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Sample records for early inflammatory arthritis

  1. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Achievement of NICE quality standards for patients with new presentation of inflammatory arthritis: observations from the National Clinical Audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis.

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    Ledingham, Joanna M; Snowden, Neil; Rivett, Ali; Galloway, James; Ide, Zoe; Firth, Jill; MacPhie, Elizabeth; Kandala, Ngianga; Dennison, Elaine M; Rowe, Ian

    2017-02-01

    A national audit was performed assessing the early management of suspected inflammatory arthritis by English and Welsh rheumatology units. The aim of this audit was to measure the performance of rheumatology services against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) quality standards (QSs) for the management of early inflammatory arthritis benchmarked to regional and national comparators for the first time in the UK. All individuals >16 years of age presenting to rheumatology services in England and Wales with suspected new-onset inflammatory arthritis were included in the audit. Information was collected against six NICE QSs that pertain to early inflammatory arthritis management. We present national data for the 6354 patients recruited from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015; 97% of trusts and health boards in England and Wales participated in this audit. Only 17% of patients were referred by their general practitioner within 3 days of first presentation. Specialist rheumatology assessment occurred within 3 weeks of referral in 38% of patients. The target of DMARD initiation within 6 weeks of referral was achieved in 53% of RA patients; 36% were treated with combination DMARDs and 82% with steroids within the first 3 months of specialist care. Fifty-nine per cent of patients received structured education on their arthritis within 1 month of diagnosis. In total, 91% of patients had a treatment target set; the agreed target was achieved within 3 months of specialist review in only 27% of patients. Access to urgent advice via a telephone helpline was reported to be available in 96% of trusts. The audit has highlighted gaps between NICE standards and delivery of care, as well as substantial geographic variability. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

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    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  4. Patient- and clinician-reported outcomes for patients with new presentation of inflammatory arthritis: observations from the National Clinical Audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis.

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    Ledingham, Joanna M; Snowden, Neil; Rivett, Ali; Galloway, James; Ide, Zoe; Firth, Jill; MacPhie, Elizabeth; Kandala, Ngianga; Dennison, Elaine M; Rowe, Ian

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to conduct a national audit assessing the impact and experience of early management of inflammatory arthritis by English and Welsh rheumatology units. The audit enables rheumatology services to measure for the first time their performance, patient outcomes and experience, benchmarked to regional and national comparators. All individuals >16 years of age presenting to English and Welsh rheumatology services with suspected new-onset inflammatory arthritis were included in the audit. Clinician- and patient-derived outcome and patient-reported experience measures were collected. Data are presented for the 6354 patients recruited from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015. Ninety-seven per cent of English and Welsh trusts participated. At the first specialist assessment, the 28-joint DAS (DAS28) was calculated for 2659 (91%) RA patients [mean DAS28 was 5.0 and mean Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact of Disease (RAID) score was 5.6]. After 3 months of specialist care, the mean DAS28 was 3.5 and slightly >60% achieved a meaningful DAS28 reduction. The average RAID score and reduction in RAID score were 3.6 and 2.4, respectively. Of the working patients ages 16-65 years providing data, 7, 5, 16 and 37% reported that they were unable to work, needed frequent time off work, occasionally and rarely needed time off work due to their arthritis, respectively; only 42% reported being asked about their work. Seventy-eight per cent of RA patients providing data agreed with the statement 'Overall in the last 3 months I have had a good experience of care for my arthritis'; <2% disagreed. This audit demonstrates that most RA patients have severe disease at the time of presentation to rheumatology services and that a significant number continue to have high disease activity after 3 months of specialist care. There is a clear need for the National Health Service to develop better systems for capturing, coding and integrating information from outpatient clinics, including measures of

  5. A distinct multicytokine profile is associated with anti-cyclical citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with early untreated inflammatory arthritis.

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    Hitchon, Carol A; Alex, Philip; Erdile, Lawrence B; Frank, Mark B; Dozmorov, Igor; Tang, Yuhong; Wong, Keng; Centola, Michael; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-12-01

    Early inflammatory arthritis is clinically heterogenous and biologically-based indicators are needed to distinguish severe from self-limited disease. Anti-cyclical citrullinated peptides (CCP) have been identified as potential prognostic markers in early arthritis cohorts. Since cytokine networks are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other forms of inflammatory arthritis, a panel of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines was measured to identify biologically-based subsets of early arthritis, relating cytokine profiles to clinical measures and to the presence of RA-associated autoantibodies. Plasma concentrations of cytokines [interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, CXCL8 (IL-8), IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon-g (IFN-g), CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1), CCL4 (MIP-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a)] were measured in patients with early, untreated inflammatory arthritis [symptom duration or = 1 swollen joint; RA, n = 41; undifferentiated arthritis (UA), n = 23]. Cytokine expression patterns were determined using cluster analysis. Both pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines were elevated in patients over controls (n = 21). RA clustered into subgroups based solely on cytokine profiles. The "mild" RA subgroup (n = 23) had higher CCL4 (MIP-1beta), CXCL8 (IL-8), IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, IL-5, and IL-10 levels, lower IL-6, IFN-g, GM-CSF, and IL-4 levels, less CCP positivity (52% vs 82%; p CCP titers [71 (78) vs 153 (94); p CCP-positive (24% vs 66%; p CCP and RF autoantibodies. Integration of cytokine profiles with autoantibody status may assist prognostication and treatment decisions in these patients.

  6. Development of a self-administered early inflammatory arthritis detection tool

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    Tugwell Peter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barriers to care limit the potential benefits of pharmacological intervention for inflammatory arthritis. A self-administered questionnaire for early inflammatory arthritis (EIA detection may complement contemporary triage interventions to further reduce delays to rheumatologic care. The objective of this study was to develop a self-administered EIA detection tool for implementation in pre-primary care settings. Methods A core set of dimensions and constructs for EIA detection were systematically derived from the literature and augmented by investigative team arbitration. Identified constructs were formulated into lay language questions suitable for self-administration. A three-round Delphi consensus panel of EIA experts and stakeholders evaluated the relevance of each question to EIA detection and suggested additional items. Questions accepted by less than 70% of respondents in rounds one or two were eliminated. In round three, questions accepted by at least 80% of the panel were selected for the tool. Results Of 584 citations identified, data were extracted from 47 eligible articles. Upon arbitration of the literature synthesis, 30 constructs encompassing 13 dimensions were formulated into lay language questions and posed to the Delphi panel. A total of 181 EIA experts and stakeholders participated on the Delphi panel: round one, 60; round two, 59; and, round three, 169; 48 participated in all three rounds. The panel evaluated the 30 questions derived from the literature synthesis, suggested five additional items, and eliminated a total of 24. The eleven-question instrument developed captured dimensions of articular pain, swelling, and stiffness, distribution of joint involvement, function, and diagnostic and family history. Conclusions An eleven-question, EIA detection tool suitable for self-administration was developed to screen subjects with six to 52 weeks of musculoskeletal complaints. Psychometric and performance

  7. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

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    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  8. Serum inflammatory biomarkers fail to identify early axial spondyloarthritis: results from the SpondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort

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    Turina, Maureen C; Yeremenko, Nataliya; van Gaalen, Floris; van Oosterhout, Maikel; Berg, Inger J; Ramonda, Ramona; Lebre, Cristina (M C); Landewé, Robert; Baeten, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Decreasing the diagnostic delay in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) remains a major challenge. Here, we assessed the value of serum inflammatory biomarkers to distinguish early axSpA from other pathologies in a large cohort of patients referred with early back pain. Methods Serum c reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and calprotectin were determined in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) cohort (n=310), an early back pain inception cohort. Additionally, explorative serum biomarkers derived from the literature (interleukin-27 (IL-27), human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) and lipcolin-2 (LCN-2)) were determined by ELISA in full-blown patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (n=21) and healthy controls (n=20). Results Serum CRP and ESR levels were not elevated in early axSpA versus ‘control’ back pain patients. Serum calprotectin was elevated in early axSpA versus controls (p=0.01) but failed to identify early axSpA at the individual level (positive predictive value of 38.7%). As to explorative biomarkers, serum levels of IL-27 were not detectable, and hBD-2 and LCN-2 serum levels were not elevated in full-blown AS versus healthy controls (p=0.572, p=0.562, respectively). Therefore, these markers were not further determined in the SPACE cohort. Conclusions None of the candidate serum inflammatory markers were useful as diagnostic markers in the early phase of axSpA. PMID:28123777

  9. Pathogenesis and early detection of inflammatory arthritis: the role of musculoskeletal symptoms, infections and arthritis-related comorbidities in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.; Beers-Tas, M. van; Korevaar, J.; Schaardenburg, D. van

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by clinically apparent inflammatory arthritis (IA). A preclinical phase has been recognized in which symptoms arise and ambulatory care utilization increases. However, information on location and timing of

  10. The effect of rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies on the incidence of cardiovascular events in a large inception cohort of early inflammatory arthritis.

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    Barra, Lillian J; Pope, Janet E; Hitchon, Carol; Boire, Gilles; Schieir, Orit; Lin, Daming; Thorne, Carter J; Tin, Diane; Keystone, Edward C; Haraoui, Boulos; Jamal, Shahin; Bykerk, Vivian P

    2017-05-01

    . RA is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events (CVEs). The objective was to estimate independent effects of RA autoantibodies on the incident CVEs in patients with early RA. Patients were enrolled in the Canadian Early Inflammatory Arthritis Cohort, a prospective multicentre inception cohort. Incident CVEs, including acute coronary syndromes and cerebrovascular events, were self-reported by the patient and partially validated by medical chart review. Seropositive status was defined as either RF or ACPA positive. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards survival analysis was used to estimate the effects of seropositive status on incident CVEs, controlling for RA clinical variables and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. . A total of 2626 patients were included: the mean symptom duration at diagnosis was 6.3 months ( s . d . 4.6), the mean age was 53 years ( s . d . 15), 72% were female and 86% met classification criteria for RA. Forty-six incident CVEs occurred over 6483 person-years [incidence rate 7.1/1000 person-years (95% confidence interval 5.3, 9.4)]. The CVE rate did not differ in seropositive vs seronegative subjects and seropositivity was not associated with incident CVEs in multivariable Cox regression models. Baseline covariates independently associated with incident CVEs were older age, a history of hypertension and a longer duration of RA symptoms prior to diagnosis. The rate of CVEs early in the course of inflammatory arthritis was low; however, delays in the diagnosis of arthritis increased the rate of CVEs. Hypertension was the strongest independent risk factor for CVEs. Results support early aggressive management of RA disease activity and co-morbidities to prevent severe complications.

  11. Circulating microparticles remain associated with complement activation despite intensive anti-inflammatory therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, I.C.; Tushuizen, M.E.; Sturk, A.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Diamant, M.; Wolbink, G.J.; Nieuwland, R.; Nurmohamed, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterised by synovitis and joint destruction. The pathogenesis of RA is not clear, but is considered to be an immune-mediated inflammatory disorder, in which the complement system plays an important role. Although ce

  12. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Arterial Hypertension and Its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Ismet H. Bajraktari

    2017-08-01

    CONCLUSION: Presence of significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28 in hypertensive patients indicate that inflammation is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. In this context, early screening for arterial hypertension and adequate therapeutic measures should be considered in early RA patients.

  13. Can imaging be used for inflammatory arthritis screening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the utility of imaging in the diagnostic work-up of suspected and undifferentiated axial and peripheral inflammatory arthritis. Radiographic findings, that is, late damage but not early inflammation, are part of the classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA......), ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and they are generally part of the early examination program in arthritis.Computed tomography visualizes calcified tissue with high resolution but is rarely used unless radiography is unclear and MRI unavailable...... of RA, PsA, and SpA.MRI and US are part of the recent American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism 2010 classification criteria for RA (can be used to count involved joints), and MRI is part of the SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for axial and peripheral Sp...

  14. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

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    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  15. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

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    Dellinger, Anthony L; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L; Brooks, D Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A; Kepley, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  16. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

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    Lin, Jiangtao [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Zheng, Yanping, E-mail: yanpingzheng@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  17. Artritis Temprana Early Arthritis

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    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la década de los años ochenta se consideraba a la artritis reumatoide (AR como una enfermedad poco frecuente, de gravedad leve a moderada, que tenía una evolución lentamente, progresiva hacia el daño articular y la incapacidad. El aborde terapéutico convencional hasta ese momento, era el tratamiento clásico de la pirámide.Until the early the eighties was considered rheumatoid arthritis to (RA as a rare disease of mild to moderate severity, which had a slowly evolution towards joint damage and disability. The conventional therapeutic option until then, was the classic treatment of the pyramid.

  18. The role of rheumatoid arthritis genetic susceptibility markers in the prediction of erosive disease in patients with early inflammatory polyarthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register

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    Plant, Darren; Thomson, Wendy; Lunt, Mark; Flynn, Edward; Martin, Paul; Eyre, Steven; Farragher, Tracey; Bunn, Diane; Worthington, Jane; Symmons, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Recent whole-genome and candidate gene association studies in RA have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that predispose to disease with moderate risk. It remains poorly understood how recently identified genetic factors may contribute to RA severity. We therefore sought to investigate the role of recently identified RA susceptibility SNP markers in predicting erosive outcome in patients with recent-onset inflammatory polyarthritis (IP). Methods. DNA and X-ray data were available for 1049 patients who were registered between 1990 and 2003 with the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR); a primary care-based inception cohort of patients with recent-onset IP. Demographic and clinical data were recorded at inclusion, and at yearly assessments thereafter. Patients were genotyped for 18 SNP markers. The presence of serum anti citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs) was assessed in samples collected at inclusion to the NOAR. The association of serological and genetic markers with poor radiological (Larsen) score at Years 1 and 5, and erosions at Years 1 and 5 was investigated. Results. Baseline ACPA positivity was associated with erosive disease and higher radiological damage. SNP markers within the TRAF1/C5 locus were associated with erosive disease at Year 1 [rs2900180: odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95% CI 1.14, 2.05)] and Year 5 [rs2900180: OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.07, 2.02)]. None of the SNP markers tested was associated with Larsen score. Conclusion. Our results are in keeping with a previous report and suggest that the TRAF1/C5 region is associated with risk of development of radiological erosions in IP/RA patients. The finding requires replication in other large data sets. PMID:20219786

  19. Combination therapy for pain management in inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthritis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ramiro; H. Radner; D. van der Heijde; A. van Tubergen; R. Buchbinder; D. Aletaha; R.B.M. Landewé

    2011-01-01

    Despite optimal therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, many people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) continue to have persistent pain that may require additional therapy. To assess the benefits and safety of combination pain therapy for people with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosi

  20. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune... Arthritis (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric... inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability...

  1. 78 FR 65450 - Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune... (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis...-Degenerative Arthritis (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and...

