii and the velocity dispersions, we find no indication of evolution of sizes or velocity dispersions with redshift at a given galaxy mass. We establish the Fundamental Plane (FP) and scaling relations between absorption line indices and velocity dispersions. We confirm that the FP is steeper at z ≈ 0.86 compared to the low-redshift FP, indicating that under the assumption of passive evolution the formation redshift, z form , depends on the galaxy velocity dispersion (or alternatively mass). At a velocity dispersion of σ = 125 km s –1 (Mass = 10 10.55 M ☉ ) we find z form = 1.24 ± 0.05, while at σ = 225 km s –1 (Mass = 10 11.36 M ☉ ) the formation redshift is z form = 1.95 +0.3 –0.2 , for a Salpeter initial mass function. The three clusters follow similar scaling relations between absorption line indices and velocity dispersions as those found for low-redshift galaxies. The zero point offsets for the Balmer lines depend on cluster redshifts. However, the offsets indicate a slower evolution, and therefore higher formation redshift, than the zero point differences found from the FP, if interpreting the data using a passive evolution model. Specifically, the strength of the higher order Balmer lines Hδ and Hγ implies z form > 2.8. The scaling relations for the metal indices in general show small and in some cases insignificant zero point offsets, favoring high formation redshifts for a passive evolution model. Based on the absorption line indices and recent stellar population models from Thomas et al., we find that MS0451.6–0305

  11. On the difficulty of N(4S) atom recombination to explain the appearance of the pink afterglow in a N2 flowing discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, J; Sa, P A; Guerra, V

    2006-01-01

    The possibility that the pink afterglow (PA) of a flowing nitrogen discharge occurs as a result of recombination of N( 4 S) atoms is evaluated and discussed, based on a detailed kinetic model for a microwave discharge and post-discharge. The present simulation shows that the N 2 + (B 2 Σ u + ,v) states responsible for the emission of the PA cannot be created via an indirect mechanism initiated with atomic recombination. Alternatively, it is indicated that the PA may have its origin in non-resonant vibration-vibration energy-exchange processes between N 2 (X 1 Σ g + ,v) molecules, which lead to an overpopulation of high levels of the vibrational manifold

  12. On the difficulty of N({sup 4}S) atom recombination to explain the appearance of the pink afterglow in a N{sub 2} flowing discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, J [Centro de Fisica dos Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Sa, P A [Centro de Fisica dos Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Guerra, V [Centro de Fisica dos Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-01-07

    The possibility that the pink afterglow (PA) of a flowing nitrogen discharge occurs as a result of recombination of N({sup 4}S) atoms is evaluated and discussed, based on a detailed kinetic model for a microwave discharge and post-discharge. The present simulation shows that the N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +},v) states responsible for the emission of the PA cannot be created via an indirect mechanism initiated with atomic recombination. Alternatively, it is indicated that the PA may have its origin in non-resonant vibration-vibration energy-exchange processes between N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +},v) molecules, which lead to an overpopulation of high levels of the vibrational manifold.

  13. Challenging the Forward Shock Model with the 80 Ms Follow up of the X-ray Afterglow of Gamma-Ray Burst 130427A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano De Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GRB 130427A was the most luminous gamma-ray burst detected in the last 30 years. With an isotropic energy output of 8.5 × 10 53 erg and redshift of 0.34, it combined very high energetics with a relative proximity to Earth in an unprecedented way. Sensitive X-ray observatories such as XMM-Newton and Chandra have detected the afterglow of this event for a record-breaking baseline longer than 80 million seconds. The light curve displays a simple power-law over more than three decades in time. In this presentation, we explore the consequences of this result for a few models put forward so far to interpret GRB 130427A, and more in general the implication of this outcome in the context of the standard forward shock model.

  14. Planck early results. XIX. All-sky temperature and dust optical depth from Planck and IRAS. Constraints on the "dark gas" in our Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    An all sky map of the apparent temperature and optical depth of thermal dust emission is constructed using the Planck-HFI (350μm to 2 mm) andIRAS(100μm) data. The optical depth maps are correlated with tracers of the atomic (Hi) and molecular gas traced by CO. The correlation with the column...... mass fraction is relatively constant down to a few degrees from the Galactic plane. A possible explanation for the dark gas lies in a dark molecular phase, where H2 survives photodissociation but CO does not. The observed transition for the onsetof this phase in the solar neighbourhood (AV = 0.4mag...

  15. Can a Double Component Outflow Explain the X-Ray and Optical Lightcurves of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Evans, P.; Oates, S.; Page, M.; Zane, S.; Schady, P.; Breeveld, A.; Holland, S.; Still, M.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing sample of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift show evidence of 'chromatic breaks', i.e. breaks that are present in the X-ray but not in the optical. We find that in a significant fraction of these GRB afterglows the X-ray and the optical emission cannot be produced by the same component. We propose that these afterglow lightcurves are the result of a two-component jet, in which both components undergo energy injection for the whole observation and the X-ray break is due to a jet break in the narrow outflow. Bursts with chromatic breaks also explain another surprising finding, the paucity of late achromatic breaks. We propose a model that may explain the behaviour of GRB emission in both X-ray and optical bands. This model can be a radical and noteworthy alternative to the current interpretation for the 'canonical' XRT and UVOT lightcurves, and it bears fundamental implications for GRB physics.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the morphological-dynamics of early cardiac pump action using video densidometry and optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Männer, Jörg; Thrane, Lars; Thommes, Jan

    2010-01-01

    During the initial phase of its pump action, vertebrate embryonic hearts are seen as valveless tubular pumps. It was traditionally thought that these tubular hearts generate unidirectional blood flow via peristalsis. Recently, however, the pumping mechanism of early embryonic hearts has become a ...... embryonic chick hearts in frontal views, which provide a much better understanding of early cardiac pump action than the traditional right or left lateral views....

  17. Fibre-optical microendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, M; Bao, H; Kang, H

    2014-04-01

    Microendoscopy has been an essential tool in exploring micro/nano mechanisms in vivo due to high-quality imaging performance, compact size and flexible movement. The investigations into optical fibres, micro-scanners and miniature lens have boosted efficiencies of remote light delivery to sample site and signal collection. Given the light interaction with materials in the fluorescence imaging regime, this paper reviews two classes of compact microendoscopy based on a single fibre: linear optical microendoscopy and nonlinear optical microendoscopy. Due to the fact that fluorescence occurs only in the focal volume, nonlinear optical microendoscopy can provide stronger optical sectioning ability than linear optical microendoscopy, and is a good candidate for deep tissue imaging. Moreover, one-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy as the linear optical microendoscopy suffers from severe photobleaching owing to the linear dependence of photobleaching rate on excitation laser power. On the contrary, nonlinear optical microendoscopy, including two-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy and second harmonic generation microendoscopy, has the capability to minimize or avoid the photobleaching effect at a high excitation power and generate high image contrast. The combination of various nonlinear signals gained by the nonlinear optical microendoscopy provides a comprehensive insight into biophenomena in internal organs. Fibre-optical microendoscopy overcomes physical limitations of traditional microscopy and opens up a new path to achieve early cancer diagnosis and microsurgery in a minimally invasive and localized manner. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Packaging materials for plasma sterilization with the flowing afterglow of an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} discharge: damage assessment and inactivation efficiency of enclosed bacterial spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levif, P; Moisan, M; Soum-Glaude, A [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Seguin, J; Barbeau, J, E-mail: michel.moisan@umontreal.ca [Faculte de Medecine Dentaire, Laboratoire de Controle des Infections, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-10-12

    In conventional sterilization methods (steam, ozone, gaseous chemicals), after their proper cleaning, medical devices are wrapped/enclosed in adequate packaging materials, then closed/sealed before initiating the sterilization process: these packaging materials thus need to be porous. Gaseous plasma sterilization being still under development, evaluation and comparison of packaging materials have not yet been reported in the literature. To this end, we have subjected various porous packagings used with conventional sterilization systems to the N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} flowing afterglow and also a non-porous one to evaluate and compare their characteristics towards the inactivation of B. atrophaeus endospores deposited on a Petri dish and enclosed in such packagings. Because the sterilization process with the N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} discharge afterglow is conducted under reduced-pressure conditions, non-porous pouches can be sealed only after returning to atmospheric pressure. All the tests were therefore conducted with one end of the packaging freely opened, post-sealing being required. The features of these packaging materials, namely mass loss, resistance, toxicity to human cells as well as some characteristics specific to the plasma method used such as ultraviolet transparency, were examined before and after exposure to the flowing afterglow. All of our results show that the non-porous packaging considered is much more suitable than the conventionally used porous ones as far as ensuring an efficient and low-damage sterilization process with an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} plasma-afterglow is concerned.

  19. AN EXPLANATION FOR THE DIFFERENT X-RAY TO OPTICAL COLUMN DENSITIES IN THE ENVIRONMENTS OF GAMMA RAY BURSTS: A PROGENITOR EMBEDDED IN A DENSE MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongold, Yair; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    We study the ∼> 10 ratios in the X-ray to optical column densities inferred from afterglow spectra of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) due to gas surrounding their progenitors. We present time-evolving photoionization calculations for these afterglows and explore different conditions of their environment. We find that homogenous models of the environment (constant density) predict X-ray columns similar to those found in the optical spectra, with the bulk of the opacity being produced by neutral material at large distances from the burst. This result is independent of gas density or metallicity. Only models assuming a progenitor immersed in a dense (∼10 2-4 cm –3 ) cloud of gas (with radius ∼10 pc), with a strong, declining gradient of density for the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) are able to account for the large X-ray to optical column density ratios. However, to avoid an unphysical correlation between the size of this cloud and the size of the ionization front produced by the GRB, the models also require that the circumburst medium is already ionized prior to the burst. The inferred cloud masses are ∼ 6 M ☉ , even if low metallicities in the medium are assumed (Z ∼ 0.1 Z ☉ ). These cloud properties are consistent with those found in giant molecular clouds and our results support a scenario in which the progenitors reside within intense star formation regions of galaxies. Finally, we show that modeling over large samples of GRB afterglows may offer strong constraints on the range of properties in these clouds, and the host galaxy ISM

  20. The long road to the use of microscope in clinical medicine in vivo: from early pioneering proposals to the modern perspectives of optical biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Muscatello, Umberto; Sgantzos, Markos

    2015-01-01

    For a long period the scientists did not recognized the potentialities of the compound microscope in medicine. Only few scientists recognized the potentialities of the microscope for the medicine; among them G. Campani who proposed the utilization of his microscope to investigate the skin lesions directly on the patient. The proposal was illustrated in a letter Acta Eruditorum of 1686. The recent development of optical techniques, capable of providing in-focus images of an object from different planes with high spatial resolution, significantly increased the diagnostic potential of the microscope directly on the patient.

  1. Towards depth profiling of organic aerosols in real time using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2014-05-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a substantial fraction of tropospheric aerosol and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, the characterization of its chemical composition and transformations remain a major challenge and is still connected to large uncertainties (IPCC, 2013). Recent measurements revealed that organic aerosol particles may reside in an amorphous or semi-solid phase state which impedes the diffusion within the particles (Virtanen et al., 2010; Shiraiwa et al., 2011). This means that reaction products which are formed on the surface of a particle, e.g. by OH, NO3 or ozone chemistry, cannot diffuse into the particle's core and remain at the surface. Eventually, this leads to particles with a core/shell structure. In the particles' cores the initial compounds are preserved whereas the shells contain mainly the oxidation products. By analyzing the particles' cores and shells separately, thus, it is possible to obtain valuable information on the formation and evolution of the aerosols' particle and gas phase. Here we present the development of the aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) technique which allows the mass spectrometric analysis of organic aerosols in real time. The AeroFAPA is an ion source based on a helium glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. The plasma produces excited helium species and primary reagent ions which are transferred into the afterglow region where the ionization of the analytes takes place. Due to temperatures of only 80 ° C to 150 ° C and ambient pressure in the afterglow region, the ionization is very soft and almost no fragmentation of organic molecules is observed. Thus, the obtained mass spectra are easy to interpret and no extensive data analysis procedure is necessary. Additionally, first results of a combination of the AeroFAPA-MS with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) suggest that it is not only possible to analyze the entire particle phase but rather that a

  2. Real-time analysis of ambient organic aerosols using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Karu, Einar; Stelzer, Torsten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, due to the chemical complexity its measurement remains a major challenge for analytical instrumentation.1 Here, we present the development, characterization and application of a new soft ionization technique that allows mass spectrometric real-time detection of organic compounds in ambient aerosols. The aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) ion source utilizes a helium glow discharge plasma to produce excited helium species and primary reagent ions. Ionization of the analytes occurs in the afterglow region after thermal desorption and results mainly in intact molecular ions, facilitating the interpretation of the acquired mass spectra. In the past, similar approaches were used to detect pesticides, explosives or illicit drugs on a variety of surfaces.2,3 In contrast, the AeroFAPA source operates 'online' and allows the detection of organic compounds in aerosols without a prior precipitation or sampling step. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge ionization technique to ambient aerosol samples. We illustrate that changes in aerosol composition and concentration are detected on the time scale of seconds and in the ng-m-3 range. Additionally, the successful application of AeroFAPA-MS during a field study in a mixed forest region in Central Europe is presented. Several oxidation products of monoterpenes were clearly identified using the possibility to perform tandem MS experiments. The acquired data are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that AeroFAPA-MS is a suitable tool for organic aerosol analysis. Furthermore, these results reveal the potential of this technique to enable new insights into aerosol formation, growth and transformation in the atmosphere. References: 1) IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The

  3. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  4. Sub-lethal Ocular Trauma (SLOT): Establishing a Standardized Blast Threshold to Facilitate Diagnostic, Early Treatment, and Recovery Studies for Blast Injuries to the Eye and Optic Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    et al., 2013). Therefore, nociceptors (pain receptors) signal to the brain via spinal cord chemical, mechanical, or thermal tissue damage, which may...Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0055 TITLE: Sub-lethal Ocular Trauma (SLOT): Establishing a Standardized Blast Threshold to Facilitate Diagnostic...lethal Ocular Trauma (SLOT): Establishing a Standardized Blastr 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Threshold to Facilitate Diagnostic, Early Treatment, and Recovery

  5. Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) project, which is part of the JPL Phaeton early career employee hands-on training program, aims to demonstrate...

  6. Bruch's Membrane Opening-Minimum Rim Width Assessment With Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Performs Better Than Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy in Discriminating Early Glaucoma Patients From Control Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshev, Anani P; Lamparter, Julia; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Hoffmann, Esther M

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance and evaluate diagnostic agreement for early glaucoma detection between a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO) and a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Fifty-five eyes of 55 open-angle glaucoma patients and 42 eyes of 42 healthy control subjects were enrolled in this observational, cross-sectional study. All participants underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examination, visual field testing, and optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer imaging by CSLO (HRT3) and SD-OCT (Spectralis OCT). The agreements of categorical classifications were evaluated (κ statistics). Area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) and sensitivity at 95% fixed specificity were computed. The agreements of HRT3 and Spectralis OCT categorical classifications were fair to moderate (κ ranged between 0.33 and 0.54), except for Moorfields regression analysis of the HRT3 and the OCT global Bruch's membrane opening-minimum rim width (BMO-MRW) (criterion 1 κ=0.63, criterion 2 κ=0.67). The AUROC of OCT global BMO-MRW (0.956) was greater than those of HRT3 cup-to-disc area ratio (0.877, P=0.0063), vertical cup-to-disc ratio (0.872, P=0.0072), and cup area (0.845, P=0.0005). At 95% specificity, Spectralis OCT global BMO-MRW attained a higher sensitivity than HRT3 cup-to-disc area ratio (P<0.001). The BMO-MRW assessment with SD-OCT performed well in discriminating early glaucoma patients from control subjects and had a better performance than CSLO. The diagnostic classifications of HRT3 and Spectralis OCT may reach good agreement.

  7. Optical Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optics has been used in computing for a number of years but the main emphasis has been and continues to be to link portions of computers, for communications, or more intrin- sically in devices that have some optical application or component (optical pattern recognition, etc). Optical digi- tal computers are still some years ...

  8. EFFECT OF ALKALINE IONS ON THE PHASE EVOLUTION, PHOTOLUMINESCENCE, AND AFTERGLOW PROPERTIES OF SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ PHOSPHOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HYUNHO SHIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ long-afterglow (LAG phosphors with varying concentration of Li+, Na+ and K+, has been synthesized. The increased concentration of the three types of alkaline ions does not decrease the quantity of the total luminescent phases (SrAl2O4 plus Sr4Al14O25, but a different set of secondary phases has been evoluted for the K+-added series due to the failure of the incorporation of relatively large K+ (1.38 Å to the Sr2+ (1.18 Å site in the hosts, unlike the cases of smaller Li+ (0.76 Å and Na+ (1.02 Å ions. PL excitation, PL emission, and LAG luminescence, are decreased by all investigated alkaline ions, which would be due to the diminished incorporation of Eu2+ and Dy3+ activators into the luminescent hosts by the alkaline ions. For the cases of the Li+ and Na+-added series, the incorporated Li+ or Na+ to the luminescent hosts would also limit the activation of Eu2+ and charge trapping/detrapping of Dy3+ to yield the diminished PL properties and LAG luminescence. The type of defect complex formed by the addition of Li+ and Na+ ions has been deduced and compared with that formed when no alkaline ion is added.

  9. [Effect of different excitation monitoring wavelengths on emission spectrum of red long afterglow phosphor Sr3Al2O6 : Eu2+, Dy3+].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Cai-e; Li, Jian; Huang, Ping; Liang, Li-ping; Wu, Yin-lan

    2012-01-01

    The Eu2+ and Dy3+ ion co-doped Sr3Al2O6 phosphor powders with long afterglow were prepared with high temperature solid-state reaction. The phase and the spectra properties of the material were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence spectrophotometer. It was found that the sample is composed of pure Sr3Al2O6 phase. Furthermore, the emission peak of 537 nm under 360 nm excitation and that of 590 nm excited by 468 nm-light were obtained, respectively, and it is more interesting that the emission peaks were at 537 and 590 nm under 394 nm excitation. The effects of different excitation wavelengths on the emission spectrum were explained reasonably by the effect of nephelauxetic effect and crystal field. It revealed that the two types of luminescence with different color were caused by the differences of the center of gravity of the 5d excited state energy level and the split range of 5d energy level.

  10. Newton's Contributions to Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Newton's Contributions to Optics. Arvind Kumar is Director,. Homi Bhabha Centre for. Science Education,. Mumbai. His main areas of interest are theoretical physics and physics education. He has been involved ... early 1666, when he was a scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge. He aligned a triangular prism in the path of a ...

  11. Tunable Optical Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    humid- quency v Ity and temperature measurements for t):efficiency of optical system metereology . A=area of receiving’telescope R=distance to...It varies with the metereologi - centrations, while others lie in regions tal conditions: in the early morning, of strong water vapor absorption

  12. Optic disc boundary segmentation from diffeomorphic demons registration of monocular fundus image sequences versus 3D visualization of stereo fundus image pairs for automated early stage glaucoma assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Vijay; Hill, Jason; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current availability in resource-rich regions of advanced technologies in scanning and 3-D imaging in current ophthalmology practice, world-wide screening tests for early detection and progression of glaucoma still consist of a variety of simple tools, including fundus image-based parameters such as CDR (cup to disc diameter ratio) and CAR (cup to disc area ratio), especially in resource -poor regions. Reliable automated computation of the relevant parameters from fundus image sequences requires robust non-rigid registration and segmentation techniques. Recent research work demonstrated that proper non-rigid registration of multi-view monocular fundus image sequences could result in acceptable segmentation of cup boundaries for automated computation of CAR and CDR. This research work introduces a composite diffeomorphic demons registration algorithm for segmentation of cup boundaries from a sequence of monocular images and compares the resulting CAR and CDR values with those computed manually by experts and from 3-D visualization of stereo pairs. Our preliminary results show that the automated computation of CDR and CAR from composite diffeomorphic segmentation of monocular image sequences yield values comparable with those from the other two techniques and thus may provide global healthcare with a cost-effective yet accurate tool for management of glaucoma in its early stage.

  13. Early restenose in a polymer-free Biolimus A9-coated stent (BioFreedom): A case report based on optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellert, Julia, E-mail: jellert55@gmail.com; Antonsen, Lisbeth; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2017-04-15

    An 81-year-old male patient with a severe de novo coronary artery stenosis in the proximal left anterior descending artery was treated with a BioFreedom stent (3.5 × 11 mm), three months later, the patient was re-admitted with chest pain and slightly increased troponin. The angiogram showed a significant in-stent restenosis in the recently treated lesion. Optical coherence tomography revealed a fully expanded stent without areas of incomplete stent apposition. Severe immature neointimal hyperplasia without formation of thrombosis was visualized, causing a severe in-stent restenosis. An underlying plaque rupture within the mid-proximal part of the in-stent restenosis was evident. - Highlights: • OCT images revealed an expanded stent without areas of incomplete stent apposition. • Severe immature neointimal hyperplasia caused a severe in-stent restenosis. • No formation of thrombosis was visualized. • A plaque rupture within the mid-proximal part of the in-stent restenosis was evident.

  14. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  15. Engineering Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  16. Optical, Infrared, and Ultraviolet Observations of the X-Ray Flash XRF 050416A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, S. T.; Boyd, P. T.; Gorosabel, J.; Hjorth, J.; Schady, P.; Thomsen, B.; Augusteijn, T.; Blustin, A. J.; Breeveld, A.; De Pasquale, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S.; Ivanushkina, M.; Landsman, W.; Laursen, P.; McGowan, K.; Mangano, V.; Markwardt, C. B.; Marshall, F.; Mason, K. O.; Moretti, A.; Page, M. J.; Poole, T.; Roming, P.; Rosen, S.; Still, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry of the afterglow of the X-ray flash XRF 050416A taken between approximately 100 s and 36 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope between 1930 and 22200 Å of β=-1.14+/-0.20 and a decay rate of α=-0.86+/-0.15. There is no evidence for a change in the decay rate between approximately 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst. Our data imply that there is no spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands between 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst and are consistent with the cooling break being redward of the Ks band (22200 Å) at 0.7 days. The combined ultraviolet/optical/infrared spectral energy distribution shows no evidence for a significant amount of extinction in the host galaxy along the line of sight to XRF 050416A. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is only approximately AV=0.2 mag, which is significantly less than the extinction expected from the hydrogen column density inferred from X-ray observations of XRF 050416A assuming a dust-to-gas ratio similar to what is found for the Milky Way. The observed extinction, however, is consistent with the dust-to-gas ratio seen in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that XRF 050416A may have a two-component jet similar to what has been proposed for GRB 030329. If this is the case, the lack of an observed jet break between 0.7 and 42 days is an illusion due to emission from the wide jet dominating the afterglow after approximately 1.5 days.

  17. Near Real-Time Use of Optical Remote Sensing and Synthetic Aperture Radar for Response to Central U.S. Flooding in Late April-Early May 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. R.; Schultz, L. A.; Jones, M.; Molthan, A.; Arko, S. A.; Hogenson, K.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    In late April and early May 2017, heavy rainfall across Missouri led to extensive flooding along the Missouri and Mississippi River basins in the Central United States. Determining the extent of flooding is critical for response organizations to properly deploy personnel and other assets involved in preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery efforts. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) relies on geospatial flood extent data, among other data, to estimate the impacts to population and infrastructure in order to prepare and engage response activities in support of the affected states and communities. To assist FEMA in mapping flood extent in a near real-time, the NASA Earth Science Disasters Program coordinates a multi-NASA center response to provide satellite imagery and products to FEMA during major flood events to supplement their analysis tools and capabilities. Scientists at the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center at Marshall Space Flight Center, who led this particular response, have been working with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks to provide synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and derived flood products to FEMA's geospatial response team in support of flooding events. Combined, these efforts helped to provide preliminary flood mapping to FEMA from a broad constellation of remote sensors. The presentation will describe the various products available throughout the response event, post-event collaborations examining these products in comparison to additional modeling and data collection by FEMA, training needs to improve product use, and more efficient methods for data delivery. Lessons learned will highlight opportunities for future work and improvement, and guide other ongoing efforts to develop collaborations that would also support other domestic emergency response activities, such as those led by the National Guard Bureau, which assists individual state Guard units.

  18. The ATLAS3D project - XXIX. The new look of early-type galaxies and surrounding fields disclosed by extremely deep optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Karabal, Emin; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Paudel, Sanjaya; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology based on star counts is instrumental to reconstruct the past mass assembly of Local Group galaxies. The development of new observing techniques and data reduction, coupled with the use of sensitive large field of view cameras, now allows us to pursue this technique in more distant galaxies exploiting their diffuse low surface brightness (LSB) light. As part of the ATLAS3D project, we have obtained with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope extremely deep, multiband images of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We present here a catalogue of 92 galaxies from the ATLAS3D sample, which are located in low- to medium-density environments. The observing strategy and data reduction pipeline, which achieve a gain of several magnitudes in the limiting surface brightness with respect to classical imaging surveys, are presented. The size and depth of the survey are compared to other recent deep imaging projects. The paper highlights the capability of LSB-optimized surveys at detecting new prominent structures that change the apparent morphology of galaxies. The intrinsic limitations of deep imaging observations are also discussed, among those, the contamination of the stellar haloes of galaxies by extended ghost reflections, and the cirrus emission from Galactic dust. The detection and systematic census of fine structures that trace the present and past mass assembly of ETGs are one of the prime goals of the project. We provide specific examples of each type of observed structures - tidal tails, stellar streams and shells - and explain how they were identified and classified. We give an overview of the initial results. The detailed statistical analysis will be presented in future papers.

  19. Applied optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orszag, A.; Antonetti, A.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report, of the Applied Optics laboratory, of the (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The optical fiber activities are focused on the development of an optical gyrometer, containing a resonance cavity. The following domains are included, in the research program: the infrared laser physics, the laser sources, the semiconductor physics, the multiple-photon ionization and the nonlinear optics. Investigations on the biomedical, the biological and biophysical domains are carried out. The published papers and the congress communications are listed [fr

  20. Hamilton's Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Hamiton, optics, wavefronts, characterisic function, conical refraction. . Hamilton's Optics. The Power of Wavefronts. Rajaram Nityananada. Building on work by Fermat and Huygens, Hamil- ton transformed the study of geometrical optics in his very first paper, presented when still in his teens. His 'characteristic function' was ...

  1. Nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear Optics is an advanced textbook for courses dealing with nonlinear optics, quantum electronics, laser physics, contemporary and quantum optics, and electrooptics. Its pedagogical emphasis is on fundamentals rather than particular, transitory applications. As a result, this textbook will have lasting appeal to a wide audience of electrical engineering, physics, and optics students, as well as those in related fields such as materials science and chemistry.Key Features* The origin of optical nonlinearities, including dependence on the polarization of light* A detailed treatment of the q

  2. Optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, J; Boutruche, J P

    1986-01-01

    Optical Fibers covers numerous research works on the significant advances in optical fibers, with particular emphasis on their application.This text is composed of three parts encompassing 15 chapters. The first part deals with the manufacture of optical fibers and the materials used in their production. The second part describes optical-fiber connectors, terminals and branches. The third part is concerned with the major optoelectronic components encountered in optical-communication systems.This book will be of value to research scientists, engineers, and patent workers.

  3. Optical interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ray T

    2006-01-01

    This book describes fully embedded board level optical interconnect in detail including the fabrication of the thin-film VCSEL array, its characterization, thermal management, the fabrication of optical interconnection layer, and the integration of devices on a flexible waveguide film. All the optical components are buried within electrical PCB layers in a fully embedded board level optical interconnect. Therefore, we can save foot prints on the top real estate of the PCB and relieve packaging difficulty reduced by separating fabrication processes. To realize fully embedded board level optical

  4. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  5. Assessment of early-stage optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma using high-resolution 1.5 Tesla MRI with surface coils: a multicentre, prospective accuracy study with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Institut CURIE, Imaging Department, Paris (France); Graaf, Pim de; Rodjan, Firazia; Jong, Marcus C. de; Castelijns, Jonas A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Galluzzi, Paolo [Neuroimaging and Neurointerventional Unit (NINT) Azienda Ospedaliera e Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy); Cosker, Kristel; Savignoni, Alexia [Institut Curie, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Maeder, Philippe [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Goericke, Sophia [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Aerts, Isabelle [Institut Curie, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Desjardins, Laurence [Institut Curie, Department of Ophthalmology, Paris (France); Moll, Annette C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hadjistilianou, Theodora [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Department of Ophthalmology, Siena (Italy); Toti, Paolo [University of Siena, Department of Medical Biotechnologies, Pathology Unit, Siena (Italy); Valk, Paul van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sastre-Garau, Xavier [Institut Curie, Department of Biopathology, Paris (France); Collaboration: European Retinoblastoma Imaging Collaboration (ERIC)

    2015-05-01

    To assess the accuracy of high-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing early-stage optic nerve (ON) invasion in a retinoblastoma cohort. This IRB-approved, prospective multicenter study included 95 patients (55 boys, 40 girls; mean age, 29 months). 1.5-T MRI was performed using surface coils before enucleation, including spin-echo unenhanced and contrast-enhanced (CE) T1-weighted sequences (slice thickness, 2 mm; pixel size <0.3 x 0.3 mm{sup 2}). Images were read by five neuroradiologists blinded to histopathologic findings. ROC curves were constructed with AUC assessment using a bootstrap method. Histopathology identified 41 eyes without ON invasion and 25 with prelaminar, 18 with intralaminar and 12 with postlaminar invasion. All but one were postoperatively classified as stage I by the International Retinoblastoma Staging System. The accuracy of CE-T1 sequences in identifying ON invasion was limited (AUC = 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.55 - 0.72) and not confirmed for postlaminar invasion diagnosis (AUC = 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.47 - 0.82); high specificities (range, 0.64 - 1) and negative predictive values (range, 0.81 - 0.97) were confirmed. HR-MRI with surface coils is recommended to appropriately select retinoblastoma patients eligible for primary enucleation without the risk of IRSS stage II but cannot substitute for pathology in differentiating the first degrees of ON invasion. (orig.)

  6. Head-to-head comparison of a drug-free early programmed dismantling polylactic acid bioresorbable scaffold and a metallic stent in the porcine coronary artery: six-month angiography and optical coherence tomographic follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Eric; Sharkawi, Tahmer; Leclerc, Guy; Raveleau, Marine; van der Leest, Machiel; Vert, Michel; Lafont, Antoine

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate a new drug-free fully bioresorbable lactic acid-based scaffold designed to allow early dismantling synchronized with artery wall healing in comparison with a bare metal stent (BMS). Twenty-three BMS (3.0×12 mm) and 36 lactic acid-based bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS, 3.0×11 mm) were implanted in porcine coronary arteries. QCA and optical coherence tomographic analyses were performed immediately after implantation and repeated after 1, 3, and 6 months. Microcomputed tomography was used to detect scaffold dismantling. Polymer degradation was evaluated throughout the study. The primary end-point was late lumen loss, and the secondary end-points were scaffold/stent diameter and acute recoil. Acute recoil was low and comparable between the BRS and the BMS groups (4.6±6.7 versus 4.6±5.1%; P=0.98). BRS outer diameter increased significantly from 1 to 6 months indicating late positive scaffold remodeling (PBRS group (P=0.003) without significant difference between BRS and BMS groups at 6 months (P=0.68). Microcomputed tomography identified BRS dismantling starting at 3 months, and weight-average molar masses of scaffold parts were 20% and 14% of their initial values at 3 and 6 months. BRS and BMS have similar 6-month outcomes in porcine coronary arteries. Interestingly, BRS dismantling was detected from 3 months and resulted in late lumen enlargement by increased scaffold diameter at 6 months.

  7. Optical properties of rare earth doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshatri, D. S.; Khare, A.

    2014-11-01

    After the first news on rare earth (RE) doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors in late 1990s, researchers all over the world geared up to develop stable and efficient persistent phosphors. Scientists studied various features of long lasting phosphors (LLP) and tried to earmark appropriate mechanism. However, about two decades after the discovery of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+, the number of persistent luminescent materials is not significant. In this review, we present an overview of the optical characteristics of RE doped SAO phosphors in terms of photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow spectra. Also, we refresh the work undertaken to study diverse factors like dopant concentration, temperature, surface energy, role of activator, etc. Simultaneously, some of our important findings on SAO are reported and discussed in the end.

  8. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.A.; Vdovine, Gleb; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Kubby, Joel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light

  9. Applied optics and optical design

    CERN Document Server

    Conrady, Alexander Eugen

    1957-01-01

    ""For the optical engineer it is an indispensable work."" - Journal, Optical Society of America""As a practical guide this book has no rival."" - Transactions, Optical Society""A noteworthy contribution,"" - Nature (London)Part I covers all ordinary ray-tracing methods, together with the complete theory of primary aberrations and as much of higher aberration as is needed for the design of telescopes, low-power microscopes and simple optical systems. Chapters: Fundamental Equations, Spherical Aberration, Physical Aspect of Optical Images, Chromatic Aberration, Design of Achromatic Object-Glass

  10. The Optical Luminosity Function of Gamma-Ray Bursts Deduced from ROTSE-III Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X. H.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W. K.; Liang, E. W.; Akerlof, C. W.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Flewelling, H. A.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; McKay, T. A.; Pandey, S. B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Yost, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs) and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). We derive R-band fluxes for these two sub-samples 100 s after the onset of the burst. The optical LFs at 100 s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star formation rate. While fitting the optical LFs using Monte Carlo simulations, we take into account the detection function of ROTSE-III. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100 s is well described by an exponential rise and power-law decay, a broken power law,and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.

  11. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly.

  12. Optics Express

    OpenAIRE

    Poon, Ting-Chung; Doh, K. B.

    2007-01-01

    The Hilbert transform as been investigated abundantly in coherent imaging. To the best of our knowledge, it is for the first time investigated in the context of incoherent imaging. We present a two-pupil optical heterodyne scanning system and analyze mathematically the design of its two pupils such that the optical system can perform the Hilbert transform on incoherent objects. Computer simulations of the idea clarify the theoretical results. (c) 2007 Optical Society of America.

  13. Optical electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Yariv, Amnon

    1991-01-01

    This classic text introduces engineering students to the first principles of major phenomena and devices of optoelectronics and optical communication technology. Yariv's "first principles" approach employs real-life examples and extensive problems. The text includes separate chapters on quantum well and semiconductor lasers, as well as phase conjugation and its applications. Optical fiber amplification, signal and noise considerations in optical fiber systems, laser arrays and distributed feedback lasers all are covered extensively in major sections within chapters.

  14. Influence of afterglow processes in TL based dosimetry of beta irradiated SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano T, O.; Melendrez, R.; Pedroza M, M.; Castaneda, B; Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M.; Brown, F.; Yen, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Afterglow (AG) and thermoluminescence (TL) in SrAl 2 O 4 : Eu 2+ , Dy 3+ coming from relaxation processes, where electron-holes pairs trapped in meta-stable states inside the band gap are recombined radiatively (515 nm) through 4f 6 5d 1 → 4f 7 electronic transitions of Eu 2+ ions. It is supposed that both processes show a proportional response with the beta radiation dose previously absorbed by the phosphor. In the case of AG, the onset of the persistent luminescence occurs without any stimulation a RT. We observed that the long persistent luminescence (LPL) had at least two well-defined processes; one fast decay component in the first 0-40 s, followed for a slow decay component from 40 to 3600 s. For the TL, the signal of the phosphor is thermally stimulated from 300 to 600 K. TL glow curves depicted two peaks at 382 and 431 K respectively. The annealing curve of LPL has shown that the lower temperature TL peak at 382 K overlapped with the maximum 323 K band, and it pointed to a common origin of LPL and TL. This correlation was remarkable for beta dosimetry, because the successive TL measurements in 10 cycles showed an increasing of TL intensity of 18% indicating the non reproducibility of the TL under the same irradiation and read-out conditions. Despite, the TL glow curves only presented slight differences in the high temperature tails with respect to the previous TL cycle read-out, we noticed that the good linearity of the dosimetric response of SrAl 2 O 4 : Eu 2+ , Dy 3+ was dimmed by the non reproducibility and the strong fading of the TL. The dose rate effect for TL influenced by AG may prevent using SrAl 2 O 4 : Eu 2+ , Dy 3+ phosphors as radiation TL dosimeters. However, the charge trapping and accumulation process started by thermal stimulation during the TL read-out step, gives an experimental evidence for correlating AG and TL in a phenomenological model that is under construction. (Author)

  15. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  16. Microscanners for optical endomicroscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyungmin; Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2017-12-01

    MEMS laser scanning enables the miniaturization of endoscopic catheters for advanced endomicroscopy such as confocal microscopy, multiphoton microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and many other laser scanning microscopy. These advanced biomedical imaging modalities open a great potential for in vivo optical biopsy without surgical excision. They have huge capabilities for detecting on-demand early stage cancer with non-invasiveness. In this article, the scanning arrangement, trajectory, and actuation mechanism of endoscopic microscanners and their endomicroscopic applications will be overviewed.

  17. Optical Computing With Nonlinear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitrova, Galina; Gibbs, Hyatt; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear optics is becoming a new thrust in the field of optical computing and signal processing.14 Optical nonlinearity makes the device's transmission intensity dependent, so one can obtain the thresholding needed for logic decisionmaking. Thresholding is essential to digital optical computing, neural nets, and associative memories. GaAs etalons exhibit many of the characteristics desirable for the nonlinear devices including high speed (picosecond) and diode-laser compatability. However, demonstrations of the use of nonlinear decisionmaking for optical computing have used ZnS or ZnSe interference filters. They are slow (millisecond), but they can be used with the visible 514.5-nm output of an argon laser. We have used such filters to demonstrate all-optical logic operations, one-bit addition by symbolic substitution, and recognition of a three-spot pattern in an arbitrary 2 x 8 array of input beams. The application to associative memories is under study.

  18. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  19. Optical Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Integration (VLSI) technology with smaller device dimensions and greater complexity. The smallest .... on a chip, much less than what was mentioned earlier (optical integration is still in its infancy compared to electronics). ..... Optical tunnel devices are under continuous development varying from small caliber endoscopes to ...

  20. Optical Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 6. Optical Computing - Optical Components and Storage Systems. Debabrata Goswami. General Article Volume 8 Issue 6 June 2003 pp 56-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Optics in neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Michael John

    multiplexing works based on an unconventional, but very intuitive, analysis of the optical far-field. A more detailed analysis based on a path-integral interpretation of the Born approximation is also derived. The capacity of shift multiplexing is compared with that of angle and wavelength multiplexing. The last part of this thesis deals with the role of optics in neuromorphic engineering. Up until now, most neuromorphic engineering has involved one or a few VLSI circuits emulating early sensory systems. However, optical interconnects will be required in order to push towards more ambitious goals, such as the simulation of early visual cortex. I describe a preliminary approach to designing such a system, and show how shift multiplexing can be used to simultaneously store and implement the immense interconnections required by such a project.

  3. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  4. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.A.; Vdovine, Gleb; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Kubby, Joel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront senso...

  5. Nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Bloembergen, Nicolaas

    1996-01-01

    Nicolaas Bloembergen, recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physics (1981), wrote Nonlinear Optics in 1964, when the field of nonlinear optics was only three years old. The available literature has since grown by at least three orders of magnitude.The vitality of Nonlinear Optics is evident from the still-growing number of scientists and engineers engaged in the study of new nonlinear phenomena and in the development of new nonlinear devices in the field of opto-electronics. This monograph should be helpful in providing a historical introduction and a general background of basic ideas both for expe

  6. Integrated optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jekowski, J.; Aeby, I.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the R and D effort is to establish a baseline technology in integrated optic techniques within the EMG. Significant investment presently being made by industry in this area indicates that this technology may offer an alternative solution for high speed digital data acquisition and transmission. The objectives of this year's integrated optics program were three-fold: (1) to establish a literature search and maintain industry contacts in an attempt to make the needs of the Weapons Test Program known; (2) to assist the Las Vegas Hybrid facility in establising integrated optic fabrication techniques for their new Thin Film Laboratory; and (3) to conduct basic experiments at Los Alamos in the construction of photolithograhicaly etched plastic film devices. The report describes the successful completion of preliminary investigations into photolithographic techniques and continuing investigations into newly announced integrated optic techniques and devices that would be applicable to the weapons test program

  7. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  8. Quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves.......Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves....

  9. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (I) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (II) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (III) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (IV) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  10. Mary, a Pipeline to Aid Discovery of Optical Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, I.; Jacobs, C.; Hegarty, S.; Pritchard, T.; Cooke, J.; Ryder, S.

    2017-09-01

    The ability to quickly detect transient sources in optical images and trigger multi-wavelength follow up is key for the discovery of fast transients. These include events rare and difficult to detect such as kilonovae, supernova shock breakout, and `orphan' Gamma-ray Burst afterglows. We present the Mary pipeline, a (mostly) automated tool to discover transients during high-cadenced observations with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The observations are part of the `Deeper Wider Faster' programme, a multi-facility, multi-wavelength programme designed to discover fast transients, including counterparts to Fast Radio Bursts and gravitational waves. Our tests of the Mary pipeline on Dark Energy Camera images return a false positive rate of 2.2% and a missed fraction of 3.4% obtained in less than 2 min, which proves the pipeline to be suitable for rapid and high-quality transient searches. The pipeline can be adapted to search for transients in data obtained with imagers other than Dark Energy Camera.

  11. QUANTUM OPTICS. Universal linear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Jacques; Harrold, Christopher; Sparrow, Chris; Martín-López, Enrique; Russell, Nicholas J; Silverstone, Joshua W; Shadbolt, Peter J; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Oguma, Manabu; Itoh, Mikitaka; Marshall, Graham D; Thompson, Mark G; Matthews, Jonathan C F; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Laing, Anthony

    2015-08-14

    Linear optics underpins fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and quantum technologies. We demonstrate a single reprogrammable optical circuit that is sufficient to implement all possible linear optical protocols up to the size of that circuit. Our six-mode universal system consists of a cascade of 15 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with 30 thermo-optic phase shifters integrated into a single photonic chip that is electrically and optically interfaced for arbitrary setting of all phase shifters, input of up to six photons, and their measurement with a 12-single-photon detector system. We programmed this system to implement heralded quantum logic and entangling gates, boson sampling with verification tests, and six-dimensional complex Hadamards. We implemented 100 Haar random unitaries with an average fidelity of 0.999 ± 0.001. Our system can be rapidly reprogrammed to implement these and any other linear optical protocol, pointing the way to applications across fundamental science and quantum technologies. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Optics education in an optometric setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Nicole M.

    2017-08-01

    The first year optics curriculum at the Arizona College of Optometry aims to provide students with an understanding of geometrical, physical, and visual optics principals that will be the foundation of their clinical understanding of the optics of the eye and its correction in advanced courses such as ophthalmic optics and contact lenses. Although the optics of the eye are a fantastic model to use in optics education, the clinical applications may not become apparent until later in the course of study. Successful strategies are needed to engage students and facilitate the understanding of optical principals and the growth of process skills including problem solving, analysis, and critical thinking that will help in their future as health care providers. These include the implementation of ophthalmic applications as early as possible, encouragement of group work including open office hours, and the use of video problem set solutions to supplement traditional static solutions.

  13. Optical Metamaterials Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Wenshan

    2010-01-01

    Metamaterials—artificially structured materials with engineered electromagnetic properties—have enabled unprecedented flexibility in manipulating electromagnetic waves and producing new functionalities. In just a few years, the field of optical metamaterials has emerged as one of the most exciting topics in the science of light, with stunning and unexpected outcomes that have fascinated scientists and the general public alike. This volume details recent advances in the study of optical metamaterials, ranging from fundamental aspects to up-to-date implementations, in one unified treatment. Important recent developments and applications such as superlenses and cloaking devices are also treated in detail and made understandable. Optical Metamaterials will serve as a very timely book for both newcomers and advanced researchers in this rapidly evolving field. Early praise for Optical Metamaterials: "...this book is timely bringing to students and other new entrants to the field the most up to date concepts. Th...

  14. On Some Statistical Properties of GRBs with Measured Redshifts Having Peaks in Optical Light Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorii Beskin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the subset of optical light curves of gamma-ray bursts with measured redshifts and well-sampled R band data that have clearly detected peaks. Among 43 such events, 11 are promptoptical peaks (P, coincident with gamma-ray activity, 22 are purely afterglows (A, and 10 more carrythe signatures of an underlying activity (A(U. We studied pair correlations of their gamma-ray andoptical parameters, e.g. total energetics, peak optical luminosities, and durations. The main outcomeof our study is the detection of source frame correlations between both optical peak luminosity and total energy and the redshift for classes A and A(U, and the absence of such a correlation for class Pevents. This result seems to provide evidence of the cosmological evolution of a medium around the burst defining class A and A(U energetics, and the absence of cosmological evolution of the internal properties of GRB engines. We also discuss some other prominent correlations.

  15. Semiconductor Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Klingshirn, Claus F

    2012-01-01

    This updated and enlarged new edition of Semiconductor Optics provides an introduction to and an overview of semiconductor optics from the IR through the visible to the UV, including linear and nonlinear optical properties, dynamics, magneto and electrooptics, high-excitation effects and laser processes, some applications, experimental techniques and group theory. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered extend from physics to materials science and optoelectronics. Significantly updated chapters add coverage of current topics such as electron hole plasma, Bose condensation of excitons and meta materials. Over 120 problems, chapter introductions and a detailed index make it the key textbook for graduate students in physics. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered ...

  16. Optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  17. Reflective optics

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Dietrich

    1991-01-01

    This is the first book dedicated exclusively to all-reflective imaging systems. It is a teaching tool as well as a practical design tool for anyone who specializes in optics, particularly for those interested in telescopes, infrared, and grazing-incidence systems. The first part of the book describes a unified geometric optical theory of all-reflective imaging systems (from near-normal to grazing incidence) developed from basic principles. The second part discusses correction methods and a multitude of closed-form solutions of well-corrected systems, supplemented with many conventional and unc

  18. Optical dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukaroff, I.; Fishman, R.

    1984-01-01

    A reflecting optical dosimeter is a thin block of optical material having an input light pipe at one corner and an output light pipe at another corner, arranged so that the light path includes several reflections off the edges of the block to thereby greatly extend its length. In a preferred embodiment, one corner of the block is formed at an angle so that after the light is reflected several times between two opposite edges, it is then reflected several more times between the other two edges

  19. Statistical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Joseph W

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses statistical methods that are useful for treating problems in modern optics, and the application of these methods to solving a variety of such problems This book covers a variety of statistical problems in optics, including both theory and applications.  The text covers the necessary background in statistics, statistical properties of light waves of various types, the theory of partial coherence and its applications, imaging with partially coherent light, atmospheric degradations of images, and noise limitations in the detection of light. New topics have been introduced i

  20. Quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flytzanis, C.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Quantum Optics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research program is focused on the behavior of dense and dilute materials submitted to short and high-intensity light radiation fields. Nonlinear optics techniques, with time and spatial resolution, are developed. An important research activity concerns the investigations on the interactions between the photon beams and the inhomogeneous or composite materials, as well as the artificial microstructures. In the processes involving molecular beams and surfaces, the research works on the photophysics of surfaces and the molecule-surface interactions, are included [fr

  1. Hydraulic urethral dilatation after optical internal urethrotomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the rate of early recurrence of urethral stricture in the first six months in patients who perform hydraulic urethral dilatation(HUD) after optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and compare the early recurrence Fate in patients who perform HUD after OIU with the recurrence rates in patients reported in the ...

  2. Conical wavefronts in optics and tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroko, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of techniques in which the information is transferred by conical (nonspherical and nonplanar) wave fronts is considered. This is the first summary of papers published in the field of mesooptics and optical tomography. After the introduction into the new branch of modern optics - mesooptics -the properties of conical wavefronts are treated in detail. Some possible applications of mesooptics in science and technology are considered. The long history of mesooptics treated in the last chapter of this review lecture goes from the early stage of our Universe, gravitational lens, first publications in the last century and up-to-date innovations in optics, mesooptics and optical tomography. 3 refs

  3. Diophantine Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouan, D.

    2016-09-01

    What I call Diophantine optics is the exploitation in optics of some remarkable algebraic relations between powers of integers. The name comes from Diophantus of Alexandria, a greek mathematician, known as the father of algebra. He studied polynomial equations with integer coefficients and integer solutions, called diophantine equations. Since constructive or destructive interferences are playing with optical path differences which are multiple integer (odd or even) of λ/2 and that the complex amplitude is a highly non-linear function of the optical path difference (or equivalently of the phase), one can understand that any Taylor development of this amplitude implies powers of integers. This is the link with Diophantine equations. We show how, especially in the field of interferometry, remarkable relations between powers of integers can help to solve several problems, such as achromatization of a phase shifter or deep nulling efficiency. It appears that all the research that was conducted in this frame of thinking, relates to the field of detection of exoplanets, a very active domain of astrophysics today.

  4. Optical profilometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieloszyńska, Aleksandra; StrÄ kowski, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The profilometry plays a huge role in the most fields of science and technology. It allows to measure the profile of the surface with high-resolution. This technique is used in the fields like optic, electronic, medicine, automotive, and much more. The aim of the current work was to design and build optical profilometer based on the interference phenomena. The developed device has been working with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm). The optical parts have been chosen in order to reach the sized 2.0 mm x 1.6 mm of scanning area. The setup of the profilometer is based on Twyman-Green interferometer. Therefore, the phase distribution of the backreflected light from measured surface is recorded. The measurements are carried out with the aid of multiframe algorithms. In this approach we have used the Hariharan algorithm to obtain the exact value of the recorded phase. During tests, which have been carried out in order to check the functionality of the device, the interference patterns have been recoded and processed in order to obtain the 3D profile of measured surface. In this contribution the setup of the optical system, as well as signal processing methods are going to be presented. The brief discussion about the advantages and disadvantages, and usefulness of this approach will be carried out.

  5. Optical fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    These optical fibres are used to detect particles passing through in bunches. Made from scintillating material, the fibres glow when a high energy particle passes through them. These detectors are known as spaghetti detectors and are used to measure the energy of particles.

  6. Optical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.; Trautman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of classical physics is Lorentzian; but weaker geometries are often more appropriate: null geodesics and electromagnetic fields, for example, are well known to be objects of conformal geometry. To deal with a single null congruence, or with the radiative electromagnetic fields associated with it, even less is needed: flag geometry for the first, optical geometry, with which this paper is chiefly concerned, for the second. The authors establish a natural one-to-one correspondence between optical geometries, considered locally, and three-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann structures. A number of Lorentzian geometries are shown to be equivalent from the optical point of view. For example the Goedel universe, the Taub-NUT metric and Hauser's twisting null solution have an optical geometry isomorphic to the one underlying the Robinson congruence in Minkowski space. The authors present general results on the problem of lifting a CR structure to a Lorentz manifold and, in particular, to Minkowski space; and exhibit the relevance of the deviation form to this problem

  7. Optical twisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We describe a diffracting beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM) but with a helical profile in both phase and amplitude components of the beam. This is different from Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams where only the phase component has a helical profile. Such profile in LG beams introduces a phase s....... Such beams can be applied to fundamental studies of light and atoms such as in quantum entanglement of the OAM, toroidal traps for cold atoms and for optical manipulation of microscopic particles....... and linearly scaled towards no phase singularity at the centre of the beam. At the focal volume, we show that our beam forms an intensity distribution that can be accurately described as an "optical twister" as it propagates in the forward direction. Unlike LG beams, an optical twister can have minimal changes...... in radius but with a scalable OAM. Furthermore, we characterize the OAM in terms of its capacity to introduce spiral motion on particles trapped along its orbit. We also show that our "optical twister" maintains a high concentration of photons at the focus even as the topological charge is increased...

  8. Skin optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, M. J.; Jacques, S. L.; Sterenborg, H. J.; Star, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model

  9. Optical metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Gåsvik, Kjell J

    2003-01-01

    New material on computerized optical processes, computerized ray tracing, and the fast Fourier transform, Bibre-Bragg sensors, and temporal phase unwrapping.* New introductory sections to all chapters.* Detailed discussion on lasers and laser principles, including an introduction to radiometry and photometry.* Thorough coverage of the CCD camera.

  10. Optical Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 7. Optical Computing - Research Trends. Debabrata Goswami. General Article Volume 8 Issue 7 July 2003 pp 8-21. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/07/0008-0021. Keywords.

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging of occult injury of optic radiation following optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiafeng; Zhu, Lijun; Li, He; Lu, Ziwen; Chen, Xin; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is easily detected by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is not possible to detect early or occult lesions in MS by routine MRI, and this may explain the inconsistency between the severity of the lesions found by MRI and the degree of clinical disability of patients with MS. The present study included 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 10 healthy volunteers. Each patient underwent routine 3.0 T MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Optic nerve and optic radiation were analyzed by DTI and DTT. The fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), λ // , and λ ┴ values were measured. In the 10 patients with MS, 7 optic nerves were affected, and 13 optic nerves were not affected. Cranial MRI showed that optic nerve thickening and hyperintensity occurred in 2 patients with MS. In the directionally encoded color maps, a hypointensive green signal in the optic nerve was observed in 3 patients with MS. The FA values were significantly lower and the MD, λ // , and λ ┴ values were significantly higher in the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiations in patients with MS in comparison with controls (P0.05). Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive in the detection of occult injury of the optic nerve and optic radiation following optic neuritis. Diffusion tensor imaging may be a useful tool for the early diagnosis, treatment and management of MS.

  12. Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Leonard

    1995-01-01

    This book presents a systematic account of optical coherence theory within the framework of classical optics, as applied to such topics as radiation from sources of different states of coherence, foundations of radiometry, effects of source coherence on the spectra of radiated fields, coherence theory of laser modes, and scattering of partially coherent light by random media. The book starts with a full mathematical introduction to the subject area and each chapter concludes with a set of exercises. The authors are renowned scientists and have made substantial contributions to many of the topi

  13. Optical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  14. Early X-Ray Flares in GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Wang, Y.; Aimuratov, Y.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becerra, L.; Bianco, C. L.; Chen, Y. C.; Karlica, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Li, L.; Melon Fuksman, J. D.; Moradi, R.; Muccino, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Primorac, D.; Rueda, J. A.; Shakeri, S.; Vereshchagin, G. V.; Xue, S.-S.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the early X-ray flares in the GRB “flare–plateau–afterglow” (FPA) phase observed by Swift-XRT. The FPA occurs only in one of the seven GRB subclasses: the binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). This subclass consists of long GRBs with a carbon–oxygen core and a neutron star (NS) binary companion as progenitors. The hypercritical accretion of the supernova (SN) ejecta onto the NS can lead to the gravitational collapse of the NS into a black hole. Consequently, one can observe a GRB emission with isotropic energy {E}{iso}≳ {10}52 erg, as well as the associated GeV emission and the FPA phase. Previous work had shown that gamma-ray spikes in the prompt emission occur at ∼ {10}15{--}{10}17 cm with Lorentz Gamma factors {{Γ }}∼ {10}2{--}{10}3. Using a novel data analysis, we show that the time of occurrence, duration, luminosity, and total energy of the X-ray flares correlate with E iso. A crucial feature is the observation of thermal emission in the X-ray flares that we show occurs at radii ∼1012 cm with {{Γ }}≲ 4. These model-independent observations cannot be explained by the “fireball” model, which postulates synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiation from a single ultrarelativistic jetted emission extending from the prompt to the late afterglow and GeV emission phases. We show that in BdHNe a collision between the GRB and the SN ejecta occurs at ≃1010 cm, reaching transparency at ∼1012 cm with {{Γ }}≲ 4. The agreement between the thermal emission observations and these theoretically derived values validates our model and opens the possibility of testing each BdHN episode with the corresponding Lorentz Gamma factor.

  15. The afterglow of the short/intermediate-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000301C: A jet at z=2.04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.L.; Fynbo, J.U.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present Ulysses and NEAR data from the detection of the short or intermediate duration (2 s) gamma-ray burst GRB 000301C (2000 March 1.41 UT). The gamma-ray burst (GRB) was localised by the Inter Planetary Network (IPN) and RXTE to an area of similar to 50 arcmin(2). A fading optical counterpart...

  16. Acousto-optic-assisted diffuse optical tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bratchenia, A.; Molenaar, Robert; van Leeuwen, Ton; Kooyman, R.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce and experimentally demonstrate acousto-optic-assisted diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using a holography-based acousto-optic setup. The method is based on probing a scattering medium with a localized acoustical modulation of the phase of the scattered light. The optical properties of

  17. CHIRALITY IN NONLINEAR OPTICS AND OPTICAL SWITCHING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.W.; Feringa, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    Chirality in molecular opto-electronics is limited sofar to the use of optically active liquid crystals and a number of optical phenomena are related to the helical macroscopic structure obtained by using one enantiomer, only. In this paper, the use of chirality in nonlinear optics and optical

  18. Determination, through titration with NO, of the concentration of oxygen atoms in the flowing afterglow of Ar-O2 and N2-O2 plasmas used for sterilization purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, A.; Moisan, M.; Moreau, S.

    2001-04-01

    Les méthodes existantes de titrage de N et O d'une post-décharge au moyen de l'intensité d'émission de la molécule NO excitée ne permettant pas d'aller au-delà de x = 5% dans un mélange xO2-(100%-x)N2, nous présentons une démarche valable pour x≤20%. Cette technique est fondée sur la mesure de l'intensité d'émission de NO2(A), en fonction du débit de NO introduit, en relation avec une dérivation analytique des équations des concentrations [N] et [O]. La concentration d'oxygène atomique obtenue par cette méthode est validée de façon indépendante à partir de la mesure du rapport des intensités d'émission de NO(B) et de N2(B, 11) (celle-ci détectable pour x≤8%). Enfin, la méthode proposée est mise en oeuvre pour apprécier l'influence de la valeur de la concentration d'oxygène atomique sur le temps de stérilisation dans une post-décharge en flux à partir d'un plasma de N2-O2. \\engabstract Existing titration methods of N and O in an afterglow based on the emission intensity of the excited NO molecule cannot be used at x values exceeding 5% in the xO2-(100%-x)N2 mixture. Our technique extends the x range to 20%. It utilizes the emission intensity measurement of NO2(A), as a function of the introduced NO flow, in relation with analytically derived equations for the O and N concentrations. The atomic oxygen concentration obtained in this way is validated independently through measurements of the emission intensity ratio of NO(B) and N2(B, 11) (detectable for x≤8%). Finally, the proposed method is used to assess the influence of the oxygen atom concentration on the sterilization time in the flowing afterglow of an N2-O2 plasma.

  19. The Early Universe: Searching for Evidence of Cosmic Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, our understanding of the evolution and fate of the universe has increased dramatically. This "Age of Precision Cosmology" has been ushered in by measurements that have both elucidated the details of the Big Bang cosmology and set the direction for future lines of inquiry. Our universe appears to consist of 5% baryonic matter; 23% of the universe's energy content is dark matter which is responsible for the observed structure in the universe; and 72% of the energy density is so-called "dark energy" that is currently accelerating the expansion of the universe. In addition, our universe has been measured to be geometrically flat to 1 %. These observations and related details of the Big Bang paradigm have hinted that the universe underwent an epoch of accelerated expansion known as "inflation" early in its history. In this talk, I will review the highlights of modern cosmology, focusing on the contributions made by measurements of the cosmic microwave background, the faint afterglow of the Big Bang. I will also describe new instruments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background in order to search for evidence of cosmic inflation.

  20. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Garrison, J C

    2008-01-01

    Quantum optics, i.e. the interaction of individual photons with matter, began with the discoveries of Planck and Einstein, but in recent years it has expanded beyond pure physics to become an important driving force for technological innovation. This book serves the broader readership growing out of this development by starting with an elementary description of the underlying physics and then building up a more advanced treatment. The reader is led from the quantum theory of thesimple harmonic oscillator to the application of entangled states to quantum information processing. An equally impor

  1. Continuing spectroscopic observations (3600-8800A) of V339 Del = Nova Del 2013 in the early nebular stage with the Nordic Optical Telescope, Ondrejov Observatory and the ARAS group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, S. N.; Cechura, J.; Korcakova, D.; Kubat, J.; Skoda, P.; Slechta, M.; Votruba, V.; Alton, K.; Antao, D.; Barbotin, E.; Berardi, P.; Blank, T.; Bohlsen, P.; Boubault, F.; Boyd, D.; Briol, J.; Buchet, Y.; Buil, C.; Charbonnel, S.; Dubreuil, P.; Dubs, M.; Edlin, J.; de France, T.; Favaro, A.; Gerlach, P.; Garde, O.; Graham, K.; Greenan, D.; Guarro, J.; Hansen, T.; Hyde, D.; Lemoult, T.; Leadbeater, R.; Martineau, G.; Masviel, J. P.; Mauclaire, B.; Montier, J.; Pollmann, E.; Potter, M.; Ribeiro, J.; Schramm, B.; Thizy, O.; Terry, J.-N.; Teyssier, F.

    2013-11-01

    We have been continuing almost nightly spectroscopic observations of V339 Del (see ATel#5378) with the 2.6 m Nordic Optical Telecope (NOT) FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) (R ~ 67000), the Ondrejov Observatory 2m Zeiss coude spectrograph (R = 18000), and a variety of grating and echelle spectrographs of the ARAS group in the wavelength range 3684 - 7431A with resolutions ranging from 580 - 12000.

  2. Early literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from the Danish contribution to the EASE project, a European research project running from 2008 to 2010 on early literacy in relation to the transition from childcare to school. It explores a holistic, inclusive approach to early literacy that resists a narrow...... and schools. The paper also draws on Gee’s (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008) sociocultural approach to literacy, and Honneth’s (2003, 2006) concept of recognition. Emphasizing participation and recognition as key elements, it claims that stakeholders in early liter- acy must pay attention to how diverse early literacy...... opportunities empower children, especially when these opportunities are employed in a project-based learning environ- ment in which each child is able to contribute to the shared literacy events....

  3. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  4. Flow diagnostics using fibre optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research in the area of flow diagnostics using fibre-optics started in our laboratory in early 1998. The first-ever multi-component wind tunnel balance in the world, working with fibre-optic sensors was built and demonstrated in 1999. Since then, several new applications of the technique in the area of fluid dynamic load ...

  5. Evolution of Optical Spectrograph Design at ESO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Hans

    2009-06-01

    The evolution of optical spectrograph design and its implementation at ESO since 1980 is sketched out from the point of view of the instrumentation with which I have been closely involved. The instruments range from the early days of EFOSC, EMMI, UVES, GIRAFFE to the present-day X-shooter and important optical design features, such as the use of focal reducers and the white light pupil principle, are highlighted.

  6. Advances in nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xianfeng; Zeng, Heping; Guo, Qi; She, Weilong

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the state of the art of nonlinear optics from weak light nonlinear optics, ultrafast nonlinear optics to electro-optical theory and applications. Topics range from the fundamental studies of the interaction between matter and radiation to the development of devices, components, and systems of tremendous commercial interest for widespread applications in optical telecommunications, medicine, and biotechnology.

  7. Optical photometry of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, G.

    1981-01-01

    The present status of the optical and near-infrared photometry of galaxies is reviewed. Part I introduces to the goals and general methods of both photographic surface photometry and integrated multicolor aperture photoelectric photometry for extended stellar systems, with a summary of the necessary corrections to the observed magnitudes and colors. Part II (surface photometry) summarizes recent results on the empirical luminosity laws for spheroidal systems and the separation of components in disk-plus-bulge systems. Part III (color problems) discusses integrated color effects (color and gas content, color-absolute magnitude relation for early-type systems, colors of interacting galaxies) and color gradient across spheroidal and disk galaxies. In part IV are summarized some constraints on the luminosity function of the stellar population in spheroidal systems given by narrow-band photometry [fr

  8. Holographic Optical Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Although the basic idea may be traced back to the earlier X-ray diffraction studies of Sir W. L. Bragg, the holographic method as we know it was invented by D. Gabor in 1948 as a two-step lensless imaging technique to enhance the resolution of electron microscopy, for which he received the 1971 Nobel Prize in physics. The distinctive feature of holography is the recording of the object phase variations that carry the depth information, which is lost in conventional photography where only the intensity (= squared amplitude) distribution of an object is captured. Since all photosensitive media necessarily respond to the intensity incident upon them, an ingenious way had to be found to convert object phase into intensity variations, and Gabor achieved this by introducing a coherent reference wave along with the object wave during exposure. Gabor's in-line recording scheme, however, required the object in question to be largely transmissive, and could provide only marginal image quality due to unwanted terms simultaneously reconstructed along with the desired wavefront. Further handicapped by the lack of a strong coherent light source, optical holography thus seemed fated to remain just another scientific curiosity, until the field was revolutionized in the early 1960s by some major breakthroughs: the proposition and demonstration of the laser principle, the introduction of off-axis holography, and the invention of volume holography. Consequently, the remainder of that decade saw an exponential growth in research on theory, practice, and applications of holography. Today, holography not only boasts a wide variety of scientific and technical applications (e.g., holographic interferometry for strain, vibration, and flow analysis, microscopy and high-resolution imagery, imaging through distorting media, optical interconnects, holographic optical elements, optical neural networks, three-dimensional displays, data storage, etc.), but has become a prominent am advertising

  9. The OCT-ORION Study: A Randomized Optical Coherence Tomography Study Comparing Resolute Integrity to Biomatrix Drug-Eluting Stent on the Degree of Early Stent Healing and Late Lumen Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen W L; Tam, Frankie C C; Lam, Simon C C; Kong, Shun-Ling; Shea, Catherine P; Chan, Kelvin K W; Wong, Michael K L; Chan, Michael P H; Wong, Anthony Y T; Yung, Arthur S Y; Lam, Yui-Ming; Zhang, Lei-Wei; Wu, Karl K Y; Mintz, Gary S; Maehara, Akiko

    2018-04-01

    Durable polymers used in drug-eluting stents are considered a potential cause of hypersensitivity inflammatory response adversely affecting stent healing. Using a sequential follow-up with optical coherence tomography, we compared the differences in healing profiles of 2 drug-eluting stents with a biodegradable or durable polymer. Sixty patients with multivessel disease were prospectively enrolled to receive both study stents, which were randomly assigned to 2 individual vessels, a Resolute Integrity zotarolimus-eluting stent with a durable BioLinx polymer and a BioMatrix NeoFlex Biolimus A9-eluting stent with a biodegradable polylactic acid polymer. Optical coherence tomography was performed at baseline, then in 5 randomly assigned monthly groups at 2 to 6 months, and at 9 months in all patients. The primary end point was the difference in optical coherence tomography strut coverage at 9 months. Key secondary end points included angiographic late lumen loss and composite major adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularization, and definite or probable stent thrombosis) at 9 months. Resolute Integrity zotarolimus-eluting stent showed significantly better strut coverage than BioMatrix NeoFlex Biolimus A9-eluting stent at 2 to 6 months ( P <0.001) and less variance of percent coverage at 9 months, 99.7% (interquartile range, 99.1-100) versus 99.6% (interquartile range, 96.8-99.9; difference, 0.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-1.05; P <0.001). No significant difference was observed in major adverse cardiac events or angiographic end points. Despite having a durable polymer, Resolute Integrity zotarolimus-eluting stent exhibited better strut coverage than BioMatrix NeoFlex Biolimus A9-eluting stent having a biodegradable polymer; both showed similar antiproliferative efficacy. This novel, longitudinal, sequential optical coherence tomography protocol using each patient as own control could achieve conclusive results in small

  10. Exploring dust extinction at the edge of reionization

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach J.; Tanvir, 1 Nial R.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Starling, Rhaana L. C.; Levan, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their occurrence in young, blue galaxies make them excellent probes to study star forming regions in the distant Universe. We here elucidate dust extinction properties in the early Universe through the analysis of the afterglows of all known z > 6 GRBs: GRB 090423, 080913 and 050904, at z = 8.2, 6.69, and 6.295, respectively. We gather all available optical and near-infrared photometry, spectroscopy and X-ray data to construct spectral en...

  11. Quantum optics for experimentalists

    CERN Document Server

    Ou, Zhe-Yu Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This book on quantum optics is from the point of view of an experimentalist. It approaches the theory of quantum optics with the language of optical modes of classical wave theory, with which experimentalists are most familiar.

  12. Introduction to biomedical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Splinter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    GENERAL BIOMEDICAL OPTICS THEORYIntroduction to the Use of Light for Diagnostic and Therapeutic ModalitiesWhat Is Biomedical Optics?Biomedical Optics TimelineElementary Optical DiscoveriesHistorical Events in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Use of LightLight SourcesCurrent State of the ArtSummaryAdditional ReadingProblemsReview of Optical Principles: Fundamental Electromagnetic Theory and Description of Light SourcesDefinitions in OpticsKirchhoff's Laws of RadiationElectromagnetic Wave TheoryLight SourcesApplications of Various LasersSummaryAdditional ReadingProblemsReview of Optical Principles: Classical OpticsGeometrical OpticsOther Optical PrinciplesQuantum PhysicsGaussian OpticsSummaryAdditional ReadingProblemsReview of Optical Interaction PropertiesAbsorption and ScatteringSummaryAdditional ReadingProblemsLight-Tissue Interaction VariablesLaser VariablesTissue VariablesLight Transportation TheoryLight Propagation under Dominant AbsorptionSummaryNomenclatureAdditional ReadingProblemsLight-Tissue Interaction Th...

  13. Coding for optical channels

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Ivan; Vasic, Bane

    2010-01-01

    This unique book provides a coherent and comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of optical communications, signal processing and coding for optical channels. It is the first to integrate the fundamentals of coding theory and optical communication.

  14. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  15. Tunable laser optics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2015-01-01

    This Second Edition of a bestselling book describes the optics and optical principles needed to build lasers. It also highlights the optics instrumentation necessary to characterize laser emissions and focuses on laser-based optical instrumentation. The book emphasizes practical and utilitarian aspects of relevant optics including the essential theory. This revised, expanded, and improved edition contains new material on tunable lasers and discusses relevant topics in quantum optics.

  16. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  17. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  18. Fibre-optic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoy, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    This book describes in a comprehensive manner the components and systems of fiber optic communications and networks. The first section explains the theory of multimode and single-mode fibers, then the technological features, including manufacturing, cabling, and connecting. The second section describes the various components (passive and active optical components, integrated optics, opto-electronic transmitters and receivers, and optical amplifiers) used in fiber optic systems. Finally, the optical transmission system design is explained, and applications to optical networks and fiber optic se

  19. GRB 990712 optical decay: indication of bright host galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, J.; Courbin, F.; Cuadra, J.; Minniti, D.

    We have obtained a 5-min R-band exposure of the optical afterglow of GRB 990712 (Frontera, GCN #385; Bakos et al., GCN #387) with the ESO 3.5-m NTT on 16.403 July 1999 UT. We detect an unresolved (seeing FWHM = 1.8") object at RA (2000) = 22 31 53.03, Dec (2000) = -73 24 28.3 (with a positional uncertainty of +- 0.6" relative to the USNO-A2.0 system), consistent with the position of the bright decaying source discovered by Bakos et al. (IAUC 7225). We have tied our photometry to the PLANET photometric zeropoint (K. Sahu, personal communication) and find that the object has continued to fade to R = 21.48 +- 0.02 (systematic) +- 0.05 (random). The combined SAAO data (Bakos et al., IAUC 7225) and NTT data indicate that the light curve is leveling off relative to a power law decline. Assuming that the light curve can be modeled as the combined effects of a power law decline of the OT and a constant contribution from the host galaxy we find an OT decay slope of -0.81 (i.e. a rather slow decay) and a bright host galaxy with R = 22.0. Such a bright host galaxy would be consistent with its fairly low redshift (z = 0.43) and would possibly even account for the prominent emission lines seen in the VLT spectrum (Galama et al., GCN #388). We caution however that the hypothesis of a bright host galaxy is based on just a few data points. To test this hypothesis continued monitoring of the system is therefore urged. The NTT image and the R-band light curve are posted at http://www.astro.ku.dk/~jens/grb990712/ .

  20. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    was yet no experimental method for counting the num- ber of molecules in a given volume of gas which would allow direct verification of Avogadro's hypothesis. 6. Periodic Properties of Elements. By the early 19th century, about fifty elements had been discovered and their properties investigated. Based on these studies ...

  1. Early intervention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family conflict.12 We also know that the effects of violence exposure are likely magnified in unstable ... and how chronic 'toxic stress' may lead to difficulties in self-regulation, poor control of emotions, and ... High levels of violence affect every family in South Africa. Exposure to violence starts early, in both the home.

  2. Light Optics for Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, Matthew [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Piot, Philippe [NICADD, DeKalb; Ruan, Jinhao [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    In Optical Stochastic Cooling (OSC) radiation generated by a particle in a "pickup" undulator is amplified and transported to a downstream "kicker" undulator where it interacts with the same particle which radiated it. Fermilab plans to carry out both passive (no optical amplifier) and active (optical amplifier) tests of OSC at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) currently in construction*. The performace of the optical system is analyzed with simulations in Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) accounting for the specific temporal and spectral properties of undulator radiation and being augmented to include dispersion of lens material.

  3. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  4. Spider silk: a novel optical fibre for biochemical sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Hey Tow, Kenny; Chow, Desmond; Vollrath, Fritz; Dicaire, Isabelle; Gheysens, Tom; Thévenaz, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Whilst being thoroughly used in the textile industry and biomedical sector, silk has not yet been exploited for fibre optics-based sensing although silk fibres directly obtained from spiders can guide light and have shown early promises to being sensitive to some solvents. In this communication, a pioneering optical fibre sensor based on spider silk is reported, demonstrating for the first time the use of spider silk as an optical fibre sensor to detect polar solvents such as water, ammonia a...

  5. The Transition Of Fiber-Optic Gyro Technology Into Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, E.; Wagoner, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in recent years toward the development of producible fiber-optic rotation sensors. An overview is presented of the movement of the fiber-optic gyro into a product at McDonnell Douglas from early developments to a fieldable oil drilling tool. The current state-of-the-art of fiber-optic gyro technology with respect to near term product prospects is assessed.

  6. Engineering Design, construction and testing of an optical device for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports the design, construction and testing of an optical device to determine the fertility of poultry egg at early age. The device consists of optical components such as condenser lens, objective lens, eyepiece lens and a source of light, all encased in a wooden frame. It has a total length of about 1m and produces ...

  7. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  8. Optical image encryption topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Liang, Xiao; Xin, Zhou; Qiong-Hua, Wang; Sheng, Yuan; Yao-Yao, Chen

    2009-10-15

    Optical image encryption topology is proposed based on the principle of random-phase encoding. Various encryption topological units, involving peer-to-peer, ring, star, and tree topologies, can be realized by an optical 6f system. These topological units can be interconnected to constitute an optical image encryption network. The encryption and decryption can be performed in both digital and optical methods.

  9. On important precursor of singular optics (tutorial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskii, Peter V.; Felde, Christina V.; Bogatyryova, Halina V.; Konovchuk, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    The rise of singular optics is usually associated with the seminal paper by J. F. Nye and M. V. Berry [Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, 336, 165-189 (1974)]. Intense development of this area of modern photonics has started since the early eighties of the XX century due to invention of the interfrence technique for detection and diagnostics of phase singularities, such as optical vortices in complex speckle-structured light fields. The next powerful incentive for formation of singular optics into separate area of the science on light was connectected with discovering of very practical technique for creation of singular optical beams of various kinds on the base of computer-generated holograms. In the eghties and ninetieth of the XX century, singular optics evolved, almost entirely, under the approximation of complete coherency of light field. Only at the threshold of the XXI century, it has been comprehended that the singular-optics approaches can be fruitfully expanded onto partially spatially coherent, partially polarized and polychromatic light fields supporting singularities of new kinds, that has been resulted in establishing of correlation singular optics. Here we show that correlation singular optics has much deeper roots, ascending to "pre-singular" and even pre-laser epoch and associated with the concept of partial coherence and polarization. It is remarcable that correlation singular optics in its present interpretation has forestalled the standard coherent singular optics. This paper is timed to the sixtieth anniversary of the most profound precursor of modern correlation singular optics [J. Opt. Soc. Am., 47, 895-902 (1957)].

  10. Early discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Felde, Lina; Gichangi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Discontinuation of medical drug treatment is a serious problem in primary care. The need for a better understanding of the processes, including physician-specific mechanisms, is apparent. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between general practitioners' prescribing....... There was a positive association between the prevalence of prescribing for the specific drugs studied (antidepressants, antidiabetics, drugs against osteoporosis and lipid-lowering drugs) and early discontinuation (r = 0.29 -0.44), but not for anti-hypertensive drugs. The analysis of the association between prevalence...... of all drugs and drug-specific early discontinuation showed some degree of positive association - strongest for anti-hypertensive drugs (r = 0.62) and antidepressants (r = 0.43). Conclusion This study confirmed our hypothesis that general practitioners with high levels of prescribing attain higher rates...

  11. Optics for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Duree, Galen C

    2011-01-01

    The easy way to shed light on Optics In general terms, optics is the science of light. More specifically, optics is a branch of physics that describes the behavior and properties of light?including visible, infrared, and ultraviolet?and the interaction of light with matter. Optics For Dummies gives you an approachable introduction to optical science, methods, and applications. You'll get plain-English explanations of the nature of light and optical effects; reflection, refraction, and diffraction; color dispersion; optical devices, industrial, medical, and military applicatio

  12. Adaptive optics in microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin J

    2007-12-15

    The imaging properties of optical microscopes are often compromised by aberrations that reduce image resolution and contrast. Adaptive optics technology has been employed in various systems to correct these aberrations and restore performance. This has required various departures from the traditional adaptive optics schemes that are used in astronomy. This review discusses the sources of aberrations, their effects and their correction with adaptive optics, particularly in confocal and two-photon microscopes. Different methods of wavefront sensing, indirect aberration measurement and aberration correction devices are discussed. Applications of adaptive optics in the related areas of optical data storage, optical tweezers and micro/nanofabrication are also reviewed.

  13. Fiber optic connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  14. The 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics: Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    article we will describe briefly the remarkable 1963 dis- covery of the Diagonal Coherent State .... of the two-point amplitude correlation function; and via this object the concepts of partial coherence and its ... way the role of statistical methods in optics came to be much better appreciated. Some of the early names are those ...

  15. Integrated optics technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  16. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  17. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  18. Integrated optics theory and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hunsperger, Robert G

    1984-01-01

    Our intent in producing this book was to provide a text that would be comprehensive enough for an introductory course in integrated optics, yet concise enough in its mathematical derivations to be easily readable by a practicing engineer who desires an overview of the field. The response to the first edition has indeed been gratifying; unusually strong demand has caused it to be sold out during the initial year of publication, thus providing us with an early opportunity to produce this updated and improved second edition. This development is fortunate, because integrated optics is a very rapidly progressing field, with significant new research being regularly reported. Hence, a new chapter (Chap. 17) has been added to review recent progress and to provide numerous additional references to the relevant technical literature. Also, thirty-five new problems for practice have been included to supplement those at the ends of chapters in the first edition. Chapters I through 16 are essentially unchanged, except for ...

  19. Optical emission from a kilonova following a gravitational-wave-detected neutron-star merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Poznanski, Dovi; Kasen, Daniel; Barnes, Jennifer; Zaltzman, Michael; Vasylyev, Sergiy; Maoz, Dan; Valenti, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The merger of two neutron stars has been predicted to produce an optical-infrared transient (lasting a few days) known as a ‘kilonova’, powered by the radioactive decay of neutron-rich species synthesized in the merger. Evidence that short γ-ray bursts also arise from neutron-star mergers has been accumulating. In models of such mergers, a small amount of mass (10-4-10-2 solar masses) with a low electron fraction is ejected at high velocities (0.1-0.3 times light speed) or carried out by winds from an accretion disk formed around the newly merged object. This mass is expected to undergo rapid neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis, leading to the formation of radioactive elements that release energy as they decay, powering an electromagnetic transient. A large uncertainty in the composition of the newly synthesized material leads to various expected colours, durations and luminosities for such transients. Observational evidence for kilonovae has so far been inconclusive because it was based on cases of moderate excess emission detected in the afterglows of γ-ray bursts. Here we report optical to near-infrared observations of a transient coincident with the detection of the gravitational-wave signature of a binary neutron-star merger and with a low-luminosity short-duration γ-ray burst. Our observations, taken roughly every eight hours over a few days following the gravitational-wave trigger, reveal an initial blue excess, with fast optical fading and reddening. Using numerical models, we conclude that our data are broadly consistent with a light curve powered by a few hundredths of a solar mass of low-opacity material corresponding to lanthanide-poor (a fraction of 10-4.5 by mass) ejecta.

  20. Topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc particle coatings deposited by means of atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallenhorst, L.M., E-mail: lena.wallenhorst@hawk-hhg.de [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Laboratory of Laser and Plasma Technologies, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Loewenthal, L.; Avramidis, G. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Laboratory of Laser and Plasma Technologies, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Gerhard, C. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Laboratory of Laser and Plasma Technologies, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, Application Center for Plasma and Photonics, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 100, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Militz, H. [Wood Biology and Wood Products, Burckhardt Institute, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Büsgenweg 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ohms, G. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Laboratory of Laser and Plasma Technologies, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Viöl, W. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Laboratory of Laser and Plasma Technologies, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, Application Center for Plasma and Photonics, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 100, 37085 Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Zn/ZnO mixed systems were deposited from elemental zinc by a cold plasma-spray process. • Oxidation was confirmed by XPS. • The coatings exhibited a strong absorption in the UV spectral range, thus being suitable as protective layers, e.g. on thermosensitive materials. - Abstract: In this research, topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc oxide layers deposited by a cold plasma-spray process were measured. Here, zinc micro particles were fed to the afterglow of a plasma spark discharge whereas the substrates were placed in a quite cold zone of the effluent plasma jet. In this vein, almost closed layers were realised on different samples. As ascertained by laser scanning and atomic force microscopic measurements the particle size of the basic layer is in the nanometre scale. Additionally, larger particles and agglomerates were found on its top. The results indicate a partial plasma-induced diminishment of the initial particles, most probably due to melting or vaporisation. It is further shown that the plasma gives rise to an increased oxidation of such particles as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the resulting mixed layer was performed. It is shown that the deposited layers consist of zinc oxide and elemental zinc in approximately equal shares. In addition, the layer's band gap energy was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Here, considerable UV blocking properties of the deposited layers were observed. Possible underlying effects as well as potential applications are presented.

  1. Topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc particle coatings deposited by means of atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenhorst, L.M.; Loewenthal, L.; Avramidis, G.; Gerhard, C.; Militz, H.; Ohms, G.; Viöl, W.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Zn/ZnO mixed systems were deposited from elemental zinc by a cold plasma-spray process. • Oxidation was confirmed by XPS. • The coatings exhibited a strong absorption in the UV spectral range, thus being suitable as protective layers, e.g. on thermosensitive materials. - Abstract: In this research, topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc oxide layers deposited by a cold plasma-spray process were measured. Here, zinc micro particles were fed to the afterglow of a plasma spark discharge whereas the substrates were placed in a quite cold zone of the effluent plasma jet. In this vein, almost closed layers were realised on different samples. As ascertained by laser scanning and atomic force microscopic measurements the particle size of the basic layer is in the nanometre scale. Additionally, larger particles and agglomerates were found on its top. The results indicate a partial plasma-induced diminishment of the initial particles, most probably due to melting or vaporisation. It is further shown that the plasma gives rise to an increased oxidation of such particles as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the resulting mixed layer was performed. It is shown that the deposited layers consist of zinc oxide and elemental zinc in approximately equal shares. In addition, the layer's band gap energy was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Here, considerable UV blocking properties of the deposited layers were observed. Possible underlying effects as well as potential applications are presented.

  2. Topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc particle coatings deposited by means of atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenhorst, L. M.; Loewenthal, L.; Avramidis, G.; Gerhard, C.; Militz, H.; Ohms, G.; Viöl, W.

    2017-07-01

    In this research, topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc oxide layers deposited by a cold plasma-spray process were measured. Here, zinc micro particles were fed to the afterglow of a plasma spark discharge whereas the substrates were placed in a quite cold zone of the effluent plasma jet. In this vein, almost closed layers were realised on different samples. As ascertained by laser scanning and atomic force microscopic measurements the particle size of the basic layer is in the nanometre scale. Additionally, larger particles and agglomerates were found on its top. The results indicate a partial plasma-induced diminishment of the initial particles, most probably due to melting or vaporisation. It is further shown that the plasma gives rise to an increased oxidation of such particles as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the resulting mixed layer was performed. It is shown that the deposited layers consist of zinc oxide and elemental zinc in approximately equal shares. In addition, the layer's band gap energy was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Here, considerable UV blocking properties of the deposited layers were observed. Possible underlying effects as well as potential applications are presented.

  3. The Robotic Super-LOTIS Telescope: Results & Future Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, G. G.; Milne, P. A.; Park, H. S.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Hartmann, D. H.; Updike, A.; Hurley, K.

    2008-01-01

    We provide an overview of the robotic Super-LOTIS (Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System) telescope and present results from gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow observations using Super-LOTIS and other Steward Observatory telescopes. The 0.6-m Super-LOTIS telescope is a fully robotic system dedicated to the measurement of prompt and early time optical emission from GRBs. The system began routine operations from its Steward Observatory site atop Kitt Peak in April 2000 and currently operates ...

  4. Design of optical switches by illusion optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoorian, H R; Abrishamian, M S

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, illusion optics theory is employed to form Bragg gratings in an optical waveguide in order to design an optical switch. By using an illusion device at a certain distance from the waveguide, the effective refractive index of the waveguide is remotely modulated, turning the waveguide into a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) which blocks the waves at a stop band. By removing the illusion device, the waves propagate through the waveguide again. In addition, this method is used to remotely tune DBR optical properties such as resonant frequency and bandwidth in a wide range, which leads to a tunable filter for optical switching applications. Finally, using an illusion device at a distance, an optical cavity is created by inserting defects remotely in a DBR without any physical damage in the primary device. (paper)

  5. Design of optical switches by illusion optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoorian, H. R.; Abrishamian, M. S.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, illusion optics theory is employed to form Bragg gratings in an optical waveguide in order to design an optical switch. By using an illusion device at a certain distance from the waveguide, the effective refractive index of the waveguide is remotely modulated, turning the waveguide into a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) which blocks the waves at a stop band. By removing the illusion device, the waves propagate through the waveguide again. In addition, this method is used to remotely tune DBR optical properties such as resonant frequency and bandwidth in a wide range, which leads to a tunable filter for optical switching applications. Finally, using an illusion device at a distance, an optical cavity is created by inserting defects remotely in a DBR without any physical damage in the primary device.

  6. Linear optics correction in the CEBAF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.A.; Bickley, M.; Bisognano, J.

    1997-01-01

    During commissioning of the CEBAF accelerator, correcting dispersion, momentum compaction and betatron beam envelopes was essential for robust operation. To speed the diagnostic process we developed a method which allows one to track and correct the machine optics on-line. The method is based on measuring the propagation of 30 Hz modulated betatron oscillations. The beam optics of the accelerator was altered to decrease lattice sensitivity at critical points and to simplify control of the betatron function match. The calculation of the Courant-Snyder invariant from signals of each pair of beam position monitors was used for a correction of the betatron functions. The experience of optics correction and the study of long and short term machine reproducibility obtained during 1996 and early 1997 are also discussed. With minor modifications this method can also be used for on-line optics measurement and correction in circular accelerators

  7. Introduction to nonimaging optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction to Nonimaging Optics covers the theoretical foundations and design methods of nonimaging optics, as well as key concepts from related fields. This fully updated, revised, and expanded Second Edition: Features a new and intuitive introduction with a basic description of the advantages of nonimaging opticsAdds new chapters on wavefronts for a prescribed output (irradiance or intensity), infinitesimal étendue optics (generalization of the aplanatic optics), and Köhler optics and color mixingIncorporates new material on the simultaneous multiple surface (SMS) design method in 3-D, int

  8. From optics testing to micro optics testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christian; Dorn, Ralf; Pfund, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    Testing micro optics, i.e. lenses with dimensions down to 0.1mm and less, with high precision requires a dedicated design of the testing device, taking into account propagation and wave-optical effects. In this paper, we discuss testing methods based on Shack-Hartmann wavefront technology for functional testing in transmission and for the measurement of surface shape in reflection. As a first example of more conventional optics testing, i.e. optics in the millimeter range, we present the measurement of binoculars in transmission, and discuss the measured wave aberrations and imaging quality. By repeating the measurement at different wavelengths, information on chromatic effects is retrieved. A task that is often tackled using Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors is the alignment of collimation optics in front of a light source. In case of a micro-optical collimation unit with a 1/e² beam diameter of ca. 1mm, we need adapted relay optics for suitable beam expansion and well-defined imaging conditions. In this example, we will discuss the alignment process and effects of the relay optics magnification, as well as typical performance data. Oftentimes, micro optics are fabricated not as single pieces, but as mass optics, e.g. by lithographic processes. Thus, in order to reduce tooling and alignment time, an automated test procedure is necessary. We present an approach for the automated testing of wafer- or tray-based micro optics, and discuss transmission and reflection measurement capabilities. Exemplary performance data is shown for a sample type with 30 microns in diameter, where typical repeatabilities of a few nanometers (rms) are reached.

  9. Miniature Optical Isolator, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA's need for miniature optical isolators in atom interferometry applications, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a miniature optical...

  10. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Optical Airborne Tracker System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Airborne Tracker System (OATS) is an airborne dual-axis optical tracking system capable of pointing at any sky location or ground target.  The objectives...

  12. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  13. Optics for SIERRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To demonstrate a massively parallel optical ray trace to enable the design and analysis of extremely large aperture optical systems. This, in turn, enables...

  14. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  15. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  16. Optical illusion: apogee development

    OpenAIRE

    Elena, Chernyсhuk; Bazylevych, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    The article provides a classification of optical illusions performed by the authors. Briefly described each of the 11 identified species. Offered the variants using optical illusions in the urban environment, exterior and interior.

  17. Advanced digital optical communications

    CERN Document Server

    Binh, Le Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a fundamental understanding of digital communication applications in optical communication technologies. Emphasizing operation principles versus mathematical analysis, the Second Edition includes new coverage of superchannel optical transmission systems, metropolitan and long-haul optical systems and networks, and Nyquist pulse shaping and high spectral efficiency of optical transmission systems, as well as new homework problems and examples. Featuring theoretical foundations as well as practical case studies, the text focuses on enhancements to digital technologies that are

  18. Emerging Correlation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Gbur, Gregory J.; Polyanskii, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques.......This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques....

  19. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2009-01-01

    In the fourty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Backscattering and Anderson localization of light- Advances in oliton manipulation in optical lattices- Fundamental quantum noise in optical amplification- Invisibility cloaks

  20. Flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) study of ion/molecule reactions in support of the detection of biogenic alcohols by medium-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooghe, F.; Amelynck, C.; Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Schoon, N.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2009-08-01

    This article deals with the validation of and first measurements with a newly constructed flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument. All reactions were studied in He buffer gas at a pressure of 1.43 hPa and a temperature of 298 K. The validation consisted of the study of the gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of methanol and ethanol (M) with the reactant ions H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 0-3), MH+, M2H+, and MH+.H2O and the reactions of MH+ with H2O. Obtained results are compared with available literature data and with calculated collision rate constants. The validated FA-SIFT has subsequently been used to characterize the reactions of the unsaturated biogenic alcohols 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, 1-penten-3-ol, cis-3-hexen-1-ol and trans-2-hexen-1-ol (ROH) with H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 0-3) as well as the secondary reactions of the H3O+/ROH product ions with H2O (hydration) and ROH in view of their accurate quantification in ambient air samples with medium-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) instrumentation using H3O+ reactant ions. Whereas water elimination following proton transfer was found to be the main mechanism for all H3O+/ROH reactions studied and for the H3O+.H2O/trans-2-hexen-1-ol reaction, all other H3O+.(H2O)n/ROH (n = 1, 2) reactions proceeded by multiple reaction mechanisms. H3O+.(H2O)3 reactions proceeded mainly (C6 alcohols) or exclusively (C5 alcohols) by ligand switching followed by water elimination. Hydration of the H3O+/ROH product ions was observed whenever they contained oxygen. The secondary reactions with ROH were also found to proceed by multiple reaction pathways.

  1. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  2. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2015-01-01

    The Progress in Optics series contains more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments, helping optical scientists and optical engineers stay abreast of their fields. Comprehensive, in-depth reviewsEdited by the leading authority in the field

  3. Multiplane optical microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-11-21

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to optical microscopy. In one aspect, an apparatus includes a sample holder, a first objective lens, a plurality of optical components, a second objective lens, and a mirror. The apparatus may directly image a cross-section of a sample oblique to or parallel to the optical axis of the first objective lens, without scanning.

  4. Fun with Optical Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alti, Kamlesh

    2017-01-01

    Optical fibres play a very crucial role in today's technologies. Academic courses in optical fibres start at the undergraduate level. Nevertheless, student's curiosity towards optical fibres starts from the school level. In this paper, some fun experiments have been designed for both school and college students, which have some concrete…

  5. Optical ordinal optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2000-07-01

    Ordinal optimization is a relatively new field of mathematics that seems never to have been applied to optics. Optics has made extensive use of traditional cardinal optimization. This paper explores the possibility that ordinal optimization might be useful in optics. The conclusion is: Not directly but indirectly.

  6. Rogue wave early warning through spectral measurements?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the spectra of the Peregrine soliton and higher-order rational solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE), which we use as a model of the rogue waves in optics and in the deep ocean. We show that these solutions have specific triangular spectra that are certainly easily measurable in optical systems and which may be amenable to characterisation in ocean environments. As the triangular feature of the solutions appears at an early stage of their evolution, this raises the possibility of early detection and possible localized warning of the appearance of rogue waves. We anticipate that studying the characteristics of 'early warning spectra' of rogue waves may become an important future field of research.

  7. Optical fiber telecommunications systems and networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminow, Ivan; Willner, Alan E

    2013-01-01

    Optical Fiber Telecommunications VI (A&B) is the sixth in a series that has chronicled the progress in the R&D of lightwave communications since the early 1970s. Written by active authorities from academia and industry, this edition brings a fresh look to many essential topics, including devices, subsystems, systems and networks. A central theme is the enabling of high-bandwidth communications in a cost-effective manner for the development of customer applications. These volumes are an ideal reference for R&D engineers and managers, optical systems implementers, university researchers and s

  8. Optical fiber telecommunications components and subsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminow, Ivan; Willner, Alan E

    2013-01-01

    Optical Fiber Telecommunications VI (A&B) is the sixth in a series that has chronicled the progress in the R&D of lightwave communications since the early 1970s. Written by active authorities from academia and industry, this edition brings a fresh look to many essential topics, including devices, subsystems, systems and networks. A central theme is the enabling of high-bandwidth communications in a cost-effective manner for the development of customer applications. These volumes are an ideal reference for R&D engineers and managers, optical systems implementers, university researchers and s

  9. Space Flight Applications of Optical Fiber; 30 Years of Space Flight Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie N.

    2010-01-01

    For over thirty years NASA has had success with space flight missions that utilize optical fiber component technology. One of the early environmental characterization experiments that included optical fiber was launched as the Long Duration Exposure Facility in 1978. Since then, multiple missions have launched with optical fiber components that functioned as expected, without failure throughout the mission life. The use of optical fiber in NASA space flight communications links and exploration and science instrumentation is reviewed.

  10. [Optical diagnosis of cervical dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Igor; Meda, Paolo; Genet, Magalie; Pelte, Marie-Françoise; Vlastos, Anne-Thérèse

    2004-01-01

    Cervix cancer is a curable disease when diagnosed at an early stage. Screening of cervical lesions by cytology and colposcopy with in situ staining has allowed for substantial progress in early diagnosis and consequently the cure of cervix cancer. Nevertheless, because of its low specificity, this approach generally implies repetitive tissue sampling and, thus a relative long time before the treatment of the lesions. Furthermore, the cost of preparation and analysis of biopsy samples is sufficiently high to represent a burden for industrialized countries and a virtual impossibility for the developing world. To overcome these problems, various biophotonic methods using optical fibers have been developed to allow for detection of cervical epithelial anomalies in a specific, fast and non-invasive way. This process, known as "optical biopsy", is based on the measurement of light-tissue interactions, which are analysed by various mathematical and data processing methods, to provide information on the metabolism and morphology of epithelial tissue. Currently investigated methods can be distinguished according to the type of signal used to probe the tissue (fluorescence, reflectance), the depth of analysed tissue (surface analysis, confocal imaging, tomography), the analysis modalities (spectral measurements or imaging), and the use of additive molecules (contrasting or photosensitizing agents, inorganic fluorophores). While most of the methods remain experimental, constant progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of light behavior in biological environments as well as advances in optical fibers technology, will make a number of these methods soon available for clinical practice to contribute efficiently to the reduction of biopsy number and cost of cervical screening. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  11. Near perfect optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeke, R.; Farnsworth, A.V.; Neumann, C.C.; Sweatt, W.C.; Warren, M.E.; Weed, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    This report discusses a novel fabrication process to produce nearly perfect optics. The process utilizes vacuum deposition techniques to optimally modify polished optical substrate surfaces. The surface figure, i.e. contour of a polished optical element, is improved by differentially filling in the low spots on the surface using flux from a physical vapor deposition source through an appropriate mask. The process is expected to enable the manufacture of diffraction-limited optical systems for the UV, extreme UV, and soft X-ray spectral regions, which would have great impact on photolithography and astronomy. This same technique may also reduce the fabrication cost of visible region optics with aspheric surfaces.

  12. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  13. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self -organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  14. Small scale optics

    CERN Document Server

    Yupapin, Preecha

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of light in small scale optics or nano/micro optical devices has shown promising results, which can be used for basic and applied research, especially in nanoelectronics. Small Scale Optics presents the use of optical nonlinear behaviors for spins, antennae, and whispering gallery modes within micro/nano devices and circuits, which can be used in many applications. This book proposes a new design for a small scale optical device-a microring resonator device. Most chapters are based on the proposed device, which uses a configuration know as a PANDA ring resonator. Analytical and nu

  15. Optic disc oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Kromann; Hamann, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Optic disc oedema describes the nonspecific, localized swelling of the optic nerve head regardless of aetiology. Therefore, differentiating among the various aetiologies depends on a thorough history and knowledge of the clinical characteristics of the underlying conditions. Papilloedema strictly...... refers to optic disc oedema as a consequence of elevated intracranial pressure. It is usually a bilateral condition and visual function is preserved until late. Optic disc oedema caused by an anterior optic neuropathy is usually unilateral and accompanied by the loss of visual function....

  16. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2006-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  17. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    1977-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  18. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nonlinear optical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lugiato, Luigi; Brambilla, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Guiding graduate students and researchers through the complex world of laser physics and nonlinear optics, this book provides an in-depth exploration of the dynamics of lasers and other relevant optical systems, under the umbrella of a unitary spatio-temporal vision. Adopting a balanced approach, the book covers traditional as well as special topics in laser physics, quantum electronics and nonlinear optics, treating them from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamical systems. These include laser emission, frequency generation, solitons, optically bistable systems, pulsations and chaos and optical pattern formation. It also provides a coherent and up-to-date treatment of the hierarchy of nonlinear optical models and of the rich variety of phenomena they describe, helping readers to understand the limits of validity of each model and the connections among the phenomena. It is ideal for graduate students and researchers in nonlinear optics, quantum electronics, laser physics and photonics.

  20. Optical logic: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2005-05-01

    Progress of optical logic has been anything but uniform or even monotonic. The hope for "all optical computers" was largely abandoned after devastating critiques by Keyes. Over time, optical logic transformed into a very viable niche activity by the needs of optical communication for "all optical" logic and the advent of a critical component: the SOA or Semiconductor Optical Amplifier. I argue that a new phase in this uneven history can be defined - linear (single photon, not multiple entangled photon) quantum optical logic. These can perform conservative, reversible logic operations without energy or time penalties, but cascading requires the irreversible act of measurement, so only single devices or single layers can deliver those advantages.