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Sample records for early miocene varved

  1. Refining the time span between the early Holocene Askja-S and Hässeldalen tephras through differential dating based on varve counting from Lake Czechowskie (N Poland)

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    Ott, Florian; Wulf, Sabine; Serb, Johanna; Słowiński, Michał; Obremska, Milena; Tjallingii, Rik; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Robust chronological framework is a crucial necessity for palaeoclimate reconstructions and especially for synchronizing records to decipher climatic teleconnections. Volcanic ash deposits (tephra) provide isochronous time marker that can be utilized as tie-lines to synchronize sedimentary archives. Advances in the detection and identification of non-visible (crypto-) tephra, often transported over thousands of kilometers, also allows identifying ash deposits even in distal records. We report the first findings of co-existing early Holocene Hässeldalen and Askja-S cryptotephras in a varved sediment record in Lake Czechowskie (JC, northern Poland). Annual layer counting was used to establish a varve chronology and micro-facies analyses, relative calcium (Ca) and titanium (Ti) concentrations were used to decipher between lake productivity and detrital flux. Here we focus (i) on the determination of the time span between both tephras, (ii) revised age estimates for the Askja-S tephra and (iii) the sedimentological response of the JC record to the Preboreal Oscillation (PBO), a short lived cold episode during the early Holocene. A differential dating approach revealed a time span of 152 +11/-8 varve years counted in the JC sediment record between both tephras. Since the varved interval of the JC sediment record comprising the tephras is floating, we anchored the floating varve chronology to an absolute timescale by using the radiocarbon-dated Hässeldalen Tephra (11,380 ± 216 cal a BP, Wohlfarth et al, 2006). The resulting age for the Askja-S of 11,454-11,002 cal a BP is, even considering the rather large uncertainties, a few decades to several hundred years older than most radiocarbon based age models, but it supports the original age model from Hässseldala port. The sediment response to the PBO cold period is seen only in a slight decrease in titanium, a proxy for detrital matter flux. Varve micro-facies did not change during this interval confirming a weak impact

  2. A major reorganization of Asian climate by the early Miocene

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    Z. T. Guo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The global climate system experienced a series of drastic changes during the Cenozoic. In Asia, these include the climate transformation from a zonal pattern to a monsoon-dominated pattern, the disappearance of typical subtropical aridity, and the onset of inland deserts. Despite major advances in the last two decades in characterizing and understanding these climate phenomena, disagreements persist relative to the timing, behaviors and underlying causes.

    This paper addresses these issues mainly based on two lines of evidence. First, we compiled newly collected data from geological indicators of the Cenozoic environment in China as paleoenvironmental maps of ten intervals. In confirming the earlier observation that a zonal climate pattern was transformed into a monsoonal one, the maps within the Miocene indicate that this change was achieved by the early Miocene, roughly consistent with the onset of loess deposition in China. Although a monsoon-like regime would have existed in the Eocene, it was restricted to tropical-subtropical regions. The latitudinal oscillations of the climate zones during the Paleogene are likely attributable to the imbalance in evolution of polar ice-sheets between the two hemispheres.

    Secondly, we examine the relevant depositional and soil forming processes of the Miocene loess-soil sequences to determine the circulation characteristics with emphasis on the early Miocene. Continuous eolian deposition in the middle reaches of the Yellow River since the early Miocene firmly indicates the formation of inland deserts, which have been constantly maintained during the past 22 Ma. Grain-size gradients between loess sections indicate northerly dust-carrying winds from northern sources, a clear indication of an Asian winter monsoon system. Meanwhile, well-developed Luvisols show evidence that moisture from the oceans reached northern China. This evidence shows the coexistence of two kinds of

  3. Early, middle, and late Miocene basin development, California

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    Bachman, S.B.

    1988-03-01

    Contrary to earlier models of progressive basin development related to northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, it can now be documented that the major basins of coastal California developed at about the same time in the late Oligocene to early Miocene. This basin development is marked by rapid deepening of basin floors, subsequent changes in depositional facies from nonmarine and shallow marine to deep marine, and widespread volcanism dated at 23-20 Ma. The coastal basins likely formed by rifting and subsidence linked to the proximity of the Farallon-pacific spreading ridge and the subduction of hot young oceanic crust, but cannot be correlated to any existing models of triple junction migration. Indeed, strike-slip restored positions of the coastal basins at their inception indicate that the basins were spread out over about 800 km of the southern coast of California. The Miocene basins were likely larger than the present coastal basins, although their configurations are obscured by late Neogene faulting and erosion. It is likely, however, that paleohighs separated at least some of the margin into proximal and distal basins. With local exceptions, structuring in the Miocene basins was primarily extensional, with widespread strike-slip and thrust tectonics restricted mainly to latest Miocene and younger events. Plate reconstructions suggest several hundred kilometers of transform motion occurred along the California margin during the Miocene, but there is only limited evidence of this movement in the known history of either the basins or the major faults of California. Sedimentation during the Miocene was controlled by both oceanic conditions (biogenic component) and the relative abundance of clastic input. The clastic input was controlled by a combination of proximal vs distal basinal positions, eustatic sea level changes, and local tectonics.

  4. The early to mid-Miocene environment of Antarctica

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    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoecological studies in the Transantarctic Mountains of the McMurdo region provide evidence that the climate was both warmer and wetter in the early to mid-Miocene than it was during the late Miocene. The climate change was accompanied by a shift from wet- to cold-based glaciation in the TAM and the probable growth of the polar ice sheet. Terrestrial and freshwater aquatic fossil assemblages from the Friis Hills (77°S) and the Olympus Range (77°S), with endpoint 40Ar/39Ar ages on tephras of 19.76 Ma and 14.07 Ma, respectively, indicate climatic cooling during the interval. At c.14 Ma, the temperature dropped below the threshold required to support the plants and insects of a tundra biome, and they became extinct. This interpretation is supported by pollen studies from Ross Sea cores. The extinction of the tundra biota on the continent appears to have been time-transgressive, occurring at 12.8 Ma on the Antarctic Peninsula. Evidence of climatic cooling from early to mid-Miocene is based on a decrease in biodiversity. During interglacial phases of the early Miocene, the poorly drained valley of the Friis Hills supported a sexually-reproducing moss community dominated by Campylium cf. polygamum, which today grows on the margins of lakes and in soil between boulders. Wood and leaves of Nothofagus (Southern Beech), and the seeds of at least five other angiosperm species are preserved as fossils. In addition, there are abundant megaspores and spiny, curved leaves of the aquatic lycopod Isoetes (Quillwort), as well as chitinous remains of curculionid beetles and Chironomidae (midges). During glacial phases, the only fossils found are Nothofagus leaves of a species which appears to be different than that associated with the interglacial phases. Pollen supports the interpretation that there was more than one species of Nothofagus in the vegetation. The types and numbers of species indicate that the vegetation was a shrub tundra. The closest modern analog for the fossil

  5. Interannual and orbital-scale climate variability in the early Miocene: Compound-specific D/H records from the Foulden Maar Diatomite, New Zealand

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    D'Andrea, W. J.; Fox, B.; Lee, D.

    2013-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle is the most important interannual climate variation on Earth and has far reaching impacts on global climate. However, the behavior of ENSO over orbital timescales and under different global climate states is poorly understood and controversial. It has been proposed that ENSO behaved much differently in the past, perhaps even transitioning toward a permanent El Niño-like state. Our understanding of the ENSO response to orbital variations and the background climate state is incomplete and there are fundamental flaws in our knowledge of this important player in Earth's climate system. Here we present a 100,000-yr long compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) record along with varve thickness data that document southern New Zealand (46°S, 170°E) climate in the early Miocene; the results suggest modulation of ENSO by Earth's orbital changes at precession (~22,000 year) and semiprecession (~11,000 year) timescales. Our data come from analyses of the Foulden Maar Diatomite, an annually laminated sediment sequence from an early Miocene freshwater lake in Otago, New Zealand. The diatomite contains approximately 100,000 dark-light couplets interpreted as biogenic varves, and has exquisite preservation of leaves, flowers, insects, diatom frustules and n-alkanoic acids derived from leaf waxes and algae. D/H records from n-alkanoic acids reveal large variations corresponding to precession (~22,000 yrs) and semi-precession (~11,000 yrs) timescales that reflect large paleohydrological changes. Varve thickness records reveal spectral power that exceeds the 99% confidence limit in the 3 to 7-yr band, and indicate that ENSO was an important driver of interannual climate variability in southern New Zealand during the early Miocene. We propose that the semiprecession-paced hydrologic changes represented by our compound-specific D/H record document the modulation of ENSO by variations in Earth's orbital configuration; specifically, that

  6. EARLY MIOCENE INSULAR VERTEBRATES FROM LAERRU (SARDINIA, ITALY: PRELIMINARY NOTE

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    DANIEL ZOBOLI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new vertebrate assemblage was discovered in an Early  Miocene lacustrine deposit near the village of Laerru (northern Sardinia, Italy. The assemblage is composed by mammals, reptiles and a bird. The mammals are represented by three ruminants (cf. Sardomeryx oschiriensis, Pecora indet. small size and Pecora indet. very small size and one dormouse (Peridyromys aff. murinus while reptiles are represented by turtles (Trionychidae? and crocodiles (cf. Diplocynodon sp.. A bird bone fragment is also reported and referred to Palaeortyx cf. brevipes (Galliformes. The assemblage can be related to the “Oschiri fauna”, one of the oldest endemic insular fauna known in the Mediterranean. The age of the Laerru vertebrates is early-middle Burdigalian, between 18.8 and 18.3 Ma, corresponding to the mammal unit of the main land MN3. The predominance of ruminants confirms the good capacity of these mammals to colonize insular environments.

  7. A fish assemblage from an early Miocene horizon from Jabal Zaltan, Libya

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    Argyriou, Thodoris; Cook, Todd D.; Muftah, Ahmed M.; Pavlakis, Paris; Boaz, Noel T.; Murray, Alison M.

    2015-02-01

    Recent excavations and prospecting in the early to middle Miocene deposits of the Maradah Formation in Jabal Zaltan, Libya, yielded a diverse fish assemblage coming from an early Miocene locality. The material described here includes more than 18 marine and freshwater taxa most of which were previously unreported from the area. Jabal Zaltan is one of the very few early Miocene Afroarabian fossil sites that produced such a diverse fish sample. Therefore, the fossils described here provide a unique insight into the composition of the early Miocene fish faunas from the northern African coast; a critical time period for faunas of the continent, as contact with Eurasia ended 100 million years of African isolation. In addition, the Jabal Zaltan fossils help consolidate the validity of Galeocerdo mayumbensis and extend its geographic range to include the Tethys. The Maradah deposits also host the first occurrences of two genera (Pteromylaeus, Distichodus) in the fossil record. The fish finds support the presumed depositional environment that of tropical shallow estuarine to deltaic conditions, and the freshwater fishes document the presence of a modern-type Nilosudanian fauna containing elements with both African and Asian affinities. The Jabal Zaltan ichthyofauna, with its diversity of taxa, has the potential to become a key reference fauna for future studies of early Miocene African fishes.

  8. A platyrrhine talus from the early Miocene of Peru (Amazonian Madre de Dios Subandean Zone)

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    Marivaux, L.; Salas-Gismondi, R.; Tejada, J.; Billet, J.; Louterbach, M.; Vink, J.; Bailleul, J.; Roddaz, M.; Antoine, P.-O

    2012-01-01

    The earliest platyrrhines have been documented from the late Oligocene of Bolivia (Salla) and from the early and early middle Miocene of middle and high latitudes (central Chile and Argentinean Patagonia). Recent paleontological field expeditions in Peruvian Amazonia (Atalaya, Cusco; Upper Madre de

  9. The flora of the Early Miocene Brandon Lignite, Vermont, USA. 8 Caldesia (Alismastaceae)

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    Haggard, K.K.; Tiffney, B.H. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Science

    1997-02-01

    Caldesia, a genus of aquatic monocotyledons, is represented by four living species, which are widely distributed in the temperate and tropical Old World. The genus has an extensive Oligocene through Pleistocene fossil record in Eurasia. This paper surveys the morphology of the extant and fossil fruits of the Alismataceae, and provides a detailed review of the morphology and anatomy of living and fossil Caldesia fruits. The latter exhibit substantial similarity, making the recognition of separate species on the basis of fruit morphology difficult. A new species Caldesia brandoniana is erected from the Early Miocene Brandon Lignite of Vermont primarily on the basis of its geographic isolation; careful revision of all fossil fruiting material of Caldesia might require placement of the Brandon specimens in a more inclusive form species. Together with leaves of Caldesia from the Miocene Clarkia flora of Idaho, this occurrence indicates that Caldesia was in the New World as recently as the Early Miocene.

  10. Effect of ocean gateways on the global ocean circulation in the late Oligocene and early Miocene

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    von der Heydt, A.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/245567526; Dijkstra, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073504467

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of changes in the tectonic boundary conditions on global ocean circulation patterns. Using a fully coupled climate model in an idealized setup, we compare situations corresponding to the late Oligocene, the early Miocene, and present day. The model results show the

  11. A major reorganization of Asian climate regime by the early Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Guo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The global climate system has experienced a series of drastic changes during the Cenozoic. These include the climate transformation in Asia, from a zonal pattern to a monsoon-dominant pattern, the disappearance of subtropical aridity related to a planetary circulation system and the onset of inland deserts in central Asia. Despite of the major advances in the last two decades in characterizing and understanding these climate phenomena, disagreements persist relative to the timing, behaviors and underlying causes.

    This paper addresses these issues mainly based on two lines of evidence. Firstly, we newly collected the available Cenozoic geological indicators of environment in China to compile the paleoenvironmental maps of ten intervals with a more detailed examination within the Oligocene and Miocene. In confirming the earlier observation that a zonal climate pattern was transformed into a monsoonal one, the new maps within the Miocene indicate that this major change was achieved by the early Miocene, roughly consistent with the onset of loess deposition in China. Although a monsoon-like regime would have existed in the Eocene, it was restricted in the tropical-subtropical regions. The observed latitudinal oscillations of the climate zones during the Paleogene are likely attributable to the imbalanced evolution of polar ice-sheets between the two hemispheres.

    Secondly, we examine the relevant depositional and soil-forming processes of the Miocene loess-soil sequences to determine the circulation characteristics with special emphasis given to the early Miocene. Continuous eolian deposition in the middle reaches of the Yellow River since the early Miocene firmly indicates the formation of inland deserts, which has been constantly maintained in the past 22 Ma. Inter-section grain-size gradients indicate northerly dust-carrying winds and source location, as is regarded as the main criteria of the Asian winter monsoon

  12. Biostratigraphical and palaeoecological implications of the small mammal assemblage from the late early Miocene of Montalvos2, Teruel Basin, Spain

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    Hordijk, Kees; Bosma, Anneke; de Bruijn, Hans; van Dam, Jan; Geraedts, Caspar; van den Hoek Ostende, Lars; Reumer, Jelle; Wessels, Wilma

    The rich early Miocene small mammal assemblage from Montalvos2, collected from lacustrine deposits directly overlying the basement, is unique within the Teruel Basin, a basin that is otherwise well known for its late Miocene/Pliocene mammal faunas. The presence of Democricetodon decipiens,

  13. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene

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    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Gasson, Edward; Kuhn, Gerhard; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco; SMS Science Team; Acton, Gary; Askin, Rosemary; Atkins, Clifford; Bassett, Kari; Beu, Alan; Blackstone, Brian; Browne, Gregory; Ceregato, Alessandro; Cody, Rosemary; Cornamusini, Gianluca; Corrado, Sveva; DeConto, Robert; Del Carlo, Paola; Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Dunbar, Gavin; Falk, Candice; Field, Brad; Fielding, Christopher; Florindo, Fabio; Frank, Tracy; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Grelle, Thomas; Gui, Zi; Handwerger, David; Hannah, Michael; Harwood, David M.; Hauptvogel, Dan; Hayden, Travis; Henrys, Stuart; Hoffmann, Stefan; Iacoviello, Francesco; Ishman, Scott; Jarrard, Richard; Johnson, Katherine; Jovane, Luigi; Judge, Shelley; Kominz, Michelle; Konfirst, Matthew; Krissek, Lawrence; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lacy, Laura; Levy, Richard; Maffioli, Paola; Magens, Diana; Marcano, Maria C.; Millan, Cristina; Mohr, Barbara; Montone, Paola; Mukasa, Samuel; Naish, Timothy; Niessen, Frank; Ohneiser, Christian; Olney, Mathew; Panter, Kurt; Passchier, Sandra; Patterson, Molly; Paulsen, Timothy; Pekar, Stephen; Pierdominici, Simona; Pollard, David; Raine, Ian; Reed, Joshua; Reichelt, Lucia; Riesselman, Christina; Rocchi, Sergio; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Sandroni, Sonia; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Schmitt, Douglas; Speece, Marvin; Storey, Bryan; Strada, Eleonora; Talarico, Franco; Taviani, Marco; Tuzzi, Eva; Verosub, Kenneth; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Warny, Sophie; Wilson, Gary; Wilson, Terry; Wonik, Thomas; Zattin, Massimiliano

    2016-03-01

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23-14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3-4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (˜280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (˜500 ppm) atmospheric CO2. These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2 during the early to mid-Miocene.

  14. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene.

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    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Gasson, Edward; Kuhn, Gerhard; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco

    2016-03-29

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23-14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3-4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (∼280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (∼500 ppm) atmospheric CO2 These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2 during the early to mid-Miocene.

  15. Early to middle Miocene foraminifera from the deep-sea Congo Fan, offshore Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Kender, S; Kaminski, M.A.; Jones, R W

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of a 630m section of an exploration well penetrating the distal part of the Congo Fan (~2000m water depth) yielded high abundance and diversity assemblages of agglutinated and calcareous benthic foraminifera. Planktonic foraminifera constrain the age to Early – Middle Miocene, and \\delta 18O records reveal the Mi1 (~16.3 Ma) isotopic shift. Relatively few taxonomic studies of deep-water calcareous and agglutinated benthic foraminifera exist from this time period in this loca...

  16. A new age model for the early-middle Miocene in the North Alpine Foreland Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbacher, Bettina; Krijgsman, Wout; Pippèrr, Martina; Sant, Karin; Kirscher, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The establishment of high-resolution age models for sedimentary successions is crucial for numerous research questions in the geosciences and related disciplines. Such models provide an absolute chronology that permits precise dating of depositional episodes and related processes such as mountain uplift or climate change. Recently, our work in the Miocene sediments of the North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB) has revealed a significantly younger age (16.6 Myr) for sediments that were thought to have been deposited 18 Myr ago. This implies that a fundamentally revised new age model is needed for the entire suite of lower-middle Miocene sedimentary rocks in the NAFB (20 to 15-Myr). Our new data also indicate that previously published reconstructions of early-middle Miocene palaeogeography, sedimentation dynamics, mountain uplift and climate change in the NAFB all require a critical review and revision. Further, the time-span addressed is of special interest, since it encompasses the onset of a global warming phase. However, it appears that a fundamentally revised new age model for the entire suite of lower-middle Miocene sedimentary rocks in the NAFB can only be achieved based on a 500 m deep drilling in the NAFB for which we currently seek collaboration partners to develop a grant application to the International Continental Deep Drilling Program (ICDP). Reference: Reichenbacher, B., W. Krijgsman, Y. Lataster, M. Pippèrr, C. G. C. Van Baak, L. Chang, D. Kälin, J. Jost, G. Doppler, D. Jung, J. Prieto, H. Abdul Aziz, M. Böhme, J. Garnish, U. Kirscher, and V. Bachtadse. 2013. A new magnetostratigraphic framework for the Lower Miocene (Burdigalian/Ottnangian, Karpatian) in the North Alpine Foreland Basin. Swiss Journal of Geosciences 106:309-334.

  17. The Late Oligocene to Early Miocene early evolution of rifting in the southwestern part of the Roer Valley Graben

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    Deckers, Jef

    2016-06-01

    The Roer Valley Graben is a Mesozoic continental rift basin that was reactivated during the Late Oligocene. The study area is located in the graben area of the southwestern part of the Roer Valley Graben. Rifting initiated in the study area with the development of a large number of faults in the prerift strata. Some of these faults were rooted in preexisting zones of weakness in the Mesozoic strata. Early in the Late Oligocene, several faults died out in the study area as strain became focused upon others, some of which were able to link into several-kilometer-long systems. Within the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene northwestward prograding shallow marine syn-rift deposits, the number of active faults further decreased with time. A relatively strong decrease was observed around the Oligocene/Miocene boundary and represents a further focus of strain onto the long fault systems. Miocene extensional strain was not accommodated by further growth, but predominantly by displacements along the long fault systems. Since the Oligocene/Miocene boundary coincides with a radical change in the European intraplate stress field, the latter might have contributed significantly to the simultaneous change of fault kinematics in the study area.

  18. Paleogene-early miocene deformations of Bukulja-Venčac crystalline (Vardar zone, Serbia

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    Marović Milun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-grade metamorphic rocks of the crystalline of Mts. Bukulja and Venčac, which are integral parts of the Vardar Zone, are of Late Cretaceous age. From the Middle Paleogene to the beginning of the Miocene, they were subjected to three phases of intensive deformations. In the first phase, during the Middle Paleogene, these rocks were subjected to intense shortening (approximately in the E-W direction, regional metamorphism and deformations in the ductile and brittle domains, when first-generation folds with NNE-SSW striking fold hinges were formed. In the second phase, during the Late Oligocene and up to the Early Miocene, extensional unroofing and exhumation of the crystalline occurred, which was followed by intrusion of the granitoid of Bukulja and refolding of the previously formed folds in a simple brachial form of Bukulja and Venčac with an ESE-WNW striking B-axis. The third phase was expressed in the Early lowermost Miocene (before the Ottnanghian, under conditions of NE-SW compression and NW-SE tension. It was characterized by wrench-tectonic activity, particularly by dextral movements along NNW-SSE striking faults.

  19. Tertiary evolution of the Shimanto belt (Japan): A large-scale collision in Early Miocene

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    Raimbourg, Hugues; Famin, Vincent; Palazzin, Giulia; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Augier, Romain

    2017-07-01

    To decipher the Miocene evolution of the Shimanto belt of southwestern Japan, structural and paleothermal studies were carried out in the western area of Shikoku Island. All units constituting the belt, both in its Cretaceous and Tertiary domains, are in average strongly dipping to the NW or SE, while shortening directions deduced from fault kinematics are consistently orientated NNW-SSE. Peak paleotemperatures estimated with Raman spectra of organic matter increase strongly across the southern, Tertiary portion of the belt, in tandem with the development of a steeply dipping metamorphic cleavage. Near the southern tip of Ashizuri Peninsula, the unconformity between accreted strata and fore-arc basin, present along the whole belt, corresponds to a large paleotemperature gap, supporting the occurrence of a major collision in Early Miocene. This tectonic event occurred before the magmatic event that affected the whole belt at 15 Ma. The associated shortening was accommodated in two opposite modes, either localized on regional-scale faults such as the Nobeoka Tectonic Line in Kyushu or distributed through the whole belt as in Shikoku. The reappraisal of this collision leads to reinterpret large-scale seismic refraction profiles of the margins, where the unit underlying the modern accretionary prism is now attributed to an older package of deformed and accreted sedimentary units belonging to the Shimanto belt. When integrated into reconstructions of Philippine Sea Plate motion, the collision corresponds to the oblique collision of a paleo Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc with Japan in Early Miocene.

  20. Evidence for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene episode of transtension along San Andreas Fault system in central California

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    Stanley, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The San Andreas is one of the most intensely studied fault systems in the world, but many aspects of its kinematic history remain controversial. For example, the period from the late Eocene to early Miocene is widely believed to have been a time of negligible strike-slip movement along the San Andreas fault proper, based on the rough similarity of offset of the Eocene Butano-Point of rocks Submarine Fan, the early Miocene Pinnacles-Neenach volcanic center, and an early Miocene shoreline in the northern Gabilan Range and San Emigdio Mountains. Nonetheless, evidence indicates that a late Oligocene-early Miocene episode of transtension, or strike-slip motion with a component of extension, occurred within the San Andreas fault system. The evidence includes: (1) about 22-24 Ma, widespread, synchronous volcanic activity occurred at about 12 volcanic centers along a 400-km long segment of the central California coast; (2) most of these volcanic centers are located along faults of the San Andreas system, including the San Andreas fault proper, the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault, and the Zayante-Vergeles fault, suggesting that these and other faults were active and served as conduits for magmas rising from below; (3) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, a pull-apart basin developed adjacent to the San Andreas fault proper in the La Honda basin near Santa Cruz; and (4) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, active faulting, rapid subsidence, and marine transgression occurred in the La Honda and other sedimentary basins in central California. The amount of right-lateral displacement along the San Andreas fault proper during this transtentional episode is unknown but was probably about 7.5-35 km, based on model studies of pull-apart basin formation. This small amount of movement is well within the range of error in published estimates of the offset of the Eocene to early Miocene geologic features noted.

  1. Paleo-environment in the upper amazon basin during early to middle Miocene times

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soelen, Els; Hoorn, Carina; Santos, Roberto V.; Dantas, Elton L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-05-01

    The Amazon River has the largest catchment in the world and is responsible for the largest water discharge from land to the ocean. The river system that flows from the Andes to the Atlantic Equatorial Margin exists since the late Miocene, and results from Andean uplift which strongly affected erosion/deposition and major flow patterns in northern South-America. Two outcrop sites from the Solimões basin, Mariñame (17.7-16.1 Ma) and Los Chorros (14.2-12.7 Ma), may shed light on the inland paleo-environmental conditions during a period of active Andean uplift in the early to middle Miocene. Earlier works revealed the Mariñame outcrops to represent a river born in Amazonia. Instead the Los Chorros outcrops are relics of the Amazon River system, characterized by extensive wetlands consisting of swamps, shallow lakes, crevasse splays channels and crevasse-delta lakes (e.g. Hoorn et al., 2010). The freshwater ecosystems alternate with some intervals that are rich in marine palynomorphs (such as dinocysts), mangrove pollen, brackish tolerant molluscs and ostracods, which indicate brackish conditions and a marine influence. It is thought that these marine incursion are related to phases of global sea-level rise and rapid subsidence in the Andean foreland (Marshall & Lundberg, 1996). Still, much remains unknown about the Miocene river systems, like the extent and diversity of the wetland system and the nature of the marine incursions. To get a better understanding of the sources of the (in)organic material, geochemical methods were used. Strontium (Sr) and Neodymium (Nd) isotopes were analyzed on bulk sediments, and used for a paleo-provenance study. The Sr and Nd isotopic signature in the older section (Mariñame) is in general more radiogenic compared to the Los Chorros section. The most radiogenic values are comparable to those found nowadays in the the Precambrian Guyana shield. A Guyana sediment source would suggest a distinctly different flow direction of the major

  2. A model study of the first ventilated regime of the Arctic Ocean during the early Miocene

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    Bijoy Thompson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The tectonic opening of Fram Strait during the Neogene was a significant geological event that transferred the Arctic Ocean from a poorly ventilated enclosed basin, with weak exchange with the North Atlantic, to a fully ventilated “ocean stage”. Previous tectonic and physical oceanographic analyses suggest that the early Miocene Fram Strait was likely several times narrower and less than half as deep as the present-day 400 km wide and 2550 m deep strait. Here we use an ocean general circulation model with a passive age tracer included to further address the effect of the Fram Strait opening on the early Miocene Arctic Ocean circulation. The model tracer age exhibits strong spatial gradient between the two major Arctic Ocean deep basins: the Eurasian and Amerasian basins. There is a two-layer stratification and the exchange flow through Fram Strait shows a bi-layer structure with a low salinity outflow from the Arctic confined to a relatively thin upper layer and a saline inflow from the North Atlantic below. Our study suggests that although Fram Strait was significantly narrower and shallower during early Miocene, and the ventilation mechanism quite different in our model, the estimated ventilation rates are comparable to the chemical tracer estimates in the present-day Arctic Ocean. Since we achieved ventilation of the Arctic Ocean with a prescribed Fram Strait width of 100 km and sill depth of 1000 m, ventilation may have preceded the timing of a full ocean depth connection between the Arctic Ocean and North Atlantic established through seafloor spreading and the development of the Lena Trough.

  3. The Cenozoic Diversity of Agglutinated Foraminifera - Evidence for a late Oligocene to early Miocene diversification event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael; Setoyama, Eiichi; Kender, Sev; Cetean, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    their poorly established taxonomy. Genera such as Alveovalvulina, Guppyella, Goesella, and Alveovalvulinella, are typical of assemblages found in subtropical oxygen minimum zones, especially in West Africa and the Caribbean. These agglutinated genera are not found in coeval assemblages from the northern high latitudes (Kaminski et al. 2005), suggesting they are restricted to the low-latitude OMZ. It is likely that the global warming of the latest Oligocene to Early Miocene contributed to intensification of dysoxic conditions in low-latitude upwelling regions, possibly from enhanced productivity and reduced deep-sea ventilation, creating an expanded niche for these organisms that flourished in low-oxygen conditions with high particulate organic matter input. We believe a more detailed phylogenetic approach to these agglutinated genera would result in the description of new genera for individual lineages and refinement of the foraminiferal diversity record.

  4. Differential proxy responses to late Allerød and early Younger Dryas climatic change recorded in varved sediments of the Trzechowskie palaeolake in Northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowiński, Michał; Zawiska, Izabela; Ott, Florian; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Plessen, Birgit; Apolinarska, Karina; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Michczyńska, Danuta J.; Wulf, Sabine; Skubała, Piotr; Kordowski, Jarosław; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution biological proxies (pollen, macrofossils, Cladocera and diatoms), geochemical data (μ-XRF element scans, TOC, C/N ratios, δ18Ocarb and δ13Corg values) and a robust chronology based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating and tephrochronology were applied to reconstruct lake system responses to rapid climatic and environmental changes of the Trzechowskie palaeolake (TRZ; Northern Poland) during the late Allerød - Younger Dryas (YD) transition. Palaeoecological and geochemical data at 5-15 years temporal resolution allowed tracing the dynamics of short-term shifts of the ecosystem triggered by abrupt climate change. The robust age control together with the high-resolution sampling allowed the detection of leads and lags between different proxies to the climate shift at the Allerød-Younger Dryas transition. Our results indicate (1) a water level decrease and an increase in wind activities during the late Allerød and the Allerød-YD transition, which caused intensified erosion in the catchment, (2) a two-decades delayed vegetation response in comparison to the lake depositional system. Comparison with the Lake Meerfelder Maar record revealed slightly different vegetation responses of the Trzechowskie palaeolake at the YD onset.

  5. Varves in lake sediments - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Francus, Pierre; Ojala, Antti E. K.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-06-01

    Downcore counting of laminations in varved sediments offers a direct and incremental dating technique for high-resolution climatic and environmental archives with at least annual and sometimes even seasonal resolution. The pioneering definition of varves by De Geer (1912) had been restricted to rhythmically deposited proglacial clays. One century later the meaning of 'varve' has been expanded to include all annually deposited laminae in terrestrial and marine settings. Under favourable basin configurations and environmental conditions, limnic varves are formed due to seasonality of depositional processes from the lake's water column and/or transport from the catchment area. Subsequent to deposition of topmost laminae, the physical preservation of the accumulating varved sequence requires the sustained absence of sediment mixing, for example via wave action or macrobenthic bioturbation. Individual (sub)laminae in varved lake sediments typically express contrasting colours, always differ in terms of their organic, chemical and/or mineralogical compositions, and often also differ with regard to grain-size. Various predominating climatic and depositional conditions may result in clastic, biogenic or endogenic (incl. evaporitic) varved sediments and their mixtures. To reliably establish a varve chronology, the annual character of laminations needs to be determined and verified in a multidisciplinary fashion. Sources and influences of possible errors in varve chronologies are best determined and constrained by repeated varve counts, and by including radioisotopes and correlation with historically documented events. A well-established varve chronology greatly enhances the scientific value of laminated limnic archives by securely anchoring the wealth of multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental information in the form of time-series for multidisciplinary investigations. Applications of varved records are discussed with special reference to advances since the 1980s. These span fields

  6. Swietenia (Meliaceae) flower in Late Oligocene Early Miocene amber from Simojovel de Allende, Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Posadas, Carlos; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S

    2007-11-01

    The amber of Simojovel de Allende, Chiapas, Mexico, of Late Oligocene-Early Miocene age, has yielded a new flower representing the Meliaceae. The flower of Swietenia miocenica Castañeda-Posadas & Cevallos-Ferriz sp. nov. is characterized by small size; free calyx composed of five glabrous lobes, ciliolated along the margin lobes; corolla composed of five free, contortedly inserted petals with ciliolated margins; cylindrical staminal tube ending in 10 acuminate or toothed accessories and 10 sessile anthers; and a discoid stigma divided in five lobular stigmatic glands. The morphology of S. miocenica is well represented among Meliaceae. Although the new species shares many characters with Swietenia microphylla, small differences in the length and width of petals and the length of staminal tube support its recognition as a new species. The presence of this genus demonstrates the establishment of tropical communities in southern Mexico by the early Miocene and highlights the influence of the northern hemisphere flora on the extant neotropical flora of the area.

  7. Andegameryx andegaviensis Ginsburg, 1971 (Artiodactyla, Ruminantia, from the early Miocene site of Estrepouy (MN3, France

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    Morales, J.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several dental remains from the Early Miocene of Estrepouy (MN3, France previously reported as Amphitragulus aurelianensis by Roman & Viret (1934 are described in this work and assigned to Andegameryx andegaviensis Ginsburg, 1971. The re-study of this material and the comparison with other remains of A. andegaviensis from several european localities of the early Miocene, including the type locality of the species, have permitted us to confirm the presence of A. andegaviensis in the ruminant fauna from Estrepouy.En esta nota describimos algunos de los restos del yacimiento del Mioceno inferior de Estrepouy (MN3, Francia atribuidos por Roman & Viret (1934 a Amphitragulus aruelianensis, cambiando su asignación a Andegameryx andegaviensis Ginsburg, 1971. El reestudio del material y su comparación con los restos de A. andegaviensis de otras localidades europeas del Mioceno inferior, incluyendo la localidad tipo de la especie, permiten confirmar su presencia entre la fauna de rumiantes fósiles de Estrepouy.

  8. The early Miocene onset of a ventilated circulation regime in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Martin; Backman, Jan; Rudels, Bert; Nycander, Jonas; Frank, Martin; Mayer, Larry; Jokat, Wilfried; Sangiorgi, Francesca; O'Regan, Matthew; Brinkhuis, Henk; King, John; Moran, Kathryn

    2007-06-21

    Deep-water formation in the northern North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean is a key driver of the global thermohaline circulation and hence also of global climate. Deciphering the history of the circulation regime in the Arctic Ocean has long been prevented by the lack of data from cores of Cenozoic sediments from the Arctic's deep-sea floor. Similarly, the timing of the opening of a connection between the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, permitting deep-water exchange, has been poorly constrained. This situation changed when the first drill cores were recovered from the central Arctic Ocean. Here we use these cores to show that the transition from poorly oxygenated to fully oxygenated ('ventilated') conditions in the Arctic Ocean occurred during the later part of early Miocene times. We attribute this pronounced change in ventilation regime to the opening of the Fram Strait. A palaeo-geographic and palaeo-bathymetric reconstruction of the Arctic Ocean, together with a physical oceanographic analysis of the evolving strait and sill conditions in the Fram Strait, suggests that the Arctic Ocean went from an oxygen-poor 'lake stage', to a transitional 'estuarine sea' phase with variable ventilation, and finally to the fully ventilated 'ocean' phase 17.5 Myr ago. The timing of this palaeo-oceanographic change coincides with the onset of the middle Miocene climatic optimum, although it remains unclear if there is a causal relationship between these two events.

  9. A New Fossil Termite(Isoptera,Stolotermitidae,Stolotermes)from the Early Miocene of Otago,New Zealand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uwe KAULFUSS; Anthony C.HARRIS; Daphne E.LEE

    2010-01-01

    The forewing of a termite from Eady Miocene lake sediments in Otago,southern New Zealand is figured and described.It exhibits the generic characters of the damp-wood termite Stolotermes Hagen,but differs from forewings of the known species in size and venation pattern and is described as Stolotermes kupe sp.nov.S.kupe represents the first confident record of fossil Stolotermitidae and extends the fossil record of the family back to the Early Miocene.It also is the first direct evidence of fossil Isoptera from New Zealand.though silicified termite faecal pellets.referable to Kalotermes brauni,have been previously described.S.kupe indicates that Stolotermitidae has been present in the Australasian re#on since at least the Early Miocene.

  10. The Brahmaputra tale of tectonics and erosion: Early Miocene river capture in the Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracciali, Laura; Najman, Yani; Parrish, Randall R.; Akhter, Syed H.; Millar, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The Himalayan orogen provides a type example on which a number of models of the causes and consequences of crustal deformation are based and it has been suggested that it is the site of a variety of feedbacks between tectonics and erosion. Within the broader orogen, fluvial drainages partly reflect surface uplift, different climatic zones and a response to crustal deformation. In the eastern Himalaya, the unusual drainage configuration of the Yarlung Tsangpo-Brahmaputra River has been interpreted either as antecedent drainage distorted by the India-Asia collision (and as such applied as a passive strain marker of lateral extrusion), latest Neogene tectonically-induced river capture, or glacial damming-induced river diversion events. Here we apply a multi-technique approach to the Neogene paleo-Brahmaputra deposits of the Surma Basin (Bengal Basin, Bangladesh) to test the long-debated occurrence and timing of river capture of the Yarlung Tsangpo by the Brahmaputra River. We provide U-Pb detrital zircon and rutile, isotopic (Sr-Nd and Hf) and petrographic evidence consistent with river capture of the Yarlung Tsangpo by the Brahmaputra River in the Early Miocene. We document influx of Cretaceous-Paleogene zircons in Early Miocene sediments of the paleo-Brahmaputra River that we interpret as first influx of material from the Asian plate (Transhimalayan arc) indicative of Yarlung Tsangpo contribution. Prior to capture, the predominantly Precambrian-Paleozoic zircons indicate that only the Indian plate was drained. Contemporaneous with Transhimalayan influx reflecting the river capture, we record arrival of detrital material affected by Cenozoic metamorphism, as indicated by rutiles and zircons with Cenozoic U-Pb ages and an increase in metamorphic grade of detritus as recorded by petrography. We interpret this as due to a progressively increasing contribution from the erosion of the metamorphosed core of the orogen. Whole rock Sr-Nd isotopic data from the same samples

  11. First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Jonathan I.; Woodruff, Emily D.; Wood, Aaron R.; Rincon, Aldo F.; Harrington, Arianna R.; Morgan, Gary S.; Foster, David A.; Montes, Camilo; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Jud, Nathan A.; Jones, Douglas S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2016-05-01

    New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are a diverse part of modern tropical ecosystems in North and South America, yet their early evolutionary history in the tropics is largely unknown. Molecular divergence estimates suggest that primates arrived in tropical Central America, the southern-most extent of the North American landmass, with several dispersals from South America starting with the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama 3-4 million years ago (Ma). The complete absence of primate fossils from Central America has, however, limited our understanding of their history in the New World. Here we present the first description of a fossil monkey recovered from the North American landmass, the oldest known crown platyrrhine, from a precisely dated 20.9-Ma layer in the Las Cascadas Formation in the Panama Canal Basin, Panama. This discovery suggests that family-level diversification of extant New World monkeys occurred in the tropics, with new divergence estimates for Cebidae between 22 and 25 Ma, and provides the oldest fossil evidence for mammalian interchange between South and North America. The timing is consistent with recent tectonic reconstructions of a relatively narrow Central American Seaway in the early Miocene epoch, coincident with over-water dispersals inferred for many other groups of animals and plants. Discovery of an early Miocene primate in Panama provides evidence for a circum-Caribbean tropical distribution of New World monkeys by this time, with ocean barriers not wholly restricting their northward movements, requiring a complex set of ecological factors to explain their absence in well-sampled similarly aged localities at higher latitudes of North America.

  12. MIDDLE EOCENE TO EARLY MIOCENE FORAMINIFERAL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY IN THE EPILIGURIAN SUCCESSION (NORTHERN APENNINES, ITALY

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    NICOLETTA MANCIN

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative biostratigraphical study was performed on the foraminiferal assemblages from 15 stratigraphic sections of the Epiligurian Succession (Middle Eocene-Early Miocene, Northern Apennines, Italy. This study enabled us to identify the presence of some of the standard bioevents and to note that other bioevents are absent or show a different chronostratigraphic range. Other additional bioevents, identified throughout the area, have therefore been utilised to improve the biostratigraphical resolution of the Epiligurian sediments. These bioevents include the massive extinction of the muricate species at the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary; the increasing abundance of Paragloborotalia opima opima near Subzone P21a/P21b and the Rupelian/Chattian boundaries; and the FO of Globoquadrina dehiscens at the Subzone N4a/N4b boundary. 

  13. Hystricognath rodents from the Pinturas Formation, Early Middle Miocene of Patagonia, biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarz, Alejandro G.; Bellosi, Eduardo S.

    2005-01-01

    The Pinturas Formation is a continental succession, characterized by eolian sediments (mainly tuffaceous) and paleosols, originated in an upland setting of west central Patagonia. The main intraformational erosive surfaces and lithological changes define three sequences. The Formation bears a rich mammalian association (Florentino Ameghino's Astrapothericulan fauna), whose age in relation to the Santacrucian SALMA (middle Miocene) is still controversial. Recent collections from the Pinturas Formation, performed with stratigraphic control, allow differentiation of two distinct hystricognath rodent associations. The lower and middle sequences bear a particular combination of Colhuehuapian (early Miocene) and Santacrucian genera, mostly represented by species exclusively known to the Pinturas Formation ('Pinturan' association). The upper sequence bears typical Santacrucian species, more derived than its Pinturan counterparts. According to the rodent record, the lower and middle sequences of the Pinturas Formation are older than the base of the Santa Cruz Formation exposed at Monte Observación and Monte León, and the upper sequence may be correlated with the lowermost levels of the Santa Cruz Formation and deposits exposed at Karaiken that bear Ameghino's 'Notohippidian' fauna. These correlations agree with more recent radiometric dates and other biostratigraphic evidence, supporting Ameghino's original hypothesis. The Pinturan rodent assemblage of the lower and middle sequences suggests the presence of humid forests, in accordance with other faunal components and palynological data. Sedimentologic, paleopedologic, and ichnologic evidence, however, suggest environments dominated by herbaceous vegetation. This seeming contradiction is interpreted as the result of a marked environmental gradient due to the paleotopography and/or climatic fluctuations. The mammal record corresponds to the more humid intervals, which have less representation in the sedimentary record

  14. Global compilation of marine varve records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Lange, Carina B.; Schieber, Juergen; Francus, Pierre; Ojala, Antti E. K.; Zolitschka, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Marine varves contain highly resolved records of geochemical and other paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental proxies with annual to seasonal resolution. We present a global compilation of marine varved sedimentary records throughout the Holocene and Quaternary covering more than 50 sites worldwide. Marine varve deposition and preservation typically depend on environmental and sedimentological conditions, such as a sufficiently high sedimentation rate, severe depletion of dissolved oxygen in bottom water to exclude bioturbation by macrobenthos, and a seasonally varying sedimentary input to yield a recognizable rhythmic varve pattern. Additional oceanographic factors may include the strength and depth range of the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) and regional anthropogenic eutrophication. Modern to Quaternary marine varves are not only found in those parts of the open ocean that comply with these conditions, but also in fjords, embayments and estuaries with thermohaline density stratification, and nearshore 'marine lakes' with strong hydrologic connections to ocean water. Marine varves have also been postulated in pre-Quaternary rocks. In the case of non-evaporitic laminations in fine-grained ancient marine rocks, such as banded iron formations and black shales, laminations may not be varves but instead may have multiple alternative origins such as event beds or formation via bottom currents that transported and sorted silt-sized particles, clay floccules, and organic-mineral aggregates in the form of migrating bedload ripples. Modern marine ecosystems on continental shelves and slopes, in coastal zones and in estuaries are susceptible to stress by anthropogenic pressures, for example in the form of eutrophication, enhanced OMZs, and expanding ranges of oxygen-depletion in bottom waters. Sensitive laminated sites may play the important role of a 'canary in the coal mine' where monitoring the character and geographical extent of laminations/varves serves as a diagnostic

  15. Redescription of Cobitis longipectoralis Zhou, 1992 (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) from late early Miocene of East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG; Mee-Mann

    2010-01-01

    Here we revise a fossil cobitid species ■Cobitis longipectoralis Zhou, 1992, based mainly on a well-preserved specimen collected recently from the taxon’s type locality of the late early Miocene of Shanwang, Shandong Province, East China. The new specimen, along with those collected by Zhou, enables us to provide an emended diagnosis and more detailed description of the species by focusing on the characters such as the structures of the suborbital spine and the presence and shape of the lamina circularis at the base of the second pectoral fin ray in adult males, the presence of a frontoparietal fontanelle, and a quad- rate-metapterygoid fenestra, etc. The long pectoral fin, initially considered by Zhou as the most important character of the spe- cies, however, turns out to be not diagnostic for the species. ■Cobitis longipectoralis Zhou, 1992 is not only the most informative and best-preserved early cobitid fossil known thus far but also the only and earliest cobitid fossil from East Asia.

  16. Early Miocene Nothofagus in Antarctica based on fossil leaves from the Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobleski, S. A.; Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Nothofagus (Southern Beech) is the most widely reported plant from Cenozoic Antarctic fossil assemblages. Most of the fossils are of pollen morphotypes and it is assumed that the plants the pollen represents were growing on the continent. However, because of the uncertainties with systematics, long-distance dispersal, and reworking, it has been difficult to interpret the assemblages in terms of paleoenvironments and paleoclimate. Here, we report an in situ assemblage of Nothofagus leaves and pollen from the Friis Hills (77⁰ 45'S, 161⁰ 28'E). The leaves are preserved as carbonaceous impressions in brown, fissile shales that represent the deposits of a lake occupying a glacial valley. The leaves most probably accumulated from deciduous shrubs. Based on the stratigraphic relationship to a tephra with a 40 Ar/39 Ar age of c. 20 Ma, the leaf assemblage is of early Miocene age. Nothofagus pollen from the shale suggests that at least 3 species were represented. A total of 227 leaves were examined and lengths, widths, and areas recorded. The preservation is generally good but only a few of the specimens represent complete leaves; the spectrum is 30-100%. Plots of the measurements of the leaves provide a summary of size variation but were otherwise not useful for separating out different taxa . The most useful characters for establishing differences between the leaves were the leaf margins, of which three or four types were distinguished: 1. margins entire or finely serrate between ribs; 2. margins with one or two convex lobes between the ribs; 3. margins with convex lobes over the ribs. The leaf study indicates that three or possibly four species were co-inhabiting the valley in the early Miocene and were part of a dynamic vegetation that colonized the valley with each deglaciation. A possible analog today would be at low elevations in Tierra del Fuego where three species of Nothofagus coexist. The stem diameters of abundant wood preserved in adjacent facies indicates

  17. High resolution isotopic ages for the early Miocene "Patagoniense" transgression in Southwest Patagonia: Stratigraphic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuitiño, José I.; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Ventura Santos, Roberto; Scasso, Roberto A.

    2012-10-01

    The classical marine Patagoniense succession at Lago Argentino, southwestern Patagonia (Argentina), known as Estancia 25 de Mayo Formation, was dated by radiometric U-Pb on zircon grains from pyroclastic rocks and 87Sr/86Sr ratio on calcitic oyster shells. U-Pb data yielded an age of 19.14 Ma for the lower portion of the Patagoniense succession and 18.85 Ma for the lowermost part of the overlying Santa Cruz Formation. 87Sr/86Sr data yielded ages ranging from 20.05 Ma at the lower part and 19.1 Ma for the upper portion of the Estancia 25 de Mayo Formation, in good agreement with respect to the U-Pb results. Our results constrain the age of these beds entirely into the early Miocene Burdigalian stage, and locally into the Superpatagoniense stage. Correlation with other Patagoniense units in Santa Cruz, especially in the westernmost parts of the Austral Basin, reveals the existence of a shallow and extended sea, and lack of correlation with global sea-level highstands suggests a local Andean tectonic overprint as the cause of the sea level rise.

  18. First discovery of colobine fossils from the Late Miocene/Early Pliocene in central Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Masanaru; Thaung-Htike; Zin-Maung-Maung-Thein; Soe, Aung Naing; Maung, Maung; Tsubamoto, Takehisa; Egi, Naoko; Nishimura, Takeshi D; Nishioka, Yuichiro

    2015-07-01

    Here we report two kinds of colobine fossils discovered from the latest Miocene/Early Pliocene Irrawaddy sediments of the Chaingzauk area, central Myanmar. A left mandibular corpus fragment preserving M1-3 is named as a new genus and species, Myanmarcolobus yawensis. Isolated upper (M(1)?) and lower (M2) molars are tentatively identified as Colobinae gen. et sp. indet. Although both forms are medium-sized colobines, they are quite different from each other in M2 morphology. The isolated teeth of the latter show typical colobine-type features, so it is difficult to identify their taxonomic position, whereas lower molars of Myanmarcolobus have unique features, such as a trapezoid-shaped long median lingual notch, a deeply concave median buccal cleft, a strongly developed mesiobuccal notch, and rather obliquely running transverse lophids. Compared with fossil and living Eurasian colobine genera, Myanmarcolobus is most similar in lower molar morphology to the Pliocene Dolichopithecus of Europe rather than to any Asian forms. In Dolichopithecus, however, the tooth size is much larger and the median lingual notch is mesiodistally much shorter than that of Myanmarcolobus. The discovery of Myanmarcolobus in central Myanmar is the oldest fossil record in Southeast Asia not only of colobine but also of cercopithecid monkeys and raises many questions regarding the evolutionary history of Asian colobine monkeys.

  19. Nd isotope as the tracer of seawater evolution of early Miocene in the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-six samples of nannofossil ooze were collected from Core PC5794 in the northern equatorial Pacific at 5 cm intervals. With the methods of mass spectrometer (VG354) and ICP, the Nd isotopic compositions εNd(t ), Mn contents and Mg/Sr ratios of carbonate phase have been analyzed. CaCO3 contents of bulk sediments were obtained by dissolution of 0.5 mol/L HCl. Based on these data, the high-resolution εNd(t) profile of seawater in early Miocene with core depth(or time) have been established. The values of εNd(t) range from -6.2 to -2.97 and 4 fluctuation cycles existed during 24.06-22.02 Ma. 4 low εNd(t) values (about -6.4) correspond to high CaCO3 contents, which implicates that there were 4 cold epochs or 4 times of Antarctic Bottom Water activity. They occurred at the time of 24.06 Ma, 23.85 Ma, 22.88 Ma and 22.26 Ma, respectively. High εNd(t ) values correspond to the high Mn contents and high values of Mg/Sr ratio, which indicates the existence of 4 intense hydrothermal activity periods during 24.06-22 Ma, the durations of them are 4.05-23.98 Ma, 23.69-23.15 Ma, 22.74-22.37 Ma and 22.06-22.02 Ma, respectively.

  20. Nd isotope as the tracer of seawater evolution of early Miocene in the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUJihua; CHENLirong; WANGYingxi; HANJianxiu

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-six samples of nannofossil ooze were collected from Core PC5794 in the northern equatorial Pacific at 5 cm intervals. With the methods of mass spectrometer (VG354) and ICP, the Nd isotopic compositions (εNd(t)), Mn contents and Mg/Sr ratios of carbonate phase have been analyzed. CaCO3 contents of bulk sediments were obtained by dissolution of 0.5 mol/L HCl. Based on these data, the high-resolution εNd(t) profile of seawater in early Miocene with core depth(or time) have been established. The values of εNd(t) range from -6.2 to -2.97 and 4 fluctuation cycles existed during 24.06-22.02 Ma. 4 low εNd(t) values (about -6.4) correspond to high CaCO3 contents, which implicates that there were 4 cold epochs or 4 times of Antarctic Bottom Water activity. They occurred at the time of 24.06 Ma, 23.85 Ma,22.88 Ma and 22.26 Ma, respectively. High εNd(t) values correspond to the high Mn contents and high values of Mg/Sr ratio, which indicates the existence of 4 intense hydrothermal activity periods during 24.06-22 Ma, the durations of them are 4.05-23.98 Ma, 23.69-23.15 Ma, 22.74-22.37 Ma and 22.06-22.02 Ma, respectively.

  1. Anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in Aegyptopithecus and early Miocene African catarrhines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossie, James B

    2005-03-01

    Neontological comparisons suggest that paranasal sinus anatomy is diagnostic of several catarrhine clades such as Cercopithecoidea, Hominoidea, Homininae, and Ponginae. However, while the loss of sinuses in cercopithecoids is generally recognized as a derived condition, determining the polarity of character-state changes within noncercopithecoid catarrhines requires knowledge of the primitive catarrhine condition. To address this problem, the paranasal sinus anatomy of Aegyptopithecus and several early Miocene catarrhines was investigated. Two partial facial skeletons of Aegyptopithecus were subjected to computed tomography in order to reveal their internal anatomy. These data were compared with facial and palatal specimens of Proconsul, Limnopithecus, Dendropithecus, Rangwapithecus, and Kalepithecus in the National Museums of Kenya in Nairobi, and to wet and dry specimens of living taxa. Results confirm that cercopithecoid paranasal anatomy is derived, and reveal that the sinus anatomy of stem catarrhines included a hominoid-like maxillary sinus as well as an ethmofrontal system like that of hominines. Accordingly, these two features do not constitute evidence for the hominoid, hominid, or hominine status of any fossil species. Conversely, the absence of the ethmofrontal sinus system in Sivapithecus and Pongo is synapomorphic. In addition, features of the nasal cavity of Limnopithecus and Kalepithecus support previous suggestions that these taxa are stem catarrhines rather than hominoids.

  2. Muscular reconstruction and functional morphology of the forelimb of early Miocene sloths (Xenarthra, Folivora) of Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Néstor; Bargo, M Susana; Vizcaíno, Sergio F

    2013-02-01

    Early Miocene sloths are represented by a diversity of forms ranging from 38 to 95 kg, being registered mainly from Santacrucian Age deposits in southern-most shores of Patagonia, Argentina. Their postcranial skeleton differs markedly in shape from those of their closest living relatives (arboreal forms of less than 10 kg), Bradypus and Choloepus. In order to gain insight on functional properties of the Santacrucian sloths forelimb, musculature was reconstructed and a comparative, qualitative morphofunctional analysis was performed, allowing proposing hypotheses about biological role of the limb in substrate preferences, and locomotor strategies. The anatomy of the forelimb of Santacrucian sloths resembles more closely extant anteaters such as Tamandua and Myrmecophaga, due to the robustness of the elements, development of features related to attachment of ligaments and muscles, and conservative, pentadactylous, and strong-clawed manus. The reconstructed forelimb musculature was very well developed and resembles that of extant Pilosa (especially anteaters), although retaining the basic muscular configuration of generalized mammals. This musculature allowed application of powerful forces, especially in adduction of the forelimb, flexion and extension of the antebrachium, and manual prehension. These functional properties are congruent with both climbing and digging activities, and provide support for proposed Santacrucian sloths as good climbing mammals, possibly arboreal or semiarboreal, being also capable diggers. Their climbing strategies were limited, thus these forms relied mainly on great muscular strength and curved claws of the manus to move cautiously on branches.

  3. Drivers and Dynamics of Ecological Responses to Abrupt Environmental Change on the Early Miocene Oregon Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    We know that the biosphere responds to abrupt climate change, but know less about the dynamics of those changes and their proximal drivers. Studies of well-preserved fossil time-series spanning past climate events that utilize multiple environmental proxies and examine multiple taxonomic groups can provide critical insight into (a) the specific environmental factors to which the biota respond, (b) the rate and tempo of those responses, and (c) whether taxonomic groups respond similarly or differently to the same stresses. I examine the drivers and dynamics of ecological changes in continental shelf benthic foraminifera and molluscs from the Early Miocene Newport Member of the Astoria Formation in Oregon (20.3-16.3 mya), which spans a time of global warming leading into the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum. Stable isotope (δ18O) data from three species of benthic foraminifera from the Astoria sediments indicate that the region abruptly warmed by 2-4°C approximately 19 mya. In addition, δ13C values from epifaunal and infaunal foraminifera indicate an increase in productivity and organic carbon flux over time. Further, an increase in δ15N from bulk sediment and an increase in sedimentary laminations suggest oxygen levels declined. Multivariate analyses demonstrate a strong correlation between foraminiferal community metrics and δ15N suggesting that the foraminiferal community is tracking oxygenation levels while correlations to productivity changes appear indirect. Molluscan community metrics also have an approximately linear relationship to δ15N. Temperature itself had little direct influence on community composition. Changes in community composition and structure of both the foraminifera and the molluscs are abrupt relative to the duration of community states, but each group responds differently to the climate change. The foraminiferal community increases in the number of species and the evenness of species abundances while the molluscan community decreases in

  4. Orbital forcing in the early Miocene alluvial sediments of the western Ebro Basin, Northeast Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, M.; Larrasoaña, J. C.; Muñoz, A.; Margalef, O.; Murelaga, X.

    2009-04-01

    time interval of about 500 kyr centered around chron C6r, although inferred absolute ages diverge depending on the assumed calibration of geomagnetic reversals with the astronomical time scale (Billups et al., 2004, Lourens et al., 2004). The section was sampled with a portable drill at regular intervals of about 30 cms, representing a time resolution of near 1 kyr. Spectral analysis of different measured parameters (lithology code, color, magnetic susceptibility and other rock magnetic parameters) revealed significant power at 20.4 m, 9.6 m and 4.2 m, which correspond to a ratio of 1:2.1:4.9 similar to that given by the Milankovitch cycles of eccentricity, obliquity and precession. Maximum power in the spetrum is focused in the eccentricity and obliquity bands while signal corresponding to precession is weakly expressed. The existing uncertainties in the astronomical tuning of the Early Miocene geomagnetic polarity time scale prevents us from using magnetostratigraphy to anchor the Peñarroya record with the astronomical solutions (Laskar et al., 2004). Instead, we have tried the expression of the eccentricity cycle to tune the Peñarroya section. We correlated the thick red clayed (dry phase) intervals with eccentricity minima, a phase relationship which is in agreement with that derived from earlier studies in marine and continental records from the Miocene of the Iberian plate (Abels et al., 2008, Sierro et al., 2000). The resulting tuning of the Peñarroya section yields an age for the base of geomagnetic chron C6r which fits with earlier work of Billups et al., (2004), while the top of C6r gives a significantly younger age. References Abels, H., Abdul Aziz, A., Calvo, J.P. and Tuenter, E., 2008. Shallow lacustrine carbonate microfacies document orbitally paced lake-level history in the Miocene Teruel Basin (North-East Spain), Sedimentology doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3091.2008.00976.x. Billups, K., Pälike, H., Channell, J.E.T., Zachos, J. and Shackleton, N.J., 2004

  5. Listriodon guptai Pilgrim, 1926 (Mammalia, Suidae) from the early Miocene of the Bugti Hills, Balochistan, Pakistan: new insights into early Listriodontinae evolution and biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orliac, Maeva Judith; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Métais, Grégoire; Marivaux, Laurent; Crochet, Jean-Yves; Welcomme, Jean-Loup; Baqri, Syed Rafiqul Hassan; Roohi, Ghazala

    2009-08-01

    New dental remains of listriodont suids are described from the lower member of the early to middle Miocene Vihowa Formation of the Bugti Hills, Pakistan. The material is homogeneous in terms of morphology and dimensions and referred as a whole to Listriodon guptai Pilgrim, 1926. This species is also mentioned in coeval deposits of the Zinda Pir Dome, Pakistan, dating back to ca. 19 Ma. The early occurrence of an advanced listriodont in Pakistan constrains the age of acquisition of several characters correlated to lophodonty within Listriodontini, and raises major questions about the early history of the Old World Listriodontinae. Strong morphological similarity between Listriodon guptai and the African species Listriodon akatikubas found in the late early Miocene of Maboko (Kenya, ca. 16.5 Ma) suggests that this latter is most probably a migrant originating from Asia.

  6. The anatomy and systematic position of the early Miocene proconsulid from Meswa Bridge, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Terry; Andrews, Peter

    2009-05-01

    A small collection of fossil catarrhines was recovered from the early Miocene locality of Meswa Bridge in western Kenya between 1978 and 1980. The associated fauna from Meswa Bridge indicates an age older than 20 Ma. Much of the material has been briefly described previously, and its taxonomic status considered. The material can be assigned to a minimum of four individuals, all of which are infants or juveniles. Although the specimens were shown to belong to a distinct species of Proconsul, the taxon was not named, primarily because many of the specimens belonged to immature individuals. Nevertheless, the combined morphological features of the deciduous and permanent teeth allow the diagnosis of a new species of Proconsul, which is formally named here as P. meswae. It is a large-sized species, similar in dental size to P. nyanzae. The main features distinguishing it from all other previously named species of Proconsul are: incisors and deciduous incisors relatively low crowned; upper deciduous canines relatively higher crowned and more robust; molars and deciduous premolars relatively broader and higher crowned, with a more pronounced degree of buccolingual flare and better developed cingula; size differential between molars not as marked; dP(4) with a longer mesial fovea and smaller hypoconulid and distal fovea; P(4) relatively broader, with a better developed buccal cingulum; lower molars less rectangular with a longer mesial fovea, smaller distal fovea, more restricted talonid basin, and a tendency for a smaller hypoconulid; dP(4) and upper molars with strongly buccolingually splayed roots; mandibular corpus in infants relatively deeper and more slender; maxilla with a well developed canine jugum and fossa. The broader and more flared molars with better developed cingula indicate that the Meswa Bridge species is more primitive than other species of Proconsul. The inference that it is a stem member of the Proconsul clade is consistent with the estimated age of

  7. A new baleen whale from the Late Miocene of Denmark and early mysticete hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steeman, Mette Elstrup

    2009-01-01

    The extinct mysticete fauna of the North East Atlantic is primarily known from the abundant but fragmented Belgian specimens. Compared to the well-preserved contemporary mysticete fauna from deposits in North America, there are only few near complete European Miocene mysticete fossils. Presented...... here is a new, almost complete fossil baleen whale Uranocetus gramensis gen. et sp. nov. from the Upper Miocene Gram Formation in South West Denmark. It is the first stem-balaenopterid that has an initial stage of reduction in the mandibular cavity and a rostral configuration that is intermediate...

  8. Amazon forest dynamics under changing abiotic conditions in the early Miocene (Colombian Amazonia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamanca Villegas, S.; van Soelen, E.; Teunissen van Manen, M.L.; Flantua, S.G.A.; Santos, R.V.; Roddaz, M.; Dantas, E.L.; van Loon, E.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, J.-H.; Hoorn, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim We analysed in detail a past marine incursion event in north-westernAmazonia and measured its effect on the forest composition. We also deter-mined the sediment provenance in the ?uvio-estuarine system and recon-structed the overall ?oral composition of the Amazon lowland forest duringthe Miocen

  9. A long-living species of the hydrophiloid beetles: Helophorus sibiricus from the early Miocene deposits of Kartashevo (Siberia, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fikácek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent hydrophiloid species Helophorus (Gephelophorus sibiricus (Motschulsky, 1860 is recorded from the early Miocene deposits of Kartashevo assigned to the Ombinsk Formation. A detailed comparison with recent specimens allowed a confident identification of the fossil specimen, which is therefore the oldest record of a recent species for the Hydrophiloidea. The paleodistribution as well as recent distribution of the species is summarized, and the relevance of the fossil is discussed. In addition, the complex geological settings of the Kartashevo area are briefly summarized.

  10. Predictive Upper Cretaceous to Early Miocene Paleogeography of the San Andreas Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, K.

    2006-12-01

    /Eagle Rest Peak correlation of Ross et al. (1973), and Matthews' (1976) correlation of Pinnacles-Neenach Volcanics. This paleogeography originally encompassed more than 30 documented pairs of correlative geologic and geophysical features at more than 20 pairs of localities, and has proved to be predictive. Since its first introduction, in April and June 1998, other authors have reported seven additional correlated pairs of geological and geophysical features that are consistent with this model. These new correlations lengthen the time interval of this paleogeography into the early Miocene, so that it now covers 70 Ma to 23.5 Ma. The expanded paleogeography now incorporates at least 45 pairs of documented correlations, and extends from Pelona and Orocopia to the northernmost end of the San Andreas fault system at the modern position of the Mendocino Triple Junction. The figures demonstrating this model incorporate reversal of: -- San Gregorio-northern (between Bolinas and the Navarro Discontinuity) San Andreas fault, 181 km dextral offset; -- San Gregorio-Hosgri fault, 93 km dextral offset; -- San Gregorio-Nacimiento fault, 90 km dextral offset; -- San Francisco peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault (between the intersections with the San Gregorio and Calaveras faults), 31 km dextral offset; -- San Andreas (north of Eagle Rest Peak)-Calaveras-Hayward-Rodgers Creek-Maacama fault, 284 km dextral offset; -- Southern San Andreas fault (south of Logan and Eagle Rest Peak), 315 km dextral offset; -- Far-northern San Andreas fault (north of the Navarro Discontinuity and the Pilarcitos fault), 204 km dextral offset; -- Hayward-Rodgers Creek fault, 36 km dextral offset; and -- Pinto Mountain fault, 16 km sinistral offset.

  11. Megalictis, the Bone-Crushing Giant Mustelid (Carnivora, Mustelidae, Oligobuninae) from the Early Miocene of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenciano, Alberto; Baskin, Jon A.; Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Álvarez-Sierra, M. Ángeles; Morales, Jorge; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We describe cranial and mandibular remains of three undescribed individuals of the giant mustelid Megalictis ferox Matthew, 1907 from the latest Arikareean (Ar4), Early Miocene mammal fauna of Nebraska, and Wyoming (USA) housed at the American Museum of Natural History (New York, USA). Our phylogenetic hypothesis indicates that Ar4 specimens assigned to M. ferox constitute a monophyletic group. We assign three additional species previously referred to Paroligobunis to Megalictis: M. simplicidens, M. frazieri, and “M.” petersoni. The node containing these four species of Megalictis and Oligobunis forms the Oligobuninae. We test the hypothesis that Oligobuninae (Megalictis and Oligobunis) is a stem mustelid taxon. Our results indicate that the Oligobuninae form the sister clade to the crown extant mustelids. Based on the cranium, M. ferox is a jaguar-size mustelid and the largest terrestrial mustelid known to have existed. This new material also sheds light on a new ecomorphological interpretation of M. ferox as a bone-crushing durophage (similar to hyenas), rather than a cat-like hypercarnivore, as had been previously described. The relative large size of M. ferox, together with a stout rostrum and mandible made it one of the more powerful predators of the Early Miocene of the Great Plains of North America. PMID:27054570

  12. Megalictis, the Bone-Crushing Giant Mustelid (Carnivora, Mustelidae, Oligobuninae from the Early Miocene of North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Valenciano

    Full Text Available We describe cranial and mandibular remains of three undescribed individuals of the giant mustelid Megalictis ferox Matthew, 1907 from the latest Arikareean (Ar4, Early Miocene mammal fauna of Nebraska, and Wyoming (USA housed at the American Museum of Natural History (New York, USA. Our phylogenetic hypothesis indicates that Ar4 specimens assigned to M. ferox constitute a monophyletic group. We assign three additional species previously referred to Paroligobunis to Megalictis: M. simplicidens, M. frazieri, and "M." petersoni. The node containing these four species of Megalictis and Oligobunis forms the Oligobuninae. We test the hypothesis that Oligobuninae (Megalictis and Oligobunis is a stem mustelid taxon. Our results indicate that the Oligobuninae form the sister clade to the crown extant mustelids. Based on the cranium, M. ferox is a jaguar-size mustelid and the largest terrestrial mustelid known to have existed. This new material also sheds light on a new ecomorphological interpretation of M. ferox as a bone-crushing durophage (similar to hyenas, rather than a cat-like hypercarnivore, as had been previously described. The relative large size of M. ferox, together with a stout rostrum and mandible made it one of the more powerful predators of the Early Miocene of the Great Plains of North America.

  13. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  14. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  15. Late Miocene volcanism and intra-arc tectonics during the early development of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luca; Conticelli, Sandro; Vaggelli, Gloria; Petrone, Chiara M.; Manetti, Piero

    2000-03-01

    The early stage of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (hereafter TMVB) is marked by widespread, mafic to intermediate, volcanism emplaced between 11 and 7 Ma from the Pacific coast to the longitude of Mexico City, to the north of the modern volcanic arc. Petrological and geochronological data support the hypothesis that this volcanism made up a unique late Miocenic central Mexican comagmatic province. Mafic lavas at the mouth of the Gulf of California and along the northwestern sector of the TMVB made up the Nayarit district, which includes calc-alkaline to transitional varieties. The central sector of the TMVB is characterized by two basaltic districts: the Jalisco-Guanajuato and the Queretaro-Hidalgo, which are distinguished from the westernmost ones by their lower Nb/La and generally lower HFSE/LILE values, as well as by spider diagrams characterized by larger negative spikes at Th, Ta, Nb, and Ti. The surface occurrence of the late Miocene basalts appears to be controlled by pre-existing zones of crustal weakness that channeled the mafic magmas. Field observations suggest that these structures have been reactivated in a transtensional fashion induced by differential tectonic motion of crustal blocks to the south and to the north of the TMVB. Starting from ˜12 Ma the TMVB separates a northern tectonic domain, subject to the developing divergent Pacific-North America plate boundary, from a southern tectonic domain, characterized by oblique subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates. Apparently, far field stresses related to these complex plate boundaries reactivated older suture zones, allowing rapid uprise of mantle-derived magmas. The subduction-related signature shown by Miocene mafic lavas of the Jalisco-Guanajuato district argues against the existence of mantle plumes beneath this sector of the North America plate. On the other hand, the occurrence in the western TMVB and in the Guadalajara region of a large volume of mafic magmas, which sometimes show

  16. Geochemistry and petrology of the Early Miocene lamproites and related volcanic rocks in the Thrace Basin, NW Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Yalçın E.; Palmer, Martin R.; Uysal, İbrahim; Gündoğan, İbrahim

    2014-08-01

    The extensional Thrace basin (NW Anatolia) contains an association of early Miocene diopside-leucite-phlogopite (Doğanca) and diopside-phlogopite (Korucuköy) lamproites with Oligocene medium-K calc-alkaline andesites (Keşan volcanics), early Miocene shoshonitic rocks (Altınyazı trachyte) and middle Miocene Na-alkaline basalts (Beğendik basalts). The Doğanca lamproite (K2O = 5.1-5.5 wt.%; K/Na = 2.78-2.89; MgO = 11.4-11.8 wt.%) consists of olivine (Fo71-86), diopside (Al2O3 = 1.0-5.0, Na2O = 0.2-0.6), phlogopite (TiO2 = 1.1-9.4, Al2O3 = 11.1-13.9), spinel (Mg# = 22.9-32.6; Cr# = 64-83.4), leucite, apatite, zircon, Fe-Ti-oxides and magnetite in a poikilitic sanidine matrix. The potassic volcanic units (lamproites and trachytes) in the region have similarly high Sr and low Nd isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.70835-0.70873 and 143Nd/144Nd(i) = 0.51227-0.51232). The major and trace element compositions and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios of the shoshonitic, ultrapotassic and lamproitic units closely resemble those of other Mediterranean ultrapotassic lamproites (i.e., orogenic lamproites) from Italia, Serbia, Macedonia and western Anatolia. The Beğendik basalts show intraplate geochemical signatures with an Na-alkaline composition, an absence of Nb negative anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized multi-element diagrams, as well as low Sr (~ 0.70416) and high Nd (0.51293) isotopic ratios; and include olivine (Fo72-84), diopside, spinel, Fe-Ti-oxides and magnetite. The Oligocene Keşan volcanics were emplaced in the earlier stages of extension in Thrace, and represent the typical volcanic products of post-collisional volcanism. The continental crust-like trace element abundances and isotopic compositions of the most primitive early Miocene ultrapotassic rocks (Mg# up to 74) indicate that their mantle sources were intensely contaminated by the continental material. By considering the geodynamic evolution of the region, including oceanic subduction, crustal

  17. Atmospheric CO2 from the late Oligocene to early Miocene reconstructed from photosynthesis data and leaf characteristics of fossil plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Michaela; Oehm, Christoph; Konrad, Wilfried; Utescher, Torsten; Kunzmann, Lutz; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita

    2013-04-01

    In the Cenozoic era, global climate changed from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. During the Oligocene, the comparatively cool phase in the earlier part of the late Oligocene is followed by the Late Oligocene Warming and a major glaciation event at the Oligocene-Miocene transition (Mi-1). Various studies indicate that these climate events were coupled to changes in atmospheric CO2 levels. In this study, atmospheric CO2 from the late Oligocene to the early Miocene was reconstructed by using photosynthesis data and fossil leaf characteristics. We used plant material from various sites located in Germany and Austria comprising fossil leaves of four angiosperm plant species: Platanus neptuni (Platanaceae), Quercus rhenana, Q. praerhenana and Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (all Fagaceae). A mechanistic-theoretical approach based on stomatal parameters, photosynthesis data and gas exchange parameters was applied to model palaeoatmospheric CO2 levels. Detailed climate data of the considered sites were reconstructed as well since the mechanistic-theoretical approach requires climate data as input parameters for calculating both assimilation rate and transpiration rate. Our results indicate a steady CO2 level of about 400 ppm for all sites and therefore suggest a decoupling of CO2 and cooling/warming events for the considered time slices.

