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Sample records for early lifestage diseases

  1. Etiology of Early Lifestage Diseases, Project 84-44, 1985 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    Each year hatcheries experience loss of eggs, fry and fingerlings due to a group of poorly defined diseases called White Spot and Coagulated Yolk. Samples of maternal blood and ovarian fluid (coelomic fluid), as well as unfertilized eggs, were collected at spawning and subsequently tested for the presence of bacteria. Our tests reveal that there is a wide range in mortality rates experienced by the progeny of different brood salmon. Microbiologic tests revealed that these eggs contained a variety of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria within their yolk and that the fluids from the females who produced these lots were contaminated with a variety of bacteria. In contrast the eggs and maternal fluids from the six egg lots which experienced the lowest mortalities did not contain high numbers of Gram positive bacteria and contributed only 5% of the total mortalities observed within the 30 egg lots tested. From the 60 egg lots tested over two brood years we have isolated 18 different bacterial genera containing 32 different species from within the yolk surface sterilized, unfertilized eggs. Our tests suggest that Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas (3 species) Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio sp., Corynebacterium hoffmanii, Listeria sp. and Bacillus sp. when detected within the yolk of eggs sampled from egg lots prior to fertilization will be associated with higher than normal mortality rates when the remainder of the egg lots containing these bacteria are incubated and reared. 36 refs., 16 figs.

  2. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Chamness, Michele A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs.

  3. Estrogenic endpoints in fish early life-stage tests: luciferase and vitellogenin induction in estrogen-responsive transgenic zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, R.; Mutsaerds, E.; Druke, J.; Roode, de D.F.; Murk, A.J.; Burg, van der B.; Legler, J.

    2006-01-01

    This study incorporated specific endpoints for estrogenic activity in the early life-stage (ELS) test, as described in Guideline 210 of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and traditionally used for toxicity screening of chemicals. A transgenic zebrafish model expressing an est

  4. Modeling polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and metabolism in time-variable early life-stage exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rooni; McGrath, Joy A; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2008-07-01

    Recent laboratory investigations into the bioaccumulation and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have focused on low-level, time-variable exposures to early life-stage fish. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon body-burden residues reported in these studies were lower than critical body-burden residues predicted by the target lipid model (TLM). To understand this discrepancy, a time-variable uptake and depuration model of PAH bioaccumulation was developed. Kinetic constants were fit using measured exposure and tissue concentrations. The resulting lipid-water partition coefficients (K(LW)) were uncorrelated with the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(OW))--a qualitatively unrealistic finding considering that numerous studies have reported a positive correlation between the two. Because PAHs are known to be metabolized, the comparison of K(LW) with K(OW) suggests that metabolism may be occurring in early life-stage fish. Therefore, the uptake and depuration model was modified to include metabolism while assuming linearity of K(LW) with K(OW). Calculated metabolism rates were positively correlated with K(OW)--a finding qualitatively similar to those of other studies. The present study provides a reasonable explanation for the discrepancy between the TLM predictions and the measured toxic effect levels. Given the time-variable exposure concentrations, the maximum measured body burdens used to relate to toxic effects may be underestimated. In addition, the maximum body burden of parent PAH plus metabolites may be a better measure in relating tissue concentrations to toxic effects. Incorporating these refinements in relating body burdens to toxic effects may result in a better comparison between TLM predictions and measured effect levels.

  5. Effects of Columbia River water on early life-stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompsett, Amber R; Vardy, David W; Higley, Eric; Doering, Jon A; Allan, Marcie; Liber, Karsten; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2014-03-01

    The white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population that resides in the Columbia River in British Columbia (BC), Canada, has suffered recruitment failures for more than three decades. During the summers of 2008 and 2009, studies were performed to determine whether exposure to water downstream of a metal smelter in Trail, BC affected survival or growth of early life-stages of white sturgeon through 60+ days post-fertilization (dpf). In both years, there were no significant differences in survival of fish that were exposed to water from downstream compared to water from upstream of the smelter. At 20-21dpf, average mortality was 2.4 percent and 12 percent in upstream water for 2008 and 2009, respectively, which was similar to the average mortality of 3.8 percent and 7.2 percent in downstream water for 2008 and 2009, respectively. Relatively great mortality after 20-21dpf complicated analysis of the subchronic exposure, but use of a survival analysis indicated that the average fish died at 25-29dpf, regardless of whether the water to which they were exposed came from upstream or downstream of the smelter. In addition, measured concentrations of metals in river water were less than the threshold for adverse effects on early life stages of white sturgeon. Based upon these analyses, it is not likely that current concentrations of metals in the Columbia River in southern BC are adversely affecting survival of early life stages of white sturgeon larvae.

  6. Ocean acidification effects in the early life-stages of summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Chambers

    2013-08-01

    -facial features were affected by CO2 levels that changed with ages of larvae. Skeletal elements of larvae from ambient CO2 environments were comparable or smaller than those from elevated CO2 environments when younger (14 d and 21 d post-hatching but larger at older ages (28 d. The degree of impairment in the early life-stages of summer flounder due to elevated CO2 levels suggests that this species will be challenged by ocean acidification in the near future. Further experimental comparative studies on marine fish are warranted in order to identify the species, life-stages, ecologies, and responses that are most sensitive to increased levels of CO2 and acidity in near-future ocean waters, and a strategy is proposed for achieving these goals.

  7. Early life-stage mortalities of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to polychlorinated diphenyl ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, C.D.; Metcalfe, T.L. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies Program; Cormier, J.A. [St. Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, Nova Scotia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.; Huestis, S.Y.; Niimi, A.J. [Canada Centre for Inland Waters, Burlington, Ontario (Canada). Fisheries and Oceans

    1997-08-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a group of compounds that resemble polychlorinated dibenzofurans in structure that have been detected at ppb concentrations in fish from the Great Lakes. The objective of this project was to determine the toxicological significance of PCDE residues in fish. PCDE congener 77 (3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorodiphenyl ether), congener 71 (2,3{prime},4{prime},6-tetrachlorodiphenyl ether), congener 118 (2,3{prime}4,4{prime},5-pentachlorodiphenyl ether), and congener 105 (2,3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-pentachlorodiphenyl) were tested for toxicity with early life stages (ELS) of Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes. These embryotoxicity data showed that the mono-ortho congeners 105 and 118 and the non-ortho congener 77 were embryotoxic to medaka. However, the toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) estimated for congeners 105, 77, and 118 relative to 2,3,7,8-TCDD were relatively low at 0.00056, 0.00003, and 0.00001, respectively. PCDE compounds were isolated in a fraction prepared from a bulk extract of Lake Ontario lake trout. In this fraction, congeners 99 (2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentaCDE), 153 (2,2{prime},4,m4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexaCDE), 154 (2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,6{prime}-hexaCDE), and 163 (2,3,3{prime},4{prime},5,6-hexaCDE) comprised 81.3% of total PCDEs, while congeners 77, 71, 118, and 105 comprised only 1.1% of total PCDEs. The LC50 for embryotoxicity of this fraction was equivalent to 15.5 ng/ml of total PCDEs. Toxicopathic lesions noted in medaka embryos exposed to either individual PCDEs or the lake trout extract included vascular hemorrhage but no edematous lesions. Medaka fry did not exhibit symptoms of hyperexcitability prior to death, as has been noted for ELS of lake trout exhibiting swim-up syndrome. These data indicate that PCDEs in Lake Ontario lake trout have the potential to induce toxic effects in early life stages of fish.

  8. Effect of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (BP1) on early life-stage development of the marine copepod Acartia tonsa at different temperatures and salinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Avdolli, Manola; Wollenberger, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Benzophenone (BP)-type ultraviolet (UV) filters are widely used in cosmetic and sunscreen products and can enter the aquatic environment. Therefore, we investigated the subchronic toxicity of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (BP1) on the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in an early life-stage devel......Benzophenone (BP)-type ultraviolet (UV) filters are widely used in cosmetic and sunscreen products and can enter the aquatic environment. Therefore, we investigated the subchronic toxicity of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (BP1) on the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in an early life......-stage development study. Since developmental endpoints depend on environmental conditions, a preceding study of A. tonsa development was performed at three temperatures, four salinities, four light:dark regimes, six food densities, and four culture densities. Times elapsed until 50% of the population had reached...... a copepodite stage (DT(½) ) at the different conditions were calculated. The DT(½) values decreased from 296 h at 15°C to 89 h at 25°C and were also affected by salinity (126 h at 15‰ and 167 h at 30‰), whereas the light:dark regime and culture density influenced development only to a minor extent. BP1...

  9. Co-exposure to sunlight enhances the toxicity of naturally weathered Deepwater Horizon oil to early lifestage red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and speckled seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, Matthew; Garner, Thomas Ross; Bridges, Kristin; Mansfield, Charles; Carney, Michael; Forth, Heather; Krasnec, Michelle; Lay, Claire; Takeshita, Ryan; Morris, Jeffrey; Bonnot, Shane; Oris, James; Roberts, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in the accidental release of millions of barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Photo-induced toxicity following co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is 1 mechanism by which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil spills may exert toxicity. Red drum and speckled seatrout are both important fishery resources in the Gulf of Mexico. They spawn near-shore and produce positively buoyant embryos that hatch into larvae in approximately 24 h. The goal of the present study was to determine whether exposure to UV as natural sunlight enhances the toxicity of crude oil to early lifestage red drum and speckled seatrout. Larval fish were exposed to several dilutions of high-energy water-accommodated fractions (HEWAFs) from 2 different oils collected in the field under chain of custody during the 2010 spill and 3 gradations of natural sunlight in a factorial design. Co-exposure to natural sunlight and oil significantly reduced larval survival compared with exposure to oil alone. Although both species were sensitive at PAH concentrations reported during the Deepwater Horizon spill, speckled seatrout demonstrated a greater sensitivity to photo-induced toxicity than red drum. These data demonstrate that even advanced weathering of slicks does not ameliorate the potential for photo-induced toxicity of oil to these species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:780-785. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  10. Growth inhibition in early life-stage tests predicts full life-cycle toxicity effects of lead in the freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munley, Kathleen M; Brix, Kevin V; Panlilio, Jennifer; Deforest, David K; Grosell, Martin

    2013-03-15

    The freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, is the most sensitive freshwater organism tested to date for several metals (Co, Cu, Pb, Ni) based on 28 d early life-stage (ELS) tests in which growth was the most sensitive endpoint. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has expressed concern that growth in 28 d ELS tests with mollusks may overpredict toxicity because of the potential for recovery in a full life-cycle (LC) test. Consequently, the USEPA only accepts the survival endpoint for these tests in establishing water quality criteria (WQC). To address this concern, the current study aimed to test the sensitivity of L. stagnalis to Pb in a 56 d full LC test evaluating survival, growth, reproductive and embryonic growth endpoints and compare the estimated effect levels to those established using the 28 d ELS test design. The most sensitive endpoints in this study were 28 d growth and 56 d egg mass production, both with a NOEC of Snails exposed to 1.0 and 2.7 μg L(-1) Pb showed full and partial recovery from growth inhibition between 28 and 56 d. While this recovery supports the USEPA's concern about the 28 d growth endpoint; considering the reproductive lifespan of L. stagnalis and the recovery dose-response, we conclude that the 28 d growth endpoint will be within a factor of 3 of full LC endpoints. This is consistent with the level of precision previously determined for fish ELS tests, which the USEPA accepts for WQC derivation, and suggests that tests using 28 d ELS growth endpoint for L. stagnalis may be acceptable for inclusion in WQC derivation.

  11. Can Early Life-Stages of the Marine Fish Sparus aurata be Useful for the Evaluation of the Toxicity of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonates Homologues (LAS C10-C14 and Commercial LAS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hampel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial household cleaning agents and personal care products contain the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulphonates (LAS as the active compound. After their use they are discharged, theoretically after adequate wastewater treatment, into receiving waters finally reaching estuaries and coastal waters. Laboratory toxicity tests are useful tools in determining at which concentration a certain wastewater compound becomes hazardous for an existing group of organisms. Early life-stage toxicity tests include exposure during the most sensitive development period of the organism. In fish, this type of assay has shown to predict accurately maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC values (comprised in the range defined by the NOEC and LOEC in fish early life-stage tests. For this reason, larvae of the seabream, Sparus aurata, were exposed to increasing concentrations of LAS homologues (C10-C14 and commercial LAS. Obtained LC50 values ranged between 0.1 and 3.0 mg l-1 and were compared with LC50 values of previous hatching experiments with the same species. Larvae proved to be more sensitive to LAS exposure of individual homologues than eggs, except in the case of commercial LAS. LC50 values can be directly employed to determine their potential risk in a concrete environment with known pollutant concentrations. Dividing the LC50 value with the found homologue concentration and extrapolating with certain security factors proposed by different environmental organisms, potentially hazardous pollutant concentrations may be detected. Average estuarine or coastal LAS concentrations are generally below toxicity limits for this kind of organism, considering that the average alkyl chain length of commercial LAS is 11.6 carbon atoms.

  12. Buffering and Amplifying Interactions among OAW (Ocean Acidification & Warming) and Nutrient Enrichment on Early Life-Stage Fucus vesiculosus L. (Phaeophyceae) and Their Carry Over Effects to Hypoxia Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Balsam; Kruse, Inken; Graiff, Angelika; Winde, Vera; Lenz, Mark; Wahl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and warming (OAW) are occurring globally. Additionally, at a more local scale the spreading of hypoxic conditions is promoted by eutrophication and warming. In the semi-enclosed brackish Baltic Sea, occasional upwelling in late summer and autumn may expose even shallow-water communities including the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus to particularly acidified, nutrient-rich and oxygen-poor water bodies. During summer 2014 (July–September) sibling groups of early life-stage F. vesiculosus were exposed to OAW in the presence and absence of enhanced nutrient levels and, subsequently to a single upwelling event in a near-natural scenario which included all environmental fluctuations in the Kiel Fjord, southwestern Baltic Sea, Germany (54°27 ´N, 10°11 ´W). We strove to elucidate the single and combined impacts of these potential stressors, and how stress sensitivity varies among genetically different sibling groups. Enhanced by a circumstantial natural heat wave, warming and acidification increased mortalities and reduced growth in F. vesiculosus germlings. This impact, however, was mitigated by enhanced nutrient conditions. Survival under OAW conditions strongly varied among sibling groups hinting at a substantial adaptive potential of the natural Fucus populations in the Western Baltic. A three-day experimental upwelling caused severe mortality of Fucus germlings, which was substantially more severe in those sibling groups which previously had been exposed to OAW. Our results show that global (OAW), regional (nutrient enrichment) and local pressures (upwelling), both alone and co-occurring may have synergistic and antagonistic effects on survival and/or growth of Fucus germlings. This result emphasizes the need to consider combined stress effects. PMID:27043710

  13. Buffering and Amplifying Interactions among OAW (Ocean Acidification & Warming) and Nutrient Enrichment on Early Life-Stage Fucus vesiculosus L. (Phaeophyceae) and Their Carry Over Effects to Hypoxia Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Balsam; Kruse, Inken; Graiff, Angelika; Winde, Vera; Lenz, Mark; Wahl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification and warming (OAW) are occurring globally. Additionally, at a more local scale the spreading of hypoxic conditions is promoted by eutrophication and warming. In the semi-enclosed brackish Baltic Sea, occasional upwelling in late summer and autumn may expose even shallow-water communities including the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus to particularly acidified, nutrient-rich and oxygen-poor water bodies. During summer 2014 (July-September) sibling groups of early life-stage F. vesiculosus were exposed to OAW in the presence and absence of enhanced nutrient levels and, subsequently to a single upwelling event in a near-natural scenario which included all environmental fluctuations in the Kiel Fjord, southwestern Baltic Sea, Germany (54°27 ´N, 10°11 ´W). We strove to elucidate the single and combined impacts of these potential stressors, and how stress sensitivity varies among genetically different sibling groups. Enhanced by a circumstantial natural heat wave, warming and acidification increased mortalities and reduced growth in F. vesiculosus germlings. This impact, however, was mitigated by enhanced nutrient conditions. Survival under OAW conditions strongly varied among sibling groups hinting at a substantial adaptive potential of the natural Fucus populations in the Western Baltic. A three-day experimental upwelling caused severe mortality of Fucus germlings, which was substantially more severe in those sibling groups which previously had been exposed to OAW. Our results show that global (OAW), regional (nutrient enrichment) and local pressures (upwelling), both alone and co-occurring may have synergistic and antagonistic effects on survival and/or growth of Fucus germlings. This result emphasizes the need to consider combined stress effects.

  14. Buffering and Amplifying Interactions among OAW (Ocean Acidification & Warming and Nutrient Enrichment on Early Life-Stage Fucus vesiculosus L. (Phaeophyceae and Their Carry Over Effects to Hypoxia Impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsam Al-Janabi

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and warming (OAW are occurring globally. Additionally, at a more local scale the spreading of hypoxic conditions is promoted by eutrophication and warming. In the semi-enclosed brackish Baltic Sea, occasional upwelling in late summer and autumn may expose even shallow-water communities including the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus to particularly acidified, nutrient-rich and oxygen-poor water bodies. During summer 2014 (July-September sibling groups of early life-stage F. vesiculosus were exposed to OAW in the presence and absence of enhanced nutrient levels and, subsequently to a single upwelling event in a near-natural scenario which included all environmental fluctuations in the Kiel Fjord, southwestern Baltic Sea, Germany (54°27 ´N, 10°11 ´W. We strove to elucidate the single and combined impacts of these potential stressors, and how stress sensitivity varies among genetically different sibling groups. Enhanced by a circumstantial natural heat wave, warming and acidification increased mortalities and reduced growth in F. vesiculosus germlings. This impact, however, was mitigated by enhanced nutrient conditions. Survival under OAW conditions strongly varied among sibling groups hinting at a substantial adaptive potential of the natural Fucus populations in the Western Baltic. A three-day experimental upwelling caused severe mortality of Fucus germlings, which was substantially more severe in those sibling groups which previously had been exposed to OAW. Our results show that global (OAW, regional (nutrient enrichment and local pressures (upwelling, both alone and co-occurring may have synergistic and antagonistic effects on survival and/or growth of Fucus germlings. This result emphasizes the need to consider combined stress effects.

  15. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolation to help contextualize activity in ToxCast assays that were mapped to an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for embryonic vascular disruption. Using life-stage PBPK models, we estimated maternal exposures that would yield fetal blood levels equivalent to in vitro activity from ToxCast assays with critical vascular signaling targets. The resulting in vivo dose estimates were then compared to life-time exposures using literature data or exposure models (SHEDS-LITE) to derive AOP-based Margins of Exposure (ME). This computational framework was applied to a list of five chemicals with varying activity against the putative Vascular Disruption AOP. The idea of linking biological information related to toxicity (using AOPs), high throughput in vitro data (ToxCast), and age-varying physiological and biochemical information to estimate AOP-based MEs is novel and can be used to help regulators in realistically assessing chemicals based on toxicity, dosimetry, and real-life exposures. Developing fetuses and infants are especially sensitive to toxicity caused by exposure to xenobiotics. The time and dose to which a developing target tissue is exposed during pregnancy or via lactation after birth are c

  16. Early Detection of Disease Outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to detect disease outbreaks early is important in order to minimize morbidity and mortality through timely implementation of disease prevention and control measures. Many national, state, and local health departments are launching disease surveillance systems with daily analyses of hospital emergency department visits, ambulance dispatch calls, or pharmacy sales for which population-at-risk information is unavailable or irrelevant. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We propose a pr...

  17. Early detection of contagious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Estacio, Pedro; Chang, John

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides an electronic proximity apparatus and a surveillance method using such an apparatus for alerting individuals that are exposed to a contagious disease. When a person becomes symptomatic and is diagnosed as positive for a given contagious agent, individuals that have recently maintained a threshold proximity with respect to an infected individual are notified and advised to seek immediate medial care. Treatment of individuals in the very early phases of infection (pre-symptomatic) significantly reduces contagiousness of the infected population first exposed to the contagious disease, thus preventing spread of the disease throughout the general population.

  18. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  19. New records of early life-stages of cephalopods in the Chiloé Interior Sea Nuevos registros de estadios de vida tempranos de cefalópodos en el mar interior de Chiloé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A Carrasco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Early life stages of cephalopods were sampled with zooplankton nets in southern Chile (41°-43°S during the CIMAR 11 Fiordos cruise, November 2005. A total of 52 individuals were collected, comprising three families (Octopodidae, Sepiolidae, Onychoteuthidae and four species (Robsonella fontaniana, Enteroctopus megalocyathus, Semirossia patagonica, an undetermined Onychoteuthidae species. Paralarvae of Octopodidae have been previously recorded in northern and southern Chile; however, for Sepiolidae and Onychoteuthidae, this is the first record of early life stages in Chilean waters.Estadios tempranos de cefalópodos fueron obtenidos con redes de zooplancton en el sur de Chile (41°-43°S durante el crucero CIMAR 11 Fiordos en noviembre de 2005. Un total de cincuenta y dos individuos fueron recolectados, comprendiendo tres familias (Octopodidae, Sepiolidae and Onychoteuthidae y cuatro especies (Robsonella fontaniana, Enteroctopus megalocyathus, Semirossia patagonica, y una especie indeterminada de Onychoteuthidae. Si bien existen descripciones previas de paralarvas de Octopodidae para el norte y sur de Chile, este trabajo provee el primer registro de estadios tempranos de vida de Sepiolidae y Onychoteuthidae para aguas chilenas.

  20. Spatio-temporal dynamics of growth and survival of Lesser Sandeel early life-stages in the North Sea: Predictions from a coupled individual-based and hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurkan, Zeren; Christensen, Asbjørn; Maar, Marie

    2013-01-01

    of larval and early juvenile Lesser Sandeel (Ammodytes marinus) in the North Sea to local feeding conditions by an adapted version of a generic bioenergetic individual-based model for larval fish describing growth and survival. Prey encounter and physiological processes are described explicitly in the model...... is validated by Continuous Plankton Recorder survey time series data. Spatio-temporal dynamics of the sandeel cohorts are simulated by the integrated model framework for the period 2004-2006 and five major area divisions of suitable sandeel habitats in the North Sea. This allows obtaining insight...... into the influence of temperature variation and zooplankton availability on the growth and survival. To determine areas promising for recruitment, area divisions are compared and optimal time of hatching for higher survival to recruitment due to match-mismatch with prey is determined by comparing different hatching...

  1. Spatio-temporal dynamics of growth and survival of Lesser Sandeel early life-stages in the North Sea: Predictions from a coupled individual-based and hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurkan, Zeren; Christensen, Asbjørn; Maar, Marie

    2013-01-01

    of larval and early juvenile Lesser Sandeel (Ammodytes marinus) in the North Sea to local feeding conditions by an adapted version of a generic bioenergetic individual-based model for larval fish describing growth and survival. Prey encounter and physiological processes are described explicitly in the model......, which allows analyzing the influence of prey on the growth and survival of sandeel. The model is coupled to a hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model with physical and prey fields and implemented in temporal and three-dimensional spatial settings. Zooplankton biomass simulated by the biogeochemical model...... is validated by Continuous Plankton Recorder survey time series data. Spatio-temporal dynamics of the sandeel cohorts are simulated by the integrated model framework for the period 2004-2006 and five major area divisions of suitable sandeel habitats in the North Sea. This allows obtaining insight...

  2. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels.

  3. Fatigue in early Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦朝晖

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence,character-istics and risk factors of fatigue in a large cohort of subjects with early Parkinson’s disease (PD).Methods A total of 391 individuals with PD,recrutied in Linzhi trial, were re-screened. Early, non-depressed subjects

  4. Pompe disease: early diagnosis and early treatment make a difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Lee, Ni-Chung

    2013-08-01

    Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II or acid maltase deficiency) is a lysosomal disorder in which acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiencies lead to intralysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues; most notably in skeletal muscles. Both the patient's age at the onset of Pompe disease symptoms and the rate of deterioration caused by the disease can vary considerably. In classical infant-onset Pompe disease (IOPD), symptoms start very early in life, and death occurs soon afterward if the disease remains untreated. In later-onset Pompe disease, symptoms are slower to appear, and patients often progress to wheelchair confinement and eventual respiratory failure. A diagnosis can be made by screening for GAA in dried blood samples, followed either by GAA assessment in lymphocytes or in fibroblasts or by the genetic analysis of mutations. Treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alfa was approved for human use in 2006. In classical IOPD, treatment significantly lengthens survival and improves motor development and cardiac function. The sooner ERT begins, the better are the results. Newborn screening aims to take advantage of different technologies for diagnosing and treating newborns early on and it yields better outcomes. However, newborns diagnosed early and other long-term survivors may encounter fresh problems, making up a new phenotype of IOPD patients. Further modifications of the treatment, such as a decrease in immune responses to ERT, a higher dosage, a better uptake formulation, and gene therapy delivered locally or systemically are being explored.

  5. Pompe Disease: Early Diagnosis and Early Treatment Make a Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsiu Chien

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II or acid maltase deficiency is a lysosomal disorder in which acid α-glucosidase (GAA deficiencies lead to intralysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues; most notably in skeletal muscles. Both the patient's age at the onset of Pompe disease symptoms and the rate of deterioration caused by the disease can vary considerably. In classical infant-onset Pompe disease (IOPD, symptoms start very early in life, and death occurs soon afterward if the disease remains untreated. In later-onset Pompe disease, symptoms are slower to appear, and patients often progress to wheelchair confinement and eventual respiratory failure. A diagnosis can be made by screening for GAA in dried blood samples, followed either by GAA assessment in lymphocytes or in fibroblasts or by the genetic analysis of mutations. Treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with alglucosidase alfa was approved for human use in 2006. In classical IOPD, treatment significantly lengthens survival and improves motor development and cardiac function. The sooner ERT begins, the better are the results. Newborn screening aims to take advantage of different technologies for diagnosing and treating newborns early on and it yields better outcomes. However, newborns diagnosed early and other long-term survivors may encounter fresh problems, making up a new phenotype of IOPD patients. Further modifications of the treatment, such as a decrease in immune responses to ERT, a higher dosage, a better uptake formulation, and gene therapy delivered locally or systemically are being explored.

  6. Linking Oxidative Stress and Magnitude of Compensatory Responses with Life-Stage Specific Differences in Sensitivity of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to Copper or Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Song; Doering, Jon A; Sun, Jianxian; Beitel, Shawn C; Shekh, Kamran; Patterson, Sarah; Crawford, Sarah; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B; Hecker, Markus

    2016-09-06

    Sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) to copper (Cu) or cadmium (Cd) has been shown to significantly differ as a function of life-stage. This study investigated oxidative stress, metal homeostasis, and associated compensatory responses as potential mechanisms of this sensitivity pattern in three early life-stages. Sturgeon were most sensitive to Cu at 15 days post hatch (dph), which was accompanied by a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO). Genes involved with amelioration of oxidative stress were significantly less inducible at this stage than in older, less sensitive fry. At 48 dph, acute lethality of sturgeon exposed to Cd was greatest and body LPO was significantly induced by 3.5-fold at 5 μg Cd/L. Moreover, there was a small but significant increase in antioxidative responses. At 139 dph, sturgeon were most tolerant to Cu and Cd and accumulation of these metals was least. Also, expression of metallothionein (MT) and apoptotic genes were greatest while expression of metal transporters was reduced and concentration of LPO was not different from controls. Our results suggest that life-stage specific sensitivity of white sturgeon to metals is complex, encompassing differences in the ability to mount compensatory responses important for metal homeostasis and combating oxidative stress and concomitant damages.

  7. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  8. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  9. The early history of Dupuytren's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, D

    1999-02-01

    Dupuytren's disease may have originated among the Vikings of northern Europe. Possible association of the disease with the Scottish bagpipe-playing MacCrimmon clan and the Papal Sign of Benediction also are examined. The evolution of pathologic understanding and the advent of surgical treatment of the disease in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in Europe and North America are reviewed in detail.

  10. Early-onset Lafora body disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Julie; Girard, Jean-Marie; Lohi, Hannes; Chan, Elayne M.; Wang, Peixiang; Tiberia, Erica; Omer, Salah; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Bennett, Christopher; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Tyagi, Atul; Liu, Yan; Pencea, Nela; Zhao, XiaoChu; Scherer, Stephen W.; Ackerley, Cameron A.

    2012-01-01

    The most common progressive myoclonus epilepsies are the late infantile and late infantile-variant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (onset before the age of 6 years), Unverricht–Lundborg disease (onset after the age of 6 years) and Lafora disease. Lafora disease is a distinct disorder with uniform course: onset in teenage years, followed by progressively worsening myoclonus, seizures, visual hallucinations and cognitive decline, leading to a vegetative state in status myoclonicus and death within 10 years. Biopsy reveals Lafora bodies, which are pathognomonic and not seen with any other progressive myoclonus epilepsies. Lafora bodies are aggregates of polyglucosans, poorly constructed glycogen molecules with inordinately long strands that render them insoluble. Lafora disease is caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding the laforin phosphatase and the malin ubiquitin ligase, respectively, two cytoplasmically active enzymes that regulate glycogen construction, ensuring symmetric expansion into a spherical shape, essential to its solubility. In this work, we report a new progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with Lafora bodies, early-onset Lafora body disease, map its locus to chromosome 4q21.21, identify its gene and mutation and characterize the relationship of its gene product with laforin and malin. Early-onset Lafora body disease presents early, at 5 years, with dysarthria, myoclonus and ataxia. The combination of early-onset and early dysarthria strongly suggests late infantile-variant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, not Lafora disease. Pathology reveals no ceroid lipofuscinosis, but Lafora bodies. The subsequent course is a typical progressive myoclonus epilepsy, though much more protracted than any infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, or Lafora disease, patients living into the fourth decade. The mutation, c.781T>C (Phe261Leu), is in a gene of unknown function, PRDM8. We show that the PRDM8 protein interacts with laforin and malin and

  11. Early psychosocial intervention in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Sørensen, Jan; Waldorff, Frans B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost utility of early psychosocial intervention for patients with Alzheimer's disease and their primary caregivers. DESIGN: Cost utility evaluation alongside a multicentre, randomised controlled trial with 3 years of follow-up. SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics...

  12. Early Onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical signs and genetic analysis of early-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT in a 2-year-old boy and members of his family are reported from the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, and Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  13. [Treatment of early stage Hodgkin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.

    1993-01-01

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment is still an unresolved issue. Twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out world-wide. The preliminary results of a global meta-analysis of these trials...

  14. Altered Fractional Anisotropy in Early Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silky Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease best known for chorea. The disorder includes numerous other clinical features including mood disorder, eye movement abnormalities, cognitive disturbance, pendular knee reflexes, motor impersistence, and postural instability. We describe a mild case of HD early in the disease course with depression and subtle neurological manifestations. In addition, we review MRI and diffusion tensor imaging features in this patient. The bicaudate ratio, a measure of caudate atrophy, was increased. Fractional anisotropy values of the bilateral caudate and putamen were increased, signifying neurodegeneration of these structures in HD.

  15. Unusual early-onset Huntingtons disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Antonio P; Carod-Artal, Francisco J; Bomfim, Denise; Vázquez-Cabrera, Carolina; Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela

    2003-06-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by involuntary movements, cognitive decline, and behavioral disorders leading to functional disability. In contrast to patients with adult onset, in which chorea is the major motor abnormality, children often present with spasticity, rigidity, and significant intellectual decline associated with a more rapidly progressive course. An unusual early-onset Huntington's disease case of an 11-year-old boy with severe hypokinetic/rigid syndrome appearing at the age of 2.5 years is presented. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction study of the expanded IT-15 allele with a compatible size of 102 cytosine-adenosine-guanosine repeats L-Dopa mildly ameliorated rigidity, bradykinesia, and dystonia. We conclude that Huntington's disease should be included in the differential diagnoses of regressive syndromes of early childhood.

  16. Biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    The existence of an effective biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer disease would facilitate improved diagnosis and stimulate therapeutic trials. Multidisciplinary clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is time consuming and expensive and relies on experts who are rarely available outside of specialty clinics. Thus, many patients do not receive proper diagnosis until the disease has progressed beyond stages in which treatments are maximally effective. In the clinical trial setting, rapid, cost-effective screening of patients for Alzheimer disease is of paramount importance for the development of new treatments. Neuroimaging of cortical amyloid burden and volumetric changes in the brain and assessment of protein concentrations (eg, β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, phosphorylated tau) in cerebrospinal fluid are diagnostic tools that are not widely available. Known genetic markers do not provide sufficient discriminatory power between different forms of dementia to be useful in isolation. Recent studies using panels of biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease or mild cognitive impairment have been promising, though no such studies have been cross-validated in independent samples of subjects. The ideal biomarker enabling early detection of Alzheimer disease has not yet been identified.

  17. Urinary biomarkers at early ADPKD disease stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petzold

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is characterized by a decline in renal function at late disease stage when the majority of functional renal parenchyma is replaced by cystic tissue. Thus, kidney function, assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR does not well represent disease burden in early disease. Here, we investigated various urinary markers for tubular injury and their association with disease burden in ADPKD patients at early disease course.ADPKD patients between 18 and 40 years with an eGFR greater or equal to 70 ml per min per 1.73m2 were eligible for this cross-sectional study. Urinary Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL, Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1, and Uromodulin (UMOD were investigated by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Clara Cell Protein 16 (CC16 was investigated by Latex Immuno Assay. Cryoscopy was performed to assess urine osmolality and Urinary Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio (UACR was calculated. The association and the predictive properties of the markers on eGFR and height adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV was evaluated using multiple regression analysis, incorporating different control variables for adjustment. Internal bootstrapping validated the obtained results.In 139 ADPKD patients (age 31 ±7 years, mean eGFR of 93 ± 19 ml per min per 1.73 m2 the total kidney volume was negatively correlated with eGFR and UMOD and positive associated with age, UACR, KIM-1 and urine osmolality after adjustment for possible confounders. Urine osmolality and htTKV were also associated with eGFR, whereas no association of CC16, NGAL and UMOD with eGFR or htTKV was found.UACR and urinary KIM-1 are independently associated with kidney size but not with renal function in our study population. Urine osmolality was associated with eGFR and kidney volume following adjustment for multiple confounders. Despite statistical significance, the clinical value of our results is not yet conceivable

  18. Understanding Parkinson's disease: detection and early disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, L A

    2000-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating, neurodegenerative disorder characterized by neuronal loss within the basal ganglia and insufficient levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Symptoms include resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia (slowness of voluntary movement), and postural disturbances. Exact cause is unknown, but theories surrounding environmental or endogenous toxicities have been suggested. Differential diagnoses include genetic and other neurologic disorders that may share symptoms similar to those seen in PD. Clinical progression has been categorized into three phases of the disease: early, nonfluctuating, and fluctuating. Medications generally offer good symptom relief during the early and nonfluctuating phases of the disease. Classifications of anti-PD medications include anticholinergics, dopamine agonists, amantadine, MAO-B inhibitors, levodopa-carbidopa, and Catechol-o-methyl transferase inhibitors. Surgical intervention may be an option for select patients whose conditions are not well controlled though medical management strategies. Primary care providers often can manage patients in the early stage of PD, but later stages require expert neurologic management. Patient/family education and anticipatory guidance is imperative.

  19. Mortality sensitivity in life-stage simulation analysis: A case study of southern sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, L.R.; Tinker, M.T.; Doak, D.F.; Estes, J.A.; Jessup, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, there are no generally recognized approaches for linking detailed mortality and pathology data to population-level analyses of extinction risk. We used a combination of analytical and simulation-based analyses to examine 20 years of age- and sex-specific mortality data for southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris), and we applied results to project the efficacy of alternative conservation strategies. Population recovery of the southern sea otter has been slow (rate of population increase ?? = 1.05) compared to other recovering populations (?? = 1.17-1.20), and the population declined (?? = 0.975) between 1995 and 1999. Age-based Leslie matrices were developed to explore explanations for the slow recovery and recent decline in the southern sea other population. An elasticity analysis was performed to predict effects of proportional changes in stage-specific reproductive or survival rates on the rate of population increase. A life-stage simulation analysis (LSA) was developed to evaluate the impact of changing age- and cause-specific mortality rates on ??. The information used to develop these models was derived from death assemblage, pathology, and live population census data to examine the sensitivity of sea otter population growth to different sources of mortality (e.g., disease and starvation, direct human take [fisheries, gun shot, boat strike, oil pollution], mating trauma and intraspecific aggression, shark bites, and unknown). We used resampling simulations to generate random combinations of vital rates for a large number of matrix replicates and drew on these to estimate potential effects of mortality sources on population growth (??). Our analyses suggest management actions that are likely and unlikely to promote recovery of the southern sea otter and more broadly indicate a methodology to better utilize cause-of-death data in conservation decision-making.

  20. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  1. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  2. Parkinson's disease therapy: treatment of early and late disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To summarize the current strategies for the treatment of early and late Parkinson's disease (PD). Data sources The presented guidelines are based on the review of the literature as well as the author's extensive experience with the treatment of 7000 patients with PD over the past 25 years. Results An analysis of reported data as well as personal experience suggest that while young patients seem to have a slower progression of the disease, they are at a higher risk for developing levodopa induced complications, such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. It is, therefore, prudent practice to delay levodopa therapy, particularly in younger patients, until the PD symptoms become troublesome and interfere with social or occupational functioning. Other strategies, such as the use of deprenyl, amantadine, trihexyphenidyl and dopamine agonists, should be employed before instituting levodopa therapy. Entacopone and dopamine agonists are useful in smoothing out levodopa related motor fluctuations. Surgical interventions, such as pallidotomy and pallidal or subthalamic deep brain stimulation, are effective therapeutic strategies, but should be reserved only for patients in whom optimal medical therapy fails to provide satisfactory control of symptoms. Conclusion The medical and surgical treatment of patients with PD must be individualized and tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  3. Arthroscopic intervention in early hip disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Joseph C; Lee, Jo-Ann

    2004-12-01

    Advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic applications for hip arthroscopy have dispelled previous myths about early hip disease. Arthroscopic findings have established the following facts: Acetabular labral tears do occur; acetabular chondral lesions do exist; tears are most frequently anterior and often associated with sudden twisting or pivoting motions; and labral tears often occur in association with articular cartilage lesions of the adjacent acetabulum or femoral head, and if present for years, contribute to the progression of delamination process of the chondral cartilage. Magnetic resonance arthrography represents an improvement over conventional magnetic resonance imaging, it does have limitations when compared with direct observation. Although indications for hip arthroscopy are constantly expanding, the most common indications include: labral tears, loose bodies, chondral flap lesions of the acetabular or femoral head, synovial chondromatosis, foreign body removal, and crystalline hip arthropathy (gout, pseudogout, and others). Contraindications include conditions that limit the potential for hip distraction such as joint ankylosis, dense heterotopic bone formation, considerable protrusio, or morbid obesity. Complication rates have been reported between 0.5 and 5%, most often related to distraction and include sciatic or femoral nerve palsy, avascular necrosis, and compartment syndrome. Transient peroneal or pudendal nerve effects and chondral scuffing have been associated with difficult or prolonged distraction. Meticulous consideration to patient positioning, distraction time and portal placement are essential. Judicious patient selection and diagnostic expertise are critical to successful outcomes. Candidates for hip arthroscopy should include only those patients with mechanical symptoms (catching, locking, or buckling) that have failed to respond to conservative therapy. The extent of articular cartilage involvement has the most direct relationship

  4. The early pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the early pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is of critical importance to ongoing and future efforts to decrease the impact of FMD in endemic regions and prevent incursions to disease-free territories. The importance of the early phase of virus-host interaction lies in two ke...

  5. Early cervical cancer coexistent with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.; Kalter, C.; Roberts, W.S.; Cavanagh, D.

    1989-07-01

    Early invasive carcinoma of the cervix may be treated by surgery or radiation therapy. Two patients with early cervical cancer are presented whose concomitant inflammatory bowel disease figured significantly in the selection of surgery as treatment. The use of radiotherapy in the face of inflammatory bowel disease, however, is not clearly addressed in the literature.

  6. Cerebral microbleeds in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakova, T; Levin, O; Arablinskiy, A; Vasenina, E; Zerr, I

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesize that cerebral microbleeds (CMB) in patients with different neuropsychological profiles (amnestic or non-amnestic) and MRI features of vascular damage could provide important information on the underlying pathological process in early Alzheimer's disease. The study was performed at two trial sites. We studied 136 outpatients with cognitive decline. MRI was performed using a magnetic field of 1.5 and 3 T. Neuropsychological assessment included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale (MoCA), Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R), Cambridge Cognitive Examination battery (CAMCOG) (Part 3), Clock Drawing Test, fluency test and the visual memory test (SCT). CSF was examined for standard parameters such as tau, phosphorylated tau, amyloid-β 1-40 and 42 and Qalbumin, in accordance with established protocols and genotype. In 61 patients (45 %), at least 1 CMB was found. Most of the CMBs were described in the amnestic profile (67 %). In 86 % of the cases, multiple CMB were observed. The ratio of Aβ1-40/42 in non-amnestic patients with CMB was significantly lower (mean 0.6) than in patients without CMB (mean 1.2). A notable difference in the albumin ratio as an indicator of the BBB was observed between groups with and without CMB. In the CMP-positive group, the E2 genotype was observed more frequently, and the E4 genotype less frequently, than in the CMB-negative group. Based on the cerebrospinal fluid-serum albumin ratio, we were able to show that patients with CMB present several features of BBB dysfunction. According to logistic regression, the predictive factors for CMB in patients with cognitive decline were age, WMHs score and albumin ratio. We found a significant reduction in the Aβ-amyloid ratio in the non-amnestic profile group with CMB (particularly in the cortical region) in comparison to those without CMB. While this is an interesting finding, its significance needs to be assessed in a prospective follow-up.

  7. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models with Adverse Outcome Pathways and Environmental Exposure Models to Screen for Environmental Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolat...

  8. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  9. Morbus-Locke's early essay on disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, J

    2000-01-01

    John Locke engaged in a systematic study of medicine from the late 1650's. In this period he acquainted himself with the three main competing natural philosophical theories of the time -Galenism, Paracelsianism and Mechanism. He was particularly interested in the work of Sennert, Helmont and Doyle. In 1666, just after the publication of Boyle's The Origine of Formes and Qualities, Locke wrote a short paper entitled Morbus. This paper gave Locke's own view of the nature of disease. Locke went out of his way to criticise Boyle's attempts to give mechanical explanations for biological phenomena. He endorsed Helmont's theory that disease was caused by "ferments" and "Archei" and re-introduced Galenic temperaments as factors of susceptibility in seminal diseases. Locke did not endorse a mechanical corpuscularianism at this stage in his career, when his contact with Boyle was most frequent. Consequently, Locke's espousal of the corpuscular philosophy in the Essay cannot be attributed to Locke's association with Boyle at this time.

  10. Improving Symptom Control in Early Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, Stuart H; Hauser, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused by a severe loss of pigmented dopamine-producing nigro-striatal neurons. Symptomatic therapies provide benefit for motor features by restoring dopamine receptor stimulation. Studies have demonstrated that delaying the introduction of dopaminergic medical therapy is associated with a rapid decline in quality of life. Nonmotor s...

  11. Pharmacological intervention of early neuropathy in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jee; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, TaeSoo; Lee, Sung Bae

    2017-02-04

    Extensive studies have reported the significant roles of numerous cellular features and processes in properly maintaining neuronal morphology and function throughout the lifespan of an animal. Any alterations in their homeostasis appear to be strongly associated with neuronal aging and the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, even before the occurrence of prominent neuronal death. However, until recently, the primary focus of studies regarding many neurodegenerative diseases has been on the massive cell death occurring at the late stages of disease progression. Thus, our understanding on early neuropathy in these diseases remains relatively limited. The complicated nature of various neuropathic features manifested early in neurodegenerative diseases suggests the involvement of a system-wide transcriptional regulation and epigenetic control. Epigenetic alterations and consequent changes in the neuronal transcriptome are now begun to be extensively studied in various neurodegenerative diseases. Upon the catastrophic incident of neuronal death in disease progression, it is utterly difficult to reverse the deleterious defects by pharmacological treatments, and therefore, therapeutics targeting the system-wide transcriptional dysregulation associated with specific early neuropathy is considered a better option. Here, we review our current understanding on the system-wide transcriptional dysregulation that is likely associated with early neuropathy shown in various neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the possible future developments of pharmaceutical therapeutics.

  12. [Cognitive rehabilitation in early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, E; Thöne-Otto, A; Bürger, K; Schröder, S G; Hoffmann, W; Schneider, W; Teipel, S

    2016-07-01

    Dementia impairs the coping with routine daily tasks and social relationships due to an increasing degeneration of cognitive abilities. An appropriate treatment must adequately consider the effects of declined cognitive abilities on patients and their environment. Therefore, in recent times, integrative procedures for cognitive rehabilitation (CR) have become increasingly important for the therapy of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild dementia (MD). CR approaches provide compensatory possibilities for clearly defined routine challenges and the individual needs of those affected. This overview article in the form of a selective review elaborates factors for the effectiveness of CR on the basis of the currently available literature: 1) individuality - consideration of personal needs and targets, 2) compensation - mediation of skills and strategies to compensate for cognitive impairments, 3) interaction - inclusion of relatives and environmental conditions and 4) integration - integration of various therapeutic disciplines and methods. On the basis of this assessment with regards to the content, a critical analysis of the methods of short and long-term therapeutic effects on MCD and MD was carried out. Although the resulting factors were of high long-term relevance for the improvement of depression and quality of life, effects on cognition were more pronounced for MCI than for MD, which emphasizes the importance of beginning therapy as early as possible. The results show that future studies on effectiveness must employ endpoints relevant for routine daily life, and that the possibility of an implementation of therapeutic concepts in a healthcare system should be considered as an essential criterion.

  13. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. OBJECTIVE: To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3...... years before a hospital contact leading to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. METHODS: Retrospective morbidity data from Danish National Patient Registry records (1997-2007) of 10,490 adult patients with a secondary care diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were compared with 42,505 control cases. RESULTS......: Parkinson's disease was associated with significantly higher morbidity rates associated with conditions in the following categories: mental and psychiatric, nervous system, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, genitourinary, abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, injury...

  14. [Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Andreia Gomes; Gago, Miguel Fernandes; Garrett, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    In current medical practice, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease remains essentially clinical. This practice determines that the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is done in an already advanced neuropathological stage of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the validity of cerebrospinal fluid protein biological markers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The a-synuclein and DJ-1 proteins, due to their role in the hereditary Parkinson's disease, have been the most widely studied cerebrospinal biomarkers. Nevertheless, they have had divergent results mostly owing to different processing, identification and control of laboratory techniques. The new proteomic techniques, directed to the detection of multiple undifferentiated proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (eg. ceruloplasmin, chromogranin B, apoH), are promising. The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is imperious as it is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes extensive morbidity. Most of current scientific research in Parkinson's disease is focused on the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. Thus, the definition of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is highly relevant.

  15. Epigenetics and early life origins of chronic noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Walker, Sheila O; Hong, Xiumei; Bartell, Tami R; Wang, Xiaobin

    2013-02-01

    In light of the increasing threats of chronic noncommunicable diseases in developing countries, the growing recognition of the early life origins of chronic disease, and innovative breakthroughs in biomedical research and technology, it is imperative that we harness cutting-edge data to improve health promotion and maintenance. It is well recognized that chronic diseases are complex traits affected by a wide range of environmental and genetic factors; however, the role of epigenetic factors, particularly with regard to early life origins, remains largely unexplored. Given the unique properties of the epigenome-functionality during critical time windows, such as the intrauterine period, heritability, and reversibility-enhancing our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms may offer new opportunities for the development of novel early prediction and prevention paradigms. This may present an unparalleled opportunity to offer maternal and child health professionals important tools with the translational value to predict, detect, and prevent disease at an early age, long before its clinical occurrence, and as such, break lifelong and transgenerational cycles of disease. In doing so, modern technology can be leveraged to make great contributions to population health, quality of life, and reducing the burdensome economic costs of noncommunicable diseases in developing countries.

  16. Biomarkers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Sheng-di

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. It has become clear that PD can have a preclinical phase, a period during which neurodegeneration has already begun years before the onset of typical motor symptoms. Consequently, if the early neurodegeneration in PD can be timely diagnosed, it will significantly slow down the progression of the disease and improve the quality of life. To date, there is no fully reliable and validated biomarker for the early diagnosis of PD, but some promising biomarker candidates exist.

  17. Intestinal microbiota during early life - impact on health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Lotta; Satokari, Reetta; Salminen, Seppo; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-11-01

    In the first years after birth, the intestinal microbiota develops rapidly both in diversity and complexity while being relatively stable in healthy adults. Different life-style-related factors as well as medical practices have an influence on the early-life intestinal colonisation. We address the impact of some of these factors on the consecutive microbiota development and later health. An overview is presented of the microbial colonisation steps and the role of the host in that process. Moreover, new early biomarkers are discussed with examples that include the association of microbiota and atopic diseases, the correlation of colic and early development and the impact of the use of antibiotics in early life. Our understanding of the development and function of the intestinal microbiota is constantly improving but the long-term influence of early-life microbiota on later life health deserves careful clinical studies.

  18. Kidney diseases in children - early diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polenakovic, Momir; Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric kidney diseases were in the focus of the World Kidney Day 2016. Macedonian pediatric nephrologists gave their contribution with public appearance in kindergartens, primary and secondary schools, with interactive lectures and discussion with the youngest about the kidney function, healthy life style and simple measures to prevent kidney and urinary tract diseases. Besides promotive appearance in the media, series of lectures were presented in front of the health professionals. The aim was to attract the attention of the professionals for early diagnosis and prevention of kidney disease. The action starts in utero, followed by early postnatal imaging and assessment, conservative treatment and in selected cases surgical treatment. The emphasis is on the multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to children and adolescents with kidney diseases.

  19. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ling

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut, while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1, CCL8 (MCP-2, CXCL10 (IP-10 and CCL3 (MIP-1α, antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1, desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1. Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease.

  20. Early-onset colorectal cancer: a sporadic or inherited disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliano, Vittoria; Sanchez-Mete, Lupe; Martayan, Aline; Anti, Marcello

    2014-09-21

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed worldwide. Although epidemiology data show a marked variability around the world, its overall incidence rate shows a slow but steady decrease, mainly in developed countries. Conversely, early-onset colorectal cancer appears to display an opposite trend with an overall prevalence in United States and European Union ranging from 3.0% and 8.6%. Colorectal cancer has a substantial proportion of familial cases. In particular, early age at onset is especially suggestive of hereditary predisposition. The clinicopathological and molecular features of colorectal cancer cases show a marked heterogeneity not only between early- and late-onset cases but also within the early-onset group. Two distinct subtypes of early-onset colorectal cancers can be identified: a "sporadic" subtype, usually without family history, and an inherited subtype arising in the context of well defined hereditary syndromes. The pathogenesis of the early-onset disease is substantially well characterized in the inherited subtype, which is mainly associated to the Lynch syndrome and occasionally to other rare mendelian diseases, whereas in the "sporadic" subtype the origin of the disease may be attributed to the presence of various common/rare genetic variants, so far largely unidentified, displaying variable penetrance. These variants are thought to act cumulatively to increase the risk of colorectal cancer, and presumably to also anticipate its onset. Efforts are ongoing in the attempt to unravel the intricate genetic basis of this "sporadic" early-onset disease. A better knowledge of molecular entities and pathways may impact on family-tailored prevention and clinical management strategies.

  1. Early Stage Disease Diagnosis System Using Human Nail Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti S. Indi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human’s hand nail is analyzed to identify many diseases at early stage of diagnosis. Study of person hand nail color helps in identification of particular disease in healthcare domain. The proposed system guides in such scenario to take decision in disease diagnosis. The input to the proposed system is person nail image. The system will process an image of nail and extract features of nail which is used for disease diagnosis. Human nail consist of various features, out of which proposed system uses nail color changes for disease diagnosis. Here, first training set data is prepared using Weka tool from nail images of patients of specific diseases. A feature extracted from input nail image is compared with the training data set to get result. In this experiment we found that using color feature of nail image average 65% results are correctly matched with training set data during three tests conducted.

  2. Cost Analysis of Early Psychosocial Intervention in Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, R.; Sørensen, J.; Waldorff, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the impact of early psychosocial intervention aimed at patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers on resource use and costs from a societal perspective. METHODS: Dyads of patients and their primary caregiver were randomised to intervention (n = 163...

  3. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Poureslami; W.E. van Amerongen

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans streptoc

  4. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poureslami, H.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans

  5. Disease associated time consumption in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, IH; Prevoo, MLL; van Leeuwen, MA; van Riel, PLCM; Lolkema, WF; Postma, DS; van Rijswijk, MH

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the disease associated time consumption of normal activities of daily living and of treatment and monitoring activities in a cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with followup of at least 6 years. Comparison was made with a group of patients with asthma and

  6. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poureslami, H.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans streptoc

  7. Markers of early disease and prognosis in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    vary substantially over time. This review explores potential markers of early disease and prognosis in COPD by examining genetic markers in the alpha(1)-antitrypsin, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and MBL-2 genes, and by examining the biochemical markers fibrinogen and C...

  8. Early Lyme disease with spirochetemia - diagnosed by DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sensitive and analytically specific nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT is valuable in confirming the diagnosis of early Lyme disease at the stage of spirochetemia. Findings Venous blood drawn from patients with clinical presentations of Lyme disease was tested for the standard 2-tier screen and Western Blot serology assay for Lyme disease, and also by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR for B. burgdorferi sensu lato 16S ribosomal DNA. The PCR amplicon was sequenced for B. burgdorferi genomic DNA validation. A total of 130 patients visiting emergency room (ER or Walk-in clinic (WALKIN, and 333 patients referred through the private physicians' offices were studied. While 5.4% of the ER/WALKIN patients showed DNA evidence of spirochetemia, none (0% of the patients referred from private physicians' offices were DNA-positive. In contrast, while 8.4% of the patients referred from private physicians' offices were positive for the 2-tier Lyme serology assay, only 1.5% of the ER/WALKIN patients were positive for this antibody test. The 2-tier serology assay missed 85.7% of the cases of early Lyme disease with spirochetemia. The latter diagnosis was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Conclusion Nested PCR followed by automated DNA sequencing is a valuable supplement to the standard 2-tier antibody assay in the diagnosis of early Lyme disease with spirochetemia. The best time to test for Lyme spirochetemia is when the patients living in the Lyme disease endemic areas develop unexplained symptoms or clinical manifestations that are consistent with Lyme disease early in the course of their illness.

  9. Clinical correlates of raphe serotonergic dysfunction in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamhawi, Zahi; Towey, David; Shah, Bina; Pagano, Gennaro; Seibyl, John; Marek, Kenneth; Borghammer, Per; Brooks, David James; Pavese, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Post-mortem and neuroimaging studies suggest that the serotonergic system, which originates from the brainstem raphe nuclei, is disrupted in Parkinson's disease. This could contribute to the occurrence of non-motor symptoms and tremor, which are only partially explained by dopamine loss. However, the level of involvement of the serotonergic raphe nuclei in early Parkinson's disease is still debated. (123)I-FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography is a marker of dopamine and serotonin transporter availability. While (123)I-FP-CIT binds primarily to dopamine transporters in the striatum, its binding in the brainstem raphe nuclei reflects serotonin transporter availability. We interrogated baseline single photon emission computed tomography scans of subjects recruited by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative to determine: (i) the integrity of the brainstem raphe nuclei in early Parkinson's disease; and (ii) whether raphe serotonin transporter levels correlate with severity of tremor and symptoms of fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance. Three hundred and forty-five patients with early drug-naïve Parkinson's disease, 185 healthy controls, and 56 subjects with possible Parkinson's disease without evidence of dopaminergic deficit were included. In the Parkinson's disease cohort, 37 patients had a tremulous, 106 patients had a pure akinetic-rigid, and 202 had a mixed phenotype. Patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower serotonin transporter availability in the brainstem raphe nuclei compared to controls (P disease individually had reduced signals. Raphe serotonin transporter availability over the entire Parkinson's disease cohort were associated with rest tremor amplitude (β = -0.106, P disease subgroup had significantly lower raphe serotonin transporter availability but less severe striatal dopaminergic deficits compared to akinetic-rigid patients with no resting tremor (P disease. We conclude that the raphe nuclei are affected in

  10. Application of Metabonomics in Early Diagnosis of Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiao

    2015-01-01

    With the development of life sciences, people have changed their focus from local research to systematic biology, thus contributing to the development of a series of “omics”, including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabonomics, etc. Metabonomics is a presently developed new branch of science that can provide qualitative and quantitative analysis on all metabolites with low-molecular quality in the body, tissues or cells of an organism. It recognizes the changes and rules of the biological endogenous substance under the impact of internal and external factors by generally and quantitatively detecting multiple small molecular compounds in biological samples, in hope of ifnding out the metabolic marker clusters in the early stage of diseases so as to provide new pathways for the early diagnosis of the diseases and the realization of individualized drug administration. Additionally, metabonomics research on clinical diseases has become a hot topic and made great achievement in the developmental condition, diagnostic methods, pathogenic mechanism and pharmaceutical efifcacy evaluation of diseases. This study mainly reviewed the application and advances of metabonomics in the early diagnosis of malignant tumors, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, hoping to provide references and prompts for metabonomics-associated researches.