  2. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  3. Photoacoustic evaluation of human inflammatory arthritis in human joints

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    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging combined with ultrasonography (US) holds promise to offer a novel and powerful tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis, including early detection and treatment monitoring. As a complement to US, PA imaging can assess additional hemodynamic changes in inflammatory synovium, including hyperemia and hypoxia, both important and early physiological biomarkers of synovitis reflecting the increased metabolic demand and the relatively inadequate oxygen delivery of the inflammatory synovial tissue. In this study on arthritis patients and normal volunteers, the targeted metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were imaged using our real-time US-PA dual-modality imaging system. The blood volume and the blood oxygenation in the segmented synovium were quantified, and the results from the arthritis patients were compared to those from the normal volunteers. This initial study on human subjects demonstrated that PA imaging, by working at the optical wavelengths that are sensitive to oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, is capable of identifying and characterizing inflammation in joints based on the detection of hemodynamic changes.

  4. Footwear characteristics in people with inflammatory arthritis in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, K.; Lahiri, M.; Cheung, P. P.; Santosa, A.; Rome, K

    2016-01-01

    Background Foot problems are common in people with inflammatory arthritis. Despite suitable footwear having the potential to alleviate pain, improve mobility and maintain independence, previous studies have found many people with inflammatory arthritis wearing poorly fitting and inappropriate footwear. Footwear styles and characteristics have not been reported in a Singapore inflammatory arthritis population. The objective of this study was to identify current footwear styles and characterist...

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

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    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  6. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

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    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  7. Application of the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria in patients with very early inflammatory arthritis: analysis of sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in the SAVE study cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biliavska, Iuliia; Stamm, Tanja A; Martinez-Avila, Jose; Huizinga, Thomas W J; Landewé, Robert B M; Steiner, Günter; Aletaha, Daniel; Smolen, Josef S; Machold, Klaus P

    2013-01-01

    Objective Performance of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) criteria was analysed in an internationally recruited early arthritis cohort (≤16 weeks symptom duration) enrolled in the ‘Stop-Arthritis-Very-Early’ trial. This sample includes patients with a variety of diseases diagnosed during follow-up. Methods Two endpoints were defined: Investigators’ diagnosis and disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment start during the 12-month follow-up. The 2010 criteria were applied to score Patients’ baseline data. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and areas under the receiver operating curves of this scoring with respect to both endpoints were calculated and compared to the 1987 criteria. The optimum level of agreement between the endpoints and the 2010 classification score ways estimated by Cohen’s ϰ coefficients. Results 303 patients had 12-months follow-up. Positive predictive values of the 2010 criteria were 0.68 and 0.71 for RA-diagnosis and DMARD-start, respectively. Sensitivity for RA-diagnosis was 0.85, for DMARD-start 0.8, whereas the 1987 criteria’s sensitivities were 0.65 and 0.55. The areas under the receiver operating curves of the 2010 criteria for RA-diagnosis and DMARD-start were 0.83 and 0.78. Analysis of inter-rater-agreement using Cohen’s ϰ demonstrated the highest ϰ values (0.5 for RA-diagnosis and 0.43 for DMARD-start) for the score of 6. Conclusions In this international very early arthritis cohort predictive and discriminative abilities of the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria were satisfactory and substantially superior to the ‘old’ 1987 classification criteria. This easier classification of RA in early stages will allow targeting truly early disease stages with appropriate therapy. PMID:22984174

  8. Parvovirus infection in early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauermann, Maria; Hochauf-Stange, Kristina; Kleymann, Alexander; Conrad, Karsten; Aringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the subgroup of early arthritis patients with new onset parvovirus infections for details that may help narrow the population tested. From their routine patient charts, patient histories and clinical and serological data were obtained for all 130 patients of the Rheumatology division with parvovirus serology performed. 11 patients had acute parvovirus infections, defined by specific IgM antibodies. 95 patients had a previous infection, 16 were never infected, together forming the n=111 control group, and 8 patients had to be excluded. Most patients with acute parvovirus infection had an acute onset, highly symmetrical polyarthritis of small joints, which was preceded by prodromal symptoms. Positive ANA were frequently found, whereas C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were only mildly elevated. No frank synovitis was found longer than two weeks after disease onset. Most patients were free of symptoms within three months, and no patient in the parvovirus group developed rheumatoid arthritis or a connective tissue disease. Parvovirus serology may be helpful in patients with acute polyarthritis of very recent onset, and if they give a history of prodromal symptoms, in particular. In most instances, parvovirus arthritis is an acute disease, which is rapidly self-limiting.

  9. Improved early identification of arthritis : evaluating the efficacy of Early Arthritis Recognition Clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nies, Jessica A. B.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Gaalen, Floris A.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.

    Objective Only 31% of Dutch rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-patients visit a rheumatologist within 12weeks after symptom onset; this is mainly due to delay at the level of the general practitioner (GP). In order to reduce delay of GPs in identifying early arthritis, we initiated an Early Arthritis

  10. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  11. Improving inflammatory arthritis management through tighter monitoring of patients and the use of innovative electronic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Piet; Alten, Rieke; Combe, Bernard; Abdulganieva, Diana; Bousquet, Paola; Courtenay, Molly; Curiale, Cinzia; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Haugeberg, Glenn; Leeb, Burkhard; Puolakka, Kari; Ravelli, Angelo; Rintelen, Bernhard; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Treating to target by monitoring disease activity and adjusting therapy to attain remission or low disease activity has been shown to lead to improved outcomes in chronic rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Patient-reported outcomes, used in conjunction with clinical measures, add an important perspective of disease activity as perceived by the patient. Several validated PROs are available for inflammatory arthritis, and advances in electronic patient monitoring tools are helping patients with chronic diseases to self-monitor and assess their symptoms and health. Frequent patient monitoring could potentially lead to the early identification of disease flares or adverse events, early intervention for patients who may require treatment adaptation, and possibly reduced appointment frequency for those with stable disease. A literature search was conducted to evaluate the potential role of patient self-monitoring and innovative monitoring of tools in optimising disease control in inflammatory arthritis. Experience from the treatment of congestive heart failure, diabetes and hypertension shows improved outcomes with remote electronic self-monitoring by patients. In inflammatory arthritis, electronic self-monitoring has been shown to be feasible in patients despite manual disability and to be acceptable to older patients. Patients' self-assessment of disease activity using such methods correlates well with disease activity assessed by rheumatologists. This review also describes several remote monitoring tools that are being developed and used in inflammatory arthritis, offering the potential to improve disease management and reduce pressure on specialists.

  12. CLINICAL HETEROGENEITY OF EARLY PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the characteristic symptoms and syndromes of early-stage psoriatic arthritis (ePsA, which are pivotal to its early diagnosis.Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients with a PsA duration of less than 2 years (mean 12 months were examined. The diagnosis of PsA was established on the basis of the conventional CASPAR criteria and the Russian criteria developed by the expert method. The conventional current criteria, including the number of tender and swollen joints, DAS28, values of acute-phase indicators, were used to detect inflammatory activity. Skin syndrome was evaluated using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. X-ray study of the hands, distal and proximal feet, pelvis, and other involved joints and MRI of the distal hands/feet were performed. The Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score (MASES and reduced GUESS were used to assess enthesopathy.Results. The types of articular syndrome in ePsA were identified in accordance of the duration of the disease. The authors determined the characteristic features of arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, their diagnostic value and associations with other manifestations in the first 2 years of PsA. There was a relationship of dermatitis and psoriatic onychopathy to the clinical picture of articular syndrome.Conclusion. ePsA is characterized by marked heterogeneity of articular syndrome with predominantly mono/oligoarthritic and polyarthritic articular syndrome. The significant signs are enthesitis and dactylitis, which serve as risk factors for the unfavorable course of the disease. 

  13. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  14. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis - inflammatory and infectious connections : review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, G. Rutger

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with burst...

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, G. Rutger

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with burst...

  17. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ivy Y; Karpus, Olga N; Turner, Jason D; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L; de Hair, Maria J H; Maijer, Karen I; Tak, Paul P; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D; Gerlag, Danielle M; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA), parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA), disease outcome (resolving vs persistent) and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers. We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables. Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  18. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Heat shock proteins and their immunomodulatory role in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Julia; van Eden, Willem

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, are characterized by a loss of self-tolerance, leading to an excessive immune responses and subsequent ongoing inflammation. Current therapies are focused on dampening this inflammation, but a permanent state of tolerance is seldom achieved. Therefore, novel therapies that restore and maintain tolerance are needed. Tregs could be a potential target to achieve permanent immunotolerance. Activation of Tregs can be accomplished when they recognize and bind their specific antigens. HSPs are proteins present in all cells and are upregulated during inflammation. These proteins are immunogenic and can be recognized by Tregs. Several studies in animal models and in human clinical trials have shown the immunoregulatory effects of HSPs and their protective effects in inflammatory arthritis. In this review, an overview is presented of the immunomodulatory effects of several members of the HSP family in general and in inflammatory arthritis. These effects can be attributed to the activation of Tregs through cellular interactions within the immune system. The effect of HSP-specific therapies in patients with inflammatory arthritis should be explored further, especially with regard to long-term efficacy and safety and their use in combination with current therapeutic approaches. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. EULAR recommendations for patient education for people with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangi, Heidi A; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Adams, Jo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The task force aimed to: (1) develop evidence-based recommendations for patient education (PE) for people with inflammatory arthritis, (2) identify the need for further research on PE and (3) determine health professionals' educational needs in order to provide evidence-based PE. METH...

  1. Factors modulating the inflammatory response in acute gouty arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleophas, M.C.P.; Crisan, T.O.; Joosten, L.A.B.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Gout is a common debilitating form of arthritis and despite our extensive knowledge on the pathogenesis its prevalence is still rising quickly. In the current review, we provide a concise overview of recent discoveries in factors tuning the inflammatory response to soluble uric

  2. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis (IA) in the general practice and compare this to a group of control patients without IA. Methods: In this nested-case-control study, data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of eneral Pra

  3. WORK DISABILITY IN EARLY RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOEGLAS, D; SUURMEIJER, T; KROL, B; SANDERMAN, R; VANLEEUWEN, M; van Rijswijk, Maria

    1995-01-01

    Objective-To assess the impact of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on work status. Methods-The employment status of 119 patients who had jobs before the onset of RA was examined. Patients with work disability were compared with those without, for several disease characteristics, therapeutic regimen,

  4. [Pregnancy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory spondylarthropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromnica-Ihle, E; Ostensen, M

    2006-05-01

    The activity of a rheumatic disease can be influenced by pregnancy and puerperium. Prospective studies have shown an improvement in joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis in two thirds to three quarters of pregnancies. After birth, an exacerbation is common. In spondylarthropathies there is no relevant change in disease activity. The fetal outcome is not impaired in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory spondylarthropathies. Every pregnancy in women with a rheumatic disease should be considered as high-risk, and such pregnancies require close collaboration between rheumatologists and obstetricians.

  5. Arthroscopic Debridement and Synovium Resection for Inflammatory Hip Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Zhou; Zhong-li Li; Yan Wang; Yu-jie Liu; Shu-ming Zhang; Jie Fu; Zhi-gang Wang; Xu Cai; Min Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of arthroscopic surgery in inflammatory hip arthritis. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted inspecting 40 hips in 36 patients of inflam-matory arthritis. There were 17 cases of ankylosing spondylitis,11 cases of rheumatoid arthritis,and 8 cases of psoriatic arthritis. The joints were irrigated and the inflamed tissues were debrided with anthroscopy. The patients were followed up with Harris hip score,Oxford hip score,Visual Analog Scale (VAS),and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Statistical analysis was performed using Student t test. Results All of the 36 cases were followed up for 46-103 months,averaging 67.2±8.4 months. Har-ris and Oxford scores increased from 66.9±12.1 and 69.4±16.4 before operation to 78.4±19.3 and 80.2±18.8 after operation,respectively (P<0.05). VAS score decreased from pre-operative 8.5±2.5 to post-operative 7.2±2.5 (P<0.05). All the patients showed improved joint range of motion. MRI revealed al-leviation of hip synovitis. The results were classified as excellent in 8 patients,good in 17 patients,fair in 8 patient,and poor in 3 according to Harris hip score. Twenty-seven patients were satisfied with the operative outcomes as they regained normal daily activities. Conclusions Arthroscopy-assisted joint debridement and synovium resection is an effective proce-dure for hip lesion in inflammatory arthritis. The inflammatory lesion might be thereby controlled and the symptoms be relieved.

  6. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and ly...

  7. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  8. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujani Yadlapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren’s syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  9. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis as a model for human inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Deen Christensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI, leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. Firstly, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Secondly, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies in general drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA and it is a potentially valuable tool especially for the pre-clinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory

  10. Clinical significance in detection of inflammatory cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Qian Wang; Yang Tang; Xiu-Yang Li; Da-Jun Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between inflammatory cytokines and rheumatoid arthritis, and explore the clinical application value of cytokines in the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis.Methods:A total of 136 cases of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were regarded as the RA group. Among them, 62 patients were in remission and 74 patients were in the active phase of the disease. Besides, 53 cases of healthy volunteers were considered as the control group. The changes of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IFN-γ of the three groups were compared and the correlation of the inflammatory cytokines in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, DSA28 score and C-reactive protein would be explored. Results:The IL-1β and IFN-γ of patients in remission in the RA group showed no statistical differences as compared with those of the control group; the IL-1β and IFN-γ of patients in the active phase of the disease in the RA group presented statistical differences as compared with those of patients in the control group and patients in remission in the RA group; The IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were compared in pairs and all showed statistical differences; CRP and DSA28 score and IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were positively correlated, while IL-1β, IFN-γ and CRP and DSA 28 score had no correlations.Conclusions:It is of important significance in the clinic to detect inflammatory cytokines in the early diagnosis, disease evaluation and prognostic prediction of rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels.

  12. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona;

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9...

  13. Pulmonary involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Hisham M; Eisa, Ashraf A; Arafat, Waleed R; Marie, Mohamed A

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common and can be due to the disease itself as well as to the therapies used to treat it. The purpose of this study was to disclose the pulmonary involvement in early RA patients not more than 2 years disease duration using the computed tomography (CT) as well as the pulmonary function tests as ways of pulmonary involvement assessment. Forty patients aged 37.6 ± 10.3 with early rheumatoid arthritis not more than 2 years of disease duration were recruited for the study. All patients were assessed clinically for their RA with DAS28, which was utilized for disease activity determination. Ten percent of our patients were found to be clinically involved by interstitial lung disease (ILD), where 27% have abnormal HRCT finding and 32.5% with abnormal PFT. Predilection for clinically manifest ILD was evident in active RA patients with high DAS28 score, seropositive RA patients, and in patients receiving steroids and anti-TNFα therapy. ILD occurs early in the course of RA, with more predilection for clinically active RA disease.