  18. A major Early Miocene thermal pulse due to subduction segmentation and rollback in the western Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spakman, W.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Vissers, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geological studies have shown that Eo-Oligocene subduction related high-pressure, low-temperature metasediments and peridotites of the Alboran region (Spain, Morocco) and the Kabylides (Algeria) experienced a major Early Miocene (~21 Ma) thermal pulse requiring asthenospheric temperatures at ~60 km depth. Despite earlier propositions, the cause of this thermal pulse is still controversial while also the paleogeographic origin of the Alboran and Kabylides units is debated. Here, we relate the thermal pulse to segmentation of the West Alpine-Tethyan slab under the SE Iberian margin (Baleares-Sardinia). We restore the Alboran rocks farther east than previously assumed, to close to the Balearic Islands, adjacent to Sardinia. We identify three major lithosphere faults, the NW-SE trending North Balearic Transform Zone (NBTZ) and the ~W-E trending Emile Baudot and North African transforms that accommodated the Miocene subduction evolution of slab segmentation, rollback, and migration of Alboran and Kabylides rocks to their current positions. The heat pulse occurred S-SE of the Baleares where slab segmentation along the NBTZ triggered radially outgrowing S-SW rollback opening a slab window that facilitated local ascent of asthenosphere below the rapidly extending Alboran-Kabylides accretionary prism. Subsequent slab rollback carried the Kabylides and Alboran domains to their present positions. Our new reconstruction is in line with tomographically imaged mantle structure and focuses attention on the crucial role of evolving subduction segmentation driving HT-metamorphism and subsequent extension, fragmentation, and dispersion of geological terrains.

  19. Extensional Basins in a Convergent Margin: Oligocene-Early Miocene Salar de Atacama and Calama basins, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. E.; Mpodozis, C.; Blanco, N.; Pananont, P.; Dávila, F.

    2004-12-01

    The Salar de Atacama Basin (SdAB) is the largest and most persistent sedimentary basin of northern Chile, accumulating nonmarine sediment from Cretaceous to modern times. Its northwestern neighbor, the Calama, was a Cenozoic basin. Although SdAB was in the backarc zone early in the Andean orogeny, both are now forearc basins. Others demonstrated that the basins overlie anomalously cold, strong, and dense crust and lithosphere. We focus on an extensional Oligocene basin stage. Interpretation of the basin-controlling faults is based on seismic reflection studies supported by field relations. The SdAB is limited to the west by the NNE-trending, steeply east-dipping, Paciencia Fault (PF). The PF experienced 5-7 km of down-to-the-east offset during the Oligocene-early Miocene. Syntectonic strata, an arid succession of siliciclastics and evaporites, are asymmetric, with thicknesses of 5000 m and abundant halite adjacent to the PF, and of 1000 m with fine detrital clastic strata 25 km farther east. Relations in conglomeratic growth strata that overlap the PF also demonstrate normal displacement during sediment accumulation. Seismic data reveal that a buried normal fault with 1-1.5 km down-to-the-east displacement limits the western margin of the Oligocene-Miocene Calama siliciclastic basin fill. Regionally, Oligocene-early Miocene margin-parallel strike-slip deformation dominated northwest of the basins, contributing sinistral offset (West Fissure Fault) to the northern segment of the long-lived Domeyko Fault System. The new SdAB and Calama data reveal that a 20,000 km2 domain of extensional basins existed within the dominantly strike-slip region. Even if PF and the fault in the Calama Basin were transtensional, the proportion of extension to strike-slip displacement is much greater in these basins than elsewhere in northern Chile. Further study is required to understand what combination of factors caused this kinematic distinction as well as delayed the onset of CVZ

  20. A fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. from the Early Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat and its bearing on palaeoclimatic interpretation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anumeha Shukla; J S Guleria; R C Mehrotra

    2012-02-01

    A new fossil fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. belonging to the family Dipterocarpaceae is described from the Early Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat. It resembles best the extant species Shorea macroptera Dyer, which is a prominent member of the tropical evergreen forests of the Malayan Peninsula. The present finding, along with the other megafossil records described from the same area, indicates a typical tropical vegetation with a warm and humid climate at the time of deposition in contrast to the present day xeric vegetation in the area. As the family Dipterocarpaceae no longer exists in western India, it is essential to discuss the time of its extinction and possible causes, which may include drastic changes in the climate of the region. The present finding also supports the theory of a Malaysian origin for the family in contrast to the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin.

  1. The tectonic emplacement of Sumba in the Sunda-Banda Arc: paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene Jawila volcanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, H.; Bergen, M.J. van

    1995-01-01

    The island of Sumba is a continental fragment in the fore-arc region near the transition between the Sunda Arc and Banda Arc in southeastern Indonesia. Paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene volcanics of the Jawila Formation in western Sumba constrain the final drift stage

  2. Oligocene-Early Miocene river incision near the first bend of the Yangze River: Insights from apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoming; Tian, Yuntao; Li, Dewen; Qin, Siwei; Vermeesch, Pieter; Schwanethal, James

    2016-09-01

    The southeastern Tibetan Plateau is deeply incised by three parallel rivers, the Salween, the Mekong and the Yangtze. The river incision and surface uplift histories of this landscape are hotly debated. This study presents bedrock apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He data from a 1800 m vertical profile, located near the first bend of the Yangtze River. Ages range from 20 to 30 Ma, indicating an Oligocene-Early Miocene phase of moderate river incision at a rate of 0.10-0.18 mm/yr. This is considerably older than elsewhere in the region, but consistent with a previously proposed phase of Eocene surface uplift inferred from stable isotope geochemistry. We consider the implications of the new data under two different tectonic models. If the surface uplift and river incision resulted from lower crustal flow, the new results require such flow to have commenced at Oligocene-Early Miocene time rather than during the previously proposed Late Miocene. Alternatively, Oligocene to Early Miocene plateau growth might have resulted from transpressional deformation in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau.

  3. Climate variations in the late Miocene - early Pliocene in the Black Sea region (Taman peninsula) inferred from palynological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundan, Ekaterina; Kürschner, Wolfram; Krijgsman, Wout

    2017-04-01

    A palynological study of Neogene sediments from the cape "Zhelezny Rog" (Taman peninsula, the Black Sea area) was carried out as part of integrated micropaleontological, lithological and paleomagnetic research. The Neogene section of the cape "Zhelezny Rog" (the Zhelezny Rog section) is one of the most representative Upper Miocene to Lower Pliocene succession of Eastern Paratethys. The section covers the Sarmatian, Maeotian, Pontian (upper Miocene) and Kimmerian (lower Pliocene) local stages. One hundred and eighteen samples were selected from the Zhelezny rog section for quantitative palynological analysis. Using PCA analysis and additional proxy such as "steppe index", art/chen and poa/ast ratios the regional climate history was reconstructed. The Early Maeotian is characterized by a warm, warm-temperate climate on the background of relatively high humidity. During the Late Maeotian it became colder and dryer. The coldest and driest conditions during the Maeotian correspond to the middle part of the Late Maeotian. There were a high number of steppe elements (as Artemisia) and low amount of thermophilous ones. Climate of the end of the Maeotian was characterized by warmer and wetter conditions. In the beginning of the Pontian there was a cooling trend, as evidenced by the decreasing thermophilous elements and the increasing high-latitude trees. Most significant changes were found within the Pontian-Kimmerian boundary beds. This level is characterized by decreasing of thermophilous elements, increasing of cool-temperate pollen and Sphagnum spores that are considered as an evidence of a temperature decrease in the background of high humidity conditions. The results will be discussed and correlated to Neogene global climate trends.

  4. ENSO in a warming world: interannual climate variability in the early Miocene Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bethany; Wilson, Gary; Lee, Daphne

    2016-04-01

    The El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant source of interannual variability in the modern-day climate system. ENSO is a quasi-periodic cycle with a recurrence interval of 2-8 years. A major question in modern climatology is how ENSO will respond to increased climatic warmth. ENSO-like (2-8 year) cycles have been detected in many palaeoclimate records for the Holocene. However, the temporal resolution of pre-Quaternary palaeoclimate archives is generally too coarse to investigate ENSO-scale variability. We present a 100-kyr record of ENSO-like variability during the second half of the Oligocene/Miocene Mi-1 event, a period of increasing global temperatures and Antarctic deglaciation (~23.032-2.93 Ma). This record is drawn from an annually laminated lacustrine diatomite from southern New Zealand, a region strongly affected by ENSO in the present day. The diatomite consists of seasonal alternations of light (diatom bloom) and dark (low diatom productivity) layers. Each light-dark couplet represents one year's sedimentation. Light-dark couplet thickness is characterised by ENSO-scale variability. We use high-resolution (sub-annual) measurements of colour spectra to detect couplet thickness variability. Wavelet analysis indicates that absolute values are modulated by orbital cycles. However, when orbital effects are taken into account, ENSO-like variability occurs throughout the entire depositional period, with no clear increase or reduction in relation to Antarctic deglaciation and increasing global warmth.

  5. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. van der Spek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and cut through by fissures. The hydraulic conductivity of the clay layers is negligible compared to the silt layers. It is conceptualized that fissures form a hydraulic connection between the colluvium and the varved clays. Groundwater recharge flows through the colluvium into the fissures where water is exchanged horizontally between the fissure and the silt layers of the varved clays. Groundwater flow in the colluvium is simulated with the Boussinesq equation while flow in the silt layers of the varved clays is simulated with the Richards' equation. Longitudinal outflow from the fissure is simulated with a linear-reservoir model. Scattered data of relatively short monitoring periods is available for several landslides in the region. A good similarity between observed and simulated heads is obtained, especially when considering the lack of important physical parameters such as the fissure width and the distance between the monitoring point and the fissure. A simulation for the period 1959–2004 showed some correlation between peaks in the simulated heads and the recorded occurrence of landslides while the bottom of the varved clays remained saturated during the entire simulation period.

  6. Evidence for Repeated Early Miocene Glaciation and the Cutting of Upper Taylor Valley from the Friis Hills, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A.; Ashworth, A. C.; Marchant, D. R.; Hemming, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Friis Hills, located at the head of Taylor Valley in the the McMurdo Dry Valleys, hold a sequence of stacked tills at least Early Miocene in age. Sedimentology, clast lithology and bedrock striations indicate these tills were deposited from wet-based glaciers that flowed southeastward down a shallow paleovalley toward the Ferrar trough. Interbedded paleosols, fluvial, and glaciolacustrine deposits register ice-free periods when the valley held small streams and ponds. Exceptionally well-preserved fossil biota suggests mild conditions during at least two of these interglacial episodes. Proglacial lacustrine deposits that include dropstones and debris flows mark the return of glacial conditions but fossil leaves and wood of Nothofagus suggest conditions during the initial phase of ice advance were also relatively mild. Geomorphic relationships show that major valley incision must have taken place after deposition of these sediments as the Friis Hills is today a flat-topped inselberg, about 5 km across, isolated from nearby topography by the deep glacial troughs of the Taylor Valley drainage. A second suite of tills, directly overlying the first, registers a reorganized glacial system with ice streaming eastward, roughly parallel to Taylor Valley. Like the first, these tills were deposited during repeated ice advances but glaciers never fully inundated the Friis Hills and ice-free periods are marked by only weak weathering surfaces and thin glaciolacustrine deposits. We interpret the changing glacial pattern to reflect headward cutting in upper Taylor Valley and the capture of ice from the Ferrar drainage. A volcanic ash interbed dated by Ar-Ar at 19.76 (±0.11) Ma occurs in a Taylor Valley-oriented drift near the eastern edge of the Friis Hills plateau. Based on its stratigraphic position, the older suite of tills and fossil-bearing interbeds are >19.76 Ma. Underlying bedrock striations show that ice flow had been redirected into Taylor Valley by this time. The

  7. Phylogenetics and molecular clocks reveal the repeated evolution of ant-plants after the late Miocene in Africa and the early Miocene in Australasia and the Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicki, Guillaume; Renner, Susanne S

    2015-07-01

    Ant-plant symbioses involve over 110 ant species in five subfamilies that are facultative or obligate occupants of stem, leaf or root domatia formed by hundreds of ant-plant species. The phylogenetic distribution and geological ages of these associations, and the frequency of gains or losses of domatium, are largely unknown. We compiled an up-to-date list of ant domatium-bearing plants, estimated their probable true number from model-based statistical inference, generated dated phylogenies that include c. 50% of ant-plant lineages, and traced the occurrence of domatia and extrafloral nectaries on a 1181-species tree, using likelihood and Bayesian methods. We found 681 vascular plants with domatia (159 genera in 50 families) resulting from minimally 158 inferred domatium origins and 43 secondary losses over the last 19 Myr. The oldest African ant-plant symbioses are younger than those in Australasia and the Neotropics. The best statistical model suggests that the true number of myrmecophytes may approach 1140 species. The phylogenetic distribution of ant-plants shows that domatia evolved from a range of pre-adapted morphological structures and have been lost frequently, suggesting that domatia have no generalizable effect on diversification. The Miocene origin of ant-plant symbioses is consistent with inferred changes in diet and behaviour during ant evolution. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Late Oligocene-Early Miocene magnetochronology of the mammalian faunas in the Lanzhou Basin-environmental changes in the NE margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ao, Hong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Li, Yongxiang; An, Zhisheng

    2016-11-01

    A large number of terrestrial mammalian fossils were reported in the well-exposed Paleogene and Neogene fluvio-lacustrine strata in Western China. Their accurate ages are crucial to understand the mammalian and environmental evolution associated with the step-wise uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. At present their ages are surprisingly poorly constrained. Here, we present a high-resolution magnetostratigraphic dating of the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene mammal assemblages from a 233-m thick fluvio-lacustrine section in the Lanzhou Basin located at the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, China. The results suggest that the section spans from the polarity subchron C6Cn.2r to C5En, i.e. ranging from ca 23 to 18 Ma. This magnetochronology provides considerably more robust ages for three associated land mammalian faunal assemblages. Updated ages end the debate on existing ambiguous and distinctly different magnetostratigraphic correlations for those Late Oligocene-Early Miocene assemblages. The new ages now enable precise correlation of these faunas to the European Land Mammal and North American Land Mammal Ages. The faunal assemblages further suggest a mixed setting of woodlands and grasslands associated with a humid environment in the Lanzhou Basin during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene, in contrast to its modern poor vegetation cover and arid environment.

  9. Oligocene-Early Miocene Magnetochronology of the Mammalian Faunas in the Lanzhou Basin—Environmental Changes in the NE Margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Ao, H.; Dekkers, M. J.; Li, Y.; An, Z.

    2016-12-01

    A large number of terrestrial mammalian fossils were reported in the well-exposed Paleogene and Neogene fluvio-lacustrine strata in Western China. Their accurate ages are crucial to understand the mammal and environmental evolution associated with the step-wise uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. To date their ages are surprisingly poorly constrained. Here, we present a high-resolution magnetostratigraphic dating of the Oligocene-Early Miocene mammal assemblages from a 383-m thick fluvio-lacustrine section in the Lanzhou Basin located at the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (China). The section is suggested to span from the uppermost part of polarity chron C12r to chron C5En, i.e. ranging from ca 31.5 to 18 Ma. This magnetochronology provides new numerical ages for five Oligocene-Early Miocene land mammalian faunal assemblages within the biostratigraphy and enables precise correlation of these faunas to the European Land Mammal Age and North American Land Mammal Ages. The faunal assemblages further suggest a mixed setting of woodlands and grasslands associated with humid environment in the Lanzhou Basin during the Oligocene-Early Miocene, in contrast to its modern poor vegetation cover and arid environment.

  10. Palaeoenvironments during a terminal Oligocene or early Miocene transgression in a fluvial system at the southwestern tip of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. L.; Neumann, F. H.; Cawthra, H. C.; Carr, A. S.; Scott, L.; Durugbo, E. U.; Humphries, M. S.; Cowling, R. M.; Bamford, M. K.; Musekiwa, C.; MacHutchon, M.

    2017-03-01

    A multi-proxy study of an offshore core in Saldanha Bay (South Africa) provides new insights into fluvial deposition, ecosystems, phytogeography and sea-level history during the late Paleogene-early Neogene. Offshore seismic data reveal bedrock topography, and provide evidence of relative sea levels as low as - 100 m during the Oligocene. 3D landscape reconstruction reveals hills, plains and an anastomosing river system. A Chattian or early Miocene age for the sediments is inferred from dinoflagellate taxa Distatodinium craterum, Chiropteridium lobospinosum, Homotryblium plectilum and Impagidinium paradoxum. The subtropical forest revealed by palynology includes lianas and vines, evergreen trees, palms and ferns, implying higher water availability than today, probably reduced seasonal drought and stronger summer rainfall. From topography, sedimentology and palynology we reconstruct Podocarpaceae-dominated forests, Proto-Fynbos, and swamp/riparian forests with palms and other angiosperms. Rhizophoraceae present the first South African evidence of Palaeogene/Neogene mangroves. Subtropical woodland-thicket with Combretaceae and Brachystegia (Peregrinipollis nigericus) probably developed on coastal plains. Some of the last remaining Gondwana elements on the sub-continent, e.g., Araucariaceae, are recorded. Charred particles signal fires prior to the onset of summer dry climate at the Cape. Marine and terrestrial palynomorphs, together with organic and inorganic geochemical proxy data, suggest a gradual glacio-eustatic transgression. The data shed light on Southern Hemisphere biogeography and regional climatic conditions at the Palaeogene-Neogene transition. The proliferation of the vegetation is partly ascribed to changes in South Atlantic oceanographic circulation, linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and the onset of the Benguela Current 14 Ma.

  11. Comparison of Varve and 14C Chronologies from Steel Lake, Minnesota, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, J; Brown, T A; Hu, F S

    2004-12-29

    Annually laminated sediments (varves) offer an effective means of acquiring high-quality paleoenvironmental records. However, the strength of a varve chronology can be compromised by a number of factors, such as missing varves, ambiguous laminations, and human counting error. We assess the quality of a varve chronology for the last three millennia from Steel Lake, Minnesota, through comparisons with nine AMS {sup 14}C dates on terrestrial plant macrofossils from the same core. These comparisons revealed an overall 8.4% discrepancy, primarily because of missing/uncountable varves within two stratigraphic intervals characterized by low carbonate concentrations and obscure laminations. Application of appropriate correction factors to these two intervals results in excellent agreement between the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies. These results, together with other varve studies, demonstrate that an independent age-determination method, such as {sup 14}C dating, is usually necessary to verify, and potentially correct, varve chronologies.

  12. Palaeo-oceanographical implications of Early-Middle Miocene subtropical ostracod faunas from the continental shelf of the SE Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dingle, R.V.; McMillan, I.K.; Majoram, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    palaeo-oceanography, miocene, SE Atlantic, ostracoda, upwelling, Benguela current, Agullas current......palaeo-oceanography, miocene, SE Atlantic, ostracoda, upwelling, Benguela current, Agullas current...

  13. The Early Burdigalian (MN3; Miocene large mammals from Estrepouy (Aquitaine basin, France: an updated faunal list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsburg, L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to describe the mammals from the Early Miocene locality of Estrepouy, Gers, France. We have identified 17 species belonging to 3 orders; Carnivora; Amphicyon lanthanicus, Cynelos helbingi, Plithocyon bruneti, Hemicyon gargan, Palaeogale hyaenoides, Semigenetta elegans y Pseudaelurus turnauensis. Perissodactyla; Anchitherium aurelianense, Protaceratherium minutum y Diaceratherium cf. aurelianense. Arctiodactyla; Aureliachoerus aurelianensis, Xenohyus venitor, Caenotherium aff. lintillae, Andegameryx andegaviensis, Oriomeryx willii, Procervulus praelucidus, Lagomeryx parvulus y Procervulus praelucidus. The Estrepouy mammal assemblage seems older than that represented in Wintershof-West (Alemania, MN 3 reference locality.

    [fr] Des grands mammifères sont determines pour le Miocène inférieur (MN3 de Etrepouy, Gers, France. 17 taxons appartenant à trois déterminés ont été identifies: Carnivora; Amphicyon lanthanicus, Cynelos helbingi, Plithocyon bruneti, Hemicyon gargan, Palaeogale hyaenoides, Semigenetta elegans et Pseudaelurus turnauensis. Perissodactyla; Anchitherium aurelianense, Protaceratherium minutum et Diaceratherium cf. aurelianense. Arctiodactyla; Aureliachoerus aurelianensis, Xenohyus venitor, Caenotherium aff. lintillae, Andegameryx andegaviensis, Oriomeryx willii, Procervulus praelucidus, Lagomeryx parvulus et Procervulus praelucidus. L’association des mammifères Estrepouy regarde un peu plus âgé que celui représenté à la localité de référence du MN3 á Wintershof-Ouest (Allemagne.

  14. Individual to community-level faunal responses to environmental change from a marine fossil record of Early Miocene global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Christina L

    2012-01-01

    Modern climate change has a strong potential to shift earth systems and biological communities into novel states that have no present-day analog, leaving ecologists with no observational basis to predict the likely biotic effects. Fossil records contain long time-series of past environmental changes outside the range of modern observation, which are vital for predicting future ecological responses, and are capable of (a) providing detailed information on rates of ecological change, (b) illuminating the environmental drivers of those changes, and (c) recording the effects of environmental change on individual physiological rates. Outcrops of Early Miocene Newport Member of the Astoria Formation (Oregon) provide one such time series. This record of benthic foraminiferal and molluscan community change from continental shelf depths spans a past interval environmental change (≈ 20.3-16.7 mya) during which the region warmed 2.1-4.5°C, surface productivity and benthic organic carbon flux increased, and benthic oxygenation decreased, perhaps driven by intensified upwelling as on the modern Oregon coast. The Newport Member record shows that (a) ecological responses to natural environmental change can be abrupt, (b) productivity can be the primary driver of faunal change during global warming, (c) molluscs had a threshold response to productivity change while foraminifera changed gradually, and (d) changes in bivalve body size and growth rates parallel changes in taxonomic composition at the community level, indicating that, either directly or indirectly through some other biological parameter, the physiological tolerances of species do influence community change. Ecological studies in modern and fossil records that consider multiple ecological levels, environmental parameters, and taxonomic groups can provide critical information for predicting future ecological change and evaluating species vulnerability.

  15. Individual to community-level faunal responses to environmental change from a marine fossil record of Early Miocene global warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Belanger

    Full Text Available Modern climate change has a strong potential to shift earth systems and biological communities into novel states that have no present-day analog, leaving ecologists with no observational basis to predict the likely biotic effects. Fossil records contain long time-series of past environmental changes outside the range of modern observation, which are vital for predicting future ecological responses, and are capable of (a providing detailed information on rates of ecological change, (b illuminating the environmental drivers of those changes, and (c recording the effects of environmental change on individual physiological rates. Outcrops of Early Miocene Newport Member of the Astoria Formation (Oregon provide one such time series. This record of benthic foraminiferal and molluscan community change from continental shelf depths spans a past interval environmental change (≈ 20.3-16.7 mya during which the region warmed 2.1-4.5°C, surface productivity and benthic organic carbon flux increased, and benthic oxygenation decreased, perhaps driven by intensified upwelling as on the modern Oregon coast. The Newport Member record shows that (a ecological responses to natural environmental change can be abrupt, (b productivity can be the primary driver of faunal change during global warming, (c molluscs had a threshold response to productivity change while foraminifera changed gradually, and (d changes in bivalve body size and growth rates parallel changes in taxonomic composition at the community level, indicating that, either directly or indirectly through some other biological parameter, the physiological tolerances of species do influence community change. Ecological studies in modern and fossil records that consider multiple ecological levels, environmental parameters, and taxonomic groups can provide critical information for predicting future ecological change and evaluating species vulnerability.

  16. Vertical thermal gradient history in the eastern equatorial Pacific during the early to middle Miocene: Implications for the equatorial thermocline development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroki; Nishi, Hiroshi; Kuroyanagi, Azumi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Ikehara, Minoru; Takashima, Reishi

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of the equatorial thermocline is essential for understanding climate changes in the tropical Pacific. Multispecies planktic foraminiferal analyses provide a way to examine temperature distributions and thus the structure of the thermocline. Although the secular thermocline development has been documented back to the late Miocene, the early to middle Miocene interval has rarely been examined. In addition, relationships with the dynamic Antarctic ice sheets remain unclear. Here we investigate the vertical thermal gradient in the upper water column at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1337 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) throughout the early to middle Miocene (23.1 to 11.7 Ma). The gradient increased over the Miocene Climatic Optimum, whereas it decreased during the East Antarctic Ice Sheet Expansion (EAIE). Comparison of the EEP record with its western equatorial Pacific (WEP) counterpart suggests that sea surface temperature was more stable in the WEP than in the EEP. We further estimated equatorial thermocline from two diagonal gradients between the EEP and the WEP: thermocline shoaled from 16.7 to 15.7 Ma and tilt weakened between 16.5 and 13.8 Ma. The onset of the "Monterey Excursion" and the reduced Antarctic ice sheet volume would have affected thermocline depth and tilt, respectively. Thermocline depth was likely much deeper compared to Pliocene-to-modern conditions. Furthermore, a 4-point-based distribution of isotherms (4DI index) was used as a metric of the evenness or unevenness of the isotherm distributions. The 4DI index considerably reduced at around the EAIE and other Mi-events, reflecting the evenly distributed isotherms under a more glaciated Antarctica.

  17. Declining Atmospheric pCO2 During the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene: New Insights from Paired Alkenone and Coccolith Stable Isotope Barometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, S. R.; Polissar, P. J.; deMenocal, P. B.; Swann, J. P.; Guo, M. Y.; Stoll, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    806 combined with previous published measurements suggests atmospheric CO2 values declined across the late Miocene and early Pliocene. This decline is coincident with decreasing ocean temperatures suggesting the fundamental relationship between atmospheric CO2 and climate can qualitatively explain late Miocene warmth.

  18. Parameters determining the carbon isotopic composition of coal and fossil wood in the Early Miocene Oberdorf lignite seam (Styrian Basin, Austria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Gratzer, R.; Lucke, A.; Puttmann, W. [University of Leoben, Leoben (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    Petrographical and geochemical data of gelified and ungelified fossil wood from the Early Miocene Oberdorf lignite seam (Styrian Basin, Austria) provide evidence that the early diagenetic, aerobic degradation of wood by fungi may be followed by further decomposition under reducing conditions by the activity of anaerobic bacteria. Based on the molecular compositions of terpenoid hydrocarbons, the wood fragments in the lignite are identified as gymnosperms. The mean carbon isotope values found for gymnosperms and coals (-24.2 parts per thousand and -24.7 parts per thousand, respectively) confirm the results from biomarker analyses indicating that the peat-forming vegetation of the Oberdorf seam was dominated by gymnosperm taxa. The results obtained from the Early Miocene Oberdorf lignite indicate that the carbon isotope ratios of the coals are primarily affected by varying contributions of different parts of whole-plant tissue, due to their different isotopic and molecular compositions (e.g. epicuticular leaf waxes, resins, wood) and their different decay-resistance against the early diagenetic changes involved in organic matter decomposition. Carbon cycling during anoxic decomposition of plant-derived organic matter is assumed to affect the {delta}-{sup 13}C values of coal. {delta}-{sup 13}C Values of wood and extracted cellulose are affected only to a minor extent.

  19. Early Miocene Kırka-Phrigian Caldera, western Turkey (Eskişehir province), preliminary volcanology, age and geochemistry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Helvacı, Cahit

    2016-11-01

    Large rhyolitic ignimbrite occurrences are closely connected to the Early Miocene initiation of extension in the central-western Anatolia crossing the Tavşanlı-Afyon zones. Field and laboratory data performed at the apex of the Eskişehir-Afyon-Isparta volcanic area allowed recognition of newly identified caldera structure, named here "Kırka-Phrigian caldera". Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses since 25 Ma ago resulted in the NNW-SSE elongation of the magma chamber and influenced the roughly elliptical shape of the subsided block (caldera floor). The caldera, which is roughly oval (24 km × 15 km) in shape, formed during a series of collapse events, starting at 19 Ma, by the generation of a huge volume of extra- and intracaldera ignimbrites. Intracaldera post-collapse sedimentation and further volcanism at the northern edge (at 18.6 Ma) were controlled through subsidence-related faults with generation of a series of volcanic structures (domes and lavas) showing a large compositional range. Enriched mantle components within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle began to melt via decompression melting during the initiation of extension. The heat resulting from the fractionation of ascending mantle melts produced the silicic compositions in large mushy crustal reservoirs; interaction of these melts with fertile crustal rocks further caused crustal anataxis and consequently two different compositions: Rhyolite-1 and Rhyolite-2. The eruptions of Kırka-Phrigian caldera-related ignimbrites were probably triggered by basaltic intrusion. Rock volumes and geochemical evidence suggest that silicic volcanic rocks come from a long-lived complex magma chamber system. After caldera generation there was a northern shift to small volume extra- and intra-caldera episodic rhyolitic, basaltic-trachy andesitic, trachytic and lamproitic volcanism, the latter being the youngest (16.2 Ma) indicating a more primitive magma input which originated in an enriched mantle

  20. Reconstructing Environmental Change Using Lake Varves as a Climate Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Christopher; Bodzin, Alec; Cirucci, Lori; Anastasio, David; Sahagian, Dork

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an investigative activity in which their eighth-grade students reconstructed past environmental change in the New England area using data from lake varves in central Vermont to examine evidence of climate change. The investigation uses an authentic paleoclimate record (Ridge 2011) from the Pleistocene epoch,…

  1. Style and age of late Oligocene-early Miocene deformation in the southern Stillwater Range, west central Nevada: Paleomagnetism, geochronology, and field relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; John, David A.; Conrad, James E.; McKee, Edwin H.

    2000-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geochronologic data combined with geologic mapping tightly restrict the timing and character of a late Oligocene to early Miocene episode of large magnitude extension in the southern Stillwater Range and adjacent regions of west central Nevada. The southern Stillwater Range was the site of an Oligocene to early Miocene volcanic center comprising (1) 28.3 to 24.3 Ma intracaldera ash flow tuffs, lava flows, and subjacent plutons associated with three calderas, (2) 24.8 to 20.7 Ma postcaldera silicic dikes and domes, and (3) unconformably overlying 15.3 to 13.0 Ma dacite to basalt lava flows, plugs, and dikes. The caldera-related tuffs, lava flows, and plutons were tilted 60°-70° either west or east during the initial period of Cenozoic deformation that accommodated over 100% extension. Directions of remanent magnetization obtained from these extrusive and intrusive, caldera-related rocks are strongly deflected from an expected Miocene direction in senses appropriate for their tilt. A mean direction for these rocks after tilt correction, however, suggests that they were also affected by a moderate (33.4° ± 11.8°) component of counterclockwise vertical axis rotation. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the episode of large tilting occurred during emplacement of 24.8 to 20.7 Ma postcaldera dikes and domes. In detail, an apparent decrease in rotation with decreasing age of individual, isotopically dated bodies of the postcaldera group indicates that most tilting occurred between 24.4 and 24.2 Ma. The onset of tilting immediately following after the final caldera eruptions suggests that the magmatism and deformation were linked. Deformation was not driven by magma buoyancy, however, because tilting equally affected the caldera systems of different ages, including their plutonic roots. It is more likely that regional extension was focused in the southern Stillwater Range due to magmatic warming and reduction of tensile strength of the brittle crust

  2. The tectonic emplacement of Sumba in the Sunda-Banda Arc: paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene Jawila volcanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensink, Hans; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    1995-11-01

    The island of Sumba is a continental fragment in the fore-arc region near the transition between the Sunda Arc and Banda Arc in southeastern Indonesia. Paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene volcanics of the Jawila Formation in western Sumba constrain the final drift stage and tectonic emplacement of the island. The lavas range from predominantly andesites to dacites, and display textural evidence for a weak metamorphism. Rock magnetic and mineral chemical data point to pseudo-single- to multi-domain (titano)magnetite (Fe 2.5-3Ti 0.5-0O 3), with grain sizes up to 10 μm, as the main carrier of remanence. The Jawila Formation reveals a ChRM direction with declination = 4.6°, inclination = - 19.2°, α95 = 9.9° and a paleolatitude of 9.9°S, which corroborates earlier results (Chamalaun and Sunata, 1982). Taking paleomagnetic evidence from other formations on the island into account, we conclude that the Sumba fragment has occupied approximately its present position since the Miocene. The calc-alkaline affinity and trace-element signatures of the lavas point to an origin in an arc environment. This occurrence of subduction-related volcanic activity in the early Miocene on Sumba implies that a volcanic arc existed south of the present-day East Sunda Arc, or that the island was located within the latter arc between Sumbawa and eastern Flores, and still had a minor southward drift to cover.

  3. The Early Miocene-Early Pliocene Vegetation and Climate Changes at the north to northwest Çankırı -Çorum Basin (Central Anatolian Plateau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalar, Müge; Kováčová, Marianna; Sezgül Kayseri Ozer, Mine; Utescher, Torsten; Mazzini, Ilaria; Gliozzi, Elsa; Cosentino, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    The ALErT project targets on climate and tectonic hazards in the densely populated regions in the Central Anatolian Plateau (CAP), within the framework of the Marie Curie FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN program, The CAP extends in a wide area in between zone the Aegean extensional zone and Bitlis /Zagros compressional zone. Çankırı Basin (in the middle CAP) is a key to understand aridification plateau interior and it was a deep pelagic Basin from Late Cretaceous -Early Tertiary as a result of the closure of Neo- Tethyan till the Middle Eocene. North to south of the Çankırı Basin; the Plio - Quaternary Deǧim formation (fluvial deposits) consist of massive mudstones and sandstones and it unconformable overlies the Bozkır formation (lacustrine deposits). That is a Messinian succession mainly by a 200 m-thick cyclic sequence of continental gypsum layers, clays and sandy clays in gypsum with different thicknesses crops. Bozkır formation, the lower being the contact with the Süleymanlı formation. It is overlay the Tuǧlu formation with uncomformably, which is an Upper Miocene succession mainly composed of dark grey silty and organic rich clays. Following formation, which outcrops in the northwest of Çankırı basin, is Hançili formation. The unit is covered by grey sediments of the Hançili Formation, showing alternations of channel sandstones and clay stones over 100 m thick in Early - Middle Miocene in the Çankırı basin. In this study, samples were analyzed for biotic proxy data (palynology) to figure the paleo-environmental and paleoclimate changes. Additionally only for Bozkir formation (longest section in the study area) were sampled for geochemical (δ18O - δ13C isotopes analyses and CaCO3) analysis and the rest of the formations were interpreted using the previous study. In the most pollen spectra the herbs and shrubs prevail: in Deǧim formation (50%), in Bozkır formation (75%), in Süleymanlı formation (47%), in Tuǧlu formation (60%) and in Han

  4. Tectonic implications of Early Miocene OIB magmatism in a near-trench setting: The Outer Zone of SW Japan and the northernmost Ryukyu Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminami, Kazuo; Imaoka, Teruyoshi; Ogura, Kazuki; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Hideo; Mori, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    The Outer Zone of the SW Japan and northernmost Ryukyu arcs was affected by intense igneous activity during the Miocene, characterized by MORB-like basalts, alkaline basalts, and S-type (with subordinate I-type) felsic to intermediate volcano-plutonic complexes. These igneous rocks are inferred to be the products of near-trench magmatism. Early Miocene (∼18 Ma) alkaline basalt dikes from the Shingu-Otoyo area in central northern Shikoku, and an alkaline lamprophyre dike from Tanegashima, one of the northernmost Ryukyu Islands, pre-date the Middle Miocene felsic to intermediate igneous rocks. The basalts and lamprophyre have compositions of basanite, basalt, trachybasalt and phonotephrite. They are characterized by elevated large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs; e.g., Sr, Ba, and Th) and high concentrations of high-field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., TiO2, Nb, and Zr). The geochemical signatures of the basalts and lamprophyre suggest an ocean island basalt-type (OIB-type) mantle source. The occurrence of alkaline basalts and lamprophyre with OIB-type, intraplate geochemical signatures in a near-trench setting is unusual with regard to plate tectonic processes. We propose that trench-ward motion of the overriding plate during the period around the Early Miocene resulted in a shallowly dipping slab, and interplate coupling between the subducting Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) and the overlying crust beneath most of the Outer Zone in the western part of SW Japan and the northernmost Ryukyu Islands. The OIB-type magmatism in the near-trench environment is most plausibly explained by the upwelling of asthenospheric material from beneath the subducting slab, which migrated through fractures and/or tears in the slab. We envisage two possible scenarios for the formation of these fractures or tears: (1) the shallowing dip angle of the subducted PSP resulted in concave-upwards flexure of the slab, generating fractures in the flexed region; and (2) differential motion within

  5. Reworked pyroclastic beds in the early Miocene of Patagonia: Reaction in response to high sediment supply during explosive volcanic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuitiño, José I.; Scasso, Roberto A.

    2013-05-01

    Two meter-scale pyroclastic levels are interbedded within the early Miocene succession of the Estancia 25 de Mayo (Patagoniense transgression) and Santa Cruz formations in the foreland Austral (or Magallanes) Basin, Argentina. The Lower Pyroclastic Level (LPL) is a tabular body interbedded within offshore marine deposits, laterally continuous for 30 km and varying in thickness from few centimeters to around 4 m. Grain-size grades from coarse to extremely fine ash with upward-fining along with a northeastern-fining trends. Structureless fine to very fine tuffs dominate and rare parallel laminations are the only tractive sedimentary structures. The Upper Pyroclastic Level (UPL) lies within low energy fluvial deposits and is laterally discontinuous, and it is composed by lenticular bodies reaching a maximum of 15 m thick and 100 m wide, with a concave-up base and a plane top. Grain-size range is similar to the LPL but it coarsens upward. The lower portion of the UPL shows parallel lamination, current ripple lamination and mud drapes with large pumice lapilli and plant debris, whereas the upper portion shows parallel lamination and trough cross-stratification. Both pyroclastic levels are composed mainly of pumice grains and glass shards with minor proportions of quartz and plagioclase crystals and lithic fragments. The LPL shows no mixing with epiclastic material whereas the UPL shows an upward increase in epiclastic material, and an upward increment in the scale of cross-bedding. The large thickness in relation to the possible emission center and the content of plant debris of the LPL does not suggest a direct, submarine, ash-fallout origin. The LPL is interpreted as a deposit of hyperpycnal-flows generated at the coastal zone when tephra-laden rivers plunged into the ocean. Large amounts of well preserved plant debris support the hypothesis of a terrestrial source of the sediments. The UPL is entirely composed of tractive deposits, so an ash fallout origin is

  6. Subsidence and conversion of the Dead Sea basin to an inland erosion base level in the early middle Miocene as inferred from geomorphological analysis of its ancient western fluvial outlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Oded; Zilberman, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    The first major subsidence of the Dead Sea pull-apart basin (DSB) is evidenced by the thick Hufeira Member of the terrestrial Hazeva Formation. The age of the Hufeira Member and the conversion of the DSB to an inland erosion base level are not well constrained. For this purpose we studied the effect of the evolving basin on its ancient fluvial outlet to the Arad-Be'er Sheva Valley (ABSV), which served as a Miocene corridor between the embryonic DSB region in the east and the Mediterranean Sea in the west. We mapped and analyzed the morphostratigraphy of four series of rock-cut erosion surfaces (from top to bottom: the Barir, Kuseifa, Ar'ara, and Shemen surfaces). They are manifested in the east as fluvial erosion surfaces, capped by conglomerates, passing laterally westward to marine wave-cut surfaces, capped by a shallow marine limestone of the early middle Miocene Ziqlag Formation. The age of these surfaces is constrained to the early middle Miocene (Langhian) based on morphostratigraphy correlation with the Ziqlag Formation. Paleogeographic reconstruction of the two higher and older surfaces reveals transverse valleys, which drained the DSB region and crossed the present route of the regional water divide. These transverse valleys were presumably the western outlets to the Mediterranean Sea of the newly subsiding basin. Precambrian components in the assemblage of the clasts that cover the Kuseifa surface were not found in the Hufeira Member and thus reflect an ongoing post-Hufeira exumation of the DSB drainage basin. Hence, this early middle Miocene surface postdates the Hufeira Member, assigning an age of late early Miocene to the first major subsidence of the DSB. The two lower and younger surfaces represent local drainage systems confined to the ABSV. This transition from regional to local drainage system marks the establishment of the present regional water divide and the conversion of the DSB to an inland erosion base level during the early middle Miocene.

  7. Crocodylian and turtle finds from the Early Miocene of the Baňa Dolina Mine in Veľký Krtíš (Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Čerňanský

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fossil reptile remains are described from the Lower Miocene deposits of the active mine Baňa Dolina in Veľký Krtíš (southern part of central Slovakia. The fossils come from lignite layers dated to the late Ottnangian. The sediments indicate a terrestrial, fluvial and swampy environments. The material is fragmented, and mostly disarticulated. It consists of several isolated teeth and osteoderms belonging to crocodylians. These fragmentary fossils document the presence of the group in Slovakia during the Early Miocene. The finds exhibit some general similarities with, for instance, the taxon Diplocynodon. However, lack of diagnostic features makes precise identification of such limited material impossible. The rest of the material consists of turtle shell fragments. The turtle material is represented by two families – Testudinidae and ?Trionychidae – and represent the oldest occurrence of turtles in Slovakia. The material of Testudinidae includes a partially preserved print of the external surface of the carapace and a fragmentary nuchal. The cervical scute is absent on the external surfaces of the nuchal and the anterior notch is wide but only very shallow. The features indicate that this tortoise may be closely related to the taxon Testudo (or Palaeotestudo burgenlandica.

  8. Age structure, carbonate production and shell loss rate in an Early Miocene reef of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Harzhauser

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first analysis of population structure and cohort distribution in a fossil oyster reef based on more than 1121 shells of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides (Schlotheim, 1813. Data derive from Terrestrial Laser Scanning of a Lower Miocene shell bed covering 459 m2. Within two transects, individual shells were manually outlined on a digital surface model and cross-checked based on high-resolution orthophotos, resulting in accurate information on center line length and area of exposed shell surface. A growth model was calculated, revealing this species as the fastest growing and largest Crassostrea known so far. Non-normal distribution of size, area and age data hints at the presence of at least four distinct recruitment cohorts. The rapid decline of frequency amplitudes with age is interpreted to be a function of mortality and shell loss. The calculated shell half-lives range around few years, indicating that oyster reefs were geologically short-lived structures, which could have been fully degraded on a decadal scale. Crassostrea gryphoides reefs were widespread and common along the Miocene circum-Tethyan coasts. Given its enormous growth performance of ~ 150 g carbonate per year this species has been an important carbonate producer in estuarine settings. Yet, the rapid shell loss impeded the formation of stable structures comparable to coral reefs.

  9. Age structure, carbonate production and shell loss rate in an Early Miocene reef of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Djuricic, Ana; Mandic, Oleg; Neubauer, Thomas A.; Zuschin, Martin; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    We present the first analysis of population structure and cohort distribution in a fossil oyster shell bed based on 1121 shells of the giant oyster Crassostrea gryphoides (von Schlotheim, 1813). Data derive from terrestrial laser scanning of a Lower Miocene shell bed covering 459 m2. Within two transects, individual shells were manually outlined on a digital surface model and cross-checked based on high-resolution orthophotos, resulting in accurate information on center line length and area of exposed shell surface. A growth model was calculated, revealing this species as the fastest growing and largest Crassostrea known so far. Non-normal distribution of size, area and age data hints at the presence of at least four distinct recruitment cohorts. The rapid decline of frequency amplitudes with age is interpreted to be a function of mortality and shell loss. The calculated shell half-lives range around a few years, indicating that oyster reefs were geologically short-lived structures, which could have been fully degraded on a decadal scale. Crassostrea gryphoides reefs were widespread and common along the Miocene circum-Tethyan coasts. Given its enormous growth performance of ˜ 150 g carbonate per year this species has been an important carbonate producer in estuarine settings. Yet, the rapid shell loss impeded the formation of stable structures comparable to coral reefs.

  10. Comparative investigations on the basal fossiliferous layers at the opencast mine Oberdorf (Koflach-Voitsberg lignite deposit, Styria, Austria; Early Miocene)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovareder, J.; Meller, B.; Zetter, R. [Museum of Natural History, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Geologisches Palaeontologie

    1998-06-01

    Two fossil plant assemblages from the base of the lignite- bearing sequence of the opencast mine Oberdorf are investigated. Leaf, pollen, and diaspore records were studied. This method - integrating the results obtained for the different plant organs - provides more far-reaching conclusions than the study of the fossil remains of only individual plant organs. The different disciplines complement one another , `Castanopsis` bavarica, Poliothyrsis eurorimosa, Distylium cf. uralense, Lanrophyllum markvarticense, Laurophyllum pseudovillense, Eomastixia are reported for the first time from Austria. The analysed assemblages prove the existence of a vegetation which may be best characterized as of the `Younger Mastixioid` type. It existed in the Koflach- Voitsberg surroundings adjacent to the wetlands during the depositional phase of the lignite-bearing sequence (Early Miocene, Ottnangian/Karpatian).

  11. Early Miocene basement clasts in ANDRILL AND-2A core and their implications for paleoenvironmental changes in the McMurdo Sound region (western Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Franco M.; Sandroni, Sonia

    2011-07-01

    A detailed provenance study of gravel-size clasts in the lowermost 438 m of the ANDRILL AND-2A core reveals a pattern of dynamic provenance variations which can be discussed for its implications for Early Miocene paleogeographical reconstructions and glaciological models in the McMurdo Sound region (Ross Sea). Clast distribution patterns and distribution of diagnostic basement clast assemblages indicative of three different provenance areas (Mulock-Skelton glacier, Carlyon-Darwin glacier and Koettlitz-Blue glacier regions) can be interpreted in terms of two distinctive ice dynamic scenarios: i) local fluctuations of outlet Transantarctic Mountains glaciers with dominant flows from W to E to the coast (documented in the lowermost core section, at ca. 20.2-20.1 Ma), and ii) larger volume of ice grounded at the regional scale in the Ross Embayment with flow lines running N-S close to the TAM front (in two periods, at ca. 19.7-19.7 Ma and at ca. 17.8-17.4 Ma). Moreover, in core sections including facies typical of open-marine to iceberg-influenced depositional environments, ice-rafted debris compositions reveal that during periods of glacial-minima setting sites of active calving processes dominantly occurred in areas including the present-day Blue-Koettlitz glacier coast, and subordinately in glacier tongues located further south in the Skelton-Mulock glacier area. Consistently with results of numerical modelling the reconstructed glaciological scenarios provide further constraints to paleogeographical reconstructions and glaciological models at the south-western tip of the Ross Sea during significant steps in Antarctic ice sheet evolution through the Early Miocene climatic events.

  12. Late Oligocene-Early Miocene compressional tectosedimentary episode and associated land-mammal faunas in the Andes of central Chile and adjacent Argentina (32 37°s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Thierry; Marshall, Larry G.; Rivano, Sergio; Godoy, Estanislao

    1994-01-01

    A reassessment of the geologic and land-mammal fossil evidence used in attribution of a tectosedimentary episode in the Andes between 32 and 37°S to the Middle Eocene "Incaic tectonic phase" of Peru indicates that the episode occurred during Late Oligocene-Early Miocene times(~ 27-20 Ma). From west to east, three structural domains are recognized for this time span in the study area: a volcanic arc (Chile); a thin-skinned, E-verging fold-thrust belt (Cordillera Principal, Chile-Argentina border strip); and a foreland basin (Argentina). Initiation of thrusting in the Cordillera Principal fold-thrust belt produced the coeval initiation of sedimentation in the foreland basin of adjacent Argentina. This onset of foreland deposition postdates strata bearing a Divisaderan Land Mammal Age fauna (i.e. ~ 35-30 Ma) and is marked at ~ 36°30'S by the base of the "Rodados Lustrosos" conglomerates, which are conformably overlain by sedimentary rocks containing a Deseadan Land Mammal Age fauna (i.e. ~ 29-21 Ma). Geologic relationships between the thick volcanic Abanico (Coya-Machalí) and Farellones formations also demonstrate that this tectosedimentary episode practically ended at ~ 20 Ma at least in the volcanic arc, and was therefore roughly coeval with the major tectonic crisis (~ 27-19 Ma) known in northwestern Andean Bolivia some 1500 km to the north. This strongly suggests that a long, outstanding tectonic upheaval affected at least an extended 12-37°S segment of the Andean margin of South America during Late Oligocene and Early Miocene times.

  13. 甘肃董湾晚新近纪地层及中新统/上新统界线%LATE MIOCENE-EARLY PLIOCENE BIOSTRATIGRAPHY AND MIOCENE/PLIOCENE BOUNDARY IN THE DONGWAN SECTION,GANSU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽萍; 郑绍华; 张兆群; 王李花

    2011-01-01

    , Pliosiphneus lyratus, Chardina sinensis, C. truncatus, Mesosiphneus sp., Pseudomeriones abbreviatus, P. complicidens, Chardinomys sp., C. yusheensis, and Apodemus sp. The beginning of biozone Ⅲ is marked by the first appearance of Mesosiphneus sp. at 35.5 m.Biozone Ⅳ covers layers 18 ~20, ranges from the upper part of C3n. 2n to the top of the section, and has a time span from 4.55 to 3.5 Ma. The small mammals found in this biozone include Ochotonoma n. sp. 2, Pliosiphneus lyratus, Mesosiphaeus praetingi, Chardina truncatus, and Chardinomys nihowanicus. The first appearance of Mesosiphneus praetingi at the depth of 20.4 m marks the beginning of this biozone.Biozone Ⅰ and Ⅱ are correlated to the late Late Miocene, equivalent to Baodean, while biozone Ⅲ and IV are correlated to the early Pliocene, equivalent to early Yushean. According to the paleomagnetic study, the boundary of Miocene/Pliocene (5.33 Ma) is located at the depth of 35.5 m of the section, and coincides with the last appearances of Prosiphneus eriksoni and Ochotonoma primitiva. The Miocene/Pliocene boundary is 2 meters lower than the boundary between biozone Ⅱ and Ⅲ, which is marked by the earliest appearance of Mesosiphneus sp. Except Mesosiphaeus sp., the earliest records of Paenepetenyia cf. P. zhudingi, Apodemus sp. and Ochotona lingtaica are also found closely above the boundary ( 1 ~2.5 meters). About 3 meters below the boundary, Parasoriculus sp., Sulimskia sp., Pliosiphneus lyratus, Chardina sinensis and Chardinomys sp. appear, and O. plicodenta and Sicista sp. disappear. The continuous sequence and high density of fossil levels qualify the section as a candidate stratotype section of Yushean Stage.%古地磁测年表明,甘肃董湾晚新近纪剖面代表了7.3~3.5 Ma间的连续风成古土壤堆积.在74.8 m厚的剖面上,发现了小哺乳动物化石层位40个,共产出小哺乳动物39种.根据小哺乳动物组合特点,董湾剖面可以划分出4个生物地层带,Ⅰ+Ⅱ

  14. Mechanism of Varve Formation and Paleoenvironmental Research at Lake Bolterskardet, Svalbard, the Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Guoqiang; LIU Jiaqi; GAO Denyi; SUN Qing

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of observation of thin sections and 137Cs data, laminations in sediment are interpreted to be varves in Bolterskardet Lake (78°06' N, 16°01' E), Svalbard, the Arctic. Varves appear under a petrologic microscope as couplets of dark-silt and light-clay layers. The mechanism of varve formation is surmized as follows: each silt layer is the production of sediment inflow interpreted as mainly derived from snowmelt during summer; each clay layer was deposited in a stillwater environment during an ice-cover period. A light -clay layer provides an important index bed to identify the annual interface. The high accumulation rates, long period of ice cover, and topographically closed basin are probably all critical factors in forming and preserving varves. Varve thickness is known to be controlled mainly by summer temperature. The variation of varve thickness in Lake Bolterskardet can then be used to reconstruct summer temperature. The varve series show that there has been distinct decade-scale variability of summer temperature over the past 150 years. Warm periods occurred in the 1860s, around 1900, the 1930s, 1950s, and 1970s, and in the last 20 years. The varved sediments of Lake Bolterskarde preserve an ideal record for high-resolution paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental research in this data-sparse area.

  15. Improved understanding of Diatom stratigraphy in a varved sediment through lake monitoring and sediment trap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Dominique Beatrice; Bigler, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Biological remains in lake sediments reflect past conditions in the lake itself and within its catchment. However, it is difficult to disentangle to which extent the environmental drivers are natural (e.g. population dynamics, climate) or human-induced (e.g. agriculture, forestry). Therefore, comprehensive lake monitoring is crucial to understand taphonomy and sediment formation, and enhances the value of the paleolimnological archive. In this study, we analyze survey data of a varved lake in northern Sweden (Nylandssjön, Nordingrå) with special focus on the diatom record. Different monitoring components are combined, i.e. (1) bi-weekly data of chemical parameters (chlorophyll a, nutrients) covering the period from 2012 to 2015, (2) physical parameters (temperature, oxygen, ice-cover) covering the period from 2000-2015, (3) high-resolution data from a sequential sediment trap covering the period from 2000-2015 and (4) annually resolved diatom data from the sediment varves. Early and intense spring mixing in 2012 translates into a short but vertically pervasive chlorophyll a band which is simultaneously recorded in the sequential trap with a high diatom peak (500 000 valves cm2 d-1). The years 2013 and 2014 show higher chlorophyll a concentrations in the water column, but diatoms do not form a peak flux (>100 000 diatoms cm2 d-1) at any time in the sediment trap, probably due to stratification patterns. The trap record from 2012 indicates a spring bloom dominating the sediment signal, but this is not repeated in 2013 and 2014. Future analyses will be directed towards linking the monitored in-lake processes to annually or even seasonally resolved environmental characteristics. The multiplicity of potential ecological and environmental drivers led us to reverse our analytical view by starting with the diatom stratigraphy in the varved sediment, continuing through the data from sediment trap and water column into the lake catchment to identify deviations (timing

  16. Early to middle Miocene climate evolution: New insights from IODP Sites U1335, U1337 and U1338 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Karlos G. D.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Lyle, Mitch; Raffi, Isabella; Channell, James E.; Andersen, Nils

    2015-04-01

    The lower to middle Miocene (~20 to 13 Ma) carbonate-rich sedimentary successions recovered at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites U1335, U1337 and U1338 allow unsurpassed resolution over the Climatic Optimum (16.9-14.7 Ma) and the transition into a colder climate mode after 13.9 Ma with re-establishment of permanent Antarctic ice sheets. High-resolution (1-10 kyr) stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes of well-preserved epibenthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides mundulus and Planulina wuellerstorfi) from these three sites show that the Climatic Optimum was characterized by high-amplitude climate variations and intense perturbations of the carbon cycle. Episodes of peak warmth coincided with transient shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth and enhanced carbonate dissolution in the deep ocean. The U1335 and U1337 records additionally reveal that the rapid global warming and/or polar ice melting event, marking the onset of the Climatic Optimum at ~16.9 Ma, was coupled to a massive increase in carbonate dissolution, indicated by sharp drops in carbonate percentages and accumulation rates and by the fragmentation or complete dissolution of planktonic foraminifers. After ~14.7 Ma, stepwise global cooling, culminating with extensive ice growth over Antarctica at ~13.8 Ma, coincide with enhanced opal and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, suggesting that increased siliceous productivity and organic carbon burial may have contributed to CO2 drawdown. Integration of age models derived from orbitally-tuned, high-resolution isotopes, biostratigraphic data and magnetic reversals allows further constraints on the temporal sequence of events and helps unravel the drivers of early to middle Miocene climate variations.

  17. Early evidence for complex social structure in Proboscidea from a late Miocene trackway site in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Faysal; Kraatz, Brian; Craig, Nathan; Beech, Mark; Schuster, Mathieu; Hill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Many living vertebrates exhibit complex social structures, evidence for the antiquity of which is limited to rare and exceptional fossil finds. Living elephants possess a characteristic social structure that is sex-segregated and multi-tiered, centred around a matriarchal family and solitary or loosely associated groups of adult males. Although the fossil record of Proboscidea is extensive, the origin and evolution of social structure in this clade is virtually unknown. Here, we present imagery and analyses of an extensive late Miocene fossil trackway site from the United Arab Emirates. The site of Mleisa 1 preserves exceptionally long trackways of a herd of at least 13 individuals of varying size transected by that of a single large individual, indicating the presence of both herding and solitary social modes. Trackway stride lengths and resulting body mass estimates indicate that the solitary individual was also the largest and therefore most likely a male. Sexual determination for the herd is equivocal, but the body size profile and number of individuals are commensurate with those of a modern elephant family unit. The Mleisa 1 trackways provide direct evidence for the antiquity of characteristic and complex social structure in Proboscidea. PMID:22357934

  18. Early evidence for complex social structure in Proboscidea from a late Miocene trackway site in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Faysal; Kraatz, Brian; Craig, Nathan; Beech, Mark; Schuster, Mathieu; Hill, Andrew

    2012-08-23

    Many living vertebrates exhibit complex social structures, evidence for the antiquity of which is limited to rare and exceptional fossil finds. Living elephants possess a characteristic social structure that is sex-segregated and multi-tiered, centred around a matriarchal family and solitary or loosely associated groups of adult males. Although the fossil record of Proboscidea is extensive, the origin and evolution of social structure in this clade is virtually unknown. Here, we present imagery and analyses of an extensive late Miocene fossil trackway site from the United Arab Emirates. The site of Mleisa 1 preserves exceptionally long trackways of a herd of at least 13 individuals of varying size transected by that of a single large individual, indicating the presence of both herding and solitary social modes. Trackway stride lengths and resulting body mass estimates indicate that the solitary individual was also the largest and therefore most likely a male. Sexual determination for the herd is equivocal, but the body size profile and number of individuals are commensurate with those of a modern elephant family unit. The Mleisa 1 trackways provide direct evidence for the antiquity of characteristic and complex social structure in Proboscidea.

  19. Hydrological reconstruction from tree rings and varved lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, D.; Nicault, A.; Francus, P.; Bégin, Y.; Perreault, L.; Arsenault, D.; Bégin, C.; Savard, M. M.; Marion, J.; Guiot, J.

    2011-12-01

    The ARCHIVES project aims at reconstructing the annual hydro-climatic variability of the boreal region of the Quebec-Labrador Peninsula (Canada) over the past millennia. The project is based on tree-ring chronologies of more than one hundred years-old black spruce stands, several millennial tree-ring chronologies developed from sub-fossil trees and a network of lake sediment cores over a territory of more than 700 000 km2 (1400km in longitude x 500km in latitude). The dendrochronological network includes various tree-ring proxies such as ring width, ring density and ∂13C and ∂18O series. An extensive search for annually laminated lakes in the area permitted the identification of several sites with a strong potential for hydro-climatic reconstitution using annual varve thickness, grain size variability and sub-annual lamination as proxies for changes in river competency. We present here a 300 years-long reconstruction of hydrological variables at the watershed scale (annual water supply, spring and summer runoff) and some climate variables used in hydrologic forecast models, including an atmospheric index used by the modelling team of Hydro-Quebec (hydroelectric power supplier) to forecast spring flood volumes using both tree rings and annually laminated sediments. The sensitivity of the tree-ring chronologies and of varved series to hydrologic parameters were tested using statistical response functions. Our reconstruction methodology combines an analogue technique for the estimation of missing tree-ring data with an artificial neural network for optimal nonlinear calibration, including a bootstrap error assessment. Transfer functions were calibrated with water supply and meteorological data provided by Hydro-Quebec, and with Climate Research Unit (CRU) gridded climate data. The reconstructed series were validated using Reduction error (RE) and Root mean square error (RMSE) coefficients, standard cross-validation tests and verified with independent instrumental

  20. Direct dating of Late Miocene-Early Pliocene compression on Elba Island: Is a new paradigm necessary for the opening of the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giulio; Torgersen, Espen; Mazzarini, Francesco; Musumeci, Giovanni; Garofalo, Paolo Stefano; van der Lelij, Roelant

    2017-04-01

    medium-grade hornfels rocks of the contact aureole at c. 6.2 Ma. K-Ar ages were produced from synkinematic illite separated from multiple grain sizes, with the goal to discriminate the role of clay synkinematic authigenesis and thus date the last increment of deformation. The age of the dated finest fraction constrains the age of the Calanchiole shear zone to 6.14±0.64 Ma (data and importantly provide the first direct dating of brittle deformation in the Apennines. In combination with field, kinematic and regional considerations, they undoubtedly constrain a Late Miocene-Early Pliocene regional compressive stress state, with the brittle ZF likely being its latest expression. This followed an earlier phase of upper crustal extension, presumably active since ˜16 Ma and was in turn followed by renewed extension. Compression at that time requires a re-evaluation of the geodynamic models of the evolution of the northern Apennines orogenic prism.

  1. Tectono-stratigraphy of the Çankiri Basin: Late Cretaceous to early Miocene evolution of the Neotethyan Suture Zone in Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaymakçi, N.; Özçelik, Y.; White, S.H.; Dijk, P.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The Çankırı Basin straddles the İzmir–Ankara–Erzincan Suture Zone which demarcates the former position of the northern branch of the Neotethys. It includes more than 3 km of pre-Middle Miocene in-fill related to late Cretaceous to pre-Middle Miocene evolution of the region. The basin has developed

  2. Lessons from Africa's Most Complete Holocene Varved Record (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroepelin, S.

    2013-12-01

    A 16 meter long core from the sub-bottom deposits of Lake Yoa in northern Chad (19°N / 20.5°E), one of the few groundwater-supported oasis lakes in the Sahara, covers the past 11,000 years at largely subannual resolution. Due to the distant oceans and prevailing northeasterly trade winds, this sedimentary archive provides representative environmental signals that reflect climate conditions from the onset of the 'Green Sahara' to the planet's major warm desert of today. Multiproxy analyses of the mostly annually laminated deposits give unprecedented information on both gradual and rapid climate change in Northern Africa, including non-climatic events. Based on a robust age model of AMS-controlled varve counts, the continuous record allows to calibrate and correlate incoherent geological and archaeological evidence from the Sahara; to relate to historical chronicles from pharaonic Egypt; or to check for clues of recent anthropogenic warming. Results also permit to test the validity of marine and ice-core data for hypercontinental ecosystems and to evaluate numeric climate models. Examples will illustrate the potential of Africa's most detailed full-Holocene varved record. Hypercontinental location of Lake Yoa at the oasis of Ounianga Kebir in the Sahara of Northern Chad with distances to the oceans Coring platform on Lake Yoa, March 2010 (Photo: S. Kröpelin)

  3. Comparing Early to Middle Miocene floras and probable vegetation types of Oberdorf N Voitsberg (Austria), Bohemia (Czech Republic), and Wackersdorf (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovar-Eder, J; Kvacek, Z; Meller, B

    2001-03-01

    The Early Miocene vegetation of western Styria, Austria, is reconstructed on the basis of detailed investigations of leaves and diaspores from the mining area Oberdorf N Voitsberg. In this paper, the flora and probable vegetation are compared with other assemblages of similar age from the Czech Republic and Germany to elucidate the diversity of wetland and mesophytic plant communities. The floristic composition and the vegetational units represented in Oberdorf are compared to the middle part of the Most Formation (M Most Fm), Cypris Shale, Mydlovary Formation (Mydlovary Fm) of Bohemia, and the Wackersdorf mining area of Bavaria. Among these sites, Oberdorf is extremely poor in hydrophytes and reed-like monocotyledons, indicating rare pond-like habitats as well as possibly more closed swamp forest conditions than, e.g. in the M Most Fm. In Oberdorf, relatively high pH-values in the lignite-forming swamps and the possible scarcity of acidic, nutrient-poor (sandy) soils have probably influenced the floristic composition of the azonal communities. The peat-forming associations in all regions share the abundance of Glyptostrobus europaeus. However, distinct differences in the accompanying elements, such as Taxodium dubium (present and abundant only in the M Most Fm) indicate even stronger floristic variability of Early(/Middle) Miocene peat-forming and riparian plant communities than previously expected. The virtual absence of Pinus, Engelhardia, Comptonia, and probably also of Quercus kubinyii/Quercus drymeja in the megafossil record of Oberdorf can possibly be explained by the edaphic conditions. The abundance of Sequoia abietina (absent in all the other compared sites), which we assign to riparian (and mesophytic) forests in Oberdorf, may have been favoured by rich alluvial soils.In the mesophytic associations, thermophilous elements of the Lauraceae, Mastixiaceae, Symplocaceae, and Rutaceae are diverse. Usually they include Trigonobalanopsis rhamnoides

  4. Miocene Antarctic Terrestrial Realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A.; Marchant, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of several locations in the Transantarctic Mountains that contain macrofossils and pollen is transforming our understanding of late Cenozoic Antarctica. The most southerly location is on the Beardmore Glacier (85.1°S) about 500 km from the South Pole. The environment was an active glacial margin in which plants, insects and freshwater mollusks inhabited the sand and gravel bars and small lakes on an outwash plain. In addition to leaves and wood of dwarf Nothofagus (Southern Beech) shrubs, achenes of Ranunculus (Buttercup), in situ cushion growth forms of mosses and a vascular plant, the assemblages contains various exoskeletal parts of carabid and curculionid beetles and a cyclorrhaphan fly, the shells of freshwater bivalve and gastropod species and a fish tooth. Initially the deposits were assigned a Pliocene age (3.5 Ma) but a mid- to early Miocene age is more probable (c. 14 - 25 Ma) based on correlation of fossil pollen from the deposits with 39Ar/40Ar dated pollen assemblages from the McMurdo Dry Valleys locations. The oldest location within the Dry Valleys also involved an active ice margin but was part of a valley system that was completely deglaciated for intervals long enough for thick paleosols to develop. The Friis Hills fossil deposits of the Taylor Valley region (77.8°S) are at least 19.76 Ma based on the 39Ar/40Ar age of a volcanic ash bed. The valley floor during the non-glacial phases had poorly-drained soils and the extensive development of mossy mires. Wood and leaves of Nothofagus are abundant in lacustrine deposits. The silts of shallow fluvial channels contain abundant megaspores and spiky leaves of the aquatic lycopod Isoetes (Quillwort). Fossils of beetles are also present in these deposits. During the glacial phases, proglacial lakes were surrounded by dwarfed, deciduous Nothofagus shrubs. The youngest fossils recovered from the Dry Valleys are from the Olympus Range (77.5°S) with an age of 14.07 Ma. The environment was an

  5. Albanerpetontid amphibian (Lissamphibia: Albanerpetontidae from the Early Miocene of the locality Merkur–North (north-west of the Czech Republic: data and a description of a new material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Čerňanský

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the first description of an albanerpetontid amphibian from the Early Miocene locality Merkur–North. The material comes from grey calcareous marls at the base of the so-called “Main Brown Coal Seam”. The marls are interpreted as reworked volcanic ash (Most Formation. The genus Albanerpeton was already known from this locality, but the material has never been described or illustrated. The new material of dentaries extends our knowledge about the state of the Merkur–North population. The extinct clade of Albanerpetontidae represents primarily Laurasian lissamphibians known from the Middle Jurassic to Pliocene periods. The Late Oligocene to Early Miocene albanerpetontids of central Europe belong to the species A. inexpectatum. The material described here allocated a big similarity closed to this species.

  6. The taphonomy of a remarkable leaf bed assemblage from the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene Gore Lignite Measures, southern New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, David K.; Zetter, Reinhard; Vavra, Norbert [Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Lee, Daphne E. [Department of Geology, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Bannister, Jennifer M. [Department of Botany, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Jordan, Gregory J. [School of Plant Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 55, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Mildenhall, Dallas C. [GNS Science, PO Box 30-368, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2010-08-01

    A diverse assemblage of fossil leaves showing cellular detail is reported from the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene Gore Lignite Measures, southern New Zealand. The leaf-remains include at least five conifers, such as the genera Agathis, Dacrycarpus, Phyllocladus and Dacrydium, as well as a number of angiosperms including Gymnostoma, Nothofagus Subgenus Brassospora, Phormium, Proteaceae, Sapindaceae and Ericaceae. A parallel palynological study has identified a number of the same elements. The leaf layers represent litter horizons laid down in pools on the surface of a subtropical ombrotrophic forest mire that formed on an extensive low-lying coastal plain. Highly acidic water ponded in tree-fall depressions prevented microbial decay of the foliage. Taxa represented by both leaves and pollen are considered to have been components of the autochthonous swamp forest. Some other pollen grains are thought to represent local elements, based on the pollination biology of their nearest living relatives. Other taxa whose extant representatives are wind-pollinated may have grown further away. (author)

  7. Oligocene-to-Early Miocene depositional and structural evolution of the Calabria-Peloritani Arc southern terrane (Italy) and geodynamic correlations with the Spain Betics and Morocco Rif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonardi, Glauco; de Capoa, Paola; Di Staso, Angelida; Estévez, Antonio; Martín-Martín, Manuél; Martín-Rojas, Iván; Perrone, Vincenzo; Tent-Manclús, José Enrique

    2003-11-01

    The Calabria-Peloritani Arc southern terrane is a stack of crystalline basement nappes, some of them provided with a widely outcropping Alpine sedimentary cover, sealed by clastics of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation (SCOF). New field observations in the Stilo area lead to define a Pignolo Formation as a sedimentary cycle predating the emplacement of the uppermost nappe (Stilo Unit) of the tectonic pile. It includes the well-known Lithothamnium and larger foraminifers bearing calcarenites, previously interpreted as a basal member of the SCOF. The biostratigraphic revision of both formations, together with recently published data about other preorogenic deposits, point to a stacking of the whole terrane between the Aquitanian and the middle-late Burdigalian. A comparison between the sedimentary cycles characterising the Calabria-Peloritani southern terrane during the Oligocene-Early Miocene and those almost coeval of the Betic-Rifian internal units highlights their quite similar evolution. Thus it is reliable that both the orogenic belts originated from contiguous paleogeographic realms. These considerations confirm that the present western Mediterranean Chains were originally segments of a continuous orogenic belt disrupted by the opening of the Balearic and Tyrrhenian basins.

  8. Late Eocene to Early Miocene Andean uplift inferred from detrital zircon fission track and U-Pb dating of Cenozoic forearc sediments (15-18°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; von Eynatten, H.; Dunkl, I.; Frei, D.; Wörner, G.

    2013-08-01

    Timing, amount, and mechanisms of uplift in the Central Andes have been a matter of debate in the last decade. Our study is based on the Cenozoic Moquegua Group deposited in the forearc basin between the Western Cordillera and the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru from ˜50 to ˜4 Ma. The Moquegua Group consists mainly of mud-flat to fluvial siliciclastic sediments with upsection increasing grain size and volcanic intercalations. Detrital zircon U-Pb dating and fission track thermochronology allow us to refine previous sediment provenance models and to constrain the timing of Late Eocene to Early Miocene Andean uplift. Uplift-related provenance and facies changes started around 35 Ma and thus predate major voluminous ignimbrite eruptions that started at ˜25 by up to 10 Ma. Therefore magmatic addition to the crust cannot be an important driving factor for crustal thickening and uplift at Late Eocene to Early Oligocene time. Changes in subduction regime and the subducting plate geometry are suggested to control the formation of significant relief in the area of the future Western Cordillera which acts as an efficient large-scale drainage divide between Altiplano and forearc from at least 15.5 to 19°S already at ˜35 Ma. The model integrates the coincidence of (i) onset of provenance change no later than 35 Ma, (ii) drastic decrease in convergence rates at ˜40, (iii) a flat-subduction period at around ˜40 to ˜30 Ma leading to strong interplate coupling, and (iv) strong decrease in volcanic activity between 45 and 30 Ma.

  9. Study of the varve record from Erlongwan maar lake,NE China, over the last 13 ka BP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a sediment sequence from Erlongwan maar lake that spans the last 13 ka BP, two main varve types can be recognized: biogenic varves (from the present to ~11.2 ka BP, 0-632 cm) and clastic varves (from ~11.2 to ~12.7 ka BP, 632-700 cm). Based on the dominant types of algae contained in the sediment, the biogenic varves can be classified into dinocyst-biogenic varves (0-63 cm) and mixed (dinocyst and diatom)-biogenic varves (214-632 cm). In this paper, the formation process and components of the varve are described, the possible reason for the types of varve changing throughout the record is discussed and a high-resolution varve chronology is established spanning the last 13 ka BP.Although further varve counting and error assessment are needed, the results presented here represent a solid foundation for studying the palaeoclimate record of Erlongwan maar lake.

  10. Miocene mass-transport sediments, Troodos Massif, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, A.R.; Harrison, R.W.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Stone, B.D.; Varol, O.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment mass-transport layers of submarine origin on the northern and southern flanks of the Troodos ophiolitic massif are dated biostratigraphically as early Miocene and late Miocene, respectively and therefore represent different seismogenic events in the uplift and erosional history of the Troodos terrane. Analysis of such events has potential for documenting Miocene seismic and uplift events regionally in the context of changing stress field directions and plate vectors through time. ?? 2009 The Geologists' Association.

  11. Geochemical and isotopic composition of volcanic rocks of the heterogeneous Miocene (~ 23-19 Ma) Tepoztlán Formation, early Transmexican Volcanic Belt, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Alvarado, Ignacio S.; Lenhardt, Nils; Arce, José Luis; Hinderer, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    We present the first geochemical data (major and trace elements, as well as Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes) on volcanic rocks from the Tepoztlán Formation in the central Transmexican Volcanic Belt. The Tepoztlán Formation is up to 800 m thick and comprises a wide range of primary volcanic rocks (lavas, pyroclastic density current deposits, pyroclastic fall deposits), and their secondary reworked products due to mass flow (lahars) and fluvial processes. Magnetostratigraphy combined with K/Ar and Ar/Ar geochronology suggests an age of Early Miocene (23-19 Ma) for this Formation. Lava flows, pyroclastic rocks, dykes and volcanic clasts range from basaltic andesite to rhyolite, with a clear dominance of andesites and dacites. All samples are subalkaline and hy-normative. These rocks show homogeneous REE patterns with LREE enrichment and higher LILE concentrations with respect to HFSE, notably the typical negative anomaly of Nb, Ta, and Ti, suggesting a subduction-related magma genesis. Major and trace element concentrations show that either assimilation of heterogeneous continental crust or crustal recycling by subduction erosion and fractional crystallization are important processes in the evolution of the Tepoztlán Formation magmas. Isotopic compositions of the Tepoztlán Formation samples range from (87Sr/86Sr)t = 0.703693 to 0.704355 and (143Nd/144Nd)t = 0.512751 to 0.512882, falling within the mantle array. All geochemical characteristics indicate that these rocks originated from a heterogeneous mantle, modified and evolved through assimilation of country rock and fractional crystallization in the upper crust.

  12. Predictive model of San Andreas fault system paleogeography, Late Cretaceous to early Miocene, derived from detailed multidisciplinary conglomerate correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Paleogeographic reconstruction of the region of the San Andreas fault system in western California, USA, was hampered for more than two decades by the apparent incompatibility of authoritative lithologic correlations. These led to disparate estimates of dextral strike-slip offsets across the San Andreas fault, notably 315 km between Pinnacles and Neenach Volcanics, versus 563 km offset between Anchor Bay and Eagle Rest peak. Furthermore, one section of the San Andreas fault between Pinnacles and Point Reyes had been reported to have six pairs of features showing only ~ 30 km offset, while several younger features in that same area were reported consistent with ~ 315 km offset. Estimates of total dextral slip on the adjoining San Gregorio fault have ranged from 5 km to 185 km. Sixteen Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene conglomerates of the California Coast Ranges, from Anchor Bay to Simi Valley, were included in a multidisciplinary study centered on identification of matching unique clast varieties, rather than on simply counting general clast types. Detailed analysis verified the prior correlation of the Upper Cretaceous strata of Anchor Bay at Anchor Bay with a then-unnamed conglomerate at Highway 92 and Skyline Road (south of San Francisco); and verified that the Paleocene or Eocene Point Reyes Conglomerate at Point Reyes is a tectonically displaced segment of the Carmelo Formation of Point Lobos (near Monterey). The work also led to three new correlations: Point Reyes Conglomerate with granitic source rock at Point Lobos; a magnetic anomaly at Black Point (near Sea Ranch) with a magnetic anomaly near San Gregorio; and strata of Anchor Bay with previously established source rock, the potassium-poor Logan Gabbro of Eagle Rest peak, at a more recently recognized subsurface location just east of the San Gregorio fault, south of San Gregorio. From these correlations, a Late Cretaceous to early Oligocene paleogeography was constructed which was unique in utilizing modern

  13. A rhinoceros from the late miocene of Fort Ternan, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1968-01-01

    SYNOPSIS A rhinoceros from the Fort Ternan site, Kenya, Late Miocene in age, represents a form distinctly more advanced than the genera and species known from the Early Miocene although it is not directly ancestral to the Quaternary forms. It is a collaterally developed tuskless, two-horned, browsin

  14. Early Miocene river capture in the Eastern Himalaya: a multi-technique provenance study of the paleo-Brahmaputra deposits (Bengal Basin, Bangladesh)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracciali, Laura; Najman, Yani; Parrish, Randall R.; Akhter, Syed H.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    arrival of detritus carried by the Yarlung Tsangpo in the Neogene deposits of the palaeo-Brahmputra river in Bangladesh (Bengal Basin) is key to date the river capture. To address this open issue we have applied a multi-disciplinary approach (that ranges from basin analysis and petrography to detrital single grain chronology) to the paleo-Brahmaputra sedimentary record. Using our recent refined approach to U-Pb dating of rutile by LA-MC-ICP-MS we have combined U-Pb data of detrital rutile and zircon from the same sample (Bracciali et al., this meeting, and [1]). These two minerals are stable and widely distributed in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks and together retain source crystallisation and cooling information over the temperature range down to ~500°C and thus are ideal proxies for potential source areas with complex tectono-metamorphic histories such as those of the Himalayan region. Our results show that the river capture is as old as Early Miocene, and does not appear to be as young as the literature consensus suggests (Geology.

  15. The tide-influenced Pétervására sandstone, early Miocene, Northern Hungary : sedimentology, palaeogeography and basin development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sztanó, O.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis are: - to determine the main sedimentary units, the dominant depositional processes, and to reconstruct the depositional environment of the Lower Miocene Petervasara Sandstone (Chapter 3), - to show the pattern of sediment dispersal in connection with the potential effe

  16. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the coastal Monte Léon and Santa Cruz formations (Early Miocene) at Rincón del Buque, Southern Patagonia: A revisited locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigemborn, M. Sol; Matheos, Sergio D.; Krapovickas, Verónica; Vizcaíno, Sergio F.; Bargo, M. Susana; Kay, Richard F.; Fernicola, Juan C.; Zapata, Luciano

    2015-07-01

    Sedimentological, ichnological and paleontological analyses of the Early Miocene uppermost Monte León Formation and the lower part of the Santa Cruz Formation were carried out in Rincón del Buque (RDB), a fossiliferous locality north of Río Coyle in Santa Cruz Province, Patagonia, Argentina. This locality is of special importance because it contains the basal contact between the Monte Léon (MLF) and the Santa Cruz (SCF) formations and because it preserves a rich fossil assemblage of marine invertebrates and marine trace fossils, and terrestrial vertebrates and plants, which has not been extensively studied. A ˜90 m-thick section of the MLF and the SCF that crops out at RDB was selected for this study. Eleven facies associations (FA) are described, which are, from base to top: subtidal-intertidal deposits with Crassotrea orbignyi and bioturbation of the Skolithos-Cruziana ichnofacies (FA1); tidal creek deposits with terrestrial fossil mammals and Ophiomorpha isp. burrows (FA2); tidal flat deposits with Glossifungites ichnofacies (FA3); deposits of tidal channels (FA4) and tidal sand flats (FA5) both with and impoverish Skolithos ichnofacies associated; marsh deposits (FA6); tidal point bar deposits recording a depauperate mixture of both the Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies (FA7); fluvial channel deposits (FA8); fluvial point bar deposits (FA9); floodplain deposits (FA10); and pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits of the floodplain where terrestrial fossil mammal remains occur (FA11). The transition of the MLF-SCF at RDB reflects a changing depositional environment from the outer part of an estuary (FA1) through the central (FA2-6) to inner part of a tide-dominated estuary (FA7). Finally a fluvial system occurs with single channels of relatively low energy and low sinuosity enclosed by a broad, low-energy floodplain dominated by partially edaphized ash-fall, sheet-flood, and overbank deposits (FA8-11). Pyroclastic and volcaniclastic materials throughout the

  17. Ecomorphological and taphonomic gradients in clypeasteroid-dominated echinoid assemblages along a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shelf from the early Miocene of northern Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mancosu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clypeasteroid echinoids are widespread and abundant within Miocene sedimentary sequences of the Mediterranean area within both siliciclastic and carbonate deposits. Herein, three clypeasteroid-dominated echinoid assemblages from the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate succession of the Mores Formation (lower Miocene cropping out within the Porto Torres Basin (northern Sardinia are described. These assemblages were compared to previously described clypeasteroid-bearing deposits from the Miocene of northern Sardinia with the purpose of investigating their palaeoecology and taphonomy along a shelf gradient. These goals are accomplished by various methods including (i logging sedimentary facies, (ii analysing the functional morphology of sea urchin skeletons, (iii comparing the relative abundance of taxa and taphonomic features, and (iv studying associated fauna, flora, and trace fossils. The clypeasteroid-bearing deposits differ greatly with respect to echinoid diversity, accompanying fauna and flora, sedimentological signatures, and taphonomic features. They also show variations in depositional environments and the mechanism of formation of the deposits. Three different shelf settings are distinguished: littoral, inner sublittoral, and outer sublittoral environments. Furthermore, an ecomorphological gradient along the shelf is recognized with respect to echinoid taxa and their morphologies. This gradient ranges from shallow water to a moderately deep shelf and is interpreted with respect to both abiotic and biotic factors as well as the taphonomy of the echinoid tests.

  18. Miocene and early Pliocene epithermal gold-silver deposits in the northern Great Basin, western United States: Characteristics, distribution, and relationship to Magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous important Miocene and early Pliocene epithermal Au-Ag deposits are present in the northern Great Basin. Most deposits are spatially and temporally related to two magmatic assemblages: bimodal basalt-rhyolite and western andesite. These magmatic assemblages are petrogenetic suites that reflect variations in tectonic environment of magma generation. The bimodal assemblage is a K-rich tholeiitic series formed during continental rifting. Rocks in the bimodal assemblage consist mostly of basalt to andesite and rhyolite compositions that generally contain anhydrous and reduced mineral assemblages (e.g., quartz + fayalite rhyolites). Eruptive forms include mafic lava flows, dikes, cinder and/or spatter cones, shield volcanoes, silicic flows, domes, and ash-flow calderas. Fe-Ti oxide barometry indicates oxygen fugacities between the magnetite-wustite and fayalite-magnetite-quartz oxygen buffers for this magmatic assemblage. The western andesite assemblage is a high K calc-alkaline series that formed a continental-margin are related to subduction of oceanic crust beneath the western coast of North America. In the northern Great Basin, most of the western andesite assemblage was erupted in the Walker Lane belt, a zone of transtension and strike-slip faulting. The western andesite assemblage consists of stratovolcanoes, dome fields, and subvolcanic plutons, mostly of andesite and dacite composition. Biotite and hornblende phenocrysts are abundant in these rocks. Oxygen fugacities of the western andesite assemblage magmas were between the nickel-nickel oxide and hematite-magnetite buffers, about two to four orders of magnitude greater than magmas of the bimodal assemblage. Numerous low-sulfidation Au-Ag deposits in the bimodal assemblage include deposits in the Midas (Ken Snyder), Sleeper, DeLamar, Mule Canyon, Buckhorn, National, Hog Ranch, Ivanhoe, and Jarbidge districts; high-sulfidation gold and porphyry copper-gold deposits are absent. Both high- and low

  19. Miocene Current-Modified Submarine Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce Perez, L. E.; Snedden, J.; Fisher, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    In the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, new and newly reprocessed seismic data has revealed a series of large bedforms, with set thicknesses of 130 to 250 meters. These exhibit hummocky, oblique and shingled to parallel seismic clinoform reflections. This seismic package has a paleowater depth of 450 meters. Those shingled seismic reflections in offshore east Mexico are interpreted as contourite drift deposits. These Miocene-age contourites may be related to strong ocean bottom currents that modified submarine fans and transported sediment to the north. Those contourites were identified on older seismic data, but are better imaged and interpreted on this new data. Plans are to map out and investigate the origin and extent of fans and contourites that extends over a large area of the Gulf of Mexico. In the Early Miocene several submarine fans systems were formed by the sediment input related to orogenic activity in Mexico. Submarine fan development persisted into the Middle Miocene due to continued uplift and erosion of the Mexican landmass. Initial, contourites are small and close proximity to the deep-water fan. In the Late Miocene time, contourite drift field reached its maximum extent in the Mexican deepwater area, anchored on its southern end by a submarine mound. This mounded submarine fan is located in the offshore northeast Veracruz and can be linked to increased uplift and erosion of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt. In the Miocene-Pliocene, the large contourite drift begins to diminish in size and scale and is moribund by the Pliocene, with establishment of oceanic circulation similar to the present day. This research is important to understand more about the Gulf of Mexico and also for the Miocene timeframe that is a key phase in the earth's history. The role of the change in bottom water flow during progressive closure of the equatorial seaway separating North and South America will also be investigated.

  20. High-resolution varve studies in Baldeggersee (Switzerland): Project overview and limnological background data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wehrli, B.; Lotter, A.F.; Schaller, T.; Sturm, M.

    1997-01-01

    This introduction to a series of high-resolution varve studies in Baldeggersee provides both an overview of the different subprojects as well as background information on relevant limnologial trends. The project was based on a new method of in-situ freezing of unconsolidated surficial

  1. Testing the potential of 10Be in varved sediments from two lakes for solar activity reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymzik, Markus; Muscheler, Raimund; Brauer, Achim; Adolphi, Florian; Ott, Florian; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Slowinski, Michal; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The potential of 10Be in annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for solar activity reconstruction is, to date, largely unexplored. It is hypothesized that 10Be contents in sediments from well-chosen lakes reflect the solar induced atmospheric production signal. The varved nature of these archives provides the chance to establish solar activity time-series with very high temporal precision. However, so far solar activity reconstruction from 10Be in varved lake sediments is hampered due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the process chain from production in the atmosphere to deposition on the lake floor. Calibrating 10Be time-series from varved lake sediments against complementary proxy records from the same sediment archive as well as instrumental meteorological and solar activity data will allow a process-based understanding of 10Be deposition in these lakes and a quantitative evaluation of their potential for solar activity reconstruction. 10Be concentration and flux time-series at annual resolution were constructed for the period 1983 to 2007 (approx. solar cycles 22 and 23) conducting accelerator mass spectrometry and varve chronology on varved sediments of Lakes Tiefer See and Czechowski, located on an east-west transect at a distance of about 450 km in the lowlands of northern-central Europe. 10Be concentrations vary between 0.9 and 1.8*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1.3*108atoms/g in Lake Tiefer See and between 0.6 and 1.6*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1*108atoms/g in Lake Czechowski. Calculated mean 10Be flux is 2.3*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Tiefer See and 0.7*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Czechowski. Calibrating the 10Be time-series against corresponding geochemical μ-XRF profiles, varve thickness and total organic carbon records as well as precipitation data from the nearby stations Schwerin for Lake Tiefer See and Koscierzyna for Lake Czechowski and a neutron monitor record of solar activity suggests (1) a complex interaction of varying processes influencing

  2. Towards an annually-resolved record of Lateglacial Patagonian ice sheet dynamics using glaciolacustrine varves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, Jacob; Palmer, Adrain; Thorndycraft, Varyl

    2016-04-01

    Proglacial sedimentary archives, in particular, glaciolacustrine varve sequences, offer the potential for detailed reconstructions of past ice sheet dynamics. Specifically, glaciolacustrine varves (i) allow reconstructions of sediment (and thus meltwater) influx at annual and even sub-annual resolution; and (ii) provide a continuous, annually-resolved chronology to estimate rates of change and/or the duration of significant events in the deglaciation of a basin. In South America, glacial geologists have relied heavily on cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating to construct chronologies for palaeoglaciological activity. Whilst effective, the typical uncertainties associated with boulder dating methods (±10%) preclude the investigation of short-term (e.g. ≤ centennial-scale) glacier and/or climatic change(s), which are shown to be important at modern ice-margins. Moreover, moraine chronologies are fragmentary, and inherently biased towards episodes of positive glacier mass balance (i.e. moraine construction), and thus limit our understanding of ice sheet retreat dynamics. By contrast, long, continuous, high-resolution (i.e. varve) palaeolimnological records have the potential to significantly refine models of ice sheet deglaciation. In this talk, we present data from Valle Fenix Chico, in the Lago Buenos Aires (LBA) basin (-46.57°S -71.07°W), in which ice-contact Glacial Lake Buenos Aires formed as the LBA ice lobe of Patagonian ice sheet withdrew from its innermost LGM moraine (~17.2 ± 0.9 ka). Thick (>40m) sequences of laminated glaciolacustrine sediment were deposited in the palaeolake, and are now exposed in a sub-aerial canyon that was cut when the lake drained. We report on the detailed macro- and micro-facies of the LBA sediments. In particular, we: (1) develop a process model for the formation of silt and clay couplets, which suggests an annual (varve) origin; (2) present varve series for the initial phase (~1kyr) of LBA ice lobe deglaciation.

  3. Miocene Coralline algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  4. A Miocene ostrich fossil from Gansu Province, northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lianhai; ZHOU Zhonghe; ZHANG Fucheng; WANG Zhao

    2005-01-01

    @@ A pelvic skeleton, recognized as a large terrestrial bird in the field, was recently collected by our paleomammalogist colleagues from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology from the late Miocene sandy mudstones in the Linxia Basin in Gansu Province, northwest China. We have further referred this bird to as an early representative of ostrich. Ostrich fossils usually coexisted with the famous Hipparion Fauna from the Miocene to Pliocene.

  5. A revision of the fossil genus Miocepphus and other Miocene Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) of the Western North Atlantic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Wijnker, T.G.; Olson, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    This study reviews and describes all known fossils of Alcidae from the Miocene of the western North Atlantic. Because the majority of alcid fossils recovered from Miocene sediments are allied with the genus Miocepphus Wetmore, 1940, the genus is revised here. Three new species of Miocepphus are described: Miocepphus bohaskai and Miocepphus blowi from the Early to Late Miocene, and Miocepphus mergulellus of uncertain Neogene age but probably Miocene. A new genus and species, Pseudocepphus tere...

  6. Grain-size of varved clays from the north-eastern Baltic Ice Lake: Insight to the sedimentary environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, Andis; Hang, Tiit; Kohv, Marko

    2017-08-01

    Besides providing high resolution chronological information, varved sediments also are excellent environmental archives. We examined the grain size distribution of varved glaciolacustrine sediments as a proxy for estimation of the water depth and the duration of winter - a period with diminished sediment input from the melting glacier and restricted water circulation due to ice cover. The particle size at the top of the winter layer is assumed to reflect the time available for a particle to settle from the top of water column during the winter before water mixing and new sediment input in spring. Glacial varves from Pärnu Bay in SW Estonia, where a local varve chronology of 584 years was established previously is examined as a case study. X-ray absorption granulometer was used to determine the grain size distribution within 10 varves with 2-14 samples collected from each varve. The coarsest particle size found on top of the winter layer is calculated for each varve from measured grain size distributions using a novel methodology and compared to the reconstructed water depth of the Baltic Ice Lake to constrain the likely duration of the winter. A high variability of the constrained winter length with an average close to the duration of a calendar year was found. It is concluded that the coarsest particles on top of the winter layer have settled from intermediate depths due to water stratification, or less likely the actual water level was lower than reconstructed. We conclude that the methodology can be used to constrain environmental parameters in glacial lakes where varved sediments are formed.

  7. The Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California Sur, Mexico: An early record of coastal upwelling along the eastern Pacific margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, K.A.; Ledesma, M.; Garrison, R.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)); Fonseca, C. (Univ. Autonoma de Baja California Sur, La Paz (Mexico))

    1991-02-01

    The Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation (Tsg) is a lithologically diverse package of siltstones, biosiliceous sediments, tuffs, and phosphorites. In the northern part of the study area (near La Purisima), the Tsg is richly biosiliceous, organic rich, and finely laminated; in many respects, the Tsg resembles the Hames member of the Monterey formation in the Salinas basin of California. In the south, the Tsg is thinner, detritus rich, and contains minable phosphorite reserves. Allochthonous phosphatic beds are prominent throughout the formation; many of these deposits apparently imported burrowing crustacea into anoxic paleoenvironments. The authors conclude that iterative episodes of turbulent transport of well-sorted (peloidal and coated grain) phosphatic sediment commonly resulted in depositional amalgamation of discrete event beds; varying degrees of postdepositional homogenization by infauna resulted in crudely stratified to massive (and economically minable) phosphorite beds. The authors regard the association of organic-rich and finely laminated biosiliceous sediments with phosphorites as a primary index of sedimentation in an upwelling environment. In addition, they observed thick, cross-stratified accumulations of barnacle conquina; they attribute this low diversity deposit to cool-water deposition on a carbonate shoal. The distinctive occurrence of cool water carbonates at near tropical paleolatitudes suggests the ecologically limiting effect of cold upwelled waters.

  8. A new 14C calibration data set for the last deglaciation based on marine varves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughen, K A; Kashgarian, M; Lehman, S J; Overpeck, J T; Peterson, L C; Southon, J R

    1999-02-22

    Varved sediments of the tropical Cariaco basin provide a new {sup 14}C calibration data set for the period of deglaciation (10,000 to 14,500 years before present: 10-14.5 cal ka BP). Independent evaluations of the Cariasco Basin calendar and {sup 14}C chronologies were based on the agreement of varve ages with the GISP2 ice core layer chronology for similar high-resolution paleoclimate records, in addition to {sup 14}C age agreement with terrestrial {sup 14}C dates, even during large climatic changes. These assessments indicate that the Cariaco Basin {sup 14}C reservoir age remained stable throughout the Younger Dryas and late Alleroed climatic events and that the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies provide an accurate alternative to existing calibrations based on coral U/Th dates. The Cariaco Basin calibration generally agrees with coral-derived calibrations but is more continuous and resolves century-scale details of {sup 14}C change not seen in the coral records. {sup 14}C plateaus can be identified at 9.6, 11.4, and 11.7 {sup 14}C ka BP, in addition to a large, sloping plateau during the Younger Dryas ({approximately}10 to 11 {sup 14}C ka BP). Accounting for features such as these is crucial to determining the relative timing and rates of change during abrupt global climate changes of the last deglaciation.

  9. A new 14C calibration data set for the last deglaciation based on marine varves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughen, K A; Kashgarian, M; Lehman, S J; Overpeck, J T; Peterson, L C; Southon, J R

    1999-02-22

    Varved sediments of the tropical Cariaco basin provide a new {sup 14}C calibration data set for the period of deglaciation (10,000 to 14,500 years before present: 10-14.5 cal ka BP). Independent evaluations of the Cariasco Basin calendar and {sup 14}C chronologies were based on the agreement of varve ages with the GISP2 ice core layer chronology for similar high-resolution paleoclimate records, in addition to {sup 14}C age agreement with terrestrial {sup 14}C dates, even during large climatic changes. These assessments indicate that the Cariaco Basin {sup 14}C reservoir age remained stable throughout the Younger Dryas and late Alleroed climatic events and that the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies provide an accurate alternative to existing calibrations based on coral U/Th dates. The Cariaco Basin calibration generally agrees with coral-derived calibrations but is more continuous and resolves century-scale details of {sup 14}C change not seen in the coral records. {sup 14}C plateaus can be identified at 9.6, 11.4, and 11.7 {sup 14}C ka BP, in addition to a large, sloping plateau during the Younger Dryas ({approximately}10 to 11 {sup 14}C ka BP). Accounting for features such as these is crucial to determining the relative timing and rates of change during abrupt global climate changes of the last deglaciation.

  10. Lake Suigetsu 2006 varved sediment project - towards a purely terrestrial radiocarbon calibration model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.; Bronk-Ramsey, C.; Bryant, C.; Staff, R.; Brock, F.; Lamb, H.; Brauer, A.; Marshall, M.; Schlolaut, G.; Yokoyama, Y.; Tarasov, P.; Payne, R. L.; Pearson, E. J.; Haraguchi, T.; Yonenobu, H.; Tada, R.; Tyler, J. J.; Gotanda, K.; Kossler, A.; Demske, D.; Takemura, K.

    2009-12-01

    A new sediment core (SG06), recovered from four parallel boreholes from Lake Suigetsu (central Japan), provides a >73m sedimentary sequence representing the last c.150,000 years, without any stratigraphic gaps. The upper ≈45m of the core is annually laminated (varved) and contains a large number of terrestrial plant macrofossil remains. An international, multi-disciplinary team is working with the core to: (i) measure the radiocarbon ages of >600 macrofossil samples; (ii) count the varves using two different methods to establish an independent chronology; (iii) identify tie points such as geomagnetic events and tephra horizons; and (iv) obtain high-resolution climate proxy records. A purely terrestrial radiocarbon calibration model, extending back to the radiocarbon detection limit, will be generated by combining the radiocarbon and varve information, whilst the high chronological precision of the core will facilitate the identification of leads and lags of key climatic events. Here, we present the current status and expected outcomes of the project. A new sediment core from Lake Suigetsu (SG06). Radiocarbon ages (before background correction) v.s. composite depth as of 29th Aug. 2009.

  11. Sediment composition, varve formation and paleolimnology of Lake Yoa, NE Chad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karls, Jens; Kröpelin, Stefan; Just, Janna; Kuper, Jan; Rethemeyer, Janet; Viehberg, Finn; Wennrich, Volker; Melles, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Lake Yoa (19.03° N / 20.31° E, NE Chad, 380 m a.s.l.) is a groundwater-fed lake in the central Sahara situated in a deflation hollow below an escarpment close to the Chadian-Libyan border. The lake persists since the onset of the Holocene "Green Sahara" 11,000 years ago. It has survived the end of the early to mid-Holocene wet phase until today due to extensive groundwater supply from the so-called Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System. Continuous lake sedimentation has generated an unparalleled depositional archive of Holocene climatic and environmental changes in the presently hyper-arid central Sahara, which is characterized by less than 10 mm of annual precipitation against an annual evaporation of more than 6,000 mm. An earlier 7.5 m long sediment core from Lake Yoa (OUNIK03/04) has provided unprecedented insight into the past 6,000 years cal BP (Kröpelin et al. 2008). Within the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre 806 "Our Way to Europe - Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late Quaternary", the record was extended to the base of the lake sediments at a depth of 16.25 m below the lake floor in 2010 (core Co1240). Most of the sedimentary column is annually to sub-annually laminated. Varve counting resulted in a highly resolved robust chronology that is supported by AMS radiocarbon dating of various components (bulk sediment, bulk carbonate, humic acids, semi-aquatic plants and charcoal). The core material was examined in a multiproxy approach, including non-destructive geophysical (e.g. magnetic susceptibility) and elemental (XRF scanning) measurements as well as sedimentological, geochemical and paleontological analyses. The data not only give detailed information on changes in the lake body and catchment of Lake Yoa but also on the regional climate and environmental history during the past 11,000 years cal BP. Kröpelin et al. (2008). Climate-Driven Ecosystem Succession in the Sahara: The Past 6000 Years. Science 320: 765

  12. Synchronizing the North American Varve Chronology with Greenland ice core records using meteoric 10Be flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, B.; Balco, G.; Ridge, J. C.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The North American Varve Chronology (NAVC) is a floating 5700-year sequence of glacial lake varves deposited in the Connecticut River Valley of the northeast US ~18,000-12,500 years ago. The NAVC is an annually resolved record of regional climate and ice-marginal processes at 40-45° N latitude, near the margin of the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). NAVC deposition occurred at the same time as rapid and abrupt Arctic and North Atlantic climate changes that took place during the last deglaciation. An age estimate for the NAVC based on radiocarbon dated plant macrofossils in individual varves implies a relationship between ice-marginal events recorded by the NAVC and climate events recorded in Greenland ice cores. For example, the retreat rate of the LIS up the Connecticut River Valley increased during the Bolling warming in Greenland, a readvance of the LIS margin took place during the Older Dryas cold period, and a correlation between an outburst flood from glacial Lake Iroquois and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period supports the hypothesis that the flood affected North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. On the other hand, a doubling of the ice-margin retreat rate recorded by the NAVC around 16,000 years ago coincides with a relatively cold period in Greenland. Our goal is to investigate the precise time relationship between these events by synchronizing the NAVC with the Greenland ice core time scale using atmospherically-produced 10Be. Existing 10Be flux records, including those from Greenland ice cores, exhibit solar variability on a range of time scales. Because this variability is globally synchronous, a 10Be flux record for the NAVC can, in principle, be used to align NAVC and ice core timescales. We are generating such a record at present. First, we are analyzing short varve sections at high temporal resolution to evaluate the magnitude of solar variability signals; a single section analyzed so far displays interannual variability with a period consistent

  13. Analysis of the varved clay accumulation in the Pärnu Bay area, Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvans, Andis; Hang, Tiit

    2015-04-01

    Varved clays are commonly found glaciolacustrine sediments representing high-resolution environmental archives of the deglaciation events. We examine varve formation in the Baltic Ice Lake at the Pärnu Bay area, Estonia, during the deglaciation of the last Scandinavian glaciation from the region. The data set of Hang and Kohv (2013) spanning 584 years is used. Analysis of the spatial variation of the seasonal layer thickness distribution based on 26 sediment cores and sub-varve resolution grain size analysis from a single section was performed. The Baltic Ice Lake water level reconstruction indicates that the water depth at the study region was up to 80 m (Rosentau et al., 2009). It is found that during the first ~130 years after the ice retreat the summer sedimentation was dominated by sediment loaded underflows emanating form the ice margin: summer layer thickness is strongly positively correlated with water depth. The winter layer thickness during this period does not demonstrate significant correlation with water depth suggesting that the simple raining-out of the suspended material from a water column was complicated by water circulation. Ice retreat from the Pandivere-Neva line of the marginal formations just north from study area took place during the interval from 96 to 130 local varve years. During the transition marked shift from proglacial to distal sedimentary environment is observed: the summer layer thickens decreased dramatically and it's thickens is markedly higher in the area close to the ice margin. The winter layer thickens becomes strongly correlated to the water depth, suggesting that the simple sedimentation model with no water circulation and addition of no new sediments is valid. The grain size data is used to estimate the "terminal grain size" - the size of the larges particles sedimented at the top of the winter layer. Provided that no significant water circulation took place during the winter, the terminal grain size will be controlled

  14. Miocene cercopithecoidea from the Tugen Hills, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Christopher C; Goble, Emily D; Hill, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Miocene to Pleistocene fossiliferous sediments in the Tugen Hills span the time period from at least 15.5 Ma to 0.25 Ma, including time periods unknown or little known elsewhere in Africa. Consequently, the Tugen Hills deposits hold the potential to inform us about crucial phylogenetic events in African faunal evolution and about long-term environmental change. Among the specimens collected from this region are a number of discoveries already important to the understanding of primate evolution. Here, we describe additional cercopithecoid material from the Miocene deposits in the Tugen Hills sequence, including those from securely dated sites in the Muruyur Beds (16-13.4 Ma), the Mpesida Beds (7-6.2 Ma) and the Lukeino Formation (∼ 6.2-5.7 Ma). We also evaluate previously described material from the Ngorora Formation (13-8.8 Ma). Identified taxa include Victoriapithecidae gen. et sp. indet., cf. Parapapio lothagamensis, and at least two colobines. Specimens attributed to cf. Pp. lothagamensis would extend the species' geographic range beyond its type locality. In addition, we describe specimens sharing derived characters with modern African colobines (Tribe: Colobina), a finding that is congruent with previous molecular estimates of colobine divergence dates. These colobine specimens represent some of the earliest known members of the modern African colobine radiation and, in contrast to previous hypotheses, suggest that early African colobines were mainly arboreal and that semi-terrestrial Late Miocene and Plio-Pleistocene colobine taxa were secondarily derived in their locomotor adaptations.

  15. Friis Hills Drilling Project - Coring an Early to mid-Miocene terrestrial sequence in the Transantarctic Mountains to examine climate gradients and ice sheet variability along an inland-to-offshore transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A. R.; Levy, R. H.; Naish, T.; Gorman, A. R.; Golledge, N.; Dickinson, W. W.; Kraus, C.; Florindo, F.; Ashworth, A. C.; Pyne, A.; Kingan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Early to mid-Miocene is a compelling interval to study Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) sensitivity. Circulation patterns in the southern hemisphere were broadly similar to present and reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentrations were analogous to those projected for the next several decades. Geologic records from locations proximal to the AIS are required to examine ice sheet response to climate variability during this time. Coastal and offshore drill core records recovered by ANDRILL and IODP provide information regarding ice sheet variability along and beyond the coastal margin but they cannot constrain the extent of inland retreat. Additional environmental data from the continental interior is required to constrain the magnitude of ice sheet variability and inform numerical ice sheet models. The only well-dated terrestrial deposits that register early to mid-Miocene interior ice extent and climate are in the Friis Hills, 80 km inland. The deposits record multiple glacial-interglacial cycles and fossiliferous non-glacial beds show that interglacial climate was warm enough for a diverse biota. Drifts are preserved in a shallow valley with the oldest beds exposed along the edges where they terminate at sharp erosional margins. These margins reveal drifts in short stratigraphic sections but none is more than 13 m thick. A 34 m-thick composite stratigraphic sequence has been produced from exposed drift sequences but correlating beds in scattered exposures is problematic. Moreover, much of the sequence is buried and inaccessible in the basin center. New seismic data collected during 2014 reveal a sequence of sediments at least 50 m thick. This stratigraphic package likely preserves a detailed and more complete sedimentary sequence for the Friis Hills that can be used to refine and augment the outcrop-based composite stratigraphy. We aim to drill through this sequence using a helicopter-transportable diamond coring system. These new cores will allow us to obtain

  16. Integrated stratigraphy and 40Ar/39Ar chronology of the Early to Middle Miocene Upper Freshwater Molasse in eastern Bavaria (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, H.; Böhme, M.; Rocholl, A.; Zwing, A.; Prieto, J.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Heissig, K.; Bachtadse, V.

    2008-02-01

    A detailed integrated stratigraphic study was carried out on middle Miocene fluvial successions of the Upper Freshwater Molasse (OSM) from the North Alpine Foreland Basin, in eastern Bavaria, Germany. The biostratigraphic investigations yielded six new localities thereby refining the OSM biostratigraphy for units C to E (sensu; Heissig, Actes du Congres BiochroM’97. Mem Trav EPHE, Inst Montpellier 21, 1997) and further improving biostratigraphic correlations between the different sections throughout eastern Bavaria. Radioisotopic ages of 14.55 ± 0.19 and 14.88 ± 0.11 Ma have been obtained for glass shards from the main bentonite horizon and the Ries impactite: two important stratigraphic marker beds used for confirming our magnetostratigraphic calibration to the Astronomical Tuned Neogene Time Scale (ATNTS04; Lourens et al. in Geologic Time Scale 2004, Cambridge University Press, 2004). Paleomagnetic analysis was performed using alternating field (AF) and thermal (TH) demagnetization methods. The AF method revealed both normal and reverse polarities but proofs to yield unreliable ChRM directions for the Puttenhausen section. Using the biostratigraphic information and radioisotopic ages, the magnetostratigraphic records of the different sections are tentatively correlated to the Astronomical Tuned Neogene Time Scale (ATNTS04; Lourens et al. in Geologic Time Scale 2004, Cambridge University Press, 2004). This correlation implies that the main bentonite horizon coincides to chron C5ADn, which is corroborated by its radioisotopic age of 14.55 Ma, whereas the new fossil locality Furth 460, belonging to OSM unit E, probably correlates to chron C5Bn.1r. The latter correlation agrees well with the Swiss Molasse locality Frohberg. Correlations of the older sections are not straightforward. The Brock horizon, which comprises limestone ejecta from the Ries impact, possibly correlates to C5ADr (14.581 14.784 Ma), implying that, although within error, the radioisotopic age

  17. Using palynology to re-assess the Dead Sea laminated sediments - Indeed varves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Merino, Lourdes; Leroy, Suzanne A. G.; Eshel, Amram; Epshtein, Valentina; Belmaker, Reuven; Bookman, Revital

    2016-05-01

    Lacustrine laminated sediments are often varves representing annual rhythmic deposition. The Dead Sea high-stand laminated sections consist of mm-scale alternating detrital and authigenic aragonite laminae. Previous studies assumed these laminae were varves deposited seasonally. However, this assumption has never been robustly validated. Here we report an examination of the seasonal deposition of detrital-aragonite couplets from two well-known Late Holocene laminated sections at the Ze'elim fan-delta using palynology and grain-size distribution analyses. These analyses are complemented by the study of contemporary flash-flood samples and multivariate statistical analysis. Because transport affects the pollen preservation state, well-preserved (mostly) air-borne transported pollen was analysed separately from badly-preserved pollen and fungal spores, which are more indicative of water transport and reworking from soils. Our results indicate that (i) both detrital and aragonite laminae were deposited during the rainy season; (ii) aragonite laminae have significantly lower reworked and fungal spore concentrations than detrital and flash-flood samples; and (iii) detrital laminae are composed of recycling of local and distal sources, with coarser particles that were initially deposited in the Dead Sea watershed and later transported via run-off to the lake. This is in line with previous carbon balance studies that showed that aragonite precipitation occurs after the massive input of TCO2 associated with run-off episodes. Consequently, at least for the Holocene Ze'elim Formation, laminated sediments cannot be considered as varves. Older Quaternary laminated sequences should be re-evaluated.

  18. History of human activity in last 800 years reconstructed from combined archive data and high-resolution analyses of varved lake sediments from Lake Czechowskie, Northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowiński, Michał; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Ott, Florian; Obremska, Milena; Kaczmarek, Halina; Theuerkauf, Martin; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to reconstruct human and landscape development in the Tuchola Pinewoods (Northern Poland) during the last 800 years. We apply an approach that combines historic maps and documents with pollen data. Pollen data were obtained from varved lake sediments at a resolution of 5 years. The chronology of the sediment record is based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating, 137Cs activity concentration measurements and tephrochronology (Askja AD 1875). We applied the REVEALS model to translate pollen percentage data into regional plant abundances. The interpretation of the pollen record is furthermore based on pollen accumulation rate data. The pollen record and historic documents show similar trends in vegetation development. During the first phase (AD 1200-1412), the Lake Czechowskie area was still largely forested with Quercus, Carpinus and Pinus forests. Vegetation was more open during the second phase (AD 1412-1776), and reached maximum openness during the third phase (AD 1776-1905). Furthermore, intensified forest management led to a transformation from mixed to pine dominated forests during this period. Since the early 20th century, the forest cover increased again with dominance of the Scots pine in the stand. While pollen and historic data show similar trends, they differ substantially in the degree of openness during the four phases with pollen data commonly suggesting more open conditions. We discuss potential causes for this discrepancy, which include unsuitable parameters settings in REVEALS and unknown changes in forest structure. Using pollen accumulation data as a third proxy record we aim to identify the most probable causes. Finally, we discuss the observed vegetation change in relation the socio-economic development of the area. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis - ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association and National Science Centre, Poland (grant No. 2011/01/B/ST10

  19. Fire history and human activity in last 2000 years reconstructed from varved lake sediments (N Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowinski, M. M.; Pienczewska, A.; Obremska, M.; Ott, F.; Dietze, E.; Feurdean, A.; Theuerkauf, M.; Brauer, A.

    2016-12-01

    Humans in the last two thousand years affect profound changes to ecosystem structure and function sometimes causing fire regimes. The aim of the study was to reconstruct fire history and human activity in the Tuchola Pinewoods (Northern Poland) during the last 2000 years. The robust chronology of the sediment record is based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating, 137Cs activity concentration measurements and tephrochronology (Askja AD 1875). Pollen and microscopic charcoal data were obtained from varved lake sediments at a resolution of consistently 5 years and 10 years. Data from Czechowskie lake suggest next to climate change that increased human activity was one of the main factors that influenced fire frequency (e.g. 50-450 AD and 900-1200 AD). This is particularly evident between 1776-1905 AD, when intensified forest management led to a transformation from mixed to pine dominated forests (fire-prone vegetation). Using high-resolution pollen and charcoal data we aim to identify the most probable causes of changes during the last 2000 years. Finally, we discuss the observed fire frequency and vegetation change in relation to climate changes and the socio-economic development of the area. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis - ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association and National Science Centre, Poland (grant No. 2011/01/B/ST10/07367 and 2015/17/B/ST10/03430).

  20. Chad Basin: Paleoenvironments of the Sahara since the Late Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Mathieu; Duringer, Philippe; Ghienne, Jean-François; Roquin, Claude; Sepulchre, Pierre; Moussa, Abderamane; Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Likius, Andossa; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2009-08-01

    Since the mid 1990s, the Mission paléoanthropologique francotchadienne (MPFT) conducts yearly paleontological field investigations of the Miocene-Pliocene of the Chad Basin. This article synthesizes some of the results of the MPFT, with focus on the Chad Basin development during the Neogene. We propose an overview of the depositional paleoenvironments of this part of Africa at different scales of time and space, based on a multidisciplinary approach (sedimentary geology, geomorphology, geophysic, numerical simulations and geochronology). The Miocene-Pliocene paleoenvironments are examined through the sedimentary archives of the early hominids levels and the Holocene Lake Mega-Chad episode illustrates the last major paleoenvironmental change in this area. The sedimentary record of the Chad Basin since the Late Miocene can be schematized as the result of recurrent interactions from lake to desert environments.

  1. Linking varve-formation processes to climate and lake conditions at Tiefer See (NE Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Nadine; Kienel, Ulrike; Plessen, Birgit; Ott, Florian; Brademann, Brian; Pinkerneil, Sylvia; Brauer, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Annually laminated (varved) lake sediments represent unique archives in continental areas providing both, precise chronologies and seasonally resolving proxy data. Monitoring of physical, chemical and biological processes influencing lake sediment formation are a suitable approach for detailed proxy understanding of varved sediment records. Lake Tiefer See (NE Germany) indicates deposition of varved sediments today as well as millennia ago (Dräger et al., 2016; Kienel et al., 2013). Therefore, the lake provides the possibility to trace current seasonal layer formation in the lake and to pair these data to climate and lake conditions (Kienel et al., 2016). Lake Tiefer See was formed during the last glaciation and is part of the Klocksin Lake Chain, a subglacial channel system that crosses the Pomeranian terminal moraine. The lake is a mesotrophic hard water lake with a maximum depth of 63 m and a surface area of 0.75 km2. During four consecutive years (2012-2015) the particulate matter deposition was trapped at bi-weekly to monthly resolution at three different water depths (5, 12 and 50 m). The sediment trap material was analysed for sediment flux and organic matter and calcite content. In addition, we monitored limnological parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, conductivity, oxygen content) as well as the meteorological conditions (e.g. temperature, wind speed and direction, precipitation) with a monitoring and climate station installed on the lake. These data describe strength and duration of lake mixing and lake stagnation phases. Our results show distinct seasonal peaks in sediment formation, which correspond to the spring and summer productivity phases comprising of diatom blooms and calcite precipitation. This observation is in line with microfacies results from surface sediment cores. The content of biogenic calcite content decreases in the trapped material with increasing water depth indicating dissolution processes. However, the strength of calcite

  2. Integrated stratigraphy and 40Ar/39Ar chronology of the early to middle Miocene Upper Freshwater Molasse in western Bavaria (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hayfaa Abdul; Böhme, Madelaine; Rocholl, Alexander; Prieto, Jerome; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Bachtadse, Valerian; Ulbig, Albert

    2010-12-01

    A detailed integrated stratigraphic study (biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy) was carried out on five sections from the western part of the Bavarian Upper Freshwater Molasse of the North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB), greatly improving the chronostratigraphy of these sediments. The sections belong to the lithostratigraphic units Limnische Untere Serie (UL) and Fluviatile Untere Serie (UF) and contain 19 (mostly new) small-mammal bearing levels, significantly refining the local biostratigraphy. Radiometric ages obtained from glass shards from tuff horizons are used together with the biostratigraphic information for constructing and confirming the magnetostratigraphic correlation of the studied sections to the Astronomical Tuned Time Scale (ANTS04; Lourens et al. in Geologic Time Scale 2004, Cambridge University Press, 2004). This correlation implies that the UL lithostratigraphic unit corresponds to the latest Ottnangian and the Early Karpatian, whereas the UF corresponds to the Karpatian and the Early Badenian. This indicates that the Brackish- to Freshwater Molasse transition already occurred during the late Ottnangian. The pre-Riesian hiatus occurred in the latest Karpatian and lower Early Badenian in Eastern Bavaria and Bohemia and in the Late Karpatian and earliest Badenian in Western Bavaria. The geochemical and Ar-Ar data of volcanic ashes suggest that highly evolved silicic magmas from a single volcano or volcanic center, characterized by a uniform Nd isotopic composition, erupted repetitively over the course of at least 1.6 Myr. Three phases of eruptive activity were identified at 16.1 ± 0.2 Ma (Zahling-2), 15.6 ± 0.4 Ma (Krumbad), and 14.5 ± 0.2 Ma (Heilsberg, Hegau). The correlation of the local biostratigraphic zonation to the ANTS04 enables further the characterization of both the Ottnangian-Karpatian and Karpatian-Badenian boundaries in the NAFB by small-mammal biostratigraphy. According to these results the Ottnangian-Karpatian boundary is

  3. A Transitional Gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae from the Miocene of Israel.

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    Raquel López-Antoñanzas

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae: Ctenodactylinae, Sayimys negevensis, on the basis of cheek teeth from the Early Miocene of the Rotem Basin, southern Israel. The Rotem ctenodactylid differs from all known ctenodactylid species, including Sayimys intermedius, which was first described from the Middle Miocene of Saudi Arabia. Instead, it most resembles Sayimys baskini from the Early Miocene of Pakistan in characters of the m1-2 (e.g., the mesoflexid shorter than the metaflexid, the obliquely orientated hypolophid, and the presence of a strong posterolabial ledge and the upper molars (e.g., the paraflexus that is longer than the metaflexus. However, morphological (e.g., presence of a well-developed paraflexus on unworn upper molars and dimensional (regarding, in particular, the DP4 and M1 or M2 differences between the Rotem gundi and Sayimys baskini distinguish them and testify to the novelty and endemicity of the former. In its dental morphology, Sayimys negevensis sp. nov. shows a combination of both the ultimate apparition of key-characters and incipient features that would be maintained and strengthened in latter ctenodactylines. Thus, it is a pivotal species that bridges the gap between an array of primitive ctenodactylines and the most derived, Early Miocene and later, gundis.

  4. U-Pb geochronology of the Santa Cruz Formation (early Miocene) at the Río Bote and Río Santa Cruz (southernmost Patagonia, Argentina): Implications for the correlation of fossil vertebrate localities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuitiño, José I.; Fernicola, Juan Carlos; Kohn, Matthew J.; Trayler, Robin; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Bargo, M. Susana; Kay, Richard F.; Vizcaíno, Sergio F.

    2016-10-01

    The early Miocene Santa Cruz Formation (SCF) in southern Patagonia hosts the Santacrucian South American Land Mammal Age (SALMA), whose age is known mainly from exposures along the Atlantic coast. Zircon U-Pb ages were obtained from intercalated tuffs from four inland sections of the SCF: 17.36 ± 0.63 Ma for the westernmost Río Bote locality, and 17.04 ± 0.55 Ma-16.32 ± 0.62 Ma for central Río Santa Cruz localities. All ages agree with the bounding age of underlying marine units and with equivalent strata in coastal exposures. New ages and available sedimentation rates imply time spans for each section of ∼18.2 to 17.36 Ma for Río Bote and 17.45-15.63 Ma for central Río Santa Cruz (Burdigalian). These estimates support the view that deposition of the SCF began at western localities ∼1 Ma earlier than at eastern localities, and that the central Río Santa Cruz localities expose the youngest SCF in southern Santa Cruz Province. Associated vertebrate faunas are consistent with our geochronologic synthesis, showing older (Notohippidian) taxa in western localities and younger (Santacrucian) taxa in central localities. The Notohippidian fauna (19.0-18.0 Ma) of the western localities is synchronous with Pinturan faunas (19.0-18.0 Ma), but older than Santacrucian faunas of the Río Santa Cruz (17.2-15.6 Ma) and coastal localities (18.0-16.2 Ma). The Santacrucian faunas of the central Río Santa Cruz localities temporally overlap Colloncuran (15.7 Ma), Friasian (16.5 Ma), and eastern Santacrucian faunas.

  5. The Miocene carnivore assemblage of Greece

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    Koufos, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Miocene carnivore assemblage of Greece includes a great number of taxa, described in numerous articles since the first decades of the 19th Century. The present article is a revision of all these taxa, providing information about their history, localities, age, as well as their stratigraphic distribution and palaeoenvironment. The Early/Middle Miocene carnivore record of Greece is poor as the available fossiliferous sites and material are rare. However, the Late Miocene one is quite rich, including numerous taxa. The Miocene localities with carnivores and their age are given in a stratigraphic table covering the European Mammal zones from MN 4 to MN 13. The type locality, holotype, and some historical and morphological remarks are given for each taxon. Several carnivore taxa were erected from Greek material and new photos of their holotypes are given. The stratigraphic distribution of the Greek carnivore taxa indicates that they are covering the time span from ~19.0-5.3Ma. The majority of the Miocene taxa (Adcrocuta, Hyaenictitherium, Plioviverrops, Protictitherium, Ictitherium, Indarctos, Dinocrocuta, Promephitis disappeared at the end of Miocene. The composition of the Early/Middle Miocene carnivore assemblage of Greece includes mainly viverrids (Lophocyon, Euboictis, while the hyaenids, percrocutids, felids and mustelids are very few. On the contrary the Late Miocene assemblage is richer, including more subfamilies and species; the hyaenids and mustelids dominate, while the viverrids are absent. The Late Miocene carnivore guild structure is similar to that of the modern Serengeti, indicating a relatively open, savannah-like environment.

    La asociación de carnívoros miocenos de Grecia incluye un gran número de taxones, descritos en numerosos artículos desde las primeras décadas del siglo XIX. El presente artículo supone un esfuerzo de síntesis de todos estos taxones, suministrando información sobre su

  6. Palaeogene to Early Miocene sedimentary history of the Sierra Espuña (Malaguide complex, internal zone of the Betic cordilleras, SE Spain. Evidence for extra-Malaguide (Sardinian? provenance of oligocene conglomerates: Palaeogeographic implications

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    Geel, T.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sierra Espuña is situated at the northern edge of the Internal Zone in the eastern Betic Cordilleras and is part of the unmetamorphosed Malaguide Complex. Palaeontological and sedimentological analysis of the Eocene to Aquitanian sediments on the northwest side of the Espuña yielded unexpected new information of importance for the reconstruction of the history of the Espuña itself and the Malaguides in general. The socalled Upper Eocene (Auversian rocks are of Early Oligocene (P20 age and contain supermature detritus derived from outside the Malaguide realm. The hundreds of meters thick limestone conglomerate formation of the Espuña is of Middle Oligocene (P21 age and represents a backstepping fan delta complex at the margin of a carbonate platform situated to the northeast of the Espuña. Analysis of the clasts suggests that this platform was a part of the north Sardinian block given the majority of fragments of Upper Jurassic sheltered inner platform (Clypeina-Trocholina limestones and dolomites. Contrary to former views (Paquet, 1966; Lonergan, 1993, the conglomerates cannot be considered to be the erosional products of Malaguide imbricated units. Therefore, one of the main arguments for early (Late Eocene to Oligocene thrusting and nappe emplacement in the Espuña area is not valido Other arguments for early kinematics are discussed, among others the allegedly continuous sedimentation from the Late Eocene until the Langhian northwest of the Espuña. Our data indicate the existence of a stratigraphic gap, comprising the middle Aquitanian to middle Burdigalian. A new model for the development of the Espuña within the Malaguide realm during the Palaeogene to Early Miocene is presented. Main thrusting and nappe emplacement is thought to have been taken place during the late Aquitanian. Finally, the recently proposed 2000 clockwise rotation of the Espuña as a coherent block during the Early to Middle Miocene (AlIerton el al., 1993 is

  7. Lithostratigraphy of the Upper Oligocene - Miocene succession of Denmark

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    Piasecki, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a revised lithostratigraphic scheme for the uppermost Upper Oligocene – Miocene succession of Denmark. The marine Oligocene Brejning Clay Member is upgraded to formation status and includes the Sydklint Member and the Øksenrade Member (new. The shallow marine and deltaic deposits of mainly Early Miocene age are included in the Ribe Group (new while the fully marine Middle and Upper Miocene clay-rich deposits are referred to the Måde Group (new. The Ribe Group is subdivided into 6 formations: the Vejle Fjord Formation is revised and includes the Skansebakke Member,the Billund Formation (new includes the Addit and Hvidbjerg Members (new, the Klintinghoved Formation is redefined formally and includes the Koldingfjord Member (new, the Bastrup Formation(new includes the Resen Member (new, the Vandel Member is a new member in the Arnum Formation (revised, the Odderup Formation is redefined and includes the Stauning Member (new and the coalbearing Fasterholt Member. The Måde Group is subdivided into the Hodde, Ørnhøj (new, Gram and Marbæk (new Formations. Subdivision of the Upper Oligocene – Miocene succession into two groups, the Ribe and Måde Groups, is compatible with the North Sea lithostratigraphic framework where they correlate with the upper part of the Hordaland Group and the Nordland Group, respectively. The revised lithostratigraphic framework correlated in three dimensions provides rigorous constraints on the palaeogeographic interpretation of the Late Oligocene – Miocene period. Three major deltaic units (Billund, Bastrup and Odderup Formations prograded from the north and north-east into the North Sea Basin during the Earlyearly Middle Miocene. Delta progradation was punctuated by deposition of marine clay and silt associated with minor transgressive events (Vejle Fjord, Klintinghoved and Arnum Formations. During the Middle–Late Miocene, marine depositional conditions dominated (Hodde, Ørnhøj and

  8. An oceanic box model of the Miocene Mediterranean Sea with emphasis on the effects of closure of the eastern gateway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karami, M.P.; Meijer, P.Th.; Dijkstra, H.A.; Wortel, M.J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The early Miocene Mediterranean Sea had two gateways toward the open ocean: the Indian Ocean in the east and the Atlantic Ocean in the west. Closure of the eastern connection during the middle Miocene had important effects on the water properties and circulation of the Mediterranean Sea. To gain ins

  9. A new magnetostratigraphic framework for the Lower Miocene (Burdigalian/Ottnangian, Karpatian) in the North Alpine Foreland Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichenbacher, B.; Krijgsman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/148529763; Lataster, Y.; Pippèrr, M.; van Baak, C.G.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341133361; Chang, L.; Kälin, D.; Jost, J.; Doppler, G.; Jung, D.; Prieto, J.; Abdul Aziz, H.; Böhme, M.; Garnish, J.; Kirscher, U.; Bachtadse, V.

    2013-01-01

    Oligocene-Miocene chronostratigraphic correlations within the Paratethys domain are still highly controversial. This study focuses on the late Early Miocene of the Swiss and S-German Molasse Basin (Late Burdigalian, Ottnangian-Karpatian). Previous studies have published different chronologies for th

  10. A varved lake sediment record from Finland: between the North Atlantic Oscillation and Siberian High Pressure Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarni, Saija; Saarinen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Varved lake sediments are widely used for paleoclimatological and paleoenvironmental studies. The advantages of such records are precise time control, which enables high resolution studies of even seasonal scale, and the length of the records extending potentially beyond thousands of years. The clastic organic varved sediments from a small boreal Lake Kalliojärvi (area 0.15 km2, maximum depth 12 m) in Central Finland, record environmental change and snow accumulation history for more than two thousand years. The high quality sediments of the Lake Kalliojärvi are laminated until the present day and reflect the annual circulation of boreal zone. A single varve year consists of two laminae that are composed of i) minerogenic clasts and ii) amorphous organic matter and microfossils. Total varve thickness was measured, and the accumulation of minerogenic and organic matter were analyzed using digital image analysis. The major element composition of the lake sediments was also determined using micro X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF). The clastic laminae are interpreted as a proxy for catchment erosion, reflecting spring floods triggered by snow melt. Qualitative comparison of minerogenic matter accumulation and reconstructed North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phases reveal correspondence between the two records. Positive NAO conditions occur simultaneously with increased minerogenic lamina thicknesses which suggest that the changes in snow accumulation are induced by NAO. However, there are indications that the strong Siberian High Pressure Cell (SHPC) prevailing on eastern Scandinavia may be important for Scandinavian climate via blocking the westerly winds. Strong SHCP potentially leads to colder winter temperatures in Finland and increased ice formation. Stronger and prolonged ice cover in lake environments cause prolonged water column stratification and increased oxygen deficiency which is related to an increased Fe/Mn ratio. This study discusses the importance of NAO and

  11. Climate variability in SE Europe since 1450 AD based on a varved sediment record from Etoliko Lagoon (Western Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsodendris, Andreas; Brauer, Achim; Reed, Jane M.; Plessen, Birgit; Friedrich, Oliver; Hennrich, Barbara; Zacharias, Ierotheos; Pross, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    To achieve deeper understanding of climate variability during the last millennium in SE Europe, we report new sedimentological and paleoecological data from Etoliko Lagoon, Western Greece. The record represents the southernmost annually laminated (i.e., varved) archive from the Balkan Peninsula spanning the Little Ice Age, allowing insights into critical time intervals of climate instability such as during the Maunder and Dalton solar minima. After developing a continuous, ca. 500-year-long varve chronology, high-resolution μ-XRF counts, stable-isotope data measured on ostracod shells, palynological (including pollen and dinoflagellate cysts), and diatom data are used to decipher the season-specific climate and ecosystem evolution at Etoliko Lagoon since 1450 AD. Our results show that the Etoliko varve record became more sensitive to climate change from 1740 AD onwards. We attribute this shift to the enhancement of primary productivity within the lagoon, which is documented by an up to threefold increase in varve thickness. This marked change in the lagoon's ecosystem was caused by: (i) increased terrestrial input of nutrients, (ii) a closer connection to the sea and human eutrophication particularly from 1850 AD onwards, and (iii) increasing summer temperatures. Integration of our data with those of previously published paleolake sediment records, tree-ring-based precipitation reconstructions, simulations of atmospheric circulation and instrumental precipitation data suggests that wet conditions in winter prevailed during 1740-1790 AD, whereas dry winters marked the periods 1790-1830 AD (Dalton Minimum) and 1830-1930 AD, the latter being sporadically interrupted by wet winters. This variability in precipitation can be explained by shifts in the large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns over the European continent that affected the Balkan Peninsula (e.g., North Atlantic Oscillation). The transition between dry and wet phases at Etoliko points to longitudinal

  12. Evidence for an Early-Middle Miocene age of the Navidad Formation (central Chile: Paleontological, paleoclimatic and tectonic implications Evidencias de una edad miocena temprana-media de la Formación Navidad: Implicancias paleontológicas, paleoclimáticas y tectónicas

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    Néstor M Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The age of the Navidad Formation in central Chile has always been controversial, mainly due to the conflicting age ranges indicated by its macro- and microfossils. Macrofossils are generally interpreted as having been reworked from older, Early to Middle Miocene strata, whereas a Late Miocene-Pliocene age has been accepted on the basis of planktonic foraminifer index species. The results of this study, however, indicate that the macrofossils occur in situ, which necessitates a complete revision of the geochronological data. It is concluded that the evidence for an Early to Middle Miocene age is overwhelming, and that the planktonic foraminifer index species must have appeared in the SE Pacific earlier than elsewhere. These include Globoturborotalia apertura, Globorotalia puncticulata (Deshayes, Globorotalia spheriomizea (Walters, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Ehrenberg, and Neogloboquadrina acostaensis (Blow. An Early to Middle Miocene age for the Navidad Formation correlates well with a reinterpretation of its depo-sitional environment as a continental shelf instead of a deepwater continental slope, global and regional paleoclimatic events, and the tectonic development of the Andes Range.La edad de la Formación Navidad en Chile central siempre ha sido controversial, debido a los distintos rangos de edad indicados por los macro- y microfósiles. En general, se considera que los macro-fósiles han sido retrabajados de estratos del Mioceno Temprano a Medio, y se aceptó una edad miocena tardía para esta unidad sobre la base de especies indicadoras de foraminíferos planctónicos. Sin embargo, los resultados de este estudio indican que los macrofósiles ocurren in situ, lo cual hace necesario una revisión completa de los datos geocronológicos. Se concluye que la evidencia por una edad miocena temprana a media es contundente, y que los foraminíferos planctónicos que indicarían una edad miocena tardía aparecieron más temprano en el SE del oc

  13. Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bijoy; Nilsson, Johan; Nycander, Jonas; Jakobsson, Martin; Döös, Kristofer

    2010-11-01

    A model study of an idealized early Miocene Arctic Ocean has been undertaken. The work is motivated by the first drill core retrieved from the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean, which suggests a transition from anoxic to oxic condition during the early Miocene, a feature presumably related to the opening of the Fram Strait. Here, the ventilation in a semienclosed basin, connected with the ocean through a strait with a sill, is examined using an ocean circulation model that includes a passive age tracer. In particular, we investigate how the ventilation depends on strait geometry, freshwater influx, and surface wind stress. We find that the turnover time, characterizing the bulk ventilation rate, is primarily controlled by the strait width and the wind stress. Generally, the oldest water in the basin is encountered near the sill depth, but wind forcing displaces the oldest water downward. For narrow straits, the turnover time gives an upper bound on the mean age of the basin water. The results have implications when translating local oxygen conditions, recorded in the sediment sequence from the Lomonosov Ridge, to basin-scale circulation patterns. Further, the results indicate that the early Miocene Arctic Ocean became well ventilated when the Fram Strait reached a width of about 100 km.

  14. Mid Miocene Terrestrial Ecosystems: Information from Mammalian Herbivore Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, C. M.; Damuth, J.; Theodor, J. M.

    2001-05-01

    In present day ecosystems the numbers and proportions of different kinds of ecologically distinct ungulates (hoofed mammals) provide an indicator of the nature of the vegetation in the habitat. Different vegetation types (such as forest, savanna, or grassland) are characteristically associated with different arrays of ungulates, with species exhibiting differences in diet, body size, and type of digestive fermentation system. These biological attributes can also be inferred for fossil ungulate species, the first two from quantitative assessment of skull and dental anatomy, and the last from phylogenetic affinity. Thus fossil ungulate communities may be used as indicators of the vegetation types of the habitats in which they lived. Vegetation types, in turn, are determined largely by a number of physical environmental factors. Typical ungulate communities of the late early to early middle Miocene (17 - 15 Ma) from the Great Plains of North America contained a diversity of browsing (leaf-eating) and grazing (grass-eating) species, with proportions of dietary types and a diversity of body sizes indicative of a woodland savanna habitat. Paleobotanical evidence also indicates a woodland savanna type of vegetation. However, these communities included a much larger number of ungulate species than can be found in any present-day community. The "excess" ungulate species were primarily browsers. Throughout the rest of the middle Miocene both species numbers and the proportion of browsers in ungulate communities appear to have declined steadily. During this decline in browser species the numbers of grazer species remained relatively constant. Within-community species numbers comparable to the present day were attained by the late Miocene. We suggest that the early Miocene browser-rich communities, and their subsequent decline, carry an important paleoenvironmental signal. In particular, communities "over rich" in browsers may reflect higher levels of primary productivity in

  15. Sex determination in miocene catarrhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J

    1995-04-01

    Canines of fossil hominoids and primitive catarrhines from several early, middle, and late Miocene sites were analyzed according to the shape indices described in Kelley (1995) and compared to those of males and females of extant great apes. In bivariate plots of the fossil canines utilizing the indices, 90% of the upper canines and 85% of the lower canines fell within or just outside the exclusively male or exclusively female territories delimited by the extant great apes. The remainder fell in the male-female overlap zones. Sex assignments based on these distributions were nearly 100% concordant with classifications according to canine height, suggesting a high degree of accuracy. There were various taxon-specific shifts in bivariate space among fossil genera, reflecting subtle differences in canine shape between taxa within the overall pattern of similarity to extant great apes as a whole. In many cases these shifts are matched by particular extant-ape species and subspecies, while other fossil taxa have no exact analogue for canine shape among the extant great apes. However, the pattern of spatial segregation of canines identified as either male or female at each of the sites largely mirrors that of males and females within the extant-ape sample, indicating that Miocene catarrhines shared with extant great apes a common pattern of shape differences between male and female canines, regardless of taxon-specific morphologies. These observations demonstrate that the canines of fossil catarrhines can be sexed with a high degree of confidence based solely on intrinsic features of shape. This will permit more reliable characterizations of morphological sexual dimorphism among fossil species. It is also argued that canine shape is a more reliable indicator of sex in fossil taxa than are canine/molar size ratios.

  16. Lower Miocene echinoderms of Jamaica, West Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, S.K.; Portell, R.W.; Veltkamp, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Despite being diverse globally, Miocene echinoids are poorly known from Jamaica. Moderately diverse echinoids and other echinoderms have been identified mainly from fragmentary specimens collected from chalks and mass-flow deposits of the Lower Miocene Montpelier Formation, White Limestone Group, ne

  17. Deformation of the late Miocene to Pliocene Inyo Surface, eastern Sierra region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    A middle and late Miocene erosion surface, the Inyo Surface, underlies late Miocene mafic flows in the White Mountains and late Miocene and (or) early Pliocene flows elsewhere in the eastern Sierra region. The Inyo Surface is correlated with an erosion surface that underlies late Miocene mafic flows in the central and northern Sierra Nevada. The mafic flows had outpourings similar to flood basalts, although of smaller volume, providing paleohorizontal and paleolowland indicators. The flows filed and locally topped the existing landscape forming broad plateau-like flats. Topographic relief in the region was characterized by weathered and rounded slopesp rior to late Miocene mafic magmatism. Relicts of the older landscape lie adjacent to late Miocene and early Pliocene basalt-covered lowlands that now occur within the crests of ranges that have 2500-3000 m relief and dramatically steep escarpments. Late Miocene mafic flows that lie on the crest of the Sierra Nevada adjacent to the White Mountains predate significant activity on the Sierra Nevada frontal fault zone. These deposits and accompanying erosion surfaces provide excellent strain markers for reconstructing part of the Walker Lane north of the Garlock fault and west of the Amargosa drainage, here referred to as the eastern Sierra region. The Inyo Surface is a compound erosional surface that records at least four major erosion events during the Cenozoic. These four surfaces were first recognized on the Kern Plateau and named from oldest to youngest, the Summit Upland, the Subsummit Plateau, the Chagoopa Plateau, and the Canyon. The three older surfaces have also been subsequently modifi ed by Pleistocene glaciation. The compound erosion surface, which is locally overlain by late Miocene mafic flows in the northern and central Sierra Nevada, is here referred to as the Lindgren Surface. Correlatives in the eastern Sierra region are found in the White Mountains, Inyo Mountains, Darwin Plateau, Coso Range, and

  18. Miocene cyclopid copepod from a saline paleolake in Mojave, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hołyńska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are remarkably few direct fossil records of Copepoda, which implies that current estimates of the lineage divergence times and inferences on the historical biogeography remain highly dubious for these small-sized crustaceans. The Cyclopidae, a predominantly freshwater copepod family with 1000+ species and distributed worldwide, has no fossil record at all. Recent collections from the middle Miocene Barstow Formation in Southern California resulted in ample material of finely preserved cyclopid fossils, including both adult and larval stages. To document the antennulary setation pattern in the adult and copepodid instars we used a coding system that is coherent between sexes and developmental stages. The majority of the cyclopid fossils, coming from saline lake environment, represent the modern genus Apocyclops, a euryhaline, thermophilic group occurring both in the New World and Old World. A new species Apocyclops californicus is described, based on the short medial spine and spiny ornamentation of the free segment of leg 5, spinule ornamentation of pediger 5, and well-developed protuberances of the intercoxal sclerite of leg 4. The presence of antennal allobasis and the features of the swimming legs unambiguously place the Miocene Apocyclops in the A. panamensis-clade, a predominantly amphi-Pacific group. The middle Miocene fossils with clear affinities to a subgroup of Apocyclops imply an early Miocene or Paleogene origin of the genus. Based on the geographic patterns of the species richness and morphology in Apocyclops and its presumed closest relative, genus Metacyclops, we hypothesize that: (i the ancestor of Apocyclops, similar in morphology to some cave-dweller Metacyclops occurring today in the peri-Mediterranean region, might have arrived in North America from Europe via the Thulean North Atlantic bridge in the late Paleocene–early Eocene; (ii Eocene termination of the Thulean land connection might have resulted in the

  19. Winter temperature conditions (1670-2010) reconstructed from varved sediments, western Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Boreux, Maxime P.

    2017-09-01

    Advances in paleoclimatology from the Arctic have provided insights into long-term climate conditions. However, while past annual and summer temperature have received considerable research attention, comparatively little is known about winter paleoclimate. Arctic winter is of special interest as it is the season with the highest sensitivity to climate change, and because it differs substantially from summer and annual measures. Therefore, information about past changes in winter climate is key to improve our knowledge of past forced climate variability and to reduce uncertainty in climate projections. In this context, Arctic lakes with snowmelt-fed catchments are excellent potential winter climate archives. They respond strongly to snowmelt-induced runoff, and indirectly to winter temperature and snowfall conditions. To date, only a few well-calibrated lake sediment records exist, which appear to reflect site-specific responses with differing reconstructions. This limits the possibility to resolve large-scale winter climate change prior the instrumental period. Here, we present a well-calibrated quantitative temperature and snowfall record for the extended winter season (November through March; NDJFM) from Chevalier Bay (Melville Island, NWT, Canadian Arctic) back to CE 1670. The coastal embayment has a large catchment influenced by nival terrestrial processes, which leads to high sedimentation rates and annual sedimentary structures (varves). Using detailed microstratigraphic analysis from two sediment cores and supported by μ-XRF data, we separated the nival sedimentary units (spring snowmelt) from the rainfall units (summer) and identified subaqueous slumps. Statistical correlation analysis between the proxy data and monthly climate variables reveals that the thickness of the nival units can be used to predict winter temperature (r = 0.71, pc research such as data-model comparisons and proxy-data assimilation in climate model simulations.

  20. Miocene-Pliocene mantle depletion event in the northern Fossa Magna, western NE Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Satoshi; Inaba, Mitsuru; Adachi, Yoshiko; Shinjo, Ryuichi

    2016-07-01

    New isotopic and trace element data presented here imply a temporal change in magma sources and thermal conditions beneath the northern Fossa Magna of NE Japan from the Miocene to the Pliocene. Less radiogenic 176Hf/177Hf and 143Nd/144Nd, high Zr/Hf, and little or no Hf anomaly characterize the Early Miocene volcanism in the northern Fossa Magna region. The mantle wedge consisted of chemically heterogeneous mantle source. Based on out isotope proxies, we propose that during the onset of subduction, influx of hot asthenospheric mantle provided sufficient heat to partially melt newly subducting sediment. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that slab-derived melt mixed with mantle wedge produces the observed isotopic and trace elemental characteristics. In the Middle Miocene, the injection of hot and depleted asthenospheric material replaced the mantle beneath the northern Fossa Magna region of NE Japan. This caused the isotopic signature of the rocks to change from enriched to depleted. Then, the mantle wedge was gradually cooled during the Middle Miocene to the Pliocene with back-arc opening ending in the Late Miocene. Slab surface temperatures were still high enough for sediments to melt but not too high (<∼780 °C) to lose zircon as a residual phase. The Late Miocene and Pliocene volcanism at the post stage of the back-arc opening is best explained by a partial melting of subducted metasediment saturated with trace quantities of zircon and rutile.

  1. Connectivity controls on the late Miocene eastern Mediterranean fish fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiadi, Konstantina; Antonarakou, Assimina; Kontakiotis, George; Kafousia, Nefeli; Moissette, Pierre; Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Manoutsoglou, Emmanouil; Karakitsios, Vasileios

    2016-06-01

    Environmental change significantly affects the production of fish resources and their dependent societies. The paleontological record offers unique insight into the effects of long-term paleoenvironmental variability on the fish species' distributions and abundances. In the present study, we investigate the late Miocene (7.5-6.5 Ma) fish assemblages of the Potamida section in western Crete (eastern Mediterranean). The determined fish taxa are examined in a paleobiogeographic context, with regard to their geographic and stratigraphic distribution from the early Miocene (~13 Ma) through today. In addition, present-day ecological data are used to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental conditions in the study area. Planktonic foraminifer biostratigraphy significantly improves the earlier dating of the studied sequence. The late Miocene fish fauna of Potamida includes 35 taxa (seven in open nomenclature) from 13 teleost families. The eastern Mediterranean biostratigraphic and geographic distribution of 32 taxa is significantly expanded into the Tortonian, whereas 13 species are recorded for the first time from the Messinian. Four stages are distinguished in the area's paleoenvironmental evolution. (1) The Potamida area was an open marine environment with depths exceeding 150 m between ~7.5-7.45 Ma. (2) Between 7.45-7.36 Ma, the results suggest depths between 300-400 m. (3) The depositional depth increases between 7.36-7.28 Ma to 400-550 m. (4) Later on, approximately between 6.8-6.6 Ma, the depth is again estimated around 100-150 m.

  2. Updated chronology for the Miocene hominoid radiation in Western Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; Alba, David M; Garcés, Miguel; Robles, Josep M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2011-04-05

    Extant apes (Primates: Hominoidea) are the relics of a group that was much more diverse in the past. They originated in Africa around the Oligocene/Miocene boundary, but by the beginning of the Middle Miocene they expanded their range into Eurasia, where they experienced a far-reaching evolutionary radiation. A Eurasian origin of the great ape and human clade (Hominidae) has been favored by several authors, but the assessment of this hypothesis has been hampered by the lack of accurate datings for many Western Eurasian hominoids. Here we provide an updated chronology that incorporates recently discovered Iberian taxa and further reevaluates the age of many previously known sites on the basis of local biostratigraphic scales and magnetostratigraphic data. Our results show that identifiable Eurasian kenyapithecins (Griphopithecus and Kenyapithecus) are much younger than previously thought (ca. 14 Ma instead of 16 Ma), which casts serious doubts on the attribution of the hominoid tooth from Engelswies (16.3-16.5 Ma) to cf. Griphopithecus. This evidence is further consistent with an alternative scenario, according to which the Eurasian pongines and African hominines might have independently evolved in their respective continents from similar kenyapithecin ancestors, resulting from an early Middle Miocene intercontinental range extension followed by vicariance. This hypothesis, which would imply an independent origin of orthogrady in pongines and hominines, deserves further testing by accurately inferring the phylogenetic position of European dryopithecins, which might be stem pongines rather than stem hominines.

  3. A varved lake sediment record of the 10Be solar activity proxy for the Lateglacial-Holocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymzik, Markus; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Mekhaldi, Florian; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Brauer, Achim

    2016-12-01

    Solar modulated variations in cosmogenic radionuclide production provide both information on past changes in the activity of the Sun and a global synchronization tool. However, to date the use of cosmogenic radionuclides for these applications is almost exclusively based on 10Be records from ice cores and 14C time-series from tree rings, all including archive-specific limitations. We present the first 10Be record from annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for the Lateglacial-Holocene transition from Meerfelder Maar. We quantify environmental influences on the catchment and, consequently, 10Be deposition using a new approach based on regression analyses between our 10Be record and environmental proxy time-series from the same archive. Our analyses suggest that environmental influences contribute to up to 37% of the variability in our 10Be record, but cannot be the main explanation for major 10Be excursions. Corrected for these environmental influences, our 10Be record is interpreted to dominantly reflect changes in solar modulated cosmogenic radionuclide production. The preservation of a solar production signal in 10Be from varved lake sediments highlights the largely unexplored potential of these archives for solar activity reconstruction, as global synchronization tool and, thus, for more robust paleoclimate studies.

  4. Structural studies on Miocene kerogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almendros, G.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.; Martin, F.; Alvarez-Ramis, C.

    1988-04-01

    The different characteristics of organic matter in Miocene sediment from Portazgo (Madrid, Spain) were studied by several physicochemical techniques. Then g.c.-m.s. was applied to bitumen and to oxidation degradation products of the insoluble organic residue. Both the palaeobotanic study and the composition of the bitumen fraction suggest an important contribution of vascular plants in the sediment; a predominance of odd-numbered alkanes, of straight-chain aliphatic compounds, and of high molecular weight homologues of the series were observed. The degradation methods employed yielded large proportions of aliphatic chains, but aromatic compounds amounted to approx. 25 wt% of the degradation products, suggesting a significant contribution of lignin. In addition to the degradation with potassium persulphate followed by alkaline permanganate oxidation, by depolymerization perborate was also applied. The latter degradation method yielded aromatic acids and polymethylene compounds, and residual kerogen was transformed into an alkali-soluble polymer, which can be studied by the usual techniques for humic acids. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Monitoring climate signal transfer into the varved lake sediments of Lake Czechowskie, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß-Schmölders, Miriam; Ott, Florian; Brykała, Dariusz; Gierszewski, Piotr; Kaszubski, Michał; Kienel, Ulrike; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    In 2012 we started a monitoring program at Lake Czechowskie, Poland, because the lake comprises a long Holocene time series of calcite varves until recent times. The aim of the program is to understand how environmental and climatic conditions influence the hydrological conditions and, ultimately, the sediment deposition processes of the lake. Lake Czechowskie is located in the north of Poland in the Pomeranian Lake District and is part of the national park Tuchola Forest. The landscape and the lake is formed by the glacier retreat after the last glaciation (Weichselian). Lake Czechowskie is a typical hardwater lake and has a length of 1.4 km, an average width of 600 m and a lake surface area of ca 4 km. The maximum depth of 32 m is reached in a rather small hollow in the eastern part of the lake. Two different types of sediment traps provide sediment samples with monthly resolution from different water depths (12m, 26m). In addition, hydrological data including water temperature in different depths, water inflow, throughflow and outflow and the depth of visibility are measured. These data allow to describe strength and duration of lake mixing in spring and autumn and its influence on sedimentation. The sediment samples were analyzed with respect to their dry weight (used to calculate mean daily sediment flux), their inorganic and organic carbon contents, the stable C- and O-isotopes of organic matter and calcite as well as N-isotopes of organic matter. For selected samples dominant diatom taxa are determined. Our first results demonstrate the strong influence of the long winter with ice cover until April in 2013 on the sedimentation. A rapid warming in only 9 days starting on April 9th from -0,3 C° to 15,2 C° resulted in fast ice break-up and a short but intensive lake mixing. In consequence of this short mixing period a strong algal bloom especially of Fragilaria and Crysophycea commenced in April and had its maximum in May. This bloom further induced biogenic

  6. Periodic jökulhlaups from Pleistocene glacial Lake Missoula-New evidence from varved sediment in northern Idaho and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Richard B.

    1984-01-01

    Newly examined exposures in northern Idaho and Washington show that catastrophic floods from glacial Lake Missoula during late Wisconsin time were repeated, brief jökulhlaups separated by decades of quiet glaciolacustrine and subaerial conditions. Glacial Priest Lake, dammed in the Priest River valley by a tongue of the Purcell trench lobe of the Cordilleran ice sheet, generally accumulated varved mud; the varved mud is sharply interrupted by 14 sand beds deposited by upvalley-running currents. The sand beds are texturally and structurally similar to slackwater sediment in valleys in southern Washington that were backflooded by outbursts from glacial Lake Missoula. Beds of varved mud also accumulated in glacial Lake Spokane (or Columbia?) in Latah Creek valley and elsewhere in northeastern Washington; the mud beds were disrupted, in places violently, during emplacement of each of 16 or more thick flood-gravel beds. This history corroborates evidence from southern Washington that only one graded bed is deposited per flood, refuting a conventional idea that many beds accumulated per flood. The total number of such floodlaid beds in stratigraphic succession near Spokane is at least 28. The mud beds between most of the floodlaid beds in these valleys each consist of between 20 and 55 silt-to-clay varves. Lacustrine environments in northern Idaho and Washington therefore persisted for two to six decades between regularly recurring, colossal floods from glacial Lake Missoula.

  7. Evidence for phase-locked changes in climate between Scotland and Greenland during GS-1 (Younger Dryas) using micromorphology of glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Adrian P.; Rose, Jim; Rasmussen, Sune Olander

    2012-01-01

    There is a current need to develop annual/decadal chronologies from periods of rapid climate change in order to understand the rate and timing of climate events and identify how other proxies either lead or lag this climate forcing. Annually-laminated or varved sediments are key proxies for under...

  8. Miocene to recent extension in NW Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokaat, Eldert L.; Hall, Robert; White, Lloyd T.; Watkinson, Ian M.; Rudyawan, Alfend; BouDagher-Fadel, Marcelle K.

    2017-10-01

    The Malino Metamorphic Complex (MMC) in the western part of the North Arm of Sulawesi (Indonesia) has previously been suggested to be a metamorphic complex exhumed in the Early - Middle Miocene. This idea was based on limited K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar age data, but no structural data were presented to provide evidence for the mechanism of exhumation. Here we present new field observations, micro-structural analyses and a revised stratigraphy of NW Sulawesi based on new age data, to provide better constraints on the timing and mechanism of exhumation. The data presented here suggest that the MMC is a metamorphic core complex which underwent lithospheric extension during the Early - Middle Miocene. Although the MMC experienced significant extension, there is no evidence that it was exhumed during this time. There is no contact between the MMC and the Pliocene Ongka Volcanics, contradicting a previously inferred unconformable contact. Pliocene undeformed granitoids intruding the MMC indicate the complex was still at depth during their emplacement. Furthermore, Pliocene and Pleistocene cover sequences do not contain metamorphic detritus. A second phase of extensional uplift was accommodated by brittle faulting from the Late Miocene-Pliocene onwards, during which the MMC was exhumed. This extension is widespread, as indicated by synchronous exhumation of the adjacent Palu Metamorphic Complex in West Sulawesi, and rapid subsidence offshore in Gorontalo Bay. It is linked to northward slab rollback of the southward-subducting Celebes Sea since the Pliocene. GPS data show rapid northward motion of the North Arm of Sulawesi with respect to the Celebes Sea, indicating that this process is ongoing at present day.

  9. Composition and structure of varves in Lake Żabińskie, northeastern Poland: a potential for high-resolution reconstruction of meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylmann, Wojciech; Bonk, Alicja; Amann, Benjamin; Butz, Christoph; Enters, Dirk; Kinder, Małgorzata; Grosjean, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental data from sediment records require a detailed knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological factors which influence sediment-formation processes and signal preservation in lake sediments. This can be achieved by process studies and high-resolution analysis of sediments that provide an opportunity to calibrate varves and paleolimnological proxies against instrumental hydrological and meteorological data. Here we present results from Lake Żabińskie located in northeastern Poland with the aim to understand the relationship between meteorological conditions, sedimentation processes and climate signal preservation in varve structure and chemical composition. This eutrophic and hardwater lake exhibits well preserved biogenic varves with high sedimentation rates (5-8 mm/yr). We conducted a three-year long observation of limnological conditions within the water column and recent sediment fluxes as well as analyzed a 70-cm long sediment core from the deepest part of the lake basin covering the last 125 years. Thin sections were prepared and analyzed microscopically for individual laminae composition. We also measured chemical variability within varves using high-resolution XRF scanning of impregnated sediment slabs. We demonstrate that different mixing patterns may occur in Lake Żabińskie, from dimictic to meromictic depending on the meteorological conditions. Sediment fluxes varied substantially during the observation period with characteristic spring maxima and, optionally, a second late fall maxima. Considerable variability was also observed for the fluxes of total organic carbon, biogenic silica and calcite. Microscopic investigation of the topmost sediments revealed a complex varve structure showing a distinct spring calcite lamina followed by one or more fine calcite laminae interbedded with diatom-rich laminae and, finally, by an organic-rich lamina with minerogenic admixtures deposited during winter

  10. Miocene Bryozoa from East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Part II: ‘Ascophoran’ Cheilostomata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martino, Di E.; Taylor, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe 72 ascophoran-grade cheilostomes, ranging in age from Early to Late Miocene (late Burdigalian to Messinian), collected from 17 sections in the vicinities of Samarinda, Bontang and Sangkulirang in East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. Two genera (Oviexechonella gen. nov. and Sendinopora

  11. Response of Mediterranean circulation to Miocene shoaling and closure of the Indian Gateway : A model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De La Vara, Alba; Meijer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In this regional ocean model study, we explore the effect of the Early to Middle Miocene shoaling and closure of the Indian Gateway on Mediterranean circulation and its exchange with the adjacent oceans. For this we use the regional ocean circulation model "sbPOM" and a collection of bathymetries cr

  12. Miocene rodent evolution and migration. Muroidea from Pakistan, Turkey and Northern Africa. Geologica Ultraiectina (307)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, W.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed research on fossil rodents from Pakistan, Turkey, northern Africa and Europe provides a better understanding of the evolutionary history of the Muroidea, especially of the Murinae, Myocricetodontinae and Rhizomyinae. The origin of these rodent groups lies in the Early Miocene of south-weste

  13. New Odostomia species (Gastropoda, Heterobranchia, Pyramidellidae) from the Miocene Pebas Formation of Western Amazonia (Peru, Colombia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsen, van J.J.; Wesselingh, F.P.

    2000-01-01

    Odostomia nuttalli spec. nov. and O. coluhensis spec. nov. are described from the Miocene Pebas Formation of Peruvian and Columbian Amazonia. A third pyramidellid snail is also diagnosed. These species are indicators for marine influence in the late Middle to early Late Miocence of Western Amazonia.

  14. The evolution of the primate foot from the earliest primates to the Miocene hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, G C; Rose, M D

    1983-01-01

    The fossil evidence relating to the evolution of the primate foot is reviewed and evaluated. Many of the characteristic features of the primate foot had evolved by the early Tertiary over 40 million years ago. Probably the most significant of these developments was the progressive migration of the talus to a position over the calcaneum. These morphological features are followed through the Miocene hominoid genera from East Africa, Europe, and South Asia. While some features of Miocene hominoids, especially those relating to climbing abilities, are still evident in the predominantly bipedal earliest hominids of the Plio-Pleistocene, there is no evidence yet from the Miocene of the first stages in the evolution of that bipedalism.

  15. Emplacement of the La Peña alkaline igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina (33° S): Implications for the early Miocene tectonic regime in the retroarc of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, D. S.; Galliski, M. A.; Márquez-Zavalía, M. F.

    2014-03-01

    The La Peña alkaline complex (LPC) of Miocene age (18-19 Ma) lies on the eastern front of the Precordillera (32°41ʹ34ʺS, 68°59ʹ48″W, 1400-2900 m a.s.l.), 30 km northwest of Mendoza city, Argentina. It is a subcircular massif of 19 km2 and 5 km in diameter, intruded in the metasedimentary sequence of the Villavicencio Formation of Silurian-Devonian age. It is the result of integration of multiple pulses derived from one or more deep magma chambers, which form a suite of silicate rocks grouped into: a clinopyroxenite body, a central syenite facies with a large breccia zone at the contact with the clinopyroxenite, bodies of malignite, trachyte and syenite porphyry necks, and a system of radial and annular dikes of different compositions. Its subcircular geometry and dike system distribution are frequent features of intraplate plutons or plutons emplaced in post-orogenic settings. These morphostructural features characterize numerous alkaline complexes worldwide and denote the importance of magmatic pressures that cause doming with radial and annular fracturing, in a brittle country rock. However, in the LPC, the attitude of the internal fabric of plutonic and subvolcanic units and the preferential layout of dikes match the NW-SE extensional fractures widely distributed in the host rock. This feature indicates a strong tectonic control linked to the structure that facilitate space for emplacement, corresponding to the brittle shear zone parallel to the N-S stratigraphy of the country rock. Shearing produced a system of discontinuities, with a K fractal fracture pattern, given by the combination of Riedel (R), anti-Riedel (R‧), (P) and extensional (T) fracture systems, responsible for the control of melt migration by the opening of various fracture branches, but particularly through the NW-SE (T) fractures. Five different pulses would have ascent, (1) an initial one from which cumulate clinopyroxenite was formed, (2) a phase of mafic composition represented by

  16. Synchronizing the North American Varve Chronology with Greenland ice core records during late MIS 2 using Meteoric 10Be Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Benjamin D.; Balco, Greg; Ridge, Jack C.; Rood, Dylan H.; Bierman, Paul R.

    2013-04-01

    The North American Varve Chronology (NAVC) is a floating 5700-year sequence of glacial lake varves deposited in the Connecticut River Valley of the northeast US ~18,000-12,500 years ago. The NAVC is an annually resolved record of regional climate and ice-marginal processes at 40-45° N latitude, near the margin of the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). NAVC deposition occurred at the same time as rapid and abrupt Arctic and North Atlantic climate changes that took place during the last deglaciation. Age calibration estimates for the NAVC based on radiocarbon dated plant macrofossils in individual varves imply a relationship between ice-marginal events recorded by the NAVC and climate events recorded in Greenland ice cores. For example, the retreat rate of the LIS up the Connecticut River Valley increased during the Bolling warming in Greenland, a readvance of the LIS margin took place during the Older Dryas cold period, and a correlation between an outburst flood from glacial Lake Iroquois and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period supports the hypothesis that the flood affected North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. On the other hand, a doubling of the ice-margin retreat rate recorded by the NAVC around 16,000 years ago coincides with a relatively cold period in Greenland. Our goal is to investigate the precise time relationship between these two records by synchronizing the NAVC with the Greenland ice core time scale using atmospherically-produced 10Be. Existing 10Be flux records, including those from Greenland ice cores, exhibit solar variability on a range of time scales. Because this variability is globally synchronous, a 10Be flux record for the NAVC can, in principle, be used to align NAVC and ice core timescales. In the first phase of this research we tested this potential by generating 10Be flux records for two 80-year varve sequences and analyzing them using multi-taper spectral analysis for determination of statistically significant periodicities. We were

  17. Middle Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, C.; Cardona, A.

    2014-12-01

    The final closure of the Panama Isthmus and permanent separation of Caribbean and Pacific waters is thought to have modified their salinity, faunistic assemblages, and ultimately, ocean circulation patterns and global climate. The Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) is thought to have been the result of Plio-Pleistocene closure of the Isthmus that allowed land animals to massively cross the Isthmus. Similarly, the separation of Caribbean and Pacific waters by a rising Isthmus is thougth to be a prime example of vicariance. The role of Isthmus closure on global changes, however, remains controversial due in part to the difficulty of establishing a precise chronology of seaway closure. While timing of glaciation is well established, new data on the chronology of Isthmus emergence suggests that the process of closure is more complex, long, and old than previously thought. We sampled fluvial and shallow marine strata in northwesternmost South America to recover zircon grains for provenance analyses in the immediate vicinity of the docking site. Because the ages of magmatic provinces in northwestern South America and the Panama Isthmus are mutually exclusive, detrital zircon analyses provides a tool to evaluate land connections. We found that an uniquely Panamanian, 40-45 Ma (early Lutetian) detrital zircon fingerprint is abundant in middle Miocene strata, but absent in underlying lower Miocene and Oligocene strata of the northern Andes. This fingerprint represents the beginning of fluvial detrital exchange between the Panama arc and South America, and therefore marks the time of docking and the end of deep-water, and probably shallow-water connections by middle Miocene times.

  18. Rifting, rotation, detachment faulting, and sedimentation: Miocene evolution of the southern California margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K. (Crouch, Bachman, and Associates, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The evolution of the Los Angeles and adjacent offshore Santa Monica and San Pedro basins of southern California began during the earliest Miocene. The basins formed as the result of rifting and subsequent large scale rotation of segments within a preexisting Mesozoic-Paleogene forearc basin. Clockwise rotation (less than 90{degree}) of the outer two-thirds of this fore-arc basin during the early and middle Miocene moved these once north-trending forearc strata into an east-west trend (the modern Transverse Ranges). The eastern margin of the initial rift remains in its original location and is best documented from outcrop and subsurface data in the San Joaquin Hills. What was once the western margin of the rift has been rotated to a position north of the rift, along the southern Santa Monica Mountains. The early Miocene Vaqueros sandstones. which that are entirely shallow-marine and thousands of feet thick provide evidence for initial subsidence of the rift. Widening of the rift and separation of the Santa Monica Mountains and the San Joaquin Hills in the early and middle Miocene was accompanied by detachment faulting and volcanism along the rift margins. These detachment faults can be documented in the subsurface of the San Joaquin Hills and in outcrop in the Santa Monica Mountains. A unique aspect of this inner borderland rift is the rapid uplift, exposure, erosion, and then subsidence of high pressure/temperature metamorphic basement blocks (Catalina schist) within the rift itself. These basement rocks were buried 20 to 30 km beneath the ancestral fore arc prior to rifting. They were uplifted, perhaps due to thermal effects, during pervasive early and middle Miocene volcanism within the rift. Evidence of these dramatic events is provided by the distinctive San Onofre breccia deposit exposed along the margins of the rift.

  19. Fine-grained sediment gravity flow deposits induced by flood and lake slope failure events: examples of lacustrine varved sediments in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yoshiro; Sasaki, Yasunori; Sasaki, Hana; Onishi, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained sediment gravity flow deposits induced by flood and lake slope failure events are frequently intercalated in lacustrine successions. When sediment gravity flow deposits are present in varved sediments, it is suggested that they provide valuable information about sediment gravity flows, because they can easily trace laterally and can give the magnitude of erosion and recurrence interval of events. In addition, because large sedimentary bodies of stacked sediment gravity flow deposits in varved sediments of a calm lake are not suggested, a relatively simple depositional environment is expected. In the present study, we analysed sedimentary facies of sediment gravity flow deposits in varved lacustrine diatomites in the Middle Pleistocene Hiruzenbara and Miyajima formations in Japan, and concluded a depositional model of the lacustrine sediment gravity flow deposits. Varved diatomites: The Hiruzenbara Fm., a dammed lake fill as foots of Hiruzen Volcanos, is deposited during an interglacial period during MIS12 to 15. Varves of ca. 8000 yr were measured in a 20 m intercalating flood and lake slope failure-induced sediment gravity flow deposits. The Miyajima Fm., distributed in a paleo-caldera lake in NE Japan, includes many sediment gravity flow deposits possibly originated from fandeltas around the lake. These formations have differences in their depositional setting; the Hiruzebara Fm. was deposited in a large lake basin, whereas the Miyajima Fm. was deposited in a relatively small basin. Because of the depositional setting, intercalation of volcaniclastics is dominant in the Miyajima Fm. Lacustrine sediment gravity flow deposits: Sediment gravity flow deposits in both formations can be classified into flood- and lake slope failure-induced types based on the sedimentary facies. Composites of the both types are also found. Flood-induced types comprise fine-grained silts dominated by carbonaceous fragments, whereas lake slope failure-induced types are

  20. Miocene freshwater Mollusca from western Brazilian Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Ranzi, A.; Räsänen, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen species of fossil molluscs are reported from the Solimões Formation of western Brazilian Amazonia. Based on mammalian chronology of the Solimões Formation and radiometric ages reported from coeval deposits in adjacent Peru, the age of the fauna is established as Late Miocene. The fauna incl

  1. Mastritherium (Artiodactyla, Anthracotheriidae) from Wadi Sabya, southwestern Saudi Arabia; an earliest Miocene age for continental rift-valley volcanic deposits of the Red Sea margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Gary T.; Schmidt, Dwight Lyman; Whitmore, Frank C.

    1983-01-01

    A lower jaw fragment with its last molar (M/3) from the Baid formation in Wadi Sabya, southwestern Saudi Arabia, represents the first recorded occurrence in the Arabian Peninsula of an anthracotheriid artiodactyl (hippo-like, even-toed ungulate). This fossil is identified as a primitive species of Masritherium, a North and East African genus restricted, previously to the later early Miocene. This identification indicates that the age of the Baid formation, long problematical, is early Miocene and, moreover, shows that the age of the fossil site is earliest Miocene (from 25 to 21Ma). The Wadi Sabya anthracothere is the first species of fossil mammal recorded from western Saudi Arabia, and more important, it indicates an early Miocene age for the volcanic deposits of a continental rift-valley that preceded the initial sea-floor spreading of the Red Sea.

  2. 中新世水杉叶片和白垩纪松型球果化石中的挥发性成分%Volatiles from Two Gymnosperm Fossils: Miocene Leaves of Metasequoia glyptostroboides and Early Cretaceous Seed Cone of Pityostrobus spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵友兴; 武素功; 张和; 罗晓东; 刘玉清; 周俊

    2007-01-01

    Fifty-one and nineteen compounds were detected respectively from the volatile extracts from the fossils of Miocene leaves of Metasequoia glyptostroboides and early Cretaceous seed cone of Pityostrobus spp. by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. These compounds were found belonging to n-alkanes, n-alkenes, n-alkanols, long chain fatty acids and their esters, phthalates, terpenoids and aromatic compounds, and three compounds of them, abietane diterpenoid, heptadecanoic acid and retene were considered as biomarkers for gymnosperm plants. Fig 1, Tab 2, Ref 22%采用气相色谱-质谱联用分析技术从中新世水杉叶片和白垩纪松型球果两种裸子植物化石中分别鉴定了51个和19个挥发性成分,类型涉及烷烃、烷烯、烷醇、长链脂肪酸及其酯、邻苯二甲酸酯、萜类和芳香族化合物.其中3种成分--松香烷型二萜、饱和十七碳脂肪酸和惹烯是裸子植物的生物标志分子.图1 表2 参22

  3. Global dominance of coralline red-algal facies: A response to Miocene oceanographic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfar, Jochen; Mutti, Maria

    2005-06-01

    Rhodoliths (free-living coralline red algae) can thrive under a wide range of temperatures, reduced light, and increased nutrient levels, and often form a distinct so-called rhodalgal lithofacies that is an important component of Cenozoic shallow-water carbonates. Global distributions illustrate that from the late-early to early-late Miocene (Burdigalian early Tortonian), rhodalgal facies reached peak abundances and commonly replaced coral-reef environments, accompanied by a decline in other carbonate-producing phototrophs. We argue that the dominance of red algae over coral reefs was triggered in the Burdigalian by enhanced trophic resources associated with a global increase in productivity, as evidenced by a long-term shift toward higher carbon isotope values. Rhodalgal lithofacies expanded further in the middle Miocene when strengthened thermal gradients associated with the establishment of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet led to enhanced upwelling while climate change generated increased weathering rates, introducing land-derived nutrients into the oceans. Globally cooler temperatures following a climatic optimum in the early-middle Miocene contributed to sustain the dominance of red algae and prevented the recovery of coral reefs. The global shift in nearshore shallow-water carbonate producers to groups tolerant of higher levels of trophic resources provides further evidence for increased nutrient levels during that time interval and shows the sensitivity of shallow-water carbonate facies as indicators of past oceanographic conditions.

  4. Anthracothere dental anatomy reveals a late Miocene Chado-Libyan bioprovince.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihoreau, Fabrice; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud; Viriot, Laurent; Coppens, Yves; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassane Taisso; Tafforeau, Paul; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2006-06-01

    Recent discovery of an abundant and diverse late Miocene fauna at Toros-Ménalla (Chad, central Africa) by the Mission Paléoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne provides a unique opportunity to examine African faunal and hominid evolution relative to the early phases of the Saharan arid belt. This study presents evidence from an African Miocene anthracotheriid Libycosaurus, particularly well documented at Toros-Ménalla. Its remains reveal a large semiaquatic mammal that evolved an autapomorphic upper fifth premolar (extremely rare in Cenozoic mammals). The extra tooth appeared approximately 12 million years ago, probably in a small northern African population isolated by climate-driven fragmentation and alteration of the environments inhabited by these anthracotheriids [Flower, B. P. & Kennett, J. P. (1994) Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 108, 537-555 and Zachos, J., Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. (2001) Science 292, 686-693]. The semiaquatic niche of Libycosaurus, combined with the distribution and relationships of its late Miocene species, indicates that by the end of the Miocene, wet environments connected the Lake Chad Basin to the Libyan Sirt Basin, across what is now the Sahara desert.

  5. A 3000-year varved record of glacier activity and climate change from the proglacial lake Hvítárvatn, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Darren J.; Miller, Gifford H.; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2011-09-01

    A suite of environmental proxies in annually laminated sediments from Hvítárvatn, a proglacial lake in the central highlands of Iceland, are used to reconstruct regional climate variability and glacial activity for the past 3000 years. Sedimentological analysis is supported by tephrostratigraphy to confirm the continuous, annual nature of the laminae, and a master varve chronology places proxies from multiple lake cores in a secure geochronology. Varve thickness is controlled by the rate of glacial erosion and efficiency of subglacial discharge from the adjacent Langjökull ice cap. The continuous presence of glacially derived clastic varves in the sediment fill confirms that the ice cap has occupied the lake catchment for the duration of the record. Varve thickness, varve thickness variance, ice-rafted debris, total organic carbon (mass flux and bulk concentration), and C:N of sedimentary organic matter, reveal a dynamic late Holocene climate with abrupt and large-scale changes in ice-cap size and landscape stability. A first-order trend toward cooler summers and ice-cap expansion is punctuated by notable periods of rapid ice cap growth and/or landscape instability at ca 1000 BC, 600 BC, 550 AD and 1250 AD. The largest perturbation began ca 1250 AD, signaling the onset of the Little Ice Age and the termination of three centuries of relative warmth during Medieval times. Consistent deposition of ice-rafted debris in Hvítárvatn is restricted to the last 250 years, demonstrating that Langjökull only advanced into Hvítárvatn during the coldest centuries of the Little Ice Age, beginning in the mid eighteenth century. This advance represents the glacial maximum for at least the last 3 ka, and likely since regional deglaciation 10 ka. The multi-centennial response of biological proxies to the Hekla 3 tephra deposition illustrates the significant impact of large explosive eruptions on local environments, and catchment sensitivity to perturbations.

  6. Improved understanding of Diatom stratigraphy in a varved sediment through a sediment trap, lake monitoring and a catchment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological sediment remains reflect past lake surrounding conditions. Potential drivers of change in the biological sediment proxy can be environmental contributors like weather and temperature changes as well as man-made such as developments in agriculture and forestry. However we don't know how these different factors contribute to the biological sediment signal. Here we are monitoring a boreal lake with a varved sediment to understand how the biological signal of diatom remains is formed in the annually layered sediment. We compare the diatom stratigraphy with a sequential sediment trap. For a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms we look at three full years of bi-weekly monitoring of physical, chemical and biological parameters and 15 years of water stratification data. We seek to link the monitored in-lake processes with the yearly environmental characteristics. The diatom sediment stratigraphy of the two most abundant species Asterionella formosa and Fragilaria delicatissima indicates three periods with a contrasting trend for both species from 1975 until 2014. In the first period Asterionella formosa is almost not abundant spanning one decade (1975-1985), reaching elevated abundance with a decreasing trend in period 2 over the following 17 years to be followed by a tripling of Asterionella fromosa remains in the sediment during the third period. The opposite trend is found for Fragilaria delicatissima. Linking the recorded data with the corresponding sediment stratigraphy allows us to distinguish between weather changes and catchment disturbances as potential drivers for changes in a sedimentary diatom signal.

  7. The presence of Lower Miocene (Eggenburgian in borehole 575 Cetea (East of Borod Basin, NW Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Petrescu

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The microfloral record evidenced in borehole 575 Cetea is very rich, consisting of 114 taxa, some of them being new species for the Tertiary of Romania. At the same time, it includes species of Eggenburgian age of the host rocks. The whole microflora assemblage suggests a forest-type vegetation developed in a warm, subtropical climate, characteristic for the Eggenburgian age of the Early Miocene. The Eggenburgian of Romania shows the same microfloral features as the Eggenburgian of Central Paratethys.

  8. Comments to Middle Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A.G.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper proposing an early (mid-Miocene) closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS), Montes et al. 2015 (1) disregard existing paleogeographic data that invalidate Panama as a source for zircons, and inappropriately ignore the evidence for trans-isthmian marine connections until 4-3 Ma. They also fail to cite previous work (2, 3), that had reconstructed the Central American arc already docked with South America by 12 Ma. Montes et al. 2015 (1) (Fig. 1) disregard the Atrato-San Juan sedimentary basin (3), a shallowing Oligocene to Pliocene, Pacific to Caribbean seaway (3, 4, 5). This deep graben (6) is filled with thousands of meters of Pre-Pliocene marine sediments (3, 5, 6) that now occupy a lowland between the Baudo uplift to the west and the Western Cordillera to the east. The Mande Batholith and numerous Eocene and younger volcanic rocks (4), the most proximal source of the zircons, are situated to the east of this seaway and would have shed zircons eastward towards the Cordillera Central. There is no evidence for any rivers crossing the seaway (3, 5), and thus no Panamanian source of zircons. Instead this seaway is evidence of a significant marine connection between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans into the Pliocene. The authors assume that the middle Miocene closure of the CAS effectively creates a continuous land bridge connecting North and South America and separating the Atlantic from the Pacific. They acknowledge, but then discount, marine connections across the Isthmus until 4-3 Ma even though these satisfactorily explain (Coates and Stallard, 2014 (6)) the oceanographic, molecular and Great American Biological Interchange events ignore unexplained by Montes et al. 2015. Only by conspicuously ignoring these events can they imply that the Isthmus was formed at 15-13 Ma. References 1. C. Montes et al., Middle Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway. Science 348, 226-229 (2015). 2. A. G. Coates, R. F. Stallard, How old is the Isthmus of

  9. The formation placement and palaeoenvironment of the Middle Miocene Los Atajos Member, Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brent; Farfan, Philip; Hughes, Chantelle

    2017-07-01

    The age, palaeoenvironment and formation placement of the conglomeratic Los Atajos Member of central Trinidad have long been unclear. Seven samples (four from calcareous silts near the member's base exposed by building work at the Los Atajos Community Centre, and three from the underlying calcareous claystones of the Brasso Formation) were examined for calcareous microfossils. These indicate a conformable succession encompassing an overall regression. The oldest of the claystone samples, of uppermost early Middle Miocene Globorotalia fohsi fohsi Zone age (N11), contained an upper bathyal benthic foraminiferal assemblage, while the younger claystone samples yielded abundant, shallow neritic Hanzawaia carstensi. The recovery of the planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia mayeri but absence of Globigerinoides subquadratus suggest a Middle Miocene age (Globorotalia mayeri planktonic foraminiferal Zone; N14) for both the uppermost Brasso claystone sample and the Los Atajos Member. The benthic foraminiferal fauna in the Los Atajos is dominated by Rosalina subaraucana, with subdominant Cibicides ex gr. aknerianus and C. floridanus sensu Galloway and Heminway, and common Elphidium spp. This faunal succession has a close affinity with that of parts of the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation, especially the N10 Guaracara Limestone Member and the clays on which it sits. However, the Los Atajos Member assemblage differs markedly from that of the overlying Late Miocene San José Calcareous Silt Member of the Manzanilla Formation, from which the Los Atajos is separated by an unconformity of Globorotalia menardii (N15) Zone age. On these grounds, the Los Atajos Member is here placed within the Brasso Formation. The low diversity, high dominance benthic foraminiferal fauna and the associated ostracod assemblage in the Los Atajos are indicative of inner to shallower middle neritic palaeodepths in a carbonate-prone palaeoenvironment with marine vegetation and strong current action

  10. Miocene reef and nonreef carbonate rocks in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Japan's main islands experienced temperature climates throughout the Neogene with a tropical invasion around 16 Ma (early middle Miocene). This climatic warming, accompanied by a eustatic sea level rise, caused the unusual occurrence of reef facies, mangrove deposits, and lateritic beds in Japan. In cooler climates both before and after reef growth, sediments rich in bryozoan and algal material were widespread. Reef rocks emplaced as penecontemporaneous olistoliths in deep-water clastics at the Pacific coast of central Honshu are characterized by a wide lithologic spectrum, ranging from grainstone to bindstone. These rocks include rudstone and floatstone, which are rich in coralline algae (encrusting forms such as Lithophyllum and Mesophyllum and articulate forms such as Amphiroa) and codiacean algae (Halimeda) with hermatypic corals and large benthic formainifera (e.g., Nephrolepidina and Miogypsina) being less common. Two types of dolomite occur: (1) limpid dolomite with O/sup 18/ = -5.77 and with bipyramidal quartz and (2) microcrystalline dolomite with O/sup 18/ = 2.00 and with length-slow chalcedony. While microcrystalline dolomite tends to predominate in muddy matrix material, limpid dolomite appears to fill pores, some of which are moldic. Younger nonreef carbonate rocks, as occur on the Noto Peninsula of central Honshu, are commonly cross-bedded, contain Bryozoa, mollusks, small foraminifera, and echinoids, and are locally dolomitized. These dolomites are ascribed to a mixed-water origin. A different type of nonreef, yet reservoir-forming, dolostone occurs in the late middle Miocene of northeast Honshu and is interpreted to have formed as a transformation from bathyal opal.

  11. Late Miocene Hydrological Change in the Indus River Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, H.; Feakins, S. J.; Clift, P. D.; Tauxe, L.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Scardia, G.; Warny, S.; Bendle, J. A.; Galy, V.; Zhou, P.; Science Party, E.

    2016-12-01

    The cause of the late Miocene proliferation of C4 grasslands in the Indo-Asian region is a long-standing question. Terrestrial records suggest that changes in regional hydrological processes drove changes in C4 plant expansion. However, part of the ambiguity lies in the geographic extent of existing proxy records as well as the particular aspect of hydrology that they record. Therefore a better understanding of the hydrological influence on C4 expansion requires the direct reconstruction of precipitation changes. Turbidite sedimentation in the Indus Fan captures the history of the terrestrial environment and erosional change in the Indus catchment. With Indus Fan sediments from IODP Expedition 355, we resolve hydrological change in this region using geochemical (both inorganic and organic) and pollen approaches. Provenance analysis using Nd isotopes verifies that changes in hydrology occurred independently of changes in sediment sourcing prior to 6 Ma. Therefore, we infer that shifts in plant wax hydrogen isotopes (up to 60‰) after 8.3 Ma and 7 Ma reflect changes in the dominant moisture source region (the Indian Ocean versus the Mediterranean and other inland seas). Vegetation also tracks hydrology: pollen and plant wax carbon isotopes (including n-alkanoic acid C28-C34 and n-alkane C27-C35) suggest that C4 grassland was present in the Indus floodplains prior 8.3 Ma and expanded after 7 Ma. The early 10 Ma C4 expansion is observed in other regions surrounding the Arabian Sea at this time and the later C4 expansion ( 7-6 Ma) occurs coeval records from the Siwalik Formation of the Himalayan foreland and Bengal Fan sediments. New evidence from plant wax hydrogen isotopes suggests that changing precipitation triggered ecological changes in the Indus catchment during the late Miocene.

  12. Palaeomagnetism of the Miocene Farellones formation (Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguitchaichvili, A.; Chauvin, A.; Roperch, P.; Prévot, M.; Aguirre, L.; Vergara, M.

    2000-02-01

    We report on a detailed palaeomagnetic study of the Miocene Farellones volcanic formation in the Chilean Andes near Santiago (two sections, 37 sites, about 400 orientated cores). Petrological observations show evidence of low-grade metamorphism increasing downwards through the volcanic sequence. Optical observations of opaque minerals and magnetic experiments suggest that in many cases maghemitization is associated with hydrothermal alteration. However, thermal demagnetization data indicate that the low-grade metamorphism did not significantly modify the direction of the primary remanent magnetization recorded at the time of emplacement of the volcanic lava flows. Four intervals of polarity with two intermediate palaeodirections were observed in the ~650-m-thick composite section. According to the dispersion of flow average directions, palaeosecular variation was slightly larger than that observed in general during the Upper Cenozoic. The site mean directions obtained in this study differ significantly from the expected Miocene direction. Clockwise rotations of up to 20 deg of small blocks are probably associated with the deformation of the Andean Cordillera since middle Miocene times. Geomagnetic palaeointensity data were obtained, using the Thellier method, on 24 samples from eight distinct lava flows. The flow mean VDM varies from 1.4 to 4.0x1022Am-2. Altogether, our data seem to suggest the existence of a relatively low geomagnetic field undergoing large fluctuations. Although a linear relationship was observed between the natural remanent magnetization and the thermal remanent magnetization acquired during the Thellier-Thellier experiments, undetected chemical alteration of the magnetic minerals during hydrothermalism may also explain the unusually low palaeointensity obtained.

  13. Investigating Tectonic Drivers of Miocene - Pliocene Polar Climate Evolution using the HadCM3 Climate Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S. J.; Knies, J.; Haywood, A. M.; Dolan, A. M.; Pound, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We model the climate of the Miocene (Tortonian and the Messinian) and the Pliocene (Piacenzian) using the HadCM3 Atmosphere-Ocean GCM. We use baseline Miocene and Pliocene geographies that have different reconstruction lineages so we describe methods to create a set of self-consistent paleogeographies that represent the main features of the three stages. We present large-scale features of the evolving climate and examine model fidelity by comparing modelled climatology against palaeoenvironmental proxy data. We focus on the climate of the Arctic region and investigate tectonic drivers of sea ice expansion by comparing and interpreting model predictions against borehole data from the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean. In particular how Late Miocene/ early Pliocene tectonic uplift in the Svalbard/Barents Sea and Greenland region, the opening of the Bering Strait, and the onset of deep water Atlantic-Arctic exchange influenced the development of modern sea ice cover.

  14. A record of Miocene carbon excursions in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Quanhong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Mackensen, A., Bickert, T., Stable isotopes in benthic Foraminifera: Proxies for deep and bottom water circulation and new production, in Use of Proxies in Paleoceanography: Examples From the South Atlantic (eds. Fischer, G., Wefer, G.),Berlin-Heiderberg: Springer-Verlag, 1999, 229-254.[2]Shackleton, N. J., Pisias, N. G., Atmospheric carbon dioxide, orbital forcing, and climate, Geophys. Monogr. Ser., 1985,32: 303-317.[3]Shackleton, N. J., Carbon-13 in Uvigerina: Tropical rainforest history and the Equatorial Pacific carbonate dissolution cy cles, in The Fate of Fossil Fuel CO2 in the Oceans (eds. Andersen, N. R., Malahoff, A.), New York: Plenum Publ. Corp.,1977, 401-427.[4]Wang Pinxian, Neogene stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of China, Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclim. Palaeoecol., 1990, 77:315-334.[5]Jian Zhimin, Stable isotopic evidences of the glacial deep water properties in the South China Sea, Science in China, Ser.D, 1998, 41(4): 337-344.[6]Hao Yichun, Xu Yulin, Xu Shice et al., Research on Micropaleontology and Paleoceanography in Pear River Mouth Basin,South China Sea (in Chinese), Beijing: China Univ. of Geosci. Press, 1996, 136.[7]Wang, P, Prell, W. L.. Blum, P. et al.. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports Volume 184 (CD-ROM),Beijing Nat. Sci. Found. & Joint Oceanogr. Inst., Inc., 2000.[8]Zhao Quanhong, Jian Zhimin, Wang Jiliang et al., Neogene oxygen isotopic stratigraphy, ODP Site 1148, northern South China Sea, Sciences in China, Ser. D (in press).[9]Vincent, E., Killingley, J. S., Oxygen and carbon isotope record for the Early and Middle Miocene in the central equatorial Pacific (Leg 85) and paleoceanographic implications, in Init. Rep. DSDP (ed. Mayer, L.), 1985, 85: 749-769.[10]Miller, K. G., Fairbanks, R. G., Oligocene to Miocene carbon isotope cycles and abyssal circulation changes, Geophys.Monogr., 1985, 32: 469-486.[11]Wright, J. D., Miller, N. G., Miocene stable isotope

  15. A comparison of micro-CT and thin section analysis of Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, Jacob M.; Palmer, Adrian P.; Carr, Simon J.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of thin section analysis in studies of Quaternary sediments, there are limitations associated with the production of thin sections (sediment modification) and the inherently 2D view that a thin section affords. Non-destructive and rapid scanning technologies such as X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) enable material samples to be visualised and analysed in 3D. In a Quaternary context, however, such techniques are in their infancy. This paper assesses the optimum approach to μCT analysis of Quaternary sediments, applying the method on Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland. Scan datasets are examined at each stage of the thin section process and comparisons are made between 2D μCT images and thin sections for the recognition of 2D sediment features, with further appraisal of 3D models to identify 3D sediment structures. Comparable sediment features are observed in 2D μCT images and thin sections, however, the μCT imaging resolution determines the precision of microfacies descriptions. Additional 3D structures are distinguished from volumetric models that are otherwise impossible to identify in thin section slides. These 3D structures can locally alter sediment properties (e.g. layer thickness) as seen in 2D thin sections and/or digital images, although such variation cannot be detected with these media. It has been demonstrated that clear benefits exist in understanding the 3D structure of Quaternary sediments, both prior to thin-sectioning to avoid complicating (e.g. deformation) structures, and after thin-sectioning to establish the complex 3D context of 2D datasets. It is recommended that μCT and thin section techniques are applied in parallel in future studies, which will profit from the integration of 'true' 3D data. It is also advised that samples are scanned soon after field sampling, due to the significant modification of in situ sediment structures that can occur during thin section processing.

  16. Gratkorn - A new late Middle Miocene vertebrate fauna from Styria (Late Sarmatian, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M.; Böhme, M.; Prieto, J.

    2009-04-01

    Integrated stratigraphic approaches provide precise correlations of global standard stages with regional Paratethys stages. Nevertheless, higher resolution stratigraphic matching of terrestrial deposits remains challenging due to the lack of a practical continental biostratigraphy. The mostly used tool for biostratigraphic correlation of non-marine deposits in the Old World is still the concept of Neogene Mammal-zones (MN-zones). However, at higher biostratigraphic resolution (imprints of gnawing structures. These taphonomic features point to a longer surface exposure before burial without considerable transportation. Trampling and the activity of scavengers (crunching, displacement of cadavers) are probable. Locally small- and medium-sized mammal remains (jaws and postcranial elements) of e.g., hamsters, flying squirrels, gymnures and shrews are concentrated, perhaps demonstrating feeding places of carnivores or more probably of birds of prey. Nonetheless, from geologic point of view, this paleosol represents an event horizon, which accumulated rapidly maybe within tens or hundreds of years. The vertebrate fauna comprises of scattered fishes (e.g. cyprinids, gobiids, ?channids), amphibians (e.g. salamandrids, ranids, discoglossids, bufonids, pelobatids,), reptiles (scincids, lacertids, gekkonids, anguids, varanids, colubrids, testudinids, emydids), birds (coliiformes), rodents and lagomorphs (cricetids, glirids, eomyids, sciurids, castorids), insectivores and chiropterans (erinaceids, soricids, talpids), and large mammals (suids, tragulids, moschids, cervids, ?palaeomerycids, equids, chalicotheriids, rhinos, proboscidians, carnivors). Litho- and biostratigraphy (terrestrial gastropods) as well as magnetostratigraphic data and the sequence stratigraphic and geodynamic frame indicate an age of 12-12.2 Ma (early Late Sarmatian s.str., chron 5An.1n) for the locality. Therefore, Gratkorn is one of richest and most complete fauna of the late Middle Miocene of Central

  17. A late Holocene record of solar-forced atmospheric blocking variability over Northern Europe inferred from varved lake sediments of Lake Kuninkaisenlampi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarni, Saija; Muschitiello, Francesco; Weege, Stefanie; Brauer, Achim; Saarinen, Timo

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a new varved lake sediment sequence from Lake Kuninkaisenlampi, Eastern Finland. The record is constituted by alternations of clastic and biogenic laminae and provides a precise chronology extending back to 3607 ± 94 varve yrs. BP. The seasonality of the boreal climatic zone, with cold winters and mild summers, is reflected in the varve structure as a succession of three laminae from bottom to top, (i) a coarse to fine-grained detrital lamina marked by detrital catchment material transported by spring floods; (ii) a biogenic lamina with diatoms, plant and insect remnants reflecting biological productivity during the season of lake productivity; and (iii) a very fine amorphous organic lamina deposited during the winter stratification. The thickness of the detrital lamina in the lake reflects changes in the rate of spring snow melt in the catchment and is, therefore, considered a proxy for winter conditions. Hence, the record allows reconstructing local climate and environmental conditions on inter-annual to the multi-centennial timescales. We find that minerogenic accumulation reflected in the detrital lamina exhibits a high multi-decadal to centennial-scale spectral coherency with proxies for solar activity, such as Δ14C, and Total Solar Irradiance, suggesting a strong link between solar variability and sediment transport to the lake basin. Increased catchment erosion is observed during periods of low solar activity, which we ascribe to the development of more frequent atmospheric winter blocking circulation induced by solar-forced changes in the stratosphere. We suggest that soil frost in the catchment of Lake Kuninkaisenlampi related to more frequent winter blocking led to increased surface run-off and ultimately to increased catchment erosion during spring. We conclude that, during the past ca 3600 years, solar forcing may have modulated multi-decadal to centennial variations in sedimentation regimes in lakes from Eastern Finland and

  18. Age and stratigraphic context of Pliopithecus and associated fauna from Miocene sedimentary strata at Damiao, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Anu; Abdul Aziz, Hayfaa; Passey, Benjamin H.; Zhang, Zhaoqun; Liu, Liping; Salminen, Johanna; Wang, Lihua; Krijgsman, Wout; Fortelius, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Since the discovery of mammalian fossils in Central Inner Mongolia in the beginning of the 20th century, this area has produced a rich and diverse record of Miocene faunas. Nevertheless, the stratigraphy has remained poorly constrained owing to scattered faunal horizons and lack of continuous vertical exposures. Consequently, most age estimates of these Miocene sites are based on paleontological evidence alone, with very few sites having been dated independently. Our field investigations in Damiao, in Siziwang Qi, Inner Mongolia have yielded more than 30 new fossiliferous localities from three horizons, including a pliopithecid fauna. This study presents the litho-, bio- and magnetostratigraphy of the Damiao area and provides age estimates for the three fossil-bearing horizons. The sedimentary sequence is interpreted as the remains of a fluvial system comprising channels, subaerially exposed floodplains and floodbasin environments. The two local stratigraphic sections measured and sampled for paleomagnetic analysis coincide with species-rich vertebrate fossil localities. The paleomagnetic results and faunal evidence suggest a correlation of lowermost fossil horizon (DM16) producing relatively rich small mammal assemblage to the early Miocene chron C6Ar or C6An.1r, roughly in 20-21 Ma age range. The pliopithecid locality level (DM01) represents latest middle Miocene and has an age estimate of about 12.1 Ma while the youngest localities (DM02) with cervoids and abundant and diverse small mammal fauna represents the earliest late Miocene with an age estimate of about 11.6 Ma. Our magnetostratigraphic results confirm that the Damiao strata constitute one of the best sequences in Inner Mongolia with early, middle and late Miocene mammalian faunas in stratigraphic superposition. The results also provide constraints on the paleoenvironmental evolution and bioevents of the area. The occurrence of pliopithecid primates in the middle Miocene of Inner Mongolia suggests humid

  19. Mammal extinctions in the Vallesian (Upper Miocene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusti, J.; Moya-Sola, S.

    The term Vallesian was created by Crusafont (1950) to designate the first European Mammalian palaeofaunas containing the equid Hipparion, the remainder of the faunas being composed of typical elements coming from the Middle Miocene such as Micromeryx, Euprox, Sansanosmilus, Pseudaelurus, and Listriodon. Thus, the Aragonian-Vallesian boundary does not show a strong change among European Miocene mammalian faunas (Agusti et al., 1984). On the other hand, the Lower Vallesian/Upper Vallesian transition corresponds to a major biotic crisis. This boudnary is characterized by the disappearence of most of the Aragonian artiodactyl forms such as Protragocerus, Miotragocerus, Listriodon, Hyotherium, Parachleusastochoerus, etc. Among the rodents, this crisis affects the family Eomyidae and most of the cricetid and glirid species. On the other hand, a number of eastern elements appear in the area at the same time. This is the case of the suid Schizochoerus and the murid Progonomys. Other eastern forms are Tragoportax, Graecoryx, Adcrocuta, Paramachairodus, Microstonyx, etc. Most of these are typical elements of the next Mammal stage, the Turolian. Thus, whereas the Lower Vallesian fauna has a typical Aragonian composition except for Hipparion. After the Middle Vallesian event, the Upper Vallesian faunas are already largely Turolian in character. The possible factors involved in this extinction event are discussed.

  20. Miocene Fossils Reveal Ancient Roots for New Zealand's Endemic Mystacina (Chiroptera) and Its Rainforest Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Suzanne J; Lee, Daphne E; Worthy, Trevor H; Archer, Michael; Worthy, Jennifer P; Tennyson, Alan J D; Salisbury, Steven W; Scofield, R Paul; Mildenhall, Dallas C; Kennedy, Elizabeth M; Lindqvist, Jon K

    2015-01-01

    The New Zealand endemic bat family Mystacinidae comprises just two Recent species referred to a single genus, Mystacina. The family was once more diverse and widespread, with an additional six extinct taxa recorded from Australia and New Zealand. Here, a new mystacinid is described from the early Miocene (19-16 Ma) St Bathans Fauna of Central Otago, South Island, New Zealand. It is the first pre-Pleistocene record of the modern genus and it extends the evolutionary history of Mystacina back at least 16 million years. Extant Mystacina species occupy old-growth rainforest and are semi-terrestrial with an exceptionally broad omnivorous diet. The majority of the plants inhabited, pollinated, dispersed or eaten by modern Mystacina were well-established in southern New Zealand in the early Miocene, based on the fossil record from sites at or near where the bat fossils are found. Similarly, many of the arthropod prey of living Mystacina are recorded as fossils in the same area. Although none of the Miocene plant and arthropod species is extant, most are closely related to modern taxa, demonstrating potentially long-standing ecological associations with Mystacina.

  1. Modern limnology, sediment accumulation and varve formation processes in Lake Żabińskie, northeastern Poland: comprehensive process studies as a key to understand the sediment record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Bonk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental data from sediment records require a thorough knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological factors that influence sediment-formation processes and signal preservation in lake sediments. Lake Żabińskie, an eutrophic hardwater lake located in northeastern Poland (Masurian Lake District, provides an unique environment for the investigation of processes that lead to the varve formation. During a two-year long observation period we investigated limnological and hydrochemical conditions within the water column, recent sediment fluxes and laminations preserved in the sediments of this lake to understand the relationship between the lake water properties and the sediment formation processes. We demonstrate that different mixing patterns may occur in Lake Żabińskie, from dimictic to meromictic depending on the meteorological conditions. Regardless of the water mixing pattern, the lake was stratified during much of the year which led to significant differences between surface and near-bottom water environments. The hypolimnion was characterized by higher conductivity and anoxic conditions with only short periods of better oxygenation, which created conditions ideal for the formation and preservation of biogenic varves. The material collected from the sediment trap revealed notable changes in sediment fluxes with characteristic spring maxima and, optionally, a second late fall maxima. Considerable variability was also observed for the fluxes of total organic carbon, biogenic silica and calcite. Microscopic investigation of the topmost sediments revealed a complex structure of the varves showing a distinct spring calcite lamina followed by several fine calcite laminae interbedded with diatom-rich laminae and, finally, by an organic-rich lamina with minerogenic admixtures deposited during winter. This seasonal variability was also reflected in the chemical composition inferred from high

  2. Chemical composition and palaeobotanical origin of Miocene resins from Kerala–Konkan Coast, western India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suryendu Dutta; Monalisa Mallick; Runcie Paul Mathews; Ulrich Mann; Paul F Greenwood; Rakesh Saxena

    2010-10-01

    The terpenoid composition of resins from the Miocene lignite horizons from the Kerala –Konkan Coast,western India was analyzed by Curie-point pyrolysis –gas chromatography –mass spectrometry (Cupy –GC –MS).The major pyrolysates were cadalene-based bicyclic sesquiterpenoids including some C30-C31 bicadinenes and bicadinanes typical of dammar resin from angiosperm plants of Dipterocarpaceae family.These plants are typically supported by tropical climates which the western Indian region was known to have experienced during early Tertiary period.The present study suggests that these palaeoclimatic conditions persisted until at least the Miocene epoch.These sesquiterpenoids which are commonly detected in many SE Asian crude oils may be utilised as useful biomarkers for petroleum exploration in the western Indian region.

  3. Miocene climate seasonality in southern India - first direct evidence for a weak Indian monsoon during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, W. E.; Reuter, M.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Asian monsoon is an integral component of the global climate system. This large-scale atmospheric circulation comprises the East Asian summer and winter monsoon and the Indian monsoon subsystems, all characterized by seasonal reversing winds and precipitation changes associated with asymmetric heating of land and sea. The Neogene monsoon history is mainly reconstructed from chemical and physical weathering rates recorded in widely continuous marine sequences of the Indus Fan, Bengal Fan and South China Sea, which, depending on the source, physiography and sediment, indicate drier or wetter climates. These indirect climate proxies display an unusually dry period during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum (MMCO, 16.5-15 Ma). As part of the FWF-projects P18189, P21414 and P23492, we present an Early/Middle Miocene coastal palynoflora record from the siliciclastic Ambalapuzha Formation at the coastal cliff of Varkala (Kerala Basin, SW India). Pollen assemblages and facies document a coastal wetland with mangrove vegetation. The Coexistence Approach was applied for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. This method uses climatic tolerances of all nearest living relatives known for a fossil flora by assuming that the tolerances of a fossil taxon are not significantly different from its modern counterpart. The maximum overlap of the environmental tolerances of all nearest living relatives (coexistence interval) is then regarded as being indicative of the most likely palaeoenvironment. By enquiring the Palaeoflora Database (http://www.palaeoflora.de/), the palaeoclimatic parameters of the pollen flora were calculated. The reconstructed climatic parameters for the MMCO show a seasonal precipitation pattern with a dry and a wet period and moderate rainfalls during the warmest period, which is comparable to the present day annual precipitation cycle in coastal Kerala, and affirms the presence of a monsoon-like atmospheric circulation over South India during the MMCO. However, the

  4. PALAEOECOLOGY OF AN EARLY-MIDDLE MIOCENE LAKE IN CHINA: PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATIONS BASED ON PHYTOLITHS FROM THE SHANWANG BASIN%中国-中新世湖泊的古生态:根据山旺盆地植硅体的初步解释

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caroline A.E.STR(O)MBERG; Else Marie FRIIS; 梁明媚; Lars WERDELIN; 张玉亮

    2007-01-01

    山东山旺中新世山旺组湖相沉积中富含保存精美的古生物化石.对于湖相沉积中的昆虫、植物和哺乳动物化石,前人已经做了大量的研究工作.其中植物大化石和孢粉的研究结果表明,中新世山旺组在沉积期间,山旺湖周围的植被处于湿润的暖温带到亚热带的古生态环境下.哺乳动物蝙蝠和貘化石的研究结果也支持这个结论.然而,迄今为止,还没有关于草本植物的种类组成及含量的研究报道.本文首次对山旺组样品中的植硅体进行了研究,为山旺中新世植被的研究提供了新的证据.对从6块山旺组样品中分析出的植硅体进行研究的结果表明,山旺中新世植硅体组合含有丰富的保存极好的草本植物植硅体,代表森林成分的双子叶植物植硅体,以及偶尔出现的棕榈科植硅体.草本植物的植硅体主要来自于C3/C4禾本科的PACCAD类群和早熟禾亚科的植物,少数可能来自于在林下封闭生活环境中生长的草本植物.山旺中新世植硅体组合显示,在湖边森林生活环境下,伴生大量的适合沼生到中生环境的草本植物,在较干旱的地区生长着早熟禾(和PACCAD)的草本植物.本文的研究结果进一步支持山旺中新世气候比现在更加湿润而且变动较小的观点.山旺中新世植硅体组合与土耳其和北美大平原中新世湖相沉积中的植硅体组合不同,后者的植硅体组合主要是由多种C3早熟禾亚科草本和不同种类的PACCAD类群草本植物组成.今后的研究工作将进一步揭示这种差异是否反映了草本植物群落在大尺度的生物地理上的差异,或者是由于地区性的局部气候不同所导致.%The lacustrine Early to Middle Miocene Shanwang Formation contains an exceptionally well-preserved biota including insects, plants, and vertebrates that has been subject to intense study. Palaeoecological work on plant macrofossils and palynofloras indicate that

  5. Petrogenesis of the Miocene volcanism along the İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone in western Anatolia, Turkey: Implications for origin and evolution of potassic volcanism in post-collisional areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Yalçın E.; Helvacı, Cahit; Uysal, İbrahim; Karaoğlu, Özgür; Palmer, Martin R.; Dindi, Fulya

    2012-10-01

    The Miocene volcanic rocks along the İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone along the western margin of the Menderes Core Complex (MCC) in western Anatolian Volcanic Province (WAVP), where strike-slip deformation is dominant, comprise: (Group 1) early-middle Miocene high-K to shoshonitic rocks with high-Mg# and relatively low SiO2, (Group 2) middle Miocene phonolitic rocks with low-Mg# and intermediate SiO2, (Group 3) early-middle Miocene medium- to high-K series from andesites to rhyolites, (Group 4) middle Miocene rhyolites with distinct trace element compositions; and (Group 5) late Miocene high-MgO basalts, K-trachybasalts and (Group 6) late Miocene high-MgO basaltic andesites. The geochemical features of these rocks are comparable with the other Oligocene to Miocene volcanic rocks, but differ from the Eocene volcanic rocks in WAVP. The geochemical features of the most primitive early-middle Miocene Group 1 rocks indicate that they were derived from an anomalously metasomatized lithospheric mantle. The mineralogical and geochemical properties of garnet-amphibole peridotite from the Ulten Zone (UZP), Eastern Alps, which is thought to represent a fossil metasomatic mantle wedge contaminated by continental subduction, is similar to the model mantle composition previously proposed for the genesis of the mafic rocks. Together with the presence of Eocene to early Miocene continental subduction beneath the Aegean-west Anatolia region, this strongly suggests that continental subduction was an important factor in the genesis of the high-MgO shoshonitic to ultrapotassic volcanism in this post-collisional area. The origin of the Group 3 andesitic to rhyolitic rocks includes; (1) lower crustal melting, (2) mixing between lower crustally-derived and mantle-derived melts, and (3) FC-AFC processes. The late Miocene Group 5 and 6 rocks, however, derived from a more depleted mantle source, indicating that the mantle became depleted over time. The rhyolites of Group 4 are most probably

  6. A semi-aquatic Arctic mammalian carnivore from the Miocene epoch and origin of Pinnipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybczynski, Natalia; Dawson, Mary R; Tedford, Richard H

    2009-04-23

    Modern pinnipeds (seals, sea lions and the walrus) are semi-aquatic, generally marine carnivores the limbs of which have been modified into flippers. Recent phylogenetic studies using morphological and molecular evidence support pinniped monophyly, and suggest a sister relationship with ursoids (for example bears) or musteloids (the clade that includes skunks, badgers, weasels and otters). Although the position of pinnipeds within modern carnivores appears moderately well resolved, fossil evidence of the morphological steps leading from a terrestrial ancestor to the modern marine forms has been weak or contentious. The earliest well-represented fossil pinniped is Enaliarctos, a marine form with flippers, which had appeared on the northwestern shores of North America by the early Miocene epoch. Here we report the discovery of a nearly complete skeleton of a new semi-aquatic carnivore from an early Miocene lake deposit in Nunavut, Canada, that represents a morphological link in early pinniped evolution. The new taxon retains a long tail and the proportions of its fore- and hindlimbs are more similar to those of modern terrestrial carnivores than to modern pinnipeds. Morphological traits indicative of semi-aquatic adaptation include a forelimb with a prominent deltopectoral ridge on the humerus, a posterodorsally expanded scapula, a pelvis with relatively short ilium, a shortened femur and flattened phalanges, suggestive of webbing. The new fossil shows evidence of pinniped affinities and similarities to the early Oligocene Amphicticeps from Asia and the late Oligocene and Miocene Potamotherium from Europe. The discovery suggests that the evolution of pinnipeds included a freshwater transitional phase, and may support the hypothesis that the Arctic was an early centre of pinniped evolution.

  7. Paleotopography of the Miocene European Central Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, M.; Mulch, A.; Kempf, O.; Schlunegger, F.; Mancktelow, N.

    2011-12-01

    Reconstructing the surface elevation, surface uplift, and relief evolution histories is fundamental to understanding the growth of mountain ranges, to explore their topographic limits, and relate these to geodynamic and Earth surface processes. Recent geologic and geodynamic models for the Central European Alps propose that the bulk of topography was built through the Pliocene, mainly based on the observation of a strong increase in sedimentation and erosion rates during the last 5-6 Ma, suggesting that the Alps never attained elevations as high as today. Here, we aim to quantify the Miocene (20-14 Ma) paleoelevation of the Central Alps through stable isotope paleoaltimetry. The novelty of the approach presented here, which renders it rather insensitive to past climate change, is to analyze stable isotope proxies of identical age, both from high internal parts of the Alpine orogen and from the adjacent foreland basin that was at or near sea level. We first exploit the hydrogen isotopic ratio in phyllosilicates (mica and chlorite) that interacted with meteoric water during activity of the Simplon detachment, a major normal fault that developed during orogen-parallel extension in high elevation regions. We then contrast the resulting meteoric water compositions with those recorded in carbonate-bearing paleosols of the North-Alpine foreland basin to provide an estimate of relative elevation differences. In the North-Alpine foreland basin, we present oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of pedogenic mudstones and carbonate concretions. These terrestrial paleosols, dated with ca. 100 ka precision, serve as our point of reference for stable isotope paleoaltimetry, since they formed at or near sea level. Here, δ18O and δ13C values vary between +19 to +25% (SMOW) and -7 to +1% respectively and show close correspondence to global climate change during the mid-Miocene climatic optimum. In the Simplon fault zone, detachment-related muscovite (-126%) and chlorite (-135

  8. A multi-proxy warm season temperature reconstruction (3400 cal yr BP - 1500 cal yr BP) from the varved sediments of Lake Silvaplana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Monique; Larocque, Isabelle; Grosjean, Martin

    2010-05-01

    A multi-proxy analysis of a nine-meter sediment core from Lake Silvaplana (1791 m a.s.l., 46°24'N, 9°42'E - 46°30'N, 9°52'E), including an innovative application of Spectrolino (380 - 730 nm) data, provides a decadal warm season temperature reconstruction (3400 cal yr BP - 1500 cal yr BP). The climate of this region has been shown to be representative of continental Europe (Trachsel et al., 2009). Consequently, we offer one of the first high-resolution multi-proxy records of European climate for this time period. The sediment of Silvaplana contains annual (‘varved') layers. Therefore, a chronology has been based on varve counts, 210Pb, 137Cs, documented flood layers and radiocarbon dates (Blass et al., 2007a;b). These varves enable high-resolution (sub-decadal) sampling and measurement of geochemical (Spectrolino, Biogenic Silica [BSi], varve thickness) and biological (chironomids) parameters. Spectrolino and BSi Flux measurements of the upper three meters of the core have been used to develop two independent calibrations-in-time and warm season (JJAS) temperature reconstructions back to AD 1177 (Spectrolino calibration period = 1864 - 1949; r = 0.92; pcorr = 0.001; BSi calibration period = 1864 - 1949; r = 0.67; pcorr = 0.03) (Trachsel et al., in review a;b; Blass et al., 2007b). A third warm season (July) temperature reconstruction to AD 1177 has been developed from chironomids (Larocque et al., 2009; Larocque-Tobler et al., 2009; accepted). Finally, Leemann and Niessen (1994), Ohlendorf et al. (1997), Nussbaumer et al. (in prep.) and Blass et al. (2007a) have shown a close relationship between local glacial activity and mean summer temperature. Here, the laboratory methods and calibrations-in-time previously used to reconstruct temperatures to AD 1177 are applied to the lower six meters of sediments (Spectrolino and varve thickness: 3400 cal yr BP - 1500 cal yr BP; BSi and chironomids: 2550 cal yr BP - 1810 cal yr BP). Both the BSi and chironomid based

  9. A new Middle Miocene selachian assemblage (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the Central Paratethys (Nyirád, Hungary): implications for temporal turnover and biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Márton; Kocsis, László

    2016-12-01

    A new Middle Miocene (Langhian - early Serravallian) assemblage with shark and ray teeth from Nyirád (Hungary, Transdanubia, Veszprém County) consists of nine families, with 15 different species. The assemblage shares many common genera with other Middle Miocene assemblages in the Paratethys (Notorynchus, Carcharias, Otodus, Cosmopolitodus, Hemipristis, Galeocerdo, Carcharhinus, and Aetobatus), and reflects a subtropical climate and a close connection with the Mediterranean Sea. However, a detailed faunal compilation of Miocene selachians reveals that several taxa that were still present in the Mediterranean or lived in the Paratethys during the Lower Miocene disappeared or became very rare by the Middle Miocene in the Central Paratethys (e.g., Isistius, Centrophorus, Mitsukurina, Carcharoides, Parotodus, Alopias). The taxa that went locally extinct in the Paratethys are mainly represented by deep-water or pelagic forms. Their disappearance is most probably related to the gradual separation of the Paratethys from the Mediterranean. The common presence of some large, rather pelagic sharks (e.g., Otodus, Cosmopolitodus) in the Central Paratethys during the Middle Miocene is explained here by the widespread occurrence of their potential prey represented by marine mammals (e.g., whales and dolphins).

  10. A new Middle Miocene selachian assemblage (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii from the Central Paratethys (Nyirád, Hungary: implications for temporal turnover and biogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó Márton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new Middle Miocene (Langhian - early Serravallian assemblage with shark and ray teeth from Nyirád (Hungary, Transdanubia, Veszprém County consists of nine families, with 15 different species. The assemblage shares many common genera with other Middle Miocene assemblages in the Paratethys (Notorynchus, Carcharias, Otodus, Cosmopolitodus, Hemipristis, Galeocerdo, Carcharhinus, and Aetobatus, and reflects a subtropical climate and a close connection with the Mediterranean Sea. However, a detailed faunal compilation of Miocene selachians reveals that several taxa that were still present in the Mediterranean or lived in the Paratethys during the Lower Miocene disappeared or became very rare by the Middle Miocene in the Central Paratethys (e.g., Isistius, Centrophorus, Mitsukurina, Carcharoides, Parotodus, Alopias. The taxa that went locally extinct in the Paratethys are mainly represented by deep-water or pelagic forms. Their disappearance is most probably related to the gradual separation of the Paratethys from the Mediterranean. The common presence of some large, rather pelagic sharks (e.g., Otodus, Cosmopolitodus in the Central Paratethys during the Middle Miocene is explained here by the widespread occurrence of their potential prey represented by marine mammals (e.g., whales and dolphins.

  11. First hominoid from the Miocene of Ethiopia and the evolution of the catarrhine elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, B G; Fleagle, J G; Kappelman, J; Swisher, C C

    1998-03-01

    The first known fossil ape from the early-middle Miocene of Fejej, Ethiopia, is described here. The specimen, FJ-18SB-68, is a partial ulna from a locality dated by 40Ar/39Ar and paleomagnetic methods to a minimum age of 16.18 MYA. Compared to a variety of extant and fossil ulnae, FJ-18SB-68 is most similar to Turkanapithecus, Proconsul, and Pliopithecus, and appears to have been an arboreal quadruped with substantial forearm rotational mobility. Among the extant ulnae, canonical variates analysis successfully discriminates platyrrhines from catarrhines and within the latter, cercopithecoids from hominoids. Basal catarrhines (e.g., Aegyptopithecus) are platyrrhine-like in their morphology. Two basic trends appear to evolve from this generalized template: one with less mobile and more habitually pronated forearms, as seen in living and fossil cercopithecoids (including Victoriapithecus and Paracolobus), and another with greater forearm rotational mobility in fossil and modern hominoids. Primitive Miocene apes, including Proconsul, Turkanapithecus, and FJ-18SB-68, share with extant hominoids a more laterally positioned and laterally facing radial notch and an incipient trochlear keel. This morphology, along with a large insertion area for m. brachialis, suggests a departure from the more habitually pronated hand posture of monkeys and may indicate greater climbing abilities in these arboreally quadrupedal apes. Later Miocene apes, such as Oreopithecus and Dryopithecus share additional morphological features with hominoids, indicating considerable suspensory and climbing capabilities.

  12. The Miocene Nullarbor Limestone, southern Australia; deposition on a vast subtropical epeiric platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Laura G.; James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne

    2012-05-01

    The early to middle Miocene Nullarbor Limestone forms the vast, karsted Nullarbor Plain in southern Australia, and may be the most extensive Miocene carbonate deposit described to date. These carbonates were deposited at southern paleolatitudes of ~ 40°S and are interpreted to be subtropical to warm-temperate in character because of the presence of certain genera of tropical coralline algae (rhodoliths and articulated types), large benthic foraminifera, tropical molluscs, zooxanthellate corals, and micrite envelopes. Facies are dominated by skeletal grainstones and floatstones that accumulated in three interpreted paleoenvironments: (1) seagrass banks (upper photic zone), (2) rhodolith pavements (lower photic zone), and (3) open seafloors (lower photic to subphotic zone). A decrease of tropical components from west to east across the platform implies that warm oceanic currents (possibly related to a proto-Leeuwin Current), as well as a period of warm climate (Miocene Climatic Optimum), resulted in subtropical deposition at southern latitudes. The Southern Ocean extended inboard ~ 450 km from the shelf edge during Nullarbor Limestone deposition, but interpreted paleodepths did not extend much below the base of the photic zone. A small slope angle (~ 0.02°) over a wide shelf (~ 300,000 km2) implies deposition on an epeiric platform or epeiric ramp. A Miocene barrier reef was likely coeval with Nullarbor Limestone deposition. Therefore, the inboard portion of the Nullarbor Limestone can be considered part of an extensive back-reef lagoon system on a rimmed epeiric platform, perhaps attaining a size similar to the modern Great Barrier Reef system.

  13. Miocene reef facies of Pelagian Block, central Mediterranean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedley, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Miocene reefs outcrop in the Maltese Islands, southeastern Sicily, and the pelagian island of Lampedusa. Several rapid eustatic sea level fluctuations affected these late Tortonian-early Messinian build-ups; normal salinities appear to have been maintained during these events. Substrate, topography, sedimentation rate, and tectonic/eustatic events controlled reef development, which can be grouped into three settings: The most stable situation, the oldest Maltese and southeastern Sicilian reefs, has a ramp profile 15-30 km wide. The outermost zone consists of a broad belt of the large benthic foraminifer Heterostegina (compared with the underyling Oligocene beds rich in Lepidocyclina). Coralline algal carbonates, commonly rhodolitic, form a broad biostromal up-ramp association, kilometers in width, which commonly extends into the shallowest parts of the shelf. Scattered across the shallower ramp areas, in water depths generally less than 10 m, are coral-algal patch reefs, rarely larger than 20-50 m in diameter, commonly with truncated tops, and dominated by crustose coralline algae and the corals Porites and Tarbellastraea.

  14. A new calymmate mimosoid polyad from the Miocene of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavari; Barreda

    2000-05-01

    A palynomorph with an unequivocal relationship to the eight-grain polyads of the mimosoid genus Calliandra Benth., is described from the Miocene sediments of San Juan Province, Argentina. Comparison of the fossil palynomorph with polyads of the extant Calliandra species shows a resemblance to those which have one, highly specialized, appendiculate monad. The new palynomorph has a rudimentary appendix, apparently transitional in the path leading to the more highly developed appendiculate forms in the extant Calliandra group. This specialized polyad type is considered to be one of the most highly evolved forms in subfamily Mimosoideae. The closest affinity of the new fossil polyad is with the eight-grain calymmate polyads of Calliandra chilensis Benth., a species which has developed in the extra-tropical, xerophilous shrub, habitat of north-central Chile. The disappearance of Calliandra species in San Juan Province is thought to be related to the culmination of the Andean rising, and the consequent interruption to the Pacific Ocean climatic influence. This new discovery is the first fossil record of Calliandra for Argentina, as well as being the most southerly and the oldest. It reinforces the hypothesis of an early origin and diversification for the Leguminosae in Tropical America.

  15. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  16. Steps in the intensification of Benguela upwelling over the Walvis Ridge during Miocene and Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzel, Sebastian; Dupont, Lydie M.; Marret, Fabienne; Jung, Gerlinde; Wefer, Gerold

    2017-01-01

    Upwelling is a significant part of the ocean circulation controlling largely the transport of nutrient-rich cold waters to the surface and therefore influencing ocean productivity and global climate. The Benguela upwelling system (BUS) is one of the major upwelling areas in the world. Previous reconstructions of the BUS mainly focused on the onset and intensification in southern and central parts, but changes of the northern part have been rarely investigated in detail. Using the Late Miocene to Pliocene organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst record of ODP Site 1081, we reconstruct and discuss the early upwelling history over the Walvis Ridge with a special focus on the movement of the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). We suggest that during the Late Miocene the Angola Current flowed southwards over the Walvis Ridge more frequently than today because the ABF was probably located further south as a result of a weaker meridional temperature gradient. A possible strengthening of the meridional gradient during the latest Miocene to early Pliocene in combination with uplift of south-western Africa intensified the upwelling along the coast and increased the upwelling's filaments over the Walvis Ridge. An intermediate period from 6.2 to 5.5 Ma is shown by the dominance of Habibacysta tectata, cysts of a cool-tolerant dinoflagellate known from the northern Atlantic, indicating changing oceanic conditions contemporaneous with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. From 4.3 Ma on, the upwelling signal got stronger again and waters were well-mixed and nutrient-rich. Our results indicate a northward migration of the ABF as early as 7 Ma and the initial stepwise intensification of the BUS.

  17. Steps in the intensification of Benguela upwelling over the Walvis Ridge during Miocene and Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzel, Sebastian; Dupont, Lydie M.; Marret, Fabienne; Jung, Gerlinde; Wefer, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    Upwelling is a significant part of the ocean circulation controlling largely the transport of nutrient-rich cold waters to the surface and therefore influencing ocean productivity and global climate. The Benguela upwelling system (BUS) is one of the major upwelling areas in the world. Previous reconstructions of the BUS mainly focused on the onset and intensification in southern and central parts, but changes of the northern part have been rarely investigated in detail. Using the Late Miocene to Pliocene organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst record of ODP Site 1081, we reconstruct and discuss the early upwelling history over the Walvis Ridge with a special focus on the movement of the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). We suggest that during the Late Miocene the Angola Current flowed southwards over the Walvis Ridge more frequently than today because the ABF was probably located further south as a result of a weaker meridional temperature gradient. A possible strengthening of the meridional gradient during the latest Miocene to early Pliocene in combination with uplift of south-western Africa intensified the upwelling along the coast and increased the upwelling's filaments over the Walvis Ridge. An intermediate period from 6.2 to 5.5 Ma is shown by the dominance of Habibacysta tectata, cysts of a cool-tolerant dinoflagellate known from the northern Atlantic, indicating changing oceanic conditions contemporaneous with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. From 4.3 Ma on, the upwelling signal got stronger again and waters were well-mixed and nutrient-rich. Our results indicate a northward migration of the ABF as early as 7 Ma and the initial stepwise intensification of the BUS.

  18. Understanding the murky history of the Coral Triangle: Miocene corals and reef habitats in East Kalimantan (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santodomingo, Nadiezhda; Renema, Willem; Johnson, Kenneth G.

    2016-09-01

    Studies on ancient coral communities living in marginal conditions, including low light, high turbidity, extreme temperatures, or high nutrients, are important to understand the current structure of reefs and how they could potentially respond to global changes. The main goal of this study was to document the rich and well-preserved fossil coral fauna preserved in Miocene exposures of the Kutai Basin in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Our collections include almost forty thousand specimens collected from 47 outcrops. Seventy-nine genera and 234 species have been identified. Three different coral assemblages were found corresponding to small patch reefs that developed under the influence of high siliciclastic inputs from the Mahakam Delta. Coral assemblages vary in richness, structure, and composition. Platy coral assemblages were common until the Serravallian (Middle Miocene), while branching coral assemblages became dominant in the Tortonian (Late Miocene). By the late Tortonian massive coral assemblages dominated, similar to modern-style coral framework. Our results suggest that challenging habitats, such as the Miocene turbid habitats of East Kalimantan, might have played an important role during the early diversification of the Coral Triangle by hosting a pool of resilient species more likely to survive the environmental changes that have affected this region since the Cenozoic. Further research that integrates fossil and recent turbid habitats may provide a glimpse into the dynamics and future of coral reefs as "typical" clear-water reefs continue to decline in most regions.

  19. New Miocene sulid birds from Peru and considerations on their Neogene fossil record in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Stucchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Boobies and gannets (family Sulidae are the most specialized plunge divers among seabirds. Their fossil record along the Pacific coast of South America extends to the early Middle Miocene. Here we describe three new species of sulids: Sula brandi sp. nov., Sula figueroae sp. nov., and Ramphastosula aguirrei sp. nov., from the early Late Miocene of the Pisco Formation (Peru. Two of them are relatives of the living genus Sula, which represents medium and large-sized boobies. A new species of the extinct genus Ramphastosula is also described, adding to the discussion of possible alternative feeding strategies among sulids. The fossil record suggests that sympatric sulids exhibit different body sizes at least since the Oligocene epoch, a strategy related with resource partitioning. Furthermore, we find current analysis and knowledge of the fossil record unsuitable to evaluate properly seabird diversity changes through time.

  20. Threshold in North Atlantic-Arctic circulation controlled by the Oligocene-Miocene subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Stärz, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Knorr, Gregor; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Changes in high latitude ocean gateways are thought to be main drivers of Cenozoic climate evolution. However, the link between global climate changes and the early ocean gateway formation between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (incl. the Greenland and Norwegian Seas) controlled by the subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge is poorly understood. Here, we use a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model for Oligocene-Miocene boundary conditions to address the ventilation h...

  1. Brachypotherium cf. brachypus and Lartetotherium sp. (Rhinocerotidae, Perissodactyla, Mammalia from the Middle Miocene Dúbravka-Pole site (western Slovakia

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    Júlia Zervanová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate fossil record from the Dúbravka-Pole site in the territory of Devínska Kobyla consists of Brachypotherium cf. brachypus and Lartetotherium sp. dental and osteological remains. The both taxa lived in swampy to forested land at the shore of shallow brackish sea (or lagoon? during the Early Sarmatian (MN 7/8. Their occurrence is probably a result of intermittent faunal migrations during changing environmental conditions at the end of the Middle Miocene.

  2. Earthquake-induced soft-sediment deformations and seismically amplified erosion rates recorded in varved sediments of Köyceğiz Lake (SW Turkey)

    KAUST Repository

    Avsar, Ulas

    2016-06-06

    Earthquake-triggered landslides amplify erosion rates in catchments, i.e. catchment response to seismic shocks (CR). In addition to historical eyewitness accounts of muddy rivers implying CRs after large earthquakes, several studies have quantitatively reported increased sediment concentrations in rivers after earthquakes. However, only a few paleolimnological studies could detect CRs within lacustrine sedimentary sequences as siliciclastic-enriched intercalations within background sedimentation. Since siliciclastic-enriched intercalations can easily be of non-seismic origin, their temporal correlation with nearby earthquakes is crucial to assign a seismic triggering mechanism. In most cases, either uncertainties in dating methods or the lack of recent seismic activity has prevented reliable temporal correlations, making the seismic origin of observed sedimentary events questionable. Here, we attempt to remove this question mark by presenting sedimentary traces of CRs in the 370-year-long varved sequence of Köyceğiz Lake (SW Turkey) that we compare with estimated peak ground acceleration (PGA) values of several nearby earthquakes. We find that earthquakes exceeding estimated PGA values of ca. 20 cm/s2 can induce soft-sediment deformations (SSD), while CRs seem only to be triggered by PGA levels higher than 70 cm/s2. In Köyceğiz Lake, CRs produce Cr- and Ni-enriched sedimentation due to the seismically mobilized soils derived from ultramafic rocks in the catchment. Given the varve chronology, the residence time of the seismically mobilized material in the catchment is determined to be 5 to 10 years.

  3. Oligocene-miocene mammalian fossils from Hongyazi Basin and its bearing on tectonics of Danghe Nanshan in northern Tibetan plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Xie, Guangpu; Yin, An

    2013-01-01

    A shortage of Cenozoic vertebrate fossils in the Tibetan Plateau has been an obstacle in our understanding of biological evolution in response to changes in tectonism, topography, and environment. This is especially true for Paleogene records, so far known by only two sites along the northern rim of the Plateau. We report a Hongyazi Basin in northern Tibetan Plateau that produces at least three mammalian faunas that span Oligocene through late Miocene. Located at the foothills of the Danghe Nanshan and presently connected to the northern margin of the Suganhu Basin through the Greater Haltang River, the intermountain basin is controlled by the tectonics of the Danghe Nanshan to the north and Chahan'ebotu Mountain to the south, making the basin sediments well suited for inferring the evolutionary history of these two mountain ranges. At the bottom of the local section, the Oligocene Haltang Fauna is best compared to the early Oligocene Desmatolagus-Karakoromys decessus assemblage in the Dingdanggou Fauna in Tabenbuluk Basin. The Middle Miocene Ebotu Fauna from the middle Hongyazi section shares many taxa with the late Middle Miocene Tunggur mammal assemblage in Inner Mongolia, such as Heterosminthus orientalis, Megacricetodon sinensis, Democricetodon lindsayi, and Alloptox gobiensis. Toward the top of the section, the Hongyazi Fauna includes late Miocene elements typical of Hipparion faunas of North China. All three faunas are of typical North China-Central Asian characteristics, suggesting a lack of geographic barriers for faunal differentiation through the late Miocene. Sedimentary packages producing these faunas are arrayed from north to south in progressively younger strata, consistent with a compressive regime to accommodate shortening between Danghe Nanshan and Chahan'ebotu Mountain by thrust faults and folds. With additional constraints from vertebrate fossils along the northern flanks of the Danghe Nanshan, an eastward propagation of the Danghe Nanshan is

  4. Oligocene-Miocene Mammalian Fossils from Hongyazi Basin and Its Bearing on Tectonics of Danghe Nanshan in Northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Xie, Guangpu; Yin, An

    2013-01-01

    A shortage of Cenozoic vertebrate fossils in the Tibetan Plateau has been an obstacle in our understanding of biological evolution in response to changes in tectonism, topography, and environment. This is especially true for Paleogene records, so far known by only two sites along the northern rim of the Plateau. We report a Hongyazi Basin in northern Tibetan Plateau that produces at least three mammalian faunas that span Oligocene through late Miocene. Located at the foothills of the Danghe Nanshan and presently connected to the northern margin of the Suganhu Basin through the Greater Haltang River, the intermountain basin is controlled by the tectonics of the Danghe Nanshan to the north and Chahan’ebotu Mountain to the south, making the basin sediments well suited for inferring the evolutionary history of these two mountain ranges. At the bottom of the local section, the Oligocene Haltang Fauna is best compared to the early Oligocene Desmatolagus-Karakoromys decessus assemblage in the Dingdanggou Fauna in Tabenbuluk Basin. The Middle Miocene Ebotu Fauna from the middle Hongyazi section shares many taxa with the late Middle Miocene Tunggur mammal assemblage in Inner Mongolia, such as Heterosminthus orientalis, Megacricetodon sinensis, Democricetodon lindsayi, and Alloptox gobiensis. Toward the top of the section, the Hongyazi Fauna includes late Miocene elements typical of Hipparion faunas of North China. All three faunas are of typical North China-Central Asian characteristics, suggesting a lack of geographic barriers for faunal differentiation through the late Miocene. Sedimentary packages producing these faunas are arrayed from north to south in progressively younger strata, consistent with a compressive regime to accommodate shortening between Danghe Nanshan and Chahan’ebotu Mountain by thrust faults and folds. With additional constraints from vertebrate fossils along the northern flanks of the Danghe Nanshan, an eastward propagation of the Danghe Nanshan

  5. Oligocene-miocene mammalian fossils from Hongyazi Basin and its bearing on tectonics of Danghe Nanshan in northern Tibetan plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available A shortage of Cenozoic vertebrate fossils in the Tibetan Plateau has been an obstacle in our understanding of biological evolution in response to changes in tectonism, topography, and environment. This is especially true for Paleogene records, so far known by only two sites along the northern rim of the Plateau. We report a Hongyazi Basin in northern Tibetan Plateau that produces at least three mammalian faunas that span Oligocene through late Miocene. Located at the foothills of the Danghe Nanshan and presently connected to the northern margin of the Suganhu Basin through the Greater Haltang River, the intermountain basin is controlled by the tectonics of the Danghe Nanshan to the north and Chahan'ebotu Mountain to the south, making the basin sediments well suited for inferring the evolutionary history of these two mountain ranges. At the bottom of the local section, the Oligocene Haltang Fauna is best compared to the early Oligocene Desmatolagus-Karakoromys decessus assemblage in the Dingdanggou Fauna in Tabenbuluk Basin. The Middle Miocene Ebotu Fauna from the middle Hongyazi section shares many taxa with the late Middle Miocene Tunggur mammal assemblage in Inner Mongolia, such as Heterosminthus orientalis, Megacricetodon sinensis, Democricetodon lindsayi, and Alloptox gobiensis. Toward the top of the section, the Hongyazi Fauna includes late Miocene elements typical of Hipparion faunas of North China. All three faunas are of typical North China-Central Asian characteristics, suggesting a lack of geographic barriers for faunal differentiation through the late Miocene. Sedimentary packages producing these faunas are arrayed from north to south in progressively younger strata, consistent with a compressive regime to accommodate shortening between Danghe Nanshan and Chahan'ebotu Mountain by thrust faults and folds. With additional constraints from vertebrate fossils along the northern flanks of the Danghe Nanshan, an eastward propagation of the

  6. Modeling geologically abrupt climate changes in the Miocene

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    B. J. Haupt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The gradual cooling of the Cenozoic, including the Miocene epoch, was punctuated by many geologically abrupt warming and cooling episodes – strong deviations from the cooling trend with time span of ten to hundred thousands of years. Our working hypothesis is that some of those warming episodes at least partially might have been caused by dynamics of the emerging Antarctic Ice Sheet, which, in turn, might have caused strong changes of sea surface salinity in the Miocene Southern Ocean. Feasibility of this hypothesis is explored in a series of coupled ocean-atmosphere computer experiments. The results suggest that relatively small and geologically short-lived changes in freshwater balance in the Southern Ocean could have significantly contributed to at least two prominent warming episodes in the Miocene. Importantly, the experiments also suggest that the Southern Ocean was more sensitive to the salinity changes in the Miocene than today, which can attributed to the opening of the Central American Isthmus as a major difference between the Miocene and the present-day ocean-sea geometry.

  7. Did tectonic activity stimulate oligo-miocene speciation in the Indo-West Pacific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Suzanne T; Duda, Thomas F

    2008-07-01

    Analyses of molecular phylogenies of three unrelated tropical marine gastropod genera, Turbo, Echinolittorina, and Conus, reveal an increase in the rate of cladogenesis of some Indo-West Pacific (IWP) clades beginning in the Late Oligocene or Early Miocene between 23.7 and 21.0 million years ago. In all three genera, clades with an increased rate of diversification reach a maximum of diversity, in terms of species richness, in the central IWP. Congruence in both the geographical location and the narrow interval of timing suggests a common cause. The collision of the Australia and New Guinea plate with the southeast extremity of the Eurasian plate approximately 25 Mya resulted in geological changes to the central IWP, including an increase in shallow-water areas and length of coastline, and the creation of a mosaic of distinct habitats. This was followed by a period of rapid diversification of zooxanthellate corals between 20 and 25 Mya. The findings reported here provide the first molecular evidence from multiple groups that part of the present-day diversity of shallow-water gastropods in the IWP arose from a rapid pulse of speciation when new habitats became available in the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene. After the new habitats were filled, the rate of speciation likely decreased and this combined with high levels of extinction (in some groups), resulted in a slow down in the rate of diversification in the genera examined.

  8. Late Miocene Tidal Deposits in the Amazonian Foreland Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanen, Matti E.; Linna, Ari M.; Santos, Jose C. R.; Negri, Francisco R.

    1995-07-01

    Late Miocene tidal sediments of Acre, Brazilian Amazonia, were deposited in an embayment or interior seaway located in the sub-Andean zone. This late Tertiary embayment system may once have connected the Caribbean with the South Atlantic. The tidal coasts of the embayment-seaway have provided an avenue for the earliest waif (over water) dispersal phases of the great American biotic interchange in the late Miocene. The subsequent change from semimarine to terrestrial environments is of value in assessing the importance of earlier hypotheses on the evolution of the western Amazonian landscape and gives insight into the formation of several observed biogeographic patterns, especially of aquatic biota.

  9. Effect of vegetation on the Late Miocene ocean circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lohmann

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A weak and shallow thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean is related to an open Central American gateway and exchange with fresh Pacific waters. We estimate the effect of vegetation on the ocean general circulation using the atmospheric circulation model simulations for the Late Miocene climate. Caused by an increase in net evaporation in the Miocene North Atlantic, the North Atlantic water becomes more saline which enhances the overturning circulation and thus the northward heat transport. This effect reveals a potentially important feedback between the ocean circulation, the hydrological cycle and the land surface cover for Cenozoic climate evolution.

  10. PULVINI OF CERCIS LEAVES FROM THE MIOCENE SHANWANG FORMATION OF SHANDONG PROVINCE AND THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF THE PULVINUS IN LEGUMINOSAE%山东中新世山旺组紫荆属(豆科)叶化石的叶枕研究——兼论豆科植物叶枕的早期演化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祺

    2012-01-01

    focused on pulvinus morphology in leaf impressions (Cercis miochinensis Hu and Chaney, 1938) from the Miocene Shanwang Formation of Shandong Province. The fossils possess obovate upper pulvinus impressions which become semi-circular when degraded, as well as an ovate lower pulvinus impression in one of the specimens.Cercis belongs to the tribe Cercideae of the subfamily Caesalpinioideae, which is one of the basalmost clades in the molecular phylogenetic trees of living Leguminosae. Therefore the fossil history of Cercis is of fundamental importance in understanding legume phylogeny, particularlytheir early evolution, diversification and biogeography. However most species of the previously reported Cercis leaf impressions from the Cenozoic of Eurasia and North America have been questioned, rejected, or else need re-investigation because of a lack of sufficiently detailed studies on the leaf architecture and pulvini. So far, the earliest pulvinate leaves of Cercis have been discovered from the late Eocene of Oregon in the U. S. A. , but the oldest legume pulvinus has been reported in a leaflet possibly assigned to the subfamily Mimosoideae from the early Palaeocene of Central Patagonia in Argentina. Together with the results from comparative morphology and anatomy, the present stud-y supports the view that the unifoliolate blade and pulvinus in the Cercis leaf are derived characters, and that the most primitive legumes had pinnately compound leaves probably with pulvini on each of their own petioles and petiolules (Text-fig. 3).A lectotype of Cercis miochinensis is here designated; specimen No. 39 (H) deposited in the collections of Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. On the Miocene Cyprideis species flock (Ostracoda; Crustacea) of Western Amazonia (Solimões Formation): Refining taxonomy on species level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F; Piller, Werner E

    2014-12-18

    The Miocene mega-wetland of western Amazonia holds a diverse, largely endemic ostracod fauna. Among them, especially the genus Cyprideis experienced a remarkable radiation. Micropalaeontologic investigations of a 400 m long sediment core (~62 km SW Benjamin Constant, Amazonia, Brazil) permitted a taxonomic revision of about two-thirds of hitherto described Cyprideis species. We evaluate the diagnostic value of shell characters and provide an extensive illustration of the intraspecific variability of species. Based on comparative morphology, the 20 recorded Cyprideis species are arranged in groups and subgroups. The "smooth" group comprises C. amazonica, C. kotzianae, C. kroemmelbeini, C. machadoi, C. multiradiata, C. olivencai, C. paralela and C. simplex; the "ornate" group C. curucae nom. nov., C. cyrtoma, C. aff. graciosa, C. inversa, C. ituiae n. sp., C. matorae n. sp., C. minipunctata, C. munoztorresi nom. nov., C. pebasae, C. reticulopunctata, C. schedogymnos and C. sulcosigmoidalis. Five species have been revalidated, two renamed, two synonymised and two are new descriptions. Along with 10 further formally established species, for which a review is pending, Cyprideis keeps at least 30 endemic species in that region during Miocene times. Up to 12 Cyprideis species have been found to occur sympatrically, representing >90% of the entire ostracod fauna. Ostracod index species enable a biostratigraphic allocation of the well succession to the Cyprideis minipunctata to Cyprideis cyrtoma biozones, corresponding to a late Middle to early Late Miocene age (late Serravallian-early Tortonian).

  12. Chronology of Miocene Pliocene deposits at Split Mountain Gorge, Southern California: A record of regional tectonics and Colorado River evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Rebecca J.; Fluette, Amy; McDougall, Kristin; Housen, Bernard A.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Axen, Gary J.; Shirvell, Catherine R.

    2007-01-01

    Late Miocene to early Pliocene deposits at Split Mountain Gorge, California, preserve a record of basinal response to changes in regional tectonics, paleogeography, and evolution of the Colorado River. The base of the Elephant Trees Formation, magnetostratigraphically dated as 8.1 ± 0.4 Ma, provides the earliest well-dated record of extension in the southwestern Salton Trough. The oldest marine sediments are ca. 6.3 Ma. The nearly synchronous timing of marine incursion in the Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California region supports a model for localization of Pacific North America plate motion in the Gulf ca. 6 Ma. The first appearance of Colorado River sand at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary (5.33 Ma) suggests rapid propagation of the river to the Salton Trough, and supports a lake-spillover hypothesis for initiation of the lower Colorado River.

  13. A partial skeleton of a new lamniform mackerel shark from the Miocene of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kriwet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cenozoic lamniform sharks are mostly represented by isolated teeth and vertebrae, whereas articulated skeletal remains are usually very scarce. Here, we describe a partial skeleton of an extinct lamniform shark consisting of 42 slightly disarticulated teeth, 49 vertebrae, and additional unidentifiable cranial and postcranial remains. The specimen originates from the Miocene mica-clay of Groß Pampau (North Germany, which is of late Langenfeldian age (= Serravallian-Tortonian boundary; middle–late Miocene. A total of 13 measurements of each tooth, as well as morphological features, were used to reconstruct the dentition of this specimen and to provide detailed taxonomic information. Additionally, the total body size and age at death were established using methodologies based on vertebral and tooth measurements and vertebral centra growth ring counts, respectively. The specimen undoubtedly represents the most complete individual of “Carcharodon (= Isurus escheri”, previously known only from a few isolated teeth. The dental pattern (e.g., marked dignathic and monognathic heterodonty patterns; only slightly labio-lingually compressed upper teeth; upper teeth slender with distally inclined or curved main cusps; massive, hook-like upper intermediate tooth; main cusps with crenulated cutting edges; lateral cusplets in teeth of all ontogenetic stages clearly separates this shark from all hitherto known Cenozoic and Recent lamnids and a new genus, Carcharomodus, consequently is introduced. Carcharomodus escheri comb. nov. is a characteristic element of late early Miocene to the Pliocene Western and Central European fish faunas. All previously identified Pacific occurrences represent a different taxon. We estimate that the specimen had a total body length of about 4 m and that it was older than 10 years and thus might have reached maturity before death, as indicated by all available evidence.

  14. New fossil records of Ceratozamia (Zamiaceae, Cycadales from the European Oligocene and lower Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvaček Zlatko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New compression leaf material of Ceratozamia (Zamiaceae has been recognised in the European Cenozoic. A leaflet of Ceratozamia floersheimensis (Engelhardt Kvaček was recovered among unidentified material from the Oligocene of Trbovlje, former Trifail, Slovenia, housed in old collections of the Austrian Geological Survey, Vienna. It is similar in morphology and epidermal anatomy to other specimens previously studied from the lower Oligocene of Flörsheim, Germany and Budapest, Hungary. A fragmentary leaflet assigned to C. hofmannii Ettingsh. was recovered in the uppermost part of the Most Formation (Most Basin in North Bohemia, Czech Republic and dated by magnetostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy to CHRON C5Cn.3n, that is, the latest early Miocene. It yielded excellently preserved epidermal structures, permitting confirmation of the generic affinity and a more precise comparison with this lower Miocene species previously known from Austria (Münzenberg, Leoben Basin and re-investigated earlier. Both the Oligocene and Miocene populations of Ceratozamia are based on isolated disarticulated leaflets matching some living representatives in the size and slender form of the leaflets. Such ceratozamias thrive today in extratropical areas near the present limits of distribution of the genus along the Sierra Madre Orientale in north-eastern Mexico, in particular C. microstrobila Vovides & J.D. Rees and others of the C. latifolia complex, as well as C. hildae G.P. Landry & M.C. Wilson (“bamboo cycad”. The occurrence of Ceratozamia suggests subtropical to warm-temperate, almost frostless climate and a high amount of precipitation. The accompanied fossil vegetation of both species corresponds well with the temperature regime. While the Oligocene species in Hungary probably thrived under sub-humid conditions, the remaining occurrences of fossil Ceratozamia were connected with humid evergreen to mixed-mesophytic forests.

  15. The record of Miocene climatic events in AND-2A drill core (Antarctica): Insights from provenance analyses of basement clasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroni, Sonia; Talarico, Franco M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper includes the results of a detailed quantitative provenance investigation on gravel-size clasts occurring within the late Early to Late Miocene sedimentary glacimarine section recovered for the first time by the AND-2A core in the SW sector of the Ross Sea (southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica). This period of time is of crucial interest, as it includes two of the major Cenozoic events in the global climatic evolution: the mid-Miocene climatic optimum and the middle Miocene climate transition. Petrographical and mineral chemistry data on basement clasts allow to individuate two different diagnostic clast assemblages, which clearly suggest two specific sectors of southern Victoria Land as the most likely sources: the Mulock-Skelton glacier and the Koettlitz-Blue glacier regions. Distribution patterns reveal high fluctuations of the detritus source areas throughout the investigated core interval, variations which can be interpreted as the direct result of an evolving McMurdo Sound paleogeography during the late Early to Late Miocene. Consistently with sedimentological studies, gravel-fraction clast distribution patterns clearly testify that the Antarctic ice sheet experienced a dramatic contraction at ca. 17.35 ± 0.14 Ma (likely correlated to the onset of the climatic optimum), and in a gravel-fraction clasts show that the variations of paleoenvironmental drivers characterising this period were able to exert deep transformation of the Antarctic ice sheet and reveal the methodology to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of paleo-glacial-flow direction and paleogeographic scenarios.

  16. Sedimentary Bacteriopheophytin a as an indicator of meromixis in varved lake sediments of Lake Jaczno, north-east Poland, CE 1891-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Christoph; Grosjean, Martin; Poraj-Górska, Anna; Enters, Dirk; Tylmann, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    Trends in eutrophication and meromixis pose serious threats to water quality and biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems around the world. Because long-term observational data rarely exist, it is very difficult to assess whether meromixis is the result of anthropogenic impacts, climate variability, natural ecosystem development or a combination of these factors. Lake sediment proxy-data may help understand how and why eutrophication and meromixis occurred and disappeared in the past. In this study, we present a novel method and proxy to investigate past episodes of meromixis and hypolimnetic anoxia recorded in lake sediments. We use high-resolution (70 × 70 μm/pixel) calibrated hyperspectral imaging of a varved lake sediment core from meromictic Lake Jaczno (north-east Poland), to quantitatively map the spatial distribution of Bacteriopheophytin a (Bphe a) at very high sub-varve (i.e. seasonal) resolution. Bphe a is a bacterial pigment and stable degradation product of Bacteriochlorophyll a (Bchl a), which is produced by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (APBs) at the chemocline of meromictic lakes. Using sedimentary Bphe a we infer episodes of meromixis (i.e. long-term hypolimnetic anoxia) and changing mixing conditions (i.e. seasonal temperature, event-based water mixing) for the past ca. 120 years. Absence of meromixis occurred on several occasions. From the beginning of our record in CE 1891 until ca. CE 1918, meromixis was not observed. During this time, green pigments (mainly chlorophyll a [Chl a] and diagenetic products) produced by phototrophic algae were deposited while Bphe a was absent. This suggests that regular lake overturning prevented the formation of a persistent chemocline. Bphe a was identified before CE 1890 (Butz et al. 2015), but over the studied period 1891-2011, meromixis was established in CE 1918 and generally persisted through modern times. However, short-term interruptions of the chemocline were observed following events of rapid

  17. Late Miocene Sciuridae (Mammalia, Rodentia) from Anatolia, Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, A.A.; de Bruijn, H.; Wessels, W.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated cheek teeth of Sciuridae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from nine late Miocene localities in central Anatolia (Turkey) are described. The teeth represent at least 12 different species, five of which belong to the ground squirrel genus Tamias, two to the ground squirrel genus Spermophilinus, one to th

  18. Lithostratigraphy of the upper Oligocene–Miocene succession in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Erik Skovbjerg; Dybkjær, Karen; Piasecki, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Oligocene – Miocene succession of onshore Denmark is about 250 m thick and is composed of interdigitating, coarse-grained fluvio-deltaic and mud-rich marine sediments; it is best exposed in coastal cliffs in eastern and northern Jylland but is also seen locally inland. These sediments...

  19. Late Miocene Sciuridae (Mammalia, Rodentia) from Anatolia, Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, A.A.; de Bruijn, H.; Wessels, W.

    Isolated cheek teeth of Sciuridae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from nine late Miocene localities in central Anatolia (Turkey) are described. The teeth represent at least 12 different species, five of which belong to the ground squirrel genus Tamias, two to the ground squirrel genus Spermophilinus, one to

  20. Primitive Anourosoricini and Allosoricinae from the Miocene of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto, J.; van Dam, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323247644

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the peculiar and highly specialized shrew tribe Anourosoricini is poorly known. The oldest known genera, Crusafontina Gibert and Darocasorex van Dam, first occur in Europe and North America around the Middle-Late Miocene transition (12-11 Ma), with the extremely rare cf. Crusafontina

  1. Proboscidea (Mammalia) from the Upper Miocene of Crevillente (Alicante, Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazo, A.V.; Montoya, P.

    2003-01-01

    The fossil Proboscidea from the Spanish Turolian (Upper Miocene) sites of Crevillente 2 (MN11) and Crevillente 15 and 16 (MN12) are described. The mastodont from Crevillente 2 is assigned to Tetralophodon cf. longirostris ‘grandincisivoid form’, recognised for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula

  2. A Miocene perspective on the evolution of the Amazonian biota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Salo, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Between c. 23 and 8 Ma, western Amazonia was occupied by the vast Pebas long-lived lake/wetland system. The Pebas system had a variety of influences over the evolution of Miocene and modern Amazonian biota; it formed a barrier for the exchange of terrestrial biota, a pathway for the transition of ma

  3. Miocene oceanographic changes of the western equatorial Atlantic (Ceara Rise) based on calcareous dinoflagellate cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, S.; Zonneveld, K. A. F.; Willems, H.

    2010-09-01

    , Palaeoecology 77, 203-234. Figueiredo, J., Hoorn, C., van der Veen, P., Soares, E. (2009): Late Miocene onset of the Amazon River and the Amazon deep-sea fan: Evidence from the Foz do Amazonas Basin. Geology; v. 37, no. 7; p. 619-622. Lear, C.H., Rosenthal, Y., Wright, J.D. (2003): The closing of a seaway: ocean water masses and global climate change. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 210, 425-436. Wright, J.D., Miller, K.G., Fairbanks, R.G. (1992): Early and middle Miocene stable isotopes: implications for deepwater circulation and climate. Paloceanography 7(3): 357-398.

  4. Rapid diversification of falcons (Aves: Falconidae) due to expansion of open habitats in the Late Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jérôme; Johnson, Jeff A; Mindell, David P

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how and why lineages diversify is central to understanding the origins of biological diversity. The avian family Falconidae (caracaras, forest-falcons, falcons) has an uneven distribution of species among multiple well-supported clades, and provides a useful system for testing hypotheses about diversification rate and correlation with environmental changes. We analyzed eight independent loci for 1-7 individuals from each of the 64 currently recognized Falconidae species, together with two fossil falconid temporal calibrations, to assess phylogeny, absolute divergence times and potential shifts in diversification rate. Our analyses supported similar diversification ages in the Early to Middle Miocene for the three traditional subfamilies, Herpetotherinae, Polyborinae and Falconinae. We estimated that divergences within the subfamily Falconinae began about 16mya and divergences within the most species-rich genus, Falco, including about 60% of all Falconidae species, began about 7.5mya. We found evidence for a significant increase in diversification rate at the basal phylogenetic node for the genus Falco, and the timing for this rate shift correlates generally with expansion of C4 grasslands beginning around the Miocene/Pliocene transition. Concomitantly, Falco lineages that are distributed primarily in grassland or savannah habitats, as opposed to woodlands, and exhibit migratory, as opposed to sedentary, behavior experienced a higher diversification rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Climatic and tectonic implications of the late Miocene Jakokkota flora, Bolivian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory-Wodzicki, Kathryn M.; McIntosh, W. C.; Velasquez, Kattia

    1998-12-01

    When compared to a database of modern foliar physiognomy and climate, the physiognomy of a new collection of dicotyledonous leaves from the 10.66±0.06 Ma Jakokkota flora, Bolivian Altiplano, implies a mean annual temperature (MAT) of 18.6-21.0±2.5°C. Similarly, a literature-derived sample of the early-middle Miocene Potosı´flora, Cordillera Oriental, implies a MAT of 21.5-21.7±2.1°C. We estimate that both floras experienced a growing season precipitation of 50±40 cm. The paleoclimate thus appears considerably warmer than the current highland climate, with MATs of 8-9°C; the paleoprecipitation is indistinguishable from modern levels. A comparison of the Miocene MATs with the modern MATs, with the effects of latitudinal continental drift and global climate change subtracted, suggests that the Jakokkota flora grew at an elevation of 590-1610±1000 m, and the Potosı´flora grew at an elevation of 0-1320±1000 m. Both paleoelevation estimates are significantly lower than the present elevations of 3940 and 4300 m, respectively, requiring a substantial component of Andean uplift since 10.7 Ma. This uplift history is consistent with two-stage tectonic models of Andean orogeny.

  6. Enamel thickness in the Middle Miocene great apes Anoiapithecus, Pierolapithecus and Dryopithecus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, D. M.; Fortuny, J.; Moyà-Solà, S.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of industrial computed tomography, relative enamel thickness (RET) is computed in three Middle Miocene (ca 11.9–11.8 Ma) hominoids from Abocador de Can Mata (Vallès-Penedès Basin, Catalonia, Spain): Pierolapithecus catalaunicus from BCV1 and Anoiapithecus brevirostris from C3-Aj, interpreted as stem hominids; and Dryopithecus fontani from C3-Ae of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Pierolapithecus displays an average RET value of 19.5, Anoiapithecus of 18.6 and Dryopithecus of 10.6. The thick-enamelled condition of Pierolapithecus and Anoiapithecus is also characteristic of afropithecids, including the more derived kenyapithecins from the early Middle Miocene of Eurasia (Griphopithecus and Kenyapithecus). Given the presence of other dentognathic and craniofacial similarities, thick enamel may be interpreted as a symplesiomorphy of the Hominidae (the great ape and human clade), which would have been later independently modified along several lineages. Given the correlation between thick enamel and hard-object feeding, our results suggest that thick enamel might have been the fundamental adaptation that enabled the out-of-Africa dispersal of great-ape ancestors and their subsequent initial radiation throughout Eurasia. The much thinner enamel of Dryopithecus is difficult to interpret given phylogenetic uncertainties, being either a hominine synapomorphy or a convergently developed feature. PMID:20335211

  7. High-resolution historical records from Pettaquamscutt River basin sediments: 1. 210Pb and varve chronologies validate record of 137Cs released by the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ana Lúcia; Hubeny, J. Bradford; Reddy, Christopher M.; King, John W.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2005-04-01

    Cesium-137 derived from the explosion of the Chernobyl reactor in 1986 was preserved in anoxic sediments from a coastal environment in southern Rhode Island. Although the radioactive plume was detected in surface air samples at several locations in the United States, this is the first known record of a Chernobyl 137Cs peak in sediments from North America. The inventory of Chernobyl 137Cs that was preserved in the Pettaquamscutt River is small compared to European counterparts and should only be detectable for the next 15-20 yr. However, the presence of two 137Cs peaks (1963 and 1987) identifies a well-dated segment of the sediment column that could be exploited in understanding the decomposition and preservation of terrestrial and aquatic organic matter. Different methods for calculating the 210Pb chronology were also evaluated in this study and checked against independent varve counting. The end result is a detailed chronology of a site well suited for reconstruction of historical records of environmental change.

  8. A southern species of the tropical catfish genus Phractocephalus (Teleostei: Siluriformes) in the Miocene of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpelicueta, María de las Mercedes; Cione, Alberto Luis

    2016-04-01

    Catfish bones from Tortonian (Miocene) freshwater beds of central Argentina are here identified as pertaining to a new species of the tropical pimelodid genus Phractocephalus. The new species differs from the other recent and fossil species of the genus in skull, pectoral girdle and spine characters. The material was found in different localities near the city of Paraná, Entre Ríos Province. The bearing horizon is the so-called "Conglomerado osífero" which constitutes the lowermost beds of the fluvial Ituzaingó Formation. The aquatic vertebrate fauna occurring in the bearing bed shows a similar generic composition to several northern South American Miocene units where Phractocephalus remains were found. This report extends the range of Phractocephalus more than 2000 km to the South. The record is in agreement with higher global temperatures and putative ample hydrographic connections of the river basins in the Paraná area with the Amazon basin until at least the early late Miocene.

  9. Miocene burial and exhumation of the India-Asia collision zone in southern Tibet: response to slab dynamics and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrapa, Barbara; Orme, D.A.; DeCelles, Peter G.; Kapp, Paul; Cosca, Michael A.; Waldrip, R.

    2014-01-01

    The India-Asia collision zone in southern Tibet preserves a record of geodynamic and erosional processes following intercontinental collision. Apatite fission-track and zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He data from the Oligocene–Miocene Kailas Formation, within the India-Asia collision zone, show a synchronous cooling signal at 17 ± 1 Ma, which is younger than the ca. 26–21 Ma depositional age of the Kailas Formation, constrained by U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and requires heating (burial) after ca. 21 Ma and subsequent rapid exhumation. Data from the Gangdese batholith underlying the Kailas Formation also indicate Miocene exhumation. The thermal history of the Kailas Formation is consistent with rapid subsidence during a short-lived phase of early Miocene extension followed by uplift and exhumation driven by rollback and northward underthrusting of the Indian plate, respectively. Significant removal of material from the India-Asia collision zone was likely facilitated by efficient incision of the paleo–Indus River and paleo–Yarlung River in response to drainage reorganization and/or intensification of the Asian monsoon.

  10. Diversity and distribution patterns of the Oligocene and Miocene decapod crustaceans (Crustacea: Malacostraca) of the Western and Central Paratethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2017-01-01

    Decapod associations have been significant components of marine habitats throughout the Cenozoic when the major diversification of the group occurred. In this respect, the circum-Mediterranean area is of particular interest due to its complex palaeogeographic history. During the Oligo-Miocene, it was divided in two major areas, Mediterranean and Paratethys. Decapod crustaceans from the Paratethys Sea have been reported in the literature since the 19th century, but only recent research advances allow evaluation of the diversity and distribution patterns of the group. Altogether 176 species-level taxa have been identified from the Oligocene and Miocene of the Western and Central Paratethys. Using the three-dimensional NMDS analysis, the composition of decapod crustacean faunas of the Paratethys shows significant differences through time. The Ottnangian and Karpatian decapod associations were similar to each other both taxonomically and in the mode of preservation, and they differed taxonomically from the Badenian ones. The Early Badenian assemblages also differed taxonomically from the Late Badenian ones. The time factor, including speciation, immigration from other provinces and/or (local or global) extinction, can explain temporal differences among assemblages within the same environment. High decapod diversity during the Badenian was correlated with the presence of reefal settings. The Badenian was the time with the highest decapod diversity, which can, however, be a consequence of undersampling of other time slices. Whereas the Ottnangian and Karpatian decapod assemblages are preserved virtually exclusively in the siliciclastic “Schlier”-type facies that originated in non-reefal offshore environments, carbonate sedimentation and the presence of reefal environments during the Badenian in the Central Paratethys promoted thriving of more diverse reef-associated assemblages. In general, Paratethyan decapods exhibited homogeneous distribution during the Oligo-Miocene

  11. Diversity and distribution patterns of the Oligocene and Miocene decapod crustaceans (Crustacea: Malacostraca of the Western and Central Paratethys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyžný Matúš

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Decapod associations have been significant components of marine habitats throughout the Cenozoic when the major diversification of the group occurred. In this respect, the circum-Mediterranean area is of particular interest due to its complex palaeogeographic history. During the Oligo-Miocene, it was divided in two major areas, Mediterranean and Paratethys. Decapod crustaceans from the Paratethys Sea have been reported in the literature since the 19th century, but only recent research advances allow evaluation of the diversity and distribution patterns of the group. Altogether 176 species-level taxa have been identified from the Oligocene and Miocene of the Western and Central Paratethys. Using the three-dimensional NMDS analysis, the composition of decapod crustacean faunas of the Paratethys shows significant differences through time. The Ottnangian and Karpatian decapod associations were similar to each other both taxonomically and in the mode of preservation, and they differed taxonomically from the Badenian ones. The Early Badenian assemblages also differed taxonomically from the Late Badenian ones. The time factor, including speciation, immigration from other provinces and/or (local or global extinction, can explain temporal differences among assemblages within the same environment. High decapod diversity during the Badenian was correlated with the presence of reefal settings. The Badenian was the time with the highest decapod diversity, which can, however, be a consequence of undersampling of other time slices. Whereas the Ottnangian and Karpatian decapod assemblages are preserved virtually exclusively in the siliciclastic “Schlier”-type facies that originated in non-reefal offshore environments, carbonate sedimentation and the presence of reefal environments during the Badenian in the Central Paratethys promoted thriving of more diverse reef-associated assemblages. In general, Paratethyan decapods exhibited homogeneous distribution

  12. Diversity and distribution patterns of the Oligocene and Miocene decapod crustaceans (Crustacea: Malacostraca) of the Western and Central Paratethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2016-10-01

    Decapod associations have been significant components of marine habitats throughout the Cenozoic when the major diversification of the group occurred. In this respect, the circum-Mediterranean area is of particular interest due to its complex palaeogeographic history. During the Oligo-Miocene, it was divided in two major areas, Mediterranean and Paratethys. Decapod crustaceans from the Paratethys Sea have been reported in the literature since the 19th century, but only recent research advances allow evaluation of the diversity and distribution patterns of the group. Altogether 176 species-level taxa have been identified from the Oligocene and Miocene of the Western and Central Paratethys. Using the three-dimensional NMDS analysis, the composition of decapod crustacean faunas of the Paratethys shows significant differences through time. The Ottnangian and Karpatian decapod associations were similar to each other both taxonomically and in the mode of preservation, and they differed taxonomically from the Badenian ones. The Early Badenian assemblages also differed taxonomically from the Late Badenian ones. The time factor, including speciation, immigration from other provinces and/or (local or global) extinction, can explain temporal differences among assemblages within the same environment. High decapod diversity during the Badenian was correlated with the presence of reefal settings. The Badenian was the time with the highest decapod diversity, which can, however, be a consequence of undersampling of other time slices. Whereas the Ottnangian and Karpatian decapod assemblages are preserved virtually exclusively in the siliciclastic "Schlier"-type facies that originated in non-reefal offshore environments, carbonate sedimentation and the presence of reefal environments during the Badenian in the Central Paratethys promoted thriving of more diverse reef-associated assemblages. In general, Paratethyan decapods exhibited homogeneous distribution during the Oligo-Miocene

  13. Middle Miocene pedological record of monsoonal climate from NW Himalaya (Jammu & Kashmir State), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjoo, R. K.; Shaker, Som

    2007-03-01

    The Lower Siwalik Subgroup represented by the Dodenal (Kamlial Formation) and Ramnagar Members (Chinji Formation) is well exposed at Ramnagar, District Udhampur, Jammu & Kashmir State. The Ramnagar Member consists of an alternating sequence of silt and mudstone formed under crevasse-splay and flood-plain environments of deposition. Argillisol and gleysol soils are developed on the Ramnagar Member deposits. Argillisols formed under well-drained conditions at high levels, whereas gleysols formed under poorly drained conditions at low levels of the palaeo-landscape. Geochemical and micromorphological studies of the Ramnagar Member palaeosols suggest formation under wet and humid climatic conditions. Early uplift of the Tibetan Plateau/Himalaya resulted in a contemporaneous change in precipitation and monsoonal climate conditions within the Indian region beginning in Middle Miocene.

  14. Evidence that ebolaviruses and cuevaviruses have been diverging from marburgviruses since the Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the timescale of evolution is critical for comparative virology but remains elusive for many RNA viruses. Age estimates based on mutation rates can severely underestimate divergences for ancient viral genes that are evolving under strong purifying selection. Paleoviral dating, however, can provide minimum age estimates for ancient divergence, but few orthologous paleoviruses are known within clades of extant viruses. For example, ebolaviruses and marburgviruses are well-studied mammalian pathogens, but their comparative biology is difficult to interpret because the existing estimates of divergence are controversial. Here we provide evidence that paleoviral elements of two genes (ebolavirus-like VP35 and NP in cricetid rodent genomes originated after the divergence of ebolaviruses and cuevaviruses from marburgviruses. We provide evidence of orthology by identifying common paleoviral insertion sites among the rodent genomes. Our findings indicate that ebolaviruses and cuevaviruses have been diverging from marburgviruses since the early Miocene.

  15. European Miocene hominids and the origin of the African ape and human clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, David R; Nargolwalla, Mariam C; Kordos, László

    2012-01-01

    In 1871, Darwin famously opined, "In each great region of the world the living mammals are closely related to the extinct species of the same region. It is therefore probable that Africa was formerly inhabited by extinct apes closely allied to the gorilla and chimpanzee; and as these two species are now man's nearest allies, it is somewhat more probable that our early progenitors lived on the African continent than elsewhere." Although this quote is frequently recalled today, Darwin's next line is rarely acknowledged: "But it is useless to speculate on this subject, for an ape nearly as large as a man, namely the Dryopithecus of Lartet, which was closely allied to the anthropomorphous Hylobates, existed in Europe during the Upper Miocene period; and since so remote a period the earth has certainly undergone many great revolutions, and there has been ample time for migration on the largest scale." Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. PROPOTAMOCHOERUS SP. (SUIDAE, MAMMALIA FROM THE LATE MIOCENE OF GRAVITELLI (MESSINA, SICILY, ITALY REDISCOVERED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIANNI GALLAI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two casts of a suid from the Late Miocene of Gravitelli (Messina, Sicily, originally described by Seguenza in 1902. The entire Gravitelli faunal collection was lost in the early 1900¡¦s. The recent rediscovery of two casts in the collections of the Museo di Storia Naturale of the University of Florence represent the only available material from this locality (in addition to the original description and illustration by Seguenza. The study of these casts allow a revision of the Gravitelli suid and its attribution to the genus Propotamochoerus. Although a specific determination is not possible, we suggest probable affinities with the species P. hysudricus or P. provincialis.

  17. Miocene progressive forearc extension in the Central Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, A.; Valente, A.; Cavuoto, G.; Torrente, M. M.

    2017-07-01

    Miocene extensional sedimentary basins are being increasingly recognized in Central Mediterranean. However the paleogeographic reconstruction of the Paleo-Tyrrhenian during this time span results a difficult task because the subsequent Pliocene-Quaternary backarc opening moved away these older sedimentary basins. Our study outlines principal deformation events recorded by sediments that were deposited within minor basins of the Tyrrhenian Sea region and provides constraints on the duration of these events. The interpretation of seismic profiles, wells, and outcrops data together with a review of the middle-upper Miocene successions permitted us to recognize Miocene third order depositional sequences, reconstruct the fault pattern, and furnish a detailed evolution of the sedimentary basins that preceded the Pliocene-Quaternary Tyrrhenian high stretching. Based on the stratigraphic and tectonic constraints together with the age migration of the depocenters, we reconstructed a detailed paleogeographic evolution of central Mediterranean. Sedimentary basins architecture and fault pattern indicate a system of approximately N-S oriented normal faults and approximately E-W transform faults that were active since the Late Oligocene. Two period of extensional/transtensional tectonics (late Oligocene-Lower Burdigalian and Upper Langhian-Tortonian) were interrupted by a compressional event (late Burdigalian-Lower Langhian). Tacking in account the position of the Miocene volcanic arc (Sardinia), we propose that the coeval sedimentary basins developed in the central Mediterranean as forearc extensional/transtensional basins during the progressive collision with the African plate and before the Tyrrhenian backarc opening. Unlike published late Oligocene-Tortonian reconstructions of the western-central Mediterranean realm that report a linear migration of backarc extension, our results support a geodynamic model characterized by a progressive deformation of the forearc extension

  18. Across the Pacific: Climate Evolution in the Middle Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lyndsey; Wade, Bridget; Holbourn, Ann; Leng, Melanie

    2014-05-01

    We present the first high-resolution (3 kyr) astronomically-tuned record of δ18O and δ13C from planktonic foraminifera for the equatorial Pacific Ocean (16.5-13.5 Myr). Our data provides exciting new information on sea surface temperatures and primary productivity changes at the tropics during the middle Miocene at a resolution not achieved in any previous study, which sheds new light on the middle Miocene climatic transition (MMCT) and associated carbon-isotope excursion. Reliable sea surface temperature estimates are crucial to any reconstruction and modelling of past ocean salinity and density, water column stratification, thermohaline circulation, and ice volume. Despite extensive studies of benthic foraminifera, existing planktonic foraminiferal records of this interval are extremely scarce and of low resolution, with samples representing time intervals of 2x105and 5x105 years. Previous studies have been hindered by the absence of biogenic carbonate (e.g., Leg 199). Consequently the impact of global warming and cooling on tropical surface waters and the propagation of orbital cycles in the Earth System are unknown. In 2009 Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320/321 recovered lower-middle Miocene sediments with high sedimentation rates (30m/myr), continuous recovery, and orbital cyclicity from the east equatorial Pacific Ocean. At Site U1338 planktonic foraminifera are abundant and diverse in the lower and middle Miocene sediments and exceptionally well preserved. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed open pore spaces, little evidence of calcitic overgrowth on the wall surface and in many cases preserved spines (Fox and Wade, 2013). We compare our data from Site U1338 to Site 1146 in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, to reconstruct bottom and surface water conditions and changes in ocean dynamics across the equatorial Pacific during this highly complex interval of climate history.

  19. Fish vertebra from Miocene beds at Govce, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasja Mikuž

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a vertebra and a small shark tooth found in the Miocene Govce sandstone near Govce west of Laško in central Slovenia. The vertebra belongs to a shark of the superorder Galeomorphii but we could not determine it with greater precision. The small tooth was assigned to Carcharias cf. taurus Rafinesque, 1810. The nannofossils in the sample are scarce and did not allow dating at biozone precision.

  20. The Costa Rican Jurassic to Miocene oceanic complexes: Origin, tectonics and relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denyer, Percy; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-12-01

    The occurrences of oceanic assemblages on the Pacific shore of Costa Rica are part of an intricate group of complexes with different tectonic origins. Although they are dismembered and disrupted, they are the only available inland source of information to decipher the evolution of this active margin. Six main regions are described in this paper: (1) Santa Elena Peninsula, constituted by a supra-subduction zone (Santa Elena Nappe), that is overthrusting an igneous-sedimentary Aptian-Cenomanian sequence (Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex), which includes OIB (Ocean Island Basalts) portions, (2) the Nicoya Complex, which is a Jurassic-Cretaceous chert sediment pile disrupted and detached from its original basement by multiple magmatic events that occurred during the formation of the CLIP (Caribbean Large Igneous Province), (3) the Tortugal area formed by the Tortugal Suite with OIB signature and surrounded by Nicoya Complex outcrops, (4) the Herradura Block composed of the Tulín Formation to Maastrichtian to Lower Eocene OIB accreted oceanic island and the Nicoya Complex as basement, (5) Quepos Block correlated with the Tulín Formation, (6) the Osa-Burica Block composed of the Golfito and Burica Terranes (geochemically and chronologically correlated to the Nicoya Complex), Rincón Block (Early Paleocene to Early Eocene accreted seamounts), and the Miocene Osa-Caño Accretionary Complex. The Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex together with the Tortugal Suite have OIB signatures and possibly without Galapagos hotspot geochemical affinity. These coincidences would be explained by the hypothetical existence of an "autochthonous" Cretaceous basement formed by these two regions together with the rest of the Caribbean. Costa Rican basement is constituted by several CLIP portions and seamounts accreted from the end of Cretaceous in the northwest to the Miocene in the southeast, forming the diverse oceanic occurrences of the Pacific, which are mainly connected to the Galapagos

  1. New Miocene Fossils and the History of Penguins in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Travis; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Gallagher, Stephen J; Tomkins, Ellyn; Allan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Australia has a fossil record of penguins reaching back to the Eocene, yet today is inhabited by just one breeding species, the little penguin Eudyptula minor. The description of recently collected penguin fossils from the re-dated upper Miocene Port Campbell Limestone of Portland (Victoria), in addition to reanalysis of previously described material, has allowed the Cenozoic history of penguins in Australia to be placed into a global context for the first time. Australian pre-Quaternary fossil penguins represent stem taxa phylogenetically disparate from each other and E. minor, implying multiple dispersals and extinctions. Late Eocene penguins from Australia are closest to contemporaneous taxa in Antarctica, New Zealand and South America. Given current material, the Miocene Australian fossil penguin fauna is apparently unique in harbouring 'giant penguins' after they went extinct elsewhere; and including stem taxa until at least 6 Ma, by which time crown penguins dominated elsewhere in the southern hemisphere. Separation of Australia from Antarctica during the Palaeogene, and its subsequent drift north, appears to have been a major event in Australian penguin biogeography. Increasing isolation through the Cenozoic may have limited penguin dispersal to Australia from outside the Australasian region, until intensification of the eastwards-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the mid-Miocene established a potential new dispersal vector to Australia.

  2. Estimates of CO2 since the mid-Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather

    2016-04-01

    For past warm climates, direct CO2 determinations are unavailable. Our inferences of Antarctic ice sheet thresholds and climate sensitivity to CO2 are therefore strongly conditioned by the reliability of CO2 proxy reconstructions. For the Miocene, these rely heavily on proxies using the carbon isotopic fractionation of marine phytoplankton during photosynthesis (ep). While recent records are beginning to reveal more clearly the long term CO2 trends since the middle Miocene , the absolute CO2 concentrations are subject to higher uncertainty. This in turn influences the ability of models to simulate dynamic Antarctic ice sheet behavior in the context of expected ice sheet hysteresis. In this contribution, I discuss a new approach for estimating CO2 from published and new measurements of phytoplankton carbon isotopic fractionation using the ACTI-CO cell model. This approach accounts for the physiological adaptations made by phytoplankton cells to avoid falling below optimal photosynthetic rates as CO2 declines, the carbon concentrating mechanism. The model yields CO2 estimates which can be significantly (up to 2-fold) higher than those estimated from classic equations. Given the large degree of cooling since the late Miocene in extratropical sea surface temperature records, such CO2 estimates are consistent with a more conservative estimate of climate sensitivity over the last 12 Ma.

  3. New Miocene Fossils and the History of Penguins in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Park

    Full Text Available Australia has a fossil record of penguins reaching back to the Eocene, yet today is inhabited by just one breeding species, the little penguin Eudyptula minor. The description of recently collected penguin fossils from the re-dated upper Miocene Port Campbell Limestone of Portland (Victoria, in addition to reanalysis of previously described material, has allowed the Cenozoic history of penguins in Australia to be placed into a global context for the first time. Australian pre-Quaternary fossil penguins represent stem taxa phylogenetically disparate from each other and E. minor, implying multiple dispersals and extinctions. Late Eocene penguins from Australia are closest to contemporaneous taxa in Antarctica, New Zealand and South America. Given current material, the Miocene Australian fossil penguin fauna is apparently unique in harbouring 'giant penguins' after they went extinct elsewhere; and including stem taxa until at least 6 Ma, by which time crown penguins dominated elsewhere in the southern hemisphere. Separation of Australia from Antarctica during the Palaeogene, and its subsequent drift north, appears to have been a major event in Australian penguin biogeography. Increasing isolation through the Cenozoic may have limited penguin dispersal to Australia from outside the Australasian region, until intensification of the eastwards-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the mid-Miocene established a potential new dispersal vector to Australia.

  4. Miocene to Pleistocene floras and climate of the Eastern Himalayan Siwaliks, and new palaeoelevation estimates for the Namling-Oiyug Basin, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahasin Ali; Spicer, Robert A.; Bera, Subir; Ghosh, Ruby; Yang, Jian; Spicer, Teresa E. V.; Guo, Shuang-xing; Su, Tao; Jacques, Frédéric; Grote, Paul J.

    2014-02-01

    Four fossil floras ranging in age from the mid Miocene to the early Pleistocene from the eastern Siwaliks near Darjeeling and in Arunachal Pradesh (AP) were compared taxonomically and subjected to a CLAMP (Climate Leaf Analysis Multivariate Program) analysis using a new calibration dataset that includes sites from India, southern China and Thailand and high resolution gridded climate data. Two lower Siwalik mid Miocene floras yielded almost the same values suggesting mean annual temperatures (MATs) of 25.4 and 25.3 °C ± 2.8 °C (all uncertainties ± 2 sigma) with warm month mean temperatures (WMMTs) of 28.4 and 27.8 ± 3.39 °C and cold month mean temperatures (CMMTs) of 17.9 and 21.3 ± 4 °C. Precipitation estimates have high uncertainties but suggest a weak monsoon with growing season precipitations of 242 ± 92 cm for Darjeeling and 174 ± 92 cm for AP. Leaves from the middle Siwalik (Pliocene) sediments of AP indicate a lowering of the MAT to 23.7 °C, a function of cooler winter months (CMMT 16.9 °C). The AP early Pleistocene temperatures and rainfall were similar to those of the mid Miocene. Changes in the monsoon index suggest that in the AP area there has been little change in the intensity of the monsoon since mid Miocene time, while further west at Darjeeling there has been an intensification since the mid Miocene. Mid Miocene CLAMP-derived enthalpy estimates provide sea level (flora from the Namling-Oiyug Basin, southern Tibet. Enthalpy values from Darjeeling and AP were 354.1 and 355.8 ± 10.3 kJ/kg respectively, while that derived from the Namling-Oiyug flora was 296.3 kJ/kg. This yields a palaeoelevation of 5888 m for the Namling site using the Darjeeling enthalpy estimate as a sea level datum and 6065 m using the AP assemblage. The combined uncertainty is ± 728 m. Model corrected enthalpy trends at sea level across palaeolatitude and longitude reduce the mean elevation to 5.54 km. These elevations are higher than earlier estimates from the same

  5. A 1000-year chironomid-based salinity reconstruction from varved sediments of Sugan Lake, Qaidam Basin, arid Northwest China, and its palaeoclimatic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JianHui; CHEN FaHu; ZHANG EnLou; BROOKS Stephen J; ZHOU AiFeng; ZHANG JiaWu

    2009-01-01

    A 1000-year high-resolution (~10 years) chironomid record from varved sediments of Sugan Lake, Qaidam Basin on the northern Tibetan Plateau, is presented. The chironomid assemblages are mainly composed of the relatively high-saline-water taxa Psectrocladius barbimanus-type and Orthocladius/Cricotopus, and the relatively low-saline-water taxa Procladius and Psectrocladius sordidellus-type. Variations in the chironomid fauna and inferred salinities suggest that over the last millennium, the Sugan Lake catchment has alternated between contrasting climatic conditions, having a dry climate during the period 990-1550 AD, a relatively humid climate during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (1550-1840 AD), and a dry climate again from 1840 AD onwards. At the decadal to centennial scale, a wet event around 1200-1230 AD, interrupting the generally arid period (990-1550 AD), and a dry event around 1590-1700 AD, punctuating the generally humid period (1550-1840 AD), are clearly documented. Trends in the chironomid-based salinity time series indicate a highly unstable climate during the LIA when salinity fluctuations were of greater magnitude and higher frequency. The effective moisture evolution in the Sugan Lake catchment during the last millennium reconstructed by chironomid analysis is in broad agreement with previous palaeo-moisture data derived from other sites in arid Northwest China (ANC). The LIA, characterized by generally humid conditions over the west-erly-dominated ANC was distinctly different from that in monsoonal China, implying an "out-of-phase" relationship between moisture evolution in these two regions during the past 1000 years.

  6. Geochemical properties and environmental impacts of seven Campanian tephra layers deposited between 40 and 38 ka BP in the varved lake sediments of Lago Grande di Monticchio, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutke, Kristina; Wulf, Sabine; Tomlinson, Emma L.; Hardiman, Mark; Dulski, Peter; Luterbacher, Jürg; Brauer, Achim

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of new tephrostratigraphical and environmental impact studies of the 40-38 ka varved sediment section of Lago Grande di Monticchio (southern Italy). The sediments in this time zone are correlated with the Heinrich H4-stadial that occurred between Greenland Interstadials GI-9 and GI-8, and include the widespread Campanian Ignimbrite (CI, 39.3 ka) as a thick tephra layer in the middle of the H4 stadial. The CI in the Monticchio record is overlain by the Schiava tephra from Vesuvius, c. 1240 varve-years younger than the CI, and preceded by four tephras from small-scale eruptions of the Phlegrean Fields and by an Ischia-derived tephra. The four Phlegrean Field-derived tephras were deposited 600 varve-years or fewer prior to the deposition of the CI and show very similar major, minor, and trace element glass compositions to those of the CI. This close similarity in composition and age could compromise the accurate linking and synchronisation of palaeoenvironmental records in the central Mediterranean area. Microfacies analyses and μ-XRF core scanning were used to characterise primary and secondary depositional features of all seven tephra layers and to evaluate environmental and ecological responses after tephra deposition. Higher concentrations of tephra-derived material (mainly glass shards and pumices) in primary and reworked layers were detected by elevated K-counts in μ-XRF elemental core scans. Reworked tephra derives mainly from in-washing from the littoral zone and the catchment and occurs within five to 30 years, and up to 1240 varve years, after the deposition of thinner (1-5 mm) and thicker (5-230 mm) tephra fallout deposits, respectively. An obvious response of diatom population growth directly after the primary tephra deposition was observed for the thicker tephra layers (>1 mm) during the first 1-8 years after deposition of the primary deposit indicating that the additional input of potential nutrients (glass shards) temporarily

  7. Small mammal carbon isotope ecology across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynek, Scott A.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Prado, José Luis; Brown, Francis H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Quade, Jay

    2012-03-01

    The late Miocene expansion of plants using the C4 photosynthetic pathway in South America has been documented by tooth enamel carbon isotope ratios (δ13Cen). However, a more detailed understanding of this ecological event is hampered by poor chronological control on the widespread fossil localities from which isotopic data are derived. This study develops a δ13Cen record from a single 2500 m-thick stratigraphic section in subtropical South America. Strata at Puerta de Corral Quemado (PCQ), northwestern Argentina, span 9 to 3.5 Ma in age, and existing paleosol carbonate data (δ13Cpc) document C4 expansion across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary. Comparison of δ13Cen data with δ13Cpc data at high stratigraphic resolution refines understanding of this ecological event in South America. Small mammal δ13Cen data in particular are complementary to that of large mammal and paleosol δ13C data. Small mammal teeth integrate isotopic data over much shorter temporal and spatial scales than large mammal teeth, providing a sensitive measure of local vegetation and placing constraints on the landscape distribution of C3 and C4 plants. Explicit consideration of the distinctive carbon isotope enrichment factor between enamel and diet for rodents (ɛ*en-diet = 11‰, as opposed to 14‰ for large mammals) allows for unequivocal inference of C4 vegetation ~ 1 Ma prior to that inferred from large mammal δ13Cen data, and ~ 2 Ma prior to δ13Cpc data. This multiproxy record demonstrates that C4 plants were a stable component of the ecosystem hundreds of thousands of years prior to their major ecological expansion, and that the expansion of C4 plants was pulsed at PCQ. Two periods of ecological change are demonstrated by δ13C and δ18O data at ~ 7 Ma and 5.3 Ma (coincident with the Miocene-Pliocene boundary). Development of small mammal δ13Cen records on other continents may provide similar insight into the early stages of the global C4 event.

  8. Oligocene to Miocene terrestrial climate change and the demise of forests on Wilkes Land, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Ulrich; Strother, Stephanie; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Bijl, Peter; Pross, Joerg; Woodward, John; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2016-04-01

    The question whether Cenozoic climate was warm enough to support a substantial vegetation cover on the Antarctic continent is of great significance to the ongoing controversial debate on the dynamic behaviour of Antarctic land ice during the transition from a greenhouse to an icehouse world. Here we present palynological results from an Oligocene to Miocene sediment record provided by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 318 to the Wilkes Land margin (East Antarctica). The Oligocene assemblages (33.9-23 Ma) are dominated by pollen and spores from temperate forest and sub-Antarctic shrub vegetation inhabiting different altitudinal zones. These include a lowland cold temperate forest with Dacrydium and Lagarostrobos (both common in southern forests of New Zealand and Tasmania today) and a high altitude tundra shrubland comprising Microcachrys, Nothofagus (southern beech) and Podocarpaceae conifers. A decline in pollen percentages of Dacrydium and Lagarostrobos and absence of Proteaceae indicate climate cooling during the late Oligocene (~25-23 Ma). However, the continuous presence of Lagarostrobos suggests that the full transition to a tundra environment had not yet occurred and climate on Wilkes Land during the late Oligocene was still warm enough to support forest vegetation in sheltered areas. Temperature reconstructions derived from the fossil pollen assemblages using the Coexistence Approach suggest mean annual temperatures (MATs) between 6.7-13.7°C during the early Oligocene and a drop of minimum MATs to 5.8°C in the late Oligocene. Pollen of "unambiguous" forest indicators, such as Lagarostrobos, are absent in the Miocene sediment record (16.2 -12.5 Ma) but temperatures were still high enough (minimum MATs > 5°C) to sustain a woody sub-Antarctic vegetation under partially ice-free conditions. Wilkes Land provides a unique record of Antarctic vegetation change from a subtropical, highly diverse Eocene rainforest to an Oligocene cold temperate

  9. Reconnaissance geochronology of tuffs in the Miocene Barstow Formation: implications for basin evolution and tectonics in the central Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D.M.; Leslie, S.R.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Vazquez, J.A.; Reynolds, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Early to middle Miocene lacustrine strata of the Barstow Formation are well dated in just a few places, limiting our ability to infer basin evolution and regional tectonics. At the type section in the Mud Hills, previous studies have shown that the lacustrine interval of the Barstow Formation is between ~16.3 Ma and ~13.4 Ma. Elsewhere, lake beds of the Barstow Formation have yielded vertebrate fossils showing the Hemingfordian/Bartovian transition at ~16 Ma but are otherwise poorly dated. In an attempt to clarify the age and depositional environments of the lake deposits, we are mapping the Barstow Formation and dating zircons from interbedded tuffs, as well as testing ash-flow tuffs for the distinctive remanent magnetization direction of the widespread Peach Spring Tuff. Thus far, our new U-Pb zircon ages inficate that the Barstow lake beds contain tuff beds as old as 19.1 Ma and as young as 15.3 Ma. At Harvard Hill, Barstow lake beds contain a thick tuff dated at 18.7 Ma. On the basis of zircon ages, mineralogy, zircon chemistry, and paleomagnetic results, we consider the thick tuff to be a lacustrine facies of the Peach Spring Tuff. We have identified the Peach Spring Tuff by similar methods at eight localities over a broad area, providing a timeline for several fluvial and lacustrine sections. The new dates indicate that long-lived lacustrine systems originated before 19 Ma and persisted to at least 15 Ma. The onset of lacustrine conditions predates the Peach Spring Tuff in most Barstow Formation sections and may be older than 19.5 Ma in some places. The new data indicate that the central Mojave Desert contained narrow to broad lake basins during and after extension, and that Barstow lacustrine deposits did not exclusively postdate extensional tectonics. At present, it is unclear whether several separate, small lake basins coexisted during the early to middle Miocene, or if instead several small early Miocene basins gradually coalesced over about 6 millions

  10. Miocene Onset of Extension in the Turkana Depression, Kenya: Implications for the Geodynamic Evolution of the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, S.; Gleadow, A. J. W.; Kohn, B. P.; Seiler, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleogene-Recent East African Rift System (EARS) is the foremost modern example of continental rifting, providing much of our understanding of the early stages of continental breakup. The EARS traverses two regions of crustal uplift, the Ethiopian and East African Domes, separated by the Turkana Depression. This wide region of subdued topography coincides with the NW-SE trend of the Jurassic-Paleogene Anza Rift. Opinions on the fundamental geodynamic driver for EARS rifting are divided, however, principally between models involving migrating plume(s) and a single elongated 'superplume'. While competing models have similar topographic outcomes, they predict different morphotectonic evolutions for the Turkana Depression. Models inferring southward plume-migration imply that the plume must have passed below the Turkana Depression during the Paleogene, in order to have migrated to the East African Dome by the Miocene. The possible temporal denudational response to such plume activity is testable using low temperature thermochronology. We present apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He (AHe), and zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) data from the Lapurr Range, an uplifted Precambrian basement block in northern Turkana. Low radiation damage ZHe results displaying an age range of ~70-210 Ma, and combined with stratigraphic evidence, suggest ~4-6 km of Jurassic-Early Cretaceous denudation, probably associated with early Anza Rift tectonism. AFT ages of ~9-15 Ma imply subsequent burial beneath no more than ~4 km of overburden, thus preserving the Jurassic-Cretaceous ZHe ages. Together with AFT results, AHe data (~3-19 Ma) support ~2-4 km of Miocene-Pliocene uplift of the Lapurr Range in the footwall of the E-dipping Lapurr normal fault. Miocene AFT and AHe ages are interpreted to reflect the initiation of the EARS in the Turkana Depression. If extension is associated with plume activity, then upwelling in the Turkana region is unlikely to have started prior to the Miocene, much

  11. Cooling history of the Gongga batholith: Implications for the Xianshuihe Fault and Miocene kinematics of SE Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Ze; Replumaz, Anne; Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Wang, Guo-Can; Bernet, Matthias; van der Beek, Peter; Paquette, Jean Louis; Chevalier, Marie-Luce

    2017-05-01

    Using thermochronological data and thermokinematic modeling, we constrain the timing of late Miocene exhumation of the northern portion of the Gongga batholith, located in Southeast Tibet along the Xianshuihe Fault (XF). We show that rapid exhumation started in the north of the Gongga batholith at ∼9 Ma at a rate of ∼1.85 km/Myr and slowed down since ∼4 Ma. A magmatic pulse occurring during the early Pliocene (∼4 Ma) has overprinted the rapid Miocene exhumation phase in some parts of the batholith, which record mainly early Pliocene post-magmatic cooling. Slow exhumation since ∼4 Ma is consistent with the present-day lower relief observed in the centre of the batholith, which contrasts with the rugged high peaks located to the south. We propose that the northern segment of the XF, the Yalahe fault, which is not active at present, was active between 9 and 4 Ma, forming a restraining bend that focused exhumation south of it. Since ∼4 Ma, the Selaha and the Zheduotang faults form the present-day restraining bend south of which the highest part of the massif is located, including the Gongga Shan that rises more than 3000 m above the mean elevation of the plateau. In the north of the batholith, similar peaks have been removed since the Miocene by local relief reduction at high elevations. Considering that the onset of motion along the XF is contemporaneous with the onset of rapid exhumation recorded along the Kangding transect at ∼9 Ma and a total offset of ∼62 km documented for the XF, the average slip rate of the XF is ∼7 mm/yr since 9 Ma.

  12. Palaeoenvironmental shifts drove the adaptive radiation of a noctuid stemborer tribe (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Apameini in the miocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel F A Toussaint

    Full Text Available Between the late Oligocene and the early Miocene, climatic changes have shattered the faunal and floral communities and drove the apparition of new ecological niches. Grassland biomes began to supplant forestlands, thus favouring a large-scale ecosystem turnover. The independent adaptive radiations of several mammal lineages through the evolution of key innovations are classic examples of these changes. However, little is known concerning the evolutionary history of other herbivorous groups in relation with this modified environment. It is especially the case in phytophagous insect communities, which have been rarely studied in this context despite their ecological importance. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic and evolutionary patterns of grass-specialist moths from the species-rich tribe Apameini (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae. The molecular dating analyses carried out over the corresponding phylogenetic framework reveal an origin around 29 million years ago for the Apameini. Ancestral state reconstructions indicate (i a potential Palaearctic origin of the tribe Apameini associated with a major dispersal event in Afrotropics for the subtribe Sesamiina; (ii a recent colonization from Palaearctic of the New World and Oriental regions by several independent lineages; and (iii an ancestral association of the tribe Apameini over grasses (Poaceae. Diversification analyses indicate that diversification rates have not remained constant during the evolution of the group, as underlined by a significant shift in diversification rates during the early Miocene. Interestingly, this age estimate is congruent with the development of grasslands at this time. Rather than clade ages, variations in diversification rates among genera better explain the current differences in species diversity. Our results underpin a potential adaptive radiation of these phytophagous moths with the family Poaceae in relation with the major environmental shifts that have occurred in the

  13. Estudio sistemático y bioestratigráfico de los Eomyidae (Rodentia) del Oligoceno superior y Mioceno inferior español = Taxonomy and biostratigraphy of Eomyidae (Rodentia) from the upper Oligocene and lower Miocene of Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Sierra, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is the first fundamental study on Spanish Eomyidae. The flourishing time of this family in Europe was the Late Oligocene and Early Miocene. Four genera are recognized in this time span: Rhodanomys Depéret & Douxami, 1902, Ritteneria Stehlin & Schaub, 1951, Pseudotheridomys Schlosser, 1926

  14. Eccentricity pacing of eastern equatorial Pacific carbonate dissolution cycles during the Miocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Karlos G. D.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Channell, James E. T.; Lyle, Mitch; Shackford, Julia K.; Wilkens, Roy H.; Andersen, Nils

    2016-09-01

    The Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO; ~16.9 to 14.7 Ma) provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate climate-carbon cycle dynamics during a geologically recent interval of global warmth. We present benthic stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope records (5-12 kyr time resolution) spanning the late early to middle Miocene interval (18 to 13 Ma) at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1335 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean). The U1335 stable isotope series track the onset and development of the MCO as well as the transitional climatic phase culminating with global cooling and expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet at ~13.8 Ma. We integrate these new data with published stable isotope, geomagnetic polarity, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanner-derived carbonate records from IODP Sites U1335, U1336, U1337, and U1338 on a consistent, astronomically tuned timescale. Benthic isotope and XRF scanner-derived CaCO3 records depict prominent 100 kyr variability with 400 kyr cyclicity additionally imprinted on δ13C and CaCO3 records, pointing to a tight coupling between the marine carbon cycle and climate variations. Our intersite comparison further indicates that the lysocline behaved in highly dynamic manner throughout the MCO, with >75% carbonate loss occurring at paleodepths ranging from ~3.4 to ~4 km in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. Carbonate dissolution maxima coincide with warm phases (δ18O minima) and δ13C decreases, implying that climate-carbon cycle feedbacks fundamentally differed from the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial pattern, where dissolution maxima correspond to δ13C maxima and δ18O minima. Carbonate dissolution cycles during the MCO were, thus, more similar to Paleogene hyperthermal patterns.

  15. Peltephilidae and Mesotheriidae (Mammalia) from late Miocene strata of Northern Chilean Andes, Caragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Sanhueza, Germán; Moreno, Karen; Bobe, René; Carrano, Matthew T.; García, Marcelo; Corgne, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Until now, only one Cenozoic fossil mammal from the Chilean Precordillera (Arica and Parinacota Region) has been reported, Caraguatypotherium munozi (Mesotheriidae: Notoungulata). In this study, we describe a fourth specimen of C. munozi and a new armadillo species, Epipeltephilus caraguensis (Peltephilidae: Cingulata), both collected from a new site closer to the fossiliferous outcrops of the Caragua area (Serravallian - Tortonian). E. caraguensis differs from other members of the family in having: two sulci in the articular surface of the mobile osteoderm; having a tubular, rough and raised anterior edge; a conspicuous transverse depression; and four widely spaced foramina. This taxon represents the youngest known peltephilid from intermediate latitudes and indicates a wide geographic distribution (Patagonia to Central Andes) of the family just prior to its extinction. The new mesothere specimen is 19% larger than previous records. The revision of the dental features of C. munozi allowed the identification of an ambiguous trait in its original diagnosis, i.e. an enamel fracture was misinterpreted with the presence of a posterior sulcus on the talonid of the m3, suggesting that further taxonomic and systematic revision for the Caragua mesothere is necessary. Although the fossil record from the Caragua area is still scarce, mesotheriines seem to be abundant at this latitude, just as has been observed at several early to late Miocene sites such as Chucal (Chile), Cerdas and Nazareno (Bolivia), as well as in southern regions such as Arroyo Chasicó and Mendoza (Argentina). The presence of a new peltephilid species in Caragua sustains the hypothesis of provincialism during the Miocene in intermediate latitudes. Our findings also provide further support for probable faunal movements between intermediate and higher latitudes rather than to lower ones.

  16. Diagenesis of Miocene, incised valley-filling limestones; Provence, Southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Margaret J.; James, Noel P.

    2017-01-01

    The Cenozoic of southeastern France is characterized by a series of incised valleys that were filled by a succession of marine carbonate and then siliciclastic sediments culminating in the modern Rhone River depositional system. The earliest of these paleovalleys (Miocene - Burdigalian) is located in the Pernes Hills between the towns of Saumane and Venasque. It was filled by a succession of marine carbonates in the form of two third-order stratigraphic sequences (S1 and S2) and three fourth-order subsequences (S1a, S1b and S1c). The deposits are heterozoan throughout, composed of echinoids, bryozoans, coralline algae, mollusks, and benthic foraminifers. They comprise a succession of spectacular cross-bedded calcarenites that accumulated in the seaward part of a tide-dominated estuary. Diagenesis is interpreted to have taken place in four stages: 1) minor synsedimentary precipitation of inclusion-rich carbonate cements, 2) shallow burial physical and chemical compaction, 3) subaerial exposure and widespread precipitation of clear, zoned, epitaxial and isopachous, followed by subsequent clear, unzoned, calcite cements and, 4) prolonged subaerial exposure (middle Miocene to Holocene), that involved dissolution, karstification, and precipitation of minor clear and locally pendant calcite cement. The rocks were essentially uncemented during shallow burial only to be well lithified during the early phases of subsequent telogenesis. The main controls on such lithification are interpreted to have been: 1) the dissolution of minor aragonite biofragments and precipitation of some LMC cement, 2) the abundance of echinoid particle nuclei for epitaxial cement nucleation, and 3) increasing rainfall together with regional tectonic uplift to the east that resulted in increased subsurface water flow. This study not only emphasizes the variable paragenesis of calcite-rich, heterozoan carbonates but also highlights the utility of these Cenozoic limestones with extant components as

  17. Carnivores from the Middle Miocene Ngorora Formation (13-12 Ma, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickford, M.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The late Middle Miocene Ngorora Formation has yielded several interesting carnivore fossils. Among these are a huge creodont, Megistotherium osteothlastes, at 12 Ma, possibly the youngest record of the species, an amphicyonid, two species of mustelids (an otter and a honey badger, two kinds of viverrids (one about the size of a civet, one the size of a genet and an extremely small herpestid the size of a dwarf mongoose. It has also yielded remains of a moderate sized percrocutid. Perhaps the most interesting carnivore is a new genus and species of bundont viverrid that is intermediate in size and morphology between Early Miocene Orangictis on the one hand and Plio-Pleistocene Pseudocivetta on the other. This lineage of bundont viverrids appears to have been restricted to Africa.La Formación Mioceno medio final de Ngorora (Kenia ha suministrado carnívoros muy interesantes. Entre los que se encuentran un enorme creodonto, Megistotherium osteothlastes, de 12 Ma, que posiblemente es el registro más moderno de la especie, un amphicyonido, dos especies de mustélidos (una nutria y un melivorino, dos diferentes tipos de vivérridos (uno de la talla de una civeta y el otro de la de una jineta y un herpéstido diminuto de la talla de una mangosta enana. También hay fósiles de un percrocútido de talla moderada. Tal vez el carnívoro más interesante es un nuevo género y especie de vivérrido bunodonto que presenta una talla y morfología intermedia entre Oragictis del Mioceno inferior y Pseudocivetta del Plio-Pleistoceno. Esta línea de vivérridos bunodontos parece estar restringida a Africa.

  18. Middle Miocene carnivorans from the Monarch Mill Formation, Nevada

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    Kent Smith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available he lowest part of the Monarch Mill Formation in the Middlegate basin, west-central Nevada, has yielded a middle Miocene (Barstovian Land Mammal Age vertebrate assemblage, the Eastgate local fauna. Paleobotanical evidence from nearby, nearly contemporaneous fossil leaf assemblages indicates that the Middle Miocene vegetation in the area was mixed coniferous and hardwood forest and chaparral-sclerophyllous shrubland, and suggests that the area had been uplifted to 2700–2800 m paleoaltitude before dropping later to near its present elevation of 1600 m. Thus, the local fauna provides a rare glimpse at a medium- to high-altitude vertebrate community in the intermountain western interior of North America. The local fauna includes the remains of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and 25 families of mammals. Carnivorans, the focus of this study, include six taxa (three of which are new belonging to four families. Canidae are represented by the borophagine Tomarctus brevirostris and the canine Leptocyon sp. indet. The earliest record and second North American occurrence of the simocyonine ailurid Actiocyon is represented by A. parverratis sp. nov. Two new mustelids, Brevimalictis chikasha gen. et sp. nov. and Negodiaetictis rugatrulleum gen. et sp. nov., may represent Galictinae but are of uncertain subfamilial and tribal affinity. The fourth family is represented by the felid Pseudaelurus sp. indet. Tomarctus brevirostris is limited biochronologically to the Barstovian land mammal age and thus is consistent with the age indicated by other members of the Eastgate local fauna as well as by indirect tephrochronological dates previously associated with the Monarch Mill Formation. Actiocyon parverratis sp. nov. extends the temporal range of the genus Actiocyon from late Clarendonian back to the Barstovian. The Eastgate local fauna improves our understanding of mammalian successions and evolution, during and subsequent to the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum

  19. Oligo-Miocene foraminiferal record (Miogypsinidae, Lepidocyclinidae and Nummulitidae) from the Western Taurides (SW Turkey): Biometry and implications for the regional geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Ercan; Less, György; Báldi-Beke, Mária; Kollányi, Katalin; Acar, Ferhat

    2009-05-01

    The marine Oligo-Miocene units of western Taurides, deposited under different tectonic regimes (in Bey Dağları platform in foreland and coeval sequences in hinterland), were studied to establish a high-resolution biostratigraphic framework. Biometric study of the full spectrum of larger foraminifera in a regional scale allowed us correlating them with the shallow benthic zonation (SBZ) system introduced by [Cahuzac, B., Poignant, A., 1997. Essai de biozonation de l'Oligo-Miocène dans les bassins européens à l'aide des grands foraminifères néritiques. Bulletin de la Société géologique de France 168, 155-169], and to determine the ages of these sites on zonal precision for the first time. In correlating these assemblages to standard shallow benthic zones, planktonic data were also used whenever possible. Taxa, classified under the genera Nummulites, Miogypsina, Miolepidocyclina, Nephrolepidina, Eulepidina, Heterostegina, Operculina and Cycloclypeus (?) and their assemblages, closely resemble to the fauna described from European basins. These groups characterize the SBZ 22B to 25 zones referring to a time interval from early Chattian to Burdigalian. However, a main gap in late Chattian (SBZ 23) and in early part of the Aquitanian (SBZ 24) is also recorded in the platform succession. In the meantime, rare Eulepidina in the Burdigalian levels suggest a clear Indo-Pacific influence. Based on the discovery of early Chattian (SBZ 22B) deposits (previously mapped under Eocene/Miocene units), the Oligo-Miocene stratigraphy of the Bey Dağları platform is also revised. A more precise chronology for regional Miocene transgression is presented based on the miogypsinid evolutionary scale.

  20. Miocene phosphate-rich sediments in Salento (southern Italy)

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    Föllmi, Karl B.; Hofmann, Hélène; Chiaradia, Massimo; de Kaenel, Eric; Frijia, Gianluca; Parente, Mariano

    2015-08-01

    The upper Middle to lower Upper Miocene (Serravallian to Tortonian) sedimentary succession in Salento (southern Italy) includes glauconite- and phosphate-rich deposits, which are associated with pelagic micrite. In Baia del Ciolo and Marittima (southern Salento), the succession is composed of shallow-water platform carbonates of Late Oligocene age (Chattian; Porto Badisco Formation), which are overlain by a 20- to 30-cm-thick level of glauconite-rich micrite with abundant reworked particles and fossils of the underlying Porto Badisco Formation. This interval is in turn covered by an up to 15 cm thick phosphatic crust ("Livello ad Aturia"), which itself is overlain either by a hemipelagic chalk-like carbonate of Middle to Late Miocene age ("Pietra Leccese"; Marittima) or directly by a micrite of Late Miocene age (Messinian; Novaglie Formation; Baia del Ciolo), which shallows upwards into a shallow-water platform carbonate. A large hiatus is present in this succession, which likely includes the Lower and lower Middle Miocene. In the region of Lecce, two discrete levels enriched in glauconite and phosphate-each associated with a major discontinuity-occur within the Pietra Leccese. The strontium-isotope ages derived on phosphate nodules and phosphatized and non-phosphatized fossils and calcareous nannofossil ages indicate a time interval of phosphogenesis between 13.5 and 7.5 Ma, with two clusters at 12 and 10.5 Ma. The glauconite and phosphate-rich sediments resulted from a current-dominated regime, which was characterized by low overall sedimentation rates, erosion and sediment reworking, and authigenesis. This regime was likely related to a generally westward-directed bottom current, which was forced to upwell once it arrived at the western border of the eastern Mediterranean basin. The timing of the principal phosphogenic phases can only partly be correlated to those of other occurrences in this part of the Mediterranean (Malta, Gozo, southern Sicily, Matese

  1. LOWER TO MIDDLE MIOCENE MOLLUSC ASSEMBLAGES FROM THE TORINO HILLS (NW ITALY: SYNTHESIS OF NEW DATA AND CHRONOSTRATIGRAPHICAL ARRANGEMENT

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    MARTA ZUNINO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to correlate in chronostratigraphic order the fossil assemblages of selected, historical Lower and Middle Miocene localities of the Torino Hills. More than 18,000 specimens have been classified and assigned to 798 taxa (cf. Tab. I. The compositional analyses mainly concern the 672 listed gastropods, most of which were already described in classical monographies. The critical evaluation of the morphological and architectural shell parameters let to a significant reduction of the species that could be realistically maintained in comparison to those cited in literature from the Torino Hills Miocene. Six localities have been analyzed: Valle Ceppi (VC and Val Sanfrà (VS referred to the middle part of the Burdigalian stage (N7a Biozone, Villa Bertini at the topmost Burdigalian, Villa Allason (VA and Villa Forzano (VF at the early Langhian (N8 Biozone and Monte dei Cappuccini (MC at the late Langhian (N9 Biozone. On the whole, the fossil assemblages show a taxonomic variation of both biochronologic and palaeobiogeographic meaning. Actually, the similarity in specific biodiversity of VC, VS, VB, VA and VS reflects homogeneity among late Burdigalian to early Langhian palaeocommunities. As to MC, its deep difference on VC is correlatable with the eastern closing between the Mediterranean areas and the Tethyan Realm, at the boundary Burdigalian-Langhian, that brought to disjoint evolutions of the Mediterranean and Indo-Pacific palaeocommunities, the former being influenced by oceanic current changes and related climatic variations. 

  2. Late Miocene lineage divergence and ecological differentiation of rare endemic Juniperus blancoi: clues for the diversification of North American conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2014-07-01

    Western North America and Mexico contain a large number of conifer species. This diversity could be the product of orographic and climate changes of the late Tertiary and Quaternary. In this study, we focus on the evolutionary history of Juniperus blancoi, in order to determine the impact of climate change and environmental heterogeneity on population differentiation. We estimated the population structure, phylogenetic relationships and historical demography of J. blancoi populations using nuclear genes. We correlated genetic structure with ecological differentiation, divergence times and changes in population size. Populations of J. blancoi are differentiated into three lineages that correspond to low-, mid- and high-altitude populations. The three groups diversified in the late Miocene, early Pliocene, with only a few events of gene flow since then. Two lineages in the north exhibited a pattern of population growth during the Pleistocene that could be linked to climate changes. Populations of J. blancoi experienced significant ecological differentiation and early divergence events, which correspond to periods of global cooling and mountain uplift during the Miocene. This suggests that mountain ranges in tropical and subtropical latitudes play an important role in the speciation and persistence of conifer taxa in diversity hotspots, by providing diverse environmental conditions. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. A minute ostracod (Crustacea: Cytheromatidae) from the Miocene Solimões Formation (western Amazonia, Brazil): evidence for marine incursions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F.; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-01-01

    A huge wetland (the ‘Pebas system’) covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine ostracod species (Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov.) in the upper middle Miocene Solimões Formation initiated a taxonomic, ecological and biogeographical review of the genus Pellucistoma. We demonstrate that this marine (sublittoral, euhaline), subtropical–tropical taxon is biogeographically confined to the Americas. The biogeographical distribution of Pellucistoma largely depends on geographical, thermal and osmotic barriers (e.g. land bridges, deep and/or cold waters, sea currents, salinity). We assume an Oligocene/early Miocene, Caribbean origin for Pellucistoma and outline the dispersal of hitherto known species up to the Holocene. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. is dwarfed in comparison to all other species of this genus and extremely thin-shelled. This is probably related to poorly oxygenated waters and, in particular, to strongly reduced salinity. The associated ostracod fauna (dominated by the eurypotent Cyprideis and a few, also stunted ostracods of possibly marine ancestry) supports this claim. Geochemical analyses (δ18O, δ13C) on co-occurring ostracod valves (Cyprideis spp.) yielded very light values, indicative of a freshwater setting. These observations point to a successful adaptation of P. curupira sp. nov. to freshwater conditions and therefore do not signify the presence of marine water. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. shows closest affinities to Caribbean species. We hypothesize that Pellucistoma reached northern South America (Llanos Basin) during marine incursions in the early Miocene. While larger animals of marine origin (e.g. fishes, dolphins, manatees) migrated actively into the Pebas

  4. A minute ostracod (Crustacea: Cytheromatidae) from the Miocene Solimões Formation (western Amazonia, Brazil): evidence for marine incursions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F; Piller, Werner E

    2016-07-02

    A huge wetland (the 'Pebas system') covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine ostracod species (Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov.) in the upper middle Miocene Solimões Formation initiated a taxonomic, ecological and biogeographical review of the genus Pellucistoma. We demonstrate that this marine (sublittoral, euhaline), subtropical-tropical taxon is biogeographically confined to the Americas. The biogeographical distribution of Pellucistoma largely depends on geographical, thermal and osmotic barriers (e.g. land bridges, deep and/or cold waters, sea currents, salinity). We assume an Oligocene/early Miocene, Caribbean origin for Pellucistoma and outline the dispersal of hitherto known species up to the Holocene. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. is dwarfed in comparison to all other species of this genus and extremely thin-shelled. This is probably related to poorly oxygenated waters and, in particular, to strongly reduced salinity. The associated ostracod fauna (dominated by the eurypotent Cyprideis and a few, also stunted ostracods of possibly marine ancestry) supports this claim. Geochemical analyses (δ(18)O, δ(13)C) on co-occurring ostracod valves (Cyprideis spp.) yielded very light values, indicative of a freshwater setting. These observations point to a successful adaptation of P. curupira sp. nov. to freshwater conditions and therefore do not signify the presence of marine water. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. shows closest affinities to Caribbean species. We hypothesize that Pellucistoma reached northern South America (Llanos Basin) during marine incursions in the early Miocene. While larger animals of marine origin (e.g. fishes, dolphins, manatees) migrated actively into the Pebas

  5. Holocene cyclic climatic variations and the role of the Pacific Ocean as recorded in varved sediments from northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guoqiang; Sun, Qing; Xie, Manman; Lin, Yuan; Shang, Wenyu; Zhu, Qingzen; Shan, Yabing; Xu, Deke; Rioual, Patrick; Wang, Luo; Liu, Jiaqi

    2014-10-01

    We present an n-alkane and compound-specific carbon isotope record of the past 9 ka from the annually laminated sedimentary sequence of Lake Xiaolongwan, northeastern China. The n-alkane distribution suggests that Lake Xiaolongwan has undergone a shift from an oligotrophic state with low algal production and little emergent/submerged macrophytes in the early Holocene, to a eutrophic state with high algal production and abundant emergent/submerged macrophytes since the middle Holocene. The pattern of variation observed in the biomarker proxies ACL (the n-alkane average chain length), Paq (aquatic macrophyte versus aquatic macrophyte and terrestrial plant ratio), and LPTP (lake productivity/terrigenous organic production) is throughout the record similar to that of the total organic carbon. The variation of compound-specific carbon isotopic values in the middle- and short-chain alkanes was mainly regulated by lake productivity and the accumulating organic pool through time. In this forested region, where the vegetation is dominated by C3 plants, the long-chain n-alkanes (C27-C31) are predominantly derived from leaf wax lipids. The compound-specific δ13C27-31 value is sensitive to effective precipitation, and therefore represents a useful indicator of regional monsoonal precipitation. Spectral analysis on the δ13C27-31 time series reveals significant periodicities of 87-89, 205-212, 1020-1050 and 1750-2041 years. On the centennial timescale, the quasi-periodicities around 88 and 210 years suggest a strong link between solar activity and monsoon rainfall. The millennial monsoon cycle in northeastern China is associated with sea surface temperature (SST) variations in two active centers of the summer monsoon, the western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH) and the Okhotsk High. Increasing SST in the subtropical sea may cause a northwards shift of the WPSH, which extends the monsoon rain band (Meiyu) to northeastern China, and thus increasing rainfall in that region

  6. Varved sediments of Lake Oeschinen, NW Alps: filling the gap in the flood frequency-precipitation relationship for the last millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Benjamin; Szidat, Sönke; Grosjean, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The global climate is warming, which is leading to changes in the hydrological cycle. What are the impacts of these climatic changes on the occurrence and magnitude of extreme flood events? Are these changes simultaneous or independent? These are key questions for future flood-risk predictions. In Europe, regional climate models do not show robust results for the future occurrence of precipitation extremes, which is mainly due to the difficulty in resolving precipitation events and the limited temporal coverage of instrumental data. To overcome this issue, considerable effort has been put forward by the paleoclimate community to produce millennial-long flood proxy records from natural archives. This has led to a more comprehensive understanding of flood events in relation to climate variability. However, while there is an increased consensus in the long-term flood-temperature relationship, still very little is known about the role of precipitation changes on flood frequency and magnitude. This is largely due to the lack of long-term and high-quality precipitation records. Here we present a millennial-long precipitation reconstruction together with a flood-frequency record obtained from the same natural paleoclimate archive. This allows, for the first time, the direct comparison between the two climate variables in the Alps. We used the varved (annually laminated) sediments of proglacial Lake Oeschinen (1580 m a.s.l., NW European Alps) to reconstruct warm season (MJJA) precipitation and summer flood frequency back to AD 884. Our results support recent findings from an increasing number of studies in the Swiss, German, French and Austrian Alps showing that floods were consistently more frequent during cool periods over the last Millennium. While the relationship between flood frequency and inferred moist climate has remained speculative, our precipitation reconstruction allows for a direct comparison and shows that flood frequency also increased during wetter

  7. Rapid middle Miocene collapse of the Mesozoic orogenic plateau in north-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    physiographic basins and ranges formed during a distinctly different episode of extension that began after about 10Ma and has continued to the present. Late Miocene and younger faulting is characterized by widely spaced, high-angle normal faults that cut both older extended and unextended domains. Major widening of the Basin and Range at this latitude thus took place during a relatively brief interval in the middle Miocene, and the lack of major shortening west of the Sierra Nevada at this time suggests that the change in the plate margin from microplate subduction to lengthy transtensional strike-slip played an important role in allowing extension to occur when it did, as rapidly as it did. The onset of extension ca. 16-17Ma was coeval with both Columbia River flood-basalt volcanism and the hypothesized final delamination of the shallow Farallon slab that lay beneath the western USA in the early Tertiary. However, it is unclear if these events were necessary prerequisites for extension, simply coincidental, or themselves consequences of rapid extension and/or reorganization of the plate boundary.

  8. Clay mineral stratigraphy of Miocene to recent marine sediments in the central Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.P. de

    1992-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses were made of the smaller than 2 J..Lm fraction from about 1250 samples of the central Mediterranean Miocene to Recent and the southeastern North-Atlantic Miocene in order to reconstruct climatic changes. Relative quantities of the clay minerals chlorite, illite, pyrophylli

  9. The first record of Deinotherium (Proboscidea, Mammalia) in the Miocene of Adygea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, K K; Lopatin, A V; Maschenko, E N

    2015-01-01

    The data on an isolated upper tooth (P4) of Deinotherium sp. from the Late Miocene beds of the Maikop 1 locality (Maikop, Republic of Adygea) are reported. This is the first record of Deinotherium from the Upper Miocene of Russia. The tooth crown of P4 is similar in size to D. proavum Eichwald, 1831 (= D. gigantissimum Stefanescu, 1892).

  10. A new Miocene baleen whale from the Peruvian desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Felix G.; Kohno, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    The Pisco-Ica and Sacaco basins of southern Peru are renowned for their abundance of exceptionally preserved fossil cetaceans, several of which retain traces of soft tissue and occasionally even stomach contents. Previous work has mostly focused on odontocetes, with baleen whales currently being restricted to just three described taxa. Here, we report a new Late Miocene rorqual (family Balaenopteridae), Incakujira anillodefuego gen. et sp. nov., based on two exceptionally preserved specimens from the Pisco Formation exposed at Aguada de Lomas, Sacaco Basin, southern Peru. Incakujira overall closely resembles modern balaenopterids, but stands out for its unusually gracile ascending process of the maxilla, as well as a markedly twisted postglenoid process of the squamosal. The latter likely impeded lateral (omega) rotation of the mandible, in stark contrast with the highly flexible craniomandibular joint of extant lunge-feeding rorquals. Overall, Incakujira expands the still meagre Miocene record of balaenopterids and reveals a previously underappreciated degree of complexity in the evolution of their iconic lunge-feeding strategy.

  11. Chronology of Miocene-Pliocene deposits at Split Mountain Gorge, Southern California: A record of regional tectonics and Colorado River evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, R.J.; Fluette, A.; McDougall, K.; Housen, B.A.; Janecke, S.U.; Axen, G.J.; Shirvell, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Late Miocene to early Pliocene deposit at Split Mountain Gorge, California, preserve a record of basinal response to changes in regional tectonics, paleogeography, and evolution of the Colorado River. The base of the Elephant Trees Formation, magnetostratigraphically dated as 8.1 ?? 0.4 Ma, provides the earliest well-dated record of extension in the southwestern Salton Trough. The oldest marine sediments are ca. 6.3 Ma. The nearly synchronous timing of marine incursion in the Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California region supports a model for localization of Pacific-North America plate motion in the Gulf ca. 6 Ma. The first appearance of Colorado River sand at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary (5.33 Ma) suggests rapid propagation of the river to the Salton Trough, and supports a lake-spillover hypothesis for initiation of the lower Colorado River. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  12. Middle miocene badenian transgression: New evidences from the Vrdnik coal basin (Fruška Gora Mt., Northern Serbia

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    Rundić Ljupko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest field investigation of the Vrdnik Coal Basin as well as new data from numerous boreholes enabled the finding of an unconformity between the undivided continental-lacustrine Lower Miocene and the marine Middle Miocene Badenian. The different terrestrial-lacustrine sediments indicate a very mobile and dynamic environment (according to known drilling data, the total thickness of these deposits reaches up to 300 m. All these rocks belong to the Vrdnik series (Vrdnik Formation. The evolution of the Vrdnik series is distinguished by several stages (e.g. pre-lacustrine, lacustrine, peat-swamp, etc.. Each of these phases was proved by their sedimentologic and structural characteristics. On the other hand, among the fossils, only the swamp flora remains (Sequoia, Laurus, Taxodium, Glyptostrobus, etc. and poor and fragmented ostracode valves (Candona sp. were documented. Presently, the exact stratigraphic position of the Vrdnik series is unknown. Discordantly over the mentioned rocks, real marine sediments of the Paratethys Sea occur. To date, it was a completely unknown subsurface distribution of these sediments. Among a few types of rocks that have a small distribution, the so-called the Leitha limestones (Middle Miocene, Badenian have great significance (up to 98% of CaCO3. The total thickness of the limestones reaches up to 70 meters (borehole B-11. The findings of key foraminifer species (Orbulina - Globigerinoides Zone indicate an early Badenian (Moravian transgressive event (ca. 15 Ma. Lithologically, it is represented by gray, sandy marls and sandy clays, coarse-grained sands and microconglomerates in the base of the mentioned limestones (boreholes B-11, B-15, B-19, and B-21 with a total thickness of up to 15 meters. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176015

  13. A new species of Nyanzachoerus (Cetartiodactyla: Suidae from the late Miocene Toros-Menalla, Chad, central Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Renaud Boisserie

    Full Text Available During the latest Miocene and the early Pliocene, tetraconodontine suids were the most predominant large omnivorous mammals in Africa. Yet, new species were often identified on the grounds of limited evidence, a situation impacting their value for biochronological correlations as well as for environmental and biogeographical reconstructions. The description of the most abundant known collection of craniodental remains attributed to the tetraconodontine Nyanzachoerus helps to improve this situation. These specimens were collected in the upper Miocene deposits at Toros-Ménalla, northern Chad, central Africa, by the Mission Paléoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne. We compared them with Nyanzachoerus from eastern and southern Africa, using extant species as a reference for patterns of morphological variation. Thanks to a large sample of observations, our work focused as much on craniomandibular morphology as on dental morphology and metrics (improved by an index scoring for the complexity of distal third molars and a detailed investigation of premolar-molar ratios. We recognized two taxa at Toros-Ménalla: Nyanzachoerus khinzir nov. sp. and Ny. cf. australis. We also revised the taxonomic status for other species, including: the restriction of Ny. syrticus to its holotype specimen from Sahabi (Libya, the resurrection of the nomen Ny. tulotos, and the synonymy of Ny. kuseralensis with Ny. waylandi. At Toros-Ménalla, Ny. khinzir was the only suid coexisting with the anthracotheriid Libycosaurus and the hominid Sahelanthropus, whereas Ny. cf. australis was associated with a different, probably younger faunal context. Nyanzachoerus. khinzir, which probably had a diversified diet, supports a latest Miocene biogeographical distinction between central Africa and eastern Africa.

  14. CARBON-OXYGEN ISOTOPE RECORDS OF PEDOGENIC CARBONATE FROM THE EARLY MIOCENE-PLEISTOCENE LOESS-RED CLAY IN THE VICINITY OF THE LIUPANSHAN REGION AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EARLY ORIGIN OF C4 PLANTS IN THE CHINESE LOESS PLATEAU%中新世以来六盘山邻区黄土-红粘土成土碳酸盐碳氧同位素记录及其对C4植物早期扩张的指示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑜; 熊尚发; 丁仲礼; 卢海建; 姜文英

    2011-01-01

    sites in the world have revealed that the timing of C4 plants origin and expansion was not globally synchronous, and different proxy records documented different timing features of C4 expansion. The history of C4 plants in Asia is an important component in reconstructing the globally geographical patterns of C4 expansion. Records from South Asia indicate C4 plants expanded abruptly during ca. 8 ~4Ma,and several localities in the Chinese Loess Plateau document a δ13C peak at ca. 6Ma,3Ma and from 1 Ma,respectively. Previous studies have demonstrated that during ca. 7 ~ 4Ma,soil carbonate records ( δ13Csc) in the Chinese Loess Plateau display a southern-ward negative trend, indicative of a southern-ward expansion of C4 plants during the Late Miocene and the Early Pliocene. It is remained unclear, however, that if the C4 plants expansion over the Chinese Loess Plateau occurred earlier than during the Late Miocene.Here we report a study based on δ13Csc of loess-red clay sequence from the Baishui and Zhuanglang sections near the Liupanshan region,and the result shows that C4 plants expansion may have initiated as early as at ca. 20Ma with C4 component up to 15% -40% during the Miocene. The Baishui section(35°24'10"N,106°54'43"E) is located in the southeastern part of the Liupanshan region,Central Loess Plateau. This section contains an upper 214m loess-paleosol sequence and a lower 82m red clay deposit. The Zhuanglang section ( 35°13'34"N, 106°4'11"E) lies at the southwestern part of the Liupanshan region,ca.80km to the Baishui section,and consists of 183. 4m red clay deposit. A total 2729 paleomagnetic samples (1026 samples for the Baishui section, 1703 for the Zhuanglang section) were analyzed by using thermal demagnetization at the Laboratory of Piaeomagnetism of the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and at Lanzhou University. The specimens that exhibit stable component two vectors (91% for the Baishui section and 83.5% for the

  15. MIOCENE MAMMALIAN FAUNAL SUCCESSION FROM DAMIAO,CENTRAL NEI MONGOL AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES%内蒙古大庙中新世哺乳动物群序列与环境变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆群; 王李花; AnuKaakinen; 刘丽萍; 傅明楷

    2011-01-01

    Nei Mongol (Inner Mongolia) has been well-known in the paleontological society by rich vertebrate fossils, however, there are few well developed sections with superimposition of fossil levels. Here we present the preliminary results of our field seasons during 2006 ~2009 in the Damiao area,Central Nei Mongol. Three main fossil horizons represented by over 20 localities produce three faunas covering Early Miocene,latest Middle Miocene and earliest Late Miocene respectively. The Early Miocene Xiejian fauna is represented by 21 species of 13 families in 5 orders. Large mammals include mainly small sized cervoids, e. G. Lagomeryx sp., Stephanocemas sp. Nov, and Micromeryx sp. Small mammals are dominated by Metexallerix gaolanshanensis, Sinolagomys ulunguensis, Tachyoryctoides sp. Nov, Prodistylomys wangae, Distylomys cf. D.tedfordi, Sinodonomys sp.,Plesiosminthus sp.,Heterosminthus sp. Pseudotheridomys sp. Nov.,and Eomyidae gen. Et sp. Nov.The late Middle Miocene fauna includes more than 30 species,sharing with the classical Tunggur fauna Mioechinust gobknsis, Desmanella storchi, Bellatona forsythmajori, Atlantoxerus orkntalis, Heterosminthus orientalis, Protalactaga grabaui, Gobicricetodon flynni, and Stenofiber hesperus, however, with more diversified cervoids and a species of pliopithecid. The early Late Miocene fauna show great similarity with the previous fauna,except with the earliest record of Late Miocene elements Lophocricetus, Eozapus, Nannocricetus etc, and disappearance of the typical Middle Miocene Atlantoxerus ,Democricetodon, and Heterosminthus. All three faunas have rich small mammals (insectivores, rodents and lagomorphs) and diversified cervoids. The similar faunal community structure and continuity of main lineages suggest a relatively stable moderate humid and warm forest-grassland environment from the Early Miocene to early Late Miocene. The significant environment change seems to have happened after the earliest Late Miocene.%中新世是现代

  16. Tectono-sedimentary constraints to the Oligocene-to-Miocene evolution of the Peloritani thrust belt (NE Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, G.; Nigro, F.

    1999-12-01

    The Peloritani thrust belt belongs to the southern sector of the Calabrian Arc and is formed by a set of south-verging tectonic units, including crystalline basement and sedimentary cover (from the top: Aspromonte U.; Mela U.; Mandanici U.; Fondachelli U.; Longi-Taormina U.), piled up starting from Late Oligocene. At least two main terrigenous clastic formations lie with complicated relationships on top of the previous units: the Frazzanò Fm (Oligocene) and the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Fm (Late Oligocene?-Early Miocene), as syn-to-post-tectonic deposits. These clastic deposits have different characteristics, in space and time, representing or flysch-like sequences involved in several thrust events (Frazzanò Fm) or molassic-like sequences (Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Fm), which unconformably overlie the tectonic units. In the present paper we describe a kinematic model of the progressive foreland migration of the Peloritani thrust belt, starting from Oligocene, carrying piggy-back basins and incorporating foredeep deposits, recognised in the Frazzanò-Stilo-Capo d'Orlando terrigenous successions. In general, the facies and structural observations on the overall Oligo-Miocene clastic sequences, outcropping in the Western Peloritani Mts, indicate: (a) the distal character of the Frazzanò Fm; (b) a complex group of terrigenous facies of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Fm, with lateral-to-vertical organisation, characterised by a distal-to-proximal-to-distal facies trend; (c) facies analogies of the basal portions of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Fm with the Frazzanò Fm; (d) the involvement of the Frazzanò Fm in lowermost and more external thrusting, and of the basal (Late Oligocene?) distal Stilo-Capo d'Orlando facies in the higher and inner thrusting during the early stages of deformation; (e) the involvement of the proximal Stilo-Capo d'Orlando facies in the tectonic edifice during the Early Miocene deformation; (f) the generally unconformable stratigraphical contacts of the higher

  17. Devínska Kobyla – a window into the Middle Miocene shallow-water marine environments of the Central Paratethys (Vienna Basin, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matúš Hyžný

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Middle Miocene strata exposed at Devínska Kobyla Hill (Malé Karpaty Mts document the temporal and spatial changes in shallow-water environments of the northern Vienna Basin during the Late Badenian and Early Sarmatian. Middle Miocene deposits of the Studienka and Holíč formations border this hill essentially along its full perimeter. The present overview of 16 localities based on published observations and new sampling shows that the Middle Miocene deposits contain species-rich micro- and macrofaunal assemblages as well as nannoflora. This contribution includes lists of all marine faunal (except tetrapods and microfloral taxa known to date. The localities can be divided into three groups on the basis of their lithology and the abundance of molluscs and foraminifers in fossil assemblages: Devín area, Dúbravka area and Devínska Nová Ves area. On the basis of foraminifers the localities in the Dúbravka area (Dúbravská hlavica, Pektenová lavica, Starý lom, partly Fuchsov lom can be assigned to the Early Sarmatian (based on benthic taxa, whereas the localities in the Devín (Šibeničný vrch, Štítová, Terasy, Lomnická, Lingulová lavica, Glosusová lavica and Devínska Nová Ves (Sandberg 1–2, Malý Sandberg, Waitov lom, Glavica, Štokeravská vápenka-Bonanza areas are predominantly of the Late Badenian age (based on benthic and planktonic taxa. However, molluscs imply that the deposits from the Dúbravka area are of Late Badenian age. The differences in the estimates of stratigraphic age between on molluscs and foraminifers can be explained with the persistence of typically Badenian mollusc taxa in the marginal parts of the Central Paratethys Sea during the Middle Miocene. For every studied locality palaeoenvironmental conditions based mostly on molluscs and foraminifers are inferred.

  18. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-01-01

    Sea cliffs 40 km east of Almeria, southeastern Spain, expose upper Miocene reefs and patch reefs of the Plomo formation. These reefs are formed of scleractinian corals, calcareous algae, and mollusks. The reef cores are as much as 65 m thick and several hundred meters wide. Fore-reef talus beds extend 1,300 m across and are 40 m thick. The reefs and reef breccias are composed of calcific dolomite. They lie on volcanic rocks that have a K-Ar date of 11.5 m.y. and in turn are overlain by the upper Miocene Vicar Formation. In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity is both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Plomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Dolomite rhombs are between 10 and 30 μ across. More moldic porosity was formed by the dissolution of the calclte bioclasts. Some porosity reduction has occurred by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsurface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene(?) and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef

  19. Phylogenetic and paleobotanical evidence for late Miocene diversification of the Tertiary subtropical lineage of ivies (Hedera L., Araliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, V; Guzmán, B; Medina, N G; Vargas, P; Wen, J

    2017-06-22

    Hedera (ivies) is one of the few temperate genera of the primarily tropical Asian Palmate group of the Araliaceae, which extends its range out of Asia to Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Phylogenetic and phylogeographic results suggested Asia as the center of origin and the western Mediterranean region as one of the secondary centers of diversification. The bird-dispersed fleshy fruits of ivies suggest frequent dispersal over long distances (e.g. Macaronesian archipelagos), although reducing the impact of geographic barriers to gene flow in mainland species. Genetic isolation associated with geographic barriers and independent polyploidization events have been postulated as the main driving forces of diversification. In this study we aim to evaluate past and present diversification patterns in Hedera within a geographic and temporal framework to clarify the biogeographic history of the genus. Phylogenetic (biogeographic, time divergence and diversification) and phylogeographic (coalescence) analyses using four DNA regions (nrITS, trnH-psbA, trnT-trnL, rpl32) revealed a complex spatial pattern of lineage divergence. Scarce geographic limitation to gene flow and limited diversification are observed during the early-mid Miocene, followed by a diversification rate increase related to geographic divergence from the Tortonian/Messinian. Genetic and palaeobotanical evidence points the origin of the Hedera clade in Asia, followed by a gradual E-W Asian extinction and the progressive E-W Mediterranean colonization. The temporal framework for the E Asia - W Mediterranean westward colonization herein reported is congruent with the fossil record. Subsequent range expansion in Europe and back colonization to Asia is also inferred. Uneven diversification among geographic areas occurred from the Tortonian/Messinian onwards with limited diversification in the newly colonized European and Asian regions. Eastern and western Mediterranean regions acted as refugia for Miocene and

  20. Ice-free summers predominant in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean - New insights from a proxy-modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Forwick, Matthias; Lohmann, Gerrit; Niessen, Frank

    2016-04-01

    During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides over a distance of >350 km along Lomonosov Ridge between about 81°N and 84°N (Stein, 2015). The load and erosional behaviour of an extended ice sheet/shelf that probably occurred during major Quaternary glaciations, may have caused physical conditions that triggered these landslides and major down-slope transport of sediments at this part of Lomonosov Ridge (Stein et al., 2016 and further references therein). The removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene to early Quaternary sediments close to the seafloor, allowing the retrieval of such old sediments by gravity coring and multi-proxy studies of theses sediments. Within one of these studies (Stein et al., 2016), we used for the first time the sea-ice biomarker IP25 (for background of approach see Belt et al., 2007; Müller et al., 2009, 2011) together with alkenone-based sea-surface temperatures (SST) to reconstruct upper Miocene Arctic Ocean sea-ice and SST conditions. The presence of IP25 as proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based relatively warm summer SST of >4 °C support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being dominant during (most of) the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or an overly weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate. References: Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, and C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25, Organic Geochemistry 38, 16-27. Müller, J., Massé, G., Stein, R., and Belt, S., 2009. Extreme variations in sea ice cover for Fram Strait during the past 30 ka. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10.1038/NGEO665. Müller, J., Wagner, A., Fahl, K., Stein, R., Prange, M., and

  1. Oceanographic changes in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic cryosphere dynamics during the Oligocene and Miocene: a view from offshore Wilkes Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, Francesca; Bijl, Peter K.; Hartman, Julian D.; Schouten, Stefan; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2016-04-01

    With the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO2 and global temperatures, a fundamental scientific and societal question arises concerning the stability of the Antarctic cryosphere. Modern observational data indicate the Southern Ocean has experienced significant warming, with oceanic fronts being pushed several tenth of km closer to the continent. Moreover, basal melt of ice shelves from warming oceans is causing accelerated grounding line retreat of the Antarctic ice sheets and shelves. However, monitoring data are available for the last few decades only, which prevents the evaluation of long-term changes in ice mass balance. Studying intervals in Earth's past history, which represent the best possible analogues of (near) future conditions, becomes thus essential. The Oligocene and Miocene Epochs encompass periods with CO2 concentrations between today's and those expected for the (near) future. It has also become clear that ice-proximal oceanographic regime is a critical factor for the stability and mass balance of ice sheets. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 318 offshore Wilkes Land (East Antarctica) Site U1356 satisfies both requirements of being ice-proximal and having a relative complete, stratigraphically well-resolved Oligocene-Miocene sequence (albeit with a possible 5-Myrs gap between Late Oligocene and Early Miocene). This allows for the first time studying oceanographic changes and cryosphere dynamics in the interval ~34-13 Myrs. Thus far, ice-proximal reconstructions were hindered by the paucity of suitable sedimentary archives around Antarctica and/or poor stratigraphic constraints. We reconstructed changes in surface oceanography and seawater temperatures by means of dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and TEX86 paleothermometry. The dinocyst data suggest (summer) sea-ice occurrence at Site U1356 only for the first 1.5 Ma following the onset of full Antarctic glaciation and after the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. In between, both dinocysts

  2. The time-space distribution of Eocene to Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian polymetallic province and its metallogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Thomas; Ullrich, Thomas D.; Tosdal, Richard M.; Friedman, Richard; Ebert, Shane

    2008-07-01

    Eocene to late Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian high-plain (approx. between Cerro de Pasco and Huancayo; Lats. ˜10.2-12°S) and east of the Cordillera Occidental is represented by scattered shallow-level intrusions as well as subaerial domes and volcanic deposits. These igneous rocks are calc-alkalic and range from basalt to rhyolite in composition, and many of them are spatially, temporally and, by inference, genetically associated with varied styles of major polymetallic mineralization. Forty-four new 40Ar- 39Ar and three U/Pb zircon dates are presented, many for previously undated intrusions. Our new time constraints together with data from the literature now cover most of the Cenozoic igneous rocks of this Andean segment and provide foundation for geodynamic and metallogenetic research. The oldest Cenozoic bodies are of Eocene age and include dacitic domes to the west of Cerro de Pasco with ages ranging from 38.5 to 33.5 Ma. South of the Domo de Yauli structural dome, Eocene igneous rocks occur some 15 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and include a 39.34 ± 0.28 Ma granodioritic intrusion and a 40.14 ± 0.61 Ma rhyolite sill, whereas several diorite stocks were emplaced between 36 and 33 Ma. Eocene mineralization is restricted to the Quicay high-sulfidation epithermal deposit some 10 km to the west of Cerro de Pasco. Igneous activity in the earliest Oligocene was concentrated up to 70 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and is represented by a number of granodioritic intrusions in the Milpo-Atacocha area. Relatively voluminous early Oligocene dacitic to andesitic volcanism gave rise to the Astabamba Formation to the southeast of Domo de Yauli. Some stocks at Milpo and Atacocha generated important Zn-Pb (-Ag) skarn mineralization. After about 29.3 Ma, magmatism ceased throughout the study region. Late Oligocene igneous activity was restricted to andesitic and dacitic volcanic deposits and intrusions around Uchucchacua (approx. 25 Ma) and felsic

  3. Miocene amber inclusions from the Bitterfeld area. [German Democratic Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, M.; Hetzer, H.

    1982-07-01

    This paper presents color and black and white photographs enlarged from 1:10 to 1:100 of insect inclusions in amber from a new amber field located in a sandy-silty layer between two brown coal seams, the main Bitterfeld brown coal seam and the Breitenfeld brown coal seam. The amber is 22 million years old, which is 12 million years younger than Baltic amber. The brown coal seams are Miocene formations. The origin of the amber is resin from the Mesozoic conifer Cupressospermum saxonicum Mai. Insect inclusions are well preserved, 55 photographs are provided, showing samples of mosquitoes, spiders, beetles, flies and other insects, from insect groups Arachnida, Myriapoda, and Hexapoda. Each insect sample from the inclusions is described in detail by scientists from the Museum of Natural History in Berlin. Infrared spectrograms of different amber pieces are also analyzed and aspects of amber genesis in the Bitterfeld area are discussed.

  4. Aliphatic biological markers in Miocene Maritz-Iztok lignite, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, M.; Magnier, C. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    Chromatographic separation and mass spectral studies of bitumens extracted from lithotypes (humovitrain, xylain, liptain and humoclarain) from the Miocene Maritza-Iztok lignite reveal the following: (1) A preponderance of the {alpha}-phyllocladane skeleton over the pimaranes/abietanes. The variety of tricyclic diterpanes confirms that the generation biota included gymnosperms; (2) The presence of dicotyledonous angiosperms in the generation biota is indicated by the occurrence of widely distributed des-A-lupane structure; (3) The dominance of terpanes over steranes confirms the prevailing contribution of terrigenous input; (4) The preponderance of C{sub 27{beta}} hopane and the presence {beta}{beta} hopanes indicates a low degree of thermal maturation. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Patterns of reef sedimentation and diagenesis in the Miocene of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, Edward J.

    1992-08-01

    An Early Tertiary regressive sedimentary succession developed along an active plate margin in Cyprus. A varied clastic and carbonate succession of the Miocene Pakhna Formation and then Messinian evaporites culminate the regression. Within the Pakhna Formation, two phases of reef growth were developed: the Aquitanian—Burdigalian, Terra Member, and the Tortonian, Koronia Member. The Terra Member is exposed only in west and southeast Cyprus, mainly between pelagic carbonates. The Koronia Member is exposed around the margins of the Troodos Massif in north, south and west Cyprus and on the Akamas Peninsula in northwest Cyprus. There was little tectonic influence on the growth pattern of the Terra Member reefs. The Koronia Member reefs, however, are developed on up-faulted blocks. Most of the Koronia Member fore-reef facies and associated clastic input was shed into downfaulted basinal depocentres. There are differences between the first and second Miocene reef phases in Cyprus in primary reef construction and in the level of background carbonate pelagic sedimentation. The Terra Member reefs are dominantly framestones, comprising faviids and domal poritids with several types of secondary reef-dwelling corals. There is no indication of a connection with the Indo-Pacific coral faunal province. Benthonic foraminifera and fragments of crustose coralline algae are abundant in the off-reef. By contrast, the Koronia Member is a bindstone comprising virtually monospecific, laminar poritid corals but with coralline algae also playing a role in encrustation. The Koronia Member off-reef facies comprises decimetre-thick beds of bioclastic reef detritus. In north Cyprus however, beds of similar detritus (centimetres in thickness), are overlain by progressively thicker (up to several metres) debris-flow sheets. The Terra Member reefs have limited acicular fringe cement (probably aragonitic). This is overlain by an abundant, marine, bladed, formerly high-Mg calcite cement. Later

  6. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO₂ site characterization mega transect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meckel, Timothy [Univ. of Austin, Austin, TX (United Staes); Trevino, Ramon [Univ. of Austin, Austin, TX (United Staes)

    2014-12-01

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO₂-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the

  7. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO₂ site characterization mega transect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meckel, Timothy [Univ. of Austin, Austin, TX (United Staes); Trevino, Ramon [Univ. of Austin, Austin, TX (United Staes)

    2014-09-30

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO₂-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the

  8. A 1500 yr warm-season temperature record from varved Lago Plomo, Northern Patagonia (47° S) and implications for the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, J.; Jacques-Coper, M.; Van Daele, M.; Urrutia, R.; Grosjean, M.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution records of calibrated proxy data for the past 2000 yr are fundamental to place current changes into the context of pre-industrial natural forced and unforced variability. Although the need for regional spatially explicit comprehensive reconstructions is widely recognized, the proxy data sources are still scarce, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere and South America. We provide a 1500 yr long warm season temperature record from varved Lago Plomo, a proglacial lake of the Northern Patagonian Ice field in southern Chile (46°59' S, 72°52' W, 203 m). The thickness of the bright summer sediment layer relative to the dark winter layer (measured as total brightness; % reflectance 400-730 nm) is calibrated against warm season SONDJF temperature (1900-2009; r = 0.58, p(aut) = 0.056, RE = 0.52; CE = 0.15, RMSEP = 0.28 °C; five-year triangular filtered data). In Lago Plomo, warm summer temperatures lead to enhanced glacier melt and suspended sediment transport, which results in a thicker light summer layer and to brighter sediments (% total brightness). Although Patagonia shows pronounced regional differences in decadal temperature trends and variability, the 1500 yr temperature reconstruction from Lago Plomo compares favourably with other regional/continental temperature records but also emphasizes significant regional differences for which no data and information existed so far. The reconstruction shows pronounced sub-decadal-multi-decadal variability with cold phases in the 5th, 7th and 9th centuries, during parts of the Little Ice Age chronozone (16th and 18th centuries) and in the beginning of the 20th century. The most prominent warm phase is the 19th century which is as warm as the second half of the 20th century, emphasizing a delayed recent global warming in the Southern Hemisphere. The comparison between winter precipitation and summer temperature (inter-seasonal coupling) from Lago Plomo reveals alternating phases with parallel and

  9. Linking hydro-climate to the sediment archive: a combined monitoring and calibration study from a varved lake in central Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. Neil; Dean, Jonathan R.; Eastwood, Warren J.; Jones, Matthew D.; Allcock, Samantha L.; Leng, Melanie J.; Metcalfe, Sarah E.; Woodbridge, Jessie; Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    Hydro-climatic reconstructions from lake sediment proxies require an understanding of modern formation processes and calibration over multiple years. Here we use Nar Gölü, a non-outlet, monomictic maar lake in central Turkey, as a field site for such a natural experiment. Fieldwork since 1997 has included observations and measurements of lake water and sediment trap samples, and automated data logging (Jones et al., 2005; Woodbridge and Roberts, 2010; Dean et al., 2015). We compare these data to isotopic, chemical and biotic proxies preserved in the lake's annually-varved sediments. Nar Gölü underwent a 3 m lake-level fall between 2000 and 2010, and δ18O in both water and carbonates is correlated with this lake-level fall, responding to the change in water balance. Over the same period, sedimentary diatom assemblages responded via changes in habitat availability and mixing regime, while conductivity inferred from diatoms showed a rise in inferred salinity, although with a non-linear response to hydro-climatic forcing. There were also non-linear shifts in carbonate mineralogy and elemental chemistry. Building on the relationship between lake water balance and the sediment isotope record, we calibrated sedimentary δ18O against local meteorological records to derive a P/E drought index for central Anatolia. Application to of this to the longer sediment core isotope record from Nar Gölü (Jones et al. 2006) highlights major drought events over the last 600 years (Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu et al., 2015). Although this lacustrine record offers an archive of annually-dated, decadally-averaged hydro-climatic change, there were also times of non-linear lake response to climate. Robust reconstruction therefore requires understanding of physical processes as well as application of statistical correlations. Dean, J.R., Eastwood, W.J., Roberts, N., Jones, M.D., Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu, H., Allcock, S.L., Woodbridge, J., Metcalfe, S.E. and Leng, M.J. (2015) Tracking the hydro

  10. A 1500 yr warm-season temperature record from varved Lago Plomo, Northern Patagonia (47° S and implications for the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Elbert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution records of calibrated proxy data for the past 2000 yr are fundamental to place current changes into the context of pre-industrial natural forced and unforced variability. Although the need for regional spatially explicit comprehensive reconstructions is widely recognized, the proxy data sources are still scarce, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere and South America. We provide a 1500 yr long warm season temperature record from varved Lago Plomo, a proglacial lake of the Northern Patagonian Ice field in southern Chile (46°59' S, 72°52' W, 203 m. The thickness of the bright summer sediment layer relative to the dark winter layer (measured as total brightness; % reflectance 400–730 nm is calibrated against warm season SONDJF temperature (1900–2009; r = 0.58, p(aut = 0.056, RE = 0.52; CE = 0.15, RMSEP = 0.28 °C; five-year triangular filtered data. In Lago Plomo, warm summer temperatures lead to enhanced glacier melt and suspended sediment transport, which results in a thicker light summer layer and to brighter sediments (% total brightness. Although Patagonia shows pronounced regional differences in decadal temperature trends and variability, the 1500 yr temperature reconstruction from Lago Plomo compares favourably with other regional/continental temperature records but also emphasizes significant regional differences for which no data and information existed so far. The reconstruction shows pronounced sub-decadal–multi-decadal variability with cold phases in the 5th, 7th and 9th centuries, during parts of the Little Ice Age chronozone (16th and 18th centuries and in the beginning of the 20th century. The most prominent warm phase is the 19th century which is as warm as the second half of the 20th century, emphasizing a delayed recent global warming in the Southern Hemisphere. The comparison between winter precipitation and summer temperature (inter-seasonal coupling from Lago Plomo reveals alternating phases with

  11. SG06, a fully continuous and varved sediment core from Lake Suigetsu, Japan: stratigraphy and potential for improving the radiocarbon calibration model and understanding of late Quaternary climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takeshi; Gotanda, Katsuya; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Danhara, Toru; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Brauer, Achim; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Tada, Ryuji; Takemura, Keiji; Staff, Richard A.; Payne, Rebecca; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Bryant, Charlotte; Brock, Fiona; Schlolaut, Gordon; Marshall, Michael; Tarasov, Pavel; Lamb, Henry; Suigetsu 2006 Project Members

    2012-03-01

    The high potential of the varved sediments of Lake Suigetsu, central Japan, to provide a purely terrestrial radiocarbon calibration model and a chronology of palaeoclimatic changes has been widely recognised for the last two decades. However, this potential has not been fully realised since the only available long sediment core from the lake ('SG93') was extracted from a single bore hole and was therefore interrupted by gaps of unknown duration between successive core sections. In the summer of 2006, a new sediment core ('SG06') was recovered from the lake. Four separate boreholes were drilled and the parallel sets of cores recovered were found to overlap completely, without gaps between segments. This new record provides the ability to test existing atmospheric radiocarbon calibration models, as well as to assess the scale of inter-regional leads and lags in palaeoclimatic changes over the last Glacial-Interglacial cycle. Multi-disciplinary analyses from SG06 are still ongoing, but a reliable description of the sedimentary sequence needs to be provided to the wider science community before major outputs from the project are released, thereby allowing fully-informed critical evaluation of all subsequent releases of data based on the SG06 record. In this paper, we report key litho-stratigraphic information concerning the SG06 sediment core, highlighting changes in the clarity of annual laminations (varves) with depth, and possible implications for the mechanism of the climate change. We also discuss the potential of the SG06 record to meet the fundamental goals of the INQUA-INTIMATE project.

  12. Out of Africa:Miocene Dispersal, Vicariance, and Extinction within Hyacinthaceae Subfamily Urgineoideae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Shujait Ali; Martin Pfosser; Wolfgang Wetschnig; Mario MartnezAzorn; Manuel B. Crespo; Yan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Disjunct distribution patterns in plant lineages are usually explained according to three hypotheses:vicariance, geodispersal, and long-distance dispersal. The role of these hypotheses is tested in Urgineoideae (Hyacinthaceae), a subfamily disjunctly distributed in Africa, Madagascar, India, and the Mediterranean region. The potential ancestral range, dispersal routes, and factors responsible for the current distribution in Urgineoideae are investigated using divergence time estimations. Urgineoideae originated in Southern Africa approximately 48.9 Mya. Two independent dispersal events in the Western Mediterranean region possibly occurred during Early Oligocene and Miocene (29.9-8.5 Mya) via Eastern and Northwestern Africa. A dispersal from Northwestern Africa to India could have occurred between 16.3 and 7.6 Mya. Vicariance and extinction events occurred approximately 21.6 Mya. Colonization of Madagascar occurred between 30.6 and 16.6 Mya, after a single transoceanic dispersal event from Southern Africa. The current disjunct distributions of Urgineoideae are not satisfactorily explained by Gondwana fragmentation or dispersal via boreotropical forests, due to the younger divergence time estimates. The flattened winged seeds of Urgineoideae could have played an important role in long-distance dispersal by strong winds and big storms, whereas geodispersal could have also occurred from Southern Africa to Asia and the Mediterranean region via the so-called arid and high-altitude corridors.

  13. Late miocene/pliocene origin of the inverted metamorphism of the Central Himalaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, T.M.; Ryerson, F.J.; LeFort, P.; Yin, A. Lovera, O.M.

    1997-01-01

    The spatial association of intracontinental thrusting and inverted metamorphism, recognized in the Himalaya more than a century ago, has inspired continuing efforts to identify their causal relationship. Perhaps the best known sequence of inverted metamorphism is that found immediately beneath the Himalayan Main Central Thrust (MCT), generally thought to have been active during the Early Miocene. It has been widely assumed that the pattern of inverted metamorphism also developed at that time. Using a new approach, in situ Th-Pb dating of monazite included in garnet, we have discovered that the peak metamorphic recrystallization recorded in the footwall of the MCT fault occurred at ca. 5 Ma. The apparent inverted metamorphism resulted from activation of a broad shear zone beneath the MCT zone which juxtaposed two right-way-up metamorphic sequences. Recognition of this remarkably youthful phase of metamorphism resolves outstanding problems in Himalayan tectonics, such as why the MCT (and not the more recently initiated thrusts) marks the break in slope of the present day mountain range, and transcends others, such as the need for exceptional conditions to explain Himalayan anatexis.

  14. Studies in Neotropical paleobotany. XIII. An Oligo-Miocene palynoflora from Simojovel (Chiapas, Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, A

    1999-01-01

    A plant microfossil assemblage of 24 identified and five unknown pollen and spore types is reported from the early Miocene La Quinta Formation near Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico. The taxa group into seven paleocommunities representing versions of the modern mangroves (Pelliciera, Rhizophora), swamp and lowland riparian forest (Ceratopteris, Crudia, Pachira), tropical rain forest (Selaginella, cf. Antrophyum, Pteris, Sphaeropteris/Trichipteris, cf. Aguiaria, Crudia, Guarea, Pachira), lower montane rain forest (Alfaroa/Oreomunnea, possibly Eugenia), evergreen cloud forest [Picea, Pinus, Podocarpus, Ericaceae (possibly Cavendishia/Vaccinium)], evergreen seasonal forest (Hymenaea, Ilex, possibly Eugenia), and tropical deciduous forest (Cedrela). Elements of arid and high-elevation habitats were absent or few, and northern temperate elements (Picea, Pinus?) were few or rare. Paleoelevations are estimated at 1000-1200 m (present average 2000 m, maximum 3004 m), MAT (mean annual temperature) at least as warm as the present 24°C, and annual rainfall near the present ∼2500 mm but more evenly distributed. The La Quinta (Simojovel) and other Tertiary floras from the region reflect a trend toward higher altitudes, more seasonal rainfall, cooling tempertures, increased introduction of cool-temperate elements from the north after ∼15 Ma (million years), and increased introduction of tropical elements from the south after completion of the isthmian land bridge ∼3.5 Ma ago.

  15. Biogeographic ecological and stratigraphic relationships of the Miocene brown coal floras, Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluiter, I.R.K.; Kershaw, A.P.; Holdgate, G.R.; Bulman, D. [Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Mildura, Vic. (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    Palaeobotanical studies of the brown coal deposits of the Latrobe Valley have contributed significantly towards an understanding of the age of the deposits, existing climatic conditions and detailed depositional environments. This paper re-assesses some past reconstructions for the Early to Mid Miocene coals using recent information on plant distributions and their bioclimatic significance and on a marine incursion model for coal lithotype formation. The brown coal flora is composed overwhelmingly of rainforest taxa. The application of a bioclimatic prediction model to these taxa allows the construction of consistent and quantitative estimates of climates during coal-forming phases. It is considered that rainfall in the area was more than twice the 850 mm received today, with significant seasonal variation. The mean annual temperature estimate of about 19{degree}C, indicating a mesothermal or subtropical environment, is some 4-5{degree}C higher than present. The original model of lithotype formation, which suggests that lithotypes conform to a successional sequence from open water in the lightest coloured lithotypes to raised bog in the darkest lithotypes, is considered to be inconsistent with the evidence for lightening upwards sequences within the coals, a central feature of the proposed marine incursion model of coal formation. The two models are reconciled to some degree by a reinterpretation of the palaeobotanical data and by the postulation of climatic rather than autogenic successional control over lithotype formation. 51 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Climate response to orbital forcing across the Oligocene-Miocene boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachos, J C; Shackleton, N J; Revenaugh, J S; Pälike, H; Flower, B P

    2001-04-13

    Spectral analyses of an uninterrupted 5.5-million-year (My)-long chronology of late Oligocene-early Miocene climate and ocean carbon chemistry from two deep-sea cores recovered in the western equatorial Atlantic reveal variance concentrated at all Milankovitch frequencies. Exceptional spectral power in climate is recorded at the 406-thousand-year (ky) period eccentricity band over a 3.4-million-year period [20 to 23.4 My ago (Ma)] as well as in the 125- and 95-ky bands over a 1.3-million-year period (21.7 to 23.0 Ma) of suspected low greenhouse gas levels. Moreover, a major transient glaciation at the epoch boundary ( approximately 23 Ma), Mi-1, corresponds with a rare orbital congruence involving obliquity and eccentricity. The anomaly, which consists of low-amplitude variance in obliquity (a node) and a minimum in eccentricity, results in an extended period ( approximately 200 ky) of low seasonality orbits favorable to ice-sheet expansion on Antarctica.

  17. An overview of lithotype associations of Miocene lignite seams exploited in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widera, Marek

    2016-09-01

    Currently, three stratigraphically distinct lignite seams of Early to Middle Miocene age are exploited in Poland, namely the third Ścinawa lignite seam (ŚLS-3), the second Lusatian lignite seam (LLS-2) and the first Mid-Polish lignite seam (MPLS-1). All of these are composed of numerous macroscopically distinguishable layers defined as lignite lithotypes. In the present paper, the lithotypes of Polish lignites are grouped into seven major lithotype associations that originated in various types of mire. Therefore, an approximate reconstruction of mire type can be based on lignite lithotypes. Within the Polish lignite seams examined, the commonest in order of importance are: xylodetritic (XDL), detroxylitic (DXL), detritic (DL) and xylitic (XL) lithotype associations, mostly with a massive (m) or horizontal (h) structure. They are particularly dominant in lignite opencasts belonging to the Konin and Adamów mines. However, in the lowermost seams at the Turów and Bełchatów mines, a substantial part of the seams comprises the bitumen-rich (BL) lithotype association. These seams also lignite lithotypes that in large quantities have a gelified (g) and/or nodular (n) structure. In contrast, lignites from the Sieniawa mine are characterised by an admixture of the best-developed lithotype associations of both fusitic (FL) and weathered (WL) lignites. Moreover, the vast majority of these lignites have a folded (fo) and/or faulted (fa) structure, because they were completely deformed by glaciotectonics.

  18. Morphometry, bite-force, and paleobiology of the late miocene caiman Purussaurus brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, Tito; Ghilardi, Aline M; Guilherme, Edson; Souza-Filho, Jonas P; Cavalcanti, Mauro; Riff, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Purussaurus brasiliensis thrived in the northwestern portion of South America during the Late Miocene. Although substantial material has been recovered since its early discovery, this fossil crocodilian can still be considered as very poorly understood. In the present work, we used regression equations based on modern crocodilians to present novel details about the morphometry, bite-force and paleobiology of this species. According to our results, an adult Purussaurus brasiliensis was estimated to reach around 12.5 m in length, weighing around 8.4 metric tons, with a mean daily food intake of 40.6 kg. It was capable of generating sustained bite forces of 69,000 N (around 7 metric tons-force). The extreme size and strength reached by this animal seems to have allowed it to include a wide range of prey in its diet, making it a top predator in its ecosystem. As an adult, it would have preyed upon large to very large vertebrates, and, being unmatched by any other carnivore, it avoided competition. The evolution of a large body size granted P. brasiliensis many advantages, but it may also have led to its vulnerability. The constantly changing environment on a large geological scale may have reduced its long-term survival, favoring smaller species more resilient to ecological shifts.

  19. An overview of lithotype associations of Miocene lignite seams exploited in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widera Marek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, three stratigraphically distinct lignite seams of Early to Middle Miocene age are exploited in Poland, namely the third Ścinawa lignite seam (ŚLS-3, the second Lusatian lignite seam (LLS-2 and the first Mid-Polish lignite seam (MPLS-1. All of these are composed of numerous macroscopically distinguishable layers defined as lignite lithotypes. In the present paper, the lithotypes of Polish lignites are grouped into seven major lithotype associations that originated in various types of mire. Therefore, an approximate reconstruction of mire type can be based on lignite lithotypes. Within the Polish lignite seams examined, the commonest in order of importance are: xylodetritic (XDL, detroxylitic (DXL, detritic (DL and xylitic (XL lithotype associations, mostly with a massive (m or horizontal (h structure. They are particularly dominant in lignite opencasts belonging to the Konin and Adamów mines. However, in the lowermost seams at the Turów and Bełchatów mines, a substantial part of the seams comprises the bitumen-rich (BL lithotype association. These seams also lignite lithotypes that in large quantities have a gelified (g and/or nodular (n structure. In contrast, lignites from the Sieniawa mine are characterised by an admixture of the best-developed lithotype associations of both fusitic (FL and weathered (WL lignites. Moreover, the vast majority of these lignites have a folded (fo and/or faulted (fa structure, because they were completely deformed by glaciotectonics.

  20. Stepwise onset of the Icehouse world and its impact on Oligo-Miocene Central Asian mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Daxner-Höck, Gudrun; López-Guerrero, Paloma; Maridet, Olivier; Oliver, Adriana; Piller, Werner E.; Richoz, Sylvain; Erbajeva, Margarita A.; Neubauer, Thomas A.; Göhlich, Ursula B.

    2016-11-01

    Central Asia is a key area to study the impact of Cenozoic climate cooling on continental ecosystems. One of the best places to search for rather continuous paleontological records is the Valley of Lakes in Mongolia with its outstandingly fossil-rich Oligocene and Miocene terrestrial sediments. Here, we investigate the response by mammal communities during the early stage of Earth’s icehouse climate in Central Asia. Based on statistical analyses of occurrence and abundance data of 18608 specimens representing 175 mammal species and geochemical (carbon isotopes) and geophysical (magnetic susceptibility) data we link shifts in diversities with major climatic variations. Our data document for the first time that the post-Eocene aridification of Central Asia happened in several steps, was interrupted by short episodes of increased precipitation, and was not a gradual process. We show that the timing of the major turnovers in Oligocene mammal communities is tightly linked with global climate events rather than slow tectonics processes. The most severe decline of up 48% of total diversity is related to aridification during the maximum of the Late Oligocene Warming at 25 Ma. Its magnitude was distinctly larger than the community turnover linked to the mid-Oligocene Glacial Maximum.

  1. Reinvestigation of the Miocene palynoflora from the Daotaiqiao Formation of north-eastern China using SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyurt, Elvan; Grímsson, Friðgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Leng, Qin; Bouchal, Johannes Martin

    2016-04-01

    : Grímsson F, Zetter R, Leng Q. 2012. Diverse fossil Onagraceae pollen from a Miocene palynoflora of north-east China: early steps in resolving the phytogeographic history of the family. Plant Systematics and Evolution 298: 671-687.

  2. Post-obduction carbonate system development in New Caledonia (Népoui, Lower Miocene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurizot, Pierre; Cabioch, Guy; Fournier, François; Leonide, Philippe; Sebih, Salim; Rouillard, Pierrick; Montaggioni, Lucien; Collot, Julien; Martin-Garin, Bertrand; Chaproniere, George; Braga, Juan C.; Sevin, Brice

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, depositional models of Lower Miocene carbonate systems from New Caledonia (Southwest Pacific) are proposed, on the basis of a sedimentological and paleoenvironmental study of both cores and outcrops. In the Népoui area, two distinct stages of carbonate ramp development (Aquitanian Lower Népoui and Burdigalian Upper Népoui carbonate systems), separated by a phase of siliciclastic deltaic deposition, are evidenced. The post-obduction marine transgression of the Western New Caledonian margin occurred at approximately 24 Ma and is characterized by the development of an aggrading foraminiferal-coralline algal-scleractinian ramp system ("Chapeau Chinois Limestone") during the early Aquitanian (24-23 Ma). A retrogradational event is evidenced at approximately 23 Ma followed by the development of a shallowing upward carbonate unit (Operculina "Green Sands" and Xuudhen Limestone) during the late Aquitanian. This unit is topped by a major erosional unconformity overlain by conglomeratic deposits ("Pindaï conglomerates"), and interpreted to record a significant uplift at around 21-19 Ma. During the Burdigalian, a marine transgression occurred at around 19 Ma, followed by the development of a low-angle carbonate ramp or open platform ("Népü Limestone") up to the late Burdigalian (19-17 Ma). In both Aquitanian and Burdigalian carbonate ramps, extensive sea-grass meadows are shown to have colonized the proximal ramp environments within the euphotic zone. In the Aquitanian carbonate ramp (Lower Népoui Formation), carbonate production within sea-grass meadows is dominated by large benthic foraminifera, together with red algae and sparse scleractinians. Mesophotic environments are characterized by large and flat lepidocyclinids, rhodoliths and platy corals whereas in deeper oligophotic settings significant carbonate producers consist mainly of large and flat benthic foraminifera. In the Burdigalian carbonate ramp (Upper Népoui Formation), porcellaneous

  3. The Randeck Maar: Facies development and habitat differentiation of a Miocene lacustrine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasser, Michael W.; Kern, Andrea K.

    2015-04-01

    The Randeck Maar in S Germany is a well-known fossil lagerstätte (Early/Middle Miocene, MN5) with exceptionally preserved fossils. Although it is a locally restricted succession of lake sediments with a diameter of only 1200 m and less than 60 m of preserved sediments, it appears to comprise a complex structure with a high scientific potential on a global scale, because the lake sediments and their fossils can provide evidence for the impact of the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) on the environment and its organisms as well as the ecological interactions between animals and/or plants during that interval. No other European locality provides such a rich insight into an ecosystem that existed during the MMCO. Excavations of Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart provided new insights into the facies types of this maar lake. They showed that a high variety of facies types existed beside the traditional separation into a basal tuffitic development, followed by calcareous and bituminous ('dysodil') laminates, and terminal massive freshwater limestones. Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions are based on the mentioned excavations and re-evaluations of collection material. They show that the Randeck Maar was a typical maar lake with a rich flora and fauna. Based on all plant remains, the IPR vegetational analysis points towards subhumid sclerophyllous forests, suggesting seasonal drought. 380 taxa in all are known thus far, which are dominated by plants (168) and insects (79). The taxonomic re-evaluation combined with palaeoecological considerations allows for the reconstruction of a palaeoenvironmental model. In brief, three main sections can be differentiated for the habitats of the Randeck Maar lake system: (1) Deep- and open-water lake habitats with local and short-termed mass occurrences of insect larvae, amphibians, and/or gastropods, while fish are particularly scarce. The interpretation of the water chemistry is problematic because palaeoenvironmental

  4. Lower Miocene stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and its bearing on the Central American Peninsula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Xavier Kirby

    Full Text Available Before the formation of the Central American Isthmus, there was a Central American Peninsula. Here we show that southern Central America existed as a peninsula as early as 19 Ma, based on new lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and strontium chemostratigraphic analyses of the formations exposed along the Gaillard Cut of the Panama Canal. Land mammals found in the Miocene Cucaracha Formation have similar body sizes to conspecific taxa in North America, indicating that there existed a terrestrial connection with North America that allowed gene flow between populations during this time. How long did this peninsula last? The answer hinges on the outcome of a stratigraphic dispute: To wit, is the terrestrial Cucaracha Formation older or younger than the marine La Boca Formation? Previous stratigraphic studies of the Panama Canal Basin have suggested that the Cucaracha Formation lies stratigraphically between the shallow-marine Culebra Formation and the shallow-to-upper-bathyal La Boca Formation, the latter containing the Emperador Limestone. If the La Boca Formation is younger than the Cucaracha Formation, as many think, then the peninsula was short-lived (1-2 m.y., having been submerged in part by the transgression represented by the overlying La Boca Formation. On the other hand, our data support the view that the La Boca Formation is older than the Cucaracha Formation. Strontium dating shows that the La Boca Formation is older (23.07 to 20.62 Ma than both the Culebra (19.83-19.12 Ma and Cucaracha (Hemingfordian to Barstovian North American Land Mammal Ages; 19-14 Ma formations. The Emperador Limestone is also older (21.24-20.99 Ma than the Culebra and Cucaracha formations. What has been called the "La Boca Formation" (with the Emperador Limestone, is re-interpreted here as being the lower part of the Culebra Formation. Our new data sets demonstrate that the main axis of the volcanic arc in southern Central America more than likely existed as a

  5. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Lower Miocene 1 Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Lower Miocene 1 sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  6. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Upper Miocene Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Upper Miocene sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  7. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Lower Miocene 2 Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Lower Miocene 2 sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  8. Generalized Representation of the Oil and Gas Producing Areas from the Miocene in Southern Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — For each of the four Miocene sequences, polygons representing producing areas within fields were created by constructing a grid of ¼ sq. mi. cells and proximal...

  9. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Middle Miocene Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Middle Miocene sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  10. Miocene transgression in the central and eastern parts of the Sivas Basin (Central Anatolia, Turkey) and the Cenozoic palaeogeographical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, André; Vrielynck, Bruno; Wernli, Roland; Negri, Alessandra; Bassetti, Maria-Angela; Büyükmeriç, Yesim; Özer, Sacit; Guillou, Hervé; Kavak, Kaan S.; Temiz, Haluk; Orszag-Sperber, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    We present here a reappraisal of the tectonic setting, stratigraphy and palaeogeography of the central part of the Sivas Basin from Palaeocene to late Miocene. The Sivas Basin is located in the collision zone between the Pontides (southern Eurasia) and Anatolia (a continental block rifted from Gondwana). The basin overlies ophiolites that were obducted onto Anatolia from Tethys to the north. The Central Anatolian Crystalline Complex (CACC) experienced similar ophiolite obduction during Campanian time, followed by exhumation and thrusting onto previously emplaced units during Maastrichtian time. To the east, crustal extension related to exhumation of the CACC created grabens during the early Tertiary, including the Sivas Basin. The Sivas Basin underwent several tectonic events during Paleogene-Neogene. The basin fill varies, with several sub-basins, each being characterised by a distinctive sequence, especially during Oligocene and Miocene. Evaporite deposition in the central part of the basin during early Oligocene was followed by mid-late Oligocene fluvio-lacustrine deposition. The weight of overlying fluvial sediments triggered salt tectonics and salt diapir formation. Lacustrine layers that are interbedded within the fluviatile sediments have locally yielded charophytes of late Oligocene age. Emergent areas including the pre-existing Sivas Basin and neighbouring areas were then flooded from the east by a shallow sea, giving rise to a range of open-marine sub-basins, coralgal reef barriers and subsiding, restricted-marine sub-basins. Utilising new data from foraminifera, molluscs, corals and nannoplankton, the age of the marine transgression is reassessed as Aquitanian. Specifically, age-diagnostic nannoplankton assemblages of classical type occur at the base of the transgressive sequence. However, classical stratigraphic markers have not been found within the planktic foraminiferal assemblages, even in the open-marine settings. In the restricted-marine sediments

  11. Early- to Mid-Holocene environmental and climate changes in the southern Baltic lowland using XRF scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjallingii, Rik; Ott, Florian; Dräger, Nadine; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Slowinski, Michal; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The ICLEA project includes several annually laminated (varved) lake records from the southern Baltic lowlands for detailed climatic and environmental reconstructions. Continuous geochemical records have been obtained by XRF scanning and reveal the dominant depositional processes of the German lake Tiefer See and the Polish lakes Głęboczek, Czechowskie and Jelonek. Each lake record has been independently dated by means of varve counting, AMS 14C dating and tephrochronology. The unprecedented age control allows accurate age correlation of individual lake records even over large distances. The detailed stratigraphy is used in combination with micro-XRF core scanning records to link depositional variability with past environmental and climatic changes. However, in each lake the major sedimentological transitions are reflected by different geochemical elements due to the different depositional conditions. Here we present a statistical concept for XRF core scanning data to evaluate the timing and frequency of the most prominent sedimentological transitions of the Early to Mid Holocene. Preliminary results reveal that depositional conditions prevail over relatively long periods (102-103 yrs) between the Younger Dryas and ~6000 yrs. The sedimentological transitions during this period are associated to regional climatic changes in the southern Baltic lowlands during this period. After ~6000 yrs BP, depositional conditions vary at a much higher frequency (10-102 yrs), which are associated with a stronger local and lake internal environmental variability. Ongoing research focuses on a multi-proxy approach to further constrain possible links between depositional changes recorded in these varved lacustrine sediments with Early- to Mid-Holocene climatic and environmental variations. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis - ICLEA - of the Helmholtz Association.

  12. The history of Post-Miocene sea level change: Inferences from stratigraphic modeling of Enewetak Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terrence M.

    1991-04-01

    The history of post-Miocene sea level change has been investigated using a quantitative, one-dimensional stratigraphic forward model. The stratigraphic model produces synthetic stratigraphies, including mineralogy and sediment age versus depth, in response to changes in sea level, subsidence, sedimentation, and diagenesis. Model outputs, using sea level curves inferred from passive margin sequence stratigraphy and deep-sea foraminiferal oxygen isotope stratigraphy, were compared to the post-Miocene stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll. Modeling results support high-frequency (104 to 105 years) fluctuations of post-Miocene sea level. Post-Miocene sea level elevations significantly greater than modern sea level elevation are not easily reconciled with the stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll. Model/data fit is maximized when a rapid subsidence rate for Enewetak Atoll is used. Alternatively, model/data fit may be maximized using a lower subsidence rate for Enewetak and having post-Miocene sea level elevations significantly lower than modem sea level elevation. Given the present state of knowledge, much work is still needed to accurately decipher the record of post-Miocene sea level change.

  13. Miocene fossil plants from Bukpyeong Formation of Bukpyeong Basin in Donghae City, Gangwon-do Province, Korea and their palaeoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Uemura, Kazuhiko; Kim, Kyungsik

    2016-04-01

    The Tertiary sedimentary basins are distributed along the eastern coast of Korean Peninsula. The northernmost Bukpyeong Basin is located in Donghae City, Gangwon-do Province, Korea. The Bukpyeong Basin consists of Bukpyeong Formation and Dogyeongri Conglomerate in ascending order. The geologic age of Bukpyeong Formation has been suggested as from Early Miocene to Pliocene, In particular, Lee & Jacobs (2010) suggested the age of the Bukpyeong Formation as late Early Miocene to early Middle Miocene based on the fossils of rodent teeth. Sedimentary environment has been thought as mainly fresh water lake and/or swamp partly influenced by marine water. Lately, new outcrops of Bukpyeong Formation were exposed during the road construction and abundant fossil plants were yielded from the newly exposed outcrops. As a result of palaeobotanical studies 47 genera of 23 families have been found. This fossil plant assemblage is composed of gymnosperms and dicotyledons. Gymnosperms were Pinaceae (e.g., Pinus, Tsuga), Sciadopityaceae (e.g., Sciadopitys) and Cupressaceae with well-preserved Metasequoia cones. Dicotyledons were deciduous trees such as Betulaceae (e.g., Alnus, Carpinus) and Sapindaceae (e.g., Acer, Aesculus, Sapindus), and evergreen trees such as evergreen Fagaceae (e.g., Castanopsis, Cyclobalanopsis, Pasania) and Lauraceae (e.g., Cinnamomum, Machilus). In addition, fresh water plants such as Hemitrapa (Lytraceae) and Ceratophyllum (Ceratophyllaceae) were also found. The fossil plant assemblage of the Bukpyeong Formation supported the freshwater environment implied by previous studies. It can be suggested that the palaeoflora of Bukpyeong Formation was oak-laurel forest with broad-leaved evergreen and deciduous trees accompanying commonly by conifers of Pinaceae and Cupressaceae under warm-temperate climate.

  14. Miocene Antarctic ice dynamics in the Ross Embayment (Western Ross Sea, Antarctica): Insights from provenance analyses of sedimentary clasts in the AND-2A drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornamusini, Gianluca; Talarico, Franco M.

    2016-11-01

    A detailed study of gravel-size sedimentary clasts in the ANDRILL-2A (AND-2A) drill core reveals distinct changes in provenance and allows reconstructions to be produced of the paleo ice flow in the McMurdo Sound region (Ross Sea) from the Early Miocene to the Holocene. The sedimentary clasts in AND-2A are divided into seven distinct petrofacies. A comparison of these with potential source rocks from the Transantarctic Mountains and the coastal Southern Victoria Land suggests that the majority of the sedimentary clasts were derived from formations within the Devonian-Triassic Beacon Supergroup. The siliciclastic-carbonate petrofacies are similar to the fossiliferous erratics found in the Quaternary Moraine in the southern McMurdo Sound and were probably sourced from Eocene strata that are currently hidden beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. Intraformational clasts were almost certainly reworked from diamictite and mudstone sequences that were originally deposited proximal to the drill site. The distribution of sedimentary gravel clasts in AND-2A suggests that sedimentary sequences in the drill core were deposited under two main glacial scenarios: 1) a highly dynamic ice sheet that did not extend beyond the coastal margin and produced abundant debris-rich icebergs from outlet glaciers in the central Transantarctic Mountains and South Victoria Land; 2) and an ice sheet that extended well beyond the coastal margin and periodically advanced across the Ross Embayment. Glacial scenario 1 dominated the early to mid-Miocene (between ca. 1000 and 225 mbsf in AND-2A) and scenario 2 the early Miocene (between ca. 1138 and 1000 mbsf) and late Neogene to Holocene (above ca. 225 mbsf). This study augments previous research on the clast provenance and highlights the added value that sedimentary clasts offer in terms of reconstructing past glacial conditions from Antarctic drill core records.

  15. The Middle Miocene lacustrine mollusc fauna of the Kupres Basin: palaeobiogeography, palaeoecology, and taxonomic implications (Dinaride Lake System, Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, T. A.; Mandic, O.; Harzhauser, M.; Hrvatović, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the Early and Middle Miocene the Dinaride Lake System displayed one of the largest freshwater systems in the Neogene of Europe, forming a palaeogeographic barrier between the Paratethys and the Mediterranean seas. It is widely known for its exceptional mollusc fauna, which experienced major radiations resulting in a high level of endemicity. Despite advanced investigations in that region our knowledge on the mollusc fauna is still fragmentary or out-dated. A major problem for taxonomic revisions is the complex geographic and geologic setting with numerous basins. Therefore, most authors were unable to assign already described taxa and localities in the literature to discrete basins and palaeo-lakes. The herein presented results give insight into the outstandingly preserved mollusc fauna of the Kupres Basin. Except for few descriptions, partly dating back to the early 20th century, and a preliminary list of species, a concise taxonomic frame is entirely missing. Consequently, the presented results provide the base for a systematic revision of several supraspecific taxa among the Hydrobiidae. Moreover, the faunal composition allows inferences on palaeobiogeography and hydrological connections within the Dinaride Lake System during the early Middle Miocene. About one third of the described taxa are restricted to the Kupres basin. The other taxa document faunistic relations to the coeval faunas of the Sinj, Drniš, and Džepi basins. Phases of hydrological isolation, indicated by carbonate dominated lithology, coincide with a high frequency of sculptured morphologies within the gastropods. Phases of increased aridity led to high evaporation, a lowered lake level and enhanced carbonate production which seem to have promoted strongly calcified shells. The stratigraphic ranges of the species imply a depositional age of 15.5 ± 0.2 Ma (earliest Middle Miocene; Langhian).

  16. Vegetation and climate development on the Atlantic Coastal Plain during the late Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (IODP Expedition 313)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prader, Sabine; Kotthoff, Ulrich; McCarthy, Francine; Greenwood, David

    2015-04-01

    which was reminiscent of Oligocene and early Miocene ecosystems analyzed in previous studies (e.g. Kotthoff et al. 2014). The ecosystem was characterized by oak-hickory forests which probably dominated in the lowlands, while frequent occurrence of conifer pollen (Pinus, Picea, Abies, Sciadopitys, and Tsuga canadensis) indicate that conifer forests prevailed in higher altitudes during the MMCO. We assume that the Miocene uplift of the Appalachian Mountains (e.g. Gallen et al., 2013) led to the proliferation of mountainous taxa and thus to an increase of related pollen taxa in the palynological record. References: Gallen, S. F., Wegmann, K. W., Bohnenstieh, D. W. R.: Miocene rejuvenation of topographic relief in the southern Appalachians, GSA Today, 23, 4-10, 2013. Kotthoff, U., McCarthy, F.M.G., Greenwood, D.R., Müller-Navarra, K., Prader, S., Hesselbo, S.P., (2014): Vegetation and climate development on the Atlantic Coastal Plain from 33 to 13 million years ago (IODP expedition 313). Climate of the Past 10, 1523-1539.

  17. On the timing and forcing mechanism of a mid-Miocene arid climate transition at the NE margins of the Tibetan Plateau: stratigraphic and sedimentologic evidence from the Sikouzi Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiubin; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Chen, Hanlin; Cheng, Xiaogan

    2016-04-01

    The Sikouzi Section is located towards the northern limits of the East Asian summer monsoon, providing the opportunity of placing the stratigraphic record into the context of the East Asian summer monsoon history. We present here the results of the details of the sedimentology of the Neogene succession of the section and use these to provide insights into the evolving history of the East Asian summer monsoon. The record is marked by a strongly expressed early Miocene lacustrine phase. A well-defined evaporate bed defines the top of the lacustrine succession, marking the onset of more arid conditions during the middle Miocene. The overlying succession is dominated by a series of alluvial packages, extending into the late Pleistocene with varying stratigraphic architectures and including a subordinate lacustrine component. Given the regional setting, the onset of drier conditions during the middle Miocene must relate to a downturn of summer monsoon activity. We focus on the question: what `forced' this palaeoclimate event? Earlier biostratigraphic work places the explanation of this change into the context of the global-scale middle Miocene climate reorganisation. Here we explore this question in the context of regional-scale climate dynamics and propose that the onset of drier conditions over the study area was a response to atmospheric subsidence driven by circulation changes related to the growth of the Tibetan Plateau.

  18. Sedimentological and palaeoecological integrated analysis of a Miocene channelized carbonate margin, Matese Mountains, Southern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Davide; Carannante, Gabriele; Checconi, Alessio; Simone, Lucia; Vigorito, Mario

    2010-10-01

    Lower-Middle Miocene temperate marine carbonates occur in the Matese Mountains, Southern Apennines (Italy). These carbonates formed in an open-shelf depositional system with an uneven margin, 10 km long and up to 6 km wide. Shelf margin morphology shows multiple submarine channelized carbonate deposits which are dominated by coralline red algae and subordinate bryozoans. Two main channel networks (Pietraroia and Regia Piana channels) with their sedimentary bodies were analysed. The studied submarine channels grew by sediment accumulation as prograding bodies on a tectonic modelled substrate. Shallow-water rhodalgal skeletal debris, from moderately re-mobilized up to significantly re-worked, built up the complex channel-system fills in which sedimentary lenses overlapped and partially amalgamated one another when they were still unlithified. The early channelized succession is characterized by parautochthonous bryozoan floatstone and rhodolith/bryozoan floatstone representing soft muddy substrates in a low water turbulence and high turbidity setting. The rhodoliths, dominated by melobesioid coralline algae, are sub-discoidal and sub-spheroidal in shape with a characteristic loosely-packed inner arrangement. These sediments, whose latter portion underwent submarine diagenetic processes (incipient to evoluted hard-grounds), were eroded and successively covered by shallower water gravitative deposits constituted by rhodolith floatstone/rudstone. Their rhodoliths, constituted by melobesioids, mastophoroids and subordinate lithophylloids and sporolithaceans, are mainly spheroidal/sub-spheroidal in shape with subordinate sub-discoidal specimens, with massive and laminar inner arrangements. The lack in early lithification can be drawn back to the physiography of the channelized shelf margin, to the active tectonic as well as to the temperate-type carbonate dominant biogenic components. The depositional surface profile and local hydrodynamic conditions were the major

  19. Evolution by structural polymorphism in a Miocene neogastropod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmon, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Morphological change in the shallow marine species Bullia (Bulliopsis) quadrata (Nassariidae) from the middle to late Miocene of Maryland and Virginia seems to have been by anagenesis within a single lineage rather than by cladogenesis, or associated with a speciation event. The mechanism for this change seems to have been a shift in frequency of a shell form polymorphism. When B.quadrata first appears in the lower St. Mary's Fm., all individuals show a similar smooth shell form. In the middle St. Mary's a distinct carinate morphotype appears, represented by only a few individuals. In the upper St. Mary's a higher proportion of these more ornate forms occurs. Finally in the upper member of the overlying Eastover Fm. the ornate morphology becomes dominant. Specimens from the Eastover Fm. are not only mostly of the more ornate type, but maximum size has increased and the ornate morphology has become more pronounced. This occurs in an area geographically and ecologically marginal to the previous main species range and so may represent an ecophenotypic effect. The genetics of gastropod shell form are very poorly understood. This study represents one of the few documented examples of the role of structural polymorphism in gastropod evolution.

  20. Paleointensity determinations from Middle Miocene volcanic rocks, Far East, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Shcherbakova, Valentina; Zhidkov, Grigoriy; Bretstein, Yury

    2010-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and paleointensity studies of a representative collection of Middle Miocene volcanic rocks of (12.4-10.0) Ma age from Far East, Russia were carried out. A comprehensive rock magnetic investigation has been performed in order to determine the mineralogy of magnetic fraction and to identify the origin of NRM. Successful Thellier palaeointensity determinations with pTRM checks were obtained for 4 sites (33 samples). The Thellier experiments were complimented by the Wilson's express method. Values of the VDMs range from 3.1 to 7.5 (10^22 Am^2) with the mean VDM = 5.5×10^22 Am^2. A total 88 Thellier-type palaeointensity determinations were found in the World Paleointensity database for the 5-23 Ma period with the overall mean VDM = 5×10^22 Am^2. The VDM distribution is characterized by high variance from 1.5 to 12 (10^22 Am^2). No significant difference between the VDM distributions for the normal and reverse polarity intervals was revealed.

  1. Peatmoss (Sphagnum) diversification associated with Miocene Northern Hemisphere climatic cooling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A Jonathan; Devos, Nicolas; Cox, Cymon J; Boles, Sandra B; Shaw, Blanka; Buchanan, Alex M; Cave, Lynette; Seppelt, Rodney

    2010-06-01

    Global climate changes sometimes spark biological radiations that can feed back to effect significant ecological impacts. Northern Hemisphere peatlands dominated by living and dead peatmosses (Sphagnum) harbor almost 30% of the global soil carbon pool and have functioned as a net carbon sink throughout the Holocene, and probably since the late Tertiary. Before that time, northern latitudes were dominated by tropical and temperate plant groups and ecosystems. Phylogenetic analyses of mosses (phylum Bryophyta) based on nucleotide sequences from the plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear genomes indicate that most species of Sphagnum are of recent origin (ca. <20 Ma). Sphagnum species are not only well-adapted to boreal peatlands, they create the conditions that promote development of peatlands. The recent radiation that gave rise to extant diversity of peatmosses is temporally associated with Miocene climatic cooling in the Northern Hemisphere. The evolution of Sphagnum has had profound influences on global biogeochemistry because of the unique biochemical, physiological, and morphological features of these plants, both while alive and after death.

  2. Miocene drowning of temperate (Foramol) carbonate platform: upper Miami Terrace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carannante, G.; Simone, L.; Neumann, C.

    1986-05-01

    Oligocene neritic rocks dredged from 350 m on the upper Miami Terrace exhibit repeated phosphatization as well as a filled void system containing post-Burdigalian foraminifera. During drowning, a neritic hardground was subjected to both pelagic deposition (infills) and repeated marine exposure (borings, P-coatings, etc). The neritic grainstone-packstone contains large benthic foraminifera, red algae, bryozoans, pelecypods, ahermatypic corals, echinoids, and some planktonic foraminifera. This composition association is the Foramol type characteristic of temperate to subtropical neritic environments such as the present Mediterranean, Brazilian, and New Zealand shelves. These temperate sediments derive from the local biocoenose, and accumulate slowly in deep sheets of loose skeletal debris. They become relict seaward where they are often bored, corroded, stained, glauconitized, and cemented into hardgrounds. Locally, hemipelagic cover might produce a palimpsest sequence. Recent Foramol-type platforms are undergoing drowning. The Miami Terrace is compared to very similar Miocene Foramol-type platforms now exposed in the southern Apennines. Both are characterized by neritic sequences passing upward into hemipelagics, via a palimpsest interval marked by glauconitic, phosphatic, iron-stained grains often mineralized into hardgrounds. The drowning of the Miami Terrace hence coincided with and, the authors suppose, was a result of the shift from a rapid, oligotrophic, tropical accumulation to a slow, temperate, eutrophic carbonate accumulation caused in turn by a temporary paleo-oceanographic shift to cooler, richer, neritic conditions within the history of this now subtropical setting.

  3. Miocene whale-fall from California demonstrates that cetacean size did not determine the evolution of modern whale-fall communities

    OpenAIRE

    Pyenson, Nicholas D.; Haasl, David M

    2007-01-01

    Whale-fall communities support a deep-sea invertebrate assemblage that subsists entirely on the decaying carcasses of large cetaceans. The oldest whale-falls are Late Eocene in age, but these early whale-falls differ in faunal content and host cetacean size from Neogene and Recent whale-falls. Vesicomyid bivalves, for example, are major components of the sulphophilic stage in Miocene and Recent whale-fall communities, but they are absent from Palaeogene fossil whale-falls. The differences bet...

  4. Stratigraphy, age, and depositional setting of the Miocene Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, central Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Shannon R.; Miller, David M.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    New detailed geologic mapping and geochronology of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill, 30 km east of Barstow, CA, help to constrain Miocene paleogeography and tectonics of the central Mojave Desert. A northern strand of the Quaternary ENE-striking, sinistral Manix fault divides the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill into two distinct lithologic assemblages. Strata north of the fault consist of: a green rhyolitic tuff, informally named the Shamrock tuff; lacustrine sandstone; partially silicified thin-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone to pebble conglomerate. Strata south of the fault consist of: lacustrine siltstone and sandstone; a rhyolitic tuff dated at 19.1 Ma (U-Pb); rock-avalanche breccia deposits; partially silicified well-bedded to massive limestone; and alluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Our U-Pb zircon dating of the Shamrock tuff by SHRIMP-RG yields a peak probability age of 18.7 ± 0.1 Ma. Distinctive outcrop characteristics, mineralogy, remanent magnetization, and zircon geochemistry (Th/U) suggest that the Shamrock tuff represents a lacustrine facies of the regionally extensive Peach Spring Tuff (PST). Here we compare zircon age and geochemical analyses from the Shamrock tuff with those of the PST at Stoddard Wash and provide new insight into the age of zircon crystallization in the PST rhyolite. Results of our field studies show that Miocene strata at Harvard Hill mostly accumulated in a lacustrine environment, although depositional environments varied from a relatively deep lake to a very shallow lake or even onshore setting. Rock-avalanche breccias and alluvial deposits near the base of the exposed section indicate proximity to a steep basin margin and detrital studies suggest a southern source for coarse-grained deposits; therefore, we may infer a southern basin-margin setting at Harvard Hill during the early Miocene. Our geochronology demonstrates that deposition of the Barstow Formation at Harvard Hill extended from before

  5. The Tunggurian Stage of the Continental Miocene in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Tunggurian Age was nominated in 1984, and the Second National Commission on Stratigraphy of China formally suggested establishing the corresponding chronostratigraphic unit, the Tunggurian Stage, based on the Tunggurian Age in 1999. The name of this stage comes from a lithostratigraphic unit, the Tunggur Formation, and the stratotype section is located at the Tunggur tableland, 15 km southeast of Saihan Gobi Township, Sonid Left Banner, Inner Mongolia. The Tunggurian Age is correlated to the Astaracian of the European land mammal ages, and they share the same definition of the lower boundary at the base of the paleomagnetic Chron C5Bn.1r with an age of 15.0 Ma. In the Tairum Nor section on the southeastern edge of the Tunggur tableland, this boundary is situated within the successive deposits of reddish-brown massive mudstone of the lower part of the Tunggur Formation, with a distance of 7.6 m from the base of the grayish-white sandstones in the middle part of the section. The Tunggurian is approximately correlated to the upper part of the marine Langhian and the marine Serravallian in the International Stratigraphical Chart. The Tunggurian Stage includes two Neogene mammal faunal units, i.e. NMU 6 (MN 6) and NMU 7 (MN 7/8). The Tairum Nor fauna from the Tairum Nor section corresponds to NMU 6, and the Tunggur fauna (senso stricto) from the localities on the northwestern edge of the Tunggur tableland, such as Platybelodon Quarry, Wolf Camp and Moergen, corresponds to NMU 7. Among the Middle Miocene mammalian faunas in China, the Laogou fauna from the Linxia Basin, Gansu, the Quantougou fauna from the Lanzhou Basin, Gansu, the Halamagai fauna from the northern Junggar Basin, Xinjiang,and the Dingjiaergou fauna from Tongxin, Ningxia correspond to NMU 6.

  6. Late Miocene “washhouse” climate in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Madelaine; Ilg, August; Winklhofer, Michael

    2008-11-01

    We present two eight-million year long proxy records of precipitation for Southwest and Central Europe, covering the middle to late Miocene (5.3-13 Ma) at a temporal resolution of about 60 kyr and 150 kyr, respectively. The estimates of precipitation are based on the ecophysiological structure of herpetological assemblages (amphibians and reptiles). From 13.0 Ma until about 9 Ma, both records show a similar trend, evolving from a long dry period (13-11 Ma) into a "washhouse climate" (10.2-9.8 Ma), characterized by global warm conditions and several times more precipitation than present. The transition from washhouse to a dryer climate between 9.7 and 9.5 Ma and the concomitant cooling episode appear to have triggered a severe biotic event known as the Vallesian crisis, which included the extinction of hominoids in Western Europe. A second washhouse period (9.0-8.5 Ma), coeval with a global warm episode, was unprecedentedly intense in Southwest Europe, but less pronounced in Central Europe. From 8 Ma onward, a divergence in the two precipitation records is observed, with Southwest Europe staying wetter and Central Europe becoming dryer than present. Both precipitation records are combined into a common run-off curve as a measure of the relative intensity of the hydrological cycle for moderate latitudes of continental Europe. The run-off curve shows a remarkable positive correlation with Atlantic deep-water temperatures from Ceará Rise by Lear et al. (2003), which are significantly higher (up to + 3 °C) during the two washhouse periods and show no other positive excursion of comparable magnitude. We discuss potential links and the role of the coeval temporary restriction of the Central American Seaway on ocean and atmosphere circulation.

  7. ALLOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE MIOCENE SEDIMENTS OF THE SPICCHIAIOLA - POMARANCE AREA, SOUTHERN SIDE OF THE VOLTERRA BASIN (TUSCANY, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALESSANDRO BOSSIO LUCA MARIA FORESI

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to analyze the Miocene depositional units of the southern side of the Volterra Basin (Tuscany, Italy utilizing outcrop and seismic data and to establish the major events that led to their formation. Four depositional units have been recognized: Unit 1 is characterized by marine sediments of late Serravallian-early Tortonian age; Unit 2 is characterized by fluvio-lacustrine and brackish deposits of late Tortonian-early Messinian age; Unit 3 is characterized by marine deposits of early Messinian age; Unit 4 is characterized by the lacustrine deposits ("Lago-mare" facies of late Messinian age. The deposition of these four units is associated with an extensional tectonic regime that has been active in Tuscany since the late Tortonian. This regime generated half graben type structures in which deposition occurred. The recognized unconformities between the units are mainly related to uplift as a consequence of the extensional tectonic regime.    

  8. Miocene sediments distribution in the central and northern parts of the Vienna Basin, central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Wagreich, M.; Decker, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Vienna Basin is a Miocene sedimentary basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition and spreading from Austria in the South to the Czech Republic and Slovakia in the north. The basin primarily developed as a piggy-back basin during the Lower Miocene (~18 - 16 Ma) on top of the NW-ward moving Eastern Alpine and West Carpathians thrust sheets. In the late Lower Miocene, the local stress regime changed by the lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian area. It leads to the developing of the basin between two left stepping sinistral strike-slip faults of the Vienna Basin faults system during the Middle and Upper Miocene (~16 - 8 Ma). Structures related with this pull-apart stage are extensional sinistral strike-slip duplexes connected with large scale listric normal fraults. Our study area mainly covers the central and northern Vienna Basin that is not yet studied well for the stratigraphy. The goal of this study is the characterization and distribution of the Miocene sediments. For this purpose we investigated approximately 200 wells in 17 well-groups in order to obtain details on the Miocene sediments. Among them 84 wells drilled down to the Northern Calcareous Alps and the flysch units in the pre-Neogene basin subcrop. The initial phase of the Miocene deposition was related to the transgression and is characterized by the deposition of coarse clastic and marly clay sediments. These sediments are distributed locally in the northern part of the basin. The overlying sediments are more widely distributed than the underlying ones. During the late Lower Miocene, the depocenters shifted towards the south and sedimentation was dominated by marly clay intercalated with sand. An unconformity depicted for the regional stage boundary fits well with the regressive phase and the subsequent transgression. From Middle to Upper Miocene, sediments were deposited over a wide area of the Vienna Basin. The sedimentation was governed by combination of pull

  9. Isotopic evidence for complex microbial ecosystems in the phosphate-rich interval of the Miocene Monterey Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiling, B. P.; Coleman, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The middle Miocene Monterey Formation has long been debated as a crucial global sink for organic carbon that led to global cooling. We evaluate proxies for the microbial ecosystem to investigate organic carbon burial within the phosphate-rich interval of the Monterey Formation at Naples Beach, California by combining mineralogical evidence with δ34S analyses of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS). All δ34S are below Miocene seawater values (~22‰, VCDT) and range from +12.2‰ to +18.5‰. δ34SCAS Sulfate reducing bacteria then consume the excess, residual sulfate, generating free H2S in the absence of available iron. H2S diffuses upward towards the sediment-water interface (an oxic-suboxic mixing zone) where H2S is oxidized to 34S-depleted sulfate either aerobically or coupled to nitrate reduction, and lowers seawater pH. The high phosphate content and low carbonate content of this interval of the Monterey Formation supports a model of precipitation in lower pH waters. Assuming a -40‰ fractionation of δ34S due to microbial sulfate reduction, we estimate at least a 10%-20% contribution of sulfate from sulfide oxidation to marine porewater sulfate. These results suggest that the phosphate-rich interval of the Monterey Formation housed a complex suite of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria as well as sulfide oxidizing bacteria, suggesting that significant organic carbon was consumed during early diagenesis and may account for low organic carbon content described in previous studies.

  10. Strong winter monsoon wind causes surface cooling over India and China in the Late Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Asian winter monsoon characterised by the strong northwesterly wind in East Asia and northeasterly wind in South Asia, has a great impact on the surface temperature of the Asian continent. Its outbreak can result in significant cooling of the monsoon region. However, it is still unclear whether such an impact existed and is detectable in the deep past. In this study, we use temperature reconstructions from plant and mammal fossil data together with climate model results to examine the co-evolution of surface temperature and winter monsoon in the Late Miocene (11–5 Ma, when a significant change of the Asian monsoon system occurred. We find that a stronger-than-present winter monsoon wind might have existed in the Late Miocene due to the lower Asian orography, particularly the northern Tibetan Plateau and the mountains north of it. This can lead to a pronounced cooling in southern China and northern India, which counteracts the generally warmer conditions in the Late Miocene compared to present. The Late Miocene strong winter monsoon was characterised by a marked westerly component and primarily caused by a pressure anomaly between the Tibetan Plateau and Northern Eurasia, rather than by the gradient between the Siberian High and the Aleutian Low. As a result, the close association of surface temperature with winter monsoon strength on inter-annual scale as observed at present may not have established in the Late Miocene.

  11. Generation and Migration of Natural Gas in Miocene Strata, Offshore Southeastern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byeong-Kook

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas and condensate are produced from Miocene strata of the Tertiary marine basin, called Ulleung Basin, which is located offshore southeastern Korea. Petroleum system in the basin has not been fully understood, because effective source rocks have not been identified in the area. However, 1-D petroleum system modelling and isotope data indicate that the source rock of the natural gas and condensate might be present at deeper strata than 5,000 m in the basin. In addition, the analysis of diamondoids in the condensate shows that the gas was transformed from type II kerogen. Based on this source rock information and other geological data, 2-D petroleum system modelling was conducted on two cross sections in the southwestern margin of the basin. The 2-D models show two phase generation and migration, which are caused by the geometry of source bed and the maturity level of each pod of the bed. In addition, the accumulation of hydrocarbon is constrained greatly by the timing of development of the regional seal. The first generation and migration of oil and gas begins with a high rate of sedimentation at a deeply and early buried pod of the source bed at 15 Ma. The hydrocarbon, however, migrates upward and diffuses toward the surface. The second generation and migration occurs at around 11 Ma from the other pod of the source bed. This hydrocarbon migrates updip toward anticlines and accumulates into the traps of anticlines. On the other hand, the model shows that the generation and migration is dominated by gas, rather than oil. This model indicates that the accumulation of hydrocarbon can be completed only by the proper and sophisticated combination of the geological elements and the timing of hydrocarbon migration in time and space. This 2-D feature of generation and migration is supported by additional 1-D models of two pseudo-wells drilled on the 2-D section.

  12. The pig Propotamochoeurs palaeochoerus from the upper Miocene of Grytsiv, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiak, H.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The suid from Grytsiv (= Gritsev in Ukraine belongs to the genus Propotamochoerus. This genus was not yet known from the Miocene of eastern Europe. The Grytsiv suid is described and its significance is discussed within the palaeobiogeographical and stratigraphical framework of the genus Propotamochoerus. Grytsiv is geographically situated between three areas with different species of the genus: W Europe (P. palaeochoerus, China (P. hyotherioides and the Indian Subcontinent (P. hysudricus. In Europe, P. palaeochoerus is replaced at the MN 9-10 boundary or early in MN 10 by a different species of Propotamochoerus with affinities with P. hyotherioides or P. hysudricus. The fossils from Grytsiv extend the known range of P. palaeochoerus eastward into Ukraine.El suido de Grytsiv (= Gritsev en Ucrania pertenece al género Propotamochoerus. Este género todavía no se conocía en el Mioceno de Europa oriental. Se describe el suido de Grytsiv y se discute su significado dentro del marco paleobiogeográfico y estratigráfico del género Propotamochoerus. Grytsiv está situado entre tres áreas con diferentes especies del género: Europa occidental (P. palaeochoerus, China (P. hyotherioides, y el Subcontinente Indio (P. hysudricus. En Europa, P. palaeochoerus fue substituido en la transición MN9-10 o a MN10 por una especie distinta de Propotamochoerus con afinidades con P. hyotherioides o P. hysudricus. Los fósiles de Grytsiv extienden su distribución geográfica conocida de P. palaeochoerus por el este hasta Ucrania.

  13. Aridification of the Sahara desert caused by Tethys Sea shrinkage during the Late Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongshi; Ramstein, Gilles; Schuster, Mathieu; Li, Camille; Contoux, Camille; Yan, Qing

    2014-09-18

    It is widely believed that the Sahara desert is no more than ∼2-3 million years (Myr) old, with geological evidence showing a remarkable aridification of north Africa at the onset of the Quaternary ice ages. Before that time, north African aridity was mainly controlled by the African summer monsoon (ASM), which oscillated with Earth's orbital precession cycles. Afterwards, the Northern Hemisphere glaciation added an ice volume forcing on the ASM, which additionally oscillated with glacial-interglacial cycles. These findings led to the idea that the Sahara desert came into existence when the Northern Hemisphere glaciated ∼2-3 Myr ago. The later discovery, however, of aeolian dune deposits ∼7 Myr old suggested a much older age, although this interpretation is hotly challenged and there is no clear mechanism for aridification around this time. Here we use climate model simulations to identify the Tortonian stage (∼7-11 Myr ago) of the Late Miocene epoch as the pivotal period for triggering north African aridity and creating the Sahara desert. Through a set of experiments with the Norwegian Earth System Model and the Community Atmosphere Model, we demonstrate that the African summer monsoon was drastically weakened by the Tethys Sea shrinkage during the Tortonian, allowing arid, desert conditions to expand across north Africa. Not only did the Tethys shrinkage alter the mean climate of the region, it also enhanced the sensitivity of the African monsoon to orbital forcing, which subsequently became the major driver of Sahara extent fluctuations. These important climatic changes probably caused the shifts in Asian and African flora and fauna observed during the same period, with possible links to the emergence of early hominins in north Africa.

  14. Magnesite formation by microbial activity: Evidence from a Miocene hypersaline lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Rodríguez-Aranda, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides an ancient analogue for biologically mediated magnesite in lacustrine hypersaline environments. Thin beds of massive to crudely laminated magnesitic marls occur interbedded with mudstone and evaporite facies deposited in a saline lake-mudflat sedimentary system during the Lower Miocene in the Madrid Basin, Central Spain. Exposure of this succession in a recently excavated tunnel and in collected cores offered a good opportunity to study magnesite precipitates that have been preserved in unaltered conditions by primary evaporitic minerals. Specifically, magnesite arranged as host matrix between and enclosed by displacive halite and glauberite crystals occurs closely associated with abundant microfossils embedded in sheets of organic matter, interpreted as the remains of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Even, many magnesite clots are seen to have resulted from the agglutination of fossilized bacterial bodies forming a biofilm. The close and pervasive association of microorganisms and magnesite is used as evidence that microbes played a fundamental role in the precipitation of this mineral. Additional traces of microorganisms and microbial activity observed in magnesite beds include the isotopic ratios in the carbonates, with the δ13C(PDB) value averaging - 6.2‰, the presence of carbonaceous film-like structures and the association with patchly-distributed pyrite and celestite minerals. On the basis of the combined sedimentological, mineralogical, chemical and morphological signatures of the magnesitic deposits, it is postulated that carbonate crystals precipitated in microbial mats. Magnesite crystals together with celestite, local barite, and/or pyrite have been also observed to replace silicate and sulphate minerals. It is suggested that magnesite precipitation was biochemically coupled with the early dissolution of the associated sedimentary minerals. Microbes may have used the associated minerals as source of energy and/or of

  15. The palaeoclimatic significance of Eurasian Giant Salamanders (Cryptobranchidae: Zaissanurus, Andrias) - indications for elevated humidity in Central Asia during global warm periods (Eocene, late Oligocene warming, Miocene Climate Optimum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyan, Davit; Böhme, Madelaine; Winklhofer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Cryptobranchids represent a group of large sized (up to 1.8 m) tailed amphibians known since the Middle Jurassic (Gao & Shubin 2003). Two species are living today in eastern Eurasia: Andrias davidianus (China) and A. japonicus (Japan). Cenozoic Eurasian fossil giant salamanders are known with two genera and two or three species from over 30 localities, ranging from the Late Eocene to the Early Pliocene (Böhme & Ilg 2003). The Late Eocene species Zaissanurus beliajevae is restricted to the Central Asian Zaissan Basin (SE-Kazakhstan, 50°N, 85°E), whereas the Late Oligocene to Early Pliocene species Andrias scheuchzeri is distributed from Central Europe to the Zaissan Basin. In the latter basin the species occur during two periods; the latest Oligocene and the late Early to early Middle Miocene (Chkhikvadse 1982). Andrias scheuchzeri is osteological indistinguishable from both recent species, indicating a similar ecology (Westfahl 1958). To investigate the palaeoclimatic significance of giant salamanders we analyzed the climate within the present-day distribution area and at selected fossil localities with independent palaeoclimate record. Our results indicate that fossil and recent Andrias species occur in humid areas where the mean annual precipitation reach over 900 mm (900 - 1.300 mm). As a working hypothesis (assuming a similar ecology of Andrias and Zaissanurus) we interpret occurrences of both fossil Eurasian giant salamanders as indicative for humid palaeoclimatic conditions. Based on this assumption the Late Eocene, the latest Oligocene (late Oligocene warming) and the late Early to early Middle Miocene (Miocene Climatic Optimum) of Central Asia (Zaissan Basin) are periods of elevated humidity, suggesting a direct (positive) relationship between global climate and Central Asian humidity evolution. Böhme M., Ilg A. 2003: fosFARbase, www.wahre-staerke.com/ Chkhikvadze V.M. 1982. On the finding of fossil Cryptobranchidae in the USSR and Mongolia. Vertebrata

  16. Description of a new species of Sparassocynus (Marsupialia: Didelphoidea: Sparassocynidae) from the late Miocene of Jujuy (Argentina) and taxonomic review of Sparassocynus heterotopicus from the Pliocene of Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abello, María Alejandra; De Los Reyes, Martín; Candela, Adriana Magdalena; Pujos, Francois; Voglino, Damián; Quispe, Bernardino Mamani

    2015-03-24

    A new species of sparassocynid marsupial, Sparassocynus maimarai n. sp. from the late Miocene of Maimará Formation (Jujuy Province, Argentina) is described from a left mandibular fragment with a complete p2-m4 series. It differs from the remaining species of the genus S. bahiai (Montehermosan-late Miocene/early Pliocene-of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) and S. derivatus (Chapadmalalan and Marplatan-Pliocene of Buenos Aires Province) by its smaller size, the relatively longer m1 with respect to the m4, the presence of a lingual cingulum extended between para- and metaconid on the m1-3, and its more robust entoconids. As part of this study the taxonomic status of Sparassocynus heterotopicus (Montehermosan, Umala, Bolivia; Pliocene) was reviewed concluding that this taxon should be referred to as 'Sparassocynus' heterotopicus and considered a Didelphoidea of uncertain affinities. Sparassocynus maimarai n. sp. is the oldest records of the genus, adding new information to evaluate the origins and early diversification of sparassocynids. Sparassocynus maimarai n. sp. was recovered with precise stratigraphic control, highlighting its potential biostratigraphic significance to the temporal correlations between Maimará Formation and other Mio-Pliocene stratigraphic units from the northwestern Argentina.

  17. Palynological and palaeobotanical investigations in the Miocene of the Yatağan basin, Turkey: High-resolution taxonomy and biostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Johannes Martin; Güner, Tuncay H.; Denk, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The subject of this study is the palynology (biostratigraphic and taxonomic) and the plant remains of the lignite strip mines of Eskihisar, Salihpasalar, and Tinaz (Muğla province, western Turkey). In the Yatağan basin two Miocene to Pliocene formations are present, the Eskihisar Formation (early to middle Miocene) and the Yatağan Formation (late Miocene to early Pliocene). Both formations represent river and lake deposits consisting mainly of conglomerate, sandstone, claystone, limestone, tuffite, and intercalated lignite; the thickest, actively mined lignite seams occur in the Sekköy member of the Eskihisar Formation. Previous palynological studies of the palynoflora of the Yatağan basin mainly focussed on its biostratigraphic and palaeoclimatic significance, using conventional morphological nomenclature and light microscopy (LM). In this study the "single grain method" is applied. Using this method, the same individual pollen grains are investigated by using both LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The resulting high-resolution pictographs enable a much higher taxonomic resolution. The studied palynoflora is very rich and taxonomically diverse. Cryptogams are represented by more than ten spore morphotypes of at least three families (Osmundaceae, Pteridaceae, Polypodiaceae). Gymnosperm pollen is dominated by Cupressaceae, Gnetales (Ephedra), and Pinaceae (Cathaya, Keteleeria, Pinus). Angiosperm pollen can be assigned to 57 different genera belonging to Poaceae, Typhaceae, Altingiaceae, Amaranthaceae (Chenopodieae), Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae (three types), Asteraceae (Asteroideae, Cichoriodeae), Betulaceae (Alnus, Betula, Carpinus, Ostrya) Buxaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae (Lonicera), Caryophyllaceae, Dipsacaceae, Eucommiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae (Fagus, Quercus, Trigonobalanopsis) Geraniaceae, Juglandaceae, Linaceae, Malvaceae (Tilia), Myricaceae, Oleaceae (four different types), Plumbaginaceae, Polygonaceae (Rumex), Rosaceae

  18. First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Maksoud, Sibelle; Azar, Dany

    2015-08-07

    Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis.

  19. First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Maksoud, Sibelle; Azar, Dany

    2015-01-01

    Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis. PMID:26250050

  20. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene-early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-07-08

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals.

  1. Geology and paleontology of the reef facies of the Pirabas Formation (Early Miocene

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    Vladimir de Araújo Távora

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns with the detailed geological and paleontological study of the reef facies of the Pirabas Formation, that outcrop at the Maçarico beach, of Salinópolis district, Pará State, as a small, isolated and lenticular sedimentary bodie developed in the inner platform inner ramp of the Pirabas Sea. The biotic constituents are diverse and composed by three groups of coralline algae, sponges, corals, bryozoans, echinoids, foraminifera, ostracodes and molluscs. Three stages of the ecologic sucession were recognized in this patch reef: stabilization, colonization and diversification. Thin micritic crusts, recognized at top of the beds in diversification stage suggest the degradation of the environmental conditions favorable to reef accretion probably due to continentalization of the depositional site. The petrographic investigation reveals only one, homogeneous depositional microfacies, named biomicrite, without compositional and textural changes. The marine cementation is represented by microcrystalline agglomerates and micritic cement, locally neomorphosed to biosparite and detrital carbonatic components of the unconsolidated biogenic debris, resulted from the disintegration of the aragonite from the algalic remains accumulated as micritic mud. In the construction of the reef framework the red macroalgae were fundamental to the lithification and building of the framework, and very important to the protection and cementation of the others constituents.

  2. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene-early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Necula, C.; Heslop, D.; Nie, J.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals.

  3. The thumb of Miocene apes: new insights from Castell de Barberà (Catalonia, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almécija, Sergio; Alba, David M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2012-07-01

    Primate hands display a major selective compromise between locomotion and manipulation. The thumb may or may not participate in locomotion, but it plays a central role in most manipulative activities. Understanding whether or not the last common ancestor of humans and Pan displayed extant-ape-like hand proportions (i.e., relatively long fingers and a short thumb) can be clarified by the analysis of Miocene ape hand remains. Here we describe new pollical remains-a complete proximal phalanx and a partial distal phalanx-from the middle/late Miocene site of Castell de Barberà (ca., 11.2-10.5 Ma, Vallès-Penedès Basin), and provide morphometric and qualitative comparisons with other available Miocene specimens as well as extant catarrhines (including humans). Our results show that all available Miocene taxa (Proconsul, Nacholapithecus, Afropithecus, Sivapithecus, Hispanopithecus, Oreopithecus, and the hominoid from Castell de Barberà) share a similar phalangeal thumb morphology: the phalanges are relatively long, and the proximal phalanges have a high degree of curvature, marked insertions for the flexor muscles, a palmarly bent trochlea and a low basal height. All these features suggest that these Miocene apes used their thumb with an emphasis on flexion, most of them to powerfully assist the fingers during above-branch, grasping arboreal locomotion. Moreover, in terms of relative proximal phalangeal length, the thumb of Miocene taxa is intermediate between the long-thumbed humans and the short-thumbed extant apes. Together with previous evidence, this suggests that a moderate-length hand with relatively long thumb-involved in locomotion-is the original hand morphotype for the Hominidae. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Integrated magnetobiostratigraphy at the Oligocene/Miocene transition in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (DSDP Leg 72, Hole 516F)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, Rocco; Persico, Davide; Florindo, Fabio; Turco, Elena; Villa, Giuliana

    2014-05-01

    , Paleoceanography, 15, 486-496. Plancq, J., Grossi, V., Henderiks, J., Simon, L. and Mattioli E., 2012. Alkenone producers during late Oligocene-early Miocene revisited, Paleoceanography, 27, PA1202. Pujol, C. and Duprat, J., 1983. Quaternary planktonic foraminifers of the southwestern Atlantic (Rio Grande Rise) Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 72. In: Barker, P.F., Carlson, R.L., Johnson, D.A., et al. (Eds.), Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, 72, 601-615. Spezzaferri, S., 1994. Planktonic foraminifers biostratigraphy of the Oligocene and lower Miocene in the oceanic record. An overview. Palaeontographia Italica 81, 1-187. Steininger, F.F., Aubry, M.P., Berggren, W.A., Biolzi, M., Borsetti, A.M., Cartlidge, J., Cati, F., Corfield, R., Gelati, R., Iaccarino, S., Napoleone, C., Ottner, F., Rogl, R., Spezzaferri, S., Tateo, F., Villa, G. and Zevenboom, D. 1997. The Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Neogene. Episodes vol. 20, 23-28.

  5. Model study of the circulation of the Miocene Mediterranean Sea and Paratethys: closure of the Indian Gateway

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    A. de la Vara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The early Mediterranean Sea and the Paratethys were both connected to the Indian Ocean until the Early/Middle Miocene, when the convergence of the Eurasian and African-Arabian plates caused the constriction and final closure of the Indian Gateway. Although little is certain concerning the timing of the closure and the consequences that it entailed, it is broadly accepted that it had a large effect on water properties and ocean dynamics on the regional and global scales and, in that way, may have also played a role in the evolution of climate. The purpose of this work is to investigate the palaeocirculation of the Mediterranean Sea and the Paratethys during different stages of closure and the impact of this event on the water exchange between the Mediterranean and the adjacent Indian and Atlantic oceans. To this extent we use a regional ocean model and an Early Miocene palaeogeographic map. In addition to varying the depth of the Indian Gateway, different sets of values for the atmospheric forcing have been applied in order to check the robustness of our results and to understand the role of the temperature and net evaporation on the marine circulation and the strait dynamics. The series of experiments performed shows that, with an Indian Gateway ranging from 1000 to 460 m deep, the Mediterranean accommodates anti-estuarine exchange to the Indian and Atlantic oceans. The shoaling of the Indian Gateway results in a progressive decrease in the water exchanged between the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean basin, and increases the spatial extension of the Atlantic inflow. When the gateway is as shallow as 220 m, there is no effective water exchange between the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean basin, suggesting that the gateway may have been closed in an oceanographical sense, even while a water passage was still in existence. On a basinal scale, closure results in a rearrangement of the circulation pattern which leads to changes in salinity and

  6. Evolutionary ecology of the Pachydontinae (Bivalvia, Corbulidae) in the Pebas lake/wetland system (Miocene, western Amazonia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, F.P.

    2006-01-01

    Miocene deposits in western Amazonia and adjacent areas of South America harbour a diverse suite of endemic corbulid bivalves, commonly referred to as Pachydontinae, that show a wide variety of morphologies. Especially in the Miocene Pebas Formation (Peru, Colombia and Brazil), this group diversifie

  7. A revision of the fossil genus Miocepphus and other Miocene Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) of the Western North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnker, T.G.; Olson, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    This study reviews and describes all known fossils of Alcidae from the Miocene of the western North Atlantic. Because the majority of alcid fossils recovered from Miocene sediments are allied with the genus Miocepphus Wetmore, 1940, the genus is revised here. Three new species of Miocepphus are desc

  8. A revision of the fossil genus Miocepphus and other Miocene Alcidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) of the Western North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnker, T.G.; Olson, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    This study reviews and describes all known fossils of Alcidae from the Miocene of the western North Atlantic. Because the majority of alcid fossils recovered from Miocene sediments are allied with the genus Miocepphus Wetmore, 1940, the genus is revised here. Three new species of Miocepphus are

  9. METAXYTHERIUM MEDIUM (MAMMALIA: SIRENIA FROM UPPER MIOCENE SEDIMENTS OF THE ARENARIA DI PONSANO FORMATION (TUSCANY, ITALY

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    GIOVANNI BIANUCCI

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Records of Metaxytherium medium (Mammalia: Sirenia from Tononian (Late Miocene sediments from che Arenaria di Ponsano Formation (Tuscany, Italy are described. They consist of fragmentary specimens, including several partial cranial elements representing at least three skulls, two humeri, fragments of venebrae and some incomplete ribs. The new Tuscan records confirm che wide diffusion of Metaxytherium in the Mediterranean during the Miocene. This sirenian's occurrence in the Arenaria di Ponsano sediments is in accordance with the shelf environment indicated by other fossils. The low sea bottom was at least partially covered by segrass meadows, the food source of this dugongid. 

  10. An age for Kajong, a Miocene fossil site east of Lake Turkana, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Francis H.; Jicha, Brian R.; Leakey, R. E.

    2016-02-01

    The Kajong Formation in Marsabit District, northern Kenya has yielded a Miocene mammalian fauna consisting of nine taxa. It is capped by a basalt 40Ar/39Ar dated at 19.1 ± 0.1 Ma, and a volcanic clast from a conglomerate within the formation yielded an age of 20.3 Ma, only slightly older. The entire fauna from this site thus lies close to the base of the Miocene Epoch and is older than 19.2 Ma. The site has yielded some of the oldest examples of Archaeobelodon filholi, Prodeinotherium hobleyi, and Gomphotherium sp. in east Africa.

  11. Developing a High-Resolution Sequence Stratigraphic Framework for Upper Lower Miocene Strata (18-16 Ma) From the ANDRILL AND-2A Drillcore, Southern McMurdo Sound Project, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, H. C.; Pekar, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    A high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework was developed for the upper lower Miocene (18-16 Ma) in Southern McMurdo Sound. Southern McMurdo Sound Project (SMS) of the ANDRILL Program completed the AND-2A drillcore (77° 45.488 S; 165° 16.613 E) from a floating sea-ice platform over approximately 380 meters of water, reaching a total depth of 1138.54 mbsf, during the 2007 austral spring/summer. One objective of the SMS Project was to recover a history of ice-proximal paleoenvironmental variation during the early to middle Miocene, which includes the Early Miocene Climatic Optimum (EMCO, 17.8-16.1 Ma), the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (16.0-14.2 Ma), and the climatic cooling that followed. The AND-2A drillcore recovered several distinct stratigraphic intervals including a thick middle Miocene section (400 to 223 mbsf) and an expanded upper lower Miocene section (700-400 mbsf) that includes the Early Miocene Climatic Optimum, with the latter being the focus of this study. Three motifs of stratigraphic stacking patterns were recognized in the AND-2A borehole of which two are observed between 700-400 mbsf. Motif 2, which dominates above 523 mbsf, is characterized by a sharp-based conglomerate and sandstone overlain by stratified, clast-poor diamictite. This is overlain by bioturbated clayey siltstone with interlaminated sandstone and siltstone above it. This is overlain by diamictite. Motif 3 is only recognized below 523 mbsf and is characterized by a sharp-based conglomerate and clast-rich sandstone overlain by stratified diamictite which grades upward into interlaminated siltstone and very fine sandstone with diamictite interbeds. This is overlain by fossiliferous diamictite. Each motif of stratigraphic stacking is capped with a sharp-based conglomerate. A minimum of 15 cycles of stratigraphic stacking, occurring at roughly 20-meter intervals between 700 and 400 mbsf, are recognized in core photographs and observations made on-ice during core description

  12. Mediterranean proto-sapropels in the Middle Miocene: implications for the strength of the African monsoon and link to Miocene glaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C. M.; Mutti, M.; Adatte, T.; Laskar, J.

    2003-04-01

    The strength of the African monsoon is known to have played a major role in determining sedimentation patterns in the Mediterranean during the Plio-Pleistocene. Increased meteoric water input by strong monsoons reduced surface water salinity, and the resulting slower water-mixing rate triggered the deposition of organic-rich layers called "sapropels". Here we present some proxy data coming from a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate section outcropping on the Maltese Islands that suggests that sapropels deposits already existed in the Middle Miocene. This implies that an enhanced monsoonal climate was likely active at that time. Our primary evidences for the existence of "proto-sapropels" are runoff proxies (clay mineral assemblages and abundance) coupled with oxygen isotopes. These indicate that a direct link existed between increased runoff regarded here as a proxy for the strength of the Monsoon- and Miocene global climate (Antarctic glaciation). Each Miocene phase of glaciation is reflected in the section as an increased flux of continental-derived material. Moreover, stable isotopes of carbon and Corg:Norg ratio analyses of organic matter revealed a higher mixing rate of terrigenous and marine organic matters during times of increased sedimentation. This is in good agreement with a monsoon model where increased sedimentation is linked to increased continental runoff. Spectral analysis of the section revealed the presence of Milankovitch-scaled cycles with a strong 100 k.y. frequency. Astronomically calibrated age model for the section shows that the African monsoon has probably initiated around 16.7 Ma and underwent a major strengthening around 13.8 Ma, a time corresponding to enhanced siliciclastic deposition on the Malta-Ragusa platform and to the global cooling phase of the Mi3 Antarctic ice-buildup phase. We argue that the strong coherence between Miocene glaciation phases and increased runoff into the Mediterranean is due to a link between Antarctic cooling

  13. Small suoids from the Miocene of Europe and Asia

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    Pickford, M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of study of small suoids from the Miocene of Eurasia is complex for several reasons: scarcity of fossil material, a high degree of dental convergence and parallelism between closely and distantly related lineages, and frequent misattribution of fossils, resulting in the gradual development of a confusing taxonomy. Changes in taxonomy above the genus level, have added to the complexity; European lineages classified in Suidae in 1924 are now arranged into three separate families; Suidae, Palaeochoeridae and Sanitheriidae. Recent studies have considerably clarified the situation, but there remain several problematic issues to resolve, especially among the Palaeochoeridae. The fossil register of some taxa is limited, so it is necessary to put on record newly recognised specimens in order to fill out our knowledge concerning them. This paper includes previously undescribed material of Palaeochoeridae and small Suidae, as well as reinterpretation of some fossils published in “obscure” scientific journals. The latter include some taxa that have priority over more recently proposed names. A systematic revision of these forms is carried out, and the paper ends with a proposal for a revised taxonomy of the Palaeochoeridae, a family that has recently taken on importance in the debate about the origins of Hippopotamidae.

    La historia del estudio de los suoideos de talla pequeña del Mioceno de Eurasia es compleja por varias razones: la escasez de material fósil, un grado alto de convergencia y paralelismo dental entre linajes cercana y lejanamente relacionados, y la frecuente errónea identificación de los fósiles, teniendo como resultado el desarrollo gradual de una taxonomía confusa. Los cambios en la taxonomía por encima del nivel de género, han contribuído a esta complejidad; linajes europeos clasificados como Suidae en 1924 ahora se reparten en tres familias separadas; Suidae, Palaeochoeridae y Sanitheriidae. Estudios

  14. Integrated Chronology, Flora and Faunas, and Paleoecology of the Alajuela Formation, Late Miocene of Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J.; Jones, Douglas S.; Jud, Nathan A.; Moreno-Bernal, Jorge W.; Morgan, Gary S.; Portell, Roger W.; Perez, Victor J.; Moran, Sean M.; Wood, Aaron R.

    2017-01-01

    The late Miocene was an important time to understand the geological, climatic, and biotic evolution of the ancient New World tropics and the context for the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). Despite this importance, upper Miocene deposits containing diverse faunas and floras and their associated geological context are rare in Central America. We present an integrated study of the geological and paleontological context and age of a new locality from Lago Alajuela in northern Panama (Caribbean side) containing late Miocene marine and terrestrial fossils (plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates) from the Alajuela Formation. These taxa indicate predominantly estuarine and shallow marine paleoenvironments, along with terrestrial influences based on the occurrence of land mammals. Sr-isotope ratio analyses of in situ scallop shells indicate an age for the Alajuela Formation of 9.77 ± 0.22 Ma, which also equates to a latest Clarendonian (Cl3) North American Land Mammal Age. Along with the roughly contemporaneous late Miocene Gatun and Lago Bayano faunas in Panama, we now have the opportunity to reconstruct the dynamics of the Central America seaway that existed before final closure coincident with formation of the Isthmus of Panama. PMID:28107398

  15. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate. PMID:27041737

  16. The Middle Miocene climate as modelled in an atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model for the Middle Miocene 15 million years ago. The model is insofar more consistent than previous models because it captures the essential interactions between ocean and atmosphere and between atmosphere and vegetation. The Middle Miocene topography, which alters both large-scale ocean and atmospheric circulations, causes a global warming of 0.7 K compared to present day. Higher than present-day CO2 levels of 480 and 720 ppm cause a global warming of 2.8 and 4.9 K. The associated water vapour feedback enhances the greenhouse effect which leads to a polar amplification of the warming. These results suggest that higher than present-day CO2 levels are necessary to drive the warm Middle Miocene climate, also because the dynamic vegetation model simulates a denser vegetation which is in line with fossil records. However, we do not find a flatter than present-day equator-to-pole temperature gradient as has been suggested by marine and terrestrial proxies. Instead, a compensation between atmospheric and ocean heat transport counteracts the flattening of the temperature gradient. The acclaimed role of the large-scale ocean circulation in redistributing heat cannot be supported by our results. Including full ocean dynamics, therefore, does not solve the problem of the flat temperature gradient during the Middle Miocene.

  17. The Middle Miocene climate as modelled in an atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapp

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-biosphere model for the Middle Miocene 15 million years ago. The Middle Miocene topography, which alters both large-scale ocean and atmospheric circulations, causes a global warming of 0.7 K compared to present-day. Higher than present-day CO2 levels of 480 and 720 ppm cause a global warming of 2.8 and 4.9 K, thereby matching proxy-based Middle Miocene global temperature estimates of 3–6 K warming. Higher CO2 levels and the associated water vapour feedback enhance the greenhouse effect and lead to a polar amplification of the warming. Although oceanic and atmospheric poleward heat transport are individually altered by 10–30 % in the mid and high latitudes, changes of the total heat transport account only for 4–8 %, pointing toward a compensation between oceanic and atmospheric heat transport. Our model reproduces a denser vegetation in agreement with fossil records. These results suggest that higher than present-day CO2 levels are essential to drive the warm Middle Miocene climate.

  18. Integrated Chronology, Flora and Faunas, and Paleoecology of the Alajuela Formation, Late Miocene of Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J; Jones, Douglas S; Jud, Nathan A; Moreno-Bernal, Jorge W; Morgan, Gary S; Portell, Roger W; Perez, Victor J; Moran, Sean M; Wood, Aaron R

    2017-01-01

    The late Miocene was an important time to understand the geological, climatic, and biotic evolution of the ancient New World tropics and the context for the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). Despite this importance, upper Miocene deposits containing diverse faunas and floras and their associated geological context are rare in Central America. We present an integrated study of the geological and paleontological context and age of a new locality from Lago Alajuela in northern Panama (Caribbean side) containing late Miocene marine and terrestrial fossils (plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates) from the Alajuela Formation. These taxa indicate predominantly estuarine and shallow marine paleoenvironments, along with terrestrial influences based on the occurrence of land mammals. Sr-isotope ratio analyses of in situ scallop shells indicate an age for the Alajuela Formation of 9.77 ± 0.22 Ma, which also equates to a latest Clarendonian (Cl3) North American Land Mammal Age. Along with the roughly contemporaneous late Miocene Gatun and Lago Bayano faunas in Panama, we now have the opportunity to reconstruct the dynamics of the Central America seaway that existed before final closure coincident with formation of the Isthmus of Panama.

  19. A new species of Sphenotrochus (Scleractinia: Turbinoliidae) from the Late Miocene (Tortonian) of Chile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cairns, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    A new species of azooxanthellate Scleractinia, Sphenotrochus denhartogi, is described from the Late Miocene (Tortonian, Navidad Formation) of Chile. Comparisons are made to three other closely related species which, based on their distinctive costal morphology, form a species complex: S. claibornens

  20. Fish remains from Miocene beds of Višnja vas near Vojnik, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Šoster

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses fossil teeth of sharks (Elasmobranchii, Neoselachii and porgies (Teleostei, Sparidae fromthe Miocene glauconite sandstones of Vi{nja vas near Vojnik. The remains of fish teeth, mostly tooth crowns, belongto cartilaginous fishes of the genera Notorynchus, Carcharias, Carcharoides, Isurus and Cosmopolitodus and to abony fish genus Pagrus.

  1. On the Late Miocene continentalization of the Guadix Basin: More evidence for a major Messinian hiatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüsing, S.K.; Oms, O.; Agustí, J.; Garcés, M.; Kouwenhoven, T.J.; Krijgsman, W.; Zachariasse, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    The chronology of the Late Miocene Mediterranean-Atlantic gateways through southern Iberia is a key issue to better understand the geodynamic processes that lead to the Messinian salinity crisis. The timing of the North Betic corridor continentalization has recently been constrained by integrated ma

  2. A stratigraphical framework for Miocene (MN4-MN13) continental sediments of Central Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daams, Remmert; Alcalá, Luis; de los Angeles Alvarez Sierra, María; Azanza, Beatriz; Arie van Dam, Jan; van der Meulen, Albert-Jan; Morales, Jorge; Nieto, Manuel; Peláez-Campomanes, Pablo; Soria, Dolores

    1998-11-01

    New bio- and magnetostratigraphic data from the Miocene continental sediments of Central Spain are used to update the existing stratigraphical framework. Our revised record is based on the study of more than two hundred mammal faunas, ranging from the Late Ramblian (ca 18 Ma) to the Late Turolian (ca 6 Ma).

  3. Do stable carbon isotopes of brown coal woods record changes in Lower Miocene palaeoecology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole, I.J.; Dolezych, M.; Kool, J.; Burgh, J. van der; Bergen, P.F. van

    2006-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of fossil wood from the Miocene brown coal deposits in former East Germany are compared with palaeobotanical and sedimentological data to test the use of stable isotopes in determining palaeoenvironment. Significant differences in the chemical composition of samples from

  4. The Middle Miocene Climate Transition in the Central Mediterranean. Geologica Ultraiectina (326)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Middle Miocene Climate Transition (~15-13.7 Ma) is one of the major steps in Cenozoic climate evolution. The rapid expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet at ~13.9 – 13.7 Ma caused important climate changes on a global scale. The aim of this PhD research has been to study the effects of the Mi

  5. A unique Middle Miocene European hominoid and the origins of the great ape and human clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Alba, David M.; Almécija, Sergio; Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; Köhler, Meike; De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Robles, Josep M.; Galindo, Jordi; Fortuny, Josep

    2009-01-01

    The great ape and human clade (Primates: Hominidae) currently includes orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, and humans. When, where, and from which taxon hominids evolved are among the most exciting questions yet to be resolved. Within the Afropithecidae, the Kenyapithecinae (Kenyapithecini + Equatorini) have been proposed as the sister taxon of hominids, but thus far the fragmentary and scarce Middle Miocene fossil record has hampered testing this hypothesis. Here we describe a male partial face with mandible of a previously undescribed fossil hominid, Anoiapithecus brevirostris gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle Miocene (11.9 Ma) of Spain, which enables testing this hypothesis. Morphological and geometric morphometrics analyses of this material show a unique facial pattern for hominoids. This taxon combines autapomorphic features—such as a strongly reduced facial prognathism—with kenyapithecine (more specifically, kenyapithecin) and hominid synapomorphies. This combination supports a sister-group relationship between kenyapithecins (Griphopithecus + Kenyapithecus) and hominids. The presence of both groups in Eurasia during the Middle Miocene and the retention in kenyapithecins of a primitive hominoid postcranial body plan support a Eurasian origin of the Hominidae. Alternatively, the two extant hominid clades (Homininae and Ponginae) might have independently evolved in Africa and Eurasia from an ancestral, Middle Miocene stock, so that the supposed crown-hominid synapomorphies might be homoplastic. PMID:19487676

  6. New magnetochronology of Late Miocene mammal fauna, NE Tibetan Plateau, China : Mammal migration and paleoenvironments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ao, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Dekkers, Mark J.; Roberts, Andrew P.; An, Zhisheng; Li, Yongxiang; Lu, Fengyan; Lin, Shan; Li, Xingwen

    2016-01-01

    Lanzhou Basin lies on the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in western China and is a rich source of Oligocene-Miocene mammalian fossils. Obtaining precise age determinations for these fossils is important to address key questions concerning mammalian and environmental evolution in Asia

  7. The westernmost tarsier: A new genus and species from the Miocene of Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Jelle S.; Flynn, Lawrence J.; Wessels, Wilma

    2013-01-01

    As the closest living sister group of anthropoids, tarsiers (Family Tarsiidae) are an important group in primate evolution. However, their fossil record is poor: only four species have been described, two from the Eocene of China and two from the Miocene of Thailand. All are from outside the range

  8. Paleomagnetic analyses on Badenian–Sarmatian drill cores from the North Carpathian foredeep (Middle Miocene, Poland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sant, K.; de Leeuw, Arjan; Chang, L.; Czapowski, Grzegorsz; Gasiewicz, Andrzej; Krijgsman, W.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate dating of the Badenian–Sarmatian transition, a boundary between two regional Middle Miocene stages of the semi-isolated Paratethys Sea, is crucial to understand what event caused the corresponding major turnover in faunal assemblage at that point in time. The general opinion is that this ev

  9. Middle-Miocene (Serravallian) temperate carbonates in a seaway connecting the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea (North Betic Strait, S Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Juan C.; Martín, José M.; Aguirre, Julio; Baird, Catherine D.; Grunnaleite, Ivar; Jensen, Niels Bo; Puga-Bernabéu, Angel; Sælen, Gunnar; Talbot, Michael R.

    2010-03-01

    Miocene deposits in the contact area between the Prebetic and Subbetic domains (Betic Cordillera, S Spain) record the last stages of marine deposition on the southern Iberian margin and the final closure of the North Betic Strait in the early Tortonian (Late Miocene). Serravallian (Middle Miocene) shallow-water carbonates and mixed carbonate-siliciclastics formed on a platform at the southern margin of the North Betic Strait. These shallow-water deposits, informally termed the La Escalera Formation, onlap an erosion surface carved into underlying Miocene and older rocks. Carbonate components are mainly bryozoans, coralline red algae, molluscs, and benthic and planktonic foraminifers, typical of heterozoan lithofacies. Several facies types can be distinguished based on different grain sizes and sedimentary structures. Large-scale geometries and stratigraphic facies relationships indicate that the La Escalera Formation was deposited on a homoclinal ramp attached to a deeply eroded, emergent relief to the south. A beach system developed at the southern margin, with backshore lagoons and local incursions of coarse terrigenous sediments. Seawards of the beach system was a submarine-dune belt that extended over several square kilometres at the northeastern end of the La Escalera Formation. Longshore currents shifted submarine dunes to the northeast. Maximum production of carbonate skeletons took place seawards of the dune field. From this factory area, skeletal debris was moved landwards and incorporated into the dunes and beaches, whereas other skeletal particles were transported downslope by storms and fed a facies belt with hummocky and swaley cross-stratified sediments. The finest-grained particles accumulated below a storm-wave base, along with significant planktic debris. Carbonate deposits change laterally westwards to terrigenous sediments formed in similar facies belts. Terrigenous influx limited carbonate production on the western part of the ramp by disturbing

  10. Evolution of the western East African Rift System reflected in provenance changes of Miocene to Pleistocene synrift sediments (Albertine Rift, Uganda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sandra; Hornung, Jens; Hinderer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Miocene to Pleistocene synrift sediments in the Albertine Graben reflect the complex geodynamic evolution in the Western branch of the East African Rift System. In this study we focus on the provenance of these siliciclastic deposits to identify sediment sources and supply paths with the ultimate goal to reconstruct the exhumation history of different tectonic blocks during prolonged rifting, with specific focus on the uplift of the Rwenzori Mountains in Uganda. We present framework and heavy mineral petrographic data combined with varietal studies of detrital garnet and rutile, based on logged sediment sections on the Ugandan side of Lake Albert (Kisegi-Nyabusosi area). The analyzed sedimentary units have a feldspatho-quartzose composition and distinct variations in heavy mineral assemblages and mineral chemical composition indicating two provenance changes. The Miocene part of the stratigraphy is dominated by garnet, zircon, tourmaline and rutile, whereas Pliocene to Pleistocene sediment yields high amounts of less stable amphibole and epidote. An abrupt switch in heavy mineral assemblages occurs during the early Pliocene (~ 5.5-5.0 Ma) and clearly postdates the formation of Palaeolake Obweruka at ~ 8 Ma. Provenance signatures point to major sediment supply from the northeast and subsequently from the southeast. We interpret this first shift as transition from the pre-rift to the syn-rift stage. In this scenario, formation of Palaeolake Obweruka is due to higher humidity in the upper Miocene, rather than forced rifting. A second change of sediment composition is documented by mineral geochemistry and coincides with fragmentation of Palaeolake Obweruka starting at ~ 2.5 Ma. Detrital garnet in sediment of Miocene to Pliocene age is rich in pyrope and almandine and calculated Zr-in-rutile temperatures range between ~ 550 and 950 °C. In contrast, garnet occurring in Pleistocene sediment (Nyabusosi Formation) has a higher spessartine component and rutile thermometry

  11. Spatial variations in the stoichiometry and geochemistry of Miocene dolomite from Grand Cayman: Implications for the origin of island dolostone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min; Jones, Brian

    2017-03-01

    The Cayman Formation (Miocene), 140 m thick on Grand Cayman, is incompletely dolomitized with the most of the dolomite restricted to the peripheral part of the island. These calcium-rich dolomites, with 50-60 mol%CaCO3 (%Ca), are divided into low-calcium dolomite (LCD, %Ca 55%). Despite the small size of the island (6.8 km wide), the percentages of LCD and HCD, the %Ca, and the geochemical properties of the dolomites show geographic variations relative to the surrounding shelf edge. Accordingly, the Cayman Formation on the east end of the island is divided into the peripheral dolostone (shelf edge-1.5 km inland), transitional dolostone (1.5-2.7 km inland), and the interior limestone and dolostone (2.7 km to island center). From the peripheral dolostone to the interior limestone and dolostone, there is an increase in the percentage of HCD and %Ca in the dolomite, and decreases in the δ18O and δ13C values of the dolomite. Interpretations based on the oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions indicate that seawater is the source of Mg for dolomitization. The concentric pattern of dolomitization on the island reflects the fact that seawater flowed into the island from all directions during dolomitization. The lateral inland variations in the dolomite stoichiometric and isotopic properties reflect the gradual modification of seawater by water-rock interaction along the flow path from the shelf edge to the island center. 87Sr/86Sr ratios indicate that two phases of dolomitization (late Miocene-early Pliocene and late Pliocene-early Pleistocene) were responsible for dolomitization of the Cayman Formation. It is very likely that during both phases, the carbonate platform was subaerially exposed and that the pump for circulating the seawater through the island was related to the seawater/freshwater mixing zone. The dolomitization model developed from Grand Cayman may be applicable to many other island dolostones affected by long-term sea-level changes. Given that the

  12. The role of changing geodynamics in the progressive contamination of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc magmas in the southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Poma, Stella; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Hinton, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andean convergent margin changed significantly between the Late Cretaceous and the Late Miocene, influencing magmatic activity and its geochemical composition. Here we investigate how these changes, which include changing slab-dip angle and convergence angles and rates, have influenced the contamination of the arc magmas with crustal material. Whole rock geochemical data for a suite of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc rocks from the Pampean flat-slab segment (29-31 °S) of the southern Central Andes is presented alongside petrographic observations and high resolution age dating. In-situ U-Pb dating of magmatic zircon, combined with Ar-Ar dating of plagioclase, has led to an improved regional stratigraphy and provides an accurate temporal constraint for the geochemical data. A generally higher content of incompatible trace elements (e.g. Nb/Zr ratios from 0.019 to 0.083 and Nb/Yb from 1.5 to 16.4) is observed between the Late Cretaceous (~ 72 Ma), when the southern Central Andean margin is suggested to have been in extension, and the Miocene when the thickness of the continental crust increased and the angle of the subducting Nazca plate shallowed. Trace and rare earth element compositions obtained for the Late Cretaceous to Late Eocene arc magmatic rocks from the Principal Cordillera of Chile, combined with a lack of zircon inheritance, suggest limited assimilation of the overlying continental crust by arc magmas derived from the mantle wedge. A general increase in incompatible, fluid-mobile/immobile (e.g., Ba/Nb) and fluid-immobile/immobile (e.g., Nb/Zr) trace element ratios is attributed to the influence of the subducting slab on the melt source region and/or the influx of asthenospheric mantle. The Late Oligocene (~ 26 Ma) to Early Miocene (~ 17 Ma), and Late Miocene (~ 6 Ma) arc magmatic rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera show evidence for the bulk assimilation of the Permian-Triassic (P

  13. Gravity modeling reveals that the "Miocene Pyrenean peneplain" developed at high elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Gemma V.; Van Den Driessche, Jean; Robert, Alexandra; Babault, Julien; Le Carlier, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Geodynamics that shaped the present morphology of the western Mediterranean are mostly linked to the African-Eurasia collision and the extension related to the Mediterranean opening. The Pyrenean chain formed by the collision between the Iberian microplate and the Eurasian plate from the Eocene to the late Oligocene. This resulted in lithosphere thickening especially below the Central Pyrenees that becomes thinner eastwards. Whether the later thinning of the lithosphere in the easternmost Pyrenees involves the removal of the lithospheric mantle or not is debated. This issue joins the problematics about the origin of the high-elevation of the "Miocene Pyrenean peneplain" remnants. Indeed the most striking feature of the Pyrenean morphology is the occurrence of high-elevation, low relief erosional surfaces that are interpreted as the remnants of a Miocene single planation surface, dissected and reworked by Quaternary fluvial and glacial erosion. Two end-member interpretations have proposed to explain the high elevation of this original surface. The first considers that the Miocene Pyrenean peneplain develops near sea-level and was later uplifted, the second claims that the planation surface developed at high elevation in response to the inhibition of erosion consecutively to the progressive rise of the base-level of the Pyrenean drainage network. The first interpretation implies the return to normal crustal thickness by erosion and later uplift by removal of the lithospheric mantle. The second interpretation considers that the mean elevation of the original planation surface matches the thickness of the lithosphere below the chain, taking into account some hundred meters of isostatic rebound due to Quaternary erosion. To test these interpretations, we first restore the Miocene original planation surface by mapping and interpolating the high-elevation, low relief surfaces across the Pyrenees. We then performed 1D and 2D gravity models that we compare with recent

  14. A WELL PRESERVED SKELETON OF THE FOSSIL SHARK COSMOPOLITODUS HASTALIS FROM THE LATE MIOCENE OF PERU, FEATURING FISH REMAINS AS FOSSILIZED STOMACH CONTENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO COLLARETA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both the preservation of the poorly mineralized skeleton of sharks and the preservation of stomach contents are rarely observed in the fossil record. Here we report on a partial skeleton of a lamniform shark, including portions of the visceral arches and the anterior segment of the vertebral column, collected from the late Miocene beds of the Pisco Formation exposed at Cerro Yesera (Ica Desert, South Peru. Based on the morphology of the preserved teeth, this specimen was determined as a juvenile of the extinct lamnid species Cosmopolitodus hastalis. The shark skeleton includes remains of fish (featuring a pilchard determined as Sardinops sp. cf. S. sagax in the abdominal region. These fish remains are interpreted herein as the fossilized stomach contents of the shark. For the first time, piscivory is demonstrated in a juvenile individual of Cosmopolitodus hastalis. This result is consistent with the current knowledge about the feeding habits of immature individuals of extant lamniform shark species (including Carcharodon carcharias and Isurus oxyrinchus. Our report further outlines the fundamental role of schooling pilchards in the late Miocene trophic chains of the highly productive coastal waters off present South Peru. Moreover, the find of this well preserved shark skeleton strengthens the qualification of the Pisco Formation as a Fossil-Lagerstätte, and emphasizes the role of early mineralization processes in cases of exceptional preservation.

  15. Structure and provenance of Late Cretaceous-Miocene sediments located near the NE Dinarides margin: Inferences from kinematics of orogenic building and subsequent extensional collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Uros; Matenco, Liviu; Andriessen, Paul; Toljić, Marinko; Rundić, Ljupko; Ducea, Mihai N.

    2017-07-01

    The NE part of the Dinarides Mountain chain, located near their junction with the Carpatho-Balkanides, is an area where sedimentary basins associated with the Neotethys subduction and collision are still exposed. We performed a provenance study, based on detrital fission track thermochronology combined with zircon Usbnd Pb magmatic geochronology, and existing studies of kinematics and exhumation. Our study shows rapid sedimentation in the trench and forearc basin overlying the upper European tectonic plate. A number of latest Cretaceous-Early Paleocene igneous provenance ages show a dominant magmatic source area, derived from a Late Cretaceous subduction-related arc. This arc shed short time lag sediments in the forearc and the trench system, possibly associated with focused exhumation in the Serbo-Macedonian margin. This was followed by burial of the trench sediments and a novel stage of Middle-Late Eocene exhumation driven by continued continental collision that had larger effects than previously thought. The collision was followed by Late Oligocene-Miocene exhumation of the former lower Adriatic plate along extensional detachments that reactivated the inherited collisional contact along the entire Dinarides margin. This event re-distributed sediments at short distances in the neighboring Miocene basins. Our study demonstrates that the Dinarides orogenic system is characterized by short lag times between exhumation and re-deposition, whereas the upper tectonic plate is significantly exhumed only during the final stages of collision. Such an exhumation pattern is not directly obvious from observing the overall geometry of the orogen.

  16. Were West Antarctic Ice Sheet grounding events in the Ross Sea a consequence of East Antarctic Ice Sheet expansion during the middle Miocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Philip J.

    2003-11-01

    Seismic correlation of glacial unconformities from the Ross Sea outer continental shelf to chronostratigraphic control at DSDP sites 272 and 273 indicates that at least two West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) expansions occurred during the early part of the middle Miocene (i.e. well before completion of continental-scale expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) inferred from δ 18O and eustatic shifts). Therefore, if the volume of the EAIS was indeed relatively low, and if the Ross Sea age model is valid, then these WAIS expansions/contractions were not a direct consequence of EAIS expansion over the Transantarctic Mountains onto West Antarctica. An in-situ development of the WAIS during the middle Miocene suggests that either West Antarctic land elevations were above sea level and/or that air and water temperatures were sufficiently cold to support a marine-based ice sheet. Additional chronostratigraphic and lithologic data are needed from Antarctic margins to test these speculations.

  17. Oligocene sivaladapid primate from the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, Pakistan) bridges the gap between Eocene and Miocene adapiform communities in Southern Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marivaux, Laurent; Welcomme, Jean-Loup; Ducrocq, Stéphane; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2002-04-01

    A new species of Guangxilemur (Sivaladapidae, Adapiformes) is described from the early Oligocene Chitarwata Formation (Bugti Member) of the Bugti Hills, Sulaiman geological Province, Balochistan, Pakistan. Guangxilemur singsilai n. sp. provides further diagnostic morphological characters from its newly described upper and lower dentitions, confirming its intermediate phylogenetic position between Eocene and Miocene Asian sivaladapid adapiforms. G. singsilai possesses moderately developed shearing and puncturing molar features and maintains lingual cusps on upper molars as in Eocene hoanghoniines; in contrast, it possesses a typical molariform P(4) as in Miocene sivaladapines. The important paleogeographic changes that have affected South Asia during the Tertiary (related to the collision between the Indian and Eurasian Plates) have played a critical role in reforming circulation and climatic differentiation. The presence in Pakistan of an unique and well-diversified Oligocene primate fauna, clearly demonstrates that South Asia maintained favourable environmental conditions during the middle Caenozoic global climatic deterioration that coincides with drastic changes in faunal structure on the whole Holarctic Province, including the extinction of adapiform primates.

  18. Paleogeographic and structural setting of Miocene strata in central western Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Late Cenozoic sedimentary rocks as old as 19 Ma are widely distributed in central western Nevada. They are greatly more abundant than older Cenozoic strata and are commonly interpreted to have formed in fault-bounded basins that mark the onset of widespread extension in the Basin and Range Province. Miocene strata are largely coeval with a magmatic arc that extended south southeast near the boundary of the Basin and Range and Sierra Nevada Provinces. This arc produced voluminous andesitic flows and lahars that locally interfinger with the Miocene strata. Miocene depositional basins apparently varied greatly in size. The largest that can be defined clearly is the Esmeralda Basin that was at least 65 km long and 45 km wide. Other basins may have been larger but are difficult to reconstruct; still other basins may be small and isolated, particularly within the magmatic arc. Lacustrine deposits and minor interfingering deltaic and distal fluvial units predominate; near-source, coarse alluvial-fan and megabreccia landslide deposits are locally conspicuous. coarse near-source deposits, particularly landslide deposits, are interpreted to be adjacent to basin-bounding normal faults. The Esmeralda, Coal Valley, and Gabbs Valley-Stewart Valley-Tonopah Basins are interpreted to be related to large-scale Miocene extension. Other basins may be (1) pull-apart structures related to strike-slip faults, (2) downdropped blocks in areas of cross-cutting normal and/or strike-slip faults related to changes in the extension direction or (3) grabens or half-grabens related to uniform extension. Younger Cenozoic basins, including present-day basins, overprint and cut across the Miocene basins.

  19. Seawater osmium isotope evidence for a middle Miocene flood basalt event in ferromanganese crust records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Veronika; Frank, Martin; Levasseur, Sylvain; Halliday, Alex N.; Hein, James R.

    2008-08-01

    Three ferromanganese crusts from the northeast, northwest and central Atlantic were re-dated using osmium (Os) isotope stratigraphy and yield ages from middle Miocene to the present. The three Os isotope records do not show evidence for growth hiatuses. The reconstructed Os isotope-based growth rates for the sections older than 10 Ma are higher than those determined previously by the combined beryllium isotope (10Be/9Be) and cobalt (Co) constant-flux methods, which results in a decrease in the maximum age of each crust. This re-dating does not lead to significant changes to the interpretation of previously determined radiogenic isotope neodymium, lead (Nd, Pb) time series because the variability of these isotopes was very small in the records of the three crusts prior to 10 Ma. The Os isotope record of the central Atlantic crust shows a pronounced minimum during the middle Miocene between 15 and 12 Ma, similar to a minimum previously observed in two ferromanganese crusts from the central Pacific. For the other two Atlantic crusts, the Os isotope records and their calibration to the global seawater curve for the middle Miocene are either more uncertain or too short and thus do not allow for a reliable identification of an isotopic minimum. Similar to pronounced minima reported previously for the Cretaceous/Tertiary and Eocene/Oligocene boundaries, possible interpretations for the newly identified middle Miocene Os isotope minimum include changes in weathering intensity and/or a meteorite impact coinciding with the formation of the Nördlinger Ries Crater. It is suggested that the eruption and weathering of the Columbia River flood basalts provided a significant amount of the unradiogenic Os required to produce the middle Miocene minimum.

  20. New sedimentological and palynological data from surface Miocene strata in the central Amazonas Basin area

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    Emílio Alberto Amaral Soares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The scarcity of stratigraphic data has hindered the demarcation of the outcropping area of Miocene deposits of the Amazon Basin, represented informally by the Novo Remanso Formation. Moreover, this unit is characterized by a sparse and irregular geographic distribution due to its sedimentological features and rare fossil content. Miocene deposits cropping out in central Amazonas Basin area were described in sedimentological terms and analyzed palynologically. All analyses were undertaken in samples collected at the Uatumã River banks (Itapiranga and São Sebastião do Uatumã cities. Lithostratigraphic data shows that Novo Remanso Formation consists of sandstones, with subordinate conglomerates and pelites, characteristic of a meandering fluvial paleosystem, with fluvial channel, point bar, floodplain and crevasse splay facies. The palynoflora retrieved from five samples consists exclusively of continental-origin palynomorphs dominated by angiosperms species. Trilete spores are well represented, while gymnosperms pollen grains are minor components. The presence of Psilastephanoporites tesseroporus, Syncolporites poricostatus, Jandufouria seamrogiformis and Polypodiaceoisporites potoniei ensure these deposits fits into the Grimsdalea magnaclavata palynozone (Regali et al. 1974a, b, and the Grimsdalea magnaclavata/Crassoretitriletes vanraadshooveni palynozones of Jaramillo et al. (2011 considered Middle Miocene age. This age is confirmed by the zonation of Jaramillo et al. (2011, based on the LADs of Bombacacidites baumfalki (11.57Ma and Crototricolpites annemariae (12.91Ma; and the FAD of Psilastephanoporites tesseroporus (14.00Ma. With these new data presented herein, it is possible to assume that the Miocene strata represented by the Novo Remanso Formation covers a larger area in the basin than previously considered, and that it may be extended for about 300 km until the Manacapuru village, indicating a Miocene subsidence phase.

  1. Palynological evidence for late Miocene stepwise aridification on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Li, Ji Jun; Song, Chun Hui; Yu, Hao; Jiang Peng, Ting; Chuang Hui, Zheng; Ye, Xi Yan

    2016-07-01

    Holding a climatically and geologically key position both regionally and globally, the northeastern Tibetan Plateau provides a natural laboratory for illustrating the interactions between tectonic activity and the evolution of the Asian interior aridification. Determining when and how the late Miocene climate evolved on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau may help us better understand the relationships among tectonic uplift, global cooling and ecosystem evolution. Previous paleoenvironmental research has focused on the western Longzhong Basin. Late Miocene aridification data derived from pollen now require corroborative evidence from the eastern Longzhong Basin. Here, we present a late Miocene pollen record from the Tianshui Basin in the eastern Longzhong Basin. Our results show that a general trend toward dry climate was superimposed by stepwise aridification: a temperate forest with a rather humid climate existed in the basin between 11.4 and 10.1 Ma, followed by a temperate open forest environment with a less humid climate between 10.1 and 7.4 Ma, then giving way to an open temperate forest-steppe environment with a relatively arid climate between 7.4 and 6.4 Ma. The vegetation succession demonstrates that the aridification of the Asian interior occurred after ˜ 7-8 Ma, which is confirmed by other evidence from Asia. Furthermore, the aridification trend on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau parallels the global cooling of the late Miocene; the stepwise vegetation succession is consistent with the major uplift of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau during this time. These integrated environmental proxies indicate that the long-term global cooling and the Tibetan Plateau uplift caused the late Miocene aridification of the Asian interior.

  2. The giant bite of a new raptorial sperm whale from the Miocene epoch of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Olivier; Bianucci, Giovanni; Post, Klaas; de Muizon, Christian; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Urbina, Mario; Reumer, Jelle

    2010-07-01

    The modern giant sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus, one of the largest known predators, preys upon cephalopods at great depths. Lacking a functional upper dentition, it relies on suction for catching its prey; in contrast, several smaller Miocene sperm whales (Physeteroidea) have been interpreted as raptorial (versus suction) feeders, analogous to the modern killer whale Orcinus orca. Whereas very large physeteroid teeth have been discovered in various Miocene localities, associated diagnostic cranial remains have not been found so far. Here we report the discovery of a new giant sperm whale from the Middle Miocene of Peru (approximately 12-13 million years ago), Leviathan melvillei, described on the basis of a skull with teeth and mandible. With a 3-m-long head, very large upper and lower teeth (maximum diameter and length of 12 cm and greater than 36 cm, respectively), robust jaws and a temporal fossa considerably larger than in Physeter, this stem physeteroid represents one of the largest raptorial predators and, to our knowledge, the biggest tetrapod bite ever found. The appearance of gigantic raptorial sperm whales in the fossil record coincides with a phase of diversification and size-range increase of the baleen-bearing mysticetes in the Miocene. We propose that Leviathan fed mostly on high-energy content medium-size baleen whales. As a top predator, together with the contemporaneous giant shark Carcharocles megalodon, it probably had a profound impact on the structuring of Miocene marine communities. The development of a vast supracranial basin in Leviathan, extending on the rostrum as in Physeter, might indicate the presence of an enlarged spermaceti organ in the former that is not associated with deep diving or obligatory suction feeding.

  3. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Gerald; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-04-01

    During the Oligo-Miocene, major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. However, most phosphate deposits represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by complex physical and chemical enrichment processes, limiting their applicability for the study regarding the temporal pacing of Miocene phosphogenesis. The Oligo-Miocene Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy) is a widely continuous carbonate succession deposited in a mostly middle to outer neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well-winnowed grain to packstones of the middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, where occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the prominent carbon isotope excursion of the Monterey event. This unique setting allows the analysis of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio, chemo, and cyclostratigraphically constrained age-model. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of uranium in the studied authigenic phosphates compared to the surrounding carbonates, allowing natural gamma-radiation (GR) to be used as a qualitative proxy for autochthonous phosphate content. Time series analyses indicate a strong 405 kyr eccentricity forcing of GR in the Bryozoan Limestone. These results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate content to orbitally paced increases in the burial of organic carbon, particularly during the carbon isotope maxima of the Monterey event. Thus, phosphogenesis during the middle Miocene in the Mediterranean was controlled by the 405 kyr eccentricity and its influence on large-scale paleoproductivity patterns. Rare earth element data were used as a tool to reconstruct the formation conditions of the investigated phosphates, indicating generally oxic formation conditions, which are consistent with microbially mediated phosphogenesis.

  4. The palaeoecologic and biostratigraphic evaluation of Middle Miocene freshwater sediments and microfossils near Denkendorf (Bavaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkenseer, C.; Reichenbacher, B.

    2009-04-01

    foreland basin. Furthermore the ostracod assemblage is related to taxa recorded from the Miocene infill of the (isolated) Steinheim meteorite crater (e.g., Pseudocandona steinheimensis). According to the evaluation of the micromammal molars (Megacricetodon cf. M. minor and M. cf. M. bavaricus) the sediments of Denkendorf are attributed to the lower MN5 mammal zone (latest Karpatian to early Badenian) and are thus considered to be younger than the associations found near Hitzhofen and Heitensheim.

  5. Stratigraphy and structural development of the southwest Isla Tiburón marine basin: Implications for latest Miocene tectonic opening and flooding of the northern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Scott E K.; Oskin, Michael; Dorsey, Rebecca; Iriondo, Alexander; Kunk, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate information on the timing of earliest marine incursion into the Gulf of California (northwestern México) is critical for paleogeographic models and for understanding the spatial and temporal evolution of strain accommodation across the obliquely divergent Pacific-North America plate boundary. Marine strata exposed on southwest Isla Tiburón (SWIT) have been cited as evidence for a middle Miocene marine incursion into the Gulf of California at least 7 m.y. prior to plate boundary localization ca. 6 Ma. A middle Miocene interpretation for SWIT marine deposits has played a large role in subsequent interpretations of regional tectonics and rift evolution, the ages of marine basins containing similar fossil assemblages along ~1300 km of the plate boundary, and the timing of marine incursion into the Gulf of California. We report new detailed geologic mapping and geochronologic data from the SWIT basin, an elongate sedimentary basin associated with deformation along the dextral-oblique La Cruz fault. We integrate these results with previously published biostratigraphic and geochronologic data to bracket the age of marine deposits in the SWIT basin and show that they have a total maximum thickness of ~300 m. The 6.44 ± 0.05 Ma (Ar/Ar) tuff of Hast Pitzcal is an ash-flow tuff stratigraphically below the oldest marine strata, and the 6.01 ± 0.20 Ma (U/Pb) tuff of Oyster Amphitheater, also an ash-flow tuff, is interbedded with marine conglomerate near the base of the marine section. A dike-fed rhyodacite lava flow that caps all marine strata yields ages of 3.51 ± 0.05 Ma (Ar/Ar) and 4.13 ± 0.09 Ma (U/Pb) from the base of the flow, consistent with previously reported ages of 4.16 ± 1.81 Ma (K-Ar) from the flow top and (K-Ar) 3.7 ± 0.9 Ma from the feeder dike. Our new results confirm a latest Miocene to early Pliocene age for the SWIT marine basin, consistent with previously documented latest Miocene to early Pliocene (ca. 6.2-4.3 Ma) planktonic and benthic

  6. The early Holocene humid period in the Tayma palaeolake, NW Arabian Peninsula -- A high-resolution micro-facies and geochemical approach

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    Neugebauer, Ina; Plessen, Birgit; Dinies, Michèle; Engel, Max; Tjallingii, Rik; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The Tayma palaeolake is a rare archive of the early Holocene humid period in northern Arabia (Dinies et al. 2015; Engel et al. 2012). Here we present a ca. 1 m thick and 500 years spanning annually laminated sediment section that was deposited in the centre of the former lake from ca. 8500 to 8000 calibrated years (cal. yrs) BP, as determined by AMS 14C dating of pollen concentrates (Dinies et al. 2015). High-resolution micro-facies analyses based on thin section microscopy, μXRF element scanning, δ18Ocarb and δ13Ccarb measurements on single carbonate laminae, as well as geochemical measurements on bulk samples for TOC, CaCO3, C/N ratio, δ18Ocarb, δ13Ccarb, δ13Corg and δ15N determination were performed in order to investigate the sedimentological and geochemical changes along the varved sequence in great detail. The finely laminated marl sediments are mainly composed of sub-mm thick laminae of endogenic aragonite, organic matter and diatoms, as well as occasional, often graded silt-clay layers. Following an early lake phase from ca. 8700 to 8500 cal. yrs BP characterized by coarsely laminated, presumably non-annual marl sediments that are rich in ostracods, three main varved phases can be distinguished within the investigated section: (1) aragonitic-organic varves from ca. 8500 to 8300 cal. yrs BP, (2) diatom-organic varves from ca. 8300 to 8100 cal. yrs BP that frequently include aragonite laminae and occasionally gastropod and ostracod shells, and (3) organic varves from ca. 8100 to 8000 cal. yrs BP with decreasing diatom and aragonite laminae and an increasing frequency of gypsum layers. After this period, gypsum becomes abundant and fine lamination appears only sporadically. In addition, we observe increasing trends of TOC, C/N and δ13Ccarb and decreasing δ18Ocarb during phase 1 and excess δ18Ocarb, δ13Ccarb and TOC values during phase 2, pointing towards the maximum lake productivity and increased seasonal precipitation. We interpret this

  7. Threshold in North Atlantic-Arctic circulation controlled by the Oligocene-Miocene subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stärz, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Knorr, Gregor; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Changes in high latitude ocean gateways are thought to be main drivers of Cenozoic climate evolution. However, the link between global climate changes and the early ocean gateway formation between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (incl. the Greenland and Norwegian Seas) controlled by the subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge is poorly understood. Here, we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model for Oligocene-Miocene boundary conditions to address a threshold behaviour for the ventilation of the Arctic Ocean controlled by the subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge. Our model simulations reveal that a deepening of the ridge from approx. 100 to 200 metres below sea-level forces major reorganizations in the North Atlantic-Arctic circulation associated with extreme salinity and temperature changes in the Arctic Ocean. These changes are induced by an abrupt regime shift from restricted estuarine conditions to a bi-directional flow regime similar to today. Taking uncertainties in timing into account this suggests that tectonic processes, which started at the late Eocene to Oligocene controlled the climate and circulation regime of the Arctic Ocean.

  8. Sub-decadal resolution in sediments of Late Miocene Lake Pannon reveals speciation of Cyprideis (Crustacea, Ostracoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitter, Frank; Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E

    2015-01-01

    Late Miocene "Lake Pannon" (~11.3 Ma) was a remnant of the Central Paratethyan Sea. Successive freshening and constantly changing environmental conditions, like oxygenation, nutrition and substrate led to a well-documented radiation in molluscs and ostracods. Among ostracods (small crustaceans), Cyprideis is one of the most common genera in "Lake Pannon", as well as in several other ancient lakes, showing numerous adaptations and speciations. Here, we present high-resolution data from an early transgression of "Lake Pannon" in the Eastern Styrian Basin (SE Austria). Mataschen clay pit is in the focus of geologic and paleontologic research since 20 years and its geologic and paleoecologic evolution is well-documented. We drilled five cores covering a ~2.3 m long section and completely sampled it in 5-mm thick intervals to reconstruct minute changes in the ostracod fauna over a transgression of a brackish water body. The dominant genus, Cyprideis, is represented by three species C. mataschensis, C. kapfensteinensis and C. ex gr. pannonica. Through morphometric analyses we highlight the variance of each taxon and suggest that there is no direct ecologic control on size or shape. Furthermore, we found a second, co-occurring morphotype of C. kapfensteinensis which is directly related to an elevation of salinities above 13 psu. The presence of two intermediate specimens between the two morphotypes in the sample directly below the first appearance of C. kapfensteinensis B leads us to the conclusion that we are facing a speciation event leading to four sympatric species of Cyprideis.

  9. Chewing through the Miocene: an examination of the feeding musculature in the ground sloth Hapalops from South America (Mammalia: Pilosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Virginia L; McAfee, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Hapalops, a smaller-sized and early sloth of the Megatheroidea, appeared in the middle Miocene Santa Cruz formation of Argentina. This genus is part of the group from which later, larger megatheroids arose, i.e., Nothrotheriops and Megatherium. Many cranial characters support this idea; however Hapalops is not merely a smaller antecedent of the later forms. Specifically, Hapalops retains short anterior caniniform teeth, and a temporomandibular joint elevated above the cheek tooth row; a combination distinct among sloths. An elevated temporomandibular joint occurs in Bradypus, a tree sloth with anterior chisel-shaped teeth instead of caniniforms, and the tree sloth Choloepus, which is aligned with the megalonychids, has anterior caniniforms. Hapalops has an elongated zygomatic ascending process that is reminiscent of that in Bradypus; however, the Bradypus skull is extremely foreshortened while that of Hapalops is elongated, as in nothrotheres, but not deepened as in megatheres. Previous work identified many sloth cranial character complexes, and functional limitations on skull feature combinations. The unique Hapalops character patterns indicate a selective feeder with a mediolaterally oriented grinding stroke during mastication.

  10. Lonestones as indicators of tsunami deposits in deep-sea sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Morozaki Group, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Toru

    2013-05-01

    Lonestones are isolated larger clasts enclosed in muddy fine-grained deposits, and are usually interpreted as iceberg-rafted dropstones. This interpretation implies the existence of glaciers (continental ice sheets) and, consequently, a cool climate. However, alternative interpretations are possible, as lonestones may also be deposited by non-glacial processes. Therefore, clarification of the depositional processes associated with lonestones is fundamental for studies based on lonestone-bearing deposits. A field survey of lonestone-bearing deposits from Early Miocene deep-sea sedimentary rocks found around the Chita Peninsula of central Japan suggests that tsunami-induced flows on the sea bottom may also form lonestones. These lonestones are associated with sandy to gravelly deposits, and were deposited by high-energy episodic currents. The main features of these deposits are the multiple stacking of normally graded units, and the laterally discontinuous distribution of coarse-grained clastic material (sands and gravels). Such features are consistent with deposition by tsunamis and suggest that lonestone-bearing depositional successions must be carefully interpreted, especially where lonestones are used as glacial indicators, as some lonestones were probably put in place by ancient tsunami events.

  11. The Miocene mammal Necrolestes demonstrates the survival of a Mesozoic nontherian lineage into the late Cenozoic of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Guillermo W; Wible, John R; Beck, Robin M D; Apesteguía, Sebastian

    2012-12-04

    The early Miocene mammal Necrolestes patagonensis from Patagonia, Argentina, was described in 1891 as the only known extinct placental "insectivore" from South America (SA). Since then, and despite the discovery of additional well-preserved material, the systematic status of Necrolestes has remained in flux, with earlier studies leaning toward placental affinities and more recent ones endorsing either therian or specifically metatherian relationships. We have further prepared the best-preserved specimens of Necrolestes and compared them with newly discovered nontribosphenic Mesozoic mammals from Argentina; based on this, we conclude that Necrolestes is related neither to marsupials nor placentals but is a late-surviving member of the recently recognized nontherian clade Meridiolestida, which is currently known only from SA. This conclusion is supported by a morphological phylogenetic analysis that includes a broad sampling of therian and nontherian taxa and that places Necrolestes within Meridiolestida. Thus, Necrolestes is a remnant of the highly endemic Mesozoic fauna of nontribosphenic mammals in SA and extends the known record of meridiolestidans by almost 45 million years. Together with other likely relictual mammals from earlier in the Cenozoic of SA and Antarctica, Necrolestes demonstrates the ecological diversity of mammals and the mosaic pattern of fauna replacement in SA during the Cenozoic. In contrast to northern continents, the Cenozoic faunal history of SA was characterized by a long period of interaction between endemic mammalian lineages of Mesozoic origin and metatherian and eutherian lineages that probably dispersed to SA during the latest Cretaceous or earliest Paleocene.

  12. Jurassic to Miocene magmatism and metamorphism in the Mogok metamorphic belt and the India-Eurasia collision in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, M. E.; Pickard, A. L.; Zaw, Khin; Rak, P.; Doyle, M. G.

    2003-06-01

    Situated south of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis at the western margin of the Shan-Thai terrane the high-grade Mogok metamorphic belt (MMB) in Myanmar occupies a key position in the tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The first sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb in zircon geochronology for the MMB shows that strongly deformed granitic orthogneisses near Mandalay contain Jurassic (˜170 Ma) zircons that have partly recrystallized during ˜43 Ma high-grade metamorphism. A hornblende syenite from Mandalay Hill also contains Jurassic zircons with evidence of Eocene metamorphic recrystallization rimmed by thin zones of 30.9 ± 0.7 Ma magmatic zircon. The relative abundance of Jurassic zircons in these rocks is consistent with suggestions that southern Eurasia had an Andean-type margin at that time. Mid-Cretaceous to earliest Eocene (120 to 50 Ma) I-type granitoids in the MMB, Myeik Archipelago, and Western Myanmar confirm that prior to the collision of India, an up to 200 km wide magmatic belt extended along the Eurasian margin from Pakistan to Sumatra. Metamorphic overgrowths to zircons in the orthogneiss near Mandalay date a period of Eocene (˜43 Ma) high-grade metamorphism possibly during crustal thickening related to the initial collision between India and Eurasia (at 65 to 55 Ma). This was followed by emplacement of syntectonic hornblende syenites and leucogranites between 35 and 23 Ma. Similar syntectonic syenites and leucogranites intruded the Ailao Shan-Red River shear belt in southern China and Vietnam during the Eocene-Oligocene to Miocene, and the Wang Chao and Three Pagodas faults in northern Thailand (that most likely link with the MMB) were also active at this time. The complex history of Eocene to early Miocene metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism in the MMB provides evidence that it may have played a key role in the network of deformation zones that accommodated strain during the northwards movement of India and resulting extrusion or

  13. Organic geochemical characteristics and paleoclimate conditions of the Miocene coals at the Çan-Durali (Çanakkale)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoş-Çebi, Fatma

    2017-05-01

    In this study, n-alkane and isoprenoid, saturated and aromatic biomarker distributions of Miocene coals in the Çan (Çanakkale) region, were studied to investigate organic geochemical characteristics, depositional environment, and hydrocarbon potential of these coals. Çan formation (Middle Miocene) unconformably overlies the basement Çan volcanites (Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene). This formation is composed of lignite, clayey lignite, and ligniferous clayey levels of various thicknesses interlayering with clay and tuffite. The formation represents sediments of small lacustrine basins that are isolated by faults that are formed contemporaneously with Early-Middle Eocene volcanism. Coaliferous units are overlain by lower agglomerate levels. The Rock Eval analyses show that the average TOC (Total Organic Carbon) content of the coal is 53.71% and the average HI (Hydrogen Index) value is 180.5 mgHC/gTOC. OI (Oxygen Index) values (avg. 22.33 mgCO2/gTOC) show that the depositional environment of peat deposits is suboxic. According to HI-Tmax, S2-TOC classification diagrams and Pr/n-C17vs. Ph/n-C18 diagram, the organic matter is composed of Type II and Type III kerogen mixing and represents a transitional environment. In gas chromatograms, n-alkanes with high, mostly odd-numbered carbons are dominant and they are associated with a slight algal contribution. CPI22-30 (Carbon Preference Index) and TARHC (Terrigenous/Aquatic Ratio) values indicate a dominance of high-carbon numbered n-alkanes, indicating the presence of terrestrial organic matter. Paq (aquatic plant n-alkane proxy) values (0.2; 0.3) indicate a climate with relatively wet conditions or low precipitation, the presence of emergent macrophyteses, and the scarcity of hydrophilic plants. Pwax (vascular plant n-alkane proxy) ratio (0.8; 0.7) shows moderately wet conditions and a relatively low water level. The TOC, ACL (n-alkane average chain length), Qwood/grass, Qwood/plant, and Qgrass/plant values indicate the

  14. New material of Anancus kenyensis (proboscidea, mammalia) from Toros-Menalla (Late Miocene, Chad): Contribution to the systematics of African anancines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, Lionel; Mackaye, Hassane Taisso; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Tassy, Pascal; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2009-03-01

    New fossil remains of the proboscidean genus Anancus are described. Among them, a complete skull allows us to revisit for the first time the entire Chadian Anancus fossil record. This genus occurred in the Old World from the late Miocene up to the early Pleistocene. The analysis of dental and cranial characters was allowed individual variations from specific characters to be distinguished. In this study we show that Anancus kenyensis and Anancus osiris are very likely synonym taxa which leads us to emend the diagnosis of A. kenyensis. In addition, this study shows that dental characters in anancines lineage are of little significance for biostratigraphical inference, by contrast to previous works. This study brings new data about the phylogenetical and palaeobiogeographical history of the African anancines.

  15. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J; Ali, Jason R; Samonds, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar's Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine.

  16. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiory H Andrianavalona

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura. In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar's Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine.

  17. Dominant 100,000-year precipitation cyclicity in a late Miocene lake from northeast Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Junsheng; Garzione, Carmala; Su, Qingda; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Rui; Heslop, David; Necula, Cristian; Zhang, Shihong; Song, Yougui; Luo, Zeng

    2017-03-01

    East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) precipitation received by northern China over the past 800 thousand years (ky) is characterized by dominant 100-ky periodicity, mainly attributed to CO2 and Northern Hemisphere insolation-driven ice sheet forcing. We established an EASM record in the Late Miocene from lacustrine sediments in the Qaidam Basin, northern China, which appears to exhibit a dominant 100-ky periodicity similar to the EASM records during the Late Quaternary. Because evidence suggests that partial or ephemeral ice existed in the Northern Hemisphere during the Late Miocene, we attribute the 100-ky cycles to CO2 and Southern Hemisphere insolation-driven Antarctic ice sheet forcing. This indicates a >6-million year earlier onset of the dominant 100-ky Asian monsoon and, likely, glacial and CO2 cycles and may indicate dominant forcing of Northern Hemisphere climate by CO2 and Southern Hemisphere ice sheets in a warm world.

  18. FIRST CETACEAN FOSSIL RECORDS FROM ECUADOR, COLLECTED FROM THE MIOCENE OF ESMERALDAS PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI BIANUCCI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Cetacean fossils from Ecuador are reported for the first time on the basis of fragmentary remains referred to odontocetes, collected during our investigations of Neogene stratigraphic sequences outcropping along the northern coast (Esmeraldas Province. One specimen was collected near Las Peñas village in the Lower-Middle Miocene sediments of the Viche Formation and consists of ear bones and mandibular fragments surely belonging to Ziphiidae. It represents the oldest record of this family in the southeastern Pacific and one of the few records of this family in South America. The other fossil was collected near Rio Verde village in the Upper Miocene sediments of the Angostura Formation and consists of an isolated tooth exhibiting some ziphiid affinities. Pdf

  19. Depositional models and reservoir properties of Miocene reefs, Visayan Islands, Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzi, A.V. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Recent commercial discoveries offshore Palawan have propelled the Philippines into the list of oil- and gas-producing countries, and have focussed on the importance of Miocene reefs as reservoirs. This new situation has motivated the update of earlier depositional-diagenetic models for the Miocene reefs in the Visayan Islands, which is presented in this paper. These reefs consisted of an association of corals, red algae, bryozoans, and encrusting foraminifers, which formed wave-resistant, constructed, barrier-and-atoll systems along the edge of narrow shelves, with associated back-reef patch reefs and frontal pinnacle reefs. The latter also grew on structural and depositional highs and platforms among deeper water carbonate mudstones and shales. Reservoirs developed in all the various types of buildups by extensive burial dissolution, often preceded (with the exception of some pinnacle reefs) by subaerial exposure generating secondary porosity by vadose to phreatic undersaturated dissolution. (author)

  20. Terpenoids Preserved in Fossils from Miocene-aged Japanese Conifer Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2015-06-01

    The compositions of terpenoids from the solvent extracts of two silicified wood samples were analyzed using a GC/MS method. Chromatographic analysis showed that several biomolecules were preserved unaltered in the Miocene-aged Japanese wood. These were α-terpineol, α-cedrene, thujopsene, widdrol and ferruginol, among others. In addition to the bioterpenoids, the fossil woods contained a series of geoterpenoids that were generated from their biological precursors before and after burial. These were cadalene, daucalene, pseudowiddrene and cuparene. The chemical composition of both analyzed fossil samples suggest that the silicified woods collected in the Noto Peninsula belong to the Cupressaceae family; this was confirmed by morphological analysis. Both samples were identified as Taxodioxylon cunninghamioides, which is the most common Miocene wood in Japan.

  1. Late Miocene evolution of the Black Sea: insights from palynology and strontium isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Arjen; van Baak, Christiaan; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stoica, Marius; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    During the late Miocene, the connection(s) between the Mediterranean Basin and the Atlantic Ocean deteriorated, which ultimately culminated in thick evaporite deposits and a water level drop in the Mediterranean Basin during the so-called Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97 - 5.33 Ma). It has been claimed that Black Sea, in response to the MSC, also desiccated but these claims have been proven incorrectly. Here we present palynological (dinoflagellate cysts and pollen) and strontium isotope ratios from two Black Sea records: the Zheleznyi Rog outcrop section and Deep Sea Drilling Project Hole 380A. Organic walled cyst-producing dinoflagellates are highly sensitive to even small changes in surface waters and strontium isotope ratios are excellent recorders of changing connectivity. Our records provide therefore more insights in the sensitivity of the Black Sea to Messinian Salinity Crisis and the general evolution of the late Miocene Black Sea.

  2. A new Mammutidae (Proboscidea, Mammalia) from the Late Miocene of Gansu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothé, Dimila; Avilla, Leonardo S; Zhao, Desi; Xie, Guangpu; Sun, Boyang

    2016-03-01

    The "Yanghecun specimen", a proboscidean specimen represented by a mandible from Miocene of China and previously described as Gomphotheriidae, is here reviewed and described as a new genus and species of Mammutidae: Sinomammut tobieni. This taxon is a longirostrine mastodon, lacking lower tusks, and bearing a wide last molar with oblique and non-inflated lophids, broad transverse interlophids, and yoke-like wear figures. Phylogenetic analysis of Mammutidae based on dental and mandibular features recovered S. tobieni as sister group of the mastodon Mammut. The longirostrine condition and the well-developed lower incisors seem to be primitive for Mammutidae, while the brevirostry is the derived condition, probably emerged during the middle Miocene (12-11 Mya). However, two derived conditions are recognized to the lower tusks: the absence of lower tusks (S. tobieni) and the occasional presence of vestigial lower tusks (Mammut).

  3. A new Mammutidae (Proboscidea, Mammalia from the Late Miocene of Gansu Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIMILA MOTHÉ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The "Yanghecun specimen", a proboscidean specimen represented by a mandible from Miocene of China and previously described as Gomphotheriidae, is here reviewed and described as a new genus and species of Mammutidae: Sinomammut tobieni. This taxon is a longirostrine mastodon, lacking lower tusks, and bearing a wide last molar with oblique and non-inflated lophids, broad transverse interlophids, and yoke-like wear figures. Phylogenetic analysis of Mammutidae based on dental and mandibular features recovered S. tobieni as sister group of the mastodon Mammut. The longirostrine condition and the well-developed lower incisors seem to be primitive for Mammutidae, while the brevirostry is the derived condition, probably emerged during the middle Miocene (12-11 Mya. However, two derived conditions are recognized to the lower tusks: the absence of lower tusks (S. tobieni and the occasional presence of vestigial lower tusks (Mammut.

  4. A new Middle Miocene Niveria Jousseaume, 1884 (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Trivioidea) from Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehse, Dirk

    2011-02-01

    A new species of Niveria from the Middle Miocene (Badenian) of the Paratethys of Borsodbóta, Hungary is described. This species is characterized by its callused dorsum and dorsal depression. Niveria jozefgregoi sp. nov. is discussed with comparative species from the Badenian of Hungary, the Pliocene of the Mediterranean region, Florida and Recent species from Madeira and the Islas Galápagos.

  5. Cretaceous to miocene palaeogegraphic evolution of Turkey: implications for hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorur, N. [Tubitak Mam, Gebze (Turkey)

    2001-04-01

    The Cretaceous to Miocene palaeogeographic development of Turkey in general reflects the evolution of the various oceanic branches of Neo-Tethys together with interactions between the Laurasian and Gondwanan margins. At the beginning of the Cretaceous, the first-order palacotectonic units which make up present-day Turkey either formed parts of these supercontinents or were isolated continental blocks within the Neo-Tethys. In Aptian to Albian times, north-dipping subduction commenced along the southern margins of these units and resulted in the development of magmatic arcs and arc-related sedimentary basins. Coeval with the start of subduction, large-scale ophiolite abduction occurred on the units' passive margins. Terminal closure of the oceans' branches took place between the latest Cretaceous and the Miocene, forming the Anatolian orogenic collage whose outline defines present-day Turkey. Post-collisional intra-continental convergence continued until the late Miocene and resulted in north-south shortening of the collage. This shortening led to internal imbrication, thrusting and crustal thickening. It forced the Anatolian landmass westwards, away from east Anatolia where there has been continuous north-south compression since the Miocene between Laurasia and the Arabian Platform. Both the continental and the oceanic palaeotectonic units pose significant problems regarding their original geometry, size, depth, extent, contact relations, motion paths, subduction polarity, stratigraphy and timing of formation. Clarification of these issues is essential if the units' original paleogeographic relationships with respect to Neo-Tethys are to be reconstructed. This paper reviews some of these problems with the aid of a number of palinspastic and non-palinspastic maps. These maps are intended to provide a basis for evaluating the hydrocarbon potential of Turkey. (author)

  6. Phylogenetic evidence for Miocene origin of Mediterranean lineages: species diversity, reproductive traits and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Fernández-Mazuecos, Mario; Heleno, Ruben

    2017-09-11

    A review of 27 species-rich and species-poor plant clades (26 genera) of angiosperms of the Mediterranean floristic region was performed considering phylogenetic and biological data. The emergent pattern is that a majority of the Mediterranean plant clades split from their sister groups between the Miocene (23-5 Ma) and the Oligocene (40-23 Ma), far earlier than the historically proposed onset of the Mediterranean climate (c. 3.2 Ma). In addition, 12 clades of the species-poor group (14 clades) have stem ages inferred for each clade in the Miocene or older, and six clades within the species-rich group (13 clades) show divergence of each stem clade within the Oligocene and/or Miocene. High levels of species diversity may be related not only to an ancient (Paleocene-Miocene) origin but also to recent origin (Pliocene-Pleistocene) followed by active speciation and even explosive radiations - i.e. many species and lineages generated in a short period of time - in some Mediterranean clades (Aquilegia, Cistus, Dianthus, Linaria sect. Supinae, Reseda). In the species-rich group, reproductive key characters were found to be significantly more important for species recognition than vegetative key characters in eight clades, but no difference was found in four clades, and vegetative characters were predominant in one clade (Saxifraga). Geographical differentiation is proposed as predominant over divergence driven by pollination ecology.. We hypothesize an evolutionary process in which lineages adapted to pre-Mediterranean (pre-Pliocene) conditions in relatively small, xeric areas became strongly competitive and expanded when the Mediterranean climate became dominant (Pliocene-Quaternary) across the whole Mediterranean basin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. The challenge of simulating warmth of the mid-Miocene Climate Optimum in CESM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Goldner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO is an intriguing climatic period due to its above-modern temperatures in mid-to-high latitudes in the presence of close-to-modern CO2 concentrations. We use the recently released Community Earth System Model (CESM1.0 with a slab ocean to simulate this warm period, incorporating recent Miocene CO2 reconstructions of 400 ppm. We simulate a global mean annual temperature (MAT of 18 °C, ~4 °C above the pre-industrial value, but 4 °C colder than the global Miocene MAT we calculate from climate proxies. Sensitivity tests reveal that the inclusion of a reduced Antarctic ice sheet, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean temperature anomalies, increased CO2 to 560 ppm, and variations in obliquity only marginally improve model-data agreement. All MMCO simulations have an equator to pole temperature gradient which is at least ~ 10 °C larger than the reconstruction from proxies. The MMCO simulation most comparable to the proxy records requires a CO2 concentration of 800 ppm. Our results illustrate that MMCO warmth is not reproducible using the CESM1.0 forced with CO2 concentrations reconstructed for the Miocene or including various proposed Earth system feedbacks; the remaining discrepancy in the MAT is comparable to that introduced by a CO2 doubling. The models tendency to underestimate proxy derived global MAT and overestimate the equator to pole temperature gradient suggests a major climate problem in the MMCO akin to those in the Eocene. Our results imply that this latest model, as with previous generations of climate models, is either not sensitive enough or additional forcings remain missing that explain half of the anomalous warmth and pronounced polar amplification of the MMCO.

  8. Miocene catfishes (Ariidae,Bagridae) from Lisbon: a Nilotic (or Sudanian) type fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, M. Telles

    2010-01-01

    Miocene catfishes from Lisbon are dealt with. Two distinct sets of pectoral and dorsal pterygiophores are described. That from the Langhian V-b is referred to Arius sp. probably close to A. heudeloti. Another ser from the uppermost Burdigalian V-a may be ascribed to a bagrid, cf. Chrysichthys sp., identified for the first time in this region. The catfish and Lates association is sctrikingly similar to African, nilotic or sudanian ones as far as freshwaters are concerned. In marine, coastal...

  9. Miocene c4tfishes (Ariidae, Bagridae) from Lisbon: a Nilotic (or Sudanian) type fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, M. Telles

    1989-01-01

    Miocene catfishes from Lisbon are dealt with. Two distinct sets of pectoral and dorsal pterygiophores are described. That from the Langhian V-b is referred to Arius sp. probably close to A. Beudeloti. Another set from the uppermost Burdigalian V-a may be ascribed to a bagtid, cf, Chrysichthys sp., identified for the first time in this region. The catfish and Lates association is strikingly similar to African, nilotic or sudanian ones as far as freshwaters are concerned. In marine, co...

  10. Etisus evamuellerae, a new xanthid crab (Decapoda, Brachyura) from the Middle Miocene of Austria and Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyžný, M.; van Bakel, B.W.M.; Guinot, D.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of several carapaces, a new species of xanthid crab, Etisus evamuellerae, is described from the Middle Miocene of the Vienna (Austria) and Great Hungarian basins. It differs from the coeval xanthids, Xantho moldavicus and Pilodius vulgaris, in having a distinctly protruding front and comparatively longer carapace. Contrary to those two species, the new one makes up for just a small percentage in the decapod crustacean assemblages studied. PMID:25983383

  11. Paleomagnetic evidence for Late Miocene counterclockwise rotation of north coast carbonate sequence, Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, J.A.; Plumley, P.W. (Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)); Schellekens, J.H. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico))

    1991-03-01

    A paleomagnetic study of the essentially undeformed middle Tertiary carbonate sequence along the north coast of Puerto Rico reveals statistically significant pre-Pliocene discordance of characteristic component directions against those expected from cratonic North America for much of the section. Despite generally weak to moderately weak magnetic intensities, confirmation of the magnetization as primary in origin comes from the presence of two distinct components of magnetization, intrasite bipolarity, and/or the reproducibility of measurements. The mean geographic direction for the upper Oligocene to middle Miocene strata is 335.2{degree}/32.9{degree} and the corrected mean paleomagnetic pole is 207.6{degree}/66.5{degree}, (N = 3, {alpha}95 = 4.3{degree}). This suggests a counter-clockwise (CCW) block rotation of Puerto Rico and its microplate of 24.5{degrees} ({plus minus} 5.8{degrees}) during the late Miocene. Using a width of 250 km for the Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone (NCPBZ) between the North American Plate and Caribbean Plate, the mean left lateral displacement implied is 1.8 to 2.4 cm/yr, which agrees fairly well with published relative motion rates for the two plates. Average rotation rate for 50 Ma to 20 Ma was 0.7{degree}/my but perhaps as great as 4{degree}/my in the Miocene. Resolution of mean paleolatitude indicates northward motion of a degree or less during the period of rotation. Causes of this short-lived rotation may include (1) tectonic escape from the inhibiting presence of the Bahama Banks and Beata Ridge during eastward motion of Puerto Rico along the sinistral transpressive Puerto Rico Trench and Muertos Trough fault systems or (2) changes in relative plate motions of the Caribbean and North American Plate during the late Miocene.

  12. Turbidites as indicators of paleotopography, Upper Miocene Lake Pannon, Western Mecsek Mountains (Hungary)

    OpenAIRE

    Sztanó Orsolya; Sebe Krisztina; Csillag Gábor; Magyar Imre

    2015-01-01

    The floor of Lake Pannon covering the Pannonian Basin in the Late Miocene had considerable relief, including both deep sub-basins, like the Drava Basin, and basement highs, like the Mecsek Mts, in close proximity. The several km thick lacustrine succession in the Drava Basin includes profundal marls, basin-center turbidites, overlain by shales of basin-margin slopes, coarsening-upward deltaic successions and alluvial deposits. Along the margin of the Mecsek Mts locally derived shoreface sands...

  13. Mid-Late Miocene vegetation and environments in Southeast China: Insights from a marine palynological record in northwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiu-dong; Weng, Chengyu; Huang, Chi-Yue; Ouyang, Xu-hong

    2017-05-01

    Taiwan Island represents the exposed accretionary prism developed by eastward subduction of South China Sea (SCS) oceanic lithosphere beneath the Philippine Sea Plate since the middle Miocene. There are many well-documented data about the biostratigraphic correlation, except for palynological studies. Here, we present a new palynological record of mid-Late Miocene deposits from the Chuhuangkeng section, Miaoli, northwestern Taiwan, which reveals a vegetation and paleoelevation reconstruction in Southeast China, during the Middle to Late Miocene, corresponding to the time interval of about 14.5-5.5 Ma. Most samples yielded well-preserved palynomorphs, and the palynological results suggest that the dominant vegetation was the mixed coniferous-broadleaved forests in the Coastal Mountains of Southeast China (CMSC) during the Mid-Late Miocene. Moreover, based on large amounts of Tsuga and Picea pollen, we hypothesized that a subalpine conifer forest then flourished in the CMSC, and the estimated maximum paleoelevation might be up to ∼3000 m above sea level (a.s.l.) during the Mid-Late Miocene, being 1000-1500 m higher than today. These findings offer a new perspective to comprehend the paleotopographic evolution of China and the source area of Taiwan's spruce forests. Additionally, the high abundance of Pinus, Tsuga, Picea pollen and fern spores also suggests an enhancement of the EASM during the Mid-Late Miocene.

  14. Clay mineralogy indicates a mildly warm and humid living environment for the Miocene hominoid from the Zhaotong Basin, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Guo, Zhengtang; Deng, Chenglong; Ji, Xueping; Wu, Haibin; Paterson, Greig A.; Chang, Lin; Li, Qin; Wu, Bailing; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-02-01

    Global and regional environmental changes have influenced the evolutionary processes of hominoid primates, particularly during the Miocene. Recently, a new Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis hominoid fossil with a late Miocene age of ~6.2 Ma was discovered in the Shuitangba (STB) section of the Zhaotong Basin in Yunnan on the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. To understand the relationship between paleoclimate and hominoid evolution, we have studied sedimentary, clay mineralogy and geochemical proxies for the late Miocene STB section (~16 m thick; ca. 6.7-6.0 Ma). Our results show that Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis lived in a mildly warm and humid climate in a lacustrine or swamp environment. Comparing mid to late Miocene records from hominoid sites in Yunnan, Siwalik in Pakistan, and tropical Africa we find that ecological shifts from forest to grassland in Siwalik are much later than in tropical Africa, consistent with the disappearance of hominoid fossils. However, no significant vegetation changes are found in Yunnan during the late Miocene, which we suggest is the result of uplift of the Tibetan plateau combined with the Asian monsoon geographically and climatically isolating these regions. The resultant warm and humid conditions in southeastern China offered an important refuge for Miocene hominoids.

  15. An evaluation of the evolution of the latest miocene to earliest pliocene bouse lake system in the lower Colorado river valley, southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.; Pearthree, P.A.; House, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    The upper Miocene to lower Pliocene Bouse Formation in the lower Colorado River trough of the American Southwest was deposited in three basins - from north to south, the Mohave, Havasu, and Blythe Basins - that were formed by extensional fault ing in the early to middle Miocene. Fossils of marine, brackish, and freshwater organ isms in the Bouse Formation have been interpreted to indicate an estuarine environment associated with early opening of the nearby Gulf of California. Regional uplift since 5 Ma is required to position the estuarine Bouse Formation at present elevations as high as 555 m, where greater uplift is required in the north. We present a compilation of Bouse Formation elevations that is consistent with Bouse deposition in lakes, with an abrupt 225 m northward increase in maximum Bouse elevations at Topock gorge north of Lake Havasu. Within Blythe and Havasu Basins, maximum Bouse elevations are 330 m above sea level in three widely spaced areas and reveal no evidence of regional tilting. To the north in Mohave Basin, numerous Bouse outcrops above 480 m elevation include three widely spaced sites where the Bouse Formation is exposed at 536-555 m. Numerical simulations of initial Colorado River inflow to a sequence of closed basins along the lower Colorado River corridor model a history of lake filling, spilling, evaporation and salt concentration, and outflow-channel incision. The simulations support the plausibility of evaporative concentration of Colorado River water to seawater-level salinities in Blythe Basin and indicate that such salinities could have remained stable for as long as 20-30 k.y. We infer that fossil marine organ isms in the Bouse Formation, restricted to the southern (Blythe) basin, reflect coloniza tion of a salty lake by a small number of species that were transported by birds.

  16. Rapid middle Miocene extension and unroofing of the southern Ruby Mountains, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Howard, Keith A.; Fleck, Robert J.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    Paleozoic rocks in the northern Ruby Mountains were metamorphosed during Mesozoic crustal shortening and Cenozoic magmatism, but equivalent strata in the southern Ruby Mountains were never buried deeper than stratigraphic depths prior to exhumation in the footwall of a west dipping brittle normal fault. In the southern Ruby Mountains, Miocene sedimentary rocks in the hanging wall of this fault date from 15.2 to 11.6 Ma and contain abundant detritus from the Paleozoic section. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He samples of the Eocene Harrison Pass pluton record rapid cooling that peaked ca. 17–15 Ma, while apatite fission track data from Jurassic plutons east and west of the southern Ruby Mountains indicate near-surface temperatures (pluton to be partially reset rather than to directly record fault slip. Our new data, together with published data on the distribution and composition of Miocene basin fill, suggest that rapid middle Miocene slip took place on the west dipping brittle detachment that bounds the Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range for 150 km along strike. This fault was thus active during a period of rapid extension (ca. 17–15 to 12–10 Ma) documented widely across the northern Basin and Range Province.

  17. On Mesopithecus habitat: Insights from late Miocene fossil vertebrate localities of Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Julien; Merceron, Gildas; Hristova, Latinka; Spassov, Nikolaï; Kovachev, Dimitar; Escarguel, Gilles

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the environments where the cercopithecid Mesopithecus was found during latest Miocene in Europe. For this purpose, we investigate the paleoecology of the herbivorous ungulate mesofauna of three very rich late Miocene fossil localities from southwestern Bulgaria: Hadjidimovo, Kalimantsi and Strumyani. While Mesopithecus has been found in the two first localities, no primate remains have yet been identified in Strumyani. Comparison between localities with and without primates using the herbivore mesofauna allows the cross-corroboration of paleoenvironmental conditions where this primate did and did not live. A multi-parameter statistical approach involving 117 equid and 345 bovid fossil dental and postcranial (phalanges, metapodia, astragali) remains from these three localities provides species to generic-level diet and locomotor habit information in order to characterize the environment in which Mesopithecus evolved. The analysis of dental mesowear indicates that the bovids were mainly mixed feeders, while coeval equids were more engaged in grazing. Meanwhile, postcranial remains show that the ungulate species from Hadjidimovo and Kalimantsi evolved in dry environments with a continuum of habitats ranging from slightly wooded areas to relatively open landscapes, whereas the Mesopithecus-free Strumyani locality was in comparison reflecting a rather contrasted mosaic of environments with predominant open and some more closed and wet areas. Environments in which Mesopithecus is known during the late Miocene were not contrasted landscapes combining open grassy areas and dense forested patches, but instead rather restricted to slightly wooded and homogeneous landscapes including a developed grassy herbaceous layer.

  18. Global warming and South Indian monsoon rainfall-lessons from the Mid-Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Markus; Kern, Andrea K; Harzhauser, Mathias; Kroh, Andreas; Piller, Werner E

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation over India is driven by the Indian monsoon. Although changes in this atmospheric circulation are caused by the differential seasonal diabatic heating of Asia and the Indo-Pacific Ocean, it is so far unknown how global warming influences the monsoon rainfalls regionally. Herein, we present a Miocene pollen flora as the first direct proxy for monsoon over southern India during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum. To identify climatic key parameters, such as mean annual temperature, warmest month temperature, coldest month temperature, mean annual precipitation, mean precipitation during the driest month, mean precipitation during the wettest month and mean precipitation during the warmest month the Coexistence Approach is applied. Irrespective of a ~ 3-4 °C higher global temperature during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum, the results indicate a modern-like monsoonal precipitation pattern contrasting marine proxies which point to a strong decline of Indian monsoon in the Himalaya at this time. Therefore, the strength of monsoon rainfall in tropical India appears neither to be related to global warming nor to be linked with the atmospheric conditions over the Tibetan Plateau. For the future it implies that increased global warming does not necessarily entail changes in the South Indian monsoon rainfall.

  19. Late Miocene remagnetization within the internal sector of the Northern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, I.W.; Hagstrum, J.T.; Principi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geologic evidence indicates that Upper Jurassic radiolarian cherts of both the Tuscan Cherts Formation (continental margin, Tuscan Units) and the Monte Alpe Cherts Formation (oceanic crust, Ligurian Units) were remagnetized during Miocene orogenesis of the Northern Apennines of Italy. Characteristic overprint magnetizations with reversed polarities have been found over a large area within the internal sector of the Northern Apennines, including eastern Liguria, Elba Island and the Thyrrenian margin, and west of the Middle Tuscan Ridge. The reversed-polarity overprint (average direction: D=177??, I=-52??, ??95=15??) was most likely acquired during Late Miocene uplift and denudation of the orogenic chain, and thermochemical remagnetization was a probable consequence of increased circulation of orogenic fluids. Similarly, mostly reversed-polarity directions of magnetization have been found by other workers in overlying post-orogenic Messinian sediments (D=177??, I=-57??, ??95=3??), which show little counterclockwise (CCW) vertical-axis rotation with respect to stable Europe (-8??5??). The Monte Alpe Cherts sampled at sites in the external sector of the Northern Apennines, close to major tectonic features, have normal- polarity overprint directions with in situ W-SW declinations. Since the overlying post-orogenic Messinian sediments have not been substantially rotated about vertical axes, the evidence points to an earlier,pre-Late Miocene remagnetization in the external parts of the orogenic chain. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. C4 plant expansion since the late Miocene and the evolution of Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Guo, Z.; Guiot, J.; Yu, Y.; Ge, J.; Zhang, Y.; Peng, S.

    2015-12-01

    A dramatic expansion of C4 plant distribution occurred in the South Asia during the late Miocene and in the East Asia during the Pliocene period, with broad spatial and temporal variations. Although the event is well documented, whether subsequent expansions were caused by a decreased atmospheric CO2 concentration or climate change is a contentious issue. In this study, we used an improved inverse vegetation modeling approach that accounts for the physiological responses of C3 and C4 plants to quantitatively reconstruct the paleoclimate in the Siwalik of South Asia and in the Loess Plateau of East Asia, based on pollen and carbon isotope data. We also studied the sensitivity of the C3 and C4 plants to changes in the climate and the atmospheric CO2 concentration. We suggest that the expansion of the C4 plant distribution since the late Miocene was unlikely caused by reduced CO2 levels alone. The expansion may have been primarily triggered by regional aridification, and seasonal analysis revealed that this climate shift mainly attributed to the summer rainfall decrease. Our findings suggest that this abrupt ecological shift mainly resulted from the weakening of the Asian summer monsoon, which may related to the decrease of SST in the tropic since the late Miocene.

  1. Molluscan fauna from the Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat, India – Part 3. Gastropods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kantimati G Kulkarni; Satarupa Bhattacharjee Kapoor; Vidyadhar D Borkar

    2010-06-01

    Systematic description of 25 gastropod species from the Khari Nadi Formation (Aquitanian) and Chhasra Formation (Burdigalian) from the Kachchh District, Gujarat, India is given. A checklist of 116 forms including those reported by earlier researchers, emending taxonomic identifications wherever necessary, is also provided. Vredenburg had referred these two formations together as ‘the Gaj Beds of Kachchh’. He noticed the affinity of molluscs among the Miocene deposits of Kachchh and Kathiawar regions of Gujarat, and Sind province of Pakistan. He also observed that molluscs from his ‘Lower Gaj’ and ‘Upper Gaj’ Formations showed relationship respectively with the Rembang (Aquitanian) and Njalindung (Burdigalian) series of the East Indies. Aquitanian and Burdigalian ages assigned by him were later substantiated by Raju on the basis of foraminifera. Present studies corroborated that the molluscan assemblage from the Miocene rocks of Kachchh is closely related to that from the Gaj Beds of Sind and the Ashapura Clay Member of Kathiawar; besides revealing that the fauna from these three formations taken together is essentially endemic. Discovery of certain species from the Quilon Beds in the Miocene of Kachchh evinces a close affinity between these two formations. The present fauna includes five extant forms, while 29 forms have related species in the Recent fauna.

  2. Late Miocene sedimentary environments in south-western Amazonia (Solimões Formation; Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E; Ramos, Maria Ines; Douglas da Silva Paz, Jackson

    2011-08-01

    In Miocene times a vast wetland existed in Western Amazonia. Whereas the general development of this amazing ecosystem is well established, many questions remain open on sedimentary environments, stratigraphical correlations as well as its palaeogeographical configuration. Several outcrops located in a barely studied region around Eirunepé (SW Amazonas state, Brazil) were investigated to obtain basic sedimentological data. The observed deposits belong to the upper part of the Solimões Formation and are biostratigraphically dated to the Late Miocene. Vertically as well as laterally highly variable fine-grained clastic successions were recorded. Based on the lithofacies assemblages, these sediments represent fluvial deposits, possibly of an anastomosing river system. Sand bodies formed within active channels and dominant overbank fines are described (levees, crevasse splays/channels/deltas, abandoned channels, backswamps, floodplain paleosols). Lacustrine environments are restricted to local floodplain ponds/lakes. The mollusc and ostracod content as well as very light δ(18)O and δ(13)C values, measured on ostracod valves, refer to exclusively freshwater conditions. Based on palaeontological and geological results the existence of a long-lived lake ("Lake Pebas") or any influx of marine waters can be excluded for that region during the Late Miocene.

  3. Invertebrate Paleontology of the Wilson Grove Formation (Late Miocene to Late Pliocene), Sonoma and Marin Counties, California, with some Observations on Its Stratigraphy, Thickness, and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles L.; Allen, James R.; Holland, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    central California through Oregon. Outcrops at Salmon Creek, northeast of Steinbeck Ranch and also in the central part of the outcrop area, contain Aulacofusus? recurva (Gabb) and Turcica brevis Stewart, which are both restricted to the Pliocene, as well as Lirabuccinum portolaensis (Arnold) known from the early Pliocene of central and northern California and into the late Pliocene in southern California. These data suggest an overall pattern of older rocks and deeper water to the south and west, and younger rocks and shallower water to the east and north. Outcrops to the southwest, south of the Bloomfield fault, are not well dated but presumably are older than the late Miocene Roblar tuff of Sarna-Wojcicki (1992). Fossils in this part of the section are rare and are not useful in determining a precise age or environment of deposition for the lower part of the Wilson Grove Formation. However, sedimentary sequences and structures in the rocks here are useful and suggest probable outer shelf and slope water depths. Lituyapecten turneri (Arnold) which occurs in this part of the section has previously been restricted to the Pliocene, but its occurrence below the Roblar tuff of Sarna-Wojcicki (1992) indicates a revised late Miocene age for this taxon. Three possibly new gastropods (Mollusca) are reported here: Calyptraea (Trochita) n. sp. and Nucella sp., aff. N. lamellosa (Gmelin), both from the Bloomfield Quarry area, and Acanthinucella? n. sp. from the River Road area. These species are not described here because this venue is deemed insufficient for the description of new taxa.

  4. Reconstructing paleoceanographic conditions during the Oligocene/Miocene Boundary using walled dinoflagellate cysts and TEX86: IODP Expedition 318, Wilkes Land, Antarctic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Peter; Bruls, Anja; Hartman, Julian D.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Peterse, Francien

    2017-04-01

    trend towards the Miocene, but does not seem to point consistently to a warmer climate state during the late Oligocene. The dinocyst and TEX86 records seem to infer a smaller than present, dynamic Antarctic ice sheet during the late Oligocene to early Miocene, yet in combination with a quite invariant state of the atmospheric pCO2 record (Zhang et al., 2013). This seems to indicate a more sensitive Antarctic ice sheet possibly related to a threshold size for a stable ice sheet. However the ice volume changes inferred from the global benthic foraminiferal δ18O record could also have been of a smaller extent. Another cause that could potentially add to the changing δ18O record, is a change in deep water source, more specifically an alternating Southern Ocean deep-water formation which is coupled to the alternating Antarctic cryosphere.

  5. Evidence for >5 Ma paleo-exposure of an Eocene-Miocene paleosol of the Bohnerz Formation, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Florian; Reichenbacher, Bettina; Farley, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-01

    We obtained (U-Th)/He formation ages and cosmogenic 3He concentrations for pisoliths from a paleosol of the Bohnerz Formation (Siderolithic) of Central Europe. The paleosol is exposed in the Almenbühl quarry near Lohn, Canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland. The paleosol consists of red clay of 3-4 m thickness developed on deeply weathered Jurassic limestone and overlain by Early Miocene conglomerates. The (U-Th)/He formation ages of the pisoliths are between 50 Ma and 8 Ma, with most ages being older than 17 Ma. There is a sharp decline in the frequency of ages at the time of burial of the paleosol at 17 Ma. These ages are inconsistent with the previous assumption that the Bohnerz Formation formed in a Cretaceous to Early Eocene laterite in a tropical climate. We propose that the Bohnerz Formation more closely resembles Terra Rossa soils, which do not require a tropical climate to form. The 3He concentration in the pisoliths is roughly constant with depth throughout the paleosol at 300 Matoms/g. We interpret this as the result of soil convection during cosmic ray exposure. The minimum exposure duration at the surface of the paleosol is ∼5 Ma. A simple model of soil convection shows that the true exposure duration of the paleosol is approximately 10-20 Ma. These results indicate that the clay soils of the Bohnerz formation were continuously exposed at the surface for millions of years. Since the paleosol was covered by conglomerate since 17 Ma, the 3He measured here was produced by cosmic ray exposure before burial. Cosmogenic 3He concentrations measured in fine-grained soil iron-oxides (<1 μm) are similar to those measured in pisoliths. This might indicate that fine-grained iron-oxides are retentive to helium and might be used for studying the formation and cosmic ray exposure of modern soils and paleosols.

  6. An objective statistical test for eccentricity forcing of Oligo-Miocene climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proistosescu, C.; Huybers, P.; Maloof, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    We seek a maximally objective test for the presence of orbital features in Oligocene and Miocene δ18O records from marine sediments. Changes in Earth's orbital eccentricity are thought to be an important control on the long term variability of climate during the Oligocene and Miocene Epochs. However, such an important control from eccentricity is surprising because eccentricity has relatively little influence on Earth's annual average insolation budget. Nevertheless, if significant eccentricity variability is present, it would provide important insight into the operation of the climate system at long timescales. Here we use previously published data, but using a chronology which is initially independent of orbital assumptions, to test for the presence of eccentricity period variability in the Oligocene/Miocene sediment records. In contrast to the sawtooth climate record of the Pleistocene, the Oligocene and Miocene climate record appears smooth and symmetric and does not reset itself every hundred thousand years. This smooth variation, as well as the time interval spanning many eccentricity periods makes Oligocene and Miocene paleorecords very suitable for evaluating the importance of eccentricity forcing. First, we construct time scales depending only upon the ages of geomagnetic reversals with intervening ages linearly interpolated with depth. Such a single age-depth relationship is, however, too uncertain to assess whether orbital features are present. Thus, we construct a second depth-derived age-model by averaging ages across multiple sediment cores which have, at least partly, independent accumulation rate histories. But ages are still too uncertain to permit unambiguous detection of orbital variability. Thus we employ limited tuning assumptions and measure the degree by orbital period variability increases using spectral power estimates. By tuning we know that we are biasing the record toward showing orbital variations, but we account for this bias in our

  7. Relating Major Surface Processes to the Deep Earth — The Importance of the Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, P. E.; Szatmari, P.

    2012-12-01

    Many global scale tectonic, oceanic and climate changes began in the Tertiary with global tectonics as the underlying driving force and changed the world. In full flower by the beginning of the Middle Miocene around 16 Ma, these changes continued through the Late Miocene into the present so we can firmly say that most of our modern world, continental glaciations excepted, began in the Middle and Late Miocene. We summarize in a flow diagram how the major earth surface processes active in the Miocene are related to the Deep Earth as understood by recent advances in seismic tomography. This 11 Ma interval had two global orogenic zones, the Alpine-Tethyan orogen from Gibraltar across southern Asia into Vietnam and around the Pacific Rim, both crustal expressions of downwellings taking place, especially in the upper mantle. These downwellings are balanced by upwellings in the lower mantle in and on the rim of the African and Pacific superplumes, which are large, low-shear velocity provinces; part of the rising plumes originated from the most extensively melted regions of the core-mantle boundary layer, D", where heat flow from the outer core is highest. Together these up-and downwellings indicate that mantle convection extended, at least periodically, through the whole mantle and reflected lateral variations in convection and heat flow in the cooling and slowly crystallizing outer core. Correlation of mantle convection with surface features is most evident in the uppermost mantle whose dynamic topography is readily reflected by the subsidence and tilting of continents moving toward the downwelling zones. Because they are closely synchronous, these two orogenic belts had enormous consequences for the earth's surface, and because they are close to us in time, they are easy to study and sample. Thus the Miocene is ideal to study for both its many global intra connections and for their link to the Deep Earth. As these two orogenies developed, they changed a global warm

  8. Source components and magmatic processes in the genesis of Miocene to Quaternary lavas in western Turkey: constraints from HSE distribution and Hf-Pb-Os isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldanmaz, Ercan; Pickard, Megan; Meisel, Thomas; Altunkaynak, Şafak; Sayıt, Kaan; Şen, Pınar; Hanan, Barry B.; Furman, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    /Hf. These lavas have distinctly higher 176Hf/177Hf and lower 208Pb*/206Pb* than the Early-Middle Miocene lavas of the region, which are interpreted as melts of enriched mantle with an overprint by sediment-derived subduction component. The source region for the OIB-type alkaline melts is interpreted to be a sub-lithospheric reservoir enriched in Hf and Pb isotopes with respect to depleted MORB mantle. Combined evaluation of Hf, Pb, and Os isotopes suggests that the relative enrichment in this domain is related to mixing of ancient oceanic crust with the ambient mantle through long-term plate recycling processes.

  9. Miocene to Recent Magmatism and Geodynamics of Eastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, M.; Sharkov, E. V.; Lebedev, V. A.; Chugaev, A. V.; Oyan, V.; Genc, S. C.; Unal, E.; Aysal, N.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Turkey has been an active continental collision zone for the last 15 My between the African and Eurasian continents. The collision started at around 15 Ma after the total consumption of oceanic lithosphere of the southern branch of the Neotethys Ocean beneath E Anatolia and is still going on, as Africa still converges to E Anatolia with a velocity of ~2.5 cm/y. The overriding Anatolian plate, resided below the sea level till the collision, was subjected to a major block uplift event around 10 Ma, emerging as a widespread plateau ~2 km above the sea level, which has been roughened by later erosion and volcanic activities. The aforementioned plateau is considered as part of a regional dome structure with ~1000 km diameter extending from E Anatolia up to Azerbaijan. Immediately after the collision, a widespread volcanism emerged on the Eastern Anatolian Plateau, whose products covered almost over half of the region. Characteristically, all these products contain a distinct subduction component. The volcanism in the collision zone continued to the historical times and is considered to be still active. The region includes some of the largest volcanic centers (e.g. Ararat, Nemrut, Tendürek and Süphan volcanoes) and plateaus (e.g. The Erzurum-Kars Plateau) around the circum-Mediterranean region. The collision-related volcanic province is not only confined into Anatolia but also continues into the neighboring countries through Georgia, Armenia, Iran and up to Russia, spanning ~1000 km. In contrast, the underthrusting Arabian platform was subjected to both crustal-scale east-west folding close to the thrust front and extensional deformations perpendicular to the suture zone. Along these extensional fractures, within-plate lavas with no subduction component erupted. This intraplate volcanism focused on the Karacadağ volcanic complex, covering an area ~10,000 km2. Early Stage volcanism of Karacadağ was dominated by magmas derived from a shallower (litospheric

  10. Effect of strain-weakening on Oligocene-Miocene self-organization of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary fault in southern New Zealand: Insights from numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaojun; Jessell, Mark Walter; Amponsah, Prince Ofori; Martin, Roland; Ganne, Jérôme; Liu, Daqing; Batt, Geoffrey E.

    2016-10-01

    Tectonic inheritance acquired from past geological events can control the formation of new plate boundaries. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of inherited NE and NW trending fabrics and their rheological influence on the propagation of Oligocene-Miocene strike-slip faulting that matured to become the Australian-Pacific plate boundary fault in southern New Zealand. Strain weakening plays a significant role in controlling the formation, growth and evolution of strain localization. In this study, three-dimensional thermo-mechanical models have been used to explore the effect of strain weakening on the Oligocene-Miocene self-organization of strain localization. Strain weakening is simulated through decreasing either the coefficient of friction of upper crust, its cohesion, or the rheological viscosity contrast between the inherited structures and their surrounding wall rocks. Viscosity contrast is obtained by varying the viscosity of inherited structures. Softening coefficient (α) is a measure of strain weakening. Our experiments robustly demonstrate that a primary boundary shear zone becomes mature quicker when softening coefficients are increased. Deformation is focused along narrow high-strain shear zones in the centre of the model when the softening coefficients are high, whereas the strain is more diffuse with many shear zones spread over the model and possibly some high-strain shear zones focused near one border at lower softening coefficients. Varying the viscosity contrast has less effect on the distribution of maximum finite strain. Under simple-shear boundary conditions, NW trending inherited structures make a major contribution to forming early zones of highly focused strain, up to a shear strain of about γ = 3.7. During this process, most NE-trending structures move and rotate passively, accommodate less strain, or even be abandoned through time.

  11. Upper Cretaceous to Miocene tectonostratigraphy of the Azuero area (Panama) and the discontinuous accretion and subduction erosion along the Middle American margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, David M.; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Flores, Kennet; Bandini, Alexandre N.

    2011-11-01

    The Central American forearc allows insight into the long-term evolution of the Middle American margin and possible shifts between accretionary and erosive periods of subduction. We present a revised tectonostratigraphic subdivision of the Azuero area based on new field observations and biochronologic data, and a synthesis of previous age, geochemical and stratigraphic data. The basement of the area is composed of an autochtonous oceanic plateau, the early Central American arc and accreted seamounts, which are unconformably overlain by forearc sediments. The nature and spatial arrangement of basement units combined with patterns of uplift and subsidence