  11. Immune-mediated diseases and microbial exposure in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Bønnelykke, K; Stokholm, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The non-communicable disease pandemic includes immune-mediated diseases such as asthma and allergy, which are likely originating in early life where the immature immune system is prone to alterations caused by the exposome. The timing of exposure seems critical for the developing immune system......, and certain exposures may have detrimental effects in the earliest life, but no or even beneficial effects later. The human microbiome and infections are candidates as intermediary in the interaction between the host and the environment. The evidence seems inconsistent as infections as well as particular...... colonization patterns in neonates drive both short-term and long-term asthma symptoms, while, on the other hand, the composition of the microbiome in early life may protect against asthma and allergy in later life. This apparent contradiction may be explained by a deeper disease heterogeneity than we...

  12. Salivaomics - A promising future in early diagnosis of dental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva plays an important role in the health of the oral cavity and of the body as a whole. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging field in the diagnosis of oral and systemic diseases. Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional, and metabolic variations. The collection of saliva samples is noninvasive, safe, and inexpensive. Traditional clinical criteria are insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Salivaomics includes five diagnostic alphabets proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, metabolic compounds, and microbes offering substantial advantages because disease states may be accompanied by detectable changes. Salivaomics, the future of saliva-based techniques for early diagnosis of dental diseases, is promising and may offer a robust alternative for clinicians to use in the near future to make clinical decisions.

  13. Salivaomics - A promising future in early diagnosis of dental diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneetha Koneru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human saliva plays an important role in the health of the oral cavity and of the body as a whole. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging field in the diagnosis of oral and systemic diseases. Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional, and metabolic variations. The collection of saliva samples is noninvasive, safe, and inexpensive. Traditional clinical criteria are insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Salivaomics includes five diagnostic alphabets proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, metabolic compounds, and microbes offering substantial advantages because disease states may be accompanied by detectable changes. Salivaomics, the future of saliva-based techniques for early diagnosis of dental diseases, is promising and may offer a robust alternative for clinicians to use in the near future to make clinical decisions.

  14. Toxicity of sulfide to early life-stages of wild rice (Zizania palustris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Douglas J; Todhunter, Kevin; Fort, Troy D; Mathis, Michael B; Walker, Rachel; Hansel, Mike; Hall, Scott; Richards, Robin; Anderson, Kurt

    2017-02-07

    Wild rice (Zizania palustris) sensitivity to sulfide is not well understood. Since sulfate in surface waters is reduced to sulfide by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and historical information indicated that 10 mg/L sulfate in Minnesota surface water reduced Z. palustris abundance, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) established 10 mg/L sulfate as a water quality criterion in 1973. A 21-day daily-renewal hydroponic study was conducted to evaluate sulfide toxicity to wild rice and the potential mitigation of sulfide toxicity by Fe. The hydroponic design used hypoxic test media for seed and root exposure and aerobic headspace for the vegetative portion of the plant. Test concentrations were 0.3, 1.6, 3.1, 7.8, and 12.5 mg/L sulfide in test media with 0.8, 2.8, and 10.8 mg/L total Fe used to evaluate the impact of iron on sulfide toxicity. Visual assessments (i.e., no plants harvested) of seed activation, mesocotyl emergence, seedling survival, and phytoxicity were conducted 10 days following dark-phase exposure. Each treatment was also evaluated for time to 30% emergence (ET30), total plant biomass, root and shoot lengths, and signs of phytotoxicity at study conclusion (21 days). Results from this study indicated that exposure of developing wild rice to sulfide at ≥3.1 mg sulfide/L in the presence of 0.8 mg/L iron reduced mesocotyl emergence. Sulfide toxicity was mitigated by the addition of iron at 2.8 and 10.8 mg /L relative to the control value of 0.8 mg Fe/L, demonstrating the importance of iron in mitigating sulfide toxicity to wild rice. Ultimately, determination of site-specific sulfate criteria that consider factors that alter toxicity, including sediment Fe and organic carbon, are necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. FUMEPOC: Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently is not feasible using conventional spirometry as a screening method in Primary Care especially among smoking population to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in early stages. Therefore, the FUMEPOC study protocol intends to analyze the validity and reliability of Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer as simpler tool to aid screening and diagnosis of this disease in early stages in primary care surgery. Methods / Design Study design: An observational, descriptive study of diagnostic tests, undertaken in Primary Care and Pneumology Outpatient Care Centre at San Juan Hospital and Elda Hospital. All smokers attending the primary care surgery and consent to participate in the study will undergo a test with Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer. Subsequently, a conventional spirometry will be performed in the hospital and the results will be compared with those of the Vitalograph COPD-6 test. Discussion It is difficult to use the spirometry as screening for early diagnose test in real conditions of primary care clinical practice. The use of a simpler tool, Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer, can help in the early diagnose and therefore, it could improve the clinical management of the disease.

  16. Transient early wheeze and lung function in early childhood associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, Marjan; Boezen, Hendrika; Granell, Raquel; Wijga, Alet H.; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Thijs, Carel; Mommers, Monique; Penders, John; Henderson, John; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been hypothesized that a disturbed early lung development underlies the susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Little is known about whether subjects genetically predisposed to COPD show their first symptoms or reduced lung function in childhood. Objective

  17. Informativeness of Early Huntington Disease Signs about Gene Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Emily; Eberly, Shirley W; Dorsey, E Ray; Kayson-Rubin, Elise; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira

    2015-01-01

    The cohort-level risk of Huntington disease (HD) is related to the age and symptom level of the cohort, but this relationship has not been made precise. To predict the evolving likelihood of carrying the Huntington disease (HD) gene for at-risk adults using age and sign level. Using data from adults with early signs and symptoms of HD linked to information on genetic status, we use Bayes' theorem to calculate the probability that an undiagnosed individual of a certain age and sign level has an expanded CAG repeat. Both age and sign levels have substantial influence on the likelihood of HD onset, and the probability of eventual diagnosis changes as those at risk age and exhibit (or fail to exhibit) symptoms. For example, our data suggest that in a cohort of individuals age 26 with a Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor score of 7-10 70% of them will carry the HD mutation. For individuals age 56, the same motor score suggests only a 40% chance of carrying the mutation. Early motor signs of HD, overall and the chorea subscore, were highly predictive of disease onset at any age. However, body mass index (BMI) and cognitive performance scores were not as highly predictive. These results suggest that if researchers or clinicians are looking for early clues of HD, it may be more foretelling to look at motor rather than cognitive signs. Application of similar approaches could be used with other adult-onset genetic conditions.

  18. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change...... in hippocampal volume. We tested the hypothesis that hippocampal texture has association to early cognitive loss beyond that of volumetric changes. The texture marker was trained and evaluated using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and subsequently...

  19. Body mass index is reduced early in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, William P; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2005-01-01

    Mean body mass index (BMI) in 100 cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) was found to be 9% reduced in comparison to that in patients with either essential tremor or no neurologic disease. A similar reduction in BMI was also discovered among the 24 cases of PD in whom retrospective BMI data were available from their presymptomatic years. These results suggest that alterations in nutrient intake or metabolism could reflect early changes in the central autonomic network preceding the emergence of classical extrapyramidal manifestations of PD.

  20. Treatment strategies in early and advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossig, Christiana; Reichmann, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    The initiation of therapy in Parkinson disease (PD), altering the medication, adding new substances, and switching to alternative therapies throughout the disease is always a matter of debate. In the past, experts in PD have propagated different medication strategies. Even though there is no new medical treatment on the horizon, much has changed in consideration of the known treatments in the early and advanced therapy for PD. Therapeutic regimens have to be adapted and adjusted on a regular basis to accomplish the best medical care for the predominant symptom of the individual patient with PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Thiopurines Versus Conventional Step-Care Therapy for Modifying the Disease Course of Early Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun; Chen, Bai-Li; Mao, Ren; Zhang, Sheng-Hong; He, Yao; Zeng, Zhi-Rong; Chen, Min-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The impact of thiopurines (TP) on the long-term outcome of early Crohn disease (CD) is still controversial. The present study designed as a comparison of conventional step-care to alternative treatment paradigms for disease progression. This longitudinal cohort study examined the established CD patients from a university-based inflammatory bowel disease referral center. Outcomes of mucosal healing (MH), CD-related surgery or hospitalization, and clinical remission were compared based on timing of initiation of TP therapy. The cumulative incidence of events was estimated by Kaplan–Meier method. One-hundred ninety patients with early CD were included. After a median follow-up of 57 months (interquartile range, 31.3–76.2), 29 patients undergone abdominal surgeries, 48 patients hospitalized, and 68 patients experienced clinical flares. A higher cumulative proportion of patients in the top-down (TD) group achieving MH than both the accelerated step-up (AC) group and conventional management (CM) group at month 36 (78.8% vs 39.9% and 42.2%, respectively; P = 0.001). There was a trend, albeit not significant, for an increased proportion of patients free of CD-related intestinal surgery in the TD group at month 60 (P = 0.16). However, among secondary outcomes, an early TP-based AC or TD strategy was not associated with improvement in clinical remission rates compared with a CM strategy at month 60 (P = 0.79). No significant difference was observed between early TP and CM for rates of MH, CD-related intestinal surgery or hospitalization, and clinical remission. Both AC and CM strategy were minimally effective for disease modification. TD strategy has the potential of achieving higher rates MH. Our results support the TD strategy in patients with early CD at risk for a disabling course. PMID:26252273

  2. Deficit of pursuit ocular movements in early Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Cordici; Pietro Lanzafame; Silvia Marino; Alessandro Celona; Lilla Bonanno; Annalisa Baglieri; Alessia Bramanti; Placido Bramanti

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that advanced Alzheimer's disease(AD)patients have deficiency of eye movements.However,there have been no reports on eye movement in the early stages of AD.The aim of this study was to evaluate pursuit ocular movements(POM)provided by a vision-based non-intrusive eye tracker in patients with early AD.POM values were significantly lower in AD patients than in normal controls(P < 0.01).In AD patients,POM values were not closely correlated with the Mini-Mental State Examination scores(P = 0.3).There was no significant difference in POM values among patients treated with or without anticholinesterase therapy.We used a vision-based method,for non-intrusive eye tracking,which can be proposed as a possible tool for supporting the diagnosis of early AD.

  3. Palmomental reflex a relevant sign in early Alzheimer's disease diagnosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Gabelle, Audrey; Gutierrez, Laure-Anne; Dartigues, Jean-François; Ritchie, Karen,; Touchon, Jacques; Berr, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    International audience; AbstractBackground: Sophisticated and expensive biomarkers are proposed for the diagnostic of Alzheimer disease (AD). Amyloid process seems to be early in AD and brain amyloid load affects the frontal lobe. Our objective is to determine if certain simple clinical signs especially frontal-related signs could help reach an earlier and better diagnosis. Methods: In the frame of the 3-City cohort, we conducted a nested case-control study comparing incident cases of Alzheim...

  4. DNAJC6 Mutations Associated With Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgiati, Simone; Quadri, Marialuisa; Fang, Mingyan; Rood, Janneke P M A; Saute, Jonas A; Chien, Hsin Fen; Bouwkamp, Christian G; Graafland, Josja; Minneboo, Michelle; Breedveld, Guido J; Zhang, Jianguo; Verheijen, Frans W; Boon, Agnita J W; Kievit, Anneke J A; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Mandemakers, Wim; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Rieder, Carlos R M; Leenders, Klaus L; Wang, Jun; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    DNAJC6 mutations were recently described in two families with autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (onset age < 11), prominent atypical signs, poor or absent response to levodopa, and rapid progression (wheelchair-bound within ∼10 years from onset). Here, for the first time, we report DNAJC6 mutations in early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). The DNAJC6 open reading frame was analyzed in 274 patients with early-onset sporadic or familial PD. Selected variants were followed up by cosegregation, homozygosity mapping, linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and protein studies. We identified two families with different novel homozygous DNAJC6 mutations segregating with PD. In each family, the DNAJC6 mutation was flanked by long runs of homozygosity within highest linkage peaks. Exome sequencing did not detect additional pathogenic variants within the linkage regions. In both families, patients showed severely decreased steady-state levels of the auxilin protein in fibroblasts. We also identified a sporadic patient carrying two rare noncoding DNAJC6 variants possibly effecting RNA splicing. All these cases fulfilled the criteria for a clinical diagnosis of early-onset PD, had symptoms onset in the third-to-fifth decade, and slow disease progression. Response to dopaminergic therapies was prominent, but, in some patients, limited by psychiatric side effects. The phenotype overlaps that of other monogenic forms of early-onset PD. Our findings delineate a novel form of hereditary early-onset PD. Screening of DNAJC6 is warranted in all patients with early-onset PD compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Our data provide further evidence for the involvement of synaptic vesicles endocytosis and trafficking in PD pathogenesis. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  5. Early life obesity and chronic kidney disease in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has increased considerably with a parallel rise in the prevalence of obesity. It is now recognized that early life nutrition has life-long effects on the susceptibility of an individual to develop obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and CKD. The kidney can be programmed by a number of intrauterine and neonatal insults. Low birth weight (LBW) is one of the most identifiable markers of a suboptimal prenatal environment, and the important intrarenal factors sensitive to programming events include decreased nephron number and altered control of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). LBW complicated by accelerated catch-up growth is associated with an increased risk of obesity, hypertension and CKD in later life. High birth weight and exposure to maternal diabetes or obesity can enhance the risk for developing CKD in later life. Rapid postnatal growth per se may also contribute to the subsequent development of obesity and CKD regardless of birth weight and prenatal nutrition. Although the mechanisms of renal risks due to early life nutritional programming remain largely unknown, experimental and clinical studies suggest the burdening role of early life obesity in longstanding cardiovascular and renal diseases.

  6. The airway microbiota in early cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayman, Katherine B; Armstrong, David S; Grimwood, Keith; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2017-08-16

    Infection plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Over the past two decades, the application of molecular and extended culture-based techniques to microbial analysis has changed our understanding of the lungs in both health and disease. CF lung disease is a polymicrobial disorder, with obligate and facultative anaerobes recovered alongside traditional pathogens in varying proportions, with some differences observed to correlate with disease stage. While healthy lungs are not sterile, differences between the lower airway microbiota of individuals with CF and disease-controls are already apparent in childhood. Understanding the evolution of the CF airway microbiota, and its relationship with clinical treatments and outcome at each disease stage, will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and potentially inform clinical management. This review summarizes current knowledge of the early development of the respiratory microbiota in healthy children and then discusses what is known about the airway microbiota in individuals with CF, including how it evolves over time and where future research priorities lie. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Awareness of memory deficits in early stage Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Cleret de Langavant

    Full Text Available Patients with Huntington's disease (HD are often described as unaware of their motor symptoms, their behavioral disorders or their cognitive deficits, including memory. Nevertheless, because patients with Parkinson's disease (PD remain aware of their memory deficits despite striatal dysfunction, we hypothesize that early stage HD patients in whom degeneration predominates in the striatum can accurately judge their own memory disorders whereas more advanced patients cannot. In order to test our hypothesis, we compared subjective questionnaires of memory deficits (in HD patients and in their proxies and objective measures of memory dysfunction in patients. Forty-six patients with manifest HD attending the out-patient department of the French National Reference Center for HD and thirty-three proxies were enrolled. We found that HD patients at an early stage of the disease (Stage 1 were more accurate than their proxies at evaluating their own memory deficits, independently from their depression level. The proxies were more influenced by patients' functional decline rather than by patients' memory deficits. Patients with moderate disease (Stage 2 misestimated their memory deficits compared to their proxies, whose judgment was nonetheless influenced by the severity of both functional decline and depression. Contrasting subjective memory ratings from the patients and their objective memory performance, we demonstrate that although HD patients are often reported to be unaware of their neurological, cognitive and behavioral symptoms, it is not the case for memory deficits at an early stage. Loss of awareness of memory deficits in HD is associated with the severity of the disease in terms of CAG repeats, functional decline, motor dysfunction and cognitive impairment, including memory deficits and executive dysfunction.

  8. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

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    Janine M Ramsey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  9. Clinical diagnosis and management in early Huntington's disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefer J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Schiefer,1,* Cornelius J Werner,1,* Kathrin Reetz1,2 1Euregional Huntington Center, 2Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA – Translational Brain Medicine, Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This review focuses on clinical diagnosis and both pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapeutic options in early stages of the autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD. The available literature has been reviewed for motor, cognitive, and psychiatric alterations, which are the three major symptom domains of this devastating progressive disease. From a clinical point of view, one has to be aware that the HD phenotype can vary highly across individuals and during the course of the disease. Also, symptoms in juvenile HD can differ substantially from those with adult-onset of HD. Although there is no cure of HD and management is limited, motor and psychiatric symptoms often respond to pharmacotherapy, and nonpharmacological approaches as well as supportive care are essential. International treatment recommendations based on study results, critical statements, and expert opinions have been included. This review is restricted to symptomatic and supportive approaches since all attempts to establish a cure for the disease or modifying therapies have failed so far. Keywords: Neurodegeneration, clinical picture, early symptoms, therapy, treatment

  10. Early gastric cancer in Menetrier’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes-Troche, Jose Maria; Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Starkman, Ivethe; De Anda, Jazmin; Arista-Nasr, Julian; Valdovinos-Diaz, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    Uncommon conditions such as pernicious anaemia and hypertrophic gastropathies have been considered as risk factors for gastric cancer; however, the exact increase in risk is unknown. Menetrier’s disease is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the stomach caused by an overexpression of tumour growth factor α, a ligand for the tyrokinase epidermal growth factor receptor, resulting in a selective expansion of surface mucous cells in the body and fundus of the stomach. There have been nearly 200 cases of Menetrier’s disease reported in the literature yet less than 15 have been associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, we report an early stage gastric adenocarcinoma detected incidentally in a patient recently diagnosed with Menetrier’s disease. PMID:21686802

  11. [Developmental origins of cardiovascular disease and early intervention windows].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the major threat to human health and underlie almost half of all deaths in China. Even more serious, obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors have emerged to be prevalent in children and adolescents of some affluent regions. As scientific knowledge emerges on the role of nutritional factors and exposures to environmental risk factors in the developmental origins of health and disease, evidence suggests that it is imperative to create and implement early effective prevention strategies, including optimisation of nutrition at first 1 000 days in life course and reduction of risk factors of obesity exposures during whole childhood, to suppress the rising trend of cardiovascular disease, otherwise, the future costs of diagnosis and treatment are likely to be unaffordable.

  12. Early Detection System of Vascular Disease and Its Application Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Markers of imaging, structure, and function reflecting vascular damage, integrating a long time accumulation effect of traditional and unrecognized cardiovascular risk factors, can be regarded as surrogate endpoints of target organ damage before the occurrence of clinical events. Prevention of cardiovascular disease requires risk stratification and treatment of traditional risk factors, such as smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. However, traditional risk stratification is not sufficient to provide accurate assessment of future cardiovascular events. Therefore, vascular injury related parameters obtained by ultrasound or other noninvasive devices, as a surrogate parameter of subclinical cardiovascular disease, can improve cardiovascular risk assessment and optimize the preventive treatment strategy. Thus, we will summarize the research progress and clinical application of early assessment technology of vascular diseases in the present review.

  13. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  14. Sex Differences in Clinical Features of Early, Treated Parkinson's Disease.

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    Erika F Augustine

    Full Text Available To improve our understanding of sex differences in the clinical characteristics of Parkinson's Disease, we sought to examine differences in the clinical features and disease severity of men and women with early treated Parkinson's Disease (PD enrolled in a large-scale clinical trial.Analysis was performed of baseline data from the National Institutes of Health Exploratory Trials in Parkinson's Disease (NET-PD Long-term Study-1, a randomized, multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 10 grams of oral creatine/day in individuals with early, treated PD. We compared mean age at symptom onset, age at PD diagnosis, and age at randomization between men and women using t-test statistics. Sex differences in clinical features were evaluated, including: symptoms at diagnosis (motor and symptoms at randomization (motor, non-motor, and daily functioning.1,741 participants were enrolled (62.5% male. No differences were detected in mean age at PD onset, age at PD diagnosis, age at randomization, motor symptoms, or daily functioning between men and women. Differences in non-motor symptoms were observed, with women demonstrating better performance compared to men on SCOPA-COG (Z = 5.064, p<0.0001 and Symbol Digit Modality measures (Z = 5.221, p<0.0001.Overall, men and women did not demonstrate differences in clinical motor features early in the course of PD. However, the differences observed in non-motor cognitive symptoms suggests further assessment of the influence of sex on non-motor symptoms in later stages of PD is warranted.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging markers for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Marino; Rosella Ciurleo; Giuseppe Di Lorenzo; Marina Barresi; Simona De Salvo; Sabrina Giacoppo; Alessia Bramanti; Pietro Lanzafame; Placido Bramanti

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective and progressive degeneration, as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In PD, approximately 60-70% of nigrostriatal neurons are degenerated and 80% of content of the striatal dopamine is reduced before the diagnosis can be established according to widely accepted clinical diagnostic criteria. This condition describes a stage of disease called "prodromal", where non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, depression, precede motor sign of PD. Detection of prodromal phase of PD is becoming an important goal for determining the prognosis and choosing a suitable treatment strategy. In this review, we present some non-invasive instrumental approaches that could be useful to identify patients in the prodromal phase of PD or in an early clinical phase, when the first motor symptoms begin to be apparent. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MRI techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, are useful to differentiate early PD with initial motor symptoms from atypical parkinsonian disorders, thus, making easier early diagnosis. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging techniques can show abnormalities in the olfactory system in prodromal PD.

  16. Foraging behavior and prey interactions by a guild of predators on various lifestages of Bemisia tabaci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Hagler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is fed on by a wide variety of generalist predators, but there is little information on these predator-prey interactions. A laboratory investigation was conducted to quantify the foraging behavior of the adults of five common whitefly predators presented with a surfeit of whitefly eggs, nymphs, and adults. The beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville and Collops vittatus (Say fed mostly on whitefly eggs, but readily and rapidly preyed on all of the whitefly lifestages. The true bugs, Geocoris punctipes (Say and Orius tristicolor (Say preyed almost exclusively on adult whiteflies, while Lygus hesperus Knight preyed almost exclusively on nymphs. The true bugs had much longer prey handling times than the beetles and spent much more of their time feeding (35-42% than the beetles (6-7%. These results indicate that generalist predators vary significantly in their interaction with this host, and that foraging behavior should be considered during development of a predator-based biological control program for B. tabaci.

  17. Foraging behavior and prey interactions by a guild of predators on various lifestages of Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, James R; Jackson, Charles G; Isaacs, Rufus; Machtley, Scott A

    2004-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is fed on by a wide variety of generalist predators, but there is little information on these predator-prey interactions. A laboratory investigation was conducted to quantify the foraging behavior of the adults of five common whitefly predators presented with a surfeit of whitefly eggs, nymphs, and adults. The beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville and Collops vittatus (Say) fed mostly on whitefly eggs, but readily and rapidly preyed on all of the whitefly lifestages. The true bugs, Geocoris punctipes (Say) and Orius tristicolor (Say) preyed almost exclusively on adult whiteflies, while Lygus hesperus Knight preyed almost exclusively on nymphs. The true bugs had much longer prey handling times than the beetles and spent much more of their time feeding (35-42%) than the beetles (6-7%). These results indicate that generalist predators vary significantly in their interaction with this host, and that foraging behavior should be considered during development of a predator-based biological control program for B. tabaci.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... myopathy with early-onset Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia ( IBMPFD ) is a condition that can affect the ...

  19. Anatomical correlates of cognitive functions in early Parkinson's disease patients.

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    Roberta Biundo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cognitive deficits may occur early in Parkinson's disease (PD but the extent of cortical involvement associated with cognitive dysfunction needs additional investigations. The aim of our study is to identify the anatomical pattern of cortical thickness alterations in patients with early stage PD and its relationship with cognitive disability. METHODS: We recruited 29 PD patients and 21 healthy controls. All PD patients performed an extensive neuropsychological examination and 14 were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI. Surface-based cortical thickness analysis was applied to investigate the topographical distribution of cortical and subcortical alterations in early PD compared with controls and to assess the relationship between cognition and regional cortical changes in PD-MCI. RESULTS: Overall PD patients showed focal cortical (occipital-parietal areas, orbito-frontal and olfactory areas and subcortical thinning when compared with controls. PD-MCI showed a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits and related significant regional thickening in the right parietal-frontal as well as in the left temporal-occipital areas. CONCLUSION: Our results confirm the presence of changes in grey matter thickness at relatively early PD stage and support previous studies showing thinning and atrophy in the neocortex and subcortical regions. Relative cortical thickening in PD-MCI may instead express compensatory neuroplasticity. Brain reserve mechanisms might first modulate cognitive decline during the initial stages of PD.

  20. Imaging in Spondyloarthritis: Controversies in Recognition of Early Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Lambert, Robert G W

    2016-01-01

    Advanced imaging has become essential for recognition of clinically suspected early spondyloarthritis. This report summarizes recent progress towards a data-driven comprehensive definition of a positive sacroiliac joint MRI in axial spondyloarthritis, which incorporates contextual information...... provided by structural lesions alongside with active changes. A focus is on emerging limitations and challenges with increasing use of imaging in spondyloarthritis. We discuss the ongoing controversy as to whether sacroiliac joint MRI due to its superior reliability and ability to depict both structural...... and active lesions should be the preferred imaging modality in early disease over the traditional approach with pelvic radiographs. Another challenge is transferring the expanding knowledge about imaging evaluation in spondyloarthritis to the community of rheumatologists and radiologists. Advanced imaging...

  1. Early postural changes in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed; Fayed, Eman Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Postural changes are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson's disease (PD). Many contributing factors have been evident either related to disease pathology or to adaptive changes. This study aimed at studying the postural changes in subjects with Parkinson's disease and its relation to duration of illness and disease severity. Methods. Eighteen patients with PD and 18 healthy matched volunteers represented the sample of the study. The patients were at stage 1 or 1.5 according to the Modified Hoehn and Yahr Staging with duration of illness between 18 and 36 months. Three-dimensional analysis of the back surface was conducted to explore the postural changes in the sagittal and frontal planes in both the patients and the healthy subjects. Results. Kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, fleche cervicale, fleche lombaire, scoliotic angle, and associated vertebral rotation and pelvic obliquity were significantly increased in patients with PD compared to the healthy subjects (P ≤ 0.05). There was no association between the measured postural changes and duration of illness as well as the severity of the IPD (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion. Postural changes start in the early stages of idiopathic PD and they have no relationship to the duration of illness and disease severity.

  2. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E; Neimat, Joseph S; Molinari, Anna L; Tramontana, Michael G; Finder, Stuart G; Gill, Chandler E; Bliton, Mark J; Kao, Chris; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M; Cannard, Kevin R; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50-75, on medication ≥6 months but ≤4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n = 15) or DBS + ODT (n = 15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. Medication requirements in the DBS + ODT group were lower at all time points with a maximal difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS + ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CT perfusion at early stage of hepatic diffuse disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Guan; Wei-Dong Zhao; Kang-Rong Zhou; Wei-Jun Peng; Jian Mao; Feng Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the validity of the non-invasive method of CT perfusion (CTP) in rat model of hepatic diffuse disease. METHODS: Twenty-eight Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Liver diffuse lesions were induced by dietthylnitrosamine in 14 rats of test group. Rats in control groupwere bred with pure water. From the 1st to 12th wk after the test group was intervened, both groups were studied every week with CTP. CTP parameters of liver parenchymain different periods and pathologic changes in two groups were compared and analyzed.RESULTS: The process of hepatic diffuse lesions in test groups was dassified into three stages or periods according to the pathologic alterations, namely hepattitis, hepatic fibrosis, and cirrhosis. During this period, hepatic artery flow (HAF)of control group declined slightly, mean transit time (MTT),blood flow (BF) and volume (BV) increased, but there wereno significant differences between different periods. Tntest group, HAF tended to increase gradually, MTT prolonged obviously, BV and BF decreased at the same time. The results of statistical analysis revealed that the difference in the HAF ratio of test group to control group was significant.The ratio of BV and BF in test group to control group in stageof hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis, hepatic fibrosis and early stage of hepatic cirrhosis was significantly different, but there was no significant difference between hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis. The main pathological changes in stage of hepatitis were swelling of hepatic cells, while sinusoid capillarization and deposition of collagen aggravated gradually in the extravascular Disse's spaces in stage of fibrosis and early stage of cirrhosis.CONCLUSION: The technique could reflect some early changes of hepatic blood perfusion in rat with liver diffuse disease and is valuable for their early diagnosis.

  4. Feasibility of an early Alzheimer's disease immunosignature diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Lucas; Stafford, Phillip; Johnston, Stephen Albert

    2013-01-15

    A practical diagnostic test is needed for early Alzheimer's disease (AD) detection. Immunosignaturing, a technology that employs antibody binding to a random-sequence peptide microarray, generates profiles that distinguish transgenic mice engineered with familial AD mutations (APPswe/PSEN1-dE9) from non-transgenic littermates. It can also detect an AD-like signature in humans. Here, we assess the changes in the immunosignature at different time points of the disease in mice and humans. We also evaluate the accuracy of the late-stage signature as a test to discriminate between young mice with familial AD mutations from non-transgenic littermates. Plasma samples from AD patients were assayed 3-12 months apart, while APPswe/PSEN1-dE9 and non-transgenic controls supplied plasma at monthly intervals until they reached 15 months of age. Microarrays with 10,000 random-sequence peptides were used to compare antibody binding patterns. These patterns gradually changed over the life-span of mice. Strong, characteristic signatures were observed in transgenic mice at early, mid and late stages, but these profiles had minimal overlap. The signature of young transgenic mice had an error rate of 18% at classifying plasma samples from late-stage transgenic mice. Conversely, the late-stage transgenic mice signature discriminated between young transgenic mice and littermates with an error rate of 21%. Less distinctive profiles were recognizable throughout the transgenic mice lifespan, being detectable as early as 2 months. The human signature had minimal change on short-term follow-up. Our results call for a reappraisal of the way incipient AD is studied, as biomarkers seen in late-stages of the disease may not be relevant in earlier stages.

  5. Early molecular changes in Alzheimer disease : can we catch the disease in its presymptomatic phase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Kerstin T S; Keitel, Stella; Swaab, Dick F; Verhaagen, J.; Bossers, K.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and characterized by deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, neurofibrillary tangles consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau, atrophy, and progressive neurodegeneration. While the familial, early onset form of AD is known to be caused by specifi

  6. Markers of early disease and prognosis in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Dahl

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Morten Dahl, Børge G NordestgaardDepartment of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: COPD is a complex disease with multiple pathological components, which we unfortunately tend to ignore when spirometry is used as the only method to evaluate the disorder. Additional measures are needed to allow a more complete and clinically relevant assessment of COPD. The earliest potential risk factors of disease in COPD are variations in the genetic background. Genetic variations are present from conception and can determine lifelong changes in enzyme activities and protein concentrations. In contrast, measurements in blood, sputum, exhaled breath, broncho-alveolar lavage, and lung biopsies may vary substantially over time. This review explores potential markers of early disease and prognosis in COPD by examining genetic markers in the α1-antitrypsin, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and MBL-2 genes, and by examining the biochemical markers fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP, which correlate with degree of pulmonary inflammation during stable conditions of COPD. Chronic lung inflammation appears to contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD, and markers of this process have promising predictive value in COPD. To implement markers for COPD in clinical practice, besides those already established for the α1-antitrypsin gene, further research and validation studies are needed.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, biomarker, pathogenesis, prognosis, genetics

  7. Challenges assessing clinical endpoints in early Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Wang, Chiachi; Duff, Kevin; Barker, Roger; Nance, Martha; Beglinger, Leigh; Moser, David; Williams, Janet K.; Simpson, Sheila; Langbehn, Douglas; van Kammen, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the current accepted standard clinical endpoint for the earliest-studied HD participants likely to be recruited into clinical trials. Since the advent of genetic testing for HD, it is possible to identify gene carriers prior to the diagnosis of disease, which opens up the possibility of clinical trials of disease-modifying treatments in clinically asymptomatic persons. Current accepted standard clinical endpoints were examined as part of a multi-national, 32-site, longitudinal, observational study of 786 research participants currently in the HD prodrome (gene-positive but not clinically diagnosed). Clinical signs and symptoms were used to prospectively predict functional loss as assessed by current accepted standard endpoints over 8 years of follow up. Functional capacity measures were not sensitive for HD in the prodrome; over 88% scored at ceiling. Prospective evaluation revealed that the first functional loss was in their accustomed work. In a survival analysis, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric measures were all predictors of job change. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study ever conducted on the emergence of functional loss secondary to brain disease. We conclude that future clinical trials designed for very early disease will require the development of new and more sensitive measures of real-life function. PMID:20623772

  8. Rate of change in early Huntington's disease: a clinicometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Christina; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Schwenke, Carsten; Doble, Adam; Orth, Michael; Ludolph, Albert C

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive outcome measures for patients with Huntington's disease (HD) are required for future clinical trials. Longitudinal data were collected from a 3-year study of 379 patients suffering from early HD who were not treated by antipsychotics. Progression of UHDRS item scores was evaluated by linear regression and slope, whereas correlation coefficient, standard error, and P values were estimated on the basis of the data of eight evaluations from screening to study end (36 months). For the functional assessment dimension, the proportion of "no" responses at baseline and at study end was determined. Linear progression was observed for the motor score and for all three functional measures (i.e., functional assessment score, independence assessment score, and total functional capacity score). In contrast, there was little evidence for progression of the behavioral assessment score over the study period, whereas the cognitive assessment score was intermediate. Twenty-two motor-score items showed linear progression, with a slope of >0.003. These included all chorea items, finger tapping and pronation/supination (left and right), gait, tongue protrusion, and tandem walking. Different symptom domains and individual items evolved at different rates in this group of patients suffering from early HD. It may be possible to select sensitive items to create a simplified version of the UHDRS, which would be more efficient and more sensitive for the assessment of disease progression in clinical trials and natural history studies.

  9. Successful Scene Encoding in Presymptomatic Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Willment, Kim Celone; Castrillon, Gabriel; Muniz, Martha; Lopera, Francisco; Budson, Andrew; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-01-01

    Brain regions critical to episodic memory are altered during the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, reliable means of identifying cognitively-normal individuals at higher risk to develop AD have not been established. To examine whether functional MRI can detect early functional changes associated with scene encoding in a group of presymptomatic presenilin-1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers. Participants were 39 young, cognitively-normal individuals from an autosomal dominant early-onset AD kindred, located in Antioquia, Colombia. Participants performed a functional MRI scene encoding task and a post-scan subsequent memory test. PSEN1 mutation carriers exhibited hyperactivation within medial temporal lobe regions (hippocampus,parahippocampal formation) during successful scene encoding compared to age-matched non-carriers. Hyperactivation in medial temporal lobe regions during scene encoding is seen in individuals genetically-determined to develop AD years before their clinical onset. Our findings will guide future research with the ultimate goal of using functional neuroimaging in the early detection of preclinical AD.

  10. Branched chain amino acid profile in early chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients is a predictor of prognosis during the first period of dialysis. Serum albumin is the most commonly used nutritional marker. Another index is plasma amino acid profile. Of these, the plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA, especially valine and leucine, correlate well with nutritional status. Plasma BCAAs were evaluated along with albumin and C-reactive protein in 15 patients of early stages of CKD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. A significant decrease in plasma valine, leucine and albumin levels was observed in CKD patients when compared with the controls (P <0.05. No significant difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels was observed between the two groups. Malnutrition seen in our CKD patients in the form of hypoalbuminemia and decreased concentrations of BCAA points to the need to evaluate the nutritional status in the early stages itself. Simple measures in the form of amino acid supplementation should be instituted early to decrease the morbidity and mortality before start of dialysis in these patients.

  11. Pramipexole for the treatment of early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Perez Lloret, Santiago; Rey, María Verónica; Ratti, Luca; Rascol, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    Pramipexole is a nonergolinic dopamine agonist, with high affinity for the D2 subfamily of dopamine receptors. Pramipexole is efficacious for the symptomatic treatment of early Parkinson's Disease (PD) and its early use, before that of levodopa can delay the emergence of levodopa-related motor complication. Dosage should be increased gradually from a starting dose of 0.375 mg/day up to a maximum of 4.5 mg/day in equally divided doses taken three times per day with pramipexole immediate-release or equivalent daily dosages once-daily with pramipexole extended-release. Pramipexole can also improve depressive symptoms and possibly health-related quality of life in PD. Nonetheless, its use is not devoid of tolerability problems. While peripheral adverse drug reactions, such as nausea, vomiting or orthostatic hypotension, can be effectively treated and usually pose few problems to most patients, neuropsychiatric events can seriously limit the use of pramipexole in some cases. Indeed, excessive daytime somnolence, impulse-control disorders, hallucinations or delusions can severely affect patients, causing important personal or social handicap. Patients should be informed about the risk of such neuropsychiatric complications and their presence should be actively detected at each consultation. More effort will have to be put into further studying the risk-benefit ratio of pramipexole and other dopamine agonists in the treatment of early PD.

  12. Academic proficiency in children after early congenital heart disease surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Swearingen, Christopher J; Melguizo, Maria S; Reeves, Rachel N; Rowell, Jacob A; Gibson, Neal; Holland, Greg; Bhutta, Adnan T; Kaiser, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-01

    Children with early surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) are known to have impaired neurodevelopment; their performance on school-age achievement tests and their need for special education remains largely unexplored. The study aimed to determine predictors of academic achievement at school age and placement in special education services among early CHD surgery survivors. Children with CHD surgery at codes. Predictors for achieving proficiency in literacy and mathematics and the receipt of special education were determined. Two hundred fifty-six children who attended Arkansas public schools and who had surgery as infants were included; 77.7 % had either school-age achievement-test scores or special-education codes of mental retardation or multiple disabilities. Scores on achievement tests for these children were 7-13 % lower than those of Arkansas students (p < 0.01). They had an eightfold increase in receipt of special education due to multiple disabilities [odds ratio (OR) 10.66, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.23-22.35] or mental retardation (OR 4.96, 95 % CI 2.6-8.64). Surgery after the neonatal period was associated with decreased literacy proficiency, and cardiopulmonary bypass during the first surgery was associated with decreased mathematics proficiency. Children who had early CHD surgery were less proficient on standardized school assessments, and many received special education. This is concerning because achievement-test scores at school age are "real-world" predictors of long-term outcomes.

  13. Associations between Early Markers of Parkinson's Disease and Sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drey, Michael; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Krenovsky, Jan-Peter; Hobert, Markus A.; Straub, Stefanie; Elshehabi, Morad; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Suenkel, Ulrike; Berg, Daniela; Maetzler, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sarcopenia and Parkinson's disease (PD) are both common age-related syndromes, and there is preliminary evidence that the probability of the co-occurrence of these syndromes within one individual is higher than expected. However, it is unclear to date whether one of the syndromes induces the other, or whether there may be common underlying causes. This pilot study thus aimed at investigating the association of the features of increased risk for PD with early stage sarcopenia (ESS). Method: Two hundred and fifty-five community-dwelling individuals were recruited from the Tübinger evaluation of Risk factors for Early detection of NeuroDegeneration (TREND) study. The following features that are associated with an increased risk for future PD were evaluated: the motor part of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, prevalence of lifetime depression, hyposmia, REM sleep behavior disorder and the recently introduced probability score for prodromal PD. Sarcopenia was defined according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People, which was adapted to this cohort of healthy adults. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify associations of PD-related features with ESS. Results: The UPDRS-III score was significantly associated with ESS. The result remained significant after the adjustment for age, gender and physical activity. No association was found between the other PD-related features and ESS. Conclusion: The significant association of the UPDRS-III score with ESS in this cohort might indicate a common and early pathway in both diseases and supports the existence of an “extended neurodegenerative overlap syndrome.” Moreover, the potential of EES to serve as a prodromal marker of PD should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:28326036

  14. Primary vision and facial emotion recognition in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Géraldine; Diederich, Nico J; Pieria, Vannina; Vaillant, Michel

    2014-03-15

    In early stages of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), lower order vision (LOV) deficits including reduced colour and contrast discrimination have been consistently reported. Data are less conclusive concerning higher order vision (HOV) deficits, especially for facial emotion recognition (FER). However, a link between both visual levels has been hypothesized. To screen for both levels of visual impairment in early IPD. We prospectively recruited 28 IPD patients with disease duration of 1.4+/-0.8 years and 25 healthy controls. LOV was evaluated by Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test, Vis-Tech and Pelli-Robson test. HOV was examined by the Ekman 60 Faces Test and part A of the Visual Object and Space recognition test. IPD patients performed worse than controls on almost all LOV tests. The most prominent difference was seen for contrast perception at the lowest spatial frequency (p=0.0002). Concerning FER IPD patients showed reduced recognition of "sadness" (p=0.01). "Fear" perception was correlated with perception of low contrast sensitivity in IPD patients within the lowest performance quartile. Controls showed a much stronger link between "fear" perception" and low contrast detection. At the early IPD stage there are marked deficits of LOV performances, while HOV performances are still intact, with the exception of reduced recognition of "sadness". At this stage, IPD patients seem still to compensate the deficient input of low contrast sensitivity, known to be pivotal for appreciation of negative facial emotions and confirmed as such for healthy controls in this study. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Early energy deficit in Huntington disease: identification of a plasma biomarker traceable during disease progression.

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    Fanny Mochel

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, with no effective treatment. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD has not been elucidated, but weight loss, associated with chorea and cognitive decline, is a characteristic feature of the disease that is accessible to investigation. We, therefore, performed a multiparametric study exploring body weight and the mechanisms of its loss in 32 presymptomatic carriers and HD patients in the early stages of the disease, compared to 21 controls. We combined this study with a multivariate statistical analysis of plasma components quantified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H NMR spectroscopy. We report evidence of an early hypermetabolic state in HD. Weight loss was observed in the HD group even in presymptomatic carriers, although their caloric intake was higher than that of controls. Inflammatory processes and primary hormonal dysfunction were excluded. (1H NMR spectroscopy on plasma did, however, distinguish HD patients at different stages of the disease and presymptomatic carriers from controls. This distinction was attributable to low levels of the branched chain amino acids (BCAA, valine, leucine and isoleucine. BCAA levels were correlated with weight loss and, importantly, with disease progression and abnormal triplet repeat expansion size in the HD1 gene. Levels of IGF1, which is regulated by BCAA, were also significantly lower in the HD group. Therefore, early weight loss in HD is associated with a systemic metabolic defect, and BCAA levels may be used as a biomarker, indicative of disease onset and early progression. The decreased plasma levels of BCAA may correspond to a critical need for Krebs cycle energy substrates in the brain that increased metabolism in the periphery is trying to provide.

  16. Disease Management of Early Childhood Caries: ECC Collaborative Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Man Wai; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Lieberman, Martin; Lee, Jessica Y; Scoville, Richard; Hannon, Cindy; Maramaldi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the standard of care for early childhood caries (ECC) has been primarily surgical and restorative treatment with little emphasis on preventing and managing the disease itself. It is now recognized that surgical treatment alone does not address the underlying etiology of the disease. Despite costly surgeries and reparative treatment, the onset and progression of caries are likely to continue. A successful rebalance of risk and protective factors may prevent, slow down, or even arrest dental caries and its progression. An 18-month risk-based chronic disease management (DM) approach to address ECC in preschool children was implemented as a quality improvement (QI) collaborative by seven teams of oral health care providers across the United States. In the aggregate, fewer DM children experienced new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the operating room (OR) for restorative treatment compared to baseline historical controls. The teams found that QI methods facilitated adoption of the DM approach and resulted in improved care to patients and better outcomes overall. Despite these successes, the wide scale adoption and spread of the DM approach may be limited unless health policy and payment reforms are enacted to compensate providers for implementing DM protocols in their practice.

  17. Disease Management of Early Childhood Caries: ECC Collaborative Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Wai Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the standard of care for early childhood caries (ECC has been primarily surgical and restorative treatment with little emphasis on preventing and managing the disease itself. It is now recognized that surgical treatment alone does not address the underlying etiology of the disease. Despite costly surgeries and reparative treatment, the onset and progression of caries are likely to continue. A successful rebalance of risk and protective factors may prevent, slow down, or even arrest dental caries and its progression. An 18-month risk-based chronic disease management (DM approach to address ECC in preschool children was implemented as a quality improvement (QI collaborative by seven teams of oral health care providers across the United States. In the aggregate, fewer DM children experienced new cavitation, pain, and referrals to the operating room (OR for restorative treatment compared to baseline historical controls. The teams found that QI methods facilitated adoption of the DM approach and resulted in improved care to patients and better outcomes overall. Despite these successes, the wide scale adoption and spread of the DM approach may be limited unless health policy and payment reforms are enacted to compensate providers for implementing DM protocols in their practice.

  18. Saliva: an emerging biofluid for early detection of diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Wong, David T

    2009-08-01

    The capability to assess physiological states, detect morbidity initiation and progression, and monitor posttreatment therapeutic outcomes through a noninvasive approach is one of the most desirable goals for healthcare research and delivery. Saliva, a multi-constituent oral fluid, has high potential for the surveillance of general health and disease. To reach the above goal through saliva-based diagnostics, two prerequisites must be fulfilled: (1) discovering biomarker(s) for different diseases among the complicated components of saliva, and (2) advancing sensitivity and specificity of biomarker(s) through persistent development of technologies. Under the support and research blueprint initiated by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), salivary diagnostics has not only steadily progressed with respect to accuracy and availability, but has also bridged up-to-date nanotechnology to expand the areas of application. With collective efforts over several years, saliva has been demonstrated to be a promising bodily fluid for early detection of diseases, and salivary diagnostics has exhibited tremendous potential in clinical applications. This review presents an overview of the value of saliva as a credible diagnostic tool, the discovery of salivary biomarkers, and the development of salivary diagnostics now and in the future.

  19. A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Mika; Gawel, Danuta; Alfredsson, Lars; Baranzini, Sergio; Bjorkander, Janne; Blomgran, Robert; Hellberg, Sandra; Eklund, Daniel; Ernerudh, Jan; KOCKUM, Ingrid; Konstantinell, Aelita; Lahesmaa, Riita; Lentini, Antonio; Liljenström, H. Robert I.; Mattson, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorph...

  20. Subjective cognitive impairment: Towards early identification of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, S; Eriksdotter, M; Jelic, V; Porta-Etessam, J; Kåreholt, I; Manzano Palomo, S

    2016-10-01

    Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease (AD) begins decades before dementia and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) already demonstrate significant lesion loads. Lack of information about the early pathophysiology in AD complicates the search for therapeutic strategies.Subjective cognitive impairment is the description given to subjects who have memory-related complaints without pathological results on neuropsychological tests. There is no consensus regarding this heterogeneous syndrome, but at least some of these patients may represent the earliest stage in AD. We reviewed available literature in order to summarise current knowledge on subjective cognitive impairment. Although they may not present detectable signs of disease, SCI patients as a group score lower on neuropsychological tests than the general population does, and they also have a higher incidence of future cognitive decline. Depression and psychiatric co-morbidity play a role but cannot account for all cognitive complaints. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in these patients reveal a pattern of hippocampal atrophy similar to that of amnestic mild cognitive impairment and functional MRI shows increased activation during cognitive tasks which might indicate compensation for loss of function. Prevalence of an AD-like pattern of beta-amyloid (Aβ42) and tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid is higher in SCI patients than in the general population. Memory complaints are relevant symptoms and may predict AD. Interpatient variability and methodological differences between clinical studies make it difficult to assign a definition to this syndrome. In the future, having a standard definition and longitudinal studies with sufficient follow-up times and an emphasis on quantifiable variables may clarify aspects of early AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Life Nutrition, Epigenetics and Programming of Later Life Disease

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    Mark H. Vickers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The global pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes is often causally linked to marked changes in diet and lifestyle; namely marked increases in dietary intakes of high energy diets and concomitant reductions in physical activity levels. However, less attention has been paid to the role of developmental plasticity and alterations in phenotypic outcomes resulting from altered environmental conditions during the early life period. Human and experimental animal studies have highlighted the link between alterations in the early life environment and increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in later life. This link is conceptualised as the developmental programming hypothesis whereby environmental influences during critical periods of developmental plasticity can elicit lifelong effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. In particular, the nutritional environment in which the fetus or infant develops influences the risk of metabolic disorders in offspring. The late onset of such diseases in response to earlier transient experiences has led to the suggestion that developmental programming may have an epigenetic component, as epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation or histone tail modifications could provide a persistent memory of earlier nutritional states. Moreover, evidence exists, at least from animal models, that such epigenetic programming should be viewed as a transgenerational phenomenon. However, the mechanisms by which early environmental insults can have long-term effects on offspring are relatively unclear. Thus far, these mechanisms include permanent structural changes to the organ caused by suboptimal levels of an important factor during a critical developmental period, changes in gene expression caused by epigenetic modifications (including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA and permanent changes in cellular ageing. A better understanding of the epigenetic basis of developmental programming and how

  2. Early life nutrition, epigenetics and programming of later life disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Mark H

    2014-06-02

    The global pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes is often causally linked to marked changes in diet and lifestyle; namely marked increases in dietary intakes of high energy diets and concomitant reductions in physical activity levels. However, less attention has been paid to the role of developmental plasticity and alterations in phenotypic outcomes resulting from altered environmental conditions during the early life period. Human and experimental animal studies have highlighted the link between alterations in the early life environment and increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in later life. This link is conceptualised as the developmental programming hypothesis whereby environmental influences during critical periods of developmental plasticity can elicit lifelong effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. In particular, the nutritional environment in which the fetus or infant develops influences the risk of metabolic disorders in offspring. The late onset of such diseases in response to earlier transient experiences has led to the suggestion that developmental programming may have an epigenetic component, as epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation or histone tail modifications could provide a persistent memory of earlier nutritional states. Moreover, evidence exists, at least from animal models, that such epigenetic programming should be viewed as a transgenerational phenomenon. However, the mechanisms by which early environmental insults can have long-term effects on offspring are relatively unclear. Thus far, these mechanisms include permanent structural changes to the organ caused by suboptimal levels of an important factor during a critical developmental period, changes in gene expression caused by epigenetic modifications (including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA) and permanent changes in cellular ageing. A better understanding of the epigenetic basis of developmental programming and how these effects may be

  3. Early developing celiac disease in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Reidun; Kaukinen, Katri; Bengtsson, Mats; Lindberg, Eva; Dahle, Charlotte

    2011-12-01

    We have reported on increased levels of antibodies against gliadin and/or transglutaminase 2 (TG2) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) but without having increased prevalence of celiac disease (CD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether these children have mucosal signs of early developing CD, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/DQ8, and antibodies against deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP). Stored blood samples from 16 children with CP were analyzed regarding HLA-DQ2/DQ8 and anti-DGP antibodies. HLA-DQ2/DQ8 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Anti-DGP antibodies were analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Small-bowel biopsies from 15 of these children were available for immunohistochemistry regarding IgA colocalized with TG2, densities of α/β+ and γ/δ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes. Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits colocalized with TG2 were found in the small-bowel biopsy from 1 patient with serum IgA-class anti-TG2 antibodies, HLA-DQ2, and gastrointestinal complaints. Another 2 children had slightly increased numbers of mucosal α/β+ and/or γ/δ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes. In total, 10 of 16 children were HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8-positive. Anti-DGP antibodies were detected in sera from 4 of 16 children. In the present study, 1 child with CP had IgA colocalizing with TG2 in the small-bowel mucosa, suggesting CD at an early stage. Although the majority of children with CP and elevated levels of CD-related seromarkers are HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8-positive, they have neither classical nor early developing CD.

  4. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  5. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  6. Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Meraz-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in elderly adults. It is estimated that 10% of the world’s population aged more than 60–65 years could currently be affected by AD, and that in the next 20 years, there could be more than 30 million people affected by this pathology. One of the great challenges in this regard is that AD is not just a scientific problem; it is associated with major psychosocial and ethical dilemmas and has a negative impact on national economies. The neurodegenerative process that occurs in AD involves a specific nervous cell dysfunction, which leads to neuronal death. Mutations in APP, PS1, and PS2 genes are causes for early onset AD. Several animal models have demonstrated that alterations in these proteins are able to induce oxidative damage, which in turn favors the development of AD. This paper provides a review of many, although not all, of the mutations present in patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease and the association between some of these mutations with both oxidative damage and the development of the pathology.

  7. Special features of Graves' disease in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segni, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoncini, B; Pucarelli, I; Pasquino, A M

    1999-09-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is extremely rare in children younger than 4 years of age, but if not recognized and treated it can seriously interfere with growth and development. We report three unrelated children, all females, in whom GD occurred before the age of 3. These children presented with goiter, exophthalmos, tachycardia, and hyperactivity. Moreover, one showed a severe psychomotor delay, and had previously undergone surgery due to craniosynostosis; the other two manifested a language delay. All had high thyroid hormones and thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) serum levels that clearly indicated autoimmune hyperthyroidism. In all of them, the disease presumably had developed during the first or second year of life. No maternal history of GD was present in two. The third child was born to a mother affected with GD during pregnancy, but it is likely that her GD began to develop after 6 months of life. These children are being treated with methimazole, and treatment is still necessary after 32 months. TRAb levels were persistently high at follow-up. Psychological evaluation including language development at follow-up was appropriate for age in two children; the third child improved, but severe mental retardation is still evident. GD assessment in early childhood also needs to focus on psychological evaluation. Pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of permanent brain damage and craniosynostosis due to hyperthyroidism in infancy.

  8. Identifying early changes in myocardial microstructure in hypertensive heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranoti Hiremath

    Full Text Available The transition from healthy myocardium to hypertensive heart disease is characterized by a series of poorly understood changes in myocardial tissue microstructure. Incremental alterations in the orientation and integrity of myocardial fibers can be assessed using advanced ultrasonic image analysis. We used a modified algorithm to investigate left ventricular myocardial microstructure based on analysis of the reflection intensity at the myocardial-pericardial interface on B-mode echocardiographic images. We evaluated the extent to which the novel algorithm can differentiate between normal myocardium and hypertensive heart disease in humans as well as in a mouse model of afterload resistance. The algorithm significantly differentiated between individuals with uncomplicated essential hypertension (N = 30 and healthy controls (N = 28, even after adjusting for age and sex (P = 0.025. There was a trend in higher relative wall thickness in hypertensive individuals compared to controls (P = 0.08, but no difference between groups in left ventricular mass (P = 0.98 or total wall thickness (P = 0.37. In mice, algorithm measurements (P = 0.026 compared with left ventricular mass (P = 0.053 more clearly differentiated between animal groups that underwent fixed aortic banding, temporary aortic banding, or sham procedure, on echocardiography at 7 weeks after surgery. Based on sonographic signal intensity analysis, a novel imaging algorithm provides an accessible, non-invasive measure that appears to differentiate normal left ventricular microstructure from myocardium exposed to chronic afterload stress. The algorithm may represent a particularly sensitive measure of the myocardial changes that occur early in the course of disease progression.

  9. Identifying early changes in myocardial microstructure in hypertensive heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Pranoti; Bauer, Michael; Aguirre, Aaron D; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Unno, Kazumasa; Patel, Ravi B; Harvey, Bethany W; Chang, Wei-Ting; Groarke, John D; Liao, Ronglih; Cheng, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The transition from healthy myocardium to hypertensive heart disease is characterized by a series of poorly understood changes in myocardial tissue microstructure. Incremental alterations in the orientation and integrity of myocardial fibers can be assessed using advanced ultrasonic image analysis. We used a modified algorithm to investigate left ventricular myocardial microstructure based on analysis of the reflection intensity at the myocardial-pericardial interface on B-mode echocardiographic images. We evaluated the extent to which the novel algorithm can differentiate between normal myocardium and hypertensive heart disease in humans as well as in a mouse model of afterload resistance. The algorithm significantly differentiated between individuals with uncomplicated essential hypertension (N = 30) and healthy controls (N = 28), even after adjusting for age and sex (P = 0.025). There was a trend in higher relative wall thickness in hypertensive individuals compared to controls (P = 0.08), but no difference between groups in left ventricular mass (P = 0.98) or total wall thickness (P = 0.37). In mice, algorithm measurements (P = 0.026) compared with left ventricular mass (P = 0.053) more clearly differentiated between animal groups that underwent fixed aortic banding, temporary aortic banding, or sham procedure, on echocardiography at 7 weeks after surgery. Based on sonographic signal intensity analysis, a novel imaging algorithm provides an accessible, non-invasive measure that appears to differentiate normal left ventricular microstructure from myocardium exposed to chronic afterload stress. The algorithm may represent a particularly sensitive measure of the myocardial changes that occur early in the course of disease progression.

  10. Longitudinal assessment of excessive daytime sleepiness in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Amy W; Chahine, Lama M; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Long, Jeffrey D; Coffey, Christopher; Högl, Birgit; Videnovic, Aleksandar; Iranzo, Alex; Mayer, Geert; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Postuma, Ron; Oertel, Wolfgang; Lasch, Shirley; Marek, Ken; Simuni, Tanya

    2017-08-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is common and disabling in Parkinson's disease (PD). Predictors of EDS are unclear, and data on biological correlates of EDS in PD are limited. We investigated clinical, imaging and biological variables associated with longitudinal changes in sleepiness in early PD. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative is a prospective cohort study evaluating progression markers in participants with PD who are unmedicated at baseline (n=423) and healthy controls (HC; n=196). EDS was measured with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Clinical, biological and imaging variables were assessed for associations with EDS for up to 3 years. A machine learning approach (random survival forests) was used to investigate baseline predictors of incident EDS. ESS increased in PD from baseline to year 3 (mean±SD 5.8±3.5 to 7.55±4.6, p<0.0001), with no change in HC. Longitudinally, EDS in PD was associated with non-tremor dominant phenotype, autonomic dysfunction, depression, anxiety and probable behaviour disorder, but not cognitive dysfunction or motor severity. Dopaminergic therapy was associated with EDS at years 2 and 3, as dose increased. EDS was also associated with presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction, whereas biofluid markers at year 1 showed no significant associations with EDS. A predictive index for EDS was generated, which included seven baseline characteristics, including non-motor symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated-tau/total-tau ratio. In early PD, EDS increases significantly over time and is associated with several clinical variables. The influence of dopaminergic therapy on EDS is dose dependent. Further longitudinal analyses will better characterise associations with imaging and biomarkers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Locomotor function in the early stage of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Crenna, Paolo; Calabrese, Elena; Rabuffetti, Marco; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Nemni, Raffaello; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    The cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been widely investigated with particular reference to abnormalities of steady-state walking. The great majority of studies, however are related to severe forms of PD patients (phases > = 3 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), where locomotor abnormalities are clearly manifested. Goal of the present study was to quantitatively describe locomotor symptoms in subjects with mild PD. Accordingly, a multitask protocol involving instrumental analysis of steady-state linear walking, initiation of gait, and turning while walking was applied to a group of patients with idiopathic PD in their early clinical stage (phases 1 and 2 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), as well as in age-matched elderly controls. Kinematic, kinetic, and myoelectric measures were obtained by optoelectronic motion analysis, force platform, and telemetric electromyography. Results in PD patients showed a tendency to bradykinetic gait, with reduction of walking speed and cadence. Impairments of gait initiation consisted in reduction of the backward shift of the center of pressure (CoP) and prolongation of the stepping phase. Alterations of the turning task were more consistent and included delayed reorientation of the head toward the new direction, altered head-upper trunk rotational strategy, and adoption of a greater number of steps to complete the turning. It is concluded that patients in the early stage of PD reveal mild alterations of steady-state linear walking and more significant anomalies in the transitional conditions, especially during changes in the travel direction. Quantitative analysis of nonstationary locomotor tasks might be a potentially useful starting point for further studies on the pathophysiology of PD.

  12. Functional integration of parietal lobe activity in early Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, H I L; Van Boxtel, M P J; Heinecke, A; Gronenschild, E H B M; Backes, W H; Ramakers, I H G B; Jolles, J; Verhey, F R J

    2012-01-31

    Parietal lobe dysfunction is an important characteristic of early Alzheimer disease (AD). Functional studies have shown conflicting parietal activation patterns indicative of either compensatory or dysfunctional mechanisms. This study aimed at examining activation differences in early AD using a visuospatial task. We focused on functional characteristics of the parietal lobe and examined compensation or disconnection mechanisms by combining a fMRI task with effective connectivity measures from Granger causality mapping (GCM). Eighteen male patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and 18 male cognitively healthy older individuals were given a mental rotation task with different rotation angles. There were no behavioral group differences on the fMRI task. Separate measurements at each angle revealed widespread activation group differences. More temporal and parietal activation in the higher angle condition was observed in patients with aMCI. The parametric modulation, which identifies regions associated with increasing angle, confirmed these results. The GCM showed increased connectivity within the parietal lobe and between parietal and temporal regions in patients with aMCI. Decreased connectivity was found between the inferior parietal lobule and posterior cingulate gyrus. Connectivity patterns correlated with memory performance scores in patients with aMCI. Our results demonstrate increased effective temporoparietal connectivity in patients with aMCI, while maintaining intact behavioral performance. This might be a compensational mechanism to counteract a parietal-posterior cingulate gyrus disconnection. These findings highlight the importance of connectivity changes in the pathophysiology of AD. In addition, effective connectivity may be a promising method for evaluating interventions aimed at the promotion of compensatory mechanisms.

  13. Effects of pyrene exposure and temperature on early development of two co-existing Arctic copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grenvald, Julie Cornelius; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Hjorth, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Oil exploration is expected to increase in the near future in Western Greenland. At present, effects of exposure to oil compounds on early life-stages of the ecologically important Calanus spp. are unknown. We investigated the effects of the oil compound pyrene, on egg hatching and naupliar devel...

  14. Early Congenital Syphilis: Recognising Symptoms of an Increasingly Prevalent Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nupur U; Oussedik, Elias; Landis, Erin T; Strowd, Lindsay C

    2017-08-01

    Congenital syphilis (CS) is an infectious disease resulting from transplacental transmission of Treponema pallidum spirochetes from an infected mother to fetus during pregnancy. While uncommon, CS has shown an increased incidence in Canada and the United States since 2001 and 2012, respectively. We present the case of a 5-week-old female infant with blistering rash on the palms and soles. The infant displayed decreased movement of the left upper extremity, clinically consistent with Parrot pseudoparalysis. Cutaneous involvement was limited to few tan crusted papules on the palms and soles. Mother reported a "false-positive" result of rapid plasma reagin (RPR) testing at 31 weeks. Cerebrospinal fluid studies of the infant resulted with positive Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VRDL) test and positive microhemagglutination assay (MHA-TP). Histopathology of a crusted papule revealed a lichenoid infiltrate composed of lymphocytes, histiocytes, and plasma cells. Immunohistochemical staining for T pallidum was negative. The patient completed treatment with a 10-day course of intravenous penicillin. While CS is largely considered a historic entity, it has been increasing in incidence in the United States since 2012 and in Canada since the early 2000s. Diagnosis of CS can be difficult as infants may be asymptomatic or present with nonspecific signs. This case highlights the presentation of minimal cutaneous involvement as well as skeletal involvement after birth. RPR testing may result in false negatives or indeterminate results, further complicating diagnosis. Given these difficulties in screening and the increasing incidence of CS, clinicians may need to refamiliarise themselves with its clinical findings.

  15. Perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid or early azathioprine/biological therapy are predictors of disease behavior change in patients with Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Laszlo Lakatos; Zsofia Czegledi; Tamas Szamosi; Janos Banai; Gyula David; Ferenc Zsigmond; Tunde Pandur; Zsuzsanna Erdelyi; Orsolya Gemela; Janos Papp; Laszlo Lakatos

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the combined effect of disease phenotype, smoking and medical therapy [steroid, azathioprine (AZA), AZA/biological therapy] on the probability of disease behavior change in a Caucasian cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Three hundred and forty well-characterized, unrelated, consecutive CD patients were analyzed (M/F: 155/185, duration: 9.4 ± 7.5 years) with a complete clinical follow-up. Medical records including disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification, extraintestinal manifestations, use of medications and surgical events were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were interviewed on their smoking habits at the time of diagnosis and during the regular follow-up visits. RESULTS: A change in disease behavior was observed in 30.8% of patients with an initially non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease behavior after a mean disease duration of 9.0 ± 7.2 years. In a logistic regression analysis corrected for disease duration, perianal disease, smoking, steroid use, early AZA or AZA/ biological therapy use were independent predictors of disease behavior change. In a subsequent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a proportional Cox regression analysis, disease location ( P = 0.001), presence of perianal disease ( P < 0.001), prior steroid use ( P = 0.006), early AZA ( P = 0.005) or AZA/biological therapy ( P = 0.002), or smoking ( P = 0.032) were independent predictors of disease behavior change. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that perianal disease, small bowel disease, smoking, prior steroid use, early AZA or AZA/biological therapy are all predictors of disease behavior change in CD patients.

  16. Early severe HIV disease precedes early antiretroviral therapy in infants: Are we too late?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Innes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the degree of HIV disease progression in infants initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART by three months of age in a programmatic setting in South Africa. Design: This was a programmatic cohort study. Methods: Electronic and manual data extraction from databases and antiretroviral registers in 20 public clinics in Cape Town and electronic data extraction from a large ART service at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto were performed. Records of all infants initiated on ART by three months of age between June 2007 and September 2010 were extracted. Demographics, immunological and clinical stage at ART initiation were analyzed descriptively by chi-square, two-sample t-test and Kaplan–Meier methods. Results: A total of 403 records were identified: 88 in Cape Town and 315 in Soweto. Median age at ART initiation was 8.4 [interquartile range (IQR: 7.2–9.7] weeks. At ART initiation, 250 infants (62% had advanced HIV disease (CD4% <25% or absolute CD4<1500 cells/mm3 or WHO clinical Stage 3 or 4. Median age at ART initiation by site was 10.3 (IQR: 8.2–11.9 weeks in Cape Town and 8.6 (IQR: 7.7–10.0 weeks in Soweto infants (p<0.0001. In Cape Town, 73 infants (83% had advanced HIV disease at ART initiation, compared to 177 infants (56% in Soweto (p<0.0001. On logistic regression, each month increase in age at ART initiation lowered the odds of initiating ART in an optimal state (OR: 0.56, CI: 0.36–0.94 and increased the odds of advanced HIV disease at ART initiation (OR: 1.69, CI: 1.05–2.71. Conclusions: ART initiation by three months of age may not adequately prevent disease progression. New emphasis on early diagnosis and rapid initiation of ART in the first weeks of life are essential to further reduce infant mortality.

  17. Cortical gyrification and sulcal spans in early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by an insidious onset of progressive cerebral atrophy and cognitive decline. Previous research suggests that cortical folding and sulcal width are associated with cognitive function in elderly individuals, and the aim of the present study was to investigate these morphological measures in patients with AD. The sample contained 161 participants, comprising 80 normal controls, 57 patients with very mild AD, and 24 patients with mild AD. From 3D T1-weighted brain scans, automated methods were used to calculate an index of global cortex gyrification and the width of five individual sulci: superior frontal, intra-parietal, superior temporal, central, and Sylvian fissure. We found that global cortex gyrification decreased with increasing severity of AD, and that the width of all individual sulci investigated other than the intra-parietal sulcus was greater in patients with mild AD than in controls. We also found that cognitive functioning, as assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores, decreased as global cortex gyrification decreased. MMSE scores also decreased in association with a widening of all individual sulci investigated other than the intra-parietal sulcus. The results suggest that abnormalities of global cortex gyrification and regional sulcal span are characteristic of patients with even very mild AD, and could thus facilitate the early diagnosis of this condition.

  18. New NIA Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... you have a family member or friends with Alzheimer's disease? Are you wondering what they're going through ...

  19. Early complications of stenting in patients with congenital heart disease : a multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gameren, Menno; Witsenburg, Maarten; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Boshoff, Derize; Mertens, Luc; van Oort, Anton M.; de Wolf, DanieL; Freund, Matthias; Sreeram, Narayanswani; Bokenkamp, Regina; Talsma, Melle D.; Gewillig, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Aims Stenting has become an established interventional cardiology procedure for congenital heart disease. Although most stent procedures are completed successfully, complications may occur. This multicentre study evaluated early complications after stenting in patients with congenital heart disease,

  20. Performance of classification criteria for gout in early and established disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, William J; Fransen, Jaap; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    -cases. Sensitivity across criteria was better in established disease (95.3% vs 84.1%, pbest performing clinical criteria were the Rome criteria with sensitivity/specificity in early and established disease of 60...

  1. To Know or Not to Know: Ethical Issues Related to Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Mattsson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, pathological processes start in the brain long before clinical dementia. Biomarkers reflecting brain alterations may therefore indicate disease at an early stage, enabling early diagnosis. This raises several ethical questions and the potential benefits of early diagnosis must be weighted against possible disadvantages. Currently, there are few strong arguments favouring early diagnosis, due to the lack of disease modifying therapy. Also, available diagnostic methods risk erroneous classifications, with potentially grave consequences. However, a possible benefit of early diagnosis even without disease modifying therapy is that it may enable early decision making when patients still have full decision competence, avoiding problems of hypothetical consents. It may also help identifying patients with cognitive dysfunction secondary to other diseases that may be responsive to treatment already today.

  2. Is early limited surgery associated with a more benign disease course in Crohn’s disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovics, Petra Anna; Lakatos, Laszlo; Nagy, Attila; Pandur, Tunde; Szita, Istvan; Balogh, Mihaly; Molnar, Csaba; Komaromi, Erzsebet; Lovasz, Barbara Dorottya; Mandel, Michael; Veres, Gabor; Kiss, Lajos S; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the difference in disease course and need for surgery in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Data of 506 patients with incident CD were analyzed (age at diagnosis: 31.5 ± 13.8 years). Both hospital and outpatient records were collected prospectively with a complete clinical follow-up and comprehensively reviewed in the population-based Veszprem province database, which includes incident CD patients diagnosed between January 1, 1977 and December 31, 2008. Follow-up data were collected until December 31, 2009. All patients included had at least 1 year of follow-up available. Patients with indeterminate colitis at diagnosis were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 73 patients (14.4%) required resective surgery within 1 year of diagnosis. Steroid exposure and need for biological therapy were lower in patients with early limited surgery (P < 0.001 and P = 0.09). In addition, surgery rates during follow-up in patients with and without early surgery differed significantly after matching on propensity scores (P < 0.001, HR = 0.23). The need for reoperation was also lower in patients with early limited resective surgery (P = 0.038, HR = 0.42) in a Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression (P = 0.04) analysis. However, this advantage was not observed after matching on propensity scores (PLogrank = 0.656, PBreslow = 0.498). CONCLUSION: Long-term surgery rates and overall exposure to steroids and biological agents were lower in patients with early limited resective surgery, but reoperation rates did not differ. PMID:24282358

  3. [Offer early attention and intervention to patients with valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shengli; Ren, Chonglei

    2015-02-01

    As a key feature of the updates, early intervention of valvular heart disease is highlighted in the 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease. This article reviewed the new guideline in regards to the issue of early intervention of diseases such as aortic stenosis, aortic insufficiency, mitral stenosis, mitral insufficiency, tricuspid insufficiency, and infective endocarditis, with discussion on the related topics according to the authors' understanding and practical experience in China. We conclude that valvular heart disease should receive early intervention and attention should also be paid on the progress of disease.

  4. Lung surfactant metabolism: early in life, early in disease and target in cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Mucci, Adele; Lachmann, Nico; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins lining the alveolar epithelium. At the air-liquid interface, surfactant lowers surface tension, avoiding alveolar collapse and reducing the work of breathing. The essential role of lung surfactant in breathing and therefore in life, is highlighted by surfactant deficiency in premature neonates, which causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and results in early death after birth. In addition, defects in surfactant metabolism alter lung homeostasis and lead to disease. Special attention should be paid to two important key cells responsible for surfactant metabolism: alveolar epithelial type II cells (AE2C) and alveolar macrophages (AM). On the one hand, surfactant deficiency coming from abnormal AE2C function results in high surface tension, promoting alveolar collapse and mechanical stress in the epithelium. This epithelial injury contributes to tissue remodeling and lung fibrosis. On the other hand, impaired surfactant catabolism by AM leads to accumulation of surfactant in air spaces and the associated altered lung function in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). We review here two recent cell therapies that aim to recover the activity of AE2C or AM, respectively, therefore targeting the restoring of surfactant metabolism and lung homeostasis. Applied therapies successfully show either transplantation of healthy AE2C in fibrotic lungs, to replace injured AE2C cells and surfactant, or transplantation of bone marrow-derived macrophages to counteract accumulation of surfactant lipid and proteinaceous material in the alveolar spaces leading to PAP. These therapies introduce an alternative treatment with great potential for patients suffering from lung diseases.

  5. Dream features in the early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, Paulo; Paiva, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Few studies have investigated the relation between dream features and cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD), although vivid dreams, hallucinations and cognitive decline have been proposed as successive steps of a pathological continuum. Our objectives were therefore to characterize the dreams of early stage PD and to study the relation between dream characteristics, cognitive function, motor status, depression, dopaminergic treatment, and the presence of REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and hallucinations. Dreams of 19 male PD patients and 21 matched control subjects were classified according to Hall and van de Castle system. h statistics was used to compare the dream content between patients and controls. We tested the relation between patients' dreams characteristics and cognitive function (Frontal assessment battery (FAB) and Mini-Mental State Examination tests) depression (Beck depression inventory), motor function (UPDRS), dopaminergic treatment, the presence of RBD (according to clinical criteria) and hallucinations, using general linear model statistics. Patients and controls differed only on FAB scores. Relevant differences in the Hall and van de Castle scale were found between patient's dreams and those of the control group, regarding animals, aggression/friendliness, physical aggression, befriender (higher in the patient group) and aggressor and bodily misfortunes (lower in the patient group) features. Cognitive and particularly frontal dysfunction had a significant influence on the frequency of physical aggression and animal related features, while dopaminergic doses, depressive symptoms, hallucinations and RBD did not. We found a pattern of dream alteration characterized by heightened aggressiveness and the presence of animals. These were related to more severe frontal dysfunction, which could be the origin of such changes.

  6. A possible new diagnostic biomarker in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kork, Felix; Holthues, Jan; Hellweg, Rainer;

    2009-01-01

    Early diagnosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of great importance since only a sufficient treatment in early stages of this disease helps to keep patients in an autonomous state for as long as possible. Until now, there is no single diagnostic biomarker for AD derived from material...

  7. Family history of premature death and risk of early onset cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Oyen, Nina;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a family history of premature death, cardiovascular death in particular, on the risk of early cardiovascular disease.......The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a family history of premature death, cardiovascular death in particular, on the risk of early cardiovascular disease....

  8. The association between early menopause and risk of ischaemic heart disease: Influence of Hormone Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Heitmann, B L

    2006-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials find no protection against development of ischaemic heart disease by use of Hormone Therapy (HT) after the age of 50 years. Observational studies suggest that early menopause is a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. Yet, a clinical very relevant question is whether...... HT reduces this risk associated with early menopause....

  9. Whole Exome Analysis of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    focus toward identification of Alzheimer disease (AD) risk genes over the past five years has been testing the common disease common variant (CDCV...hypothesis through the use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). While common variation clearly plays a role...12-25 4 INTRODUCTION: The primary focus in the identification of Alzheimer disease (AD) risk genes has focused on the common disease

  10. Impact of body mass index on breast cancer in accordance with the life-stage of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko eSuzuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of epidemiological evidence suggests that the impact of body weight on breast cancer risk should be heterogeneous throughout the life stage of women. At birth, high weight has been positively associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.While, the body mass index (a relative body weight; BMI kg/m2 has been inversely associated with breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. The inverse trend had been observed in both Western and Asian population, with a relatively lower percentage of obesity and higher percentage of leanness, suggested that the inverse trend could be explained not only due to the protective impact due to obesity, but also the increased risk of breast cancer due to leanness.Among postmenopausal women, however, an elevated BMI has been positively associated with the development of breast cancer, particularly in the cases of estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and progesterone receptor positive (PR+ tumors. Currently, the mechanisms underlying the heterogeneous impacts between BMI on breast cancer risk and the life stage of women remain poorly understood. We reviewed several proposed biological mechanisms that may contribute to the various impacts of relative body weight on breast cancer risk across life-stage. We also discussed the impact of BMI upon the outcome of endocrine therapy, particularly for aromatase inhibitor, in breast cancer patients. To prevent breast cancer incidence and recurrence, the desirable BMI of women may differ throughout their life-stage. To define the underlying mechanism for the various impacts of BMI in the context of breast cancer across various female life stages, further studies will be required.

  11. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S; Medland, Julia E; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-12-15

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted.

  12. Neurostimulation for Parkinson's disease with early motor complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuepbach, W.M.; Rau, J.; Knudsen, K.; Volkmann, J.; Krack, P.; Timmermann, L.; Halbig, T.D.; Hesekamp, H.; Navarro, S.M.; Meier, N.; Falk, D.; Mehdorn, M.; Paschen, S.; Maarouf, M.; Barbe, M.T.; Fink, G.R.; Kupsch, A.; Gruber, D.; Schneider, G.H.; Seigneuret, E.; Kistner, A.; Chaynes, P.; Ory-Magne, F.; Brefel Courbon, C.; Vesper, J.; Schnitzler, A.; Wojtecki, L.; Houeto, J.L.; Bataille, B.; Maltete, D.; Damier, P.; Raoul, S.; Sixel-Doering, F.; Hellwig, D.; Gharabaghi, A.; Kruger, R.; Pinsker, M.O.; Amtage, F.; Regis, J.M.; Witjas, T.; Thobois, S.; Mertens, P.; Kloss, M.; Hartmann, A.; Oertel, W.H.; Post, B.; Speelman, H.; Agid, Y.; Schade-Brittinger, C.; Deuschl, G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subthalamic stimulation reduces motor disability and improves quality of life in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who have severe levodopa-induced motor complications. We hypothesized that neurostimulation would be beneficial at an earlier stage of Parkinson's disease. METHODS:

  13. MPS I: Early diagnosis, and treatment of bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, S.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Patients present with a spectrum of symptoms, including progressive mental retardation and bone disease. To optimize outcome, ear

  14. MPS I: Early diagnosis, and treatment of bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, S.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Patients present with a spectrum of symptoms, including progressive mental retardation and bone disease. To optimize outcome, ear

  15. Autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bonifati (Vincenzo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence of 1-2% in the population aged 65 years.1 The disease is clinically defi ned by the presence of parkinsonism (the combination of akinesia, resting tremor, and muscul

  16. Metabolic differentiation of early Lyme disease from southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, Claudia R; Ashton, Laura V; Wormser, Gary P; Andre, Barbara G; Hess, Ann M; Delorey, Mark J; Pilgard, Mark A; Johnson, Barbara J; Webb, Kristofor; Islam, M Nurul; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Molla, Irida; Jewett, Mollie W; Belisle, John T

    2017-08-16

    Lyme disease, the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States, results from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Early clinical diagnosis of this disease is largely based on the presence of an erythematous skin lesion for individuals in high-risk regions. This, however, can be confused with other illnesses including southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI), an illness that lacks a defined etiological agent or laboratory diagnostic test, and is coprevalent with Lyme disease in portions of the eastern United States. By applying an unbiased metabolomics approach with sera retrospectively obtained from well-characterized patients, we defined biochemical and diagnostic differences between early Lyme disease and STARI. Specifically, a metabolic biosignature consisting of 261 molecular features (MFs) revealed that altered N-acyl ethanolamine and primary fatty acid amide metabolism discriminated early Lyme disease from STARI. Development of classification models with the 261-MF biosignature and testing against validation samples differentiated early Lyme disease from STARI with an accuracy of 85 to 98%. These findings revealed metabolic dissimilarity between early Lyme disease and STARI, and provide a powerful and new approach to inform patient management by objectively distinguishing early Lyme disease from an illness with nearly identical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. Development of a metabolic biosignature for detection of early Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, Claudia R; Ashton, Laura V; Wormser, Gary P; Hess, Ann M; Delorey, Mark J; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Schriefer, Martin E; Belisle, John T

    2015-06-15

    Early Lyme disease patients often present to the clinic prior to developing a detectable antibody response to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent. Thus, existing 2-tier serology-based assays yield low sensitivities (29%-40%) for early infection. The lack of an accurate laboratory test for early Lyme disease contributes to misconceptions about diagnosis and treatment, and underscores the need for new diagnostic approaches. Retrospective serum samples from patients with early Lyme disease, other diseases, and healthy controls were analyzed for small molecule metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A metabolomics data workflow was applied to select a biosignature for classifying early Lyme disease and non-Lyme disease patients. A statistical model of the biosignature was trained using the patients' LC-MS data, and subsequently applied as an experimental diagnostic tool with LC-MS data from additional patient sera. The accuracy of this method was compared with standard 2-tier serology. Metabolic biosignature development selected 95 molecular features that distinguished early Lyme disease patients from healthy controls. Statistical modeling reduced the biosignature to 44 molecular features, and correctly classified early Lyme disease patients and healthy controls with a sensitivity of 88% (84%-95%), and a specificity of 95% (90%-100%). Importantly, the metabolic biosignature correctly classified 77%-95% of the of serology negative Lyme disease patients. The data provide proof-of-concept that metabolic profiling for early Lyme disease can achieve significantly greater (P Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cognitive impairment in early-stage non-demented Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Helle Cecilie Viekilde; Løkkegaard, A; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) are common. PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing PDD. Knowledge of cognition in early-stages PD is essential in understanding and predicting the dementia process....

  19. Clinical zinc deficiency as early presentation of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Küry, Sébastien; De Bruyne, Ruth; Vanakker, Olivier M; Schmitt, Sébastien; Vande Velde, Saskia; Blouin, Eric; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Wilson disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP-ase Cu(2+) transporting polypeptide (ATP7B) gene. The copper accumulation in different organs leads to the suspicion of Wilson disease. We describe a child with clinical zinc deficiency as presenting symptom of Wilson disease, which was confirmed by 2 mutations within the ATP7B gene and an increased copper excretion.

  20. [Systemic diseases--the significance of early diagnosis exemplified by systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener's granulomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, H

    1993-12-01

    New therapeutic modalities have shown remarkable advances in the fields of systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener's granulomatosis. For an optimal clinical outcome therapy has to be started early and must be adapted to disease activity. Concerning these two points early diagnosis is essential. This aim can be reached by a detailed evaluation of the patient's history by focusing on early symptoms and on typical clinical constellations, taking into account that both diseases show a great variability and sometimes even an insidious course. Immunological tests, capillary microscopy, echocardiography and computed tomography can be very helpful in the diagnosis of these diseases.

  1. Early immune responses to Marek’s disease vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated lymphotropic 'alpha-herpesvirus, is the causative agent of Marek’s disease (MD) in domestic chickens. MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4+ T cells. The latently infected CD4+ T cells carry the vir...

  2. The chronic renal disease course: from early symptons to discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Fortunato Fortes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory and descriptive study with a qualitative approach aim at understanding the significance of the discovery of chronic kidney disease and the need for the hemodialysis machine. The research was made with twenty patients from two hemodialysis services of the city of RS. The data collection took place between September and December of 2007, throughout semi-structured interviews. The thematic analysis generated the following categories: history of chronic kidney disease, from the silence of the disease to the classical clinical symptoms; the discovery and its immediate effects; life after the discovery; acceptance of the dependence on a machine. We conclude that there is a need to adapt the daily life of patients with chronic kidney disease, because the hemodialysis causes physical and social changes, requiring support from health-team to manage the disease. The professional should not abdicate knowledge, safety and technical skill, as requirements to care.

  3. Towards an All-Polymer Biosensor for Early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Heegaard, Niels

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is quickly evolving into one of the biggest and most costly health issues in Europe and the United States. AD is a protein misfolding disease, caused by accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau protein in the brain. The build-up of protein is believed...... to degenerate the brain tissue literally shrinking the brain. This slowly destroys function of these parts of the brain. It has been discovered that the concentration of A42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a biomarker for this disease. It is therefor of great interest to develop quick and low cost methods...

  4. Interleukin-23 in early disease development in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, M; Johansen, C;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the levels of interleukin (IL)-23 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) and the effect of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-α treatment on IL-23 levels. METHOD: Treatment-naïve eRA patients from the OPERA cohort were included (n = 151). Patients were...

  5. Intestinal microbiota during early life - impact on health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Satokari, R.M.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the first years after birth, the intestinal microbiota develops rapidly both in diversity and complexity while being relatively stable in healthy adults. Different life-style-related factors as well as medical practices have an influence on the early-life intestinal colonisation. We address the i

  6. DNAJC6 Mutations Associated With Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olgiati, Simone; Quadri, Marialuisa; Fang, Mingyan; Rood, Janneke P. M. A.; Saute, Jonas A.; Chien, Hsin Fen; Bouwkamp, Christian G.; Graafland, Josja; Minneboo, Michelle; Breedveld, Guido J.; Zhang, Jianguo; Verheijen, Frans W.; Boon, Agnita J. W.; Kievit, Anneke J. A.; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Mandemakers, Wim; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Rieder, Carlos R. M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Wang, Jun; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    ObjectiveDNAJC6 mutations were recently described in two families with autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (onset age MethodsThe DNAJC6 open reading frame was analyzed in 274 patients with early-onset sporadic or familial PD. Selected variants were followed up by cosegregation, homozygosity

  7. Intestinal microbiota during early life - impact on health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Satokari, R.M.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the first years after birth, the intestinal microbiota develops rapidly both in diversity and complexity while being relatively stable in healthy adults. Different life-style-related factors as well as medical practices have an influence on the early-life intestinal colonisation. We address the i

  8. Intestinal microbiota during early life - impact on health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Satokari, R.M.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the first years after birth, the intestinal microbiota develops rapidly both in diversity and complexity while being relatively stable in healthy adults. Different life-style-related factors as well as medical practices have an influence on the early-life intestinal colonisation. We address the

  9. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramsey, Janine M; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely...

  10. Is epigenetics an important link between early life events and adult disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epigenetic mechanisms provide one potential explanation for how environmental influences in early life cause long-term changes in chronic disease susceptibility. Whereas epigenetic dysregulation is increasingly implicated in various rare developmental syndromes and cancer, the role of epigenetics in...

  11. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ... (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain...

  12. Salivaomics - A promising future in early diagnosis of dental diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Suneetha Koneru; Rambabu Tanikonda

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva plays an important role in the health of the oral cavity and of the body as a whole. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging field in the diagnosis of oral and systemic diseases. Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional, and metabolic variations. The collection of saliva samples is noninvasive, safe, and inexpensive. Traditional clinical criteria are insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring ...

  13. Predictive motor timing performance dissociates between early diseases of the cerebellum and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Martin; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Husárová, Ivica; Gescheidt, Tomás

    2010-03-01

    There is evidence that both the basal ganglia and the cerebellum play a role in the neural representation of time in a variety of behaviours, but whether one of them is more important is not yet clear. To address this question in the context of predictive motor timing, we tested patients with various movement disorders implicating these two structures in a motor-timing task. Specifically, we investigated four different groups: (1) patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD); (2) patients with sporadic spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA); (3) patients with familial essential tremor (ET); and (4) matched healthy controls. We used a predictive motor-timing task that involved mediated interception of a moving target, and we assessed the effect of movement type (acceleration, deceleration and constant), speed (slow, medium and fast) and angle (0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees) on performance (hit, early error and late error). The main results showed that PD group and arm ET subgroup did not significantly differ from the control group. SCA and head ET subjects (severe and mild cerebellar damage, respectively) were significantly worse at interception than the other two groups. Our findings support the idea that the basal ganglia play a less significant role in predictive motor timing than the cerebellum. The fact that SCA and ET subjects seemed to have a fundamental problem with predictive motor timing suggests that the cerebellum plays an essential role in integrating incoming visual information with the motor output in a timely manner, and that ET is a heterogeneous entity that deserves increased attention from clinicians.

  14. In utero and early life arsenic exposure in relation to long-term health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Karagas, Margaret R. [Children' s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Community and Family Medicine and Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Chen, Yu, E-mail: yu.chen@nyumc.org [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is a growing body of evidence that prenatal and early childhood exposure to arsenic from drinking water can have serious long-term health implications. Objectives: Our goal was to understand the potential long-term health and disease risks associated with in utero and early life exposure to arsenic, as well as to examine parallels between findings from epidemiological studies with those from experimental animal models. Methods: We examined the current literature and identified relevant studies through PubMed by using combinations of the search terms “arsenic”, “in utero”, “transplacental”, “prenatal” and “fetal”. Discussion: Ecological studies have indicated associations between in utero and/or early life exposure to arsenic at high levels and increases in mortality from cancer, cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease. Additional data from epidemiologic studies suggest intermediate effects in early life that are related to risk of these and other outcomes in adulthood. Experimental animal studies largely support studies in humans, with strong evidence of transplacental carcinogenesis, atherosclerosis and respiratory disease, as well as insight into potential underlying mechanisms of arsenic's health effects. Conclusions: As millions worldwide are exposed to arsenic and evidence continues to support a role for in utero arsenic exposure in the development of a range of later life diseases, there is a need for more prospective studies examining arsenic's relation to early indicators of disease and at lower exposure levels. - Highlights: • We review in utero and early-life As exposure impacts on lifelong disease risks. • Evidence indicates that early-life As increases risks of lung disease, cancer and CVD. • Animal work largely parallels human studies and may lead to new research directions. • Prospective studies and individual exposure assessments with biomarkers are needed. • Assessing intermediary

  15. Serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 in early rheumatoid arthritis is correlated with disease activity and radiological progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthumus, MD; Limburg, PC; Westra, J; van Leeuwen, MA; van Rijswijk, MH

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the clinical significance of serial measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) levels in relation to markers of disease activity and radiological progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. In a 3 year prospective study of 33 patients with early RA (s

  16. Early childhood environment related to microbial exposure and the occurrence of atopic disease at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, G; Janssen, NAH; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a growing body of evidence that the early childhood environment with respect to day care attendance, older siblings, pet ownership, and early life airway infections may protect from developing atopic disease. Few studies have distinguished between atopic sensitization and sympto

  17. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson's disease: the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S; Toledo, Jon B; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1-42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1-42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1-42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1-42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance.

  18. Early and late endocrine effects in pediatric central nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ivy R; Cheung, Clement C

    2014-01-01

    Endocrinopathies are frequently linked to central nervous system disease, both as early effects prior to the disease diagnosis and/or late effects after the disease has been treated. In particular, tumors and infiltrative diseases of the brain and pituitary, such as craniopharyngioma, optic pathway and hypothalamic gliomas, intracranial germ cell tumor, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis, can present with abnormal endocrine manifestations that precede the development of neurological symptoms. Early endocrine effects include diabetes insipidus, growth failure, obesity, and precocious or delayed puberty. With improving prognosis and treatment of childhood brain tumors, many survivors experience late endocrine effects related to medical and surgical interventions. Chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary axes governing growth, thyroid, gonadal, and adrenal function. In addition, obesity and metabolic alterations are frequent late manifestations. Diagnosing and treating both early and late endocrine manifestations can dramatically improve the growth, well-being, and quality of life of patients with childhood central nervous system diseases.

  19. The structural involvement of the cingulate cortex in premanifest and early Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Nicola Z; Pedrick, Amy V; Say, Miranda J; Frost, Chris; Dar Santos, Rachelle; Coleman, Allison; Sturrock, Aaron; Craufurd, David; Stout, Julie C; Leavitt, Blair R; Barnes, Josephine; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Scahill, Rachael I

    2011-08-01

    The impact of Huntington's disease neuropathology on the structure of the cingulate is uncertain, with evidence of both cortical enlargement and atrophy in this structure in early clinical disease. We sought to determine differences in cingulate volume between premanifest Huntington's disease and early Huntington's disease groups compared with controls using detailed manual measurements. Thirty controls, 30 subjects with premanifest Huntington's disease, and 30 subjects with early Huntington's disease were selected from the Vancouver site of the TRACK-HD study. Subjects underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and motor, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric assessment. The cingulate was manually delineated and subdivided into rostral, caudal, and posterior segments. Group differences in volume and associations with performance on 4 tasks thought to utilize cingulate function were examined, with adjustment for appropriate covariates. Cingulate volumes were, on average, 1.7 mL smaller in early Huntington's disease (P=.001) and 0.9 mL smaller in premanifest Huntington's disease (P=.1) compared with controls. Smaller volumes in subsections of the cingulate were associated with impaired recognition of negative emotions (P=.04), heightened depression (P=.009), and worse visual working memory performance (P=.01). There was no evidence of associations between volume and ability on a performance-monitoring task. This study disputes previous findings of enlargement of the cingulate cortex in Huntington's disease and instead suggests that the cingulate undergoes structural degeneration during early Huntington's disease with directionally consistent, nonsignificant differences seen in premanifest Huntington's disease. Cingulate atrophy may contribute to deficits in mood, emotional processing, and visual working memory in Huntington's disease.

  20. Early growth in children with coeliac disease: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrs, Christian R; Magnus, Maria C; Stigum, Hein; Lundin, Knut E A; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-06-13

    We aimed to study growth during the first 2 years of life in children later diagnosed with coeliac disease compared with children without, in a time with changing epidemiology and improved diagnostics. A prospective population-based pregnancy cohort study. The nationwide Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. 58 675 children born between 2000 and 2009 with prospectively collected growth data. Coeliac disease was identified through combined data from questionnaires and the Norwegian Patient Register. The differences in height and weight at age 0, 3, 6, 8, 12, 15-18 and 24 months using internally standardised age and gender-specific z-scores. Linear regression and mixed models were used. During a median follow-up of 8.6 years (range 4.6-14.2), 440 children (0.8%) were diagnosed with coeliac disease at a mean age of 4.4 years (range 1.5-8.5). Children with coeliac disease had significantly lower z-scores for height from 12 months (-0.09 standard deviation scores (SDS), 95% CI -0.18 to -0.01) and weight from 15 to 18 months of life (-0.09 SDS, 95% CI -0.18 to -0.01) compared with cohort controls. The longitudinal analysis from 0 to 24 months yielded a significant reduction in height z-score per year (-0.07 SDS, 95% CI -0.13 to -0.01) but not for weight among children with coeliac disease. Excluding children diagnosed before age 2 years gave similar results. This study indicates that growth retardation in children later diagnosed with coeliac disease commonly starts at 12 months of age, and precedes clinical symptoms that usually bring the suspicion of diagnosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Microglial TNF and IL-1 as early disease-modifiers in Alzheimer's-like disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkjær, Laura; Babcock, Alicia; Finsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) signs of microglial activation is evident already in prodromal and early AD. This and other evidence suggest that neuroinflammation contributes to the progression of the early disease development in AD. Microglial cells have the capacity to produce cytokines such as TNF...... and IL-1, and to phagocytose and clear amyloid beta (As), however, the influence of TNF and IL-1, and inflammation in general, on these processes is still poorly understood. We have studied the development of As pathology, and basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated microglial cytokine production...... mice. Microglial expression of TNF and IL-1s can be significantly increased by i.p. injection of LPS, which we find reduces cortical As pathology at 12 months. Results will also be reported on the influence of IL-1 in modulating As pathology during early disease stages in APPswe/PS1DE9 mice. Together...

  2. Sensory Dysfunction in Early Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Disease Rating Scale ( UPDRS ), Hoehn and Yahr Scale (H&Y) and Schwab and England ADL Scale (S&E). All contrl subjects were entirely free of motor...symptoms ( UPDRS score < 2, H&Y = 0, S&E = 100%). A careful family history was taken to insure that that no first-degree relatives had PD or any other...neurodegenerative disease. All PD patients were rated with mild PD motor characteristics ( UPDRS score < 25, H&Y ≤ 2, S&E ≥ 90%) and were newly

  3. Converging approaches to understanding early onset familial Alzheimer disease: A First Nation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Laura Y; Beattie, B Lynn; Dwosh, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2007, a novel pathogenic genetic mutation associated with early onset familial Alzheimer disease was identified in a large First Nation family living in communities across British Columbia, Canada. Building on a community-based participatory study with members of the Nation, we sought to explore the impact and interplay of medicalization with the Nation’s knowledge and approaches to wellness in relation to early onset familial Alzheimer disease. Methods: We performed a secondary content analysis of focus group discussions and interviews with 48 members of the Nation between 2012 and 2013. The analysis focused specifically on geneticization, medicalization, and traditional knowledge of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, as these themes were prominent in the primary analysis. Results: We found that while biomedical explanations of disease permeate the knowledge and understanding of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, traditional concepts about wellness are upheld simultaneously. Conclusion: The analysis brings the theoretical framework of “two-eyed seeing” to the case of early onset familial Alzheimer disease for which the contributions of different ways of knowing are embraced, and in which traditional and western ways complement each other on the path of maintaining wellness in the face of progressive neurologic disease. PMID:27092264

  4. Immunity to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout at an early life-stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2001-01-01

    Rainbow trout fry of average weight 0.5 g were vaccinated against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) by intramuscular injection of 1 mug of plasmid DNA encoding the VHS virus glycoprotein gene. Challenge with a lethal dose of virus at two different time points, 9 and 71 days post...

  5. Laboratory evaluation of effects of early life-stage exposure to selenium on pallid and shovelnose sturgeon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Endangered pallid sturgeon and congeneric shovelnose sturgeon found in the lower Platte River, NE and elsewhere in the Missouri River basin have elevated tissue...

  6. Cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with early Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Østergaard, Karen;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Decreased activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This model would most likely predict a decrease in the rate of cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)). To test this hypothesis, we compared CMRO(2...

  7. Early vitamin K deficiency bleeding in a neonate associated with maternal Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, A; Nakashima, S; Ogata, T; Iijima, S

    2014-08-01

    We report herein a case of early vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) in a neonate associated with maternal Crohn's disease. A female neonate was born at 37 weeks' gestation and weighed 2778 g. She developed broad purpura on her back on day 1. Laboratory data showed anemia, prolonged coagulation time and elevated protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. Early VKDB has not been reported in a neonate born from mother with active Crohn's disease. It is essential to give vitamin K selectively as soon as possible after birth to prevent early VKDB in neonates.

  8. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Pazarín-Villaseñor, Leonardo; Yanowsky-Escatell, Francisco Gerardo; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disea...

  9. Early sensitisation and development of allergic airway disease - risk factors and predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    development of allergic disease at birth. Early sensitisation, cow's milk allergy and atopic eczema are predictors for later development of allergic airway disease. Exposure to indoor allergens, especially house dust mite allergens, is a risk factor for sensitisation and development of asthma later...

  10. Early diagnostics and Alzheimer's disease: Beyond ‘cure’ and ‘care’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Y.M.; van Lente, H.

    2015-01-01

    Research on early diagnostics for Alzheimer's disease is supported by what has been labeled as aging-and-innovation discourse, in which innovation is assumed to (partially) resolve the societal problems related to aging. This discourse draws on a specific way of understanding Alzheimer's disease and

  11. Loss of serotonin 2A receptors exceeds loss of serotonergic projections in early Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Frøkjær, Vibe; Kalbitzer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), postmortem and imaging studies have revealed early and prominent reductions in cerebral serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. To establish if this was due to a selective disease process of the serotonin system, we investigated the cerebral 5-HT(2A) receptor...

  12. Altered cerebral hemodynamics in early Alzheimer disease: a pilot study using transcranial Doppler.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Diaz-Arrastia, R.; Martin-Cook, K.; Levine, B.D.; Zhang, R.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease may contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated whether impairments in cerebral hemodynamics can be detected in early-stage AD. Nine patients with mild AD and eight cognitively normal controls matched for age underwent br

  13. Early diagnostics and Alzheimer's disease: Beyond ‘cure’ and ‘care’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Y.M.; van Lente, H.

    Research on early diagnostics for Alzheimer's disease is supported by what has been labeled as aging-and-innovation discourse, in which innovation is assumed to (partially) resolve the societal problems related to aging. This discourse draws on a specific way of understanding Alzheimer's disease and

  14. Early menopause predicts future coronary heart disease and stroke: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank P = 0.008 and P = 0.0158). In models adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, Multi-ethnic Study Atherosclerosis site, and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, this risk for coronary heart disease and stroke remained (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.17-3.70; and hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.11-4.32, respectively). Early menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  15. Six psychotropics for pre-symptomatic & early Alzheimer's (MCI, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C Lauterbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for neuroprotective drugs to slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and Huntington's disease (HD, has been largely unrewarding. Preclinical evidence suggests that repurposing quetiapine, lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine for early and pre-symptomatic disease-modification in NDDs may be promising and can spare regulatory barriers. The literature of these psychotropics in early stage and pre-symptomatic AD, PD, and HD is reviewed and propitious findings follow. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI phase of AD: salutary human randomized controlled trial findings for low-dose lithium and, in selected patients, donepezil await replication. Pre-symptomatic AD: human epidemiological data indicate that lithium reduces AD risk. Animal model studies (AMS reveal encouraging results for quetiapine, lithium, donepezil, and memantine. Early PD: valproate AMS findings show promise. Pre-symptomatic PD: lithium and valproate AMS findings are encouraging. Early HD: uncontrolled clinical data indicate non-progression with lithium, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine. Pre-symptomatic HD: lithium and valproate are auspicious in AMS. Many other promising findings awaiting replication (valproate in MCI; lithium, valproate, fluoxetine in pre-symptomatic AD; lithium in early PD; lithium, valproate, fluoxetine in pre-symptomatic PD; donepezil in early HD; lithium, fluoxetine, memantine in pre-symptomatic HD are reviewed. Dose- and stage-dependent effects are considered. Suggestions for signal-enhancement in human trials are provided for each NDD stage.

  16. Perinatal inflammation: a common factor in the early origins of cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Maria U; Wallace, Megan J; Pepe, Salvatore; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Moss, Timothy J; Burgner, David

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Traditional risk factors account for only part of the attributable risk. The origins of atherosclerosis are in early life, a potential albeit largely unrecognized window of opportunity for early detection and treatment of subclinical cardiovascular disease. There are robust epidemiological data indicating that poor intrauterine growth and/or prematurity, and perinatal factors such as maternal hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, diabetes and obesity, are associated with adverse cardiovascular intermediate phenotypes in childhood and adulthood. Many of these early-life risk factors result in a heightened inflammatory state. Inflammation is a central mechanism in the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, but few studies have investigated the role of overt perinatal infection and inflammation (chorioamnionitis) as a potential contributor to cardiovascular risk. Limited evidence from human and experimental models suggests an association between chorioamnionitis and cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Early life inflammatory events may be an important mechanism in the early development of cardiovascular risk and may provide insights into the associations between perinatal factors and adult cardiovascular disease. This review aims to summarise current data on the early life origins of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, with particular focus on perinatal inflammation.

  17. Early action to address an emerging wildlife disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Harris, M. Camille; Grear, Daniel A.

    2017-02-23

    A deadly fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) that affects amphibian skin was discovered during a die-off of European fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra) in 2014. This pathogen has the potential to worsen already severe worldwide amphibian declines. Bsal is a close relative to another fungal disease known as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Many scientists consider Bd to be the greatest threat to amphibian biodiversity of any disease because it affects a large number of species and has the unusual ability to drive species and populations to extinction.Although not yet detected in the United States, the emergence of Bsal could threaten the salamander population, which is the most diverse in the world. The spread of Bsal likely will lead to more State and federally listed threatened or endangered amphibian species, and associated economic effects.Because of the concern expressed by resource management agencies, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has made Bsal and similar pathogens a priority for research.

  18. Spatial disorientation as an early symptom of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, A; de Jong, G J; Meerwaldt, J D

    1987-03-01

    In 44 consecutive outpatients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without levodopa substitution therapy, we tested spatial orientation. Spatial orientation was impaired on the rod orientation test in 43 patients, on the line orientation test in 7 patients, and on the facial recognition test in 17 patients. There was no correlation between severity of spatial disorientation and age, length of illness, verbal WAIS score, or severity of PD. Impairment of spatial orientation is part of PD even in mild cases.

  19. Can we change the natural history of Crohn's disease with early immunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, James

    2014-01-01

    In both children and adults, the natural history of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by relapsing and remitting bouts of intestinal inflammation, often associated with a progressive shift from inflammatory to complicated stricturing or penetrating disease behavior. The past 2 decades have seen a dramatic shift in therapeutic approach with the increasingly common use of early thiopurine immunomodulation. These maintenance medications were initially introduced primarily as corticosteroid-sparing agents capable of minimizing recurrent flares of inflammatory disease and have proven to be quite efficacious. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that thiopurines may only delay rather than prevent the development of complicated disease behavior. Data from both adult and pediatric CD populations from around the world are reviewed in terms of the effect of early immunomodulation on progression to complicated disease behavior, need for surgery, and prevention of recurrent disease after resection. The effect of thiopurines on the growth of children is also reviewed.

  20. [Bioethical reflections on ill-considered care due to an early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxó, M Jesús; Casado, María

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease raises important bioethical issues. In the interval between early disease detection and symptom onset, there is a time in which the patient's autonomy, privacy, and dignity may be undermined by certain healthcare measures or by family care and support. These measures may eventually turn patients into an object of care, preventing them from accepting the disease, developing an identity, and rearranging their living spaces. Every effort should be made to ensure that care does not become compassionate harassment or an invasive act, annulling the patient's autonomy, identity, and self-determination.

  1. Evidence-based early clinical detection of emerging diseases in food animals and zoonoses: two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegerman, Claude; Humblet, Marie-France; Porter, Sarah Rebecca; Zanella, Gina; Martinelle, Ludovic

    2012-03-01

    If diseases of food-producing animals or zoonoses (re-)emerge, early clinical decision making is of major importance. In this particular condition, it is difficult to apply a classic evidence-based veterinary medicine process, because of a lack of available published data. A method based on the partition of field clinical observations (evidences) could be developed as an interesting alternative approach. The classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to improve the early clinical detection in two cases of emerging diseases: bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease) and bluetongue due to the serotype 8-virus in cattle.

  2. Cognitive Development in Infantile-Onset Pompe Disease Under Very Early Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Jou; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Yang, Chia-Feng; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Chuang, Ya-Chin; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Most patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease die in early infancy before beginning enzyme replacement therapy, which has made it difficult to evaluate the impact of Pompe disease on cognitive development. Patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease can survive with enzyme replacement therapy, and physicians can evaluate cognitive development in these patients. We established an effective newborn screening program with quick clinical diagnostic criteria. Cognitive and motor development were evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. The patients who were treated very early demonstrate normal cognitive development with no significant change in cognition during this period (P = .18 > .05). The cognitive development was positively correlated with motor development (r = 0.533, P = .011). The results indicated that very early enzyme replacement therapy could protect cognitive development in patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease up to 24 months of age.

  3. Development of a Multiantigen Panel for Improved Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Infection in Early Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Lauren J; Panas, Michael W; Mao, Rong; Delanoy, Michelle; Flanagan, John J; Binder, Steven R; Rebman, Alison W; Montoya, Jose G; Soloski, Mark J; Steere, Allen C; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Arnaboldi, Paul M; Aucott, John N; Robinson, William H

    2015-12-01

    The current standard for laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease in the United States is serologic detection of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tiered testing algorithm; however, this scheme has limited sensitivity for detecting early Lyme disease. Thus, there is a need to improve diagnostics for Lyme disease at the early stage, when antibiotic treatment is highly efficacious. We examined novel and established antigen markers to develop a multiplex panel that identifies early infection using the combined sensitivity of multiple markers while simultaneously maintaining high specificity by requiring positive results for two markers to designate a positive test. Ten markers were selected from our initial analysis of 62 B. burgdorferi surface proteins and synthetic peptides by assessing binding of IgG and IgM to each in a training set of Lyme disease patient samples and controls. In a validation set, this 10-antigen panel identified a higher proportion of early-Lyme-disease patients as positive at the baseline or posttreatment visit than two-tiered testing (87.5% and 67.5%, respectively; P Lyme disease. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Functional neuroanatomical associations of working memory in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Haense, Cathleen; Harris, Jennifer M; Stopford, Cheryl L; Segobin, Shailendra H; Jones, Matthew; Richardson, Anna M T; Gerhard, Alexander; Anton-Rodriguez, José; Thompson, Jennifer C; Herholz, Karl; Snowden, Julie S

    2017-03-16

    To characterize metabolic correlates of working memory impairment in clinically defined subtypes of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Established models of working memory suggest a key role for frontal lobe function, yet the association in Alzheimer's disease between working memory impairment and visuospatial and language symptoms suggests that temporoparietal neocortical dysfunction may be responsible. Twenty-four patients with predominantly early-onset Alzheimer's disease were clinically classified into groups with predominantly amnestic, multidomain or visual deficits. Patients underwent neuropsychological evaluation focused on the domains of episodic and working memory, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data were analysed by using a region-of-interest approach. Patients with multidomain and visual presentations performed more poorly on tests of working memory compared with amnestic Alzheimer's disease. Working memory performance correlated with glucose metabolism in left-sided temporoparietal, but not frontal neocortex. Carriers of the apolipoprotein E4 gene showed poorer episodic memory and better working memory performance compared with noncarriers. Our findings support the hypothesis that working memory changes in early-onset Alzheimer's disease are related to temporoparietal rather than frontal hypometabolism and show dissociation from episodic memory performance. They further support the concept of subtypes of Alzheimer's disease with distinct cognitive profiles due to prominent neocortical dysfunction early in the disease course. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Early outcome after emergency gastrectomy for complicated peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mina; Li, W H; Cheung, M T

    2012-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To analyse outcomes of patients who underwent emergency gastrectomy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. DESIGN. Prognostic study on a historical cohort. SETTING. A regional hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Patients who underwent emergency gastrectomy from 2000 to 2009 in our hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Primary outcome measures were in-hospital mortality and the predictors of such deaths. Secondary outcome measures were 7-day mortality, 30-day mortality, and morbidities. RESULTS. In all, 112 patients had emergency gastrectomies performed for complicated peptic ulcer disease during the study period. In-hospital mortality was 30%. In the univariate analysis, old age, duodenal ulcer, failed primary surgery, gastrojejunostomy anastomosis for reconstruction, hand-sewn technique for duodenal stump closure, use of a sump drain, low haemoglobin level, preoperative blood transfusion, prolonged prothrombin time, and high creatinine or bilirubin levels were associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality. In the multivariate analysis, failed primary surgery, old age, and high creatinine level turned out to be independent risk factors. CONCLUSIONS. Emergency gastrectomy should be considered seriously as the primary treatment option in appropriately selected elderly patients, instead of salvage procedures to repair a perforation or control bleeding by plication.

  6. Mitochondrial genes are altered in blood early in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnon, Katie; Keohane, Aoife; Pidsley, Ruth; Newhouse, Stephen; Riddoch-Contreras, Joanna; Thubron, Elisabeth B; Devall, Matthew; Soininen, Hikka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Schalkwyk, Leonard; Dobson, Richard; Malik, Afshan N; Powell, John; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela

    2017-01-07

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease in the brain and blood, the molecular mechanisms behind these phenomena are unknown. Here we have replicated our previous findings demonstrating reduced expression of nuclear-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits and subunits required for the translation of mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS genes in blood from people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Interestingly this was accompanied by increased expression of some mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS genes, namely those residing closest to the transcription start site of the polycistronic heavy chain mitochondrial transcript (MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CO2, MT-C03) and MT-ND6 transcribed from the light chain. Further we show that mitochondrial DNA copy number was unchanged suggesting no change in steady-state numbers of mitochondria. We suggest that an imbalance in nuclear and mitochondrial genome-encoded OXPHOS transcripts may drive a negative feedback loop reducing mitochondrial translation and compromising OXPHOS efficiency, which is likely to generate damaging reactive oxygen species.

  7. Emerging Ultrasound Technologies for Early Markers of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest J. Feleppa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound has been a popular clinical imaging modality for decades. It is well established as a means of displaying the macroscopic anatomy of soft-tissue structures. While conventional ultrasound methodologies (i.e., B-mode and Doppler methods are well proven and continue to advance technically on a daily basis, e.g. by extending into higher frequencies and taking advantage of harmonic phenomena in tissues, fundamentally new ultrasound technologies also are emerging and offer exciting promise for making significant improvements in the clinical imaging of disease. These emerging methods include spectrum analysis, elasticity imaging, contrast-agent methods, and advanced flow detection and measurement techniques. Each provides independent information and, used alone, each can provide powerful new imaging capabilities; combined with each other, their capabilities may be even greater in many applications; and all in principle can be used in concert with other imaging modalities to offer the possibility of further improvements in disease detection, evaluation, and monitoring.

  8. Historical cohort studies and the early origins of disease hypothesis: making sense of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan C K

    2009-05-01

    The hypothesis that early-life growth patterns contribute to non-communicable diseases initially emerged from historical cohort studies, consistently associating low birth weight and infant weight gain with later disease risk. Cohort studies offer crucial life-course data on disease aetiology, but also suffer from important limitations, including the difficulty of adjusting for confounding factors and the challenge of interpreting data on early growth. Prospective randomised trials of infant diet appear to provide evidence in direct contradiction to cohort studies, associating faster early growth with disease risk. The present article attempts to resolve this contradiction on two grounds. First, insufficient attention has been directed to inconsistency of outcomes between cohort studies and prospective trials. Cohort studies can assess actual mortality, whereas prospective trials investigate proxies for disease risk. These proxies are often aspects of phenotype that reflect the 'normalisation' of metabolism in response to growth, and not all those displaying normalisation in adolescence and early adulthood may go on to develop disease. Second, a distinction is made between 'metabolic capacity', defined as organ development that occurs in early life, and 'metabolic load', which is imposed by subsequent growth. Disease risk is predicted to be greatest when there is extreme disparity between metabolic capacity and metabolic load. Whereas cohort studies link disease risk with poor metabolic capacity, prospective trials link it with increased metabolic load. Infancy is a developmental period in which nutrition can affect both metabolic capacity and metabolic load; this factor accounts for reported associations of both slow and fast infant growth with greater disease risk.

  9. Early childhood poverty, immune-mediated disease processes, and adult productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M; Duncan, Greg J; Kalil, Ariel; Boyce, W Thomas

    2012-10-16

    This study seeks to understand whether poverty very early in life is associated with early-onset adult conditions related to immune-mediated chronic diseases. It also tests the role that these immune-mediated chronic diseases may play in accounting for the associations between early poverty and adult productivity. Data (n = 1,070) come from the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics and include economic conditions in utero and throughout childhood and adolescence coupled with adult (age 30-41 y) self-reports of health and economic productivity. Results show that low income, particularly in very early childhood (between the prenatal and second year of life), is associated with increases in early-adult hypertension, arthritis, and limitations on activities of daily living. Moreover, these relationships and particularly arthritis partially account for the associations between early childhood poverty and adult productivity as measured by adult work hours and earnings. The results suggest that the associations between early childhood poverty and these adult disease states may be immune-mediated.

  10. Early automatic detection of Parkinson's disease based on sleep recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempfner, Jacob; Sorensen, Helge B D; Nikolic, Miki;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Idiopathic rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is most likely the earliest sign of Parkinson's Disease (PD) and is characterized by REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) and consequently increased muscle activity. However, some muscle twitching in normal subjects occurs...... the number of outliers during REM sleep was used as a quantitative measure of muscle activity. RESULTS: The proposed method was able to automatically separate all iRBD test subjects from healthy elderly controls and subjects with periodic limb movement disorder. CONCLUSION: The proposed work is considered...... during REM sleep. PURPOSE: There are no generally accepted methods for evaluation of this activity and a normal range has not been established. Consequently, there is a need for objective criteria. METHOD: In this study we propose a full-automatic method for detection of RSWA. REM sleep identification...

  11. Perinatal and early life risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen E Roberts; Clare J Wotton; John G Williams; Myfanwy Griffith; Michael J Goldacre

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate associations between perinatal risk factors and subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and young adults.METHODS: Record linked abstracts of birth registrations,maternity, day case and inpatient admissions in a defined population of southern England. Investigation of 20 perinatal factors relating to the maternity or the birth: maternal age, Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in the mother, maternal social class, marital status, smoking in pregnancy, ABO blood group and rhesus status, pre-eclampsia, parity, the infant's presentation at birth, caesarean delivery, forceps delivery, sex, number of babies delivered, gestational age, birthweight, head circumference, breastfeeding and Apgar scores at one and five minutes.RESULTS: Maternity records were present for 180 children who subsequently developed IBD. Univariate analysis showed increased risks of CD among children of mothers with CD (P = 0.011, based on two cases of CD in both mother and child) and children of mothers who smoked during pregnancy. Multivariate analysis confirmed increased risks of CD among children of mothers who smoked (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% CI =1.06-3.92) and for older mothers aged 35+ years (4.81,2.32-9.98). Multivariate analysis showed that there were no significant associations between CD and 17 other perinatal risk factors investigated. It also showed that, for UC, there were no significant associations with the perinatal factors studied.CONCLUSION: This study shows an association between CD in mother and child; and elevated risks of CD in children of older mothers and of mothers who smoked.

  12. Crohn's disease and early exposure to domestic refrigeration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Malekzadeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental risk factors playing a causative role in Crohn's Disease (CD remain largely unknown. Recently, it has been suggested that refrigerated food could be involved in disease development. We thus conducted a pilot case control study to explore the association of CD with the exposure to domestic refrigeration in childhood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a standard questionnaire we interviewed 199 CD cases and 207 age-matched patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS as controls. Cases and controls were followed by the same gastroenterologists of tertiary referral clinics in Tehran, Iran. The questionnaire focused on the date of the first acquisition of home refrigerator and freezer. Data were analysed by a multivariate logistic model. The current age was in average 34 years in CD cases and the percentage of females in the case and control groups were respectively 48.3% and 63.7%. Patients were exposed earlier than controls to the refrigerator (X2 = 9.9, df = 3, P = 0.04 and refrigerator exposure at birth was found to be a risk factor for CD (OR = 2.08 (95% CI: 1.01-4.29, P = 0.05. Comparable results were obtained looking for the exposure to freezer at home. Finally, among the other recorded items reflecting the hygiene and comfort at home, we also found personal television, car and washing machine associated with CD. CONCLUSION: This study supports the opinion that CD is associated with exposure to domestic refrigeration, among other household factors, during childhood.

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia.

  14. Ceruloplasmin gene-deficient mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis show attenuated early disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresle, Melissa M; Schulz, Katrin; Jonas, Anna; Perreau, Victoria M; Cipriani, Tania; Baxter, Alan G; Miranda-Hernandez, Socorro; Field, Judith; Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Cherny, Robert; Volitakis, Irene; David, Samuel; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2014-06-01

    We conducted a microarray study to identify genes that are differentially regulated in the spinal cords of mice with the inflammatory disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) relative to healthy mice. In total 181 genes with at least a two-fold increase in expression were identified, and most of these genes were associated with immune function. Unexpectedly, ceruloplasmin (Cp), a ferroxidase that converts toxic ferrous iron to its nontoxic ferric form and also promotes the efflux of iron from astrocytes in the CNS, was shown to be highly upregulated (13.2-fold increase) in EAE spinal cord. Expression of Cp protein is known to be increased in several neurological conditions, but the role of Cp regulation in CNS autoimmune disease is not known. To investigate this, we induced EAE in Cp gene knockout, heterozygous, and wild-type mice. Cp knockout mice were found to have slower disease evolution than wild-type mice (EAE days 13-17; P = 0.05). Interestingly, Cp knockout mice also exhibited a significant increase in the number of astrocytes with reactive morphology in early EAE compared with wild-type mice at the same stage of disease. CNS iron levels were not increased with EAE in these mice. Based on these observations, we propose that an increase in Cp expression could contribute to tissue damage in early EAE. In addition, endogenous CP either directly or indirectly inhibits astrocyte reactivity during early disease, which could also worsen early disease evolution.

  15. Expansion of extracellular volume in early polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, H; Pedersen, E B; Nielsen, A H; Herlevsen, P; Kornerup, H J; Posborg, V

    1986-01-01

    Blood volume (BV), extracellular volume (ECV), blood pressure (BP), creatinine clearance (CCr), plasma levels of angiotensin II (AII), aldosterone (Aldo) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), and serum osmolality (Sosm) were determined in 18 patients with adult polycystic kidney disease, 8 normotensive (group I), 10 hypertensive (group II), and in 11 control subjects (group III). ECV but not BV was increased in group I compared with group III, whereas BV and ECV did not differ significantly between groups II and III. In group II, Aldo and AVP were increased and AII tended to be increased, while in group I the hormone levels did not differ significantly from those in group III. Sosm did not differ significantly between the groups. In the combined patient group, CCr correlated positively with BV and ECV and negatively with BP. In the patients, AII and AVP were positively correlated with BP but not with CCr. The results suggest that both the renin-angiotensin system and AVP might be involved in the BP elevation, whereas expansion of ECV can be found without an increase in BP.

  16. Characterization of early and mature electrophysiological biomarkers of patients with Parkinson’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard

    of NDD is to find a neuroprotective agent, and if such treatment becomes available, it is essential that the patients can be identified as early as possible. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common NDD, and early disease identification is an active field of research as no reliable markers yet...... exist [83]. Sleep disturbances are common non-motor symptoms of PD, and strong findings associating a specific sleep disorder ("iRBD") to Parkinsonism suggest that sleep disturbances might precede the clinical diagnosis of PD. Analysis of sleep thus hold potential to serve as early disease...... and EOG in pathological sleep and may serve to reveal PD biomarkers. The aims of this dissertation was to: 1) Develop full data-driven sleep models based on EEG, EOG or both, that can describe sleep in detail and can be used in the analysis of normal as well as pathological sleep. 2) Extract appropriate...

  17. "DASH" symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease: red flags for early cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naismith, Sharon L; Lewis, Simon J G

    2011-03-01

    Neuropsychiatric features in Parkinson's Disease (PD) are associated with developing dementia longitudinally. Therefore, identifying appropriate screening methods for such features, and their association with early cognitive dysfunction, may help to inform early intervention approaches. In this study, 53 PD patients without dementia underwent detailed neurological and neuropsychological assessment. The sum scores of the four items detailing Depression, Anxiety, Sleep disturbance and Hallucinosis (DASH) were calculated from the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and examined in relation to cognitive tasks. Results demonstrated that higher DASH scores were significantly correlated with poorer working memory and set-shifting performance, even after controlling for age, predicted intellect, depression, disease stage and duration. These data indicate that DASH symptoms are related to executive dysfunction even in non-demented patients with PD. The DASH score may represent a simple screening method for highlighting early cognitive decline, which in turn is associated with the development of dementia in PD.

  18. Probing Alzheimers Disease Pathology and Early Detection at the NSLS with Infrared, XRF, and DEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong,Z.; Bennett, D.; Chapman, D.; Chen, J.; Connor, D.; Dilmanian, A.; Faulconer, L.; Kao, T.; Leskovjan, A.; et al

    2008-01-01

    We explored diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) in both planar and computed tomography (CT) modes for early detection of beta amyloid deposition, a hallmark feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since amyloid plaques precede clinical symptoms by years, their early detection is of great interest. These findings were correlated with results from synchrotron infrared microspectroscopic imaging and X-ray fluorescence microscopy, to determine the secondary structure of the amyloid beta protein and metal concentration in the amyloid plaques, respectively.

  19. Early-life origin of adult disease: evidence from natural experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiserman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Until the present time, disease susceptibility was believed to be determined solely by the genetic information carried in the DNA sequence. In recent years, however, it has become clear that epigenetic rearrangements play an equally essential role in the disease development and that this process, particularly at key developmental stages, is very susceptible to environmental modulations. The extensive studies, both human and animal, have shown that early-life environment is probably the most important causal component in the etiology of some diseases including cancer as well as metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. This review considers the natural experiment-based evidence regarding the developmental origin of human adult disease.

  20. Neuropsychology test and P300 detection characteristics analysis in early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄静

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and cognitive characteristics of early-onset Parkinson’s disease(EOPD).Methods Two hundred and forty-two Parkinson’s disease(PD)patients were divided into EOPD(≤50 year-old,n=76)and late-onset Parkinson’s disease(LOPD;>50 year-old,n=1 66)according to their age.The age,disease duration,family history and other general clinical features were compared between EOPD and LOPD groups.Global and various aspects of cognitive dysfunction were

  1. Developmental Origins of Chronic Kidney Disease: Should We Focus on Early Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a global burden, despite recent advances in management. CKD can begin in early life by so-called “developmental programming” or “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD). Early-life insults cause structural and functional changes in the developing kidney, which is called renal programming. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the proposition that early-life adverse events lead to renal programming and make subjects vulnerable to developing CKD and its comorbidities in later life. In addition to low nephron endowment, several mechanisms have been proposed for renal programming. The DOHaD concept opens a new window to offset the programming process in early life to prevent the development of adult kidney disease, namely reprogramming. Here, we review the key themes on the developmental origins of CKD. We have particularly focused on the following areas: evidence from human studies support fetal programming of kidney disease; insight from animal models of renal programming; hypothetical mechanisms of renal programming; alterations of renal transcriptome in response to early-life insults; and the application of reprogramming interventions to prevent the programming of kidney disease. PMID:28208659

  2. Early diagnosis of complex diseases by molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and dynamical network biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Xiangdong; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have been carried out for early diagnosis of complex diseases by finding accurate and robust biomarkers specific to respective diseases. In particular, recent rapid advance of high-throughput technologies provides unprecedented rich information to characterize various disease genotypes and phenotypes in a global and also dynamical manner, which significantly accelerates the study of biomarkers from both theoretical and clinical perspectives. Traditionally, molecular biomarkers that distinguish disease samples from normal samples are widely adopted in clinical practices due to their ease of data measurement. However, many of them suffer from low coverage and high false-positive rates or high false-negative rates, which seriously limit their further clinical applications. To overcome those difficulties, network biomarkers (or module biomarkers) attract much attention and also achieve better performance because a network (or subnetwork) is considered to be a more robust form to characterize diseases than individual molecules. But, both molecular biomarkers and network biomarkers mainly distinguish disease samples from normal samples, and they generally cannot ensure to identify predisease samples due to their static nature, thereby lacking ability to early diagnosis. Based on nonlinear dynamical theory and complex network theory, a new concept of dynamical network biomarkers (DNBs, or a dynamical network of biomarkers) has been developed, which is different from traditional static approaches, and the DNB is able to distinguish a predisease state from normal and disease states by even a small number of samples, and therefore has great potential to achieve "real" early diagnosis of complex diseases. In this paper, we comprehensively review the recent advances and developments on molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and DNBs in particular, focusing on the biomarkers for early diagnosis of complex diseases considering a small number of samples and high

  3. Reduced life expectancy seen in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans DGR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available D Gareth R Evans,1 Sarah Louise Ingham21Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK; 2Centre for Health Informatics, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: There are several hereditary diseases that are a predisposition to early-onset tumors. These include syndromic conditions like neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel–Lindau syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia, and familial adenomatous polyposis; and conditions which are usually not possible to diagnose clinically in a single individual, such as Lynch syndrome and BRCA1/2. Understanding of the mortality in hereditary cancer predisposing diseases is important for developing effective disease treatment programs. A number of studies have been undertaken to investigate the genetic predictors, prevalence and incidence, and treatment outcomes of these diseases; however, the majority examine only the most common of these diseases (eg, neurofibromatosis or BRCA, or look into postoperative survival. The mortality of individuals who are diagnosed with one of these hereditary diseases remains an area for investigation. This review is the first to attempt identification of studies investigating life expectancy in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors.Keywords: mortality, survival, life expectancy, early-onset, tumors

  4. RED Alert – Early warning or detection of global re-emerging infectious disease (RED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Alina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This is the PDF of a presentation for a webinar given by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the early warning or detection of global re-emerging infectious disease (RED). First, there is an overview of LANL biosurveillance tools. Then, information is given about RED Alert. Next, a demonstration is given of a component prototype. RED Alert is an analysis tool that can provide early warning or detection of the re-emergence of an infectious disease at the global level, but through a local lens.

  5. Early diagnosis of Gaucher disease in pediatric patients: proposal for a diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rocco, Maja; Andria, Generoso; Deodato, Federica; Giona, Fiorina; Micalizzi, Concetta; Pession, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by an enzyme deficiency that leads to the accumulation of glycolipids in various organs. Although the signs and symptoms of GD emerge in childhood in the majority of patients, the disease often remains unrecognized for many years with delay of benefits of therapy or development of irreversible complications. Based on published data and data from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group Registry, an algorithm has been drafted for early diagnosis of GD in pediatric patients. It will help hematologists in promoting a timely diagnosis and early access to therapy for pediatric patients with GD.

  6. Patient Perspectives on Deep Brain Stimulation Clinical Research in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, Lauren; Hacker, Mallory; Turchan, Maxim; Bollig, Madelyn; Tamargo, Christina; Fisher, William; McLaughlin, Lauren; Martig, Adria; Charles, David

    2017-01-01

    The FDA has approved a multicenter, double-blind, Phase III, pivotal trial testing deep brain stimulation (DBS) in 280 people with very early stage Parkinson's disease (PD; IDE#G050016). In partnership with The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, we conducted a survey to investigate motivating factors, barriers, and gender differences among potentially eligible patients for participation in a trial testing DBS in early PD compared to standard medical treatment. The majority of survey respondents (72%) indicated they would consider learning more about participating. Early PD patients are therefore likely to consider enrolling in trials of invasive therapies that may slow symptom progression and help future patients.

  7. Early-life origins of chronic respiratory diseases: understanding and promoting healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Silvia; Scheltema, Nienke; Bont, Louis; Baraldi, Eugenio

    2014-12-01

    Chronic obstructive respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often originate early in life. In addition to a genetic predisposition, prenatal and early-life environmental exposures have a persistent impact on respiratory health. Acting during a critical phase of lung development, these factors may change lung structure and metabolism, and may induce maladaptive responses to harmful agents, which will affect the whole lifespan. Some environmental factors, such as exposure to cigarette smoke, type of childbirth and diet, may be modifiable, but it is more difficult to influence other factors, such as preterm birth and early exposure to viruses or allergens. Here, we bring together recent literature to analyse the critical aspects involved in the early stages of lung development, going back to prenatal and perinatal events, and we discuss the mechanisms by which noxious factors encountered early on may have a lifelong impact on respiratory health. We briefly comment on the need for early disease biomarkers and on the possible role of "-omic" technologies in identifying risk profiles predictive of chronic respiratory conditions. Such profiles could guide the ideation of effective preventive strategies and/or targeted early lifestyle or therapeutic interventions.

  8. Association between α-synuclein blood transcripts and early, neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locascio, Joseph J; Eberly, Shirley; Liao, Zhixiang; Liu, Ganqiang; Hoesing, Ashley N; Duong, Karen; Trisini-Lipsanopoulos, Ana; Dhima, Kaltra; Hung, Albert Y; Flaherty, Alice W; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Hayes, Michael T; Wills, Anne-Marie; Shivraj Sohur, U; Mejia, Nicte I; Selkoe, Dennis J; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Dong, Xianjun; Marek, Ken; Zheng, Bin; Ivinson, Adrian; Hyman, Bradley T; Growdon, John H; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Ravina, Bernard; Scherzer, Clemens R

    2015-09-01

    There are no cures for neurodegenerative diseases and this is partially due to the difficulty of monitoring pathogenic molecules in patients during life. The Parkinson's disease gene α-synuclein (SNCA) is selectively expressed in blood cells and neurons. Here we show that SNCA transcripts in circulating blood cells are paradoxically reduced in early stage, untreated and dopamine transporter neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease in three independent regional, national, and international populations representing 500 cases and 363 controls and on three analogue and digital platforms with P disease of 2.45 compared to individuals in the highest quartile. Disease-relevant transcript isoforms were low even near disease onset. Importantly, low SNCA transcript abundance predicted cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease during up to 5 years of longitudinal follow-up. This study reveals a consistent association of reduced SNCA transcripts in accessible peripheral blood and early-stage Parkinson's disease in 863 participants and suggests a clinical role as potential predictor of cognitive decline. Moreover, the three independent biobank cohorts provide a generally useful platform for rapidly validating any biological marker of this common disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Association between α-synuclein blood transcripts and early, neuroimaging-supported Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locascio, Joseph J.; Eberly, Shirley; Liao, Zhixiang; Liu, Ganqiang; Hoesing, Ashley N.; Duong, Karen; Trisini-Lipsanopoulos, Ana; Dhima, Kaltra; Hung, Albert Y.; Flaherty, Alice W.; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Hayes, Michael T.; Wills, Anne-Marie; Shivraj Sohur, U.; Mejia, Nicte I.; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Dong, Xianjun; Marek, Ken; Zheng, Bin; Ivinson, Adrian; Hyman, Bradley T.; Growdon, John H.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Schlossmacher, Michael G.; Ravina, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    There are no cures for neurodegenerative diseases and this is partially due to the difficulty of monitoring pathogenic molecules in patients during life. The Parkinson’s disease gene α-synuclein (SNCA) is selectively expressed in blood cells and neurons. Here we show that SNCA transcripts in circulating blood cells are paradoxically reduced in early stage, untreated and dopamine transporter neuroimaging-supported Parkinson’s disease in three independent regional, national, and international populations representing 500 cases and 363 controls and on three analogue and digital platforms with P disease of 2.45 compared to individuals in the highest quartile. Disease-relevant transcript isoforms were low even near disease onset. Importantly, low SNCA transcript abundance predicted cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson’s disease during up to 5 years of longitudinal follow-up. This study reveals a consistent association of reduced SNCA transcripts in accessible peripheral blood and early-stage Parkinson’s disease in 863 participants and suggests a clinical role as potential predictor of cognitive decline. Moreover, the three independent biobank cohorts provide a generally useful platform for rapidly validating any biological marker of this common disease. PMID:26220939

  10. Systematic review with meta-analysis: early infant feeding and coeliac disease--update 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewska, H; Shamir, R; Chmielewska, A; Pieścik-Lech, M; Auricchio, R; Ivarsson, A; Kolacek, S; Koletzko, S; Korponay-Szabo, I; Mearin, M L; Ribes-Koninckx, C; Troncone, R

    2015-06-01

    New evidence emerged on early feeding practices and the risk of coeliac disease. To systematically update evidence on these practices to find out whether there is a need to revise current recommendations. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched from July 2012 (end of last search) to February 2015 for studies of any design that assessed the effect of gluten consumption and breastfeeding on the development of coeliac disease and/or coeliac disease-related autoimmunity. We identified 21 publications, including two, new, large, randomised controlled trials performed in high-risk infants. Exclusive or any breastfeeding, as well as breastfeeding at the time of gluten introduction, did not reduce the risk of developing coeliac disease during childhood. For infants at high risk of developing coeliac disease, gluten introduction at 4 months of age in very small amounts, or at 6 or 12 months of age, resulted in similar rates of coeliac disease diagnosis in early childhood. Later gluten introduction was associated with later development of coeliac specific autoimmunity and coeliac disease during childhood, but not total risk reduction. Observational studies indicate that consumption of a higher amount of gluten at weaning may increase the risk for coeliac disease development. Infant feeding practices (breastfeeding, time of gluten introduction) have no effect on the risk of developing coeliac disease during childhood (at least at specific timeframes evaluated in the included studies), necessitating an update of current European recommendations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA' released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria.

  12. Glucosylsphingosine accumulation in mice and patients with type 2 Gaucher disease begins early in gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvisky, E; Sidransky, E; McKinney, C E; Lamarca, M E; Samimi, R; Krasnewich, D; Martin, B M; Ginns, E I

    2000-08-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common of the sphingolipidoses, results from the inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase (EC 3.2.1.45). Although type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease is associated with rapidly progressive and fatal neurologic deterioration, the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to the neurologic symptoms and early demise remain uncharacterized. While the pathology encountered in Gaucher disease has been attributed to glucocerebroside storage, glucosylsphingosine (Glc-sph), a cytotoxic compound, also accumulates in the tissues. Elevations of brain Glc-sph have been reported in patients with types 2 and 3 Gaucher disease. In this study, Glc-sph levels were measured using HPLC in tissues from mice with type 2 Gaucher disease created with a null glucocerebrosidase allele. Compared with unaffected littermates, homozygous mice with type 2 Gaucher disease had approximately a 100-fold elevation of Glc-sph in brain, as well as elevated levels in other tissues. This accumulation was detected in utero by E 13 and increased progressively throughout gestation. Similarly, elevated Glc-sph levels were seen in human fetuses with type 2 Gaucher disease, indicating that therapy initiated after birth may be too late to prevent the sequelae of progressive neurologic damage that begins early in gestation. These findings suggest that the accumulation of Glc-sph may be responsible for the rapid demise of mice with type 2 Gaucher disease and the devastating clinical course seen in patients with type 2 Gaucher disease.

  13. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for early detection of plant diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Maneva, Svetla; Zdravev, Tomas

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications in Earth observation. Nowadays spectral remote sensing techniques allow presymptomatic monitoring of changes in the physiological state of plants with high spectral resolution. Hyperspectral leaf reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence proved to be highly suitable for identification of growth anomalies of cultural plants that result from the environmental changes and different stress factors. Hyperspectral technologies can find place in many scientific areas, as well as for monitoring of plants status and functioning to help in making timely management decisions. This research aimed to detect a presence of viral infection in young pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) caused by Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) by using hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence data and to assess the effect of some growth regulators on the development of the disease. In Bulgaria CMV is one of the widest spread pathogens, causing the biggest economical losses in crop vegetable production. Leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence data were collected by a portable fibre-optics spectrometer in the spectral ranges 450÷850 nm and 600-900 nm. Greenhouse experiment with pepper plants of two cultivars, Sivria (sensitive to CMV) and Ostrion (resistant to CMV) were used. The plants were divided into six groups. The first group consisted of healthy (control) plants. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, the second group was inoculated with CMV. The other four groups were treated with growth regulators: Spermine, MEIA (beta-monomethyl ester of itaconic acid), ВТН (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester) and Phytoxin. On the next day, the pepper plants of these four groups were inoculated with CMV. The viral concentrations in the plants were determined by the serological method DAS-ELISA. Statistical, first derivative and cluster analysis were applied and several vegetation indices were

  14. Early Menopause Predicts Future Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if a self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank p=menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22692332

  15. A common genetic background could explain early-onset Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Zanin, Valentina; Girardelli, Martina; Magnolato, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Martellossi, Stefano; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Crovella, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease, in which environmental, microbial and genetic factors play important roles. CD is characterized by a chronic granulomatous inflammation by necrotic scarring with aspects of full-thickness wall. In spite of affecting mainly young adults, sometimes, CD can be present in the first year of life (early onset Crohn disease, EOCD) showing an unpredictable course and being often more severe than at older ages. In this paper we propose the hypothesis that EOCD patients should be analyzed using a Mendelian approach with family studies aimed to identify new loci directly involved in the early onset Crohn's disease. So we will leave the classic association study approach used until now for the identification of genes responsible for susceptibility to CD and propose linkage family analysis as alternative and powerful tool for the identification of new genetic variants associated with familiar cases of EOCD.

  16. Early Diagnosis of Rare Diseases with a Focus on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaguro, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Health outcomes for rare diseases can be greatly affected by timely diagnosis.This paper presents a narrative review of current literature on rare diseases, with a focuson Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH), to identify needs for early diagnosisinitiatives. The review assessed: what needs to be done, what is currently being done,and what are the approaches or change theories that underlie these initiatives.Literature from online key-word searches included academic articles pertaining todia...

  17. A Case Report of Probable Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: How to Approach Early Diagnosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Bowei; Morales Mangual, Carlos; Mahmud, Iftekhar; Tongo, Nosakhare D; Mararenko, Larisa; Kay, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare and fatal spongiform encephalopathy characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and myoclonus. The rarity of this disease and varied initial symptoms make the early diagnosis fairly challenging. Here, we present?a case initially admitted for confusion and bizarre behaviors. She had acute deterioration of mental status, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus jerks four weeks later. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was positive for protein 14-3-3....

  18. Efficacy of early treatment with infliximab in pediatric Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong; Seung; Lee; Jee; Hyun; Lee; Ji; Hyuk; Lee; Hye; Jin; Lee; Mi; Jin; Kim; Hae; Jeong; Lee; Yon; Ho; Choe

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of early infliximab use for induction and maintenance therapy in pediatric Crohn’s disease. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 36 patients with Crohn’s disease. Ten patients (group A) were treated with mesalamine after induction therapy with oral prednisolone, and 13 patients (group B) were treated with azathioprine after induction therapy with oral prednisolone. Thirteen patients (group C) received infliximab and azathioprine for induction and mainte...

  19. Perspective: Identification of genetic variants associated with dopaminergic compensatory mechanisms in early Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is slowly progressive, and heterogeneity of its severity among individuals may be due to endogenous mechanisms that counterbalance the striatal dopamine loss. In this perspective paper, we introduce a neuroimaging-genetic approach to identify genetic variants, which may contribute to this compensation. First, we briefly review current known potential compensatory mechanisms for premotor and early disease PD, located in the striatum and other brain regions. Then, we c...

  20. Cognitive rehabilitation for elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive rehabilitation including tasks of cognitive training on performance of everyday activities in elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three elderly people (15 men, 28 women) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease who had a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 18 or above were randomly assigned to two groups: the cognitive rehabilitation group (experimental) and co...

  1. Altered mental status, an unusual manifestation of early disseminated Lyme disease: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Early disseminated Lyme disease can have a myriad of central nervous system manifestations. These run the gamut from meningitis to radiculopathy and cranial neuropathy. Here we present a case that manifested with only acute mental status change in the setting of central nervous system involvement with Lyme disease. A paucity of other central nervous system manifestations is rare, especially with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid markers. This article underscores the importance o...

  2. Activating germline mutations in STAT3 cause early-onset multi-organ autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah E; Haapaniemi, Emma; Russell, Mark A; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana; De Franco, Elisa; McDonald, Timothy J; Rajala, Hanna; Ramelius, Anita; Barton, John; Heiskanen, Kaarina; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Kajosaari, Merja; Murphy, Nuala P; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Seppänen, Mikko; Lernmark, Åke; Mustjoki, Satu; Otonkoski, Timo; Kere, Juha; Morgan, Noel G; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-08-01

    Monogenic causes of autoimmunity provide key insights into the complex regulation of the immune system. We report a new monogenic cause of autoimmunity resulting from de novo germline activating STAT3 mutations in five individuals with a spectrum of early-onset autoimmune disease, including type 1 diabetes. These findings emphasize the critical role of STAT3 in autoimmune disease and contrast with the germline inactivating STAT3 mutations that result in hyper IgE syndrome.

  3. Predictors of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Hanna-Pladdy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to identify mild cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD prior to extensive neurodegeneration and to evaluate the extent to which dopamine depletion and other disease-related predictors can explain cognitive profiles. Methods: Neuropsychological performances of 40 nondemented early-stage PD patients and 42 healthy controls were compared across on or off dopaminergic medications. Stepwise regression evaluated cognitive predictors of early-stage PD and disease-related predictors of PD cognition (levodopa dose, disease duration, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score, sleep, quality of life, and mood across on and off states. Results: Neuropsychological performance was lower in PD patients across cognitive domains with significant memory, naming, visuomotor, and complex attention/executive deficits, but with intact visuospatial, simple attention, and phonemic fluency functions. However, medication effects were absent except for simple attention. Regression analyses revealed age, working memory, and memory recall to be the best cognitive predictors of PD, while age, quality of life, disease duration, and anxiety predicted PD cognition in the off state. Conclusion: Nondemented early-stage PD patients presented with extensive mild cognitive deficits including prominent memory impairment. The profile was inconsistent with expected isolated frontostriatal dysfunction previously attributed to dopamine depletion and this highlights the need to further characterize extranigral sources of mild cognitive impairment in PD.

  4. Prototype early warning system for heart disease detection using Android Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zennifa, Fadilla; Fitrilina; Kamil, Husnil; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Heart Disease affects approximately 70 million people worldwide where most people do not even know the symptoms. This research examines the prototype of early warning system for heart disease by android application. It aims to facilitate users to early detect heart disease which can be used independently. To build the application in android phone, variable centered intelligence rule system (VCIRS) as decision makers and pulse sensor - Arduino as heart rate detector were applied in this study. Moreover, in Arduino, the heart rate will become an input for symptoms in Android Application. The output of this system is the conclusion statement of users diagnosed with either coronary heart disease, hypertension heart disease, rheumatic heart disease or do not get any kind of heart disease. The result of diagnosis followed by analysis of the value of usage variable rate (VUR) rule usage rate (RUR) and node usage rate (NUR) that shows the value of the rule that will increase when the symptoms frequently appear. This application was compared with the medical analysis from 35 cases of heart disease and it showed concordance between diagnosis from android application and expert diagnosis of the doctors.

  5. Patient considerations in early management of Parkinson’s disease: focus on extended-release pramipexole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salawu FK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatai Kunle SalawuDivision of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Federal Medical Centre Yola, Adamawa State, NigeriaAbstract: This article reviews the role of an extended-release formulation of pramipexole in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease at an early stage. Pramipexole is a nonergot D2/D3 synthetic aminobenzothiazole derivative that is effective as monotherapy in early disease and as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with motor fluctuations. Although levodopa is the current “gold standard” for treatment of Parkinson’s disease, its effectiveness fades rapidly and its use results in serious motor fluctuations (on-off, wearing-off, freezing, involuntary movements for most patients with the disease. Pramipexole has selective actions at dopamine receptors belonging to the D2 subfamily, where it possesses full activity similar to dopamine itself. Its preferential affinity for the D3 receptor subtype could contribute to its efficacy in the treatment of both the motor and psychiatric symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The best approach to medical management of early Parkinson’s disease remains controversial. While enormous progress has been made in the treatment of the disease, challenges still remain. A variety of treatment-related and patient-related factors must be taken into account when making these decisions. The current approach to treatment of early Parkinson’s disease depends in part on individual patient factors, including age, severity and nature of symptoms and their impact, presence of cognitive dysfunction, possible underlying behavioral factors predisposing to impulse control disorders, and other comorbidities. Today, the once-daily extended-release formulation of pramipexole offers the advantages of easy continuous delivery of drug and convenience to patients, particularly early in the disease when monotherapy is the rule. Thus, a new “levodopa-sparing” paradigm for treating Parkinson’s disease may now be

  6. Reducing disease burden and health inequalities arising from chronic disease among Indigenous children: an early childhood caries intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Merrick Jessica; Chong Alwin; Parker Eleanor; Roberts-Thomson Kaye; Misan Gary; Spencer John; Broughton John; Lawrence Herenia; Jamieson Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This study seeks to determine if implementing a culturally-appropriate early childhood caries (ECC) intervention reduces dental disease burden and oral health inequalities among Indigenous children living in South Australia, Australia. Methods/Design This paper describes the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial conducted among Indigenous children living in South Australia with an anticipated sample of 400. The ECC intervention consists of four components: (1) p...

  7. Computer keyboard interaction as an indicator of early Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancardo, L.; Sánchez-Ferro, A.; Arroyo-Gallego, T.; Butterworth, I.; Mendoza, C. S.; Montero, P.; Matarazzo, M.; Obeso, J. A.; Gray, M. L.; Estépar, R. San José

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disease with early manifestation of motor signs. Objective measurements of motor signs are of vital importance for diagnosing, monitoring and developing disease modifying therapies, particularly for the early stages of the disease when putative neuroprotective treatments could stop neurodegeneration. Current medical practice has limited tools to routinely monitor PD motor signs with enough frequency and without undue burden for patients and the healthcare system. In this paper, we present data indicating that the routine interaction with computer keyboards can be used to detect motor signs in the early stages of PD. We explore a solution that measures the key hold times (the time required to press and release a key) during the normal use of a computer without any change in hardware and converts it to a PD motor index. This is achieved by the automatic discovery of patterns in the time series of key hold times using an ensemble regression algorithm. This new approach discriminated early PD groups from controls with an AUC = 0.81 (n = 42/43 mean age = 59.0/60.1 women = 43%/60%PD/controls). The performance was comparable or better than two other quantitative motor performance tests used clinically: alternating finger tapping (AUC = 0.75) and single key tapping (AUC = 0.61).

  8. Early phenotypic differences between Parkinson's disease patients with and without freezing of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, J. M.; Shine, J. M.; Walton, C. C.; Gilat, M.; Kamsma, Y. P. T.; Naismith, S. L.; Lewis, S. J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have associated freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease with the presence of specific phenotypic features such as mood disturbances, REM sleep behavior disorder and selective cognitive impairments. However, it is not clear whether these features are present in the earlie

  9. Apolipoprotein E genotype and association between smoking and early onset Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock); P. de Knijff (Peter); M. Cruts (Marc); A. Wehnert (Anita); L.M. Havekes; C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE--To investigate the hypothesis that differential survival between smokers and non-smokers leading to a decrease in the frequency of the e4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene may explain the inverse relation between smoking history and early onset Alzheimer's disease. DESIGN--A

  10. How does early detection by screening affect disease progression?: Modeling estimated benefits in prostate cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Wever (Elisabeth); G. Draisma (Gerrit); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Simulation models are essential tools for estimating benefits of cancer screening programs. Such models include a screening-effect model that represents how early detection by screening followed by treatment affects disease-specific survival. Two commonly used screening-effec

  11. Clinical features and mortality in patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.N. Samson; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn a population-based study of 198 patients with probable early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the occurrence of extrapyramidal signs (tremors and rigidity), myoclonus, psychosis and seizures, as well as their predictive value for mortality. The presence of tremors was signif

  12. Computer keyboard interaction as an indicator of early Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancardo, L.; Sánchez-Ferro, A.; Arroyo-Gallego, T.; Butterworth, I.; Mendoza, C. S.; Montero, P.; Matarazzo, M.; Obeso, J. A.; Gray, M. L.; Estépar, R. San José

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disease with early manifestation of motor signs. Objective measurements of motor signs are of vital importance for diagnosing, monitoring and developing disease modifying therapies, particularly for the early stages of the disease when putative neuroprotective treatments could stop neurodegeneration. Current medical practice has limited tools to routinely monitor PD motor signs with enough frequency and without undue burden for patients and the healthcare system. In this paper, we present data indicating that the routine interaction with computer keyboards can be used to detect motor signs in the early stages of PD. We explore a solution that measures the key hold times (the time required to press and release a key) during the normal use of a computer without any change in hardware and converts it to a PD motor index. This is achieved by the automatic discovery of patterns in the time series of key hold times using an ensemble regression algorithm. This new approach discriminated early PD groups from controls with an AUC = 0.81 (n = 42/43; mean age = 59.0/60.1; women = 43%/60%;PD/controls). The performance was comparable or better than two other quantitative motor performance tests used clinically: alternating finger tapping (AUC = 0.75) and single key tapping (AUC = 0.61). PMID:27703257

  13. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  14. Early changes in Huntington's disease patient brains involve alterations in cytoskeletal and synaptic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiProspero, Nicholas A; Chen, Er-Yun; Charles, Vinod; Plomann, Markus; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Tagle, Danilo A

    2004-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein. Huntingtin is normally present in the cytoplasm where it may interact with structural and synaptic elements. The mechanism of HD pathogenesis remains unknown but studies indicate a toxic gain-of-function possibly through aberrant protein interactions. To investigate whether early degenerative changes in HD involve alterations of cytoskeletal and vesicular components, we examined early cellular changes in the frontal cortex of HD presymptomatic (PS), early pathological grade (grade 1) and late-stage (grade 3 and 4) patients as compared to age-matched controls. Morphologic analysis using silver impregnation revealed a progressive decrease in neuronal fiber density and organization in pyramidal cell layers beginning in presymptomatic HD cases. Immunocytochemical analyses for the cytoskeletal markers alpha -tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2, and phosphorylated neurofilament demonstrated a concomitant loss of staining in early grade cases. Immunoblotting for synaptic proteins revealed a reduction in complexin 2, which was marked in some grade 1 HD cases and significantly reduced in all late stage cases. Interestingly, we demonstrate that two synaptic proteins, dynamin and PACSIN 1, which were unchanged by immunoblotting, showed a striking loss by immunocytochemistry beginning in early stage HD tissue suggesting abnormal distribution of these proteins. We propose that mutant huntingtin affects proteins involved in synaptic function and cytoskeletal integrity before symptoms develop which may influence early disease onset and/or progression.

  15. [Early identification of impaired renal function in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hu; Fu, Junfen; Chen, Xuefeng; Huang, Ke; Wu, Wei; Liang, Li

    2013-07-01

    To early assess the impaired renal function in the obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to identify the relationship between NAFLD and impairment of renal function. Three hundred and eighty-six obese children were enrolled and divided into NAFLD group and simple obesity group (control) according to the diagnostic criteria. Clinical biochemical parameters and early impaired renal functions were evaluated and compared. Among all patients 234 obese children aged over 10 y were subdivided into 3 groups: NAFLD combined with metabolic syndrome (NAFLD+MS) group, NAFLD group and simple obesity group (control), and the above indexes were compared among 3 groups. The urinary microalbumin levels in NAFLD, NAFLD+MS (>10y) and NAFLD groups (>10y) were significantly higher than those in controls. Additionally, the positive correlations of urinary microalbumin with systolic pressure, triglyceride and 2h-postprandial blood glucose were found. There is early renal dysfunction in children with NAFLD and those accompanied with MS, which may be associated with hypertension and glucose-lipid metabolic disorder. The results indicate that NAFLD is not only an early sign of early impaired renal function but also an early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in obese children.

  16. Exercise and Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Theoretical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid M. Hooghiemstra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although studies show a negative relationship between physical activity and the risk for cognitive impairment and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, studies concerning early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD are lacking. This review aims to justify the value of exercise interventions in EOAD by providing theoretical considerations that include neurobiological processes. Methods: A literature search on key words related to early-onset dementia, exercise, imaging, neurobiological mechanisms, and cognitive reserve was performed. Results/Conclusion: Brain regions and neurobiological processes contributing to the positive effects of exercise are affected in EOAD and, thus, provide theoretical support for exercise interventions in EOAD. Finally, we present the design of a randomized controlled trial currently being conducted in early-onset dementia patients.

  17. Early change in proteinuria as a surrogate end point for kidney disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inker, Lesley A; Levey, Andrew S; Pandya, Kruti

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is controversial whether proteinuria is a valid surrogate end point for randomized trials in chronic kidney disease. STUDY DESIGN: Meta-analysis of individual patient-level data. SETTING & POPULATION: Individual patient data for 9,008 patients from 32 randomized trials evaluating 5...... intervention types. SELECTION CRITERIA FOR STUDIES: Randomized controlled trials of kidney disease progression until 2007 with measurements of proteinuria both at baseline and during the first year of follow-up, with at least 1 further year of follow-up for the clinical outcome. PREDICTOR: Early change....... Pooled estimates for the proportion of treatment effect on the clinical outcome explained by early decline in proteinuria ranged from -7.0% (95%CI, -40.6% to 26.7%) to 43.9% (95%CI, 25.3% to 62.6%) across 5 intervention types. The direction of the pooled treatment effects on early change in proteinuria...

  18. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  19. Portable microfluidic raman system for rapid, label-free early disease signature detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meiye [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, Ryan Wesley [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hatch, Anson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In the early stages of infection, patients develop non-specific or no symptoms at all. While waiting for identification of the infectious agent, precious window of opportunity for early intervention is lost. The standard diagnostics require affinity reagents and sufficient pathogen titers to reach the limit of detection. In the event of a disease outbreak, triaging the at-risk population rapidly and reliably for quarantine and countermeasure is more important than the identification of the pathogen by name. To expand Sandia's portfolio of Biological threat management capabilities, we will utilize Raman spectrometry to analyze immune subsets in whole blood to rapidly distinguish infected from non-infected, and bacterial from viral infection, for the purpose of triage during an emergency outbreak. The goal of this one year LDRD is to determine whether Raman spectroscopy can provide label-free detection of early disease signatures, and define a miniaturized Raman detection system meeting requirements for low- resource settings.

  20. Altered mental status, an unusual manifestation of early disseminated Lyme disease: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabria, Shiven B; Lawrason, Jock

    2007-01-01

    Early disseminated Lyme disease can have a myriad of central nervous system manifestations. These run the gamut from meningitis to radiculopathy and cranial neuropathy. Here we present a case that manifested with only acute mental status change in the setting of central nervous system involvement with Lyme disease. A paucity of other central nervous system manifestations is rare, especially with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid markers. This article underscores the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in detection of Lyme disease related manifestations in endemic areas. PMID:17688693

  1. Altered mental status, an unusual manifestation of early disseminated Lyme disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabria Shiven B

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Early disseminated Lyme disease can have a myriad of central nervous system manifestations. These run the gamut from meningitis to radiculopathy and cranial neuropathy. Here we present a case that manifested with only acute mental status change in the setting of central nervous system involvement with Lyme disease. A paucity of other central nervous system manifestations is rare, especially with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid markers. This article underscores the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in detection of Lyme disease related manifestations in endemic areas.

  2. Signal and image processing for early detection of coronary artery diseases: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobssite, Youness; Samir, B. Belhaouari; Mohamad Hani, Ahmed Fadzil B.

    2012-09-01

    Today biomedical signals and image based detection are a basic step to diagnose heart diseases, in particular, coronary artery diseases. The goal of this work is to provide non-invasive early detection of Coronary Artery Diseases relying on analyzing images and ECG signals as a combined approach to extract features, further classify and quantify the severity of DCAD by using B-splines method. In an aim of creating a prototype of screening biomedical imaging for coronary arteries to help cardiologists to decide the kind of treatment needed to reduce or control the risk of heart attack.

  3. Deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson's disease: operative experience from a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Elyne; D'Haese, Pierre-Francois; Dawant, Benoit; Allen, Laura; Kao, Chris; Charles, P David; Konrad, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) may have a disease modifying effect in early Parkinson's disease (PD). A randomised, prospective study is underway to determine whether STN-DBS in early PD is safe and tolerable. 15 of 30 early PD patients were randomised to receive STN-DBS implants in an institutional review board approved protocol. Operative technique, location of DBS leads and perioperative adverse events are reported. Active contact used for stimulation in these patients was compared with 47 advanced PD patients undergoing an identical procedure by the same surgeon. 14 of the 15 patients did not sustain any long term (>3 months) complications from the surgery. One subject suffered a stroke resulting in mild cognitive changes and slight right arm and face weakness. The average optimal contact used in symptomatic treatment of early PD patients was: anterior -1.1±1.7 mm, lateral 10.7±1.7 mm and superior -3.3±2.5 mm (anterior and posterior commissure coordinates). This location is statistically no different (0.77 mm, p>0.05) than the optimal contact used in the treatment of 47 advanced PD patients. The perioperative adverse events in this trial of subjects with early stage PD are comparable with those reported for STN-DBS in advanced PD. The active contact position used in early PD is not significantly different from that used in late stage disease. This is the first report of the operative experience from a randomised, surgical versus best medical therapy trial for the early treatment of PD.

  4. Digitized Spiral Drawing: A Possible Biomarker for Early Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Luciano, Marta; Wang, Cuiling; Ortega, Roberto A.; Yu, Qiping; Boschung, Sarah; Soto-Valencia, Jeannie; Bressman, Susan B.; Lipton, Richard B.; Pullman, Seth; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pre-clinical markers of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) are needed, and to be relevant in pre-clinical disease, they should be quantifiably abnormal in early disease as well. Handwriting is impaired early in PD and can be evaluated using computerized analysis of drawn spirals, capturing kinematic, dynamic, and spatial abnormalities and calculating indices that quantify motor performance and disability. Digitized spiral drawing correlates with motor scores and may be more sensitive in detecting early changes than subjective ratings. However, whether changes in spiral drawing are abnormal compared with controls and whether changes are detected in early PD are unknown. Methods 138 PD subjects (50 with early PD) and 150 controls drew spirals on a digitizing tablet, generating x, y, z (pressure) data-coordinates and time. Derived indices corresponded to overall spiral execution (severity), shape and kinematic irregularity (second order smoothness, first order zero-crossing), tightness, mean speed and variability of spiral width. Linear mixed effect adjusted models comparing these indices and cross-validation were performed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was applied to examine discriminative validity of combined indices. Results All indices were significantly different between PD cases and controls, except for zero-crossing. A model using all indices had high discriminative validity (sensitivity = 0.86, specificity = 0.81). Discriminative validity was maintained in patients with early PD. Conclusion Spiral analysis accurately discriminates subjects with PD and early PD from controls supporting a role as a promising quantitative biomarker. Further assessment is needed to determine whether spiral changes are PD specific compared with other disorders and if present in pre-clinical PD. PMID:27732597

  5. Disease activity trajectories in early axial spondyloarthritis: results from the DESIR cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molto, Anna; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Wendling, Daniel; Dougados, Maxime; Vanier, Antoine; Gossec, Laure

    2017-06-01

    Disease activity may change over time in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). The objectives were to identify patterns of disease activity evolution in patients with early axSpA. Patients from the prospective early axSpA cohort (DEvenir des Spondyloarthrites Indifférenciées Récentes (DESIR)) who fulfilled the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis Society (ASAS) criteria for axSpA at baseline and with at least three Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) values available over the 3 years of follow-up were analysed. Statistical analyses: trajectories were estimated by group-based trajectory modelling; predisposing baseline factors for such trajectories were identified by univariate and multivariable multinomial (logit) regression; work disability over time was compared between the trajectories by Cox hazard model. In all, 370 patients were analysed: mean disease duration was 1.6 (±0.9) years. The five distinct trajectories of disease activity over the 3 years were (t1) 'persistent moderate disease activity' (n=134 (36.2%)); (t2) 'persistent inactive disease' (n=66 (17.8%); (t3) 'changing from very high disease activity to inactive disease' ((n=29 (7.8%)); (t4) 'persistent high disease activity' (n=126 (34.1%)) and (t5) 'persistent very high disease activity' (n=15 (4.1%)). After adjustment for other characteristics, t2 was associated with a white-collar job (OR=2.6 (95% CI 1.0 to 6.7)) and t3 with male gender (OR=7.1 (1.6 to 32.2)), higher education level (OR=9.4 (1.4 to 63.4)) and peripheral joint involvement (OR=6.2 (1.23 to 31.32)). Patients from (t4) and (t5) were more often declared work disabled over follow-up (HR=5.2 (1.5 to 18.0) and HR=8.0 (1.3 to 47.9), respectively). Trajectory modelling of disease activity was feasible in early axSpA: more than 30% patients (141/370) were in a trajectory with a persistent high disease activity. Persistent high disease activity trajectories were significantly associated with consequences on work. NCT01648907

  6. [Working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Kemmler, Georg; Bliem, Harald R; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of studies demonstrated that some forms of memory for music are spared in dementia, but only few studies have investigated patients with early stages of dementia. In this pilot-study we tested working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) with a newly created test. The test probed working memory using 7 gradually elongated tone-lines and 6 chords which were each followed by 3 similar items and 1 identical item. The participants of the study, namely 10 patients with MCI, 10 patients with early stage AD and 23 healthy subjects were instructed to select the identical tone-line or chord. Subjects with MCI and early AD showed significantly reduced performance than controls in most of the presented tasks. In recognizing chords MCI- participants surprisingly showed an unimpaired performance. The gradual increase of the impairment during the preclinical phase of AD seems to spare this special ability in MCI.

  7. The role of neuroimaging in the early diagnosis and evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibyl, J; Jennings, D; Tabamo, R; Marek, K

    2005-10-01

    The development of imaging biomarkers which target specific sites in the brain represents a significant advance in neurodegenerative diseases and Parkinson's disease with the promise of new and improved approaches for the early and accurate diagnosis of disease as well as novel ways to monitor patients and assess treatment. The 3 major applications of imaging may play a role in Parkinson's disease include: 1) the use of neuroimaging as a biomarker of disease in order to improve the accuracy, timeliness, and reliability of diagnosis; 2) objective monitoring of the progression of disease to provide a molecular phenotype of Parkinson's disease which may illuminate some of the sources of clinical variability; 3) the evaluation of so-called ''disease-modifying'' treatments designed to retard the progression of disease by interfering with pathways thought implicated in the ongoing neuronal loss or replace dopamine-producing cells. Each of these areas has shown a numbers of critical clinical investigations which have better defined the utility of the imaging tools to these tasks. Nonetheless, current unresolved issues around the clinical role of neuroimaging in monitoring patients over time and validation of quantitative imaging measures of dopaminergic function are immediate issues for the field and the subject of current research efforts and the extension of the lessons learned in Parkinson's to other neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's dementia.

  8. The difficulties of early detection for infectious disease outbreak in China:A qualitative investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weirong Yan; Yikai Zhou; Shen Wei; Huijuan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To make intensified analysis upon the existing difficulties in early detection for the infectious diseases outbreak in China and put forward some effective measures to improve it. Methods: Field investigation and in-depth interview were applied in 23 interviewees from different-level CDC. Results:The study findings suggest that although the timeliness of outbreak detection has been improved since SARS epidemic in China, some problems still exist, such as: ① lacking syndrome surveillance; ② report quality of infectious disease should be improved; ③ difficulties of identifying the cases at lower social economic status; ④ a definite financial compensation mechanism for the operation of web-based report system is absent; ⑤ insufficient information exchange among different branches. Conclusion:Some effective measures must be taken including developing syndrome surveillance system; affording more education and training for related staff; increasing payout on surveillance and establishing an information exchange platform for early detection of disease outbreak.

  9. Short Telomere Length, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, and Early Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Bojesen, Stig E; Cawthon, Richard M;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that short telomere length is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, and early death. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured leukocyte telomere length in 2 prospective studies of 19 838 Danish general population participants...... from the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study. Participants were followed for up to 19 years for incident myocardial infarction (n=929), ischemic heart disease (n=2038), and death (n=4342). Follow-up was 100% complete. Telomere length decreased linearly...... with increasing age in women and men in both studies (P=7×10(-74) to P=3×10(-125)). Multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios were 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.19) for myocardial infarction, 1.06 (1.00-1.11) for ischemic heart disease, and 1.09 (1.05-1.13) for early death per 1000-base pair decrease in telomere length...

  10. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschow, Christine; Scheef, Lukas; Paus, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Nadine; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. Methods 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI) during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ) and higher (E = 640 mJ) target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale. Results No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson’s disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson’s disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson’s disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced

  11. Dopamine Transporter Neuroimaging as an Enrichment Biomarker in Early Parkinson's Disease Clinical Trials: A Disease Progression Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, Daniela J; Nicholas, Timothy; Tsai, Kuenhi; Macha, Sreeraj; Sinha, Vikram; Stone, Julie; Corrigan, Brian; Bani, Massimo; Muglia, Pierandrea; Watson, Ian A; Kern, Volker D; Sheveleva, Elena; Marek, Kenneth; Stephenson, Diane T; Romero, Klaus

    2017-07-27

    Given the recognition that disease-modifying therapies should focus on earlier Parkinson's disease stages, trial enrollment based purely on clinical criteria poses significant challenges. The goal herein was to determine the utility of dopamine transporter neuroimaging as an enrichment biomarker in early motor Parkinson's disease clinical trials. Patient-level longitudinal data of 672 subjects with early-stage Parkinson's disease in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) observational study and the Parkinson Research Examination of CEP-1347 Trial (PRECEPT) clinical trial were utilized in a linear mixed-effects model analysis. The rate of worsening in the motor scores between subjects with or without a scan without evidence of dopamine transporter deficit was different both statistically and clinically. The average difference in the change from baseline of motor scores at 24 months between biomarker statuses was -3.16 (90% confidence interval [CI] = -0.96 to -5.42) points. Dopamine transporter imaging could identify subjects with a steeper worsening of the motor scores, allowing trial enrichment and 24% reduction of sample size. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  12. Neurophysiological assessment of neural network plasticity and connectivity: Progress towards early functional biomarkers for disease interception therapies in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, C; Drinkenburg, W H I M; Ahnaou, A

    2017-02-01

    Despite a great deal of research into Alzheimer's disease (AD) over the last 20 years, an effective treatment to halt or slow its progression has yet to be developed. With many aspects of the disease progression still to be elucidated, focus has shifted from reducing levels of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brains of AD patients towards tau, another pathology, which initiates much earlier in deeper brainstem networks and is thought to propagate via cell-to-cell processes prior to the onset of amyloid pathology and cognitive impairments. In-vitro, ex-vivo molecular biology/biochemistry read-outs, and various transgenic animal models have been developed, yet clinical failures have highlighted a clear disconnect and inadequate use of such animal models in translational research across species. AD pathology is now estimated to begin at least 10-20 years before clinical symptoms, and imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are leading the way in assessing the disease progression at a stage where neuronal damage has already occurred. Here, we emphasize the relevance of assessing early disruptions in network connectivity and plasticity that occur before neuropathological damage and progressive memory dysfunction, which can have high translational value for discovery of pre-symptomatic AD biomarkers and early mechanism-based disease interception therapeutics.

  13. THE РERSONALITY PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH EARLY MANIFESTATIONS OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Bogdanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders that sometimes may precede motor dysfunction have an important value in Parkinson's disease, especially at its earlier stages. Personality characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease have not been studied enough and require a  detailed assessment, because it is a  major factor contributing to treatment efficacy. Aim: To assess personality profiles of patients with early stages of Parkinson's disease and an impact of a dopamine receptor agonist on the personality profile. Materials and methods: We assessed 33 treatment-naïve patients with early symptoms of Parkinson's disease (Hoehn-Yahr stage I and II. The following scales were used before treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months of treatment with pramipexol: for motor disorders (UPDRS, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, depressive disorders (MADRS, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale and anxiety disorders (HARS, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, as well as personality profile (MMPI, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Results: The personality profile assessed by MMPI in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease was characterized by highest T scores on scales 2 (pessimism (74 [64; 86], 1 (neurotic excess control (67 [63; 74], 3  (emotional instability (64 [56; 70], 7 (anxiousness (63 [52; 70], 8 (autism (64 [58; 74], 0  (introversion (63 [59; 66]. This indicates basic pathopsychological characteristics of patients with early stages of the disease. In particular, their emotional sphere demonstrated anxiety- and depression-related affective disorders. Their personality structure was characterized by dysthymic, anxious, rigid and explosive traits, and susceptibility to hypochondriasis. With a background of a dramatic motivational conflict, frustration of high-level need in self-actualization and recognition due to a chronic disease with motor dysfunction triggered a depressive response type. Pharmacological treatment with

  14. Monitoring Huntington’s disease progression through preclinical and early stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chris; Feigin, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder that typically begins in middle adulthood. The neurodegenerative process that underlies HD, however, likely begins many years before clinical diagnosis. Since genetic testing can identify individuals that will develop HD during this preclinical period, clinical trials aiming to slow disease progression will likely focus on this phase of the illness in an effort to delay disease onset. How to best measure the efficacy of potential disease-modifying therapies in preclinical HD remains a complex challenge. This article will review the clinical and imaging measures that have been assessed as potential markers of disease progression in preclinical and early symptomatic HD. PMID:23243467

  15. Neuroimaging markers for the prediction and early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Michael; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Hampel, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive age-related neurodegenerative disease. At the time of clinical manifestation of dementia, significant irreversible brain damage is already present, rendering the diagnosis of AD at early stages of the disease an urgent prerequisite for therapeutic treatment to halt, or at least slow, disease progression. In this Review, we discuss various neuroimaging measures that are proving to have potential value as biomarkers of AD pathology for the detection and prediction of AD before the onset of dementia. Recent studies that have identified AD-like structural and functional brain changes in elderly people who are cognitively within the normal range or who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are discussed. A dynamic sequence model of changes that occur in neuroimaging markers during the different disease stages is presented and the predictive value of multimodal neuroimaging for AD dementia is considered. PMID:21696834

  16. Lack of miRNA misregulation at early pathological stages in Drosophila neurodegenerative disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita eReinhardt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Late onset neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health concern as the population in many countries ages. Both frequent diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD, 14% incidence for 80-84 year old Europeans or Parkinson disease (PD, 1.4% prevalence for > 55 years old share, with other low-incidence neurodegenerative pathologies such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs, 0.01% prevalence and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, 0.02% prevalence, a lack of efficient treatment in spite of important research efforts. Besides significant progress, studies with animal models have revealed unexpected complexities in the degenerative process, emphasizing a need to better understand the underlying pathological mechanisms. Recently, microRNAs, a class of small regulatory non-coding RNAs, have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. The current data supporting a role of miRNAs in PD, tauopathies, dominant ataxias and FTLD will first be discussed to emphasize the different levels of the pathological processes which may be affected by miRNAs. To investigate a potential involvement of miRNA dysregulation in the early stages of these neurodegenerative diseases we have used Drosophila models for 7 diseases (PD, 3 FTLD, 3 dominant ataxias that recapitulate many features of the human diseases. We performed deep sequencing of head small RNAs after 3 days of pathological protein expression in the fly head neurons. We found no evidence for a statistically significant difference in miRNA expression in this early stage of the pathological process. In addition, we could not identify small non coding CAG repeat RNAs (sCAG in polyQ disease models. Thus our data suggest that transcriptional deregulation of miRNAs or sCAG is unlikely to play a significant role in the initial stages of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. The Serum Glycome to Discriminate between Early-Stage Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Benign Ovarian Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Biskup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths in women because the diagnosis occurs mostly when the disease is in its late-stage. Current diagnostic methods of EOC show only a moderate sensitivity, especially at an early-stage of the disease; hence, novel biomarkers are needed to improve the diagnosis. We recently reported that serum glycome modifications observed in late-stage EOC patients by MALDI-TOF-MS could be combined as a glycan score named GLYCOV that was calculated from the relative areas of the 11 N-glycan structures that were significantly modulated. Here, we evaluated the ability of GLYCOV to recognize early-stage EOC in a cohort of 73 individuals comprised of 20 early-stage primary serous EOC, 20 benign ovarian diseases (BOD, and 33 age-matched healthy controls. GLYCOV was able to recognize stage I EOC whereas CA125 values were statistically significant only for stage II EOC patients. In addition, GLYCOV was more sensitive and specific compared to CA125 in distinguishing early-stage EOC from BOD patients, which is of high relevance to clinicians as it is difficult for them to diagnose malignancy prior to operation.

  18. Development and evaluation of a novel contamination device that targets multiple life-stages of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing global threat of Dengue demands new and easily applicable vector control methods. Ovitraps provide a low-tech and inexpensive means to combat Dengue vectors. Here we describe the development and optimization process of a novel contamination device that targets multiple life-stages of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Special focus is directed to the diverse array of control agents deployed in this trap, covering adulticidal, larvicidal and autodissemination impacts. Methods Different trap prototypes and their parts are described, including a floater to contaminate alighting gravid mosquitoes. The attractiveness of the trap, different odor lures and floater design were studied using fluorescent powder adhering to mosquito legs and via choice tests. We demonstrate the mosquitocidal impacts of the control agents: a combination of the larvicide pyriproxyfen and the adulticidal fungus Beauveria bassiana. The impact of pyriproxyfen was determined in free-flight dissemination experiments. The effect on larval development inside the trap and in surrounding breeding sites was measured, as well as survival impacts on recaptured adults. Results The developmental process resulted in a design that consists of a black 3 Liter water-filled container with a ring-shaped floater supporting vertically placed gauze dusted with the control agents. On average, 90% of the mosquitoes in the fluorescence experiments made contact with the gauze on the floater. Studies on attractants indicated that a yeast-containing tablet was the most attractive odor lure. Furthermore, the fungus Beauveria bassiana was able to significantly increase mortality of the free-flying adults compared to controls. Dissemination of pyriproxyfen led to >90% larval mortality in alternative breeding sites and 100% larval mortality in the trap itself, against a control mortality of around 5%. Conclusion This ovitrap is a promising new tool in the battle against Dengue. It has proven to be attractive

  19. Basal ganglia dysfunction in idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder parallels that in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Michal; Griffanti, Ludovica; Piccini, Paola; Roussakis, Andreas A; Szewczyk-Krolikowski, Konrad; Menke, Ricarda A; Quinnell, Timothy; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Klein, Johannes C; Mackay, Clare E; Hu, Michele T M

    2016-08-01

    SEE POSTUMA DOI101093/AWW131 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging dysfunction within the basal ganglia network is a feature of early Parkinson's disease and may be a diagnostic biomarker of basal ganglia dysfunction. Currently, it is unclear whether these changes are present in so-called idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, a condition associated with a high rate of future conversion to Parkinson's disease. In this study, we explore the utility of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to detect basal ganglia network dysfunction in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We compare these data to a set of healthy control subjects, and to a set of patients with established early Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, we explore the relationship between resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging basal ganglia network dysfunction and loss of dopaminergic neurons assessed with dopamine transporter single photon emission computerized tomography, and perform morphometric analyses to assess grey matter loss. Twenty-six patients with polysomnographically-established rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 48 patients with Parkinson's disease and 23 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Resting state networks were isolated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging data using dual regression with a template derived from a separate cohort of 80 elderly healthy control participants. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging parameter estimates were extracted from the study subjects in the basal ganglia network. In addition, eight patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 10 with Parkinson's disease and 10 control subjects received (123)I-ioflupane single photon emission computerized tomography. We tested for reduction of basal ganglia network connectivity, and for loss of tracer uptake in rapid eye movement sleep

  20. Effect of Early Intervention Applied to Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease at Different Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Lei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Early intervention in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD includes health education, smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and enhancing immunity (administration of influenza vaccine and polysaccharide nucleic acid fraction of bacillus Calmette-Guerin [BCG-PSN]. The effect of early intervention was investigated systematically in patients with COPD at different stages. Methods: We enrolled 422 patients with COPD at different stages without symptoms and then randomly assigned them to intervention and control groups. The intervention group was provided with early intervention and usual care while the control group was only provided with usual care. One year of follow-up was performed to observe forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC, and the ratio of patients with acute exacerbation (number of patients with acute exacerbation/total of patients. Results: The values of decline in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC were significantly lower in the intervention groups of stage I and II than control groups (all p 0.05. The ratios of patients with acute exacerbation were lower in the intervention groups of all the stages than the control groups (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Early intervention could slow the decline of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC in patients with COPD in stages I and II, but not in stages III and IV. Early intervention could also prevent patients with COPD from getting acute exacerbation and improve their quality of life in all the stages of the disease.

  1. Illness representations and coping processes of Taiwanese patients with early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Chen, Mei-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health problem worldwide with an increasing incidence and prevalence and high cost. The role of illness perceptions in understanding health-related behavior has received little attention in patients with early-stage CKD. This qualitative study aimed to describe the illness representation and coping process experience of patients with early-stage CKD in Taiwan. A qualitative content analysis approach was used to analyze semistructured, open-ended, one-on-one interviews with 15 patients with early-stage CKD. Purposive sampling was used to recruit patients diagnosed with early-stage CKD from the nephrology departments of two medical centers in Taiwan. Trustworthiness of the study was evaluated using four criteria suggested by Lincoln and Guba. Six themes emerged from the analysis: experiencing early symptoms, self-interpreting the causes of having CKD, realizing CKD as a long-term disease, believing CKD could be controlled by following doctors' orders, anticipating the consequences of having CKD, and adopting coping strategies to delay the progress of CKD. Findings from this study compared with previous studies reveal that education can effectively change patient illness representations as an approach to improve coping behavior. This finding offers healthcare professionals insight into the health education necessary to assess patient illness representation to provide culturally sensitive interventions.

  2. Albuminuria Is Associated with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Patients with Early Diabetic Kidney Disease

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    Nan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and albuminuria are both markers for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We speculate that albuminuria in T2DM patients with early diabetic kidney disease (DKD could predict LVH. Methods. 333 diabetic patients (219 non-DKD and 114 early DKD were enrolled. The association between albuminuria and LVMI was examined using multivariate linear regression and logistic regression. Results. The rate of LVH was significantly higher in patients with early DKD versus those without DKD (57.0% versus 32.9%; P<0.001. Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that albuminuria status (no, micro-, and macroalbuminuria; P<0.001, age (P<0.001, systolic blood pressure (P=0.0578, and the use of ACEI/ARB drug (P<0.001 were independently associated with LVMI. The risks were substantially higher for LVH in the microalbuminuria group (odds ratio 2.473 (95% confidence interval 1.370–4.464 and macroalbuminuria group (odds ratio 3.940 (95% confidence interval 1.553–9.993 compared with that in non-DKD group. Concentric hypertrophy was the most common geometric pattern in patients with early DKD (36.0%, followed by eccentric hypertrophy (21.0%. Conclusions. Albuminuria is associated with higher LVMI and higher rate of LVH in patients with early phase DKD.

  3. Mining disease risk patterns from nationwide clinical databases for the assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis risk.

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    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997-2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease.

  4. Differences between early and late-onset Alzheimer's disease in neuropsychological tests.

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    Francisca eSá

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although patients with Alzheimer disease (AD share clinical and histological features regardless of age of onset, the hypothesis that early-onset AD constitutes a distinct subgroup prevails. Some authors suggest that early attention or language impairment constitute patterns of differentiation in terms of neuropsychological profile. However, investigations are not consensual in terms of cognitive domains affected in each group.Aim: To investigate whether there is early neuropsychological difference between two types of AD using the conventional dividing line of 65 years.Methods: We evaluated the results obtained in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and in a comprehensive neuropsychological battery – Battery of Lisbon for the Assessment of Dementia (BLAD, at a Dementia clinic in the University Hospital of Coimbra and a Memory Clinic. Consecutive patients with a clinical probable diagnosis of mild to moderate AD, using standard criteria (DSMIV and NINCDS-ADRDA, were selected. Statistical analysis was performed using Qui-square and U-Mann-Whitney, for categorical and non-categorical variables.Results: The sample included 280 patients: 109 with early-onset AD and 171 with a late-onset form. Groups were comparable in gender, education, severity of disease and MMSE. In BLAD, the early onset group had lower scores in Naming (p=0,025, Right-Left Orientation (p=0,029 and Praxis (p=0,001, and better performances in Orientation (p=0,001 and Visual Memory (p=0,022. After application of Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons only Praxis and Orientation could differentiate the two groups.Discussion: The results are suggestive of dissociated profiles between early and late-onset AD. Younger patients have a major impairment in Praxis and a tendency for a great impairment in neocortical temporal functions. Late-onset form had a tendency for worse performances in Visual Memory and Orientation, suggesting a more localized disease to the limbic

  5. GATA2 is associated with familial early-onset coronary artery disease.

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    Jessica J Connelly

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor GATA2 plays an essential role in the establishment and maintenance of adult hematopoiesis. It is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, as well as the cells that make up the aortic vasculature, namely aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. We have shown that GATA2 expression is predictive of location within the thoracic aorta; location is suggested to be a surrogate for disease susceptibility. The GATA2 gene maps beneath the Chromosome 3q linkage peak from our family-based sample set (GENECARD study of early-onset coronary artery disease. Given these observations, we investigated the relationship of several known and novel polymorphisms within GATA2 to coronary artery disease. We identified five single nucleotide polymorphisms that were significantly associated with early-onset coronary artery disease in GENECARD. These results were validated by identifying significant association of two of these single nucleotide polymorphisms in an independent case-control sample set that was phenotypically similar to the GENECARD families. These observations identify GATA2 as a novel susceptibility gene for coronary artery disease and suggest that the study of this transcription factor and its downstream targets may uncover a regulatory network important for coronary artery disease inheritance.

  6. Towards non-invasive diagnostic imaging of early-stage Alzheimer's disease

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    Viola, Kirsten L.; Sbarboro, James; Sureka, Ruchi; de, Mrinmoy; Bicca, Maíra A.; Wang, Jane; Vasavada, Shaleen; Satpathy, Sreyesh; Wu, Summer; Joshi, Hrushikesh; Velasco, Pauline T.; Macrenaris, Keith; Waters, E. Alex; Lu, Chang; Phan, Joseph; Lacor, Pascale; Prasad, Pottumarthi; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    One way to image the molecular pathology in Alzheimer's disease is by positron emission tomography using probes that target amyloid fibrils. However, these fibrils are not closely linked to the development of the disease. It is now thought that early-stage biomarkers that instigate memory loss are composed of Aβ oligomers. Here, we report a sensitive molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast probe that is specific for Aβ oligomers. We attach oligomer-specific antibodies onto magnetic nanostructures and show that the complex is stable and binds to Aβ oligomers on cells and brain tissues to give a magnetic resonance imaging signal. When intranasally administered to an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, the probe readily reached hippocampal Aβ oligomers. In isolated samples of human brain tissue, we observed a magnetic resonance imaging signal that distinguished Alzheimer's disease from controls. Such nanostructures that target neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are potentially useful for evaluating the efficacy of new drugs and ultimately for early-stage Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and disease management.

  7. Adolescents' Sexually Transmitted Disease Protective Attitudes Predict Sexually Transmitted Disease Acquisition in Early Adulthood

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    Crosby, Richard A.; Danner, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Background: Estimates suggest that about 48% of nearly 19 million cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) occurring annually in the United States are acquired by persons aged 15-24 years. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that adolescents' attitudes about protecting themselves from STDs predict their laboratory-confirmed…

  8. Impulsivity trait in the early symptomatic BACHD transgenic rat model of Huntington disease.

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    Manfré, Giuseppe; Doyère, Valérie; Bossi, Simon; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; El Massioui, Nicole

    2016-02-15

    Impulsivity trait was characterized in 3-5 months old BACHD rats, a transgenic model of Huntington disease, using (1) the delay discounting task to assess cognitive/choice impulsivity, and (2) the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rate of Responding task to evaluate motor/action impulsivity. Transgenic animals showed a high level of choice impulsivity and, to a lesser extent, action impulsivity. Our results provide the first evidence that the transgenic BACHD rat (TG5 line) displays impulsivity disorder as early as 3 months old, as described in early symptomatic HD patients, thus adding to the face validity of the rat model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Etiologic factors of early-onset periodontal disease in Down syndrome

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    Atsuo Amano

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with Down syndrome often develop extensive gingivitis, and exhibit rapid and generalized periodontal breakdown in early adulthood. Earlier studies reported a significant prevalence of periodontal disease in patients with Down syndrome younger than 30 years old, whereas recent studies have indicated that periodontal disease associated with the syndrome is less severe than formerly thought, likely due to improved dental care at home and the dental office. Although the etiology of the condition is not yet fully elucidated, a number of studies have shown that Down syndrome related periodontitis is caused by such factors as immunological deficiency, poor oral hygiene, fragile periodontal tissue, early senescence, salivary deficiency, and poor masticatory function. In addition, those individuals experience very early colonization by various periodontal pathogens, and exhibit an exaggerated innate immune response to produce inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2 and matrix metalloproteinases. Recent studies regarding Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam provide further evidence for increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral diseases in Down syndrome. In this review, an overview of contemporary findings on the etiology of periodontal disease associated with Down syndrome is presented.

  10. Molecular correlates of epilepsy in early diagnosed and treated Menkes disease

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    Liew, Clarissa J.; Donsante, Anthony; Hicks, Julia D.; Sato, Susumu; Greenfield, Jacquelyn C.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a major feature of Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive infantile neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in ATP7A, which produces a copper-transporting ATPase. Three prior surveys indicated clinical seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities in a combined 27 of 29 (93%) symptomatic Menkes disease patients diagnosed at 2 months of age or older. To assess the influence of earlier, presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment on seizure semiology and brain electrical activity, we evaluated 71 EEGs in 24 Menkes disease patients who were diagnosed and treated with copper injections in early infancy (≤6 weeks of age), and whose ATP7A mutations we determined. Clinical seizures were observed in only 12.5% (3/24) of these patients, although 46% (11/24) had at least one abnormal EEG tracing, including 50% of patients with large deletions in ATP7A, 50% of those with small deletions, 60% of those with nonsense mutations, and 57% of those with canonical splice junction mutations. In contrast, five patients with mutations shown to retain partial function, either via some correct RNA splicing or residual copper transport capacity, had neither clinical seizures nor EEG abnormalities. Our findings suggest that early diagnosis and treatment improve brain electrical activity and decrease seizure occurrence in classical Menkes disease irrespective of the precise molecular defect. Subjects with ATP7A mutations that retain some function seem particularly well protected by early intervention against the possibility of epilepsy. PMID:20652413

  11. Survival benefit associated with early cyclosporine treatment for dermatomyositis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Dong Jin; Park, Jin Kyun; Kang, Eun Ha; Kwon, Hyun Mi; Lee, Yun Jong; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Eun Bong

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most common cause of death in dermatomyositis (DM). Cyclosporine A (CsA) has shown to be effective in DM-associated ILD (DM-ILD). This study aimed to define the optimal time of CsA administration. A total of 47 patients with DM-ILD, who were treated with CsA at Seoul National University Hospital between January 1998 and June 2013, were enrolled. ILD was diagnosed based on typical chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings. Patients with early and delayed CsA treatment were compared in regard to the mortality and ILD progression on HRCT. The early (n = 16) and the delayed treatment group (n = 31) did not differ in regard to baseline clinical characteristics including HRCT scores and pulmonary function. Patients with clinically amyopathic DM (CADM) were more common in the early treatment group. The mortality rate was significantly lower in the early treatment group than in the delayed treatment group (p = 0.009). The survival benefit of early CsA treatment remained significant even after adjusting for age, degree of dyspnea, CADM status, and the year of CsA treatment (hazard ratio 0.057, 95 % confidence interval 0.007-0.472). CsA stabilized disease progression on HRCT in the early treatment group (p = 0.738). Delay in CsA treatment is associated with a worse survival in patients with DM-ILD. Early CsA treatment should be considered at DM-ILD diagnosis especially in patients at a higher risk of developing a rapidly progressive ILD.

  12. The Design of the Valsartan for Attenuating Disease Evolution in Early Sarcomeric Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (VANISH) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; McMurray, John J V; Cirino, Allison L; Colan, Steven D; Day, Sharlene M; Desai, Akshay S; Lipshultz, Steven E; MacRae, Calum A; Shi, Ling; Solomon, Scott D; Orav, E John; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often caused by sarcomere gene mutations, resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myocardial fibrosis, and increased risk of sudden cardiac death and heart failure. Studies in mouse models of sarcomeric HCM demonstrated that early treatment with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) reduced development of LVH and fibrosis. In contrast, prior human studies using ARBs for HCM have targeted heterogeneous adult cohorts with well-established disease. The VANISH trial is testing the safety and feasibility of disease-modifying therapy with an ARB in genotyped HCM patients with early disease. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial is being conducted in sarcomere mutation carriers, 8 to 45 years old, with HCM and no/minimal symptoms, or those with early phenotypic manifestations but no LVH. Participants are randomly assigned to receive valsartan 80 to 320 mg daily (depending on age and weight) or placebo. The primary endpoint is a composite of 9 z-scores in domains representing myocardial injury/hemodynamic stress, cardiac morphology, and function. Total z-scores reflecting change from baseline to final visits will be compared between treatment groups. Secondary endpoints will assess the impact of treatment on mutation carriers without LVH, and analyze the influence of age, sex, and genotype. The VANISH trial is testing a new strategy of disease modification for treating sarcomere mutation carriers with early HCM, and those at risk for its development. In addition, further insight into disease mechanisms, response to therapy, and phenotypic evolution will be gained. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Stabilizing ER Ca2+ channel function as an early preventative strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

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    Shreaya Chakroborty

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative condition with no known cure. While current therapies target late-stage amyloid formation and cholinergic tone, to date, these strategies have proven ineffective at preventing disease progression. The reasons for this may be varied, and could reflect late intervention, or, that earlier pathogenic mechanisms have been overlooked and permitted to accelerate the disease process. One such example would include synaptic pathology, the disease component strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Dysregulated Ca(2+ homeostasis may be one of the critical factors driving synaptic dysfunction. One of the earliest pathophysiological indicators in mutant presenilin (PS AD mice is increased intracellular Ca(2+ signaling, predominantly through the ER-localized inositol triphosphate (IP(3 and ryanodine receptors (RyR. In particular, the RyR-mediated Ca(2+ upregulation within synaptic compartments is associated with altered synaptic homeostasis and network depression at early (presymptomatic AD stages. Here, we offer an alternative approach to AD therapeutics by stabilizing early pathogenic mechanisms associated with synaptic abnormalities. We targeted the RyR as a means to prevent disease progression, and sub-chronically treated AD mouse models (4-weeks with a novel formulation of the RyR inhibitor, dantrolene. Using 2-photon Ca(2+ imaging and patch clamp recordings, we demonstrate that dantrolene treatment fully normalizes ER Ca(2+ signaling within somatic and dendritic compartments in early and later-stage AD mice in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the elevated RyR2 levels in AD mice are restored to control levels with dantrolene treatment, as are synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Aβ deposition within the cortex and hippocampus is also reduced in dantrolene-treated AD mice. In this study, we highlight the pivotal role of Ca(2+ aberrations in AD, and propose a novel strategy to

  14. Are we giving azathioprine too late? The case for early immunomodulation in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    María Josefina Etchevers; Montserrat Aceituno; Miquel Sans

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes two entities, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Both are chronic conditions with frequent complications and surgical procedures and a great impact on patient's quality of life. The thiopurine antimetabolites azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine are widely used in IBD patients. Current indications include maintenance therapy, steroid-dependant disease, fistula closure, prevention of infliximab immunogenicity and prevention of Crohn's disease recurrence. Surprisingly, the wide use of immunosuppressants in the last decades has not decreased the need of surgery, probably because these treatments are introduced at too late stages in disease course. An earlier use of immunossupressants is now advocated by some authors. The rational includes: (1) failure to modify IBD natural history of present therapeutic approach, (2) demonstration that azathioprine can induce mucosal healing, a relevant prognostic factor for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and (3) demonstration that early immunossupression has a very positive impact on pediatric, recently diagnosed Crohn's disease patients. We are now awaiting the results of new studies, to clarify the contribution of azathioprine, as compared to infliximab (SONIC Study), and to demonstrate the usefulness of azathioprine in recently diagnosed adult Crohn's disease patients (AZTEC study).

  15. Demons, nature, or God? Witchcraft accusations and the French disease in early modern Venice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Laura J

    2006-01-01

    In early modern Venice, establishing the cause of a disease was critical to determining the appropriate cure: natural remedies for natural illnesses, spiritual solutions for supernatural or demonic ones. One common ailment was the French disease (syphilis), widely distributed throughout Venice's neighborhoods and social hierarchy, and evenly distributed between men and women. The disease was widely regarded as curable by the mid-sixteenth century, and cases that did not respond to natural remedies presented problems of interpretation to physicians and laypeople. Witchcraft was one possible explanation; using expert testimony from physicians, however, the Holy Office ruled out witchcraft as a cause of incurable cases and reinforced perceptions that the disease was of natural origin. Incurable cases were explained as the result of immoral behavior, thereby reinforcing the associated stigma. This article uses archival material from Venice's Inquisition records from 1580 to 1650, as well as mortality data.

  16. Early events of citrus greening (Huanglongbing) disease development at the ultrastructural level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Achor, Diann S

    2010-09-01

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing [HLB]) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. The causal agent of HLB in Florida is thought to be 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. Understanding of the early events in HLB infection is critical for the development of effective measures to control the disease. In this work, we conducted cytopathological studies by following the development of the disease in citrus trees graft inoculated with 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-containing material under greenhouse conditions to examine the correlation between ultrastructural changes and symptom production, with the main objective of characterizing the early events of infection. Based on our observations, one of the first degenerative changes induced upon invasion of the pathogen appears to be swelling of middle lamella between cell walls surrounding sieve elements. This anatomical aberration was often observed in samples from newly growing flushes in inoculated sweet orange and grapefruit trees at the early "presymptomatic" stage of HLB infection. Development of symptoms and their progression correlated with an increasing degree of microscopic aberrations. Remarkably, the ability to observe the bacterium in the infected tissue also correlated with the degree of the disease progression. Large numbers of bacterial cells were found in phloem sieve tubes in tissue samples from presymptomatic young flushes. In contrast, we did not observe the bacteria in highly symptomatic leaf samples, suggesting a possibility that, at more advanced stages of the disease, a major proportion of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is present in a nonviable state. We trust that observations reported here advance our understanding of how 'Ca. L. asiaticus' causes disease. Furthermore, they may be an important aid in answering a question: when and where within an infected tree the tissue serves as a better inoculum source for acquisition and transmission of the bacterium by its psyllid vector.

  17. A critical review: early life nutrition and prenatal programming for adult disease.

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    Carolan-Olah, Mary; Duarte-Gardea, Maria; Lechuga, Julia

    2015-12-01

    To present the evidence in relation to early life nutrition and foetal programming for adult disease. Epigenetics is a new and growing area of study investigating the impact of the intrauterine environment on the lifelong health of individuals. Discursive paper. Searches were conducted in a range of electronic health databases. Hand searches located additional articles for review. Maternal search terms included: pregnancy; nutrition; diet; obesity; over nutrition; under nutrition. Offspring related search terms included: macrosomia; intrauterine growth restriction; epigenetics; foetal programming; childhood obesity; adolescent obesity; adolescent type 2 diabetes. Results indicate that foetal programming for adult disease occurs in response to particular insults during vulnerable developmental periods. Four main areas of foetal exposure were identified in this review: (1) under nutrition; (2) over nutrition; (3) gestational diabetes mellitus; and (4) infant catch-up growth. Numerous studies also described the trans-generational nature of foetal programming. Overall, foetal exposure to excess or insufficient nutrition during vulnerable developmental periods appears to result in a lifelong predisposition to obesity and adult disease, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiac disease. For the infant who has been undernourished during early life, a predisposition to renal disease also occurs. Pregnancy is a time when women are engaged in health systems and are receptive to health messages. These factors suggest that pregnancy may be an optimal time for dietary education and intervention. There is a particular need for education on healthy diet and for interventions which aim to limit over consumption of calories. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prototype Early Warning Systems for Vector-Borne Diseases in Europe

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    Jan C. Semenza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization and environmental change, social and demographic determinants and health system capacity are significant drivers of infectious diseases which can also act as epidemic precursors. Thus, monitoring changes in these drivers can help anticipate, or even forecast, an upsurge of infectious diseases. The European Environment and Epidemiology (E3 Network has been built for this purpose and applied to three early warning case studies: (1 The environmental suitability of malaria transmission in Greece was mapped in order to target epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control activities. Malaria transmission in these areas was interrupted in 2013 through such integrated preparedness and response activities. (2 Since 2010, recurrent West Nile fever outbreaks have ensued in South/eastern Europe. Temperature deviations from a thirty year average proved to be associated with the 2010 outbreak. Drivers of subsequent outbreaks were computed through multivariate logistic regression models and included monthly temperature anomalies for July and a normalized water index. (3 Dengue is a tropical disease but sustained transmission has recently emerged in Madeira. Autochthonous transmission has also occurred repeatedly in France and in Croatia mainly due to travel importation. The risk of dengue importation into Europe in 2010 was computed with the volume of international travelers from dengue affected areas worldwide.These prototype early warning systems indicate that monitoring drivers of infectious diseases can help predict vector-borne disease threats.

  19. Pramipexole in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PROUD): a randomised delayed-start trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Anthony H V; McDermott, Michael P; Barone, Paolo; Comella, Cynthia L; Albrecht, Stefan; Hsu, Helen H; Massey, Daniel H; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Marek, Kenneth

    2013-08-01

    In models of dopaminergic neuronal loss, the dopamine agonist pramipexole has exhibited neuroprotective properties. The Pramipexole On Underlying Disease (PROUD) study was designed to identify whether early versus delayed pramipexole initiation has clinical and neuroimaging benefits in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Between May 24, 2006, and April 22, 2009, at 98 centres, we recruited patients with PD diagnosed within 2 years and aged 30-79 years. We randomly assigned eligible patients (ratio 1:1), by a centralised, computerised randomisation schedule, to receive double-blind either placebo or pramipexole (1·5 mg a day) and followed them up for 15 months. At 9 months, or as early as 6 months if considered necessary, placebo recipients were assigned to pramipexole. In a neuroimaging substudy, striatal dopamine-transporter binding was assessed by SPECT. All patients, investigators, and independent raters were masked to study treatment. The primary endpoint was the 15-month change from baseline in total score on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00321854. Of 535 patients, 261 were randomly assigned to receive pramipexole and 274 to receive placebo. At 15 months (n=411), adjusted mean change in UPDRS total score showed no significant difference between early and delayed pramipexole (-0·4 points, 95% CI -2·2 to 1·4, p=0·65). 62 patients in the early pramipexole group and 61 patients in the delayed pramipexole group were included in the neuroimaging substudy, for which the adjusted mean 15-month change in striatal (123)I-FP-CIT binding was -15·1% (SE 2·1) for early and -14·6% (2·0) for delayed pramipexole (difference -0·5 percentage points, 95% CI -5·4 to 4·4, p=0·84). Overall, 180 (81%) of patients given early pramipexole and 179 (84%) patients given delayed pramipexole reported adverse events (most frequently nausea), and 22 (10%) patients in the early pramipexole

  20. A molecular signature in blood identifies early Parkinson’s disease

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    Molochnikov Leonid

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD is crucial to identify the disease early and monitor the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapies. We aim to assess whether a gene signature could be detected in blood from early/mild PD patients that could support the diagnosis of early PD, focusing on genes found particularly altered in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD. Results The transcriptional expression of seven selected genes was examined in blood samples from 62 early stage PD patients and 64 healthy age-matched controls. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis identified five genes as optimal predictors of PD: p19 S-phase kinase-associated protein 1A (odds ratio [OR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60–0.90, huntingtin interacting protein-2 (OR 1.32; CI 1.08–1.61, aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 subfamily A1 (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.75–0.99, 19 S proteasomal protein PSMC4 (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60–0.89 and heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (OR 1.39; 95% CI 1.14–1.70. At a 0.5 cut-off the gene panel yielded a sensitivity and specificity in detecting PD of 90.3 and 89.1 respectively and the area under the receiving operating curve (ROC AUC was 0.96. The performance of the five-gene classifier on the de novo PD individuals alone composing the early PD cohort (n = 38, resulted in a similar ROC with an AUC of 0.95, indicating the stability of the model and also, that patient medication had no significant effect on the predictive probability (PP of the classifier for PD risk. The predictive ability of the model was validated in an independent cohort of 30 patients at advanced stage of PD, classifying correctly all cases as PD (100% sensitivity. Notably, the nominal average value of the PP for PD (0.95 (SD = 0.09 in this cohort was higher than that of the early PD group (0.83 (SD = 0.22, suggesting a potential for the model to assess disease severity. Lastly, the gene panel fully

  1. Enamel remineralization: controlling the caries disease or treating early caries lesions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Aparecido Cury

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The emphasis currently given to new technologies for enamel remineralization suggests that the changes in the understanding of the dental caries disease, which occurred in the last century, were either not yet adopted or were forgotten. Just like in the past, when the disease was "treated" by restoring cavities, there is presently a misunderstanding on the concept of incipient lesion remineralization. The aim of this paper was to review some concepts about caries, the natural phenomenon of enamel remineralization and the effect of fluoride (F on it, and also to discuss the clinical relevance of remineralizing products recently launched in the marketplace aiming to "treat early caries lesions".

  2. A Case Report of Probable Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: How to Approach Early Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bowei; Morales Mangual, Carlos; Mahmud, Iftekhar; Tongo, Nosakhare D; Mararenko, Larisa; Kay, Arthur

    2017-05-30

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare and fatal spongiform encephalopathy characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and myoclonus. The rarity of this disease and varied initial symptoms make the early diagnosis fairly challenging. Here, we present a case initially admitted for confusion and bizarre behaviors. She had acute deterioration of mental status, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus jerks four weeks later. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was positive for protein 14-3-3. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensities in the bilateral cortex, basal ganglia, and thalami in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed bihemispheric periodic lateralizing epileptiform discharges. The probable diagnosis of sCJD was reached based on the clinical features, characteristic findings in her MRI, the EEG, and a positive 14-3-3 CSF assay. The literature was also reviewed for early diagnosis of sCJD.

  3. Varenicline improves motor and cognitive symptoms in early Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Ailsa L; Dysart, Jo; Tingle, Malcolm D; Russell, Bruce R; Kydd, Rob R; Finucane, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the effects of varenicline, a smoking cessation aid that acts as a nicotinic agonist, on cognitive function in patients with early clinical Huntington’s disease (HD) who were current smokers. Three gene-positive patients transitioning to symptomatic HD were evaluated using the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale part I and III (motor and behavioral subscales) at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. Cognitive function was assessed using a touch screen computer-based neurocognitive test battery (IntegNeuro®). Varenicline (1 mg twice daily) significantly improved performance in executive function and emotional recognition tasks. Our case reports describe no clinically significant adverse effects and suggest that varenicline improves aspects of cognitive function in patients with early HD. A randomized controlled study is now underway. PMID:27695336

  4. The Usefulness of Biological and Neuroimaging Markers for the Diagnosis of Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Padovani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent proposed criteria for Alzheimer's Disease (AD have strongly claimed the usefulness of biological and neuroimaging markers for early identification AD. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Tau/Abeta ratio, hippocampal atrophy, posterior cingulate, and neocortical associative area hypometabolism, or amyloid burden evaluated by PiB compound, held the premises to increase diagnostic accuracy in the preclinical disease stages. Despite many efforts to identify subjects at risk of developing AD, less attention has been paid to presenile AD diagnosis. A few data are already available in early onset AD, mainly obtained in cases of monogenic disorder. In this paper, we discuss the current literature on the role of biological and neuroimaging markers in presenile AD.

  5. The impact of rotigotine on cardiovascular autonomic function in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Camilla; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Pisani, Valerio; Marfia, Girolama Alessandra; Di Giorgio, Alessandra; Stanzione, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Stefani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Dysautonomia can occur in early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) influencing tolerance to dopaminergic therapies. Rotigotine, a non-ergot dopamine agonist, has recently been developed as an effective alternative antiparkinsonian drug, but its influence on the autonomic nervous system was not investigated. Twenty subjects out of 34 consecutive de novo PD patients were submitted to full assessment of cardiovascular autonomic function before and after reaching a stable rotigotine regimen [6 mg/24 h (n = 3) or 8 mg/24 h (n = 17)]. Patients reached significant clinical improvement (-27% on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III) and did not show significant differences in cardiovascular tests compared to baseline data. However, an unexpected trend towards increasing systolic blood pressure after head-up tilt test was detected. Our study demonstrates that rotigotine does not influence cardiovascular autonomic responses in early de novo PD patients. Consequently, it may represent a well-tolerated and efficacious therapeutic option in newly diagnosed PD subjects.

  6. A Meta-analysis of angitensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on normotensive early diabetic renal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Li; GU Ming-jun; LIU Zhi-min; FAN Cheng-hui

    2001-01-01

    To make a systematic assessment on whether the progression of early diabetic renal disease with normotension may be slowed down by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Methods: Randomized clinical experiments published on MEDLINE from January 1990 to April 1999 and on China Biological Medicine were reviewed for studying the effects of ACE-inhibitors on normotensive patients with early diabetic renal diseases. Based on the inclusion criteria, 10 studies were selected. Their results were combined and analyzed with RevMan3.1 software.Results: The pooled effect of urinary microalbumin excretion rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial blood pressure were -77.502 mg/24 h [-100.748 to-54.256], -5.002 mmHg [-9.630 to 0.685], -2.949mmHg [-4.005 to 1.892], -4.284 mmHg [-5.444 to 3.123] respectively. Using clinical albuminuria as the end-point. The pooled odd ratio was 0.27 [95% CI 0.18 0.40]. The sub-group analysis showed that those results had no difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There was no significant correlation between the pooled effects of urinary micro-albuminuria excretion rate and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure or mean arterial blood pressure. Conclusion:ACE inhibitors can decline urinary micro-albuminuria excretion rate in normotensive patients with early diabetic renal disease and delay the progression of early diabetic renal disease to clinical albuminuria. These effects may not be dependent on its blood pressure-reduction effect.

  7. Inflammatory cytokine production predominates in early Lyme disease in patients with erythema migrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Lisa; Moore, Brian; Bledsoe, Tara; Damle, Nitin; Sikand, Vijay; Steere, Allen C

    2003-10-01

    In a study of cytokine production ex vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 27 patients with culture-positive erythema migrans, production of inflammatory cytokines predominated, particularly gamma interferon and, to a lesser degree, tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, with the exception of interleukin-13, anti-inflammatory cytokine production was negligible. Thus, B. burgdorferi antigens in early Lyme disease often induce a strong inflammatory response.

  8. The relationship between cortisol and verbal memory in the early stages of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirbin, Christopher A; Chua, Phyllis; Churchyard, Andrew; Hannan, Anthony J; Lowndes, Georgia; Stout, Julie C

    2013-03-01

    Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity has been linked to learning and memory difficulties in a range of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. In Huntington's disease (HD), both declines in learning and memory and HPA axis dysfunction are present early in the disease. However, the relationship between specific learning and memory deficits and HPA axis functioning in HD has not been examined. The aim of this study was to investigate cortisol levels in relation to verbal learning and memory in pre-diagnosed (pre-HD) participants and patients at the early stages of diagnosed HD (early-HD). Cortisol concentration was assayed in saliva samples from 57 participants (17 early-HD, 20 pre-HD, and 20 controls) at four time-points across a 24-h period. Verbal memory was assessed using the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II). We focused statistical analyses on the late evening cortisol concentration, and examined cortisol levels and verbal memory function in relation to diagnostic group (control, pre-HD, early-HD), and in a separate set of analyses combining pre-HD and early-HD (and excluding controls) we also examined cortisol and verbal memory performance in relation to the severity of HD-related motor signs. Of these two classification approaches, HD motor sign severity was more strongly associated with high evening cortisol levels and both reduced information encoding and memory retrieval. Separately, there was also a trend of higher cortisol levels in pre-HD. The findings suggest hypercortisolism and the underlying pathological changes may begin many years before a clinical diagnosis is made, but the memory decline associated with HPA axis disturbance may only become detectable once motor signs become pronounced.

  9. Borrelia burgdorferi genetic markers and disseminated disease in patients with early Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn L; Glickstein, Lisa J; Damle, Nitin; Sikand, Vijay K; McHugh, Gail; Steere, Allen C

    2006-12-01

    Three genetic markers of Borrelia burgdorferi have been associated with disseminated disease: the OspC type, the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer type (RST), and vlsE. Here, we modified previous methods so as to identify the three markers by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism in parallel, analyzed B. burgdorferi isolates from erythema migrans (EM) skin lesions in 91 patients, and correlated the results with evidence of dissemination. OspC type A was found approximately twice as frequently in patients with disseminated disease, whereas type K was identified approximately twice as often in those without evidence of dissemination, but these trends were not statistically significant. The remaining seven types identified were found nearly equally in patients with or without evidence of dissemination. RST 1 strains were significantly associated with dissemination (P=0.03), whereas RST 2 and RST 3 strains tended to have an inverse association with this outcome. The vlsE gene was identified in all 91 cases, using primer sets specific for an N-terminal sequence of B. burgdorferi strain B31 (vlsEB31) or strain 297 (vlsE297), but neither marker was associated with dissemination. Specific combinations of the three genetic markers usually occurred together. OspC type A was always found with RST 1 and vlsEB31, type K was always identified with RST 2 and more often with vlsE297, and types E and I were almost always found with RST 3 and equally often with vlsEB31 and vlsE297. We conclude that B. burgdorferi strains vary in their capacity to disseminate, but almost all strains isolated from EM lesions sometimes caused disseminated disease.

  10. Discriminative power of different nonmotor signs in early Parkinson's disease. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Nico J; Pieri, Vannina; Hipp, Géraldine; Rufra, Olivier; Blyth, Sara; Vaillant, Michel

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the discriminative power of different nonmotor signs for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty patients with PD with controls. Six deficit domains (DD) were defined: hyposmia, sleep abnormalities, dysautonomia, visual deficits, executive dysfunction, and depression. Plotting of Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and exact conditional logistic modeling, followed by manual stepwise descending procedure were used to identify a model for nonmotor signs that detects early PD. Patients with PD and controls did not differ in terms of age, gender, and educational level. Several DD discriminated patients with PD from healthy controls. Visual deficits showed the largest area under the ROC curve (0.83), followed by hyposmia (0.81) and dysautonomia (0.80). When combining the DD visual deficits and dysautonomia, the best residual model was obtained; it maximized both sensitivity and specificity for PD at a level of 0.77. At an early disease stage, several nonmotor domains were already able to discriminate patients with PD from healthy controls. Visual deficits had the best discriminatory power. Being brief and inexpensive, visual tests should be further investigated in larger cohorts as potential screening tool for early PD.

  11. DYT1 mutations in early onset primary torsion dystonia and Parkinson disease patients in Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-Fang; Wu, Tao; Li, Jian-Yu; Li, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Li; Chan, Piu

    2009-01-30

    Torsion dystonia is an autosomal dominant movement disorder characterized by involuntary, repetitive muscle contractions and twisted postures. The most severe early onset form of dystonia has been linked to mutations in the human DYT1 (TOR1A) gene encoding a protein termed torsinA. Moreover, dystonia and Parkinson disease share the common feature of reduced dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum, so we assumed that mutations in the DYT1 gene might have the same role in cases of early onset primary torsion dystonia (EOPTD) and early onset Parkinson disease (EOPD) that present dystonia. In this present study, 17 patients with EOPTD, 221 patients with EOPD and 164 control subjects were screened for mutations of the DYT1 gene by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and DNA sequencing. Our results showed that the GAG deletion was identified in 7 EOPTD patients, which results in Glu302del of DYT1 gene. No mutations were found in EOPD patients and control subjects. By carefully reviewing the available literature on studies of sporadic, non-Ashkenazi Jewish populations, the results showed that the prevalence rate of DYT1 mutation was not significantly different (p=0.267) between European (27.3%) and Asian (22.2%) patients with early onset primary torsion dystonia.

  12. Primary Prevention of Celiac Disease: Environmental Factors with a Focus on Early Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Anna; Pieścik-Lech, Małgorzata; Szajewska, Hania; Shamir, Raanan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder caused by ingestion of gluten. When diagnosed, it should be treated with a lifelong, strict gluten-free diet. Early infant feeding practices have been suggested as a means of preventing CD. In the last few decades, observational data have suggested that breastfeeding, especially at the time of introducing gluten into the infant's diet, as well as the time and mode of gluten first being given to a child could prevent or delay the occurrence of CD. As a result, recommendations advised that it is prudent to avoid both early (months) and late (>7 months) introduction of gluten, and to introduce gluten gradually while the infant is still being breastfed, as this may reduce the risk of celiac disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and wheat allergy. Recently, the results of two large randomized trials have shown that breastfeeding in general, breastfeeding during gluten introduction, and early or delayed gluten introduction do not influence the total risk of CD in genetically predisposed individuals. Introducing gluten at 4 versus 6 months in very small amounts, or at 6 versus 12 months, resulted in similar rates of CD in these children. Thus, early feeding practices seem to have no impact on the risk of developing CD during childhood. In children without the genetic predisposition, the age and mode of gluten introduction do not influence the risk anyway.

  13. Early neurovascular dysfunction in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Illsung L.; Lai, Aaron Y.; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Koletar, Margaret M.; Dorr, Adrienne; Brown, Mary E.; Thomason, Lynsie A. M.; Sled, John G.; McLaurin, JoAnne; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), pathologically characterized by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, and neurodegeneration, is thought to involve early-onset neurovascular abnormalities. Hitherto studies on AD-associated neurovascular injury have used animal models that exhibit only a subset of AD-like pathologies and demonstrated some Aβ-dependent vascular dysfunction and destabilization of neuronal network. The present work focuses on the early stage of disease progression and uses TgF344-AD rats that recapitulate a broader repertoire of AD-like pathologies to investigate the cerebrovascular and neuronal network functioning using in situ two-photon fluorescence microscopy and laminar array recordings of local field potentials, followed by pathological analyses of vascular wall morphology, tau hyperphosphorylation, and amyloid plaques. Concomitant to widespread amyloid deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation, cerebrovascular reactivity was strongly attenuated in cortical penetrating arterioles and venules of TgF344-AD rats in comparison to those in non-transgenic littermates. Blood flow elevation to hypercapnia was abolished in TgF344-AD rats. Concomitantly, the phase-amplitude coupling of the neuronal network was impaired, evidenced by decreased modulation of theta band phase on gamma band amplitude. These results demonstrate significant neurovascular network dysfunction at an early stage of AD-like pathology. Our study identifies early markers of pathology progression and call for development of combinatorial treatment plans. PMID:28401931

  14. Early neurovascular dysfunction in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Illsung L; Lai, Aaron Y; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Koletar, Margaret M; Dorr, Adrienne; Brown, Mary E; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Sled, John G; McLaurin, JoAnne; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2017-04-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), pathologically characterized by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, and neurodegeneration, is thought to involve early-onset neurovascular abnormalities. Hitherto studies on AD-associated neurovascular injury have used animal models that exhibit only a subset of AD-like pathologies and demonstrated some Aβ-dependent vascular dysfunction and destabilization of neuronal network. The present work focuses on the early stage of disease progression and uses TgF344-AD rats that recapitulate a broader repertoire of AD-like pathologies to investigate the cerebrovascular and neuronal network functioning using in situ two-photon fluorescence microscopy and laminar array recordings of local field potentials, followed by pathological analyses of vascular wall morphology, tau hyperphosphorylation, and amyloid plaques. Concomitant to widespread amyloid deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation, cerebrovascular reactivity was strongly attenuated in cortical penetrating arterioles and venules of TgF344-AD rats in comparison to those in non-transgenic littermates. Blood flow elevation to hypercapnia was abolished in TgF344-AD rats. Concomitantly, the phase-amplitude coupling of the neuronal network was impaired, evidenced by decreased modulation of theta band phase on gamma band amplitude. These results demonstrate significant neurovascular network dysfunction at an early stage of AD-like pathology. Our study identifies early markers of pathology progression and call for development of combinatorial treatment plans.

  15. Role and clinical utility of pramipexole extended release in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hametner, Eva-Maria; Seppi, Klaus; Poewe, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a short review of the most relevant pharmacological and clinical data on pramipexole extended release (ER) as well as to address the clinical utility and potential advantages of a once-daily formulation especially in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease (PD). Pramipexole is widely established as a symptomatic treatment in early as well as advanced PD. The development of an ER formulation, with stable pramipexole plasma concentration over 24 hours, now offers a bioequivalent once-daily alternative. Double-blind randomized controlled trials in early and advanced PD, have established noninferiority of pramipexole ER compared with immediate release as well as superiority of both formulations over placebo. The overnight switch from the standard to the once-daily formulation was shown to be successful in >80% of patients without requiring any dose adjustments. Potential benefits of the prolonged-release design, which have not yet been formally demonstrated in the pivotal trial program, include improved compliance and a potential for better symptomatic control, particularly in patients with early disease that can be managed with monotherapy.

  16. An early and late peak in microglial activation in Alzheimer's disease trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen; Brooks, David J; Okello, Aren; Edison, Paul

    2017-01-24

    Amyloid-β deposition, neuroinflammation and tau tangle formation all play a significant role in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that there is microglial activation early on in Alzheimer's disease trajectory, where in the initial phase, microglia may be trying to repair the damage, while later on in the disease these microglia could be ineffective and produce proinflammatory cytokines leading to progressive neuronal damage. In this longitudinal study, we have evaluated the temporal profile of microglial activation and its relationship between fibrillar amyloid load at baseline and follow-up in subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and this was compared with subjects with Alzheimer's disease. Thirty subjects (eight mild cognitive impairment, eight Alzheimer's disease and 14 controls) aged between 54 and 77 years underwent (11)C-(R)PK11195, (11)C-PIB positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Patients were followed-up after 14 ± 4 months. Region of interest and Statistical Parametric Mapping analysis were used to determine longitudinal alterations. Single subject analysis was performed to evaluate the individualized pathological changes over time. Correlations between levels of microglial activation and amyloid deposition at a voxel level were assessed using Biological Parametric Mapping. We demonstrated that both baseline and follow-up microglial activation in the mild cognitive impairment cohort compared to controls were increased by 41% and 21%, respectively. There was a longitudinal reduction of 18% in microglial activation in mild cognitive impairment cohort over 14 months, which was associated with a mild elevation in fibrillar amyloid load. Cortical clusters of microglial activation and amyloid deposition spatially overlapped in the subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Baseline microglial activation was increased by 36% in Alzheimer's disease subjects compared with controls. Longitudinally, Alzheimer's disease subjects

  17. NK cells, displaying early activation, cytotoxicity and adhesion molecules, are associated with mild dengue disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, E L; De Oliveira-Pinto, L M; Zagne, S M; Cerqueira, D I S; Nogueira, R M R; Kubelka, C F

    2006-01-01

    During the innate immune response against infections, Natural Killer (NK) cells are as important effector cells as are Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated after antigenic stimulation in the adaptative response. NK cells increase in numbers, after viral infection or vaccination. We investigated the NK cell and CD8 T lymphocyte status in 55 dengue infected patients. The NK (CD56+CD3−) and CD56+ T cell (CD56+CD3+) rates rise during the acute phase of disease. The majority of NK cells from dengue patients display early markers for activation (CD69, HLA-DR, and CD38) and cell adhesion molecules (CD44, CD11a) during the acute phase of disease. The intracellular cytotoxic granule, TIA-1, is also up-regulated early in NK cells. Most of these markers appear also on CD8+ T lymphocytes but during the late acute phase. Circulating IL-15 is elevated in a significant number of patients during early acute infection and its values were statistically correlated with NK frequencies and cytotoxic markers on NKs. We have therefore shown that dengue virus infection is very likely stimulating a cytotoxic response that may be efficient in controlling the virus in synergism with CD8+ T lymphocytes. Interestingly, the heightened CD56+CD3−, CD56+CD3+, CD56+TIA-1+ and CD56+CD11a+ cell rates are associated with mild dengue clinical manifestations and might indicate a good prognosis of the disease. PMID:16412060

  18. Endoscopic fluorescence imaging for early assessment of anastomotic recurrence of Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Geboes, K.; Klein, Olivier; Desreumaux, P.; Debaert, A.; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    1999-02-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The mechanism of the initial mucosal alterations is still unclear: ulcerations overlying lymphoid follicles and/or vasculitis have been proposed as the early lesions. We have developed a new and original method combining endoscopy of fluorescence angiography for identifying the early pathological lesions, occurring in the neo-terminal ileum after right ileocolonic resection. The patient population consisted of 10 subjects enrolled in a prospective protocol of endoscopic follow-up at 3 and 12 months after surgery. Fluorescence imaging showed small spots giving a bright fluorescence distributed singly in mucosa which appeared normal in routine endoscopy. Histopathological examination demonstrated that the fluorescence of small spots originated from small, usually superficial, erosive lesions. In several cases, these erosive lesions occurred over lymphoid follicles. Endoscopic fluorescence imaging provides a suitable means of investigating the initial aspect of the Crohn's disease process in displaying some correlative findings between fluorescent aspects and early pathological mucosal alterations.

  19. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. NK cells, displaying early activation, cytotoxicity and adhesion molecules, are associated with mild dengue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, E L; De Oliveira-Pinto, L M; Zagne, S M; Cerqueira, D I S; Nogueira, R M R; Kubelka, C F

    2006-02-01

    During the innate immune response against infections, Natural Killer (NK) cells are as important effector cells as are Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated after antigenic stimulation in the adaptative response. NK cells increase in numbers, after viral infection or vaccination. We investigated the NK cell and CD8 T lymphocyte status in 55 dengue infected patients. The NK (CD56+CD3-) and CD56+ T cell (CD56+CD3+) rates rise during the acute phase of disease. The majority of NK cells from dengue patients display early markers for activation (CD69, HLA-DR, and CD38) and cell adhesion molecules (CD44, CD11a) during the acute phase of disease. The intracellular cytotoxic granule, TIA-1, is also up-regulated early in NK cells. Most of these markers appear also on CD8+ T lymphocytes but during the late acute phase. Circulating IL-15 is elevated in a significant number of patients during early acute infection and its values were statistically correlated with NK frequencies and cytotoxic markers on NKs. We have therefore shown that dengue virus infection is very likely stimulating a cytotoxic response that may be efficient in controlling the virus in synergism with CD8+ T lymphocytes. Interestingly, the heightened CD56+CD3-, CD56+CD3+, CD56+TIA-1+ and CD56+CD11a+ cell rates are associated with mild dengue clinical manifestations and might indicate a good prognosis of the disease.

  1. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ.

  2. Hematopoietic cytokines as therapeutic players in early stages Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle eFarmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a devastating age related neurodegenerative disease that is believed to have a lengthy prodromal state. It is critical to find methods of interfering with the progression of this early degenerative stage by inducing compensatory recovery processes to slow or prevent the eventual clinical symptoms. The current perspective article argues that immune system signalling molecules represent such a promising therapeutic approach. Two cytokines of interest are granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and erythropoietin (EPO. These hematopoietic cytokines have been protective in models of stroke, neuronal injury, and more recently PD. It is our belief that these trophic cytokines can be used not only for cell protection but also regeneration. However, success is likely dependent on early intervention. This paper will outline our perspective on the development of novel trophic recovery treatments for PD. In particular, we present new data from our lab suggesting that EPO and GM-CSF can foster neural re-innervation in a mild or partial lesion PD model that could be envisioned as reflecting the early stages of the disease.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation follow-up study in early Parkinson's disease: A decline in compensation with disease progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojovic, Maja; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Bologna, Matteo; Pareés, Isabel; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Berardelli, Alfredo; Beraredelli, Alfredo; Edwards, Mark J; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2015-07-01

    A number of neurophysiological abnormalities have been described in patients with Parkinson's disease, but very few longitudinal studies of how these change with disease progression have been reported. We describe measures of motor cortex inhibition and plasticity at 6 and 12 mo in 12 patients that we previously reported at initial diagnosis. Given the well-known interindividual variation in these measures, we were particularly concerned with the within-subject changes over time. Patients were assessed clinically, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to measure motor cortical excitability, inhibition (short interval intracortical inhibition, cortical silent period), and plasticity (response to excitatory paired associative stimulation protocol) in both hemispheres. All measurements were performed 6 mo and 12 mo after the baseline experiments. Asymmetry in clinical motor symptoms was reflected in asymmetry of plasticity and inhibition. In the group as a whole, little change was seen in any of the parameters over 12 mo. However, analysis of within-individual data showed clear correlations between changes in clinical asymmetry and asymmetry of response to paired associative stimulation protocol and cortical silent period. Longitudinal changes in cortical silent period and response to paired associative stimulation protocol in Parkinson's disease reflect dynamic effects on motor cortex that are related to progression of motor signs. They are useful objective markers of early disease progression that could be used to detect effects of disease-modifying therapies. The decline in heightened plasticity that was present at disease onset may reflect failure of compensatory mechanisms that maintained function in the preclinical state. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. The economic benefits of disease triggered early harvest: A case study of pancreas disease in farmed Atlantic salmon from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, J M; Rich, K M; Jensen, B Bang; Aunsmo, A

    2015-10-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) is an important viral disease in Norwegian, Scottish and Irish aquaculture causing biological losses in terms of reduced growth, mortality, increased feed conversion ratio, and carcass downgrading. We developed a bio-economic model to investigate the economic benefits of a disease triggered early harvesting strategy to control PD losses. In this strategy, the salmon farm adopts a PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) diagnostic screening program to monitor the virus levels in stocks. Virus levels are used to forecast a clinical outbreak of pancreas disease, which then initiates a prescheduled harvest of the stock to avoid disease losses. The model is based on data inputs from national statistics, literature, company data, and an expert panel, and use stochastic simulations to account for the variation and/or uncertainty associated with disease effects and selected production expenditures. With the model, we compared the impacts of a salmon farm undergoing prescheduled harvest versus the salmon farm going through a PD outbreak. We also estimated the direct costs of a PD outbreak as the sum of biological losses, treatment costs, prevention costs, and other additional costs, less the costs of insurance pay-outs. Simulation results suggests that the economic benefit from a prescheduled harvest is positive once the average salmon weight at the farm has reached 3.2kg or more for an average Norwegian salmon farm stocked with 1,000,000smolts and using average salmon sales prices for 2013. The direct costs from a PD outbreak occurring nine months (average salmon weight 1.91kg) after sea transfer and using 2013 sales prices was on average estimated at NOK 55.4 million (5%, 50% and 90% percentile: 38.0, 55.8 and 72.4) (NOK=€0.128 in 2013). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the losses from a PD outbreak are sensitive to feed- and salmon sales prices, and that high 2013 sales prices contributed to substantial losses associated with a PD outbreak.

  5. Realizing the Potential of Adolescence to Prevent Transgenerational Conditioning of Noncommunicable Disease Risk: Multi-Sectoral Design Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquie L. Bay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from the field of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD demonstrates that early life environmental exposures impact later-life risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This has revealed the transgenerational nature of NCD risk, thus demonstrating that interventions to improve environmental exposures during early life offer important potential for primary prevention of DOHaD-related NCDs. Based on this evidence, the prospect of multi-sectoral approaches to enable primary NCD risk reduction has been highlighted in major international reports. It is agreed that pregnancy, lactation and early childhood offer significant intervention opportunities. However, the importance of interventions that establish positive behaviors impacting nutritional and non-nutritional environmental exposures in the pre-conceptual period in both males and females, thus capturing the full potential of DOHaD, must not be overlooked. Adolescence, a period where life-long health-related behaviors are established, is therefore an important life-stage for DOHaD-informed intervention. DOHaD evidence underpinning this potential is well documented. However, there is a gap in the literature with respect to combined application of theoretical evidence from science, education and public health to inform intervention design. This paper addresses this gap, presenting a review of evidence informing theoretical frameworks for adolescent DOHaD interventions that is accessible collectively to all relevant sectors.

  6. Spectrum and Image Texture Features Analysis for Early Blight Disease Detection on Eggplant Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanqi Xie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated both spectrum and texture features for detecting early blight disease on eggplant leaves. Hyperspectral images for healthy and diseased samples were acquired covering the wavelengths from 380 to 1023 nm. Four gray images were identified according to the effective wavelengths (408, 535, 624 and 703 nm. Hyperspectral images were then converted into RGB, HSV and HLS images. Finally, eight texture features (mean, variance, homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, second moment and correlation based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM were extracted from gray images, RGB, HSV and HLS images, respectively. The dependent variables for healthy and diseased samples were set as 0 and 1. K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN and AdaBoost classification models were established for detecting healthy and infected samples. All models obtained good results with the classification rates (CRs over 88.46% in the testing sets. The results demonstrated that spectrum and texture features were effective for early blight disease detection on eggplant leaves.

  7. Relationship between CAG repeat length and brain volume in premanifest and early Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Susie M D; Wild, Edward J; Hobbs, Nicola Z; Scahill, Rachael I; Ridgway, Gerard R; Macmanus, David G; Barker, Roger A; Fox, Nick C; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2009-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat on the gene encoding for the protein huntingtin. There are conflicting findings about the extent to which repeat length predicts signs of the disease or severity of disease progression in adults. This study examined the relationship between CAG repeat length and brain volume in a large cohort of pre- and post-motor onset HD gene carriers, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), an approach which allowed us to investigate the whole brain without defining a priori regions of interest. We also used VBM to examine group differences between 20 controls, 21 premanifest, and 40 early HD subjects. In the 61 mutation-positive subjects higher CAG repeat length was significantly associated with reduced volume of the body of the caudate nucleus bilaterally, left putamen, right insula, right parahippocampal gyrus, right anterior cingulate, and right occipital lobe, after correcting for age. The group contrasts showed significant reduction in grey matter volume in the early HD group relative to controls in widespread cortical as well as subcortical areas but there was no evidence of difference between controls and premanifest subjects. Overall we have demonstrated that increased CAG repeat length is associated with atrophy in extra-striatal as well as striatal regions, which has implications for the monitoring of disease-modifying therapies in the condition.

  8. Very Early-Onset Inflammatory Manifestations of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

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    Roxane Labrosse

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a rare primary immune deficiency caused by mutations in genes coding for components of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, characterized by severe and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, together with inflammatory complications. Dysregulation of inflammatory responses are often present in this disease and may lead to granulomatous lesions, most often affecting the gastrointestinal (GI and urinary tracts. Treatment of inflammatory complications usually includes corticosteroids, whereas antimicrobial prophylaxis is used for infection prevention. Curative treatment of both infectious susceptibility and inflammatory disease can be achieved by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We report herein three patients with the same mutation of the CYBB gene who presented with very early-onset and severe GI manifestations of X-linked CGD. The most severely affected patient had evidence of antenatal inflammatory involvement of the GI and urinary tracts. Extreme hyperleukocytosis with eosinophilia and high inflammatory markers were observed in all three patients. A Mycobacterium avium lung infection and an unidentified fungal lung infection occurred in two patients both during their first year of life, which is indicative of the severity of the disease. All three patients underwent bone marrow transplantation and recovered fully from their initial symptoms. To our knowledge, these are the first reports of patients with such an early-onset and severe inflammatory manifestations of CGD.

  9. A pilot study on the use of interferon beta-1a in early Alzheimer's disease subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Luigi Maria Edoardo; Zappalà, Giuseppe; Iemolo, Francesco; Castellano, Anna Elisa; Ruggieri, Stefano; Bruno, Giuseppe; Paolillo, Andrea

    2014-02-13

    Despite the fact that multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share common neuroimmunological features, interferon beta 1a (IFNβ1a), the well-established treatment for the prevention of disease progression and cognitive decline in MS patients, has never been used in AD. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of IFNβ1a in subjects affected by mild-to-moderate AD in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter pilot study. Forty-two early Alzheimer's patients were randomized to receive either a 22 mcg subcutaneous injection of IFNβ1a or placebo three times per week. A treatment period of 28 weeks was followed by 24 weeks of observation. IFNβ1a was well tolerated and adverse events were infrequent and mild to moderate. Although not statistically significant, a reduction in disease progression during follow-up was measured in IFNβ1a-treated patients by the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale. Interestingly, the treatment group showed significant improvements in the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and Physical Self-maintenance Scale. This study suggests that IFNβ1a is safe and well tolerated in early AD patients, and its possible beneficial role should be further investigated in larger studies.

  10. Early changes in cytokine expression in peste des petits ruminants disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jana; Bin-Tarif, Abdelghani; Herbert, Rebecca; Frost, Lorraine; Taylor, Geraldine; Baron, Michael D

    2014-02-22

    Peste des petits ruminants is a viral disease of sheep and goats that has spread through most of Africa as well as the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. Although, the spread of the disease and its economic impact has made it a focus of international concern, relatively little is known about the nature of the disease itself. We have studied the early stages of pathogenesis in goats infected with six different isolates of Peste des petits ruminants virus representing all four known lineages of the virus. No lineage-specific difference in the pathogenicity of the virus isolates was observed, although there was evidence that even small numbers of cell culture passages could affect the degree of pathogenicity of an isolate. A consistent reduction in CD4+ T cells was observed at 4 days post infection (dpi). Measurement of the expression of various cytokines showed elements of a classic inflammatory response but also a relatively early induction of interleukin 10, which may be contributing to the observed disease.

  11. Problems of the neonates with congenital heart disease requiring early interventions: a regional report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Muhittin; Aldudak, Bedri; Akar, Melek; Akdeniz, Osman; Tüzün, Heybet; Çelebi, Vefik

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, it was aimed to determine the problems of the neonates who were diagnosed with congenital heart disease requiring early intervention in our hospital. Material and Methods: The files of the newborn babies with congenital heart disease requiring early intervention who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital between January 2011 and January 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. In all cases, echocardiography and ‘’Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-II” (SNAP-II) scoring were performed within the first day of admission. The data were interpreted using Number Cruncher Statistical System 2007 software. The statistical significance was set at palprostadil and age were not related to mortality. Three patients were discharged following planning of elective surgery and 60 patients were referred to a tertiary center by air ambulance. Conclusions: The results of our study indicated that prenatal diagnosis could not be made in neonates with congenital heart disease requiring intervention in our region. The mortality rates of these patients were related to the severity of the clinical status at presentation rather than to the age, gender and type of congenital heart disease. The mortality was much higher in the patients who developed circulatory failure. Most of the patients who survived were sent by air ambulance to the centers where the intervention was to be performed. PMID:26568691

  12. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Alzheimer's Disease... a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of... demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials in patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease that occur...

  13. Ethical Considerations for Deep Brain Stimulation Trials in Patients with Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaña, John Noel M; Bittlinger, Merlin; Gilbert, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Several studies of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the fornix or the nucleus basalis of Meynert have been recently conducted in people with Alzheimer's disease, with several recruiting participants early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). Although EOAD accounts for less than 5.5% of AD cases, ethical considerations must still be made when performing DBS trials including these participants since a portion of people with EOAD, especially those possessing autosomal-dominant mutations, have an atypical and more aggressive disease progression. These considerations include appropriate patient selection and signing of an informed consent for genetic testing; appropriate study design; potential outcomes that people with EOAD could expect; and accurate interpretation and balanced discussion of trial results. Finally, recommendations for future DBS for AD trials will be made to ensure that EOAD patients will not experience avoidable harms should they be enrolled in these experimental studies.

  14. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars Svend; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32...... premanifest and 48 manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and 24 gene-expansion negative at-risk controls. We examined biomarkers of neuroinflammation (matrix metalloproteinase 9, C-X-C motif chemokine 13, terminal complement complex, chitinase-3-like-protein 1 [CHI3L1], and osteopontin [OPN...... was the only biomarker that increased in premanifest stages and no evidence of early involvement of neuroinflammation in HD was found. However, we found that the biomarkers for neurodegeneration, MBP and tau, increased during the disease course in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and were associated...

  15. Are Upper-Body Axial Symptoms a Feature of Early Parkinson’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Caroline; Baille, Guillaume; Delval, Arnaud; Tard, Céline; Perez, Thierry; Danel-Buhl, Nicolas; Seguy, David; Labreuche, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Delliaux, Marie; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background Axial disorders are considered to appear late in the course of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The associated impact on quality of life (QoL) and survival and the lack of an effective treatment mean that understanding and treating axial disorders is a key challenge. However, upper-body axial disorders (namely dysarthria, swallowing and breathing disorders) have never been prospectively assessed in early-stage PD patients. Objectives To characterize upper-body axial symptoms and QoL in consecutive patients with early-stage PD. Methods We prospectively enrolled 66 consecutive patients with early-stage PD (less than 3 years of disease progression) and assessed dysarthria, dysphagia and respiratory function (relative to 36 controls) using both objective and patient-reported outcomes. Results The mean disease duration was 1.26 years and the mean UPDRS motor score was 19.4 out of 108. 74% of the patients presented slight dysarthria (primarily dysprosodia). Men appeared to be more severely affected (i.e. dysphonia). This dysfunction was strongly correlated with low swallowing speed (despite the absence of complaints about dysphagia), respiratory insufficiency and poor QoL. Videofluorography showed that oral-phase swallowing disorders affected 60% of the 31 tested patients and that pharyngeal-phase disorders affected 21%. 24% of the patients reported occasional dyspnea, which was correlated with anxiety in women but not in men. Marked diaphragmatic dysfunction was suspected in 42% of the patients (predominantly in men). Conclusion Upper body axial symptoms were frequent in men with early-stage PD, whereas women presented worst non-motor impairments. New assessment methods are required because currently available tools do not reliably detect these upper-body axial disorders. PMID:27654040

  16. Developmental origins of cardiovascular disease: Impact of early life stress in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M O; Cohn, D M; Loria, A S

    2017-03-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesizes that environmental insults during childhood programs the individual to develop chronic disease in adulthood. Emerging epidemiological data strongly supports that early life stress (ELS) given by the exposure to adverse childhood experiences is regarded as an independent risk factor capable of predicting future risk of cardiovascular disease. Experimental animal models utilizing chronic behavioral stress during postnatal life, specifically maternal separation (MatSep) provides a suitable tool to elucidate molecular mechanisms by which ELS increases the risk to develop cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. The purpose of this review is to highlight current epidemiological studies linking ELS to the development of cardiovascular disease and to discuss the potential molecular mechanisms identified from animal studies. Overall, this review reveals the need for future investigations to further clarify the molecular mechanisms of ELS in order to develop more personalized therapeutics to mitigate the long-term consequences of chronic behavioral stress including cardiovascular and heart disease in adulthood.

  17. Menkes disease – An important cause of early onset refractory seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Menkes disease is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by early onset of cerebral and cerebellar neurodegeneration, fair skin, hypopigmented sparse hair and connective tissue abnormalities. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the clinical, electrophysiological and radiological features of children with Menkes disease seen at our institute. Setting/Design: The medical records of children diagnosed with Menkes disease admitted in the pediatric neurology ward or attending the special pediatric neurology clinic at a tertiary care and a referral hospital in North India, from January 2010 to December 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical data of each case was subsequently summarized and reported. Statistical analysis used: Descriptive statistics were used. Results: During the study period, 1174 children were seen. Out of these, 6 cases were diagnosed as Menkes disease on the basis of clinical phenotype, low serum copper and ceruloplasmin and supportive neuroimaging. All the children were males and had disease onset within 3 months of age, with 4 children presenting in the neonatal period. Global developmental delay and refractory seizures were the predominant clinical symptoms. Two children had symptomatic West syndrome. Other seizure semiologies included tonic-clonic (4, myoclonic (2 and tonic seizures (1. The electroencephalographic abnormalities included hypsarrythmia (2 and multifocal epileptiform discharges (3. The salient radiological features included white matter changes, temporal lobe abnormalities, global atrophy, subdural hygromas and tortuous cerebral blood vessels. Conclusions: Menkes disease should be suspected in a case of refractory early onset seizures especially in the presence of subtle clinical clues. The neuroimaging findings may further support the diagnosis.

  18. Nutrition in early life and the programming of adult disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley-Evans, S C

    2015-01-01

    Foetal development and infancy are life stages that are characterised by rapid growth, development and maturation of organs and systems. Variation in the quality or quantity of nutrients consumed by mothers during pregnancy, or infants during the first year of life, can exert permanent and powerful effects upon developing tissues. These effects are termed 'programming' and represent an important risk factor for noncommunicable diseases of adulthood, including the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease. This narrative review provides an overview of the evidence-base showing that indicators of nutritional deficit in pregnancy are associated with a greater risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular mortality. There is also a limited evidence-base that suggests some relationship between breastfeeding and the timing and type of foods used in weaning, and disease in later life. Many of the associations reported between indicators of early growth and adult disease appear to interact with specific genotypes. This supports the idea that programming is one of several cumulative influences upon health and disease acting across the lifespan. Experimental studies have provided important clues to the mechanisms that link nutritional challenges in early life to disease in adulthood. It is suggested that nutritional programming is a product of the altered expression of genes that regulate the cell cycle, resulting in effective remodelling of tissue structure and functionality. The observation that traits programmed by nutritional exposures in foetal life can be transmitted to further generations adds weight the argument that heritable epigenetic modifications play a critical role in nutritional programming. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Lactate dehydrogenase as a biomarker for early renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S Alzahri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among many complications of sickle cell disease, renal failure is the main contributor to early mortality. It is present in up to 21% of patients with sickle cell disease. Although screening for microalbuminuria and proteinuria is the current acceptable practice to detect and follow renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease, there is a crucial need for other, more sensitive biomarkers. This becomes especially true knowing that those biomarkers start to appear only after more than 60% of the kidney function is lost. The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether lactate dehydrogenase (LDH correlates with other, direct and indirect bio-markers of renal insufficiency in patients with sickle cell disease and, therefore, could be used as a biomarker for early renal damage in patients with sickle cell disease. Fifty-five patients with an established diagnosis of sickle cell disease were recruited to in the study. Blood samples were taken and 24-h urine collection samples were collected. Using Statcrunch, a data analysis tool available on the web, we studied the correlation between LDH and other biomarkers of kidney function as well as the distribution and relationship between the variables. Regression analysis showed a significant negative correlation between serum LDH and creatinine clearance, R (correlation coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.0008. This correlation was more significant at younger age. This study shows that in sickle cell patients LDH correlates with creatinine clearance and, therefore, LDH could serve as a biomarker to predict renal insufficiency in those patients.

  20. Sex Differences in Clinical Features of Early, Treated Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Erika F.; Pérez, Adriana; Dhall, Rohit; Umeh, Chizoba C.; Videnovic, Aleksandar; Cambi, Franca; Wills, Anne-Marie A.; Elm, Jordan J.; Zweig, Richard M.; Shulman, Lisa M.; Nance, Martha A.; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Suchowersky, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To improve our understanding of sex differences in the clinical characteristics of Parkinson’s Disease, we sought to examine differences in the clinical features and disease severity of men and women with early treated Parkinson’s Disease (PD) enrolled in a large-scale clinical trial. Methods Analysis was performed of baseline data from the National Institutes of Health Exploratory Trials in Parkinson’s Disease (NET-PD) Long-term Study-1, a randomized, multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 10 grams of oral creatine/day in individuals with early, treated PD. We compared mean age at symptom onset, age at PD diagnosis, and age at randomization between men and women using t-test statistics. Sex differences in clinical features were evaluated, including: symptoms at diagnosis (motor) and symptoms at randomization (motor, non-motor, and daily functioning). Results 1,741 participants were enrolled (62.5% male). No differences were detected in mean age at PD onset, age at PD diagnosis, age at randomization, motor symptoms, or daily functioning between men and women. Differences in non-motor symptoms were observed, with women demonstrating better performance compared to men on SCOPA-COG (Z = 5.064, p<0.0001) and Symbol Digit Modality measures (Z = 5.221, p<0.0001). Conclusions Overall, men and women did not demonstrate differences in clinical motor features early in the course of PD. However, the differences observed in non-motor cognitive symptoms suggests further assessment of the influence of sex on non-motor symptoms in later stages of PD is warranted. PMID:26171861

  1. Air pollution in early life and adult mortality from chronic rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David I W; Osmond, Clive; Williams, Martin L; Jones, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Chronic rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a globally important cause of heart disease. The reasons for the continuing high prevalence of this disease are obscure, but it may have its origins in the poor social and economic conditions with which the disease has been consistently and strongly linked. Mortality studies from the UK have suggested the importance of adverse environmental factors in early life; these studies demonstrated specific geographical associations between high rates of chest infection during infancy and subsequent RHD. They raised the possibility that early air pollution, which is known to be strongly linked with chest infection during infancy, may predispose to RHD. We related estimates of air pollution and social conditions developed by Daly in 1951-52 for 78 urban areas in England and Wales to their subsequent RHD mortality rates at ages 35-74 in men and women during 1993-2012. There were strong relationships between domestic air pollution and RHD [relative risk per standard deviation (SD) increase in pollution 1.168, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.128 to 1.210, P pollution association was independent of these; only overcrowding was separately linked with RHD. We present the first evidence of an association between air pollution in early life and RHD. Although there are several limitations to this study, the strength and consistency of the results, together with their biological plausibility, suggest a causal link. This deserves attention because it may have important consequences for the control of RHD in resource-poor countries where widespread use of biomass fuels and domestic pollution remain a problem.

  2. Left atrial enlargement in the early stage of hypertensive heart disease: a common but ignored condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanhua; Cao, Heng; Xu, Sudan; Lu, Yongxin; Shuai, Xinxin; Sun, Yufei; Liao, Yuhua; Li, Jingdong

    2014-03-01

    How to identify the early signs of hypertensive heart disease is the key to block or reverse the process of heart failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of left atrial (LA) enlargement in the early stage of hypertensive heart disease and to explore the correlations between LA enlargement and heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFnEF), as well as the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Baseline clinical characteristics, biochemical indices, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic data were collected from 341 consecutive patients with essential hypertension. Among those patients, LA enlargement was more frequently presented than LV enlargement (57.2% vs 17.9%). Compared with patients without HFnEF, the prevalence of LA enlargement was higher in patients with HFnEF (82.9% vs 49.0%, Page, body mass index, waist circumference, triglyceride level, and left ventricular diameter were independent predictors of LA enlargement. The simple measurement for identification of LA enlargement potentially allows early recognition of those patients at risk for heart failure, particularly among patients with MetS.

  3. Hypothesis: atorvastatin has pleiotropic effects that translate into early clinical benefits on cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novela, Cristina; Hennekens, Charles H

    2004-03-01

    The results of numerous long-term, randomized trials show that statins significantly decrease the risks of myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular death as well as total mortality. The benefits of statins on cardiovascular disease in patients who are not experiencing acute coronary syndromes generally become apparent only after about 2 years. In contrast, atorvastatin conferred an early clinical benefit in the lipid-lowering arm of the long-term Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial as well as early benefit on progression of atherosclerosis in the Reversal of Atherosclerosis with Aggressive Lipid Lowering trial. An unexpected finding at baseline in the prospective Interaction of Atorvastatin and Clopidogrel Study was that patients on atorvastatin had significantly decreased platelet activity compared with either patients on other statins or those taking no statins. Atorvastatin has protective effects against membrane lipid peroxidation at pharmacologic concentrations. These and other considerations contribute to the hypothesis that atorvastatin has pleiotropic effects that translate into early clinical benefits on cardiovascular disease.

  4. Chronic Disease Management Strategies of Early Childhood Caries: Support from the Medical and Dental Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L; Ng, Man Wai

    2015-01-01

    An Institute of Medicine report places chronic disease management (CDM) as an intervention on a treatment spectrum between prevention and acute care. CDM commonly focuses on conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant. Framing early childhood caries (ECC) as such a chronic condition invites dentistry to reconsider its approach to caries management and shift gears from a strictly surgical approach to one that also incorporates a medical approach. This paper's purpose was to explore the definition of and concepts inherent in CDM. An explanatory model is introduced to describe the multiple factors that influence ECC-CDM strategies. Reviewed literature suggests that early evidence from ECC-CDM interventions, along with results of pediatric asthma and diabetes CDM, supports CDM of ECC as a valid approach that is independent of both prevention and repair. Early results of ECC-CDM endeavors have demonstrated a reduction in rates of new cavitation, dental pain, and referral to the operating room compared to baseline rates. ECC-CDM strategies hold strong promise to curtail caries activity while complementing dental repair when needed, thereby reducing disease progression and cavity recurrence. Institutionalizing ECC-CDM will both require and benefit from evolving health care delivery and financing systems that reward positive health outcomes.

  5. Identification of Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Using Sulcal Morphology and Other Common Neuroimaging Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kunpeng; Xu, Hong; Guan, Hao; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; Cui, Yue; Zhang, Jicong; Liu, Tao; Wen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Identifying Alzheimer’s disease (AD) at its early stage is of major interest in AD research. Previous studies have suggested that abnormalities in regional sulcal width and global sulcal index (g-SI) are characteristics of patients with early-stage AD. In this study, we investigated sulcal width and three other common neuroimaging morphological measures (cortical thickness, cortical volume, and subcortical volume) to identify early-stage AD. These measures were evaluated in 150 participants, including 75 normal controls (NC) and 75 patients with early-stage AD. The global sulcal index (g-SI) and the width of five individual sulci (the superior frontal, intra-parietal, superior temporal, central, and Sylvian fissure) were extracted from 3D T1-weighted images. The discriminative performances of the other three traditional neuroimaging morphological measures were also examined. Information Gain (IG) was used to select a subset of features to provide significant information for separating NC and early-stage AD subjects. Based on the four modalities of the individual measures, i.e., sulcal measures, cortical thickness, cortical volume, subcortical volume, and combinations of these individual measures, three types of classifiers (Naïve Bayes, Logistic Regression and Support Vector Machine) were applied to compare the classification performances. We observed that sulcal measures were either superior than or equal to the other measures used for classification. Specifically, the g-SI and the width of the Sylvian fissure were two of the most sensitive sulcal measures and could be useful neuroanatomical markers for detecting early-stage AD. There were no significant differences between the three classifiers that we tested when using the same neuroanatomical features. PMID:28129351

  6. Early start of dialysis has no survival benefit in end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae Hyun; Rim, Min Young; Sung, Jiyoon; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Dong Ki; Jung, Ji Yong; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Sejoong

    2012-10-01

    The timing for dialysis initiationis still debated. The aim of this study was to compare mortality rates, using a propensity-score approach, in dialysis patients with early or late starts. From January 2000 to June 2009, incident adult patients (n = 836) starting dialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were enrolled. The patients were assigned to either an early- or late-start group depending on the initiation time of the dialysis. After propensity-score-basedmatching, 450 patients remained. At the initiation of dialysis, the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 11.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in the early-start group compared with 6.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in the late-start group. There were no significant differences in survival between the patients in the early- and late-start groups (Log rank tests P = 0.172). A higher overall mortality risk was observed in the early-start group than in the late-start group for the patients aged ≥ 70 yr (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.29; P = 0.048) and/or who had albumin levels ≥ 3.5 g/dL (HR: 2.53; P = 0.046). The survival of the ESRD patients was comparable between the patients in the early and late-start groups. The time to initiate dialysis should be determined based on clinical findings as well as the eGFR.

  7. Working memory and FDG-PET dissociate early and late onset Alzheimer disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Eustache, Francis; de la Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Chételat, Gaël; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2005-05-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the influence of the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on 1) memory and cerebral glucose metabolism, 2) the relationships between cognitive performance and cerebral glucose metabolism. Brain metabolism was measured by 18FDG-PET in 12 early onset AD patients (age 65), with comparable mean MMSE scores. Working memory, semantic memory and episodic memory were assessed. Cognitivo-metabolic correlations (CMC) and complementary interregional correlations were performed in order to identify specific neurocognitive processes within each group. Both AD groups performed poorly on all tasks, except digit span in the late onset group. The early onset group performed more poorly than the late onset one on both the digit span and Brown-Peterson Paradigm (BPP) tasks. Temporo-parietal hypometabolism was found in both groups, the left hemisphere being more affected than the right, especially in the early onset patients, who also showed specific left frontal hypometabolism. For the BPP task, the CMC principally involved left frontal areas in the early onset group, and the cerebellum in the late onset one. For the digit span task, they involved cerebellar and occipital regions in the latter. Regarding the digit span, the occipital and cerebellar involvement may have reflected an effective compensatory mechanism in the late onset patients, while high left supramarginal gyrus hypometabolism in the early onset patients may have explained their failure in this task. In the BPP task, the lower performance of the early onset group may have been due to a frontal lobe dysfunction, as suggested by 1) the hypometabolism of this region, 2) the CMC results, 3) the interregional correlations, which indicated greater disruption of the antero- posterior loop.

  8. A review on the genetic, environmental, and lifestyle aspects of the early-life origins of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelishadi, Roya; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2014-03-01

    This article is a comprehensive review on developmental origins of health and disease regarding various factors related to the origins of cardiovascular diseases from early life. It presents a summary of the impacts of various factors such as epigenetics; gene-environment interaction; ethnic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases and their underlying risk factors; prenatal factors; fetal programming; maternal weight status and weight gain during pregnancy; type of feeding during infancy; growth pattern during childhood; obesity; stunting; socioeconomic status; dietary and physical activity habits; active, secondhand, and thirdhand smoking, as well as environmental factors including air pollution and global climate change on the development and progress of cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors. The importance of early identification of predisposing factors for cardiovascular diseases for primordial and primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases from early life is highlighted.

  9. Diffusion imaging changes in grey matter in Alzheimer's disease: a potential marker of early neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Philip S J; Simpson, Ivor J A; Ryan, Natalie S; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is recognized to have a long presymptomatic period, during which there is progressive accumulation of molecular pathology, followed by inexorable neuronal damage. The ability to identify presymptomatic individuals with evidence of neurodegenerative change, to stage their disease, and to track progressive changes will be important for early diagnosis and for prevention trials. Despite recent advances, particularly in magnetic resonance imaging, our ability to identify early neurodegenerative changes reliably is limited. The development of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, which is sensitive to microstructural changes not visible with conventional volumetric techniques, has led to a number of diffusion imaging studies in AD; these have largely focused on white matter changes. However, in AD cerebral grey matter is affected very early, with pathological studies suggesting that grey matter changes predate those in white matter. In this article we review the growing number of studies that assess grey matter diffusivity changes in AD. Although use of the technique is still at a relatively early stage, results so far have been promising. Initial studies identified changes in diffusion measures in the hippocampi of patients with mild cognitive impairment, which predated macroscopic volume loss, with positive predictive value for progression to AD dementia. More recent studies have identified abnormalities in multiple neocortical areas (particularly the posterior cingulate) at various stages of disease progression. Studies of patients who carry genetic mutations predisposing to autosomal dominant familial AD have shown cortical and subcortical grey matter diffusivity changes several years before the expected onset of the first clinical symptoms. The technique is not without potential methodological difficulties, especially relating to partial volume effects, although recent advances appear to be reducing such issues. Going forward

  10. Hippocampal disconnection in early Alzheimer's disease: a 7 tesla MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, Laura E M; Reijmer, Yael D; ter Telgte, Annemieke; Kuijf, Hugo J; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R; Koek, Huiberdina L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), atrophy of the entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampal formation may induce degeneration of connecting white matter tracts. We examined the association of hippocampal subfield and ERC atrophy at 7 tesla MRI with fornix and parahippocampal cingulum (PHC) microstructure in patients with early AD. Twenty-five patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) (n = 15) or early AD (n = 10) and 17 controls underwent 3 tesla diffusion MRI to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) of the fornix and PHC and 7 tesla MRI to obtain ERC and hippocampal subfield volumes. Linear regression analyses were performed, adjusted for age, gender, and intracranial volume. Fornix FA was significantly lower and subiculum, cornu ammonis (CA) 1, and dentate gyrus &CA4 volume were significantly smaller in patients with MCI or AD as compared to controls. In patients with MCI or AD, fornix FA was positively associated with subiculum volume (β = 0.53, 95% CI 0.10; 0.96), but not with ERC/other subfield volumes. PHC FA was not associated with ERC/subfield volumes. These findings indicate that in early AD subiculum atrophy is associated with lower FA of the fornix, which primarily consists of axons originating in the subiculum. This suggests that degeneration of subicular cell bodies and their axons are related processes in early AD.

  11. Clinical features and gene analysis in Korean patients with early-onset Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Joo; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Won Yong; Kim, In-Suk; Kim, Ji-Youn

    2006-08-01

    Systematic analysis of clinical features and gene mutations has not been performed in Korean patients with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). To investigate the clinical characteristics and genetic background of Korean patients with early-onset PD. Clinical and genetic study. University hospital. Ninety-four patients with early-onset PD (mean +/- SD age at onset, 39.8 +/- 7.3 years) of 1100 patients with PD. Analysis of clinical characteristics and mutation analysis of the parkin and PTEN-induced kinase (PINK1) genes by direct sequencing and gene-dosage analysis using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique. The correlation between age at onset and clinical characteristics and the clinical features of patients with onset before age 30 years vs patients with onset after age 30 years. Because age at onset was younger, levodopa-induced dyskinesia and off-dystonia were more frequently observed (P=.008). Patients affected before age 30 years showed more frequent levodopa-induced dyskinesia and off-dystonia (P=.002). We identified 3 patients (5%) with parkin gene mutations but none with the PINK1 mutation. Earlier onset of levodopa-induced dyskinesia and off-dystonia were characteristic features of early-onset PD, especially before an onset age of 30 years. However, parkin gene mutations were less frequent in these patients than in Japanese groups reported elsewhere.

  12. Impaired Early Attentional Processes in Parkinson's Disease: A High-Resolution Event-Related Potentials Study.

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    Perrine Bocquillon

    Full Text Available The selection of task-relevant information requires both the focalization of attention on the task and resistance to interference from irrelevant stimuli. A previous study using the P3 component of the event-related potentials suggested that a reduced ability to resist interference could be responsible for attention disorders at early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD, with a possible role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.Our objective was to better determine the origin of this impairment, by studying an earlier ERP component, the N2, and its subcomponents, as they reflect early inhibition processes and as they are known to have sources in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, which is involved together with the DLPFC in inhibition processes. Fifteen early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs performed a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm, consisting in detecting target inputs amongst standard stimuli, while resisting interference from distracter ones. A 128-channel electroencephalogram was recorded during this task and the generators of the N2 subcomponents were identified using standardized weighted low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA.PD patients displayed fewer N2 generators than HCs in both the DLPFC and the ACC, for all types of stimuli. In contrast to controls, PD patients did not show any differences between their generators for different N2 subcomponents.Our data suggest that impaired inhibition in PD results from dysfunction of the DLPFC and the ACC during the early stages of attentional processes.

  13. Neuroinflammation - an early event in both the history and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelenboom, Piet; van Exel, Erik; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Veerhuis, Rob; Rozemuller, Annemieke J M; van Gool, Willem A

    2010-01-01

    About hundred years ago, Oskar Fischer proposed that the senile plaques are the consequence of the deposition of a foreign substance that could induce an inflammatory response leading to an abnormal neuritic response of the surrounding neurons. To show that the interest in inflammation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not only an early event in the history of AD but that inflammation is also an early event in the pathogenesis of AD. Evaluation of the neuropathological, epidemiological and genetic evidence for a role of inflammation early in the pathogenesis of AD. Neuropathological studies show presence of activated microglia and inflammation-related mediators in the cerebral neocortex of autopsied patients with a low Braak stage for AD pathology. Prospective population-based cohort studies indicate that higher serum levels of acute phase proteins predict dementia. On a genetic level, it was found that the production capacity of proinflammatory cytokines after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (a process that is under strong genetic control) is higher in offspring with a parental history of late-onset AD. Neuropathological studies show that a neuroinflammatory response in the cerebral neocortex parallels the early stages of AD pathology and precedes the late stage, tau-related pathology. Epidemiological and genetic studies indicate that systemic markers of the innate immunity are risk factors for late-onset AD. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Arterial Spin Labeling as Markers of Early Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaobo; Yan, Ronghua; Chen, Zhaoyu; Weng, Ruihui; Liu, Xu; Gao, Huimin; Xu, Xiaofeng; Kang, Zhuang; Liu, Zhexing; Guo, Yan; Liu, Zhenhua; Larsen, Jan Petter; Wang, Jin; Tang, Beisha; Hallett, Mark; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify a PD-specific MRI pattern using combined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) to discriminate patients with early PD from healthy subjects and evaluate disease status. Twenty-one early and 22 mid-late PD patients, and 22 healthy, age/gender-matched controls underwent 3-T MRI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), fiber number (FN) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements. We found that compared with healthy subjects, there was a profound reduction in FN passing through the SN in PD. FA in the SN and CBF in the caudate nucleus were inversely correlated with motor dysfunction. A negative correlation was observed between FA in the hippocampus (Hip) and the NMSS-Mood score, whereas CBF in the Hip and the prefrontal cortex(PFC) correlated with declined cognition. Stratified five-fold cross-validation identified FA in the SN(FA-SNAv), CBF in the PFC(CBF-PFCAv) and FA in the parietal white matter(FA-PWMAv), and the combination of these measurements offered relatively high accuracy (AUC 0.975, 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity) in distinguishing those with early PD from healthy subjects. We demonstrate that the decreased FNs through SN in combination with changes in FA-SNAv, CBF-PFCAv and FA-PWMAv values might serve as potential markers of early-stage PD. PMID:27646647

  15. Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Arterial Spin Labeling as Markers of Early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaobo; Yan, Ronghua; Chen, Zhaoyu; Weng, Ruihui; Liu, Xu; Gao, Huimin; Xu, Xiaofeng; Kang, Zhuang; Liu, Zhexing; Guo, Yan; Liu, Zhenhua; Larsen, Jan Petter; Wang, Jin; Tang, Beisha; Hallett, Mark; Wang, Qing

    2016-09-20

    This study aimed to identify a PD-specific MRI pattern using combined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) to discriminate patients with early PD from healthy subjects and evaluate disease status. Twenty-one early and 22 mid-late PD patients, and 22 healthy, age/gender-matched controls underwent 3-T MRI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), fiber number (FN) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements. We found that compared with healthy subjects, there was a profound reduction in FN passing through the SN in PD. FA in the SN and CBF in the caudate nucleus were inversely correlated with motor dysfunction. A negative correlation was observed between FA in the hippocampus (Hip) and the NMSS-Mood score, whereas CBF in the Hip and the prefrontal cortex(PFC) correlated with declined cognition. Stratified five-fold cross-validation identified FA in the SN(FA-SNAv), CBF in the PFC(CBF-PFCAv) and FA in the parietal white matter(FA-PWMAv), and the combination of these measurements offered relatively high accuracy (AUC 0.975, 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity) in distinguishing those with early PD from healthy subjects. We demonstrate that the decreased FNs through SN in combination with changes in FA-SNAv, CBF-PFCAv and FA-PWMAv values might serve as potential markers of early-stage PD.

  16. Use of recombinant OspC from Borrelia burgdorferi for serodiagnosis of early Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, S J; Dias, F; Sampieri, A; Craven, R B; Ryan, R W

    1994-01-01

    Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is associated with an early and dominant humoral response to the spirochete's 23-kDa outer surface protein C (OspC). We have cloned and expressed OspC as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and have shown that patient serum samples react with it in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (S. J. Padula, A. Sampieri, F. Dias, A. Szczepanski, and R. W. Ryan, Infect. Immun. 61:5097-5105, 1993). Now we have compared the detection of B. burgdorferi-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies in 74 individuals with culture-positive erythema migrans by a whole-cell ELISA, immunoblot, and the recombinant OspC (rOspC) ELISA. Seventy-six negative controls were also studied. With all of the tests, there was a statistically significant association between the duration of disease and the frequency of a positive result. With the rOspC ELISA, the predictive value of a positive test was 100% and the predictive value of a negative test was 74%. Similar results were obtained with the whole-cell ELISA and with the immunoblot using as the source of test antigen a strain of B. burgdorferi which expresses abundant levels of OspC. We conclude that the use of rOspC in an ELISA is a convenient, readily automated, and easily standardized test for the serodiagnosis of early Lyme disease. PMID:7929767

  17. Two Novel De Novo GARS Mutations Cause Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

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    Yi-Chu Liao

    Full Text Available Mutations in the GARS gene have been identified in a small number of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V, for whom disease onset typically occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, initially manifesting as weakness and atrophy of the hand muscles. The role of GARS mutations in patients with inherited neuropathies in Taiwan remains elusive.Mutational analyses of the coding regions of GARS were performed using targeted sequencing of 54 patients with molecularly unassigned axonal CMT, who were selected from 340 unrelated CMT patients. Two heterozygous mutations in GARS, p.Asp146Tyr and p.Met238Arg, were identified; one in each patient. Both are novel de novo mutations. The p.Asp146Tyr mutation is associated with a severe infantile-onset neuropathy and the p.Met238Arg mutation results in childhood-onset disability.GARS mutations are an uncommon cause of CMT in Taiwan. The p.Asp146Tyr and p.Met238Arg mutations are associated with early-onset axonal CMT. These findings broaden the mutational spectrum of GARS and also highlight the importance of considering GARS mutations as a disease cause in patients with early-onset neuropathies.

  18. Two Novel De Novo GARS Mutations Cause Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Chang, Chia-Ching; Huang, Yen-Hua; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the GARS gene have been identified in a small number of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V, for whom disease onset typically occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, initially manifesting as weakness and atrophy of the hand muscles. The role of GARS mutations in patients with inherited neuropathies in Taiwan remains elusive. Mutational analyses of the coding regions of GARS were performed using targeted sequencing of 54 patients with molecularly unassigned axonal CMT, who were selected from 340 unrelated CMT patients. Two heterozygous mutations in GARS, p.Asp146Tyr and p.Met238Arg, were identified; one in each patient. Both are novel de novo mutations. The p.Asp146Tyr mutation is associated with a severe infantile-onset neuropathy and the p.Met238Arg mutation results in childhood-onset disability. GARS mutations are an uncommon cause of CMT in Taiwan. The p.Asp146Tyr and p.Met238Arg mutations are associated with early-onset axonal CMT. These findings broaden the mutational spectrum of GARS and also highlight the importance of considering GARS mutations as a disease cause in patients with early-onset neuropathies.

  19. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease: Present limitations and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih-Hung; Lin; Yi-Cheng; Chang; Lee-Ming; Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease(DKD) is one of the most common diabetic complications, as well as the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease around the world. To prevent the dreadful consequence, development of new assays for diagnostic of DKD has always been the priority in the research field of diabetic complications. At present, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate(eG FR) are the standard methods for assessing glomerular damage and renal function changes in clinical practice. However, due to diverse tissue involvement in different individuals, the so-called "non-albuminuric renal impairment" is not uncommon, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the precision of creatinine-based GFR estimates is limited in hyperfiltration status. These facts make albuminuria and eG FR less reliable indicators for early-stage DKD. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD, along with the elucidation of its genetic profiles and phenotypic expression of different molecules. With the help of ever-evolving technologies, it has gradually become plausible to apply the thriving information in clinical practice. The strength and weakness of several novel biomarkers, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic signatures in assisting the early diagnosis of DKD will be discussed in this article.

  20. Daily Physical Activity Patterns During the Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Vijay R; Watts, Amber

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that results in severe disability. Very few studies have explored changes in daily physical activity patterns during early stages of AD when components of physical function and mobility may be preserved. Our study explored differences in daily physical activity profiles, independent of the effects of non-cognitive factors including physical function and age, among individuals with mild AD compared to controls. Patients with mild AD and controls (n = 92) recruited from the University of Kansas Alzheimer's Disease Center Registry, wore the Actigraph GT3X+ for seven days, and provided objective physical function (VO2 max) and mobility data. Using multivariate linear regression, we explored whether individuals with mild AD had different daily average and diurnal physical activity patterns compared to controls independent of non-cognitive factors that may affect physical activity, including physical function and mobility. We found that mild AD was associated with less moderate-intensity physical activity (p testing time-of-day specific physical activity interventions targeting individuals in the early stages of AD, prior to significant declines in mobility and physical function.

  1. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

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    Katherine eLintner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP, has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy number variation, and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low gene copy numbers of total C4, heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein alterations for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases.

  2. Mechanism of disease in early osteoarthritis: application of modern MR imaging techniques -- a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobke, Bjoern; Bolbos, Radu; Saadat, Ehsan; Cheng, Jonathan; Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    The application of biomolecular magnetic resonance imaging becomes increasingly important in the context of early cartilage changes in degenerative and inflammatory joint disease before gross morphological changes become apparent. In this limited technical report, we investigate the correlation of MRI T1, T2 and T1ρ relaxation times with quantitative biochemical measurements of proteoglycan and collagen contents of cartilage in close synopsis with histologic morphology. A recently developed MRI sequence, T1ρ, was able to detect early intracartilaginous degeneration quantitatively and also qualitatively by color mapping demonstrating a higher sensitivity than standard T2-weighted sequences. The results correlated highly with reduced proteoglycan content and disrupted collagen architecture as measured by biochemistry and histology. The findings lend support to a clinical implementation that allows rapid visual capturing of pathology on a local, millimeter level. Further information about articular cartilage quality otherwise not detectable in vivo, via normal inspection, is needed for orthopedic treatment decisions in the present and future.

  3. Kcne2 deletion causes early-onset nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Min; Nguyen, Dara; Anand, Marie; Kant, Ritu; Köhncke, Clemens; Lisewski, Ulrike; Roepke, Torsten K.; Hu, Zhaoyang; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasing health problem worldwide, with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental components. Here, we describe the first example of NAFLD caused by genetic disruption of a mammalian potassium channel subunit. Mice with germline deletion of the KCNE2 potassium channel β subunit exhibited NAFLD as early as postnatal day 7. Using mouse genetics, histology, liver damage assays and transcriptomics we discovered that iron deficiency arising from KCNE2-dependent achlorhydria is a major factor in early-onset NAFLD in Kcne2─/─ mice, while two other KCNE2-dependent defects did not initiate NAFLD. The findings uncover a novel genetic basis for NAFLD and an unexpected potential factor in human KCNE2-associated cardiovascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26984260

  4. Emotional enhancement of perceptual priming is preserved in aging and early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBar, Kevin S; Torpey, Dana C; Cook, Craig A; Johnson, Stephanie R; Warren, Lauren H; Burke, James R; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2005-01-01

    Perceptual priming for emotionally-negative and neutral scenes was tested in early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy younger, middle-aged and older adults. In the study phase, participants rated the scenes for their arousal properties. In the test phase, studied and novel scenes were initially presented subliminally, and the exposure duration was gradually increased until a valence categorization was made. The difference in exposure duration required to categorize novel versus studied items was the dependent measure of priming. Aversive content increased the magnitude of priming, an effect that was preserved in healthy aging and AD. Results from an immediate recognition memory test showed that the priming effects could not be attributable to enhanced explicit memory for the aversive scenes. These findings implicate a dissociation between the modulatory effect of emotion across implicit and explicit forms of memory in aging and early-stage AD.

  5. Impact of oxidative stress during pregnancy on fetal epigenetic patterns and early origin of vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Jose Guillermo Ortega; Echeverri, Isabella; de Plata, Cecilia Aguilar; Castillo, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have led scientists to postulate the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis for noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and obesity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the development of these diseases are not well understood. In various animal models, it has been observed that oxidative stress during pregnancy is associated with the early development of endothelial dysfunction in offspring. This phenomenon suggests that endothelial dysfunction may initiate in the uterus and could lead to increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Currently, it is known that many of the fetal adaptive responses to environmental factors are mediated by epigenetic changes in the genome, especially by the degree of methylation in cytosines in the promoter regions of genes. These findings suggest that the establishment of a particular epigenetic pattern in the genome may be generated by oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Early and late oral features of chronic graft-versus-host disease

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    Alessandra Oliveira Ferrari Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic graft-versus-host disease is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, and the mouth is one of the affected sites. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral features of this disease after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Methods: This was a cross-sectional multicenter study that enrolled patients submitted to transplantation. Oral evaluations used the National Institutes of Health criteria, salivary flow rates, and the range of mouth opening. Pain and xerostomia were evaluated through a visual analogue scale. Patients were divided into two groups based on the transplantation time (up to one year and more than one year. Results: Of the 57 evaluated recipients, 44 had chronic graft-versus-host disease: ten (22.72% in the group with less than one year after transplantation, and 34 (77.27% in the group with more than one year after transplantation. Lichenoid/hyperkeratotic plaques, erythematous lesions, xerostomia, and hyposalivation were the most commonly reported oral features. Lichenoid/hyperkeratotic plaques were significantly more common in patients within the first year after the transplant. The labial mucosa was affected more in the first year. No significant changes occurred in the frequency of xerostomia, hyposalivation, and reduced mouth opening regarding time after transplantation. Conclusion: Oral chronic graft-versus-host disease lesions were identified early in the course of the disease. The changes observed in salivary gland function and in the range of mouth opening were not correlated with the time after transplantation.

  7. PGC-1{alpha}, A Potential Therapeutic Target for Early Intervention in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, B.; Liao, Z.; Locascio, J.J.;

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease affects 5 million people worldwide, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are still unclear. Here, we report a genome-wide meta-analysis of gene sets (groups of genes that encode the same biological pathway or process) in 410 samples from patients with sympt......Parkinson's disease affects 5 million people worldwide, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are still unclear. Here, we report a genome-wide meta-analysis of gene sets (groups of genes that encode the same biological pathway or process) in 410 samples from patients...... with symptomatic Parkinson's and subclinical disease and healthy controls. We analyzed 6.8 million raw data points from nine genome-wide expression studies, and 185 laser-captured human dopaminergic neuron and substantia nigra transcriptomes, followed by two-stage replication on three platforms. We found 10 gene...... by mutant α-synuclein or the pesticide rotenone in cellular disease models. Our systems biology analysis of Parkinson's disease identifies PGC-1α as a potential therapeutic target for early intervention....

  8. Frequency of LRRK2 mutations in early- and late-onset Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, L N; Wang, Y; Karlins, E; Saito, L; Mejia-Santana, H; Harris, J; Louis, E D; Cote, L J; Andrews, H; Fahn, S; Waters, C; Ford, B; Frucht, S; Ottman, R; Marder, K

    2006-11-28

    To evaluate the frequency of leucine-rich repeat kinase gene (LRRK2) mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in early-onset Parkinson disease (EOPD) and late-onset Parkinson disease (LOPD). We genotyped five previously reported LRRK2 mutations (G2019S, L1114L, I1122V, R1441C, and Y1699C) and 17 coding SNPs for haplotype analysis in 504 cases with PD and 314 controls enrolled in the Genetic Epidemiology of PD Study. Cases and controls were recruited without knowledge of family history of PD and cases were oversampled in the 50 (p = 0.56). All cases with PD with the G2019S mutation shared the same disease-associated haplotype. The frequency of the LRRK2 G2019S mutation was higher in the subset of 181 cases reporting four Jewish grandparents (9.9%) than in other cases (3.1%) (p Parkinson disease and confirms the previous report of a greater frequency of the G2019S mutation in Jewish than in non-Jewish cases with Parkinson disease.

  9. Early Postural Changes in Individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

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    Mohamed Elsayed Khallaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Postural changes are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Many contributing factors have been evident either related to disease pathology or to adaptive changes. This study aimed at studying the postural changes in subjects with Parkinson’s disease and its relation to duration of illness and disease severity. Methods. Eighteen patients with PD and 18 healthy matched volunteers represented the sample of the study. The patients were at stage 1 or 1.5 according to the Modified Hoehn and Yahr Staging with duration of illness between 18 and 36 months. Three-dimensional analysis of the back surface was conducted to explore the postural changes in the sagittal and frontal planes in both the patients and the healthy subjects. Results. Kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, fleche cervicale, fleche lombaire, scoliotic angle, and associated vertebral rotation and pelvic obliquity were significantly increased in patients with PD compared to the healthy subjects (P≤0.05. There was no association between the measured postural changes and duration of illness as well as the severity of the IPD (P≤0.05. Conclusion. Postural changes start in the early stages of idiopathic PD and they have no relationship to the duration of illness and disease severity.

  10. Cimetidine as a novel adjunctive treatment for early stage Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemenski, Justin

    2016-04-09

    Lyme disease, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. It is a complex disease which may affect the skin, joints, heart, eyes, and central nervous system. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is curative in most instances. However, a significant percentage of patients experience ongoing symptoms after treatment. Currently, there is much controversy regarding the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of Lyme disease. Pathogen persistence despite treatment lies at the heart of this debate. Many believe that the ongoing symptoms are due to factors such as autoimmunity or permanent damage that is incurred during the active infection. However, there is an emerging school of thought that states that ongoing symptoms are due to a persistent infection that is able to survive both the immune response and antibiotic therapy. Numerous studies have shown that Bb can indeed persist within the host despite treatment and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain Bb's persistence capabilities. These include: polymorphism, antigenic variance, biofilm formation, persister cells, and immunomodulation. There is evidence that Bb is able to alter cytokine profiles within the host which may allow the organism to survive the immune response. This immunomodulation follows a pattern of T-helper 1 (TH1) suppression in favor of T-helper 2 (TH2) processes. In contrast, it has been shown that the optimal immune response to Bb infection involves an early, robust TH1 response and a later conversion to TH2 dominance once the infection is controlled or cleared. It has been proposed that a reconstitution of proper immune-competency in the infected host may improve clinical outcomes in Lyme disease. Cimetidine (CIM) is an over-the-counter histamine-2 (H2) antagonist that is primarily used to lower acid secretions in the stomach. T-regulatory (Treg) cells also possess the H2 receptor, which has spurred interest in CIM as a

  11. Blood Biomarkers Associated with Cognitive Decline in Early Stage and Drug-Naive Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Santiago

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD continues to be a major challenge in the field. The lack of a robust biomarker to detect early stage PD patients has considerably slowed the progress toward the development of potential therapeutic agents. We have previously evaluated several RNA biomarkers in whole blood from participants enrolled in two independent clinical studies. In these studies, PD patients were medicated, thus, expression of these biomarkers in de novo patients remains unknown. To this end, we tested ten RNA biomarkers in blood samples from 99 untreated PD patients and 101 HC nested in the cross-sectional Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative by quantitative real-time PCR. One biomarker out of ten, COPZ1 trended toward significance (nominal p = 0.009 when adjusting for age, sex, and educational level. Further, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 mRNAs correlated with clinical features in PD patients including the Hoehn and Yahr scale, Movement Disorder Society revision of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA score. Levels of EFTUD2 and PTBP1 were significantly higher in cognitively normal PD patients (PD-CN compared to cognitively impaired PD patients (PD-MCI. Interestingly, blood glucose levels were significantly higher in PD and PD-MCI patients (≥ 100 mg/dL, pre-diabetes compared to HC. Collectively, we report the association of three RNA biomarkers, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 with clinical features including cognitive decline in early drug-naïve PD patients. Further, our results show that drug-naïve PD and PD-MCI patients have glucose levels characteristic of pre-diabetes patients, suggesting that impaired glucose metabolism is an early event in PD. Evaluation of these potential biomarkers in a larger longitudinal study is warranted.

  12. Blood Biomarkers Associated with Cognitive Decline in Early Stage and Drug-Naive Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) continues to be a major challenge in the field. The lack of a robust biomarker to detect early stage PD patients has considerably slowed the progress toward the development of potential therapeutic agents. We have previously evaluated several RNA biomarkers in whole blood from participants enrolled in two independent clinical studies. In these studies, PD patients were medicated, thus, expression of these biomarkers in de novo patients remains unknown. To this end, we tested ten RNA biomarkers in blood samples from 99 untreated PD patients and 101 HC nested in the cross-sectional Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative by quantitative real-time PCR. One biomarker out of ten, COPZ1 trended toward significance (nominal p = 0.009) when adjusting for age, sex, and educational level. Further, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 mRNAs correlated with clinical features in PD patients including the Hoehn and Yahr scale, Movement Disorder Society revision of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score. Levels of EFTUD2 and PTBP1 were significantly higher in cognitively normal PD patients (PD-CN) compared to cognitively impaired PD patients (PD-MCI). Interestingly, blood glucose levels were significantly higher in PD and PD-MCI patients (≥ 100 mg/dL, pre-diabetes) compared to HC. Collectively, we report the association of three RNA biomarkers, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 with clinical features including cognitive decline in early drug-naïve PD patients. Further, our results show that drug-naïve PD and PD-MCI patients have glucose levels characteristic of pre-diabetes patients, suggesting that impaired glucose metabolism is an early event in PD. Evaluation of these potential biomarkers in a larger longitudinal study is warranted.

  13. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, 65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD.

  14. Early detection of myocardial dysfunction in children with mitochondrial disease: An ultrasound and two-dimensional strain echocardiography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcus, K.A.; Barends, M.; Morava, E.; Feuth, T.; Korte, C.L. de; Kapusta, L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial dysfunction in children diagnosed with mitochondrial disease is an ominous sign and has been associated with substantial increased mortality rates. Early detection of cardiac involvement would therefore be desirable. Two dimensional strain echocardiography (2DSTE) has proven t

  15. Clinical heterogeneity in patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease: a cluster analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping LIU; Tao FENG; Yong-jun WANG; Xuan ZHANG; Biao CHEN

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease (PD) among a cohort of Chinese patients in early stages.Clinical data on demographics,motor variables,motor phenotypes,disease progression,global cognitive function,depression,apathy,sleep quality,constipation,fatigue,and L-dopa complications were collected from 138 Chinese PD subjects in early stages (Hoehn and Yahr stages 1-3).The PD subject subtypes were classified using k-means cluster analysis according to the clinical data from five- to three-cluster consecutively.Kappa statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the consistency among different subtype solutions.The cluster analysis indicated four main subtypes:the non-tremor dominant subtype (NTD,n=28,20.3%),rapid disease progression subtype (RDP,n=7,5.1%),young-onset subtype (YO,n=50,36.2%),and tremor dominant subtype (TD,n=53,38.4%).Overall,78.3% (108/138) of subjects were always classified between the same three groups (52 always in TD,7 in RDP,and 49 in NTD),and 98.6% (136/138) between five- and four-cluster solutions.However,subjects classified as NTD in the four-cluster analysis were dispersed into different subtypes in the three-cluster analysis,with low concordance between four- and three-cluster solutions (kappa value=-0.139,P=0.001 ).This study defines clinical heterogeneity of PD patients in early stages using a data-driven approach.The subtypes generated by the four-cluster solution appear to exhibit ideal internal cohesion and external isolation.

  16. EARLY DETECTION OF CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN NEW BORNS USING PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShahForum,Chatterjee Rajib, PatelPrashant C, Kunkulol Rahul R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital heart diseases which are dependent on the ductusarteriosus to maintain adequate oxygenation or systemic blood flow are termed as a critical congenital heart disease (CCHD. Delay in the diagnosis of CCHD is the major cause leading to morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Clinical evaluation is likely to miss the diagnosis in first few hours of hospital stay after birth due to absence of signs and symptoms of CCHD. In the absence of clinical findings during early neonatal period, the best parameter that can be assessed is the detection of hypoxemia by pulse oximetry screening. Objectives: To record the value of Pulse Oximetry within 24 hours of birth and evaluate Pulse Oximetry as screening tool for early diagnosis of CCHD. &Methods: Longitudinal descriptive study was conducted on total 700 intramural neonates, satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, who were evaluated within 24 hours of birth with currently available pulse oximeter, after the Institutional Ethical Committee approval. The study was conducted over a period of 4 months. Part-A: Neonatal Case Record, Part-B: Pulse Oximetry Screening Record, Part-C: Clinical Examination Record, Part-D: Echocardiography Record. Results and Conclusion: Total 700 neonates were screened by pulse oximeter with consecutive sampling method. 4 (0.57% subjects were detected to have positive screen and the diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography. Study revealed that Pulse Oximetry Screening can be an important primary screening tool in routine neonatal care for early detection of Critical Congenital Heart Diseases particularly in rural setup

  17. A prospective study of freezing of gait with early Parkinson disease in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Yin, Xifan; Ouyang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shenghua; Zhang, Changguo; Pan, Xin; Wang, Shiliang; Yang, Junxiang; Feng, Yaoyao; Yu, Ping; Zhang, Qiangchun

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the risk factors for freezing of gait (FOG) in the early stage of Parkinson disease in China, using a sample of 248 patients who were followed for 3 years. Part III of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the modified Hoehn-Yahr grading scale were used to evaluate the severity of motor symptoms. Nonmotor symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), and Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS). The end-point was the presence of FOG at the end of follow-up; patients with FOG were classified as freezers. The risk factors for FOG were analyzed at the end of the first, second, and third years after baseline. There were 40 freezers (16.13%) 1 year later, 98 (39.52%) 2 years later, and 128 (51.61%) 3 years later. FOG 3 years later was associated with the following variables: depression (P = 0.003), older age, living in the countryside, lower education, akinetic-rigid style, lower limbs as site of onset, early use of levodopa, higher daily dose of levodopa, and not using amantadine or selegiline and dopamine receptor agonists (P Parkinson disease were more likely to experience FOG if: they were older, or from the countryside; had an akinetic-rigid style, anxiety, or higher NMSS scores; they used levodopa early or did not use amantadine or selegiline; their lower limbs were the site of onset; or they had more severe motor disability or higher HAMD scores at baseline.

  18. The dramatic effects of Galantamine in a patient with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Harveer; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the case of a 51 year old former mid-wife presented to the NHS Luton and Bedfordshire psychiatric services with a 2 year history of increasing forgetfulness with significant impairment to her daily function. She was diagnosed with non-familial early-onset Alzheimer's Disease (EOAD) and started on 8mg daily of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor Galantamine. The information for this study was gathered from patient notes, consultant, collateral and personal accounts. Periodic outpatient consultations at the NHS Luton and Bedfordshire psychiatric services were used to monitor Mrs LF's global, functional and behavioral progress. These were supplemented with the mini mental state examination (MMSE) at each outpatient appointment. The graph of MMSE scores illustrates severe decline in scores, followed eventually by increase in score to sustained improvement while continuing on galantamine. Functionally, this lady has successfully negotiated a divorce, moved into her own accommodation, began travelling on holidays, including abroad, with friends, and has now embarked on a new relationship. Whilst only being a single case study, this demonstrates the significant benefits which are attainable with Galantamine in EOAD. The extent of this improvement may be a result of individual variation, or perhaps a greater efficacy for this drug in the subset of 'early-onset' AD patients, which has long been thought to share the same mechanism as traditional AD. The responsiveness to Galantamine in this patient may suggest an alternative mechanism of Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease to typical Alzheimer's Disease in the over 65's. The case raises interesting questions as to whether EOAD should be considered distinct to typical (over 65's) AD, given the greater than expected response to Galantamine.

  19. Entorhinal cortex disruption causes memory deficit in early Alzheimer's disease as shown by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustache, F; Desgranges, B; Giffard, B; de la Sayette, V; Baron, J C

    2001-03-26

    Voxel-based mapping of the correlations between cognitive scores and resting-state brain glucose utilization measured by PET has recently emerged as a novel way to reveal in living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) the neural systems whose disruption underlies particular neuropsychological, especially mnemonic, deficits. We have now applied this approach using a novel cognitive paradigm designed to selectively assess verbal episodic memory, and show that in early AD disruption of the left entorhinal cortex underlies this memory deficit, consistent with post mortem data showing that this brain area is affected earliest and most severely by tau pathology in AD.

  20. Axial spondyloarthritis: a new disease entity, not necessarily early ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip Cameron; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-02-01

    New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis have been developed with the goal of increasing sensitivity of criteria for early inflammatory spondyloarthritis. However these criteria substantially increase heterogeneity of the resulting disease group, reducing their value in both research and clinical settings. Further research to establish criteria based on better knowledge of the natural history of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis, its aetiopathogenesis and response to treatment is required. In the meantime the modified New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis remain a very useful classification criteria set, defining a relatively homogenous group of cases for clinical use and research studies.

  1. ATP13A2 variants in early-onset Parkinson's disease patients and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djarmati, Ana; Hagenah, Johann; Reetz, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    Four genes responsible for recessively inherited forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been identified, including the recently discovered ATP13A2 (PARK9) gene. Our objective was to investigate the role of this gene in a large cohort of PD patients and controls. We extensively screened all 29 exons...... of the ATP13A2 coding region in 112 patients with early-onset PD (EOPD; origin and of 55 controls. We identified four carriers (3.6%) of novel single heterozygous ATP13A2 missense changes that were absent in controls. Interestingly, the carrier of one of these variants...

  2. Meta-Analysis of Early Nonmotor Features and Risk Factors for Parkinson Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noyce, Alastair J.; Jonathan P Bestwick; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Hawkes, Christopher H; Giovannoni, Gavin; Andrew J. Lees; Schrag, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) and risk factors or early symptoms amenable to population-based screening. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors for PD. Results The strongest associations with later diagnosis of PD were found for having a first-degree or any relative with PD (odds ratio [OR], 3.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.65–3.93 and OR, 4.45; 95% CI, 3.39–5.83) or any relative with tremor (OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 2.1...

  3. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163 is a marker of disease activity and progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Moller, H J; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  4. Prodromal symptoms and early detection of Parkinson's disease in general practice: a nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plouvier, A.O.A.; Hameleers, R.J.M.G.; Heuvel, E.A. van den; Bor, H.H.; Olde Hartman, T.C.; Bloem, B.R.; Weel, C. van; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Timely diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD), facilitating early intervention, depends largely on the GP's awareness of early symptomatology. For general practice, it is unknown which prodromal symptoms (symptoms preceding the typical motor symptoms of PD) demand the GP's alertness. OBJE

  5. Analysis of the evolution to defined connective tissue diseases of patients with “early unidifferentiated connective tissue diseases (UCTD”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talarico

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The term undifferentiated connective tissue diseases (UCTD is used to identify systemic autoimmune diseases not fulfilling classificative criteria for defined connective tissue diseases (CTD. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the evolution to defined CTD of an historical cohort of 91 UCTD patients followed at our Unit and to describe clinical and serological characteristics of stable UCTD patients with a disease duration of more than 5 years. Patients, previously described, were selected for having an undifferentiated profile after 1 year of follow up. These patients have been regularly followed at our Unit and their diagnosis has been reassessed annually based on the existing classificative criteria. Seven UCTD patients with a follow up of less than 5 years have been excluded from the study, therefore 84 patients (F: 81, M: 3 have been analysed. During the follow up 28 patients (33% developed a defined CTD. In particular 22 patients developed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, while the remaining 6 patients developed other CTDs (2 primary Sjögren’s syndrome, 2 overlap syndromes, 1 Systemic Sclerosis, 1 rheumatoid arthritis. The evolution to a defined CTD occurred after a mean disease duration of 80.6± 66.8 months (min 14, max 336, median 72; the evolution to SLE occurred after a mean disease duration of 66.8±43.3 months (min 17, max 216, median 57. Anti-cardiolipin antibodies were the only variable correlated with the evolution to SLE (p<0.05. Stable UCTD were characterized by a simplified clinical picture with no major organ involvement and by a simplified autoantibody profile (anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and anti-RNP antibodies were the single antibody specificities observed in 22% and 13% of patients respectively. These results confirm previous data showing that about 30% of UCTD patients will develop a defined CTD, the predictive role of anti-cardiolipin antibodies for the evolution to SLE, and the existence of stable UCTD, distinct

  6. The importance of early involvement of paediatric palliative care for patients with severe congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaud, Sophie; Lloyd, David F A; Laddie, Joanna; Razavi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Growing numbers of patients with severe congenital heart disease (CHD) are surviving into late childhood and beyond. This increasingly complex patient group may experience multiple formidable and precarious interventions, lifelong morbidity and the very real risk of premature death on many occasions throughout their childhood. In this paper, we discuss the advantages of a fully integrated palliative care ethos in patients with CHD, offering the potential for improved symptom control, more informed decision-making and enhanced support for patients and their families throughout their disease trajectory. These core principles may be delivered alongside expert cardiac care via non-specialists within pre-existing networks or via specialists in paediatric palliative care when appropriate. By broaching these complex issues early-even from the point of diagnosis-an individualised set of values can be established around not just end-of-life but also quality-of-life decisions, with clear benefits for patients and their families regardless of outcome.

  7. Early warning system for coffee rust disease based on error correcting output codes: a proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Camilo Corrales

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Colombian coffee producers have had to face the severe consequences of the coffee rust disease since it was first reported in the country in 1983. Recently, machine learning researchers have tried to predict infection through classifiers such as decision trees, regression Support Vector Machines (SVM, non-deterministic classifiers and Bayesian Networks, but it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that combining multiple classifiers can substantially improve the classification performance of the constituent members. An Early Warning System (EWS for coffee rust disease was therefore proposed based on Error Correcting Output Codes (ECOC and SVM to compute the binary functions of Plant Density, Shadow Level, Soil Acidity, Last Nighttime Rainfall Intensity and Last Days Relative Humidity.

  8. Asymptomatic sleep abnormalities are a common early feature in patients with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Anna O G; Rogers, Lorraine; Pilsworth, Samantha; McAllister, Catherine J; Shneerson, John M; Morton, A Jennifer; Barker, Roger A

    2011-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disturbance. In this article, we used polysomnography, actigraphy and a variety of validated questionnaires to ascertain the extent to which sleep changes are identifiable and measurable in mild stage HD, and importantly, to see whether patients are negatively impacted by the changes in their sleep. We found significant differences in sleep architecture and sleep efficiency in patients compared with controls using polysomnography. However, patient scores on the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes of Sleep Scale, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were not significantly different to controls. These results suggest that although marked changes in sleep architecture are present in early HD and can be detected using polysomnography, patients do not necessarily recognize or report these abnormalities.

  9. Early Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease with Renal Injury Caused by Hypertension in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yabuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old spayed female Papillon weighing 4.0 kg presented with a history of persistent hematuria and pollakiuria. Concurrent bladder calculi, a mammary gland tumor, and nonazotemic early stage of chronic kidney disease with contracted kidneys were noted in this dog. The dog underwent cystectomy, unilateral mastectomy, and intraoperative renal biopsy. On the basis of histopathological analysis of renal biopsy results, it was suspected that renal injury of the dog was caused by persistent hypertension, and a follow-up examination revealed severe hypertension. The dog was treated with a combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and calcium channel blocker. The treatment produced a good outcome in the dog, and there has been no progression of the chronic kidney disease for over 2 years.

  10. Severe agitation in severe early-onset Alzheimer’s disease resolves with ECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksay SS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Suna Su Aksay, Lucrezia Hausner, Lutz Frölich, Alexander Sartorius Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany Abstract: Dementia-related behavioral disturbances are mostly treated with antipsychotics; however, the observed beneficial effects are modest and the risk of serious adverse effects high. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with severe early-onset Alzheimer’s disease and severe agitation, whom we treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. A significant clinical improvement was achieved over eight ECT sessions, which were tolerated well without cognitive worsening, and lasted approximately 3 months. Our case demonstrates the safe and effective use of ECT in pharmacotherapy-resistant severe agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. The risk–benefit profile of ECT for dementia-related agitation should be further investigated in clinical trials. Keywords: dementia, electroconvulsive therapy, cognition, emotional distress, disinhibition.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency in early life and the potential programming of cardiovascular disease in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezmish, Oksan; Black, Mary Jane

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a major worldwide public health problem affecting people of all ages, from infants to the elderly. Of particular concern is the high incidence of vitamin D deficiency in women during pregnancy and lactation, leading to the exposure of the growing fetus/infant to inadequate levels of vitamin D, which is essential for normal development. Vitamin D deficiency in adulthood is linked to the etiology of hypertension and to a multitude of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. It is now well-established that the antecedents of cardiovascular disease can originate very early in life. The purpose of this review is to highlight how maternal vitamin D deficiency, and its effects in upregulating the fetal renin-angiotensin system and altering cardiomyocyte growth in the fetal heart, has the potential to program long-term vulnerability to cardiovascular disease.

  12. Conceptual Model for Automatic Early Warning Information System of Infectious Diseases Based on Internet Reporting Surveillance System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA-QI MA; LI-PING WANG; XUAO-PENG QI; XIAO-MING SHI; GONG-HUAN YANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish a conceptual model of automatic early warning of infectious diseases based on internet reporting surveillance system,with a view to realizing an automated warning system on a daily basis and timely identifying potential outbreaks of infectious diseases. Methods The statistic conceptual model was established using historic surveillance data with movable percentile method.Results Based on the infectious disease surveillance information platform,the conceptualmodelfor early warning was established.The parameter,threshold,and revised sensitivity and specificity of early warning value were changed to realize dynamic alert of infectious diseases on a daily basis.Conclusion The instructive conceptual model of dynamic alert can be used as a validating tool in institutions of infectious disease surveillance in different districts.

  13. Early life influences on the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Janet; Sonnappa, Samatha

    2013-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not simply a disease of old age that is largely restricted to heavy smokers, but may be associated with insults to the developing lung during foetal life and the first few years of postnatal life, when lung growth and development are rapid. A better understanding of the long-term effects of early life factors, such as intrauterine growth restriction, prenatal and postnatal exposure to tobacco smoke and other pollutants, preterm delivery and childhood respiratory illnesses, on the subsequent development of chronic respiratory disease is imperative if appropriate preventive and management strategies to reduce the burden of COPD are to be developed. The extent to which insults to the developing lung are associated with increased risk of COPD in later life depends on the underlying cause, timing and severity of such derangements. Suboptimal conditions in utero result in aberrations of lung development such that affected individuals are born with reduced lung function, which tends to remain diminished throughout life, thereby increasing the risk both of wheezing disorders during childhood and subsequent COPD in genetically susceptible individuals. If the current trend towards the ever-increasing incidence of COPD is to be reversed, it is essential to minimize risks to the developing lung by improvements in antenatal and neonatal care, and to reduce prenatal and postnatal exposures to environmental pollutants, including passive tobacco smoke. Furthermore, adult physicians need to recognize that lung disease is potentially associated with early life insults and provide better education regarding diet, exercise and avoidance of smoking to preserve precious reserves of lung function in susceptible adults. This review focuses on factors that adversely influence lung development in utero and during the first 5 years of life, thereby predisposing to subsequent COPD.

  14. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Larsen, Ida U.; Hjermind, Lena E.; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32 premanifest and 48 manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and 24 gene-expansion negative at-risk controls. We examined biomarkers of neuroinflammation (matrix metalloproteinase 9, C-X-C motif chemokine 13, terminal complement complex, chitinase-3-like-protein 1 [CHI3L1], and osteopontin [OPN]) and neurodegeneration (microtubule-associated protein tau, neurofilament light polypeptide [NFL], and myelin basic protein [MBP]). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (H2-2011-085) and written informed consent was obtained from each participant before enrollment. Results: NFL was the only biomarker that increased in premanifest stages and no evidence of early involvement of neuroinflammation in HD was found. However, we found that the biomarkers for neurodegeneration, MBP and tau, increased during the disease course in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and were associated with an increase of the neuroinflammation biomarkers CHI3L1 and OPN. Tau was also increased in all gene-expansion carriers with psychiatric symptoms compared to gene-expansion carriers without psychiatric symptoms. Conclusions: Neuroinflammation, which seems not to be an early event in our cohort, may be secondary to neurodegeneration in late HD. NFL is a possible disease burden correlate in HD, reflecting neuronal loss even before motor symptom onset, and may be useful as a dynamic biomarker in intervention studies. PMID:27734023

  15. Prodromal Huntington disease as a model for functional compensation of early neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Malejko

    Full Text Available Functional compensation demonstrated as mechanism to offset neuronal loss in early Alzheimer disease may also occur in other adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Huntington disease (HD with its genetic determination and gradual changes in structural integrity. In HD, neurodegeneration typically initiates in the dorsal striatum, successively affecting ventral striatal areas. Investigating carriers of the HD mutation with evident dorsal, but only minimal or no ventral striatal atrophy, we expected to find evidence for compensation of ventral striatal functioning. We investigated 14 pre- or early symptomatic carriers of the mutation leading to HD and 18 matched healthy controls. Participants underwent structural T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and functional MRI during a reward task that probes ventral striatal functioning. Motor functioning and attention were assessed with reaction time (RT tasks. Structural images confirmed a specific decrease of dorsal striatal but only marginal ventral striatal volume in HD relative to control subjects, paralleling prolonged RT in the motor response tasks. While behavioral performance in the reward task during fMRI scanning was unimpaired, reward-related fMRI signaling in the HD group was differentially enhanced in the bilateral ventral striatum and in bilateral orbitofrontal cortex/anterior insula, as another region sensitive to reward processing. We provide evidence for the concept of functional compensation in premanifest HD which may suggest a defense mechanism in neurodegeneration. Given the so far inevitable course of HD with its genetically determined endpoint, this disease may provide another model to study the different aspects of the concept of functional compensation.

  16. Genetic mutations in early-onset Parkinson's disease Mexican patients: molecular testing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Guerrero-Camacho, Jorge Luis; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Boll-Woehrlen, Marie-Catherine; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Alonso-Vilatela, María Elisa; López-López, Marisol

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in PARK2, PINK1, and DJ-1 have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. Here, we report the prevalence of sequence and structural mutations in these three main recessive genes in Mexican Mestizo patients. The complete sequences of these three genes were analyzed by homo/heteroduplex DNA formation and direct sequencing; exon dosage was determined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and real-time PCR in 127 patients belonging to 122 families and 120 healthy Mexican Mestizo controls. All individuals had been previously screened for the three most common LRRK2 mutations. The presence of two mutations in compound heterozygous or homozygous genotypes was found in 16 unrelated patients, 10 had mutations in PARK2, six in PINK1, and none in DJ-1. Two PARK2-PINK1 and one PARK2-LRRK2 digenic cases were observed. Novel mutations were identified in PARK2 and PINK1 genes, including PINK1 duplication for the first time. Exon dosage deletions were the most frequent mutations in PARK2 (mainly in exons 9 and 12), followed by those in PINK1. The high prevalence of heterozygous mutations in PARK2 (12.3%) and the novel heterozygous and homozygous point mutations in PINK1 observed in familial and sporadic cases from various states of Mexico support the concept that single heterozygous mutations in recessive Parkinson's disease genes play a pathogenic role. These data have important implications for genetic counseling of Mexican Mestizo patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease. The presence of digenic inheritance underscores the importance of studying several genes in this disease. A step-ordered strategy for molecular diagnosis is proposed.

  17. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children.

  18. Factors That Increase Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity After a Gastrointestinal Infection in Early Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Lynch, Kristian F; Liu, Edwin; Lönnrot, Maria; Simell, Ville; Briese, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hagopian, William; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Lernmark, Åke; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    , and diet in the etiology of celiac disease in early childhood. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperspectral remote sensing for advanced detection of early blight (Alternaria solani) disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Daniel

    Early detection of disease and insect infestation within crops and precise application of pesticides can help reduce potential production losses, reduce environmental risk, and reduce the cost of farming. The goal of this study was the advanced detection of early blight (Alternaria solani) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants using hyperspectral remote sensing data captured with a handheld spectroradiometer. Hyperspectral reflectance spectra were captured 10 times over five weeks from plants grown to the vegetative and tuber bulking growth stages. The spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), spectral change (ratio) analysis, partial least squares (PLS), cluster analysis, and vegetative indices. PCA successfully distinguished more heavily diseased plants from healthy and minimally diseased plants using two principal components. Spectral change (ratio) analysis provided wavelengths (490-510, 640, 665-670, 690, 740-750, and 935 nm) most sensitive to early blight infection followed by ANOVA results indicating a highly significant difference (p < 0.0001) between disease rating group means. In the majority of the experiments, comparisons of diseased plants with healthy plants using Fisher's LSD revealed more heavily diseased plants were significantly different from healthy plants. PLS analysis demonstrated the feasibility of detecting early blight infected plants, finding four optimal factors for raw spectra with the predictor variation explained ranging from 93.4% to 94.6% and the response variation explained ranging from 42.7% to 64.7%. Cluster analysis successfully distinguished healthy plants from all diseased plants except for the most mildly diseased plants, showing clustering analysis was an effective method for detection of early blight. Analysis of the reflectance spectra using the simple ratio (SR) and the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) was effective at differentiating all diseased plants from healthy plants, except for the

  20. Nutrition in early life and the programming of adult disease: the first 1000 days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2016-07-12

    Development during fetal life and infancy is characterized by rapid growth as well as the maturation of organs and systems. Changes, both in quality and quality, in nutrients during these periods may permanently infl uence the way these organs mature and function. These effects are termed as “programming” and play an important role in the presence of non-transmissible diseases through the lifespan. Specially cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders and carbohydrate intolerance. Nutritional deficits during pregnancy, leading to intrauterine growth restriction, are associated to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, and coronary disease among the offspring. This infl uence does not stop with the delivery but early nutrition in infancy, type of lactation, and the way and time solid foods are introduced, does play a role in this programming. Nutritional and non-nutritional factors alter the expression of some genes, resulting in effective remodeling of tissue structure and functionality. These epigenetic modifications can be transmitted to further generations, adding evidence that hereditable epigenetic modifications play a critical role in nutritional programming. But, at the same time, it opens a window of opportunity to decrease the burden of non-transmissible disease by a clever advise on nutrition during pregnancy and across the first 2 years of life (the so-called 1000 days strategy).

  1. Early detection of emerging zoonotic diseases with animal morbidity and mortality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Isabelle-Anne; Ssebide, Benard J; Marra, Peter P

    2015-03-01

    Diseases transmitted between animals and people have made up more than 50% of emerging infectious diseases in humans over the last 60 years and have continued to arise in recent months. Yet, public health and animal disease surveillance programs continue to operate independently. Here, we assessed whether recent emerging zoonotic pathogens (n = 143) are known to cause morbidity or mortality in their animal host and if so, whether they were first detected with an animal morbidity/mortality event. We show that although sick or dead animals are often associated with these pathogens (52%), only 9% were first detected from an animal morbidity or mortality event prior to or concurrent with signs of illness in humans. We propose that an animal morbidity and mortality reporting program will improve detection and should be an essential component of early warning systems for zoonotic diseases. With the use of widespread low-cost technology, such a program could engage both the public and professionals and be easily tested and further incorporated as part of surveillance efforts by public health officials.

  2. Dealing with Coronary Artery Disease in Early Encountering: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mojalli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is rising in industrial and developing countries. Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is the most common cardiovascular disease. Thus, understanding the signs and risk factors of CAD from the patients’ perspective and their ways of dealing with this disease is of vital importance. Objectives: This qualitative study aimed to explore the Iranian patients’ viewpoints about CAD and how they dealt with it in their first encounter. Patients and Methods: This study was a qualitative content analysis conducted on 18 patients with CAD. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Initially, purposeful sampling was performed followed by maximum variety. Sampling continued until data saturation. Then, all the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. After all, the data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis using MAXQUDA2010 software. Results: The themes manifested in this study included “invasion of disease” with subthemes of “warning signs” and “risk factors” and “confrontation strategies” with subthemes of “seeking for information”, “follow-up”, and “control measures”. Conclusions:: The results of this study described the patients’ perceptions of CAD and how they dealt with this disorder in early encountering. Based on the results, physicians and nurses should focus on empowerment of patients by facilitating this process as well as by educating them with regards to dealing with CAD.

  3. The early life origin theory in the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Runa; Ververis, Katherine; Tortorella, Stephanie M; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2015-04-01

    Life expectancy has been examined from a variety of perspectives in recent history. Epidemiology is one perspective which examines causes of morbidity and mortality at the population level. Over the past few 100 years there have been dramatic shifts in the major causes of death and expected life length. This change has suffered from inconsistency across time and space with vast inequalities observed between population groups. In current focus is the challenge of rising non-communicable diseases (NCD), such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the search to discover methods to combat the rising incidence of these diseases, a number of new theories on the development of morbidity have arisen. A pertinent example is the hypothesis published by David Barker in 1995 which postulates the prenatal and early developmental origin of adult onset disease, and highlights the importance of the maternal environment. This theory has been subject to criticism however it has gradually gained acceptance. In addition, the relatively new field of epigenetics is contributing evidence in support of the theory. This review aims to explore the implication and limitations of the developmental origin hypothesis, via an historical perspective, in order to enhance understanding of the increasing incidence of NCDs, and facilitate an improvement in planning public health policy.

  4. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens-Martín, Maria; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Rabano, Alberto; Hernandez, Felix; Avila, Jesus; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII → dentate gyrus → CA3 → CA1) and monosynaptic (ECIII → CA1) circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits. PMID:24904307

  5. Plasma protein thiols: an early marker of oxidative stress in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinellu, Angelo; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Sotgia, Salvatore; Zinellu, Elisabetta; Bifulco, Fabiana; Pintus, Gianfranco; Mangoni, Arduino A; Carru, Ciriaco; Pirina, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are both characterized by heterogeneous chronic airway inflammation and obstruction as well as oxidative stress (OS). However, it is unknown whether OS occurs in early disease and how to best assess its presence. Plasma OS markers (TBARS, PSH, taurine, GSH, ergothioneine and paraoxonase 1 activity) and lung function tests were measured in patients with mild stable asthma (n = 24) and mild stable COPD (n = 29) and in age- and sex-matched controls. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was associated with age both in patients and control groups. By contrast, FEV1 was positively correlated with PSH only in COPD (ρ = 0·49, P = 0·007). In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower PSH was the only OS marker independently associated with increased odds of both asthma (OR = 0·32, 95% CI 0·13-0·78, P = 0·01) and COPD (OR = 0·50, 95% CI 0·26-0·95, P = 0·03). These findings suggest that proteins -SH are a sensitive OS marker in early COPD and asthma.

  6. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María eLlorens-Martín

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC. Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII→dentate gyrus→CA3→CA1 and monosynaptic (ECIII→CA1 circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits.

  7. Therapeutic singing as an early intervention for swallowing in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemöller, E L; Hibbing, P; Radig, H; Wingate, J

    2017-04-01

    For persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), secondary motor symptoms such as swallow impairment impact the quality of life and are major contributors to mortality. There is a present need for therapeutic interventions aimed at improving swallow function during the early stages of PD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a group therapeutic singing intervention on swallowing in persons with PD with no significant dysphagia symptoms. Cohort study. University in the United States. Twenty-four participants with PD. Eight weeks of group therapeutic singing. Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess muscle activity associated with swallow pre and post the group singing intervention. Swallow quality of life (SWAL-QOL) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were also obtained pre- and post-intervention. Participants reported minimal difficulty with swallowing, yet results revealed a significant increase in EMG outcome measures, as well as significant improvement in UPDRS total and UPDRS motor scores. No significant differences were revealed for SWAL-QOL. Increases in EMG timing measures may suggest that group singing results in the prolongation of laryngeal elevation, protecting the airway from foreign material for longer periods of time during swallow. Combined with the improvement in UPDRS clinical measures, therapeutic singing may be an engaging early intervention strategy to address oropharyngeal dysphagia while also benefiting additional clinical symptoms of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Early insulin treatment to prevent cardiovascular disease in prediabetes and overt diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, G; Hancu, N

    2009-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and CVD represents the leading cause of death in people with type 2 DM. The cardiovascular risk is increased long before diabetes is diagnosed, in the prediabetes stage, when impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) develop. These stages are characterized by dysglycemia, defined as any elevated fasting or postprandial glycemia, extending from the normal range into diabetic range, associated with an increased risk of CVD. Due to metabolic memory demonstrated for type 2 DM as well, early interventions addressed to achieve and maintain glycemic control are required for long-term benefits in terms of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The recommendation of early insulin therapy in type 2 DM is sustained by its pleiotropic effects, which may be cardioprotective and potentially anti-atherosclerotic. Insulin therapy in prediabetes and earlier in type 2 DM, could be a strategy in preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 DM progression. To test this hypothesis, a large trial has been designed. Outcome Reduction with an Initial Glargine Intervention trial (ORIGIN) is an international, multicenter, randomized controlled, 2 x 2 factorial trial, investigating the possibility to prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in people with type 2 DM, IGT, and/or IFG, and high cardiovascular risk by treating the normoglycemia with either insulin glargine or omega-3 fatty acid, compared to the standard intervention.

  9. Early-onset behavioral and synaptic deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J. Steven; Wu, Chi-Cheng; Redwine, Jeffrey M.; Comery, Thomas A.; Arias, Robert; Bowlby, Mark; Martone, Robert; Morrison, John H.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Reinhart, Peter H.; Bloom, Floyd E.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which numerous mouse models have been generated. In both AD patients and mouse models, there is increasing evidence that neuronal dysfunction occurs before the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ)-containing plaques and neurodegeneration. Characterization of the timing and nature of preplaque dysfunction is important for understanding the progression of this disease and to identify pathways and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Hence, we have examined the progression of dysfunction at the morphological, functional, and behavioral levels in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Our data show that decreased dendritic spine density, impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), and behavioral deficits occurred months before plaque deposition, which was first detectable at 18 months of age. We detected a decrease in spine density in the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) beginning as early as 4 months of age. Furthermore, by 5 months, there was a decline in LTP in the DG after perforant path stimulation and impairment in contextual fear conditioning. Moreover, an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was first observed at these early ages. However, total amyloid levels did not significantly increase until ≈18 months of age, at which time significant increases in reactive astrocytes and microglia could be observed. Overall, these data show that the perforant path input from the entorhinal cortex to the DG is compromised both structurally and functionally, and this pathology is manifested in memory defects long before significant plaque deposition. PMID:16549764

  10. Early and Late CNS Inflammation in Alzheimer's Disease: Two Extremes of a Continuum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, A Claudio

    2017-08-31

    In 1990 it was reported that individuals receiving NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) showed a markedly reduced prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to the overall population. Large epidemiological studies corroborated this assertion and provoked numerous prospective AD clinical trials with a variety of NSAIDs, all of which demonstrated lack of efficacy. It is postulated that the explanation for the success of NSAIDS in preventing AD onset when given at preclinical stages, and for their failure when administered after AD clinical presentation, lies in the changing nature of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation in the decades-long continuum of AD pathology. Early disease-aggravating CNS inflammation might start decades before the presentation of severe cognitive impairments or dementia, and the nature of this process will co-evolve with the neuropathological progression from preclinical to clinical AD stages. This early CNS inflammation should be considered a promising therapeutic target as we continue searching for an unequivocal diagnosis of AD preclinical stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-method analysis of MRI images in early diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Wolz

    Full Text Available The role of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is becoming more and more emphasized in the early diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease (AD. This study aimed to assess the improvement in classification accuracy that can be achieved by combining features from different structural MRI analysis techniques. Automatically estimated MR features used are hippocampal volume, tensor-based morphometry, cortical thickness and a novel technique based on manifold learning. Baseline MRIs acquired from all 834 subjects (231 healthy controls (HC, 238 stable mild cognitive impairment (S-MCI, 167 MCI to AD progressors (P-MCI, 198 AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI database were used for evaluation. We compared the classification accuracy achieved with linear discriminant analysis (LDA and support vector machines (SVM. The best results achieved with individual features are 90% sensitivity and 84% specificity (HC/AD classification, 64%/66% (S-MCI/P-MCI and 82%/76% (HC/P-MCI with the LDA classifier. The combination of all features improved these results to 93% sensitivity and 85% specificity (HC/AD, 67%/69% (S-MCI/P-MCI and 86%/82% (HC/P-MCI. Compared with previously published results in the ADNI database using individual MR-based features, the presented results show that a comprehensive analysis of MRI images combining multiple features improves classification accuracy and predictive power in detecting early AD. The most stable and reliable classification was achieved when combining all available features.

  12. Early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Nonamnestic Subtypes and Type 2 AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most prevalent neurodegenerative dementia, are usually elderly; however, ~4–5% develop early-onset AD (EOAD) with onset before age 65. Most EOAD is sporadic, but about 5% of patients with EOAD have an autosomal dominant mutation such as Presenilin 1, Presenilin 2, or alterations in the Amyloid Precursor Protein gene. Although most Alzheimer’s research has concentrated on older, late-onset AD (LOAD), there is much recent interest and research in EOAD. These recent studies indicate that EOAD is a heterogeneous disorder with significant differences from LOAD. From 22–64% of EOAD patients have a predominant nonamnestic syndrome presenting with deficits in language, visuospatial abilities, praxis, or other non-memory cognition. These nonamnestic patients may differ in several ways from the usual memory or amnestic patients. Patients with nonamnestic EOAD compared to typical amnestic AD have a more aggressive course, lack the apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) susceptibility gene for AD, and have a focus and early involvement of non-hippocampal areas of brain, particularly parietal neocortex. These differences in the EOAD subtypes indicate differences in the underlying amyloid cascade, the prevailing pathophysiological theory for the development of AD. Together the results of recent studies suggest that nonamnestic subtypes of EOAD constitute a Type 2 AD distinct from the usual, typical disorder. In sum, the study of EOAD can reveal much about the clinical heterogeneity, predisposing factors, and neurobiology of this disease. PMID:23178565

  13. Elman neural network for the early identification of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertè, Francesco; Lamponi, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of dementia can be useful to delay progression of the disease and to raise awareness of the condition. Alterations in temporal and spatial EEG markers have been found in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Herein, we propose an automatic recognition method of cognitive impairment evaluation based on EEG analysis using an artificial neural network (ANN) combined with a genetic algorithm (GA). The EEGs of 43 AD and MCI patients (aged between 62 and 88 years) were recorded, analyzed and correlated with their MMSE scores. Quantitative EEGs were calculated using discrete wavelet transform. The data obtained were analyzed by the means of the combined use of ANN and GA to determine the degree of cognitive impairment. The good recognition rate of ANN fed with these inputs suggests that the combined GA/ANN approach may be useful for early detection of AD and could be a valuable tool to support physicians in clinical practice. PMID:25014050

  14. Renal sonographic findings of type I glycogen storage disease in infancy and early childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Lee, Hung-Chang [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan); Taipei Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-08-01

    Type I glycogen storage disease (GSD-I) is an inherited disorder affecting glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The characteristic manifestations are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Renal disease is regarded as a long-term complication and is reported mainly in older patients. We report the renal manifestations and renal ultrasonographic findings of GSD-I in infancy and early childhood in order to assess the role of renal sonography in the diagnosis of GSD-I. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital's database for patients with GSD-I from January 1993 to September 2004. The records of five patients were reviewed for this study. These five patients were diagnosed when they were younger than 3 years old. Data extracted from the charts included the initial extrarenal and renal manifestations, laboratory data, and imaging studies. We analyzed the indications for, and results of, renal sonography. In addition to the clinical presentations and laboratory abnormalities, all five children had nephromegaly and increased echogenicity on ultrasonography on their first visit, although only a minor degree of tubular dysfunction was noted clinically. Three of these five patients had nephrocalcinosis or renal stones or both. Hyperechoic large kidneys, nephrocalcinosis, and renal stones are common in GSD-I. They can be present in early infancy. Abnormalities on renal sonography might suggest GSD-I in a patient with suspected inborn errors of metabolism. (orig.)

  15. Sleep Characteristics in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease in the HypnoLaus Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogna, Adam; Forni Ogna, Valentina; Haba Rubio, José; Tobback, Nadia; Andries, Dana; Preisig, Martin; Tafti, Mehdi; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the association between early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB), restless legs syndrome (RLS), and subjective and objective sleep quality (SQ). Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of a general population-based cohort (HypnoLaus). 1,760 adults (862 men, 898 women; age 59.3 (± 11.4) y) underwent complete polysomnography at home. Results: 8.2% of participants had mild CKD (stage 1–2, estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 with albuminuria) and 7.8% moderate CKD (stage 3, eGFR 30–60 mL/min/1.73 m2). 37.3% of our sample had moderate-to-severe SDB (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15/h) and 15.3% had severe SDB (AHI ≥ 30/h). SDB prevalence was positively associated with CKD stages and negatively with eGFR. In multivariate analysis, age, male sex, and body mass index were independently associated with SDB (all P Haba Rubio J, Tobback N, Andries D, Preisig M, Tafti M, Vollenweider P, Waeber G, Marques-Vidal P, Heinzer R. Sleep characteristics in early stages of chronic kidney disease in the HypnoLaus cohort. SLEEP 2016;39(4):945–953. PMID:26715230

  16. Vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with endothelial dysfunction in patients with early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Han; Park, Dong Kyu; Yong, Seok Woo; Hong, Ji Man

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) have lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) than healthy controls. Low vitamin D has been associated with endothelial dysfunction which may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is widely used as a clinical marker of overall endothelial function. We evaluated the relationship between serum 25(OH)D levels and FMD in PD. We enrolled 81 patients with early PD and 52 healthy controls, and we evaluate endothelial function based on vitamin D status and identify the association between FMD and vitamin D status in patients with early PD. The mean serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower in the PD patients than in the controls (21.8 ± 9.5 vs. 25.2 ± 9.3 ng/mL, p body mass index, motor Unified PD Rating Scale status and homocysteine levels (adjusted R (2) = 0.331, β = 0.494, p < 0.001). These findings provide evidence of a possible association between endothelial dysfunction as assessed by FMD and low vitamin D status in patients with early PD.

  17. [Early lung disease in infants with cystic fibrosis. Diagnostic tools and possible therapeutic pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reix, P; Matecki, S; Fayon, M

    2016-02-01

    The lungs of infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) have been considered to be normal at birth. However, recent data indicates that this is unlikely to be true in most cases. Animal CF-models developed in the early 2000s have shown that constitutional airway narrowing may be present at birth, and is associated with both functional and structural abnormalities. Longitudinal birth cohort studies have shown that 25 % of CF infants followed in specialized centers, while being asymptomatic, showed decreased lung function at 3months of age. Air trapping was present in 68 % and bronchiectasis in 28 % of patients at the same age. The presence of neutrophil elastase in the bronchoalveolar lavage at 3months of age tripled the risk of bronchiectasis at the age of 3years. Currently available tools such as infant pulmonary function tests (both the jacket and multiple breath washout) as well as high-resolution volume controlled chest-computed tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging will facilitate early intervention trials in the very near future. The role of such tools for the routine follow-up of patients, and the ability of early therapeutic interventions to alter the natural history of CF-lung disease should soon be established. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuropsychological correlates of theory of mind in patients with early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Gabriella; Vitale, Carmine; Trojano, Luigi; Errico, Domenico; Amboni, Marianna; Barbarulo, Anna Maria; Grossi, Dario; Barone, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The theory of mind is the ability to attribute mental states to oneself and others and to understand that others have beliefs, desires and intentions different from one's own. The aim of the study was to explore the neuropsychological correlates of theory of mind in patients affected by early Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty-three PD patients and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched control subjects underwent the Frontal Assessment Battery, as well as tasks assessing "cognitive" and "affective" theory of mind, and memory abilities; questionnaires evaluating behavioral disorders and quality of life were also administrated. Although the 2 groups did not differ on neuropsychological tasks, PD patients' performance on tasks assessing cognitive and affective theory of mind was significantly worse than controls. Moreover, PD patients had more behavioral disorders and worse quality of life than controls. After covarying for behavioral and quality of life scores, the differences between patients and controls on theory of mind tasks remained significant. "Cognitive" theory of mind was associated with Frontal Assessment Battery score and 2 domains of quality of life scale, whereas "affective" theory of mind scores correlated only with behavioral scales such as the Frontal Behavioral Inventory and Apathy Evaluation Scale. The results demonstrate that both affective and cognitive aspects of theory of mind are simultaneously impaired in early PD and suggest that deficits in the 2 subcomponents of theory of mind may be linked to dysfunction of different frontosubcortical circuitries in early PD. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Standardized Symptom Measurement of Individuals with Early Lyme Disease Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Kathleen T; Rebman, Alison W; Crowder, Lauren A; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Aucott, John N

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the Lyme disease (LD) literature is challenging given the lack of consistent methodology and standardized measurement of symptoms and the impact on functioning. This prospective study incorporates well-validated measures to capture the symptom picture of individuals with early LD from time of diagnosis through 6-months post-treatment. One hundred seven patients with confirmed early LD and 26 healthy controls were evaluated using standardized instruments for pain, fatigue, depressive symptoms, functional impact, and cognitive functioning. Prior to antibiotic treatment, patients experience notable symptoms of fatigue and pain statistically higher than controls. After treatment, there are no group differences, suggesting that symptoms resolve and that there are no residual cognitive impairments at the level of group analysis. However, using subgroup analyses, some individuals experience persistent symptoms that lead to functional decline and these individuals can be identified immediately post-completion of standard antibiotic treatment using well-validated symptom measures. Overall, the findings suggest that ideally-treated early LD patients recover well and experience symptom resolution over time, though a small subgroup continue to suffer with symptoms that lead to functional decline. The authors discuss use of standardized instruments for identification of individuals who warrant further clinical follow-up.

  20. A new Brief computerized cognitive screening battery (CompCogs for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenice Charchat Fichman

    Full Text Available Abstract Screening tests for early diagnosis of dementia are of great clinical relevance. The ideal test set must be brief and reliable, and should probe cognitive components impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Objectives: To develop a new Computerized Cognitive Screening test (CompCogs, and to investigate its validity for the early diagnosis of AD, and evaluate its heuristic value in understanding the processing of information in AD. Methods: The computerized neuropsychological performance battery, originally including six tests, was applied in forty seven patients with probable mild AD and 97 controls matched for age and education. This computerized neuropsychological test battery, developed with MEL Professional, allows control of timing and order of stimuli presentation, as well as recording of response type and latency. A brief-screening version, CompCogs, was selected using the most discriminative neuropsychological test variables derived from logistic regression analysis. Full battery administration lasted about 40 minutes, while the CompCogs took only 15 minutes. Results: CompCogs included the Face test (correct response and Word and Forms with Short term memory tests (reaction time. CompCogs presented 91.8% sensitivity and 93.6% specificity for the diagnosis of AD using ROC analyses of AD diagnosis probability derived by logistic regression. Conclusions: CompCogs showed high validity for AD early diagnosis and, therefore, may be a useful alternative screening instrument.

  1. Imprecise vowel articulation as a potential early marker of Parkinson's disease: effect of speaking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Jan; Cmejla, Roman; Tykalova, Tereza; Ruzickova, Hana; Klempir, Jiri; Majerova, Veronika; Picmausova, Jana; Roth, Jan; Ruzicka, Evzen

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze vowel articulation across various speaking tasks in a group of 20 early Parkinson's disease (PD) individuals prior to pharmacotherapy. Vowels were extracted from sustained phonation, sentence repetition, reading passage, and monologue. Acoustic analysis was based upon measures of the first (F1) and second (F2) formant of the vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/, vowel space area (VSA), F2i/F2u and vowel articulation index (VAI). Parkinsonian speakers manifested abnormalities in vowel articulation across F2u, VSA, F2i/F2u, and VAI in all speaking tasks except sustained phonation, compared to 15 age-matched healthy control participants. Findings suggest that sustained phonation is an inappropriate task to investigate vowel articulation in early PD. In contrast, monologue was the most sensitive in differentiating between controls and PD patients, with classification accuracy up to 80%. Measurements of vowel articulation were able to capture even minor abnormalities in speech of PD patients with no perceptible dysarthria. In conclusion, impaired vowel articulation may be considered as a possible early marker of PD. A certain type of speaking task can exert significant influence on vowel articulation. Specifically, complex tasks such as monologue are more likely to elicit articulatory deficits in parkinsonian speech, compared to other speaking tasks.

  2. Comprehensive study of early features in spinocerebellar ataxia 2: delineating the prodromal stage of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Cruz-Rivas, Edilia M; Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Lilia-Campins, Jandy; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Peña-Acosta, Arnoy; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimeé; Diaz, Rosalinda; Magaña-Aguirre, Jonathan J; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; Estupiñán-Rodríguez, Annelié; Laffita-Mesa, José M; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Canales-Ochoa, Nalia; González-Zaldivar, Yanetza

    2014-10-01

    The prodromal phase of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) has not been systematically studied. Main findings come from a homogeneous SCA type 2 (SCA2) population living in Cuba. The aim of this study was to characterize extensively the prodromal phase of SCA2 by several approaches. Thirty-seven non-ataxic SCA2 mutation carriers and its age- and sex-matched controls underwent clinical assessments, including standardized neurological exam, structured interviews and clinical scales, and looking for somatic and autonomic features, as well as a neuropsychological battery, antisaccadic recordings, and MRI scans. Main clinical somatic features of non-ataxic mutation carriers were cramps, sensory symptoms, sleep disorders, and hyperreflexia, whereas predominating autonomic symptoms were pollakiuria/nocturia, constipation, and frequent throat clearing. Cognitive impairments included early deficits of executive functions and visual memory, suggesting the involvement of cerebro-cerebellar-cerebral loops and/or reduced cholinergic basal forebrain input to the cortex. Antisaccadic task revealed impaired oculomotor inhibitory control but preserved ability for error correction. Cognitive and antisaccadic deficits were higher as carriers were closer to the estimated onset of ataxia, whereas higher Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) scores were associated most notably to vermis atrophy. The recognition of early features of SCA2 offers novel insights into the prodromal phase and physiopathological base of the disease, allowing the assessment of its progression and the efficacy of treatments, in particular at early phases when therapeutical options should be most effective.

  3. Neuroanatomical correlates of impaired decision-making and facial emotion recognition in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa; Junque, Carme; Tolosa, Eduardo; Marti, Maria-Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Bargallo, Nuria; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2009-09-01

    Decision-making and recognition of emotions are often impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the amygdala are critical structures subserving these functions. This study was designed to test whether there are any structural changes in these areas that might explain the impairment of decision-making and recognition of facial emotions in early PD. We used the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the Ekman 60 faces test which are sensitive to the integrity of OFC and amygdala dysfunctions in 24 early PD patients and 24 controls. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) were also obtained. Group analysis using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) showed significant and corrected (P Ekman test performance in PD patients. We conclude that: (i) impairment in decision-making and recognition of facial emotions occurs at the early stages of PD, (ii) these neuropsychological deficits are accompanied by degeneration of OFC and amygdala, and (iii) bilateral OFC reductions are associated with impaired recognition of emotions, and GM volume loss in left lateral OFC is related to decision-making impairment in PD.

  4. Shortened telomere length in bipolar disorder: a comparison of the early and late stages of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia M. Barbé-Tuana

    Full Text Available Objective: Bipolar disorder (BD has been associated with increased rates of age-related diseases, such as type II diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disorders. Several biological findings have been associated with age-related disorders, including increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and telomere shortening. The objective of this study was to compare telomere length among participants with BD at early and late stages and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-six euthymic subjects with BD and 34 healthy controls were recruited. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and mean telomere length was measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Telomere length was significantly shorter in both the early and late subgroups of BD subjects when compared to the respective controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.005, respectively. The sample size prevented additional subgroup analyses, including potential effects of medication, smoking status, and lifestyle. Conclusion: This study is concordant with previous evidence of telomere shortening in BD, in both early and late stages of the disorder, and supports the notion of accelerated aging in BD.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease with Early Motor Complications: A UK Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundament, Tomasz; Eldridge, Paul R; Green, Alexander L; Whone, Alan L; Taylor, Rod S; Williams, Adrian C; Schuepbach, W M Michael

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating illness associated with considerable impairment of quality of life and substantial costs to health care systems. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established surgical treatment option for some patients with advanced PD. The EARLYSTIM trial has recently demonstrated its clinical benefit also in patients with early motor complications. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of DBS, compared to best medical therapy (BMT), among PD patients with early onset of motor complications, from a United Kingdom (UK) payer perspective. We developed a Markov model to represent the progression of PD as rated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) over time in patients with early PD. Evidence sources were a systematic review of clinical evidence; data from the EARLYSTIM study; and a UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) dataset including DBS patients. A mapping algorithm was developed to generate utility values based on UPDRS data for each intervention. The cost-effectiveness was expressed as the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to explore the effect of parameter uncertainty. Over a 15-year time horizon, DBS was predicted to lead to additional mean cost per patient of £26,799 compared with BMT (£73,077/patient versus £46,278/patient) and an additional mean 1.35 QALYs (6.69 QALYs versus 5.35 QALYs), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £19,887 per QALY gained with a 99% probability of DBS being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000/QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were not significantly impacted by plausible changes in the input parameter values. These results indicate that DBS is a cost-effective intervention in PD patients with early motor complications when compared with existing interventions, offering additional health benefits at acceptable incremental cost

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease with Early Motor Complications: A UK Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Fundament

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a debilitating illness associated with considerable impairment of quality of life and substantial costs to health care systems. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established surgical treatment option for some patients with advanced PD. The EARLYSTIM trial has recently demonstrated its clinical benefit also in patients with early motor complications. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of DBS, compared to best medical therapy (BMT, among PD patients with early onset of motor complications, from a United Kingdom (UK payer perspective.We developed a Markov model to represent the progression of PD as rated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS over time in patients with early PD. Evidence sources were a systematic review of clinical evidence; data from the EARLYSTIM study; and a UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD dataset including DBS patients. A mapping algorithm was developed to generate utility values based on UPDRS data for each intervention. The cost-effectiveness was expressed as the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to explore the effect of parameter uncertainty.Over a 15-year time horizon, DBS was predicted to lead to additional mean cost per patient of £26,799 compared with BMT (£73,077/patient versus £46,278/patient and an additional mean 1.35 QALYs (6.69 QALYs versus 5.35 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £19,887 per QALY gained with a 99% probability of DBS being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000/QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were not significantly impacted by plausible changes in the input parameter values.These results indicate that DBS is a cost-effective intervention in PD patients with early motor complications when compared with existing interventions, offering additional health benefits at acceptable incremental

  7. Development and Operation of Space-Based Disease Early Warning Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M. M.

    2010-12-01

    Millions of people die every year from preventable diseases such as malaria and cholera. Pandemics put the entire world population at risk and have the potential to kill thousands and cripple the global economy. In light of these dangers, it is fortunate that the data and imagery gathered by remote sensing satellites can be used to develop models that predict areas at risk for outbreaks. These warnings can help decision makers to distribute preventative medicine and other forms of aid to save lives. There are already many Earth observing satellites in orbit with the ability to provide data and imagery. Researchers have created a number of models based on this information, and some are being used in real-life situations. These capabilities should be further developed and supported by governments and international organizations to benefit as many people as possible. To understand the benefits and challenges of disease early warning models, it is useful to understand how they are developed. A number of steps must occur for satellite data and imagery to be used to prevent disease outbreaks; each requires a variety of inputs and may include a range of experts and stakeholders. This paper discusses the inputs, outputs, and basic processes involved in each of six main steps to developing models, including: identifying and validating links between a disease and environmental factors, creating and validating a software model to predict outbreaks, transitioning a model to operational use, using a model operationally, and taking action on the data provided by the model. The paper briefly overviews past research regarding the link between remote sensing data and disease, and identifies ongoing research in academic centers around the world. The activities of three currently operational models are discussed, including the U.S. Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS), NASA carries out its Malaria Modeling and Surveillance

  8. Children with chronic kidney disease and hypertension: could hypertension footprints be early biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balat, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension (HT) is one of the major problems in chronic kidney disease (CKD), not only for adults, but also for children. It is one of the main factors in the progression of CKD, increased rate of cardiovascular disease, and impairment in quality of life. The most important devastating effect of HT is on the cardiovascular system. It may leave significant footprints in developing children that can be carried over to adulthood. Existing data clearly show that in CKD children with proteinuria the blood pressure goal should be 50th centile, while it is 75th centile in those without proteinuria. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors are considered the first choice pharmacological option in hypertensive CKD stage 2 to 4 patients. However, in clinical practice, pediatric nephrologists may experience significant problems in treatment and follow-up of these patients, especially in compliance. Due to multiple drug use, physician-patient and family cooperation would be essential to improve the compliance. Remembering the fact that prevention is always cheaper than treatment, we need early detection of CKD and its devastating complications, like HT. Therefore, active screening programs should be encouraged in children, as well as trying to find new biomarkers, inspired from the footprints of HT. Although the researches on new urinary biomarkers for early detection of CKD and HT are promising, more studies are needed in this area. This review aims to give an overview of HT in CKD children, mainly focusing on importance of HT, basic principles of treatment, problems in follow up, and possible markers for early detection of CKD and HT.

  9. The relationship between clinical phenotype and early staged bilateral deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Victor W; Watts, Ray L; Schrandt, Christian J; Guthrie, Stephanie; Wang, Deli; Amara, Amy W; Guthrie, Barton L; Walker, Harrison C

    2013-12-01

    While many centers place bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems simultaneously, unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS followed by a staged contralateral procedure has emerged as a treatment option for many patients. However, little is known about whether the preoperative phenotype predicts when staged placement of a DBS electrode in the opposite STN will be required. The authors aimed to determine whether preoperative clinical phenotype predicts early staged placement of a second STN DBS electrode in patients who undergo unilateral STN DBS for Parkinson disease (PD). Eighty-two consecutive patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral STN DBS contralateral to the most affected hemibody and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined preoperative characteristics that predicted staged placement of a second electrode in the opposite STN. Preoperative measurements included aspects of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), motor asymmetry index, and body weight. At 2-year follow-up, 28 (34%) of the 82 patients had undergone staged placement of a contralateral electrode while the remainder chose to continue with unilateral stimulation. Statistically significant improvements in UPDRS total and Part 3 scores were retained at the end of the 2-year follow-up period in both subsets of patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the most important predictors for early staged placement of a second subthalamic stimulator were low asymmetry index (OR 13.4, 95% CI 2.8-64.9), high tremor subscore (OR 7.2, CI 1.5-35.0), and low body weight (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.4-22.3). This single-center study provides evidence that elements of the preoperative PD phenotype predict whether patients will require early staged bilateral STN DBS. These data may aid in the management of patients with advanced PD who undergo STN DBS.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Brain Perfusion SPECT with Brodmann Areas Mapping in Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Papatriantafyllou, John; Sifakis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Chara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on clinical criteria alone may be problematic, while current and future treatments should be administered earlier in order to be more effective. Thus, various disease biomarkers could be used for early detection of AD. We evaluated brain perfusion with 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Brodmann areas (BAs) mapping in mild AD using an automated software (NeuroGam) for the semi-quantitative evaluation of perfusion in BAs and the comparison with the software's normal database. We studied 34 consecutive patients with mild AD: 9 men, 25 women, mean age 70.9 ± 8.1 years, mean Mini-Mental State Examination 22.6 ± 2.5. BAs 25L, 25R, 38L, 38R, 28L, 28R, 36L, and 36R had the lower mean perfusion values, while BAs 31L, 31R, 19R, 18L, 18R, 17L, and 17R had the higher mean values. Compared with healthy subjects of the same age, perfusion values in BAs 25L, 25R, 28R, 28L, 36L, and 36R had the greatest deviations from the healthy sample, while the lowest deviations were found in BAs 32L, 32R, 19R, 24L, 17L, 17R, 18L, and 18R. A percentage of ≥94% of patients had perfusion values more than -2SDs below the mean of healthy subjects in BAs 38R, 38L, 36L, 36R, 23L, 23R, 22L, 44L, 28L, 28R, 25L, and 25R. The corresponding proportion was less than 38% for BAs 11L, 19R, 32L, 32R, 18L, 18R, 24L, and 17R. In conclusion, brain SPECT studies with automated perfusion mapping could be useful as an ancillary tool in daily practice, revealing perfusion impairments in early AD.

  11. Oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Sandra I; Costa, Rui O; Ferreira, Ildete L; Santana, Isabel; Caldeira, Gladys L; Padovano, Carmela; Fonseca, Ana C; Baldeiras, Inês; Cunha, Catarina; Letra, Liliana; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia M F; Rego, Ana Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. In this study we analyzed whether oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress may constitute early events in AD pathogenesis by using human peripheral blood cells and an AD transgenic mouse model at different disease stages. Increased oxidative stress and increased phosphorylated Nrf2 (p(Ser40)Nrf2) were observed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Moreover, we observed impaired ER Ca2+ homeostasis and increased ER stress markers in PBMCs from MCI individuals and mild AD patients. Evidence of early oxidative stress defense mechanisms in AD was substantiated by increased p(Ser40)Nrf2 in 3month-old 3xTg-AD male mice PBMCs, and also with increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in brain cortex. However, SOD1 protein levels were decreased in human MCI PBMCs and in 3xTg-AD mice brain cortex; the latter further correlated with reduced SOD1 mRNA levels. Increased ER stress was also detected in the brain cortex of young female and old male 3xTg-AD mice. We demonstrate oxidative stress and early Nrf2 activation in AD human and mouse models, which fails to regulate some of its targets, leading to repressed expression of antioxidant defenses (e.g., SOD-1), and extending to ER stress. Results suggest markers of prodromal AD linked to oxidative stress associated with Nrf2 activation and ER stress that may be followed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  12. Early detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected cattle using a dry filter air sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of high economic impact. Early detection of FMD virus (FMDV) is fundamental for rapid outbreak control. Air sampling collection has been demonstrated as a useful technique for detection of FMDV RNA in infected animals, related to ...

  13. MicroRNA-132 and early growth response-1 in nucleus basalis of Meynert during the course of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Qiong-Bin; Unmehopa, U.A.; Bossers, K.; Hu, Yu-Ting; Verwer, R.W.H.; Balesar, R.A.; Zhao, Juan; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    The cholinergic nucleus basalis of Meynert, which is important for memory functions, shows neuronal activation ('up-phase') during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and neurodegeneration ('down-phase') in later stages of Alzheimer's disease. MicroRNA-132 (miR-132) and the transcription factor

  14. Loss-of-function mutations in TNFAIP3 leading to A20 haploinsufficiency cause an early-onset autoinflammatory disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Qing; Wang, Hongying; Schwartz, Daniella M; Stoffels, Monique; Park, Yong Hwan; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Dan; Demirkaya, Erkan; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Lyons, Jonathan J; Yu, Xiaomin; Ouyang, Claudia; Chen, Celeste; Chin, David T; Zaal, Kristien; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; P Hanson, Eric; Yu, Zhen; Mullikin, James C; Hasni, Sarfaraz A; Wertz, Ingrid E; Ombrello, Amanda K; Stone, Deborah L; Hoffmann, Patrycja; Jones, Anne; Barham, Beverly K; Leavis, Helen L; van Royen, Annet; Sibley, Cailin; Batu, Ezgi D; Gül, Ahmet; Siegel, Richard M; Boehm, Manfred; Milner, Joshua D; Ozen, Seza; Gadina, Massimo; Chae, JaeJin; Laxer, Ronald M; Kastner, Daniel L; Aksentijevich, Ivona

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are driven by abnormal activation of innate immunity. Herein we describe a new disease caused by high-penetrance heterozygous germline mutations in TNFAIP3, which encodes the NF-κB regulatory protein A20, in six unrelated families with early-onset systemic inflamma

  15. The Cognitive and Neural Expression of Semantic Memory Impairment in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Sven; Brambati, Simona M.; Ansado, Jennyfer; Barbeau, Emmanuel J.; Felician, Olivier; Didic, Mira; Lacombe, Jacinthe; Goldstein, Rachel; Chayer, Celine; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Semantic deficits in Alzheimer's disease have been widely documented, but little is known about the integrity of semantic memory in the prodromal stage of the illness. The aims of the present study were to: (i) investigate naming abilities and semantic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), early Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to…

  16. Six psychotropics for pre-symptomatic & early Alzheimer’s (MCI), Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease modiifcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward C. Lauterbach

    2016-01-01

    The quest for neuroprotective drugs to slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs), includ-ing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD), has been largely unrewarding. Preclinical evidence suggests that repurposing quetiapine, lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine for early and pre-symptomatic disease-modiifcation in NDDs may be promising and can spare regulatory barriers. The literature of these psychotropics in early stage and pre-symptomatic AD, PD, and HD is reviewed and propitious ifndings follow. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) phase of AD: salutary human randomized controlled trial ifndings for low-dose lithium and, in selected patients, donepezil await replication. Pre-symptomatic AD: human epidemiological data indicate that lithium reduc-es AD risk. Animal model studies (AMS) reveal encouraging results for quetiapine, lithium, donepezil, and memantine. Early PD: valproate AMS ifndings show promise. Pre-symptomatic PD: lithium and valproate AMS ifndings are encouraging. Early HD: uncontrolled clinical data indicate non-progression with lithium, lfuoxetine, donepezil, and memantine. Pre-symptomatic HD: lithium and valproate are auspicious in AMS. Many other promising ifndings awaiting replication (valproate in MCI; lithium, valproate, lfuoxetine in pre-symptomatic AD; lithium in early PD; lithium, valproate, lfuoxetine in pre-symptomatic PD; donepezil in early HD; lithium, lfuoxetine, memantine in pre-symptomatic HD) are reviewed. Dose- and stage-de-pendent effects are considered. Suggestions for signal-enhancement in human trials are provided for each NDD stage.

  17. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L; Currie, Amanda D; Molinari, Anna L; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Neimat, Joseph S; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD.

  18. The Frequency and Severity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Young Sung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although gastrointestinal dysfunctions occur in the majority of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD, they are often unrecognized because many patients remain relatively asymptomatic in the early stage. We investigated the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD using newly developed gastrointestinal symptom questionnaires. Methods Early PD patients with a symptom duration not exceeding 3 years were included in this study. All PD patients were evaluated using a questionnaire, which consisted of three relevant domains: oropharyngoesophageal (10 items; gastric (3 items; and intestinal-anorectal (7 items. The frequency of symptoms was calculated as a proportion with an item score ≥ 2. Results Of the 54 patients enrolled, 48 patients (88.9% responded that bowel symptoms developed before the onset of Parkinsonian motor symptoms, and four patients reported that the onset of two types of symptoms (i.e., bowel and neurological occurred approximately simultaneously, with only months between them. The frequencies of gastrointestinal symptoms are as follows: speech disturbance (40.7%, drooling (24.1%, sense of getting stuck (31.5%, choking (27.8%, globus pharyngis (16.7%, repetitive deglutition (29.6%, pain during swallowing (5.6%, food regurgitation (3.7%, acid reflux (7.4%, nausea/vomiting (11.1%, early satiety (16.7%, postprandial fullness (14.8%, epigastric soreness (9.3%, abdominal pain (3.7%, constipation (46.3%, excessive strain during defecation (33.3%, fecal incontinence (7.4%, tenesmus (20.4%, loose stool or diarrhea (3.7%, and difficulty in relaxing anal sphincter (11.1%. Two patients were scored at zero. Conclusions Our findings confirm that gastrointestinal dysfunction occurs in early PD in relatively high frequency.

  19. Executive Abilities as Reflected by Clock Hand Placement: Frontotemporal Dementia Versus Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Robin J; Barsuglia, Joseph; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Eknoyan, Donald; Sabodash, Valeriy; Lee, Grace J; Mendez, Mario F

    2015-12-01

    The clock-drawing test (CDT) is widely used in clinical practice to diagnose and distinguish patients with dementia. It remains unclear, however, whether the CDT can distinguish among the early-onset dementias. Accordingly, we examined the ability of both quantitative and qualitative CDT analyses to distinguish behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and early-onset Alzheimer disease (eAD), the 2 most common neurodegenerative dementias with onset <65 years of age. We hypothesized that executive aspects of the CDT would discriminate between these 2 disorders. The study compared 15 patients with bvFTD and 16 patients with eAD on the CDT using 2 different scales and correlated the findings with neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging. The total CDT scores did not discriminate bvFTD and eAD; however, specific analysis of executive hand placement items successfully distinguished the groups, with eAD exhibiting greater errors than bvFTD. The performance on those executive hand placement items correlated with measures of naming as well as visuospatial and executive function. On tensor-based morphometry of the magnetic resonance images, executive hand placement correlated with right frontal volume. These findings suggest that lower performance on executive hand placement items occurs with involvement of the right dorsolateral frontal-parietal network for executive control in eAD, a network disproportionately affected in AD of early onset. Rather than the total performance on the clock task, the analysis of specific errors, such as executive hand placement, may be useful for early differentiation of eAD, bvFTD, and other conditions.

  20. Gender-related differences in severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, E K; Weiss, S T; Drazen, J M; Chapman, H A; Carey, V; Campbell, E J; Denish, P; Silverman, R A; Celedon, J C; Reilly, J J; Ginns, L C; Speizer, F E

    2000-12-01

    Men have higher prevalence rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than women, which has been attributed to the historically higher rates of cigarette smoking in males. However, the increased rates of cigarette smoking in females within the last several decades have been associated with steadily increasing rates of COPD in women. As part of a study of the genetics of severe, early-onset COPD, we assembled a group of 84 probands with severe, early-onset COPD (without severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency) and 348 of their first-degree relatives. We found a markedly elevated prevalence (71.4%) of females among the early-onset COPD probands. Among the entire group of first-degree relatives of early-onset COPD probands, univariate analysis demonstrated similar spirometric values and bronchodilator responsiveness in males and females; however, among current or ex-smokers, female first-degree relatives had significantly lower FEV(1)/ FVC (81.4 +/- 17.2% in females versus 87.0 +/- 12.9% in males, p = 0.009) and significantly greater bronchodilator responsiveness (expressed as percentage of baseline FEV(1)) (7.7 +/- 9.4% pred in females versus 4.1 +/- 6.4% pred in males, p = 0.002). Female smoking first-degree relatives were significantly more likely to demonstrate profound reductions in FEV(1) (< 40% pred) than male smoking first-degree relatives (p = 0. 03). Multivariate analysis, performed with generalized estimating equations, demonstrated that current or ex-smoking female first-degree relatives had significantly greater risk of FEV(1) < 80% pred (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.03- 3.54), FEV(1) < 40% pred (OR 3.56, 95% CI 1.08-11.71), and bronchodilator response greater than 10% of baseline FEV(1) (OR 4.74, 95% CI 1.91-11.75). These results suggest that women may be more susceptible to the development of severe COPD.

  1. Impact of admission triglyceride for early outcome in diabetic patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of triglyceride (TG) in predicting the outcomes in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been well investigated. Methods A total of 329 cases with stable angina pectoris (SAP) were prospectively enrolled and followed up for an average of 12 months. They were classified into the two groups according to the cut-off values of predicting early outcome of fasting TG level (low group <1.2 mmol/L, n = 103; High group ≥1.2 mmol/L, n = 226). The relationship between the TG levels and early outcomes were evaluated. Results High TG group showed severer lipid profile and elevated inflammatory markers. During an average of 12-month follow-up, 47 out of 329 patients suffered from pre-specified outcomes. Area under the receivers operating characteristic curve suggested that TG, similar to serum Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), was a significant predictor of early outcome for diabetic patients with SAP (P = 0.002). In Cox regression models, after adjusted age, gender, body mass index, other lipid parameters, fasting blood glucose, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, neutrophil count and HbA1C, TG remained as an independent predictor of adverse prognosis. Conclusions High level of fasting TG (≥1.2 mmol/L) was an independent predictor for early outcome of diabetic patients with SAP as like as HBA1c and number of affected coronary arteries in the era of revascularization and statin therapeutics. PMID:24766776

  2. Progressively Disrupted Intrinsic Functional Connectivity of Basolateral Amygdala in Very Early Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortner, Marion; Pasquini, Lorenzo; Barat, Martina; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Grimmer, Timo; Förster, Stefan; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra; Sorg, Christian; Peters, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Very early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) – i.e., AD at stages of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild dementia – is characterized by progressive structural and neuropathologic changes, such as atrophy or tangle deposition in medial temporal lobes, including hippocampus and entorhinal cortex and also adjacent amygdala. While progressively disrupted intrinsic connectivity of hippocampus with other brain areas has been demonstrated by many studies, amygdala connectivity was rarely investigated in AD, notwithstanding its known relevance for emotion processing and mood disturbances, which are both important in early AD. Intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) patterns of hippocampus and amygdala overlap in healthy persons. Thus, we hypothesized that increased alteration of iFC patterns along AD is not limited to the hippocampus but also concerns the amygdala, independent from atrophy. To address this hypothesis, we applied structural and functional resting-state MRI in healthy controls (CON, n = 33) and patients with AD in the stages of MCI (AD-MCI, n = 38) and mild dementia (AD-D, n = 36). Outcome measures were voxel-based morphometry (VBM) values and region-of-interest-based iFC maps of basolateral amygdala, which has extended cortical connectivity. Amygdala VBM values were progressively reduced in patients (CON > AD-MCI and AD-D). Amygdala iFC was progressively reduced along impairment severity (CON > AD-MCI > AD-D), particularly for hippocampus, temporal lobes, and fronto-parietal areas. Notably, decreased iFC was independent of amygdala atrophy. Results demonstrate progressively impaired amygdala intrinsic connectivity in temporal and fronto-parietal lobes independent from increasing amygdala atrophy in very early AD. Data suggest that early AD disrupts intrinsic connectivity of medial temporal lobe key regions, including that of amygdala. PMID:27698649

  3. Progressively Disrupted Intrinsic Functional Connectivity of Basolateral Amygdala in Very Early Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Ortner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Very early Alzheimer’s disease (AD - i.e., AD at stages of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and mild dementia - is characterized by progressive structural and neuropathologic changes such as atrophy or tangle deposition in medial temporal lobes, including hippocampus and entorhinal cortex but also adjacent amygdala. While progressively disrupted intrinsic connectivity of hippocampus with other brain areas has been demonstrated by many studies, amygdala connectivity was rarely investigated in AD, notwithstanding its known relevance for emotion processing and mood disturbances, which are both important in early AD. Intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC patterns of hippocampus and amygdala overlap in healthy persons. Thus, we hypothesized that increased alteration of iFC patterns along AD is not limited to the hippocampus but also concerns the amygdala, independent from atrophy. To address this hypothesis, we applied structural and functional resting-state MRI in healthy controls (CON, n=33 and patients with AD in the stages of MCI (AD-MCI, n=38 and mild dementia (AD-D, n=36. Outcome measures were voxel-based morphometry (VBM values and region of interest-based intrinsic functional connectivity maps (iFC of basolateral amygdala, which has extended cortical connectivity. Amygdala VBM values were progressively reduced in patients (CON > AD-MCI and AD-D. Amygdala iFC was progressively reduced along impairment severity (CON > AD-MCI > AD-D, particularly for hippocampus, temporal lobes, and fronto-parietal areas. Notably, decreased iFC was independent of amygdala atrophy. Results demonstrate progressively impaired amygdala intrinsic connectivity in temporal and fronto-parietal lobes independent from increasing amygdala atrophy in very early AD. Data suggest that early AD disrupts intrinsic connectivity of medial temporal lobe key regions including that of amygdala.

  4. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Pitoyo, Ceva Wicaksono; Aditianingsih, Dita; Rumende, Cleopas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74) in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus). Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P < 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%), mean age was 58 years (range 18–79), mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5), majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%), and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2%) is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%). Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM) (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803) was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients. PMID:27994377

  5. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurmeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74 in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus. Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P< 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%, mean age was 58 years (range 18–79, mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5, majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%, and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2% is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%. Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803 was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients.

  6. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L.; Currie, Amanda D.; Molinari, Anna L.; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M.; Heusinkveld, Lauren E.; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E.; Davis, Thomas L.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W.; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson’s disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Methods: Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Results: Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p <  0.05; OR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.04–0.97). Conclusions: STN-DBS in early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD. PMID:26967937

  7. Subjective cognitive concerns and neuropsychiatric predictors of progression to the early clinical stages of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Nancy J; Amariglio, Rebecca E; Zoller, Amy S; Rudel, Rebecca K; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Blacker, Deborah; Hyman, Bradley T; Locascio, Joseph J; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Marshall, Gad A; Rentz, Dorene M

    2014-12-01

    To examine neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological predictors of progression from normal to early clinical stages of Alzheimer disease (AD). From a total sample of 559 older adults from the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center longitudinal cohort, 454 were included in the primary analysis: 283 with clinically normal cognition (CN), 115 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 56 with subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) but no objective impairment, a proposed transitional group between CN and MCI. Two latent cognitive factors (memory-semantic, attention-executive) and two neuropsychiatric factors (affective, psychotic) were derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Centers' Uniform Data Set neuropsychological battery and Neuropsychiatric Inventory brief questionnaire. Factors were analyzed as predictors of time to progression to a worse diagnosis using a Cox proportional hazards regression model with backward elimination. Covariates included baseline diagnosis, gender, age, education, prior depression, antidepressant medication, symptom duration, and interaction terms. Higher/better memory-semantic factor score predicted lower hazard of progression (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.4 for 1 standard deviation [SD] increase, p <0.0001), and higher/worse affective factor score predicted higher hazard (HR = 1.3 for one SD increase, p = 0.01). No other predictors were significant in adjusted analyses. Using diagnosis as a sole predictor of transition to MCI, the SCC diagnosis carried a fourfold risk of progression compared with CN (HR = 4.1, p <0.0001). These results identify affective and memory-semantic factors as significant predictors of more rapid progression from normal to early stages of cognitive decline and highlight the subgroup of cognitively normal elderly with SCC as those with elevated risk of progression to MCI. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impaired awareness of deficits and neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease: the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    Impaired awareness may be associated with increased neuropsychiatric symptoms in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, but relatively little is known about the association in early Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if impaired awareness was associated with a higher...... frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease. In a Danish multicenter study, 321 patients with MMSE score > or =20 were evaluated. Patients with poor insight had significantly more neuropsychiatric symptoms than patients with full insight. When patients had increasing neuropsychiatric...

  9. Early behavioural changes in familial Alzheimer's disease in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M; Liang, Li-Jung; Zhou, Yan; Vangala, Sitaram; Teng, Edmond; Kremen, Sarah; Wharton, David; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Farlow, Martin; Ghetti, Bernardino; McDade, Eric; Masters, Colin L; Mayeux, Richard P; Rossor, Martin; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Buckles, Virginia; Bateman, Randall; Morris, John C

    2015-04-01

    Prior studies indicate psychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy and anxiety are risk factors for or prodromal symptoms of incipient Alzheimer's disease. The study of persons at 50% risk for inheriting autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations allows characterization of these symptoms before progressive decline in a population destined to develop illness. We sought to characterize early behavioural features in carriers of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutations. Two hundred and sixty-one persons unaware of their mutation status enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, a study of persons with or at-risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Ninety-seven asymptomatic (CDR = 0), 25 mildly symptomatic (CDR = 0.5), and 33 overtly affected (CDR > 0.5) autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers were compared to 106 non-carriers with regard to frequency of behavioural symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire and severity of depressive symptoms on the Geriatric Depression Scale using generalized linear regression models with appropriate distributions and link functions. Results from the adjusted analyses indicated that depressive symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire were less common in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers than in non-carriers (5% versus 17%, P = 0.014) and the odds of experiencing at least one behavioural sign in cognitively asymptomatic mutation carriers was lower than in non-carriers (odds ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.98, P = 0.042). Depression (56% versus 17%, P = 0.0003), apathy (40% versus 4%, P Alzheimer's disease, we demonstrated increased rates of depression, apathy, and other behavioural symptoms in the mildly symptomatic, prodromal phase of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease that

  10. Which early ‘red flag’ symptoms identify children with meningococcal disease in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hassan, Tanya Ali; Thompson, Matthew J; Mayon-White, Richard T; Ninis, Nelly; Harnden, Anthony; Smith, Lindsay FP; Perera, Rafael; Mant, David C

    2011-01-01

    Background Symptoms are part of the initial evaluation of children with acute illness, and are often used to help identify those who may have serious infections. Meningococcal disease is a rapidly progressive infection that needs to be recognised early among children presenting to primary care. Aim To determine the diagnostic value of presenting symptoms in primary care for meningococcal disease. Design of study Data on a series of presenting symptoms were collected using a parental symptoms checklist at point of care for children presenting to a GP with acute infection. Symptom frequencies were compared with existing data on the pre-hospital features of 345 children with meningococcal disease. Setting UK primary care. Method The study recruited a total of 1212 children aged under 16 years presenting to their GP with an acute illness, of whom 924 had an acute self-limiting infection, including 407 who were reported by parents to be febrile. Symptom frequencies were compared with those reported by parents of 345 children with meningococcal disease. Main outcome measures were diagnostic characteristics of individual symptoms for meningococcal disease. Results Five symptoms have clinically useful positive likelihood ratios (LR+) for meningococcal disease: confusion (LR+ = 24.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.5 to 51.3), leg pain (LR+ = 7.6, 95% CI = 4.9 to 11.9), photophobia (LR+ = 6.5, 95% CI = 3.8 to 11.0), rash (LR+ = 5.5, 95% CI = 4.3 to 7.1), and neck pain/stiffness (LR+ = 5.3, 95% CI = 3.5 to 8.3). Cold hands and feet had limited diagnostic value (LR+ = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.9 to 3.0), while headache (LR+ = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.8 to 1.3), and pale colour (LR+ = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.2 to 0.5) did not discriminate meningococcal disease in children. Conclusion This study confirms the diagnostic value of classic ‘red flag’ symptoms of neck stiffness, rash, and photophobia, but also suggests that the presence of confusion or leg pain in a child with an unexplained acute

  11. Involvement of metabolites in early defense mechanism of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) against Ganoderma disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusaibah, S A; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Idris, A S; Sariah, M; Mohamad Pauzi, Z

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of interaction between the oil palm and its key pathogen, Ganoderma spp. is crucial as the disease caused by this fungal pathogen leads to a major loss of revenue in leading palm oil producing countries in Southeast Asia. Here in this study, we assess the morphological and biochemical changes in Ganoderma disease infected oil palm seedling roots in both resistant and susceptible progenies. Rubber woodblocks fully colonized by G. boninense were applied as a source of inoculum to artificially infect the roots of resistant and susceptible oil palm progenies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure an array of plant metabolites in 100 resistant and susceptible oil palm seedling roots treated with pathogenic Ganoderma boninense fungus. Statistical effects, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify key-Ganoderma disease associated metabolic agitations in both resistant and susceptible oil palm root tissues. Ganoderma disease related defense shifts were characterized based on (i) increased antifungal activity in crude extracts, (ii) increased lipid levels, beta- and gamma-sitosterol particularly in the resistant progeny, (iii) detection of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, benzo [h] quinoline, pyridine, pyrimidine (iv) elevation in antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol (iv) degraded cortical cell wall layers, possibly resulting from fungal hydrolytic enzyme activity needed for initial penetration. The present study suggested that plant metabolites mainly lipids and heterocyclic aromatic organic metabolites could be potentially involved in early oil palm defense mechanism against G. boninense infection, which may also highlight biomarkers for disease detection, treatment, development of resistant variety and monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential sialylation of serpin A1 in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jesse

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD increases with age. Up to 50% of PD show cognitive decline in terms of a mild cognitive impairment already in early stages that predict the development of dementia, which can occur in up to 80% of PD patients over the long term, called Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD. So far, diagnosis of PD/PDD is made according to clinical and neuropsychological examinations while laboratory data is only used for exclusion of other diseases. The aim of this study was the identification of possible biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of PD, PDD and controls (CON which predict the development of dementia in PD. For this, a proteomic approach optimized for CSF was performed using 18 clinically well characterized patients in a first step with subsequent validation using 84 patients. Here, we detected differentially sialylated isoforms of Serpin A1 as marker for differentiation of PD versus PDD in CSF. Performing 2D-immunoblots, all PDD patients could be identified correctly (sensitivity 100%. Ten out of 24 PD patients showed Serpin A1 isoforms in a similar pattern like PDD, indicating a specificity of 58% for the test-procedure. In control samples, no additional isoform was detected. On the basis of these results, we conclude that differentially sialylated products of Serpin A1 are an interesting biomarker to indicate the development of a dementia during the course of PD.

  13. Early post-operative results of percutaneous needle fasciotomy in 451 patients with Dupuytren disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenkamp, Sanne; Schouten, Tanneke A M; Broekstra, Dieuwke C; Werker, Paul M N; Moolenburgh, J Daniel

    2017-02-13

    Percutaneous needle fasciotomy (PNF) is a minimally invasive treatment modality for Dupuytren disease (DD). In this study we analyzed the efficacy and complication-rate of PNF using a statistical method that takes the multi-level structure of data, regarding multiple measurements from the same patients, into account. The data of 470 treated rays from 451 patients with Dupuytren disease that underwent percutaneous needle fasciotomy (PNF) were analyzed retrospectively. We described the early postoperative results of PNF and we applied linear mixed models to compare mean correction of PED between joints and efficacy of primary versus secondary PNF. Mean preoperative PED's at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints were 37˚, 40˚ and 31˚ respectively. Mean preoperative TPED was 54˚. Results were excellent, with a mean TPED correction of 85%. PNF was most effective for MCP-joints and less effective for PIP and DIP-joints. Secondary PNF was as effective as primary PNF. Complications were rare and mostly minor. The results of this study confirm that PNF is an effective and safe treatment modality for patients with mild to moderate disease who prefer a minimally invasive procedure.

  14. Early Postoperative Results of Percutaneous Needle Fasciotomy in 451 Patients with Dupuytren Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenkamp, Sanne; Schouten, Tanneke A M; Broekstra, Dieuwke C; Werker, Paul M N; Moolenburgh, J Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Percutaneous needle fasciotomy is a minimally invasive treatment modality for Dupuytren disease. In this study, the authors analyzed the efficacy and complication rate of percutaneous needle fasciotomy using a statistical method that takes the multilevel structure of data, regarding multiple measurements from the same patient, into account. The data of 470 treated rays from 451 patients with Dupuytren disease that underwent percutaneous needle fasciotomy were analyzed retrospectively. The authors described the early postoperative results of percutaneous needle fasciotomy and applied linear mixed models to compare mean correction of passive extension deficit between joints and efficacy of primary versus secondary percutaneous needle fasciotomy. Mean preoperative passive extension deficits at the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints were 37, 40, and 31 degrees, respectively. Mean preoperative total passive extension deficit was 54 degrees. Results were excellent, with a mean total passive extension deficit correction of 85 percent. Percutaneous needle fasciotomy was most effective for metacarpophalangeal joints and less effective for proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. Secondary percutaneous needle fasciotomy was as effective as primary percutaneous needle fasciotomy. Complications were rare and mostly minor. The results of this study confirm that percutaneous needle fasciotomy is an effective and safe treatment modality for patients with mild to moderate disease who prefer a minimally invasive procedure. Therapeutic, IV.

  15. Cognitive rehabilitation for elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyun

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive rehabilitation including tasks of cognitive training on performance of everyday activities in elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three elderly people (15 men, 28 women) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease who had a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 18 or above were randomly assigned to two groups: the cognitive rehabilitation group (experimental) and control group. This study used a randomized controlled trial design. Cognitive rehabilitation is consisted of 8 sessions, each lasting 60 minutes (individual 30 min, group 30 min). The eight weekly individual sessions of cognitive rehabilitation were performed consisting of an individualized intervention focusing on a personally meaningful goal. The eight weekly group sessions involved practicing time-and-place orientation, matching faces and names, and learning memory and sustaining attention. [Results] Significant improvements were observed in rating of occupation performance and satisfaction, Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease (QOL-AD), and the orientation subscale of the MMSE in the experimental group, whereas participants in the control group did not show any significant difference in any tests between before and after the intervention. [Conclusion] Cognitive rehabilitation including tasks of cognitive training is an effective intervention for improving performance and satisfaction with respect to activities of daily living and specific cognitive functions.

  16. Trefoil Factor 1 Excretion Is Increased in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lebherz-Eichinger

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In many patients CKD is diagnosed late during disease progression. Therefore, the implementation of potential biomarkers may facilitate the early identification of individuals at risk. Trefoil factor family (TFF peptides promote restitution processes of mucous epithelia and are abundant in the urinary tract. We therefore sought to investigate the TFF peptide levels in patients suffering from CKD and their potential as biomarkers for CKD. We analysed TFF1 and TFF3 in serum and urine of 115 patients with CKD stages 1-5 without dialysis by ELISA. 20 healthy volunteers served as controls. Our results showed, that urinary TFF1 levels were significantly increased with the onset of CKD in stages 1-4 as compared to controls and declined during disease progression (p = 0.003, 0.8. In conclusion our results show increased levels of TFF1 and TFF3 in CKD patients with a pronounced elevation of urinary TFF1 in lower CKD stages. Furthermore, TFF1 and TFF3 seems to be differently regulated and show potential to predict various CKD stages, as shown by ROC curve analysis.

  17. Perspective: Identification of genetic variants associated with dopaminergic compensatory mechanisms in early Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior eGreenbaum

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is slowly progressive, and heterogeneity of its severity among individuals may be due to endogenous mechanisms that counterbalance the striatal dopamine loss. In this perspective paper, we introduce a neuroimaging-genetic approach to identify genetic variants, which may contribute to this compensation. First, we briefly review current known potential compensatory mechanisms for premotor and early disease PD, located in the striatum and other brain regions. Then, we claim that a mismatch between mild symptomatic disease, manifested by low motor score on the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS and extensive Nigro-Striatal degeneration, manifested by reduced uptake of [123I]FP-CIT is indicative of compensatory processes. If genetic variants are associated with the severity of motor symptoms, while the level of striatal terminals degeneration measured by ligand uptake is taken into account and controlled in the analysis, then these variants may be involved in functional compensatory mechanisms for striatal dopamine deficit. To demonstrate feasibility of this approach, we performed a small "proof of concept" study (candidate gene design in a sample of 28 Jewish PD patients, and preliminary results are presented.

  18. Nick Hales Award Lecture 2011: glucocorticoids and early life programming of cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R M

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between low birthweight and a range of diseases in adult life including cardiometabolic and psychiatric diseases. One of the key mechanisms proposed to underlie early life 'programming' of disease is overexposure of the developing foetus to glucocorticoids. This review will explore the data from human studies that glucocorticoids are not only mediators of programming, but also targets of programming. Cohort studies of men and women of known birthweight have demonstrated that low birthweight is associated with high fasting cortisol levels. In healthy individuals and in people with type 2 diabetes who are at high cardiovascular risk, there is a similar association between high fasting cortisol and the metabolic syndrome. The high cortisol levels appear to be due to activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis though detailed studies to further explore central negative feedback sensitivity are required. The evidence in humans that glucocorticoids mediate programming is more scanty, though changes in maternal body composition, stress and anxiety levels and activity of the placental barrier enzyme 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) may all influence maternal HPA axis activity. Emerging studies are supportive that high maternal cortisol levels in humans and/or deficiencies placental 11β-HSD2 humans are associated with lower birthweight and adverse metabolic and neurocognitive outcomes in the offspring.

  19. Assessment of voice and speech symptoms in early Parkinson's disease by the Robertson dysarthria profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Giovanni; Guerrieri, Marta; Liuzzi, Daniele; Gigante, Angelo Fabio; di Nicola, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Changes in voice and speech are thought to involve 75-90% of people with PD, but the impact of PD progression on voice/speech parameters is not well defined. In this study, we assessed voice/speech symptoms in 48 parkinsonian patients staging dysarthria profile (a clinical-perceptual method exploring all components potentially involved in speech difficulties), the Voice handicap index (a validated measure of the impact of voice symptoms on quality of life) and the speech evaluation parameter contained in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III). Accuracy and metric properties of the Robertson dysarthria profile were also measured. On Robertson dysarthria profile, all parkinsonian patients yielded lower scores than healthy control subjects. Differently, the Voice Handicap Index and the speech evaluation parameter contained in the UPDRS-III could detect speech/voice disturbances in 10 and 75% of PD patients, respectively. Validation procedure in Parkinson's disease patients showed that the Robertson dysarthria profile has acceptable reliability, satisfactory internal consistency and scaling assumptions, lack of floor and ceiling effects, and partial correlations with UPDRS-III and Voice Handicap Index. We concluded that speech/voice disturbances are widely identified by the Robertson dysarthria profile in early parkinsonian patients, even when the disturbances do not carry a significant level of disability. Robertson dysarthria profile may be a valuable tool to detect speech/voice disturbances in Parkinson's disease.

  20. Periodontal disease in a Portuguese identified skeletal sample from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasterlain, Sofia N; Cunha, Eugénia; Hillson, Simon

    2011-05-01

    Periodontal status was investigated in 600 adult dentitions belonging to the identified osteological collections curated at the University of Coimbra, Portugal. These collections date to a point temporally intermediate between the large epidemiological studies of the 20th century and archaeological collections that antedate the 19th century. The aim of this study is to compare periodontal data derived from contemporary samples with statistics compiled from epidemiological studies to determine if factors such as age-at-death, sex, and tooth type are essential or not to account for in future archaeological studies of periodontitis. Periodontal disease status was assessed based on the textural and architectural variations of the interdental septum and the extent of bone loss. Overall, the frequency of periodontitis within the Coimbra collections is 73.8%. Men were more susceptible to periodontal disease than women. Gingivitis was widespread in the younger age groups. Destructive periodontitis was observed early in adulthood, rising steadily with age. The most susceptible sites to periodontal breakdown were located in the posterior region of the upper jaw. Some variation in reported frequencies of periodontitis was found in epidemiological reports, which might result from variation in methods for identifying the pathology, differences in the age composition of the samples examined, variation in oral hygiene and/or diet, or some other factors. Regarding the pattern of distribution of periodontal disease, Coimbra results were similar to comparable modern epidemiological surveys, making clear the importance of considering sex, age, and oral distribution of periodontitis in future archaeological studies.

  1. Anosognosia and Its Relation to Psychiatric Symptoms in Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bora; Shim, Yong S; Hong, Yun Jeong; Choi, Seong Hye; Park, Hee Kyung; Park, Sun Ah; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Yoon, Soo Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2017-05-01

    We investigated differences in the prevalence of anosognosia and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) characteristics according to disease severity in patients with early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD). We recruited 616 patients with EOAD. We subdivided participants into 2 groups based on the presence or absence of anosognosia and then again by Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale. We compared the differences in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) scores according to anosognosia and disease severity. The percentage of patients with anosognosia in each CDR group steadily increased as the CDR rating increased (CDR 0.5 8.6% vs CDR 1 13.6% vs CDR 2 26.2%). The NPI total score was significantly higher in patients with anosognosia in the CDR 0.5 and 1 groups; by contrast, it had no association in the CDR 2 group. Frontal lobe functions were associated with anosognosia only in the CDR 0.5 and 1 groups. After stratification by CDR, in the CDR 0.5 group, the prevalence of agitation ( P = .040) and appetite ( P = .013) was significantly higher in patients with anosognosia. In the CDR 1 group, patients with anosognosia had a significantly higher prevalence of delusions ( P = .032), hallucinations ( P = .048), and sleep disturbances ( P = .047). In the CDR 2 group, we found no statistical difference in the frequency of symptoms between patients with and without anosognosia. These results confirm that the prevalence of anosognosia as well as the individual NPS and cognitive functions associated with it differ according to EOAD severity.

  2. Early and midterm results of kissing stent technique in the management of aortoiliac obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulli, Raffaele; Dorigo, Walter; Fargion, Aaron; Angiletta, Domenico; Azas, Leonidas; Pratesi, Giovanni; Alessi Innocenti, Alessandro; Pratesi, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    To retrospectively analyze the early and the midterm results of endovascular management of aortoiliac obstructive disease with the kissing stent technique. From January 2005 to September 2012, 229 consecutive endovascular interventions for aortoiliac obstructive disease were performed; data from all the interventions were prospectively collected in a dedicated database. In 41 patients, the kissing stent technique at the level of aortic bifurcation was performed (group 1), whereas in the remaining 188 it was not (group 2). Perioperative results were compared with chi-squared test. Follow-up results were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with log-rank test. Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II C and D lesions were present in 66% of patients in group 1 and in 28.5% in group 2 (P kissing stent technique provided satisfactory results in patients with obstructive aortoiliac diseases, without an increase in immediate and midterm complications, representing an effective solution in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cognitive and Neuropsychiatric Symptom Differences in Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease: Kuopio ALSOVA Study

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    Ilona Hallikainen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes impairment in memory and other cognitive functions as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms and limitations in the activities of daily living (ADL. The aim of this study was to examine whether demographic variables, dementia severity, ADL and neuropsychiatric symptoms are associated with cognition in very mild or mild AD. Methods: We analyzed the baseline data of 236 patients with very mild or mild AD participating in a prospective AD follow-up study (ALSOVA. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease neuropsychological battery total score was used in the evaluation of the global cognitive performance. Results: Cognition was associated with dementia severity and ADL but not with neuropsychiatric symptoms. ADL functions were associated with both cognitive performance and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Conclusion: Even patients with very mild or mild AD may exhibit neuropsychiatric symptoms not related to cognitive impairment. The results of this study emphasize the importance of taking a multidimensional approach to the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of AD patients already in the early stages of the disease.

  4. Cognitive performance patterns in healthy individuals with substantia nigra hyperechogenicity and early Parkinson’s disease

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    Rezzak Yilmaz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN+ is a risk marker for Parkinson’s disease (PD which can be detected before the diagnosis. In healthy individuals, SN+ has been associated with slight deficits in specific cognitive functions, suggesting cognitive impairment as a possible pre-diagnostic marker for PD. However, the pattern of cognitive deficits associated with SN+ has not yet been compared with those present in PD.Methods: Data of 262 healthy individuals with normal echogenicity (SN- and 48 healthy individuals with SN+ were compared with 82 early stage PD patients using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s disease test battery. First, the test clusters (factors were identified using a principal component analysis (PCA. Mean group performance of cognitive tests belonging to distinct factors, according to the PCA, and single subtest performances were compared using analyses of variance. Second, the number of individuals with abnormal cognitive performances (z-score <-1.0 were compared between groups. Results: Verbal memory, semantic and executive function, and praxis were identified as components of cognitive performances. The SN+ group performed significantly worse than the SN- group in tests assessing semantic and executive function, with a non-significant decrease in verbal memory. On the subtest level, individuals of the SN+ group scored significantly lower than the SN- group on the Boston Naming Test (BNT (p=0.008. In all subtests, the percentages of PD patients with values below the cut-off for abnormal performance were higher than in the SN- group. Moreover, more individuals from the SN+ group scored below the cut-off in the BNT (SN-=8.4%, SN+=20.8%, p=0.01 and TMT-B (SN-=6.9%, SN+=16.7%, p=0.02, compared to the SN- group. Conclusion: This study confirms poorer performance of healthy individuals with SN+ compared to SN- in specific cognitive domains. However, against the SN- group, the cognitive

  5. Decreased circulating visfatin is associated with improved disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis: data from the PERAC cohort.

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    Ondřej Sglunda

    Full Text Available To evaluate circulating visfatin and its relationship with disease activity and serum lipids in patients with early, treatment-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Serum visfatin was measured in 40 patients with early RA before and after three months of treatment and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. Disease activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score for 28 joints (DAS28 at baseline and at three and 12 months. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether improved disease activity is related to serum visfatin or a change in visfatin level.Serum visfatin was significantly elevated in early RA patients compared to healthy controls (1.92±1.17 vs. 1.36±0.93 ng/ml; p = 0.034 and significantly decreased after three months of treatment (to 0.99±0.67 ng/ml; p<0.001. Circulating visfatin and a change in visfatin level correlated with disease activity and improved disease activity over time, respectively. A decrease in visfatin after three months predicted a DAS28 improvement after 12 months. In addition, decreased serum visfatin was not associated with an improved atherogenic index but was associated with an increase in total cholesterol level.A short-term decrease in circulating visfatin may represent an independent predictor of long-term disease activity improvement in patients with early RA.

  6. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson’s disease: the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S.; Toledo, Jon B.; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R.; Irwin, David J.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M.; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W.; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1–42 (Aβ1–42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1–42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1–42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1–42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1–42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance. PMID:27021906

  7. Reducing disease burden and health inequalities arising from chronic disease among Indigenous children: an early childhood caries intervention

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    Merrick Jessica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study seeks to determine if implementing a culturally-appropriate early childhood caries (ECC intervention reduces dental disease burden and oral health inequalities among Indigenous children living in South Australia, Australia. Methods/Design This paper describes the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial conducted among Indigenous children living in South Australia with an anticipated sample of 400. The ECC intervention consists of four components: (1 provision of dental care; (2 fluoride varnish application to the teeth of children; (3 motivational interviewing and (4 anticipatory guidance. Participants are randomly assigned to two intervention groups, immediate (n = 200 or delayed (n = 200. Provision of dental care (1 occurs during pregnancy in the immediate intervention group or when children are 24-months in the delayed intervention group. Interventions (2, (3 and (4 occur when children are 6-, 12- and 18-months in the immediate intervention group or 24-, 30- and 36-months in the delayed intervention group. Hence, all participants receive the ECC intervention, though it is delayed 24 months for participants who are randomised to the control-delayed arm. In both groups, self-reported data will be collected at baseline (pregnancy and when children are 24- and 36-months; and child clinical oral health status will be determined during standardised examinations conducted at 24- and 36-months by two calibrated dental professionals. Discussion Expected outcomes will address whether exposure to a culturally-appropriate ECC intervention is effective in reducing dental disease burden and oral health inequalities among Indigenous children living in South Australia.

  8. Prenatal and early-life predictors of atopy and allergic disease in Canadian children: results of the Family Atherosclerosis Monitoring In earLY life (FAMILY) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, T; Reece, P L; Schulze, K M; Morrison, K M; Atkinson, S A; Anand, S S; Teo, K K; Denburg, J A; Cyr, M M

    2016-12-01

    Prenatal and early-life environmental exposures play a key role in the development of atopy and allergic disease. The Family Atherosclerosis Monitoring In earLY life Study is a general, population-based Canadian birth cohort that prospectively evaluated prenatal and early-life traits and their association with atopy and/or allergic disease. The study population included 901 babies, 857 mothers and 530 fathers. Prenatal and postnatal risk factors were evaluated through questionnaires collected during the antenatal period and at 1 year. The end points of atopy and allergic diseases in infants were evaluated through questionnaires and skin prick testing. Key outcomes included atopy (24.5%), food allergy (17.5%), cow's milk allergy (4.8%), wheezing (18.6%) and eczema (16%). The association between infant antibiotic exposure [odds ratio (OR): 2.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.45-2.88] and increased atopy was noted in the multivariate analysis, whereas prenatal maternal exposure to dogs (OR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.84) and acetaminophen (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51-0.92) was associated with decreased atopy. This population-based birth cohort in Canada demonstrated high rates of atopy, food allergy, wheezing and eczema. Several previously reported and some novel prenatal and postnatal exposures were associated with atopy and allergic diseases at 1 year of age.

  9. MM1-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with 1-month total disease duration and early pathologic indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Kato, Hiroko; Ando, Tetsuo; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-10-01

    A 62-year-old man presented with abnormal behavior and cognitive impairment. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) obtained on MRI showed extensive hyperintense regions in the cerebral cortex and striatum. Myoclonus was recognized, and the patient died 1 month after the onset; his condition did not reach the akinetic mutism state. The brain weighed 1300 g and showed no apparent atrophy. Extensive spongiform changes were observed in the cerebral neocortex, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex, but gliosis was mild or absent. Neuropil rarefaction and neuron loss were not apparent. Mild proliferation of anti- GFAP-positive astrocytes was observed in the cerebral cortex, but unaffected regions were noted. Regions without spongiform changes and GFAP-positive astrocytes included the hippocampal formation and subiculum. PrP immunostaining showed extensive diffuse synaptic-type PrP deposition in the gray matter, including the hippocampal region, but it was also mild. PrP gene analysis revealed no mutation with methionine homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129. Western blot analysis of proteinase K-resistant PrP indicated type 1 PrP(Sc) . The clinicopathological findings of the present case confirm several hypotheses: (i) the earliest pathologic evidence observed by HE staining in CJD are spongiform changes; (ii) DWI hyperintense regions indicate these spongiform changes; and (iii) regions without spongiform changes, gliosis and proliferation of GFAP-positive astrocytes, but with PrP deposition, exist in the early disease stage. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Artificial neural networks allow the use of simultaneous measurements of Alzheimer Disease markers for early detection of the disease

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    Gardoni Fabrizio

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that in platelets of mild Alzheimer Disease (AD patients there are alterations of specific APP forms, paralleled by alteration in expression level of both ADAM 10 and BACE when compared to control subjects. Due to the poor linear relation among each key-element of beta-amyloid cascade and the target diagnosis, the use of systems able to afford non linear tasks, like artificial neural networks (ANNs, should allow a better discriminating capacity in comparison with classical statistics. Objective To evaluate the accuracy of ANNs in AD diagnosis. Methods 37 mild-AD patients and 25 control subjects were enrolled, and APP, ADM10 and BACE measures were performed. Fifteen different models of feed-forward and complex-recurrent ANNs (provided by Semeion Research Centre, based on different learning laws (back propagation, sine-net, bi-modal were compared with the linear discriminant analysis (LDA. Results The best ANN model correctly identified mild AD patients in the 94% of cases and the control subjects in the 92%. The corresponding diagnostic performance obtained with LDA was 90% and 73%. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that the processing of biochemical tests related to beta-amyloid cascade with ANNs allows a very good discrimination of AD in early stages, higher than that obtainable with classical statistics methods.

  11. [Risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the descendants of patients after early myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateřánková, Markéta; Karnosová, Petra; Mlíková Seidlerová, Jitka; Filipovský, Jan; Mayer, Otto

    2017-01-01

    The cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) developing as the result of atherosclerosis are among the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality within the Czech Republic and elsewhere. Genetic predisposition for cardiovascular diseases is amplified in the presence of routine risk factors which can be influenced. Our aim was to establish whether the level of the risk factors for ICHS already differs in the population of healthy descendants of the patients after early myocardial infarction, as opposed to the control group of examined individuals. We approached adult children (n = 127; age 28.7 ± 6.5 years) of the patients with early manifestation of ICHS, who were examined within the study EUROASPIRE IV. The examination of both the descendants and the control group (n = 199; age 28.9 ± 5.3 years) focused on identifying the risk factors for ICHS. Descendants presented arterial hypertension more often (18.9 vs 8.0 %, p = 0.003) and there were more smokers among them compared to the control group (37 vs 24.1 %, p = 0.01). The levels of triglycerides (1.13 vs 0.99 mmol/l, p = 0.05) and LDL-cholesterol (2.7 vs 2.45 mmol/l, p = 0.01) were higher in the descendant group, HDL-cholesterol was similar in both groups (1.6 vs 1.67 mmol/l, p = 0.17). Increased fasting glycemia occurred more frequent in the descendant group (5.5 vs 1.5 %, p = 0.05). None of the examined participants met the criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Aortic stiffness was higher in the descendant group as opposed to the control group (6.2 vs 5.8 m/s, p = 0.001). The total calculated cardiovascular risk based on the SCORE system was also higher in the descendant group as compared to the control group - the current risk related to the age of 40 years: 0.35 (0.19-0.64) vs 0.20 (0.13-0.47), p triglycerides and impaired fasting glycemia more frequently. Unfavourable genetic predisposition along with unfitting lifestyle contributes to a higher likelihood of accumulation of risk factors, and therefore

  12. Exercise as a provocative test in early renal disease in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Baker, L; Deckert, T

    1985-01-01

    The value of exercise as a provocative test for early renal disease in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes was re-evaluated. Three carefully characterized groups of males were studied: 10 non-diabetic controls, 16 diabetic patients (group 1) with normal urinary albumin excretion (less than 15.......05). During exercise the urinary albumin excretion rate increased significantly in all three groups (normal subjects: 6 +/- 0.7 to 8 +/- 1.3 (microgram/min); group 1: 6 +/- 0.6 to 9 +/- 1 microgram/min and group 2: 48 +/- 10 to 113 +/- 23 micrograms/min), the relative increase being higher in group 2 (p less...... micrograms/min) and 14 Albustix-negative diabetics (group 2) with increased urinary albumin excretion (15-122 micrograms/min). Assignment to a study group was made on the basis of three 24-h urine collections, and the groups were well matched for age, weight, height, and serum creatinine concentration...

  13. [Identifying different susceptibility loci associated with early onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Mexican families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; Riba-Ramírez, Laura; Monroy-Guzmán, Adriana; Domínguez-López, Aarón; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Tusié-Luna, María Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus are among the primary mortality and morbidity causes in Mexico. Genetic factors play a fundamental role in the development of these entities. In the past few years due to the recognition and study of families with monogenic forms of diabetes and dislipidemias associated with development of atherosclerosis, several genes and loci have been associated with these conditions through genetic linkage studies. These studies have provided evidence of the genetic heterogeneity that exists and the type of genes involved in different ethnic groups. The study of Mexican families with early-onset diabetes and combined familial hyperlipidemia showed the participation of different genetic loci associated with these conditions in the Mexican population. These findings show the value of gene mapping strategies in the identification of the genetic component in these entities in our population.

  14. Prediction of dengue disease severity among pediatric Thai patients using early clinical laboratory indicators.

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    James A Potts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical resource-poor countries. Dengue illness can range from a nonspecific febrile illness to a severe disease, Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS, in which patients develop circulatory failure. Earlier diagnosis of severe dengue illnesses would have a substantial impact on the allocation of health resources in endemic countries.We compared clinical laboratory findings collected within 72 hours of fever onset from a prospective cohort children presenting to one of two hospitals (one urban and one rural in Thailand. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to develop diagnostic algorithms using different categories of dengue disease severity to distinguish between patients at elevated risk of developing a severe dengue illness and those at low risk. A diagnostic algorithm using WBC count, percent monocytes, platelet count, and hematocrit achieved 97% sensitivity to identify patients who went on to develop DSS while correctly excluding 48% of non-severe cases. Addition of an indicator of severe plasma leakage to the WHO definition led to 99% sensitivity using WBC count, percent neutrophils, AST, platelet count, and age.This study identified two easily applicable diagnostic algorithms using early clinical indicators obtained within the first 72 hours of illness onset. The algorithms have high sensitivity to distinguish patients at elevated risk of developing severe dengue illness from patients at low risk, which included patients with mild dengue and other non-dengue febrile illnesses. Although these algorithms need to be validated in other populations, this study highlights the potential usefulness of specific clinical indicators early in illness.

  15. Feasibility and efficacy of cognitive telerehabilitation in early Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcic, Nela; Agostini, Michela; Meneghello, Francesca; Bussè, Cinzia; Parise, Sara; Galano, Antonietta; Tonin, Paolo; Dam, Mauro; Cagnin, Annachiara

    2014-01-01

    Background This pilot study compared the effects of lexical-semantic stimulation through telecommunication technology (LSS-tele) with in-person LSS (LSS-direct) and unstructured cognitive treatment (UCS) in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. Methods Twenty-seven patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the very early stage (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] >26/30) were divided into three groups: seven patients received LSS-tele treatment, ten received standard LSS-direct intervention, and ten participants underwent UCS as control condition. Intervention treatments consisted of two weekly sessions of LSS (through teleconference or face to face depending on group assignment) or UCS exercises administered to small groups throughout a 3-month period. The main outcome measures were changes of global cognitive performance, language abilities, and memory function. Secondary outcome measures were changes in attention, working memory, executive functions, and visual-spatial abilities tests. Results The mean MMSE score improved significantly in LSS-tele and LSS-direct treatments; LSS-tele improved language abilities, both phonemic and semantic, and stabilized delayed verbal episodic memory with respect to an improved performance after the LSS-direct intervention and to a memory decline observed in the control group. Improvement was not achieved in any neuropsychological test score after UCS. Conclusion Clinical application of telecommunication technology to cognitive rehabilitation of elderly patients with neurodegenerative cognitive impairment is feasible and may improve global cognitive performance. Technical aspects to ameliorate efficacy of delivery may further improve its impact on domain-specific cognitive abilities. PMID:25284993

  16. Axonal damage and loss of connectivity in nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine pathways in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Silvia Paola; Presotto, Luca; Baroncini, Damiano; Garibotto, Valentina; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Gianolli, Luigi; Volonté, Maria Antonietta; Antonini, Angelo; Perani, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    A progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is considered the main feature of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent neuropathological evidence however suggests that the axons of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system are the earliest target of α-synuclein accumulation in PD, thus the principal site for vulnerability. Whether this applies to in vivo PD, and also to the mesolimbic system has not been investigated yet. We used [(11)C]FeCIT PET to measure presynaptic dopamine transporter (DAT) activity in both nigrostriatal and mesolimbic systems, in 36 early PD patients (mean disease duration in months ± SD 21.8 ± 10.7) and 14 healthy controls similar for age. We also performed anatomically-driven partial correlation analysis to evaluate possible changes in the connectivity within both the dopamine networks at an early clinical phase. In the nigrostriatal system, we found a severe DAT reduction in the afferents to the dorsal putamen (DPU) (η(2) = 0.84), whereas the SN was the less affected region (η(2) = 0.31). DAT activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventral striatum (VST) were also reduced in the patient group, but to a lesser degree (VST η(2) = 0.71 and VTA η(2) = 0.31). In the PD patients compared to the controls, there was a marked decrease in dopamine network connectivity between SN and DPU nodes, supporting the significant derangement in the nigrostriatal pathway. These results suggest that neurodegeneration in the dopamine pathways is initially more prominent in the afferent axons and more severe in the nigrostriatal system. Considering PD as a disconnection syndrome starting from the axons, it would justify neuroprotective interventions even if patients have already manifested clinical symptoms.

  17. Non-motor symptoms in treated and untreated Chinese patients with early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Gu, Zhuqin; An, Jing; Wang, Chaodong; Chan, Piu

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms (NMS) are important preclinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD) and have become the leading cause of poor quality of life with disease progression. There are little data on how antiparkinsonian medications influence the NMS in PD at early stage. In this study, we explored the distribution of NMS in treated and untreated PD and investigated the association between NMS and antiparkinsonian medications in Chinese patients with early PD. Subjects were enrolled from a Chinese PD patient cohort based on 2 clinical trials. Face-to-face interviews and evaluations were performed for clinical information. NMS were compared in patients with or without antiparkinsonian treatment, and between subgroups of dopaminergic medications. Eight hundred and sixteen PD patients were enrolled in this study, of whom 428 were newly diagnosed PD. Only 5 in 646 patients who completed all these NMS measurements (0.6%) were free of NMS. PD patients with antiparkinsonian medications had a significantly higher frequency of poor sleep (p = 0.001), depression (p = 0.0001) and constipation (p = 0.0001) after adjusted gender, onset age, duration, and Hoehn & Yahr stage. Moreover, patients treated by levodopa plus dopamine agonist had a higher percentage of bad sleepers (adjusted p = 0.040), and correlation analysis revealed that Levodopa Equivalent Dose (LED) was associated with constipation (coefficient 0.146, p = 0.005). These findings suggest that although NMS exist in the prodromal stage of PD, antiparkinsonian treatment is associated with increased frequency of some NMS, which may challenge the management for PD.

  18. S-nitrosation of proteins relevant to Alzheimer's disease during early stages of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Uthpala; Nott, Alexi; Bhat, Vadiraja B; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Wishnok, John S; Tsai, Li-Huei; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-04-12

    Protein S-nitrosation (SNO-protein), the nitric oxide-mediated posttranslational modification of cysteine thiols, is an important regulatory mechanism of protein function in both physiological and pathological pathways. A key first step toward elucidating the mechanism by which S-nitrosation modulates a protein's function is identification of the targeted cysteine residues. Here, we present a strategy for the simultaneous identification of SNO-cysteine sites and their cognate proteins to profile the brain of the CK-p25-inducible mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration. The approach-SNOTRAP (SNO trapping by triaryl phosphine)-is a direct tagging strategy that uses phosphine-based chemical probes, allowing enrichment of SNO-peptides and their identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. SNOTRAP identified 313 endogenous SNO-sites in 251 proteins in the mouse brain, of which 135 SNO-proteins were detected only during neurodegeneration. S-nitrosation in the brain shows regional differences and becomes elevated during early stages of neurodegeneration in the CK-p25 mouse. The SNO-proteome during early neurodegeneration identified increased S-nitrosation of proteins important for synapse function, metabolism, and Alzheimer's disease pathology. In the latter case, proteins related to amyloid precursor protein processing and secretion are S-nitrosated, correlating with increased amyloid formation. Sequence analysis of SNO-cysteine sites identified potential linear motifs that are altered under pathological conditions. Collectively, SNOTRAP is a direct tagging tool for global elucidation of the SNO-proteome, providing functional insights of endogenous SNO proteins in the brain and its dysregulation during neurodegeneration.

  19. Early surgery in Crohn’s disease a benefit in selected cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinna An; Lauren Cohen; Mat