  14. The evidence for microbiome manipulation in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethwa, Hannah; Abraham, Sonya

    2017-09-01

    The human body consists of millions of commensal bacteria (the microbiome), with the intestinal tract being the most prevalent site of colonization. This colonization process begins at birth, and despite numerous factors such as ageing, diet and drug use affecting the microbiome make-up, by adulthood the composition of the gut bacteria is relatively consistent across local populations. The recent advent of new scientific techniques has enabled us to explore how the microbiome affects health and, in particular, has shed light on the involvement of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease. In this review we highlight the current evidence for microbiome manipulation in inflammatory arthritis in animal and human models and discuss potential therapeutics targeting the microbiome as treatment for these diseases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0314 TITLE: Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis ...19 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro- Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... arthritis (RA) patients rely on glucocorticoids (GCs) at some point during the disease. GCs signal through the GC receptor (GR), a transcription factor that

  16. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M;

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  17. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  18. Angiogenesis and blood vessel stability in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Aisling

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess blood vessel stability in inflammatory synovial tissue (ST) and to examine neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), oxidative DNA damage, and hypoxia in vivo. METHODS: Macroscopic vascularity and ST oxygen levels were determined in vivo in patients with inflammatory arthritis who were undergoing arthroscopy. Vessel maturity\\/stability was quantified in matched ST samples by dual immunofluorescence staining for factor VIII (FVIII)\\/alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). NCAM and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Angiogenesis was assessed in vitro, using human dermal endothelial cells (HDECs) in a Matrigel tube formation assay. RESULTS: A significant number of immature vessels (showing no pericyte recruitment) was observed in tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis (P < 0.001), in contrast to osteoarthritic and normal tissue, which showed complete recruitment of pericytes. Low in vivo PO(2) levels in the inflamed joint (median [range] 22.8 [3.2-54.1] mm Hg) were inversely related to increased macroscopic vascularity (P < 0.04) and increased microscopic expression of FVIII and alpha-SMA (P < 0.04 and P < 0.03, respectively). A significant proportion of vessels showed focal expression of NCAM and strong nuclear 8-oxodG expression, implicating a loss of EC-pericyte contact and increased DNA damage, levels of which were inversely associated with low in vivo PO(2) (P = 0.04 for each comparison). Circulating cells were completely negative for 8-oxodG. Exposure of HDEC to 3% O(2) (reflecting mean ST in vivo measurements) significantly increased EC tube formation (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate the presence of unstable vessels in inflamed joints associated with hypoxia, incomplete EC-pericyte interactions, and increased DNA damage. These changes may further contribute to persistent hypoxia in the inflamed joint to further drive this unstable microenvironment.

  19. JNK1, but not JNK2, is required in two mechanistically distinct models of inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denninger, Katja; Rasmussen, Susanne B; Larsen, Jeppe Madura

    2011-01-01

    JNK1- or JNK2-deficient mice in the collagen-induced arthritis and the KRN T-cell receptor transgenic mouse on C57BL/6 nonobese diabetic (K/BxN) serum transfer arthritis models, we demonstrate that JNK1 deficiency results in protection from arthritis, as judged by clinical score and histological...... evaluation in both models of inflammatory arthritis. In contrast, abrogation of JNK2 exacerbates disease. In collagen-induced arthritis, the distinct roles of the JNK isotypes can, at least in part, be explained by altered regulation of CD86 expression in JNK1- or JNK2-deficient macrophages in response...

  20. Leflunomide (Arava in early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Balabanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess efficacy and safety of leflunomide in the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. 30 pts with RA aged 18 to 67 years were examined. 17 pts with disease duration less than 6 months (mean 3,6±2,6 months were included in group 1 and 13 pts with disease duration from 6 months to 3 years (mean 1,8+1,3 years - in group 2. DAS 28, ACR criteria, patient's general health, pain, HAQ, Keitel functional test and laboratory indices were used as outcome measures. Leflunomide was administered 20 mg/day during 12 months. Results. Significant decrease of RA activity indices was achieved during 3 months in both groups. Group 1 pts showed progressive improvement during the whole period of the treatment. Group 2 pts had the most prominent decrease of activity after 6 months of the treatment. Later some of them showed tendency to deterioration of several parameters. In 10 (58,8% pts of group I clinical remission was achieved by the 6th month. The treatment was stopped because of adverse events in 4 pts. Serious adverse events were absent. Conclusion. Leflunomide (arava is a highly effective and well tolerated disease modifying drug for the treatment of early RA. Leflunomide was more effective in pts with disease duration less than 6 months.

  1. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Suppress Inflammatory Activation of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient Synovial Macrophages and Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Grabiec; S. Krausz; W. de Jager; T. Burakowski; D. de Groot; M.E. Sanders; B.J. Prakken; W. Maslinski; E. Eldering; P.P. Tak; K.A. Reedquist

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages contribute significantly to the pathology of many chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Macrophage activation and survival are tightly regulated by reversible acetylation and deacetylation of histones, trans

  3. Treatment of early rheumatoid and undifferentiated arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimans, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on different aspects of treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated arthritis (UA), based on the results of three intervention studies; the IMPROVED-study, the BeSt study and the PROMPT study. This thesis discusses the results of different treatment

  4. Treatment of early rheumatoid and undifferentiated arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimans, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on different aspects of treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated arthritis (UA), based on the results of three intervention studies; the IMPROVED-study, the BeSt study and the PROMPT study. This thesis discusses the results of different treatment

  5. Glucocorticoids and endothelial function in inflammatory diseases: focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Frank; Prati, Clément; Maguin-Gaté, Katy; Wendling, Daniel; Demougeot, Céline

    2016-11-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common systemic autoimmune disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular (CV) diseases. RA increases the CV mortality by up to 50 % compared with the global population and CV disease is the leading cause of death in patients with RA. There is growing evidence that RA favors accelerated atherogenesis secondary to endothelial dysfunction (ED) that occurs early in the course of the disease. ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium towards reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state, proliferative and prothrombotic properties. The mechanistic links between RA and ED have not been fully explained, but growing evidence suggests a role for traditional CV factors, auto-antibodies, genetic factors, oxidative stress, inflammation and iatrogenic interventions such as glucocorticoids (GCs) use. GCs have been used in RA for several decades. Whilst their deleterious CV side effects were described in the 1950s, their effect on CV risk associated with inflammatory arthritis remains subject for debate. GC might induce negative effects on endothelial function, via a direct effect on endothelium or via increasing CV risk factors. Conversely, they might actually improve endothelial function by decreasing systemic and/or vascular inflammation. The present review summarizes the available data on the impact of GCs on endothelial function, both in normal and inflammatory conditions, with a special focus on RA patients.

  6. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future.

  8. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were...... % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations...

  9. Th17 plasticity in human autoimmune arthritis is driven by the inflammatory environment

    OpenAIRE

    Nistala, Kiran; Adams, Stuart; Cambrook, Helen; Ursu, Simona; Olivito, Biagio; de Jager, Wilco; Evans, Jamie G.; Cimaz, Rolando; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2010-01-01

    In several murine models of autoimmune arthritis, Th17 cells are the dominant initiators of inflammation. In human arthritis the majority of IL-17–secreting cells within the joint express a cytokine phenotype intermediate between Th17 and Th1. Here we show that Th17/1 cells from the joints of children with inflammatory arthritis express high levels of both Th17 and Th1 lineage-specific transcription factors, RORC2 and T-bet. Modeling the generation of Th17/1 in vitro, we show that Th17 cells ...

  10. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Deficiency Inhibits Autoimmune Arthritis in Mice but Fails to Block Immune Complex-Mediated Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhoff, Lindsay E; Barron, Bridgette L; Johnson, Elizabeth M; Bonami, Rachel H; Maseda, Damian; Fensterheim, Benjamin A; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S; Crofford, Leslie J; Kendall, Peggy L

    2016-08-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a B cell signaling protein that also contributes to innate immunity. BTK inhibitors prevent autoimmune arthritis but have off-target effects, and the mechanisms of protection remain unknown. We undertook these studies using genetic deletion to investigate the role of BTK in adaptive and innate immune responses that drive inflammatory arthritis. BTK-deficient K/BxN mice were generated to study the role of BTK in a spontaneous model that requires both adaptive and innate immunity. The K/BxN serum-transfer model was used to bypass the adaptive system and elucidate the role of BTK in innate immune contributions to arthritis. BTK deficiency conferred disease protection to K/BxN mice, confirming outcomes of BTK inhibitors. B lymphocytes were profoundly reduced, more than in other models of BTK deficiency. Subset analysis revealed loss of B cells at all developmental stages. Germinal center B cells were also decreased, with downstream effects on numbers of follicular helper T cells and greatly reduced autoantibodies. In contrast, total IgG was only mildly decreased. Strikingly, and in contrast to small molecule inhibitors, BTK deficiency had no effect in the serum-transfer model of arthritis. BTK contributes to autoimmune arthritis primarily through its role in B cell signaling and not through innate immune components. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in early undifferentiated peripheral arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Evgeniyevich Karateev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the effect of a drug of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA in patients with early undifferentiated peripheral arthritis (UPA on the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the induction of remission, the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, the immunological manifestations of the disease during a 12-week follow-up. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 40 patients with UPA and a symptom duration of less than 12 months, who took nonsteroidal anti-inflamma tory drugs (NSAIDs and omega-3 PUFA (Vitrum Cardio Omega-3 as one capsule twice daily for 12 weeks. A control group comprised 20 patients with UPA receiving therapy with NSAIDs for 3 months. The groups did not differ significantly (p > 0.05 in age (42.98±10.81 and 48.25±13.92 years, the duration of symptoms (6.73±2.81 and 5.95±2.54 months, the number of patients positive for rheumatoid factor [14 (35% and 7 (35%] and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide [9 (22.5% and 7 (35%] patients, the duration of morning stiffness (35.6±25.82 and 37.0±19.15 min, the number of swollen (3.08±1.39 and 3.30±1.21 and tender (3.63±1.63 and 3.85±1.69 joints, and DAS 28 (4.21±0.65 and 4.35±0.63. Results. The use of omega-3 PUFA did not affect significantly the incidence of RA and the use of DMARDs. Clinical remission and low DAS28 were considerably observed in the study group patients, but no statistical significance was achieved. The dose of NSAIDs, including on-demand drugs, was decreased in 22 (55% and 4 (20% patients in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.013. At 12 weeks, the study group showed signifi cant reductions in the number of tender joints, the duration of morning stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, DAS 28, and interleukin 6 levels (p < 0.05; no significant changes were found in the control group. There were no significant differences in the frequency of undesirable events. Conclusion. Omega-3 PUFAs

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of sphingosine kinase modulation in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wen-Qi; Irwan, Anastasia Windy; Goh, Hong Heng; Howe, Hwee Siew; Yu, David T; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; McInnes, Iain B; Melendez, Alirio J; Leung, Bernard P

    2008-12-01

    Sphingosine kinase (SphK) is a key enzyme in the sphingolipid metabolic pathway responsible for phosphorylating sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). SphK/S1P play a critical role in angiogenesis, inflammation, and various pathologic conditions. Recently, S1P(1) receptor was found to be expressed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovium, and S1P signaling via S1P(1) enhances synoviocyte proliferation, COX-2 expression, and prostaglandin E(2) production. Here, we examined the role of SphK/S1P in RA using a potent SphK inhibitor, N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS), and a molecular approach against one of its isoenzymes, SphK1. We observed that levels of S1P in the synovial fluid of RA patients were significantly higher than those of osteoarthritis patients. Additionally, DMS significantly reduced the levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1beta, MCP-1, and MMP-9 in cell-contact assays using both Jurkat-U937 cells and RA PBMCs. In a murine collagen-induced arthritis model, i.p. administration of DMS significantly inhibited disease severity and reduced articular inflammation and joint destruction. Treatment of DMS also down-regulated serum levels IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, S1P, and IgG1 and IgG2a anti-collagen Ab. Furthermore, DMS-treated mice also displayed suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in response to type II collagen in vitro. Moreover, similar reduction in incidence and disease activity was observed in mice treated with SphK1 knock-down via small interfering RNA approach. Together, these results demonstrate SphK modulation may provide a novel approach in treating chronic autoimmune conditions such as RA by inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  14. Left ventricular function in treatment-naive early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Deibjerg, Lone K; Nielsen, Agnete Desirèe;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of inflammation and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. Previous studies have suggested that both disease activity and disease duration are associated...

  15. Interleukin-23 in early disease development in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, M; Johansen, C;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the levels of interleukin (IL)-23 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) and the effect of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-α treatment on IL-23 levels. METHOD: Treatment-naïve eRA patients from the OPERA cohort were included (n = 151). Patients were...

  16. Systemic immune markers characterizing early stages of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalan, Paulina Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease occurring in ~1% of the world population. The main feature of the disease is ongoing joint inflammation, caused by immune cells and their soluble factors, leading to irreversible bone erosions and cartilage damage. Early treatment can halt progres

  17. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities.

  18. Early and late synovectomy of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C M; Poulsen, S; Ostergren, M

    1991-01-01

    The results after open knee synovectomy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis were investigated in a retrospective study including 44 patients with 55 knees. Median observation time was 73 months. Early synovectomy showed significant pain-relief and improvement of knee function, effusion...... treatment has failed. Late synovectomy must be regarded as a palliative procedure in order to postpone TKA....

  19. Disease associated time consumption in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, IH; Prevoo, MLL; van Leeuwen, MA; van Riel, PLCM; Lolkema, WF; Postma, DS; van Rijswijk, MH

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the disease associated time consumption of normal activities of daily living and of treatment and monitoring activities in a cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with followup of at least 6 years. Comparison was made with a group of patients with asthma and

  20. A Toll-like Receptor 1 Polymorphism Is Associated with Heightened T-helper 1 Inflammatory Responses and Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strle, Klemen; Shin, Junghee J.; Glickstein, Lisa J.; Steere, Allen C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in several genes encoding Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that alter immune function, inflammatory responses and disease susceptibility. The SNPs with best evidence for affecting immune function are TLR1 (1805GG), TLR2 (2258GA) and TLR5 (1174CT). Methods We studied the frequency and functional outcome of these polymorphisms in 248 patients with Lyme disease. Cytokine and chemokine levels were determined in serum of patients with erythema migrans (EM), joint fluid of patients with Lyme arthritis, and supernatants of B. burgdorferi-stimulated PBMC from Lyme arthritis patients, using multiplex assays. Results The frequency of TLR1-1805GG polymorphism was greater in patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis compared with patients with EM or antibiotic-responsive arthritis. Early in the illness, EM patients with 1805GG, primarily those infected with B. burgdorferi RST1 strains, had higher serum levels of IFNγ, CXCL9 and CXCL10, and more severe infection than patients with 1805TG/TT. These inflammatory responses were amplified in patients with Lyme arthritis, and the highest responses were observed in antibiotic-refractory arthritis patients with 1805GG who had been infected with RST1 strains. When PBMC from Lyme arthritis patients were stimulated with a B. burgdorferi RST1 strain, the 1805GG group had significantly larger fold-increase in the levels of IFNγ, CCL2, CXCL9 and CXCL10, than the 1805TG/TT group. In contrast, the TLR2 and TLR5 polymorphisms did not vary among groups in frequency or function. Conclusion The TLR1-1805GG polymorphism in B. burgdorferi RST1-infected patients was associated with stronger TH1-like inflammatory responses, which may set the stage for antibiotic-refractory arthritis. PMID:22246581

  1. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Ian K.; O’Donnell, Kristy; Lawlor, Kate E.; Wicks, Ian P

    2001-01-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf–/–) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf–/– mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evid...

  2. Protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis by the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Hua; Ping, Li-Feng; Sun, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Juan

    2016-12-01

    Taraxasterol is an effective component of dandelion that has anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. The present study was performed to explore whether taraxasterol exhibits a protective effect against rheumatoid arthritis through the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. Eight-week-old CCR9-deficient mice were injected with a collagen II monoclonal antibody cocktail to create a rheumatoid arthritis model. In the experimental group, arthritic model mice were treated with 10 mg/kg taraxasterol once per day for 5 days. Treatment with taraxasterol significantly increased the pain thresholds and reduced the clinical arthritic scores of the mice in the experimental group compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, treatment with taraxasterol significantly suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nuclear factor-κB protein expression levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Taraxasterol treatment also significantly reduced nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model group. These observations indicate that the protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis is mediated via the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

  3. Early-onset arthritis in retired National Football League players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Marshall, Stephen W; Callahan, Leigh F; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Injury has been identified as a potential risk factor for osteoarthritis. However, no previous study has addressed playing-career injuries and subsequent osteoarthritis in a large sample of former athletes. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and determinants of arthritis and osteoarthritis in retired professional football players. Self-reported arthritis prevalence and retrospectively-recalled injury history were examined in a cross-sectional survey of 2,538 retired football players. Football players reported a high incidence of injury from their professional playing days (52.8% reported knee injuries, 74.1% reported ligament/tendon injuries, and 14.2% reported anterior cruciate ligament tears). For those under 60 years, 40.6% of retired NFL players reported arthritis, compared with 11.7% of U.S. males (prevalence ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 3.3 to 3.7). Within the retired NFL player cohort, osteoarthritis was more prevalent in those with a history of knee injury (prevalence ratio = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.5 to 1.9) and ligament/tendon injury (prevalence ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.4 to 1.9). In males under the age of 60, arthritis is over 3 times more prevalent in retired NFL players than in the general U.S. population. This excess of early-onset arthritis may be due to the high incidence of injury in football.

  4. PHENOTYPIC FEATURES OF T REGULATORY CELLS IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the count and characteristics of the phenotype of T regulatory cells (Treg in the peripheral blood of healthy donors and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA, by using multicolor flow cytometry.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 39 patients with early RA. The percentage and absolute count of Treg (FoxP3+CD25+, surface CD152+, intracellular CD152+, FoxP3+CD127, CD25+CD127, FoxP3+ICOS+, FoxP3+CD154+; and FoxP3+CD274+ was determined by multicolor flow-cytometry. A control group consisted of 20 healthy donors matched for sex and age with the examined patients.Results and discussion. In the patients included in the study, the median [25th; 75th percentiles] DAS28 was 5.01 [4.2; 5.8]; high, moderate, and low activity showed 22 (48.9%, 20 (44.4%, and 3 (6.7% patients, respectively. The patients with early RA had a lower percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ cells and a lower percentage and absolute count of FoxP3+ICOS+, FoxP3+CD154+, and FoxP3+CD274+ T cells than the healthy donors (p<0.05 in all cases. There was a negative correlation of the percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ cells with C-reactive protein (CRP (r = -0.4, that of intracellular CD152+ with DAS28 (r = -0.35, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR (r = -0.46, and CRP (r=-0.54; that of FoxP3+CD127 with CRP (r = -0.42; that of CD25+CD127 with DAS28 (r = -0.38, Simplified Disease Activity Index (r = -0.41, Clinical Disease Activity Index (r = -0.36, ESR (r = -0.39, and CRP (r = -0.47 (p < 0.05 in all cases.Conclusion. The findings suggest that the functional activity of Treg is impaired in early RA, which has an impact on the activity of the inflammatory process.

  5. General characteristics of an early arthritis cohort in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Josefina; Waimann, Christian; Dal Pra, Fernando; Hogrefe, Jimena; Retamozo, Soledad; Caeiro, Francisco; Casalla, Luciana; Benegas, Mariana; Rillo, Oscar; Spindler, Alberto; Berman, Horacio; Berman, Alberto; Secco, Anastasia; García Salinas, Rodrigo; Catalán Pellet, Antonio; Ceccato, Federico; Paira, Sergio; Marcos, Juan C; Maldonado Cocco, José A; Citera, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the general characteristics of a cohort of patients with early arthritis in Argentina. CONAART (Consorcio Argentino de Artritis Temprana--Argentine Consortium for Early Arthritis) is an initiative of seven rheumatology centres across Argentina. Patients were included if they had at least one or more swollen joints and <2 years of disease duration. Social, demographic, familiar, hereditary, clinical and laboratory data were recollected. At first visit and every year, X-rays of hands and feet were performed and working characteristics and pharmaco-economic data were re-collected. A total of 413 patients were included. Of them, 327 (79.2%) were women with a median age of 49 years and a median disease duration of 6 months. Of the total, 183 (44.3%) had RA (ACR 1987) and 167 (40.4%) undifferentiated arthritis (UA). Other diagnoses included: 12 crystalics, 11 PsA, 6 uSpA, 6 other CTD, 1 AS and 27 other diagnosis. As 85% of our population had RA and UA, we only compared these two groups of patients. Patients with RA had significantly worse activity parameters of the disease (DAS of 28 joints), functional capacity (HAQ) and quality of life (Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life) than patients with UA. The frequency of RF and anti-CCP, and symmetrical distribution were also significantly higher in patients with RA compared with UA patients. All patients with RA initiated early specific treatment, in a period no longer than 6 months from the beginning of the disease. Early arthritis clinics are a useful tool to identify and treat patients with different forms of joint involvement.

  6. Uncoupling of inflammatory and destructive mechanisms in arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update clinicians on recent advances in the differentiation of the mechanisms of inflammation and cartilage destruction in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We present analysis of recent published literature and abstracts that elucidates the independent actions of

  7. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model. METHODS: Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed. RESULTS: Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  8. Lithothamnion muelleri treatment ameliorates inflammatory and hypernociceptive responses in antigen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian V Costa

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic disease characterized by persistent inflammation and pain. Alternative therapies to reduce these symptoms are needed. Marine algae are valuable sources of diverse bioactive compounds. Lithothamnion muelleri (Hapalidiaceae is a marine algae with anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunomodulatory properties. Here, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of L. muelleri in a murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA in mice. Our results demonstrate that treatment with L. muelleri prevented inflammation and hypernociception in arthritic mice. Mechanistically, the crude extract and the polysaccharide-rich fractions of L. muelleri may act impairing the production of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, and consequently inhibit neutrophil influx to the knee joint by dampening the adhesion step of leukocyte recruitment in the knee microvessels. Altogether our results suggest that treatment with L.muelleri has a potential therapeutic application in arthritis treatment.

  9. Coexistence of hypothyroidism with inflammatory arthritis is associated with cardiovascular disease in women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raterman, H.G.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Peters, M.J.L.; Verheij, R.A.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypothyroidism and inflammatory arthritis tend to coexist, but data on this association are sparse. In terms of cardiovascular risk, this association may have clinical relevance as this coexistence may carry an additional cardiovascular risk. This study calculates, first, the prevalence

  10. Coexistence of hypothyroidism with inflammatory arthritis is associated with cardiovascular disease in women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raterman, H.G.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Peters, M.J.L.; Verheij, R.A.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypothyroidism and inflammatory arthritis tend to coexist, but data on this association are sparse. In terms of cardiovascular risk, this association may have clinical relevance as this coexistence may carry an additional cardiovascular risk. This study calculates, first, the prevalence

  11. The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Arthritis Group - advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Bird, Paul;

    2007-01-01

    This article updates the work and research priorities of the OMERACT working group on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis, as presented to the OMERACT 8 meeting in Malta in May 2006. This work focused on testing the reliability of dedicated extremity MRI in rheumatoid...

  12. Inflammatory memories: is epigenetics the missing link to persistent stromal cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ospelt; K.A. Reedquist; S. Gay; P.P. Tak

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to joint destruction. Synovial fibroblasts are recognized as key cells in the pathogenesis of RA since they attract and activate immune cells and produce matrix degrading enzymes. Most notably synovial fibroblasts from patients with

  13. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis: a population-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Little is known about the presence of chronic morbidity in inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients at disease onset. Previous studies have been mainly performed in established IA patients or they focus on isolated co-morbid diseases. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of chronic disease

  14. Cardiovascular diseases-related hospital admissions of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), suggesting a high rate of CVD-related hospitalizations, but data on this topic are limited. Our study addressed hospital admissions for CVD in a primary care-based population of patients wit

  15. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination and varicella status in inflammatory arthritis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, E M

    2011-11-15

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections. This risk is increased by immunomodulatory therapies. Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcal disease reduces the risk. Severe cases of varicella infection have occurred in patients on biologic therapies. We sought to identify vaccination rates for commonly acquired infections and to ascertain varicella immune status in patients with inflammatory arthritis. 100 patients with inflammatory arthritis were administered a standardised questionnaire. Data collected included age, diagnosis, vaccination history, history of varicella, treatment and the presence of other indications for vaccination. 58 patients (58%) had not received the influenza vaccine in the past year. Only 19 patients (19%) had ever received pneumococcal vaccine. Anti TNF use did not predict vaccination (p = .46). An increasing number of co morbid conditions predicted both pneumococcal (p < 0.003) and influenza vaccine (p < 0.03) administration. Nineteen patients (19%) gave no history of varicella infection, none having had varicella titres checked pre treatment. Immunisation rates in patients with inflammatory arthritis on immunosuppressive therapies are low. Immunisation schedules should be available for each patient during rheumatology and general practice consultations.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging applications in early rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga; Olech, Ewa

    2012-05-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment have been recognized as essential for improving clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive modality that can assess both inflammatory and structural lesions. MRI can assist in following the disease course in patients treated with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapies both in the clinic and in research trials. Therefore, it is anticipated that MRI becomes the diagnostic imaging modality of choice in RA clinical trials while remaining a useful tool for clinicians evaluating patients with RA.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutger Persson, G.

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS) to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, pperiodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs) that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusions Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis) carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance knowledge and develop clinical strategies how to coordinate therapy and risk assessments

  18. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  19. 13-Series resolvins mediate the leukocyte-platelet actions of atorvastatin and pravastatin in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary E; Souza, Patricia R; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond

    2017-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition characterized by overzealous inflammation that leads to joint damage and is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Statins are frontline therapeutics for patients with cardiovascular disease and exert beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism that mediates the beneficial actions of statins in rheumatoid arthritis remains of interest. In the present study, we found that the administration of 2 clinically relevant statins-atorvastatin (0.2 mg/kg) or pravastatin (0.2 mg/kg)-to mice during inflammatory arthritis up-regulated systemic and tissue amounts of a novel family of proresolving mediators, termed 13-series resolvins (RvTs), and significantly reduced joint disease. Of note, administration of simvastatin (0.2 mg/kg) did not significantly up-regulate RvTs or reduce joint inflammation. We also found that atorvastatin and pravastatin each reduced systemic leukocyte activation, including platelet-monocyte aggregates (∼25-60%). These statins decreased neutrophil trafficking to the joint as well as joint monocyte and macrophage numbers. Atorvastatin and pravastatin produced significant reductions (∼30-50%) in expression of CD11b and major histocompatibility complex class II on both monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in joints. Administration of an inhibitor to cyclooxygenase-2, the initiating enzyme in the RvT pathway, reversed the protective actions of these statins on both joint and systemic inflammation. Together, these findings provide evidence for the role of RvTs in mediating the protective actions of atorvastatin and pravastatin in reducing local and vascular inflammation, and suggest that RvTs may be useful in measuring the anti-inflammatory actions of statins.-Walker, M. E., Souza, P. R., Colas, R. A., Dalli, J. 13-Series resolvins mediate the leukocyte-platelet actions of atorvastatin and pravastatin in inflammatory arthritis. © The Author(s).

  20. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytokines as therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Stefan; Tsoukas, Alexander; Robertson, Jamie; McInnes, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The human immune system involves highly complex and coordinated processes in which small proteins named cytokines play a key role. Cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokines are therefore attractive therapeutic targets in these conditions. Anticytokine therapy for inflammatory diseases became a clinical reality with the introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis. Although these therapies have transformed the treatment of patients with severe inflammatory arthritis, there remain significant limiting factors: treatment failure is commonly seen in the clinic; safety concerns remain; there is uncertainty regarding the relevance of immunogenicity; the absence of biomarkers to direct therapy decisions and high drug costs limit availability in some healthcare systems. In this article, we provide an overview of the key efficacy and safety trials for currently approved treatments in rheumatoid arthritis and review the major lessons learned from a decade of use in clinical practice, focusing mainly on anti-TNF and anti-interleukin (IL)-6 agents. We also describe the clinical application of anticytokine therapies for other inflammatory diseases, particularly within the spondyloarthritis spectrum, and highlight differential responses across diseases. Finally, we report on the current state of trials for newer therapeutic targets, focusing mainly on the IL-17 and IL-23 pathways.

  2. The Agreement Between Blood Pool - Delayed Bone Scintigraphy and Tc-99m Human Immunoglobulin G (HIG Scintigraphy in the Determination of the Presence and Severity of Inflammatory Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulizar Kacar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, it was aimed to investigate the agreement between early phase of bone scintigraphy – human immunoglobulin scintigraphy (EPBS-HIG and late phase bone scintigraphy – HIG (LPBS-HIG in the determination of the presence and also the severity of inflammatory arthritis. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (23 female, 5 male; between 19 to 80 years of age with inflammatory arthritis were included in the study. Tc-99m HIG and blood pool/late phase bone scintigraphies were performed in all patients. In scintigraphic examinations, the joints were scored with the degree of accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical by the semiquantitative analysis (0=Background activity, 1=Faint uptake, 2=Moderate uptake, 3=Marked uptake which is called as visually active joint score as severity index of the disease. To estimate the agreement between EPBS – HIG and LPBS - HIG in the determination of the presence and severity of inflammatory arthritis, 2x2 kappa coefficients were calculated. Results: Our results showed good agreement between EPBS - HIG for the presence of inflammation (kappa: 0.72 but not for the severity of the disease (kappa: 0.29, poor agreement between LPBS - HIG for both the presence (kappa: 0.51 and severity (kappa: 0.01 of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusion: The blood pool scintigraphy could be used in the investigation of the presence of inflammatory arthritis because the good agreement with HIG and the lower cost but not for the severity of the disease. (MIRT 2011;20:45-51

  3. Further optimization of the reliability of the 28-joint disease activity score in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Liseth Siemons; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald E.; van de laar, Mart A. F. J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) combines scores on a 28-tender and swollen joint count (TJC28 and SJC28), a patient-reported measure for general health (GH), and an inflammatory marker (either the erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR] or the C-reactive protein [CRP]) into a composite measure of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined the reliability of the DAS28 in patients with early RA using principles from generalizability theory and evalua...

  4. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: roles of magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, conventional radiography and computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, Bo; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While conventional X-rays only visualize the late signs of preceding disease activity, there is evidence for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography being highly sensitive...... for early inflammatory and destructive changes in RA joints, and for MRI findings being sensitive to change and of predictive value for future progressive X-ray damage. Reviewing the data on X-ray, computed tomography, MRI and ultrasonography in RA, this paper discusses current and future roles...... of these imaging modalities in the management of early RA. The main focus is on recent advances in MRI and ultrasonography. Suggestions on clinical use and research priorities are provided...

  5. How early should psoriatic arthritis be treated with a TNF-blocker?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harty, Leonard

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most commonly identified inflammatory arthropathy in early arthritis clinics. It is a complex multisystem disease involving the skin and joints, but may also present with inflammation of the spine - spondylitis, digits - dactylitis, eyes - uveitis and ligamentous insertions - enthesitis. The skin manifestations may be mild or patchy and often precede the joint inflammation. Joint erosions, however, may occur within the first 2 years in up to half of PsA patients and an erosion rate of 11% per annum has been reported suggesting it is not a benign disease as it was once regarded. RECENT FINDINGS: Therapy with mild anti-inflammatories is only beneficial in very mild or localized disease. In cases of more widespread joint involvement systemic therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate may be required and in the case of extra-articular or spinal disease, in which DMARDs have failed to show efficacy, biologic therapy may be highly effective. SUMMARY: The question of how early treatment should be instituted should be decided in a specialist rheumatology referral centre following appropriate assessment. Optimal therapy with combination DMARD and biologics may result in remission rates of up to 60%.

  6. [Inflammatory myopathy with initial respiratory muscles involvement and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Martín; Telias, Irene; Collado, Victoria; Sarano, Judith; Alvarez, Clarisa; Suárez, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies comprise a heterogeneous group of subacute, chronic and sometimes acute acquired muscle diseases. The most common inflammatory myopathies seen in practice can be separated into four distinct subsets: polymyositis, dermatomyositis, necrotizing autoimmune myositis and inclusion body myositis. These disorders present as proximal and symmetric muscle weakness but rarely respiratory muscles may also be affected. We report the case of a 39 year-old female with inflammatory myopathy with acute respiratory failure due to alveolar hypoventilation secondary to respiratory muscle dysfunction that required mechanical ventilation. The treatment with steroids, methotrexate and intravenous immune globulin was successful as well as the implementation of non-invasive ventilation as an alternative to endotracheal intubation.

  7. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  8. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of hand and foot MRI for early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Mangnus, Lukas; Newsum, Elize C; Bloem, Johan L; Huizinga, Tom W J; le Cessie, Saskia; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2017-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI for early RA. In some RA patients, a classifiable diagnosis cannot be made at first presentation; these patients present with unclassified arthritis (UA). The use of MRI for early diagnosis of RA is recommended, yet the evidence for its reliability is limited. MRI of hand and foot was performed in 589 early arthritis patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (229 presented with RA, 159 with other arthritides and 201 with UA). Symptom-free controls provided a reference for defining an abnormal MRI. In preliminary investigations, MRI of patients who presented with RA was compared with MRI of symptom-free controls and of patients with other arthritides. Thereafter, the value of MRI in early RA diagnosis was determined in UA patients using the 1-year follow-up on fulfilling the 1987 RA criteria and start of disease-modifying drugs as outcomes. Preliminary investigations were promising. Of the UA patients, 14% developed RA and 37% started disease-modifying treatment. MRI-detected tenosynovitis was associated with RA development independent of other types of MRI-detected inflammation [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, 95% CI: 2.4, 23] and also independent of age and other inflammatory measures (swollen joints, CRP) (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12.9). Within UA patients, the negative predictive value of abnormal tenosynovitis was 95% (95% CI: 89%, 98%) and the positive predictive value 25% (95% CI: 17%, 35%). The performance was best in the subgroup of UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis (18% developed RA): the positive predictive value was 36% (95% CI: 23%, 52%), the negative predictive value was 98% (95% CI: 88%, 100%), the sensitivity was 93% (95% CI: 70%, 99%) and the specificity was 63% (95% CI: 51%, 74%). MRI contributes to the identification of UA patients who will develop RA, mostly in UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis.

  9. Role of sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate in inflammatory arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alirio; J; Melendez; Bernard; P; Leung

    2010-01-01

    The importance of sphingosine kinase(SphK)and sphingosine-1-phosphate(S1P)in inflammation has been extensively demonstrated.As an intracellular second messenger,S1P plays an important role in calcium signaling and mobilization,and cell proliferation and survival.Activation of various plasma membrane receptors,such as the formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine receptor,C5a receptor,and tumor necrosis factor α receptor,leads to a rapid increase in intracellular S1P level via SphK stimulation.SphK and S1P are implicated in various chronic autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjgren’s syndrome,and inflammatory bowel disease.Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of SphK and S1P in the development of arthritis by regulating the pro-inflammatory responses.These novel pathways represent exciting potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Combined therapeutic approach: Inflammatory bowel diseases and peripheral or axial arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiola Atzeni; Sandro Ardizzone; Luca Bertani; Marco Antivalle; Alberto Batticciotto; Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), particularly Crohn's disease(CD) and ulcerative colitis(UC), are associated with a variety of extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs). About 36% of IBD patients have at least one EIM, which most frequently affect the joints,skin, eyes and the biliary tract. The EIMs associated with IBD have a negative impact on patients with UC and CD, and the resolution of most of them parallels that of the active IBD in terms of timing and required therapy; however, the clinical course of EIMs such as axial arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis is independent of IBD activity. The peripheral and axial arthritis associated with IBD have traditionally been treated with simple analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs,steroids, sulfasalazine, methotrexate, local steroid injections and physiotherapy, but the introduction of biological response modifiers such as tumor necrosis factor-α blockers, has led to further improvements.

  11. Acute gouty arthritis as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS in HIV-infected subjects initiating antiretroviral therapy most commonly involves new or worsening manifestations of previously subclinical or overt infectious diseases. Reports of non-infectious IRIS are much less common but represent important diagnostic and treatment challenges. We report on a 34-year-old HIV-infected male patient with no history of gout who developed acute gouty arthritis in a single joint one month after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  12. Folate Receptor-Targeted Dendrimer-Methotrexate Conjugate for Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Rong; Majoros, Istvan; Misra, Asish C; Koch, Alisa E; Campbell, Phil; Marotte, Hubert; Bergin, Ingrid L; Cao, Zhengyi; Goonewardena, Sascha; Morry, Jingga; Zhang, Shuai; Beer, Michael; Makidon, Paul; Kotlyar, Alina; Thomas, Thommey P; Baker, James R

    2015-08-01

    Generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamide) (PAMAM) dendrimers are synthetic polymers that have been broadly applied as drug delivery carriers. Methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate metabolite, has been successfully used as an anti-inflammatory drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the clinic. In this study, we examine the therapeutic efficacy of G5 PAMAM dendrimer methotrexate conjugates (G5-MTX) that also have folic acid (FA) conjugated to the G5-MTX (G5-FA-MTX) to target inflammation-activated folate receptors overexpressing macrophages. These cells are thought to play an important role in the development of RA. With G5 serving as a control, the in vitro binding affinities of G5-FA-MTX and G5-MTX to activated macrophages were assessed in RAW264.7, NR8383 and primary rat peritoneal macrophages. The results indicated that the binding of either conjugate to macrophages was concentration- and temperature-dependent and could be blocked by the presence of 6.25 mM free FA (p < 0.005). The preventive effects of G5-MTX and G5-FA-MTX conjugates on the development of arthritis were explored on an adjuvant-induced inflammatory arthritis model and had similar preventive effects in inflammatory arthritis at a MTX equivalent dose of 4.95 μmol/kg. These studies indicated that when multiples of MTX are conjugated on dendritic polymers, they specifically bind to folate receptor overexpressing macrophages and have comparable anti-inflammatory effects to folate targeted MTX conjugated polymers.

  13. Clinical and immunological features of early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Shostak

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study clinical and immunological features of rheumatoid arthritis (RA early stage. Material and Methods. 130 RA pts aged 16 to 80 years (mean age 52,5 years, 105 female and 25 male were examined. 55 pts had disease duration up to 1 year, 34 - between 1 and 3 years and 41 - more than 3 years. Standard clinical, laboratory and radiological examination was performed in all pts. In 43 pts with earlv RA T and В cell receptors were studied with monoclonal antibodies against CD3, CD72, CD4, CD8, CDI6. Results. The most frequent initial symptoms preceding characteristic RA picture were arthralgia (39,2%, fever (34,6% and body weight loss (24,6%. Mono- or oligoarticuiar onset with subsequent quick transformation into polyarthritis within one year revealed in 61,5% of pts was the usual feature of early RA. The most frequent false diagnoses in early RA were osteoarthritis (in 25,1%, reactive arthritis (in 24,9% and gout (in 4,6%. Male pts had longer morning stiffness, higher levels of C-reactive protein, more pronounced functional disability, T and В cell immunity activation than female. Conclusion. Understanding of essential clinical and immunologic features of early RA will allow to diagnose the disease in time.

  14. Significance of arthrosonography for knee joint damage diagnosis in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L V Sizova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess significance of arthrosonography in diagnosis of in knee joint changes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. 44 patients with early RA aged 19 to 73 years were examined. 29,5% of pts had early RA without primary osteoarthritis (OA, 70,5% had early RA with primary OA. Ultrasonography of knee joints was performed with Diasonics (USA, 1997 by the linear sensor with frequency of 7 MHz. The protocol of ultrasonic examination of knee joints was filled for each pt. Results. Clinical signs of of knee joint synovitis have been revealed in 61,5% of pts with early RA without primary OA, and in 80,6% of pts with early RA with primary OA, ultrasonic - in 100% of pts. Intraarticular knee joint effusion resulted in increase of suprapatellar bursa and lateral recesses size. Extraarticular inflammation was frequently shown by thickening of semymemranous muscles tendons, especially in pts with the early RA with primary OA (p<0,005. Degenerative changes in the group of pts with primary OA were more expressed in early RA and usually accompanied by non-uniform decrease of cartilage thickness and occurrence of osteophytes while cartilage in pts with early RA without primary OA had normal thickness or thickening because of swelling, and osteophytes were absent. Conclusion. Prevalence of knee joint intraarticular and extraarticular inflammatory changes over degenerate changes (symmetric thickening of the synovium, primary increase of the sizes of suprapatellar bursa and lateral recesses because of effusion, thickening of tendons of knee joints at the normal or increased thickness of cartilage because of inflammation can be considered sonographic sign of early RA. In pts with early RA coincided with primary OA these changes were usually found in combination with non-uniform decrease of cartilage thickness. In case of cartilage inflammatory edema, detection of osteophytes allows to confirm presence of OA in pts with

  15. Cardiovascular disease prevalence in patients with inflammatory arthritis, diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielen Markus MJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is accumulating evidence for an increased cardiovascular burden in inflammatory arthritis, but the true magnitude of this cardiovascular burden is still debated. We sought to determine the prevalence rate of non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD in inflammatory arthritis, diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis (non-systemic inflammatory comparator compared to controls, in primary care. Methods Data on CVD morbidity (ICPC codes K75 (myocardial infarction, K89 (transient ischemic attack, and/or K90 (stroke/cerebrovascular accident from patients with inflammatory arthritis (n = 1,518, diabetes mellitus (n = 11,959, osteoarthritis (n = 4,040 and controls (n = 158,439 were used from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH, a large nationally representative primary care based cohort. Data were analyzed using multi-level logistic regression analyses and corrected for age, gender, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Results CVD prevalence rates were significantly higher in inflammatory arthritis, diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis compared with controls. These results attenuated - especially in diabetes mellitus - but remained statistically significant after adjustment for age, gender, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia for inflammatory arthritis (OR = 1.5 (1.2-1.9 and diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.3 (1.2-1.4. The association between osteoarthritis and CVD reversed after adjustment (OR = 0.8 (0.7-1.0. Conclusions These results confirm an increased prevalence rate of CVD in inflammatory arthritis to levels resembling diabetes mellitus. By contrast, lack of excess CVD in osteoarthritis further suggests that the systemic inflammatory load is critical to the CVD burden in inflammatory arthritis.

  16. EXPERIENCE OF THE ADALIMUMAB APPLICATION FOR THE PATIENT WITH EARLY DEBUT OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS AND UVEITIS

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    K. B. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of early debut and heavy course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the patient at the age of 1 year and 8 months, associated with uveitis refractory to the therapy by methotrexate and nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations is presented. The given clinical example shows high therapeutic efficiency of the adalimumab. To the 8th week of treatment inflammatory changes in conjunctiva were stopped, to the 12th week the stage of inactive illness was registered, i.e. the patient had no inflammatory changes in joints, uveitis activity signs, increase of laboratory indicators of illness activity. Duration of remission of articulate syndrome and uveitis made 9 months.

  17. Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Ardle, Angela; Flatley, Brian; Pennington, Stephen R; FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate

  18. Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Ardle, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate

  19. Circadian rhythm and the influence of physical activity on circulating surfactant protein D in early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A F; Hoegh, S V; Lottenburger, T

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the collectin family and has pro-and anti-inflammatory capacities depending on its oligomerization. Previously, circulating SP-D was shown to be decreased in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and negatively correlated to disease activity. This study aimed...

  20. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook [College of Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 1, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Youngsook, E-mail: ysson@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Biotechnology and Department of Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus, Seochun-dong, Kiheung-ku, Yong In 441-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  1. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions in patients with early arthritis: a systematic literature review informing the 2016 update of EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daien, Claire Immediato; Hua, Charlotte; Combe, Bernard; Landewe, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To perform a systematic literature review (SLR) on pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, in order to inform the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of early arthritis (EA). The expert committee defined research questions concerning non-pharmacological interventions, patient information and education, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, glucocorticoid (GC) and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) use, as well as on disease monitoring. The SLR included articles published after the last EULAR SLR until November 2015 found in the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases and abstracts from the 2014 and 2015 American College of Rheumatology and EULAR conferences. Exercise programmes may improve pain and physical function in patients with EA. Patients with EA treated within the first 3 months of symptoms have better clinical and radiological outcomes than those treated beyond 3 months. The clinical and radiological efficacy of GCs is confirmed, with similar efficacy of oral and parenteral administrations. Long-term data raise concerns regarding cardiovascular safety when using GCs. Step-up DMARD therapy is as effective as intensive DMARD therapy 'ab initio' for the long-term outcome of EA. Short-term superiority of intensive therapy with bDMARDs is not maintained on withdrawal of bDMARD. Patients with early psoriatic arthritis have better skin and joint outcomes when tight control is used compared to standard care. The findings confirm the beneficial effect of exercise programmes and the importance of early drug therapy and tight control. They support the use of methotrexate and GCs as first-line drugs, although the long-term use of GCs raises safety concerns.

  2. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions in patients with early arthritis: a systematic literature review informing the 2016 update of EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAIEN, Claire Immediato; HUA, Charlotte; COMBE, Bernard; LANDEWE, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic literature review (SLR) on pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, in order to inform the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of early arthritis (EA). Methods The expert committee defined research questions concerning non-pharmacological interventions, patient information and education, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, glucocorticoid (GC) and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) use, as well as on disease monitoring. The SLR included articles published after the last EULAR SLR until November 2015 found in the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases and abstracts from the 2014 and 2015 American College of Rheumatology and EULAR conferences. Results Exercise programmes may improve pain and physical function in patients with EA. Patients with EA treated within the first 3 months of symptoms have better clinical and radiological outcomes than those treated beyond 3 months. The clinical and radiological efficacy of GCs is confirmed, with similar efficacy of oral and parenteral administrations. Long-term data raise concerns regarding cardiovascular safety when using GCs. Step-up DMARD therapy is as effective as intensive DMARD therapy ‘ab initio’ for the long-term outcome of EA. Short-term superiority of intensive therapy with bDMARDs is not maintained on withdrawal of bDMARD. Patients with early psoriatic arthritis have better skin and joint outcomes when tight control is used compared to standard care. Conclusions The findings confirm the beneficial effect of exercise programmes and the importance of early drug therapy and tight control. They support the use of methotrexate and GCs as first-line drugs, although the long-term use of GCs raises safety concerns.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rutger Persson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001. Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusion s: Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance

  4. Arthritis induces early bone high turnover, structural degradation and mechanical weakness.

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    Bruno Vidal

    Full Text Available We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone.Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers.AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046. Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002 and bone volume (p = 0.0003 and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009 in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively in the arthritic group.We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness.

  5. Arthritis induces early bone high turnover, structural degradation and mechanical weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Bruno; Cascão, Rita; Vale, Ana Catarina; Cavaleiro, Inês; Vaz, Maria Fátima; Brito, José Américo Almeida; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2015-01-01

    We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months) inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone. Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers. AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively) and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046). Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002) and bone volume (p = 0.0003) and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009) in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively) in the arthritic group. We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness.

  6. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Døhn, Uffe M; Ejbjerg, Bo J;

    2006-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring, and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis. Data on the value of ultrasonography and MRI are accumulating rapidly, fueling their increasing use in early rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on recent advances in the clinical a...... applications of these imaging modalities. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Oct...

  7. Lactobacillus casei reduces the inflammatory joint damage associated with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines: Lactobacillus casei: COX-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam; Keshav, Poonam; Kumar, Avnish

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Lactobacillus casei in treating rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal model. Healthy female Wistar rats (weight-180-200 g) were included in this study. Oral administration of L. casei was started on the same day. Indomethacin was used as standard reference drug. Serum level of IL-6, α-TNF, and IL-10 were observed. Four-point arthritis indexes were also assessed at the end of week for 28th day. L. casei-treated rats had shown normal histopathology without any synovial infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage, and bone destruction. Arthritis score was also lower for the group treated with L. casei. Oral administration of L. casei significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Present study suggests that L. casei has potent antiarthritic effect in CIA model. Inhibition of COX-2 via inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokines is an understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways.

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using anti-inflammatory drugs and classical DMARDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease typically characterized by arthritis and psoriasis variably associated with other extra-articular manifestations. PsA has been considered a milder and less disabling disease compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, even if some studies showed that PsA had joint erosions and damage. In addition, about 20-40% of PsA patients have axial skeleton involvement that may lead to functional limitation and deformity. The treatment of PsA ranged from initial treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs to one or more disease-modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs for the suppression of inflammation in patients with recalcitrant peripheral joint disease. In clinical practice, the most widely used DMARDs are methotrexate (level of evidence B, sulfasalazine (level of evidence A, leflunomide (level of evidence A, and ciclosporin (level of evidence B. However, the efficacy of these agents in inhibiting joint erosions has not been assessed in controlled studies. Finally, the effectiveness of DMARDs in treating enthesitis and dactylitis is controversial. The present paper revised the evidence-based results on treatment with “conventional” therapy for PsA. The revision was based on all the subsets of the diseases, namely the various manifestations of the articular involvement (peripheral, axial, enthesitis, dactylitis as well as the skin and nail involvement.

  9. Correlation of Periodontal Disease With Inflammatory Arthritis in the Time Before Modern Medical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Bruce

    2017-03-01

    Controversy exists regarding possible correlation of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Confounding factors may relate to stringency of inflammatory disease diagnosis and the effect of therapeutic intervention for RA on periodontal disease. These factors are investigated in this study. Forty-five individuals with documented RA (n = 15), spondyloarthropathy (n = 15), and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) (n = 15), from the Hamann-Todd collection of human skeletons compiled from 1912 to 1938, and 15 individuals contemporarily incorporated in the collection were examined for tooth loss, cavity occurrence, average and maximum lingual and buccal depth of space between tooth and bone, periosteal reaction, serpentine bone resorption, abscess formation, and root penetration of the bone surface and analyzed by analysis of variance. Tooth loss was common, but actual number of teeth lost, cavity occurrence, average and maximum lingual and buccal depth of space between tooth and bone, periosteal reaction, serpentine grooving surrounding teeth (considered a sign of inflammation), abscess formation, and root exposure (penetration of bone surface) were indistinguishable among controls and individuals with RA, spondyloarthropathy, and CPPD. Although many factors can affect periodontal disease, presence of inflammatory arthritis does not appear to be one of them. The implication is that dental disease was common in the general population and not necessarily associated with arthritis, at least before the advent of modern rheumatologic medications. As specific diagnosis did not affect prevalence, perhaps current prevalence controversy may relate to current intervention, a subject for further study.

  10. The th17 pathway as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune and inflammatory disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeleveld, D.M.; Nieuwenhuijze, A.E. van; Berg, W.B. van den; Koenders, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 by Th17 cells and other cells of the immune system protects the host against bacterial and fungal infections, but also promotes the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Several biolog

  11. Left ventricular function in treatment-naive early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Deibjerg, Lone K; Hedemann-Andersen, Agnete;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of inflammation and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. Previous studies have suggested that both disease activity and disease duration are associated...... with atherosclerosis and a higher mortality rate caused primarily by coronary artery disease. OBJECTIVE: We investigated how disease activity, anti-CCP status and coronary calcium score in treatment-naive early RA impacts left ventricular (LV) systolic function. METHODS: Fifty-tree patients (30 women) with mean age 58...... by computed tomography by calculating the Agaston score. One experienced senior rheumatologist and one experienced cardiologist performed all the clinical assessments as well as all the transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and coronary CT analysis. RESULTS: Disease activity scores before treatment at baseline...

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of hyaluronan in arthritis therapy: Not just for viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Masuko

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Kayo Masuko1, Minako Murata2, Kazuo Yudoh2, Tomohiro Kato1, Hiroshi Nakamura31Department of Biochemistry; 2Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Department of Joint Disease and Rheumatism, Nippon Medical School, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA has been widely used for viscosupplementation of diseased or aged articular joints. However, recent investigations have revealed the active anti-inflammatory or chondroprotective effect of HA, suggesting its potential role in attenuation of joint damage. In particular, interactions between HA and other inflammatory mediators are attracting interest. This review summarizes several aspects of recent investigations of the anti-inflammatory effects of HA in arthritis.Keywords: hyaluronan, inflammation, chondroprotection

  13. Early arthritis in children and adolescents — immune status of patients and perspectives of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Keltsev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study state of immune status in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA at early stages of the disease development and perspectives of their treatment. Materials and methods. 286 children and adolescents with olygo- and polyarticular variants of JIA aged 3 to 18 years were included. Examination of CD4, CD8, CD16, CD95 lymphocyte markers, IgA, IgG, IgM rheumatoid factor, interleukin 1(3, 4, 6, 8, 10, tumor necrosis factor a as well as lymphocyte morphometry was performed. Results. High blood levels of CD4, CD8, CD 16, CD95, pro- and anti- inflammatory interleukins were revealed at active stage of JIA particularly in pts with polyarthritis and extended olygoarthritis. Changes of mean lymphocyte morphometric measures linearly inversely correlated with relative lymphocyte markers level what proves relationship of processes of proliferation, cytotoxicity and elevation of circulating apoptotic cell count in blood. However increase of “programmed death cells" may reflect not only proliferation but also capability of cells to induce cell death program in presence of provocative factors. In pts with very high humoral level of lymphocyte markers and cytokines appropriate therapy more often induces clinico-laboratory remission than in pts with lower values. Conclusion. Immune and cytokine status in children and adolescents with JIA determines evolution of arthritis. Early administration of disease modifying drugs more often induces of clinico-laboratory remission in pts with high levels of lymphocyte markers and antiinflammatory cytokines.

  14. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R.; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H.; Guns, Emma S.; McNagny, Kelly M.; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%– 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  15. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis, early unclassified polyarthritis, and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Rostrup, Egill;

    2000-01-01

    AND METHODS: We examined 42 RA and 23 early unclassified polyarthritis patients, and 12 healthy controls in a cross-sectional study. Dynamic MRI (repeated FLASH-MR images after injection of a contrast agent) was performed through the 2nd to the 5th MCP joint. Two methods for identification of the enhancing......OBJECTIVE: To introduce dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an indicator of inflammatory activity in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or early unclassified polyarthritis, and to compare the results with a healthy control group. MATERIALS...

  16. Management of the temporomandibular joint in inflammatory arthritis: Involvement of surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Rory C; Fawthrop, Fiona; Salha, Rami; Sidebottom, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Many conditions may affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but its incidence in individual joint diseases is low. However, inflammatory arthropathies, particularly rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, appear to have a propensity for affecting the joint. Symptoms include pain, restriction in mouth opening, locking, and noises, which together can lead to significant impairment. Jaw rest, a soft diet, a bite splint, and medical therapy, including disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and simple analgesia, are the bedrock of initial treatment and will improve most symptoms in most patients. Symptom deterioration does not necessarily follow disease progression, but when it does, TMJ arthroscopy and arthrocentesis can help modulate pain, increase mouth opening, and relieve locking. These minimally invasive procedures have few complications and can be repeated. Operations to repair or remove a damaged intra-articular disc or to refine joint anatomy are used in select cases. Total TMJ replacement is reserved for patients where joint collapse or fusion has occurred or in whom other treatments have failed to provide adequate symptomatic control. It yields excellent outcomes and is approved by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE), UK. Knowledge of the assessment and treatment of the TMJ, which differs from other joints affected by inflammatory arthritis due to its unique anatomy and function, is not widespread outside of the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight the peculiarities of TMJ disease secondary to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis and how to best manage these ailments, which should help guide when referral to a specialist TMJ surgeon is appropriate. PMID:28638693

  17. ANALGESIC AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF LEECH THERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ARTHRITIS

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    Singh Akhilesh Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The day-to-day advancement in each and every aspect has made human’s life very fast, hectic and full of stress. In such an outfit every person is compelled to make the life fast and mechanical even shifted their food habits to fast food, altered their social structure and life style, having various negative impacts on the body. Occurrence of arthritis on large scale is one of the outcomes of this modification. It is commonest among acute as well as chronic inflammatory joint disease in which joint become painful, swollen and stiff. This study was designed to access the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Leech Therapy in the treatment Arthritis. The study was randomized open phase clinical trial. Jalauka used for the therapy were obtained from fresh water pond of Madhyam Akara (4-6gms weight. Jalaukas were applied once in every week for six weeks duration.The patients of age group 18 to 60 were selected on the basis of Ayurvedic signs and symptoms of Sandhigata Vata. Observations were recorded for Pain, Swelling, Stiffness, Score of ACR, RA index, ARA joint count, Tenderness. The laboratory values of ESR, CRP and S.uric Acid were also recorded before and after the treatment. Since the assessment criteria was Quantitative, paired 't' test was applied. In the current Study the treatment was found significantly effective in treating arthritis. The effect of treatment was 44% patients were of Uttam Upashya in relieving Pain, 40% in swelling, 28% in stiffness, 32% in restricted movement, 16% in deformity. So, we can conclude that leech therapy is effective in the treatment of arthritis.

  18. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

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    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  19. Combination therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis: a treatment holiday perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Shintaro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    To date, the significance of early intervention with methotrexate and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been realized. Longitudinal safety and cost have arisen as new concerns. The concept of a treatment holiday, drug discontinuation after achieving remission, may solve these problems. The authors performed a systematic literature review and identified 13 reports from 10 studies (TNF20, BeSt, OPITMA, HIT-HARD, IMPROVED, PRIZE, IDEA, EMPIRE, tREACH and AVERT) for early RA (≤2 years). Eight out of 13 reports (61.5%) were published in 2013 or 2014, indicating emerging interest in recent years. Also, the authors performed a sub-analysis of the HONOR study (n = 51) to compare early (≤2 years) and established RA. The proportions of remission (REM) and low disease activity were higher in early RA (REM: 63.0 vs 33.3%, p = 0.0346; low disease activity: 77.8 vs 45.8%, p = 0.0185). In conclusion, early intervention is beneficial for successful treatment holiday, which may lead to risk and cost reduction. However, further investigation is required.

  20. Animal Models of Bone Loss in Inflammatory Arthritis: from Cytokines in the Bench to Novel Treatments for Bone Loss in the Bedside-a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, C Henrique; Farrell, Eric; Vis, Marijn; Colin, Edgar M; Lubberts, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Throughout life, bone is continuously remodelled. Bone is formed by osteoblasts, from mesenchymal origin, while osteoclasts induce bone resorption. This process is tightly regulated. During inflammation, several growth factors and cytokines are increased inducing osteoclast differentiation and activation, and chronic inflammation is a condition that initiates systemic bone loss. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease that is characterised by active synovitis and is associated with early peri-articular bone loss. Peri-articular bone loss precedes focal bone erosions, which may progress to bone destruction and disability. The incidence of generalised osteoporosis is associated with the severity of arthritis in RA and increased osteoporotic vertebral and hip fracture risk. In this review, we will give an overview of different animal models of inflammatory arthritis related to RA with focus on bone erosion and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a humanised endochondral ossification model will be discussed, which can be used in a translational approach to answer osteoimmunological questions.

  1. Shikonin Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts via lncRNA-NR024118

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    Ke-ya Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Shikonin is a major chemical component of zicao that possesses anti-inflammatory properties and the ability to mediate cellular and humoral immunity, especially in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We investigated the impact of shikonin on inflammatory response in RA synovial fibroblasts using the CAIA model. Methods. Severe polyarticular arthritis was induced in Balb/c female mice. Expressions of lncRNA-NR024118, SOCS3, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs were evaluated using RT-RCR. Histone acetylation and SOCS3 protein expression were assessed by ChIP assay and western blot, respectively. Results. Mice treated with shikonin showed an abrogation of soft tissue and bone lesions. Shikonin remarkably enhanced the expression of NR024118 and SOCS3 and suppressed the secretion and expression of IL-6, IL-8, and MMPs. Proliferation of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts in the presence of IL-1β was also significantly inhibited by shikonin. Moreover, shikonin dose-dependently increased acetylation of histone H3 at the promoter of NR024118. Finally, NR024118 overexpression and interference significantly changed SOCS3 expression and NR024118 interference could reverse regulation of shikonin on SOCS3, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs expression level in MH7A cells. Conclusion. Our results reveal that, in the CAIA mouse model of RA, shikonin has disease modifying activity that is attributable to the inhibition of inflammatory response via lncRNA-NR024118.

  2. An intra-articular salmon calcitonin-based nanocomplex reduces experimental inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sinéad M; McMorrow, Jason; Umerska, Anita; Patel, Hetal B; Kornerup, Kristin N; Tajber, Lidia; Murphy, Evelyn P; Perretti, Mauro; Corrigan, Owen I; Brayden, David J

    2013-04-28

    Prolonged inappropriate inflammatory responses contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to aspects of osteoarthritis (OA). The orphan nuclear receptor, NR4A2, is a key regulator and potential biomarker for inflammation and represents a potentially valuable therapeutic target. Both salmon calcitonin (sCT) and hyaluronic acid (HA) attenuated activated mRNA expression of NR4A1, NR4A2, NR4A3, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1, 3 and 13 in three human cell lines: SW1353 chondrocytes, U937 and THP-1 monocytes. Ad-mixtures of sCT and HA further down-regulated expression of NR4A2 compared to either agent alone at specific concentrations, hence the rationale for their formulation in nanocomplexes (NPs) using chitosan. The sCT released from NP stimulated cAMP production in human T47D breast cancer cells expressing sCT receptors. When NP were injected by the intra-articular (I.A.) route to the mouse knee during on-going inflammatory arthritis of the K/BxN serum transfer model, joint inflammation was reduced together with NR4A2 expression, and local bone architecture was preserved. These data highlight remarkable anti-inflammatory effects of sCT and HA at the level of reducing NR4A2 mRNA expression in vitro. Combining them in NP elicits anti-arthritic effects in vivo following I.A. delivery.

  3. Self-limiting arthritis among patients fulfilling the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis in a very early arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norli, Ellen Sauar; Brinkmann, Gina H; Kvien, Tore K; Bjørneboe, Olav; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Thunem, Cathrine; Lie, Elisabeth; Mjaavatten, Maria D

    2016-12-01

    To study occurrence of and factors associated with self-limiting arthritis among patients fulfilling the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (2010 RA criteria) in patients with ≤16 weeks׳ duration of joint swelling. We applied the 2010 RA criteria in 1118 patients included in a 2-year longitudinal cohort. In all, 256 patients fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria at baseline; outcome was defined as either "self-limiting arthritis" (no DMARD use during follow-up, no swollen joints at last assessment, and no final clinical diagnosis of RA) or "persistent disease." The associations between baseline characteristics, including the components of the 2010 RA criteria score, and outcomes were studied. In total, 36 of 256 patients (14.1%) classified as having RA had self-limiting arthritis. These patients differed from patients with persistent disease according to ACPA positivity (11.1% vs. 65.0%, p < 0.001), duration of joint swelling (median = 47.5 vs. 66.0 days, p = 0.002), 2010 RA criteria points (median = 6.0 vs. 7.0, p < 0.001), and ever smoking (52.8% vs. 74.5%, p = 0.01). Having no serology points and no duration points were independent predictors of self-limiting arthritis. The rate of self-limiting arthritis was 2.7% vs. 29.4% among ACPA positive vs. ACPA negative patients (p < 0.001), and 32.5% when duration of joint swelling was <4 weeks vs. 10.6% with longer duration (p < 0.001). Negative ACPA status, short duration of joint swelling and being a never smoker were factors associated with self-limiting arthritis in early arthritis patients classified as having RA at presentation. Our findings contribute to identify patients who potentially do not need DMARDs and who should not be included in early RA clinical drug trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Osteoarthritis-like damage of cartilage in the temporomandibular joints in mice with autoimmune inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi-Nejad, S.; Kobezda, T.; Rauch, T.A.; Matesz, C.; Glant, T.T.; Mikecz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective To study temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in an autoimmune murine model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease characterized by inflammatory destruction of the synovial joints. Although TMJ dysfunction is frequently found in RA, TMJ involvement in RA remains unclear, and TMJ pathology has not been studied in systemic autoimmune animal models of RA. Methods Proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan-induced arthritis (PGIA) was generated in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice. TMJs and joint tissues/cartilage were harvested for histological and immunohistochemical analyses and RNA isolation for quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Serum cytokine levels were measured in mice with acute or chronic arthritis, and in non-arthritic control animals. Results Despite the development of destructive synovitis in the limbs, little or no synovial inflammation was found in the TMJs of mice with PGIA. However, the TMJs of arthritic mice showed evidence of aggrecanase- and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated loss of glycosaminoglycan-containing aggrecan, and in the most severe cases, structural damage of cartilage. Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, were elevated in arthritic animals. Expression of the IL-1β gene was also high in the inflamed limbs, but essentially normal in the TMJs. Local expression of genes encoding matrix-degrading enzymes (aggrecanases and stromelysin) was upregulated to a similar degree in both the limbs and the TMJs. Conclusion We propose that constantly elevated levels of catabolic cytokines, such as IL-1β, in the circulation (released from inflamed joints) create a pro-inflammatory milieu within the TMJ, causing local upregulation of proteolytic enzymes and subsequent loss of aggrecan from cartilage. PMID:21262368

  5. [EULAR recommendations for patient education of people with inflammatory arthritis. Translation and evaluation in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patermann, J; Ehlebracht-König, I; Lind-Albrecht, G; Genth, E; Reusch, A; Küffner, R; Müller-Ladner, U; Braun, J

    2016-03-01

    In 2015 EULAR published recommendations for patient education of people with inflammatory arthritis. The recommendations included two superior principles and eight recommendations based on the level of evidence and expert knowledge. The German translation of the recommendations was evaluated by 15 German experts. Experts graded the strength of the recommendations (SOR) on an 11 point numerical rating scale (from 0 = no agreement to 10 = total agreement). The mean score was 8,8 ± 0,49.

  6. Role of erosions typical of rheumatoid arthritis in the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: results from a very early arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Gina Hetland; Norli, Ellen S; Bøyesen, Pernille; van der Heijde, Désirée; Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Kvien, Tore K; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    To determine how the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) definition of erosive disease (erosion criterion) contributes to the number of patients classified as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/EULAR RA classification criteria (2010 RA criteria) in an early arthritis cohort. Patients from the observational study Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic with joint swelling ≤16 weeks, a clinical diagnosis of RA or undifferentiated arthritis, and radiographs of hands and feet were included. Erosive disease was defined according to the EULAR definition accompanying the 2010 RA criteria. We calculated the additional number of patients being classified as RA based on the erosion criteria at baseline and during follow-up. Of the 289 included patients, 120 (41.5%) fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria, whereas 15 (5.2%) fulfilled only the erosion criterion at baseline. 118 patients had radiographic follow-up at 2 years, of whom 6.8% fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria and only one patient fulfilled solely the erosion criterion during follow-up. Few patients with early arthritis were classified as RA based on solely the erosion criteria, and of those who did almost all did so at baseline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  8. Early cervical cancer coexistent with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.; Kalter, C.; Roberts, W.S.; Cavanagh, D.

    1989-07-01

    Early invasive carcinoma of the cervix may be treated by surgery or radiation therapy. Two patients with early cervical cancer are presented whose concomitant inflammatory bowel disease figured significantly in the selection of surgery as treatment. The use of radiotherapy in the face of inflammatory bowel disease, however, is not clearly addressed in the literature.

  9. Nonclassical Ly6C− Monocytes Drive the Development of Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice

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    Alexander V. Misharin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Different subsets and/or polarized phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages may play distinct roles during the development and resolution of inflammation. Here, we demonstrate in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis that nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes are required for the initiation and progression of sterile joint inflammation. Moreover, nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes differentiate into inflammatory macrophages (M1, which drive disease pathogenesis and display plasticity during the resolution phase. During the development of arthritis, these cells polarize toward an alternatively activated phenotype (M2, promoting the resolution of joint inflammation. The influx of Ly6C− monocytes and their subsequent classical and then alternative activation occurs without changes in synovial tissue-resident macrophages, which express markers of M2 polarization throughout the course of the arthritis and attenuate joint inflammation during the initiation phase. These data suggest that circulating Ly6C− monocytes recruited to the joint upon injury orchestrate the development and resolution of autoimmune joint inflammation.

  10. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Trachyspermum ammi seeds in collagen induced arthritis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq Umar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and other reactive nitrogen species (RNS might be implicated to have a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Modulatory agents derived from plants that have properties like scavenging of free radicals clearly have therapeutic potential against these diseases. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible antioxidant potential of Trachyspermum ammi on collagen induced arthritis (CIA in Wistar rat. Trachyspermum ammi extract (TAE in a dose of 100 mg kg−1 was orally administered to rat once daily for 21 days after immunization. The estimation of levels of oxidant products and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were carried out in the joints. The induction of arthritis significantly increased the levels of oxidative stress markers like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and inflammation markers like elastase. The level of non-enzymatic antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased. The study revealed that the treatment with TAE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters studied as compared with CIA rat. Supplementation with T.ammi reversed the oxidative changes in all the parameters suggesting either termination of cellular infiltration or limiting the generation of oxidants following CIA in rats and might have potential value in the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  11. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Can Monitor the Very Early Inflammatory Treatment Response upon Intra-Articular Steroid Injection in the Knee Joint: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Kubassova, Olga; Cimmino, Marco A;

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in inflammatory arthritis, especially in conjunction with computer-aided analysis using appropriate dedicated software, seems to be a highly sensitive tool for monitoring the early inflammatory treatment response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This paper gives...... a review of the current knowledge of the emerging technique. The potential of the technique is demonstrated and discussed in the context of a case report following the early effect of an intra-articular steroid injection in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis flare in the knee....

  12. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p 20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified.

  13. Optimizing the optical wavelength for the photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Hu, Jack; Francis, Sheeja; Marquardt, April; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    With the capability of assessing high resolution optical information in soft tissues at imaging depth up to several centimeters, innovative biomedical photoacoustic imaging (PAI) offers benefits to diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis, particularly in combination with more established ultrasonography (US). In this work, a PAI and US dual-modality system facilitating both imaging functions in a real-time fashion was developed and initially tested for its clinical performance on patients with active inflammatory arthritis. Photoacoustic (PA) images of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were acquired at 580-nm wavelength that provides a desired balance between optical absorption of blood and attenuation in background tissue. The results from six patients and six normal volunteers used as a control demonstrated the satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing the physiological changes in the joints, specifically enhanced blood flow as a result of active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that PAI, by revealing vascular features suggestive of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US for rheumatology clinic.

  14. Effects of cold mist shower on patients with inflammatory arthritis: a crossover controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkka, H; Väättänen, S; Ala-Peijari, S; Nummi, T

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and effects of a new home treatment method, a whole-body cold mist treatment, on patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Whole-body cold mist shower therapy was given to 121 voluntary patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in this crossover study during 1-week rehabilitation periods. Pain and sleep quality were assessed by a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Mental status was assessed by the Depression Scale (DEPS). Body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, use of occasional pain and sleep medication, and possible side-effects were recorded. The differences in pain (VAS) between treatment and control periods were significant (2.0 vs. 2.4, p = 0.006, paired t-test) in the last measurement, when assessing the pain of the past week as a whole. A trend could be seen of an increasing difference towards the end of the week. The treatment effect was statistically significant [likelihood ratio test (LRT), p cold treatment method may offer a safe option for self-treatment of pain at home but further study is needed to determine the clinical significance of the effect after longer use.

  15. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Global metabolite profiling of synovial fluid for the specific diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis from other inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooah Kim

    Full Text Available Currently, reliable biomarkers that can be used to distinguish rheumatoid arthritis (RA from other inflammatory diseases are unavailable. To find possible distinctive metabolic patterns and biomarker candidates for RA, we performed global metabolite profiling of synovial fluid samples. Synovial fluid samples from 38 patients with RA, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet's disease, and gout were analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF MS. Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant and hierarchical clustering analyses were performed for the discrimination of RA and non-RA groups. Variable importance for projection values were determined, and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test and the breakdown and one-way analysis of variance were conducted to identify potential biomarkers for RA. A total of 105 metabolites were identified from synovial fluid samples. The score plot of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis showed significant discrimination between the RA and non-RA groups. The 20 metabolites, including citrulline, succinate, glutamine, octadecanol, isopalmitic acid, and glycerol, were identified as potential biomarkers for RA. These metabolites were found to be associated with the urea and TCA cycles as well as fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. The metabolomic analysis results demonstrated that global metabolite profiling by GC/TOF MS might be a useful tool for the effective diagnosis and further understanding of RA.

  17. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice [G. Gaslini Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Genoa (Italy); Malattia, Clara [G. Gaslini Institute, Department of Pediatrics 2, Genoa (Italy); Martini, Alberto [University of Genova, Department of Pediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Toma, Paolo [Bambin Gesu Pediatric Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  18. The early magnetic resonance imaging features of the knee in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Johnson, Karl; Wittkop, Berndt; Haigh, Fiona; Ryder, Clive; Gardner-Medwin, Janet M

    2002-06-01

    AIMS: Early diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) facilitates earlier more aggressive therapy, and improved outcome. Recognition of the features of early, untreated JIA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will improve disease detection and expedite treatment. This study aims to highlight the relevant MRI features. METHODS: MRI examinations of the knee joint were performed on 11 children with clinically confirmed, early, untreated JIA. The MRI images were obtained at a mean of 2 months after symptom onset and independently evaluated by two consultant paediatric radiologists. RESULTS: Abnormalities were found on all MRI examinations. Synovial hypertrophy, joint effusions, popliteal lymph nodes and soft tissue swelling were present in all patients. Gadolinium DTPA enhancement improved the detection of synovial hyperplasia. Metaphyseal splaying and condylar overgrowth were seen in five cases (41%), oedema of the lateral collateral ligament in two cases (18%) and superficial cartilage thinning in one case. Bony erosions and deep cartilage destruction were not demonstrated. CONCLUSION: MRI of the knee joint identifies early joint changes which are distinct from those in later disease. The presence of these features should alert the radiologist to the possible diagnosis of JIA and post gadolinium DTPA sequences should be performed. Gadolinium DPTA enhancement increases the sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory changes in JIA. Johnson, K. et al. (2002)

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease-related arthritis – clinical evaluation and possible role of cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontny, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation, rheumatic abnormalities ranging from arthralgia to spondyloarthritis (SpA) are the most common extraintestinal manifestations. The pathogenesis of IBD-related arthritis is unclear. In this study, we search for clinical and immunological differences between patients with IBD-associated spondyloarthritis and IBD patients without SpA symptoms. Material and methods Patients with an established diagnosis of IBD, suffering from Leśniowski-Crohn disease (L-CD, n = 24) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 27), were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation of patients, based on medical history, blood tests, physical and radiological examinations, allowed two subgroups of patients to be established. One subgroup comprised patients fulfilling criteria for both IBD and SpA (IBD + SpA, n = 29), while the other included IBD patients with arthralgia only (IBD, n = 22). Serum concentrations of interleukins (IL-6, IL-10, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23) and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Results Patients with IBD + SpA were characterized by shorter disease duration (3 vs. 9 years), higher frequency of HLA-B27 positivity (60.7% vs. 4.5%) and uveitis (20.7% vs. 0%), compared with the IBD subgroup. The serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tested cytokines did not differ between IBD + SpA and IBD patients, or between L-CD and UC groups. However, in the IBD + SpA subgroup there was weak to moderate positive correlation between serum concentrations of CRP and several cytokines (IL-6, IL-21, IFN-γ), and additional moderate positive correlation between serum concentrations of IL-23 and clinical activity of SpA. By contrast, in IBD subgroup a strong inverse correlation between serum concentrations of Interleukin 23 and CRP was found. Conclusions IBD-related spondyloarthritis occurs relatively early, affects mostly HLA-B27

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease-related arthritis – clinical evaluation and possible role of cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Dmowska-Chalaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: I n inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation, rheumatic abnormalities ranging from arthralgia to spondyloarthritis (SpA are the most common extraintestinal manifestations. The pathogenesis of IBD-related arthritis is unclear. In this study, we search for clinical and immunological differences between patients with IBD-associated spondyloarthritis and IBD patients without SpA symptoms. Material and methods : Patients with an established diagnosis of IBD, suffering from Leśniowski-Crohn disease (L-CD, n = 24 or ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 27, were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation of patients, based on medical history, blood tests, physical and radiological examinations, allowed two subgroups of patients to be established. One subgroup comprised patients fulfilling criteria for both IBD and SpA (IBD + SpA, n = 29, while the other included IBD patients with arthralgia only (IBD, n = 22. Serum concentrations of interleukins (IL-6, IL-10, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23 and interferon  (IFN- were measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Results : Patients with IBD + SpA were characterized by shorter disease duration (3 vs. 9 years, higher frequency of HLA-B27 positivity (60.7% vs. 4.5% and uveitis (20.7% vs. 0%, compared with the IBD subgroup. The serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP and tested cytokines did not differ between IBD + SpA and IBD patients, or between L-CD and UC groups. However, in the IBD + SpA subgroup there was weak to moderate positive correlation between serum concentrations of CRP and several cytokines (IL-6, IL-21, IFN-, and additional moderate positive correlation between serum concentrations of IL-23 and clinical activity of SpA. By contrast, in IBD subgroup a strong inverse correlation between serum concentrations of Interleukin 23 and CRP was found. Conclusions : IBD-related spondyloarthritis occurs relatively early, affects mostly HLA

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of TRAF-Interacting Protein in Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes

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    Qing-Zhu Kong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, synovial inflammation, and cartilage destruction. Proliferative fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS play crucial roles in both propagation of inflammation and joint damage because of their production of great amount of proinflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we investigate the role of TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP in regulating inflammatory process in RA-FLS. TRIP expression was attenuated in RA-FLS compared with osteoarthritis- (OA- FLS. Overexpression of TRIP significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB signaling and decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in TNFα-stimulated RA-FLS. Furthermore, TRIP was found to interact with transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 and promoting K48-linked polyubiquitination of TAK1 in RA-FLS. Our results demonstrate that TRIP has anti-inflammatory effects on RA-FLS and suggest TRIP as a potential therapeutic target for human RA.

  2. Relationship between Plasma Levels of Homocysteine and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Ayşe Balkarli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate levels of homocysteine (Hcy, folate, vitamin B12, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and to assess relationship between Hcy levels and inflammatory mediators including IL-6 and TNF-α in untreated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods: The study included 55 women including 30 newly diagnosed and untreated female RA patients and 25 age-matched healthy individuals as controls. Results: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESH, C-reactive protein (CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in RA patients than controls (p0.05. There were no significant correlations between Hcy levels and acute phase reactants or inflammatory mediators (p>0.05. Conclusion: Both mediators such as IL-6 and TNF-α and hyper-homocysteinemia are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. There was no significant correlation between Hcy levels and inflammatory mediators, although levels of these molecules were elevated in RA. Both inflammatory mediators and Hcy may cause an increase in athero­sclerotic cardiovascular disorders through diverse pathways. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (2: 163-167

  3. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, L.H.D. van; Plass, A.M.C.; Lems, W.F.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Boers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). I

  4. Chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis induced by extreme hypomagnesemia in short bowel syndrome

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    Hahn Markus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short bowel syndrome (SBS may induce a plethora of clinical symptoms ranging from underweight to nutrient-, vitamin- and electrolyte deficiencies. The objective of this case report is to illustrate how demanding the management of a 60 year old patient with SBS and recurrent joint attacks was for different medical disciplines. Case presentation The patient with SBS presented with a body mass index of 16.5 kg/m2 after partial jejunoileal resection of the small intestine with a six year long history of recurrent pain attacks in multiple peripheral joints, chronic diarrhoea and food intolerances. Pain attacks occurred 4–5 times a week with a median consumption of 15 mg prednisone per day. The interdisciplinary workup after several gastroenterologic, rheumatologic, radiologic, psychiatric and orthopedic consultations is shown including successful treatment steps. Clinical diagnosis revealed no systemic inflammatory disease, but confirmed extreme hypomagnesemia (0.2 mmol/l after reproducible pathological magnesium resorption tests as causative for chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis (pseudogout, chondrocalcinosis. Multidisciplinary treatment included application of colchicines, parenteral nutrition and magnesium substitution, antiperistaltic agents and avoidance of intolerant foods. Normalization of magnesium levels and a marked remission of joint attacks were achieved after six months with significant reduction of prednisone to 1.5 mg/day. Conclusion Despite the rarity of this condition, it is important to know that hypomagnesaemia may be associated with calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis (chondrocalcinosis and that SBS patients may be prone to develop extreme hypomagnesaemia causing recurrent joint attacks without systemic inflammation.

  5. Periodontal Disease in Individuals With a Genetic Risk of Developing Arthritis and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Gualtero, Juan M; Lafaurie, Gloria I; Hoyos, Lida X; Castillo, Diana M; De-Avila, Juliette; Munevar, Juan C; Unriza, Sonia; Londoño, John; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo

    2016-04-01

    Recent consensus emphasizes the importance of studying individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (pre-RA) and those with early RA (eRA). Periodontal tissues have been recently evaluated, but these studies are limited. To evaluate the periodontal condition, immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses against Porphyromonas gingivalis in individuals with pre-RA and eRA were compared with controls to establish an association between periodontal infection markers and rheumatic activity. Rheumatologic and periodontal condition was evaluated in 119 individuals with pre-RA, 48 patients with eRA, and matched controls. P. gingivalis IgG1 and IgG2 were analyzed. C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor, anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and RA activity were measured. The groups were compared with McNemar test and paired t-test. Conditional logistic regression was performed for pre-RA confounders, and χ(2) test was used to evaluate periodontal variables and RA activity indices. Pre-RA individuals showed significantly higher levels of plaque index (P = 0.01) and bleeding on probing (P = 0.03) and higher severity of periodontal disease (P = 0.02). Periodontitis was associated with pre-RA (odds ratio, 3.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.64 to 7.01) but not with eRA. In pre-RA, P. gingivalis-specific IgG2 was associated with ACPAs (P = 0.049) and disease severity visual analog scale (P = 0.03). In eRA, IgG2 against P. gingivalis was associated with ESR (P = 0.046) and ACPAs (P = 0.04). P. gingivalis was associated with ACPAs (P = 0.04). This study shows that individuals with pre-RA have significant inflammatory periodontal involvement. There was a significant association between IgG against P. gingivalis and ACPAs in pre-RA and markers of RA activity in individuals with eRA.

  6. Combination DMARD therapy including corticosteroids in early rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Möttönen, T T; Hannonen, P J; Boers, M

    1999-01-01

    A number of reports indicating the growing acceptance of simultaneous therapy with multiple disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), as well as the use of more aggressive treatment measures in the early phases of disease to combat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have appeared during the last decade. However, only a few randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted on the use of DMARD combinations in early RA. We review these trials in this article. In two separate one-year studies combination therapy with sulphasalazine (SSZ) and methotrexate (MTX) seemed to offer no benefits compared to either drug used as monotherapy. On the other hand, the DMARD combinations so far proven to be superior to single DMARDs have initially also included a corticosteroid component. In the COBRA study (Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis) the combination of SSZ (2 gm/day), MTX (7.5 mg/week for 40 weeks), and prednisolone (Prd) (initially 60 mg/day, tapered in 6 weekly steps to 7.5 mg/day and stopped after 28 weeks) compared to SSZ alone (2 gm/day) resulted in significantly better clinical outcomes at week 28. Although the difference in clinical response between the treatment arms was lost at week 58, the progression of joint damage remained statistically significantly slower at week 80 in the patients initially assigned to the combination therapy. Furthermore, in the FIN-RACo trial (Finnish Rheumatoid Arthritis Combination Therapy Trial), therapy using a "tailored-steps" strategy with SSZ (1-2 gm/day), MTX (7.5-1.5 mg/week), hydroxychloroquine (300 mg/day), and Prd (up to 10 mg/day) yielded a significantly increased remission rate and less peripheral joint damage at two years than the single DMARD treatment strategy (initially SSZ 2 gm/day), with or without Prd. Adverse effects in both study arms were comparable. Two additional preliminary reports (in abstract form) suggest that intensive local therapy in the form of intra-articular injections added to single or

  7. Up-Regulation of the Inflammatory Response by Ovariectomy in Collagen-Induced Arthritis. Effects of Tin Protoporphyrin IX.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibanez, L.; Alcaraz, M.J.; Maicas Blasco, N.; Guede, D.; Caeiro, J.R.; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Ferrandiz, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the influence of ovariectomy on the inflammatory response and bone metabolism on CIA as a model of postmenopausal arthritis as well as the effects of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), a heme oxygenase inhibitor. Ovariectomy in non-arthritic mice produced increased serum PGD(2) levels and

  8. [Significance of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase assay in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Liu, J; Zhu, L; Zhang, X W; Li, Z G

    2016-12-18

    To explore the titer of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) for early diagnosis of the outpatient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in real life, and to analyze its relationship with disease activity. In the study, 1 051 patients with arthritis were collected in the group who had joints tender and swelling, and 90 cases of healthy people as a control group. ELISA method was used to detect the serum level of GPI, and according to clinical features and laboratory test, all the patients including 525 RA patients, the other patients including osteoarthritis (OA), 134 cases of seronegative spine joint disease (SpA), 104 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 31 cases of primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), 24 cases of gout arthritis (GA), 22 cases of other connective tissue diseases (including polymyalgia rheumatica, dermatomyositis, systemic sclerosis, adult Still disease) and 46 cases of other diseases (including 165 cases of osteoporosis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, traumatic osteomyelitis, bone and joint disease, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, tumor). The diagnostic values of GPI were assessed, and the differences between the GPI positive and negative groups of the RA patients in clinical characteristics, disease activity, severity and inflammatory index analyzed. The positive rate of serum GPI in the patients with RA was 55.4%, contrasting to other autoimmune diseases (14.3%) and healthy controls (7.78%)(P<0.001). Compared with the OA and SpA patients, the RA group was increased more significantly, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). The diagnostic value of GPI alone for RA was 0.39 mg/L, the sensitivity was 54.2%, and specificity was 87.3%. The positive rate of GPI in RF negative patients was 36.1%; the positive rate of GPI in anti-CCP antibody negative patients was 34.2%; the positive rate of GPI in RF and anti-CCP antibody negative patients was 24.1%. The level of GPI had positive correlation (P<0.05) with ESR, RF, anti

  9. Do we need to lower the cut point of the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Ven (Myrthe); C. Alves (Celina); J.J. Luime (Jolanda); A.H. Gerards (Andreas); P.J. Barendregt (Pieternella); D. van Zeben (Derkjen); B. van Schaeybroeck (B.); P.B.J. de Sonnaville (Peter); B.A. Grillet (B.); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effect of lowering the cut point of the 2010 criteria to identify more patients with RA among early inflammatory arthritis patients. Methods. We included early arthritis patients from the Rotterdam Early Arthritis Cohort with at least one

  10. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging for early rheumatoid arthritis activity

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    E Y Pogozeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess possibility of magnetic resonance image (MRI application for rheu- matoid arthritis (RA activity and severity assessment.Material and methods. 100 pts with RA who fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria with disease duration less than 12 months were included. Standard clinical examination with evaluation of tender and swollen joint counts, acute phase markers, hand and foot X-ray and hand MRI with 0,2 T Artoscan apparatus (ESAOTE Biomedica, Italy were performed.Results. MRI showed hand joint synovitis in 94,5%, erosions – in 67,3% of cases. X-ray examination revealed erosions in only 20,8% of pts. Localization of erosions revealed by X-ray and MRI coincided in 36,4% of cases and in 61,8% of pts erosions were detected only by MRI. MRI confirmed clinical conclusion about presence or absence of metacarpophalangeal and wrist joint synovitis in 64,5% and 74,5% of cases respectively. In8,2% and 21,8% MRI revealed signs of synovitis in clinically intact joints. MRI synovitis score correlated with clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity – DAS 28 (r=0,37, p=0,001, CRP(r=0,30, p=0,001, ESR (r=0,42, p=0,001, HAQ (r=0,24, p=0,001. Weak correlation was revealed between ESR and presence of erosions (r=0,29, CRP, ESR and MRI signs of bone marrow edema (r=0,27, p=0,005 and r=0,29, p=0,002 respectively. Relationship between laboratory and clinical features was weaker and referred only to CRP level and swollen joint count (p=0,05.Conclusion. MRI signs may be used as additional and independent measures of inflammatory activity (particularly synovitis score and severity of RA

  11. Trends of inflammatory markers and cytokines after one month of phototherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    José Meneses Calderón

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. to evaluate changes in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with rheumatoid arthritis submitted to phototherapy. Materials and methods. This was an open label study, enrolling ten patients. The phototherapy scheme within a range of 425 to 650 nm, 11.33 Joules/cm2, 30 cm above the chest was as follows: a 45-min daily sessions from Monday to Friday for 2 to 3 months; b three, 45min weekly sessions for 1 to 2 months; c twice weekly 45-min sessions for 1 to 2 months, and d one weekly session for 1 to 2 months until completion. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor were measured in peripheral blood and tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10 in leukocytes by quantitative real-time Reverse transcriptase-Polymerase chain reaction. In all the patients the next indexes: Karnofsky scale, Rheumatoid Arthritis-specific quality of life instrument, Steinbrocker Functional Capacity Rating and the Visual Analog Scale were evaluated. Results. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor declined notoriously after the indicated sessions. In gene expression, there was a tendency in tumor necrosis factor-α to decrease after 1 month, from 24.5±11.4 to 18±9.2 relative units, without reaching a significant statistical difference. The four tested indexes showed improvement. Conclusion. Phototherapy appears to be a plausible complementary option to reduce the inflammatory component in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

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    Rogier M Thurlings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  13. Association between periodontal disease and inflammatory arthritis reveals modulatory functions by melanocortin receptor type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F M; Norling, Lucy V; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A; da Silva, Tarcília A; Perretti, Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp(8)-γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 μg dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 μg DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r(-/-) compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early arthritis

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    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: MRI has been proposed as the imaging method of choice to evaluate the long-term outcome in patients with early arthritis. The role of dynamic MRI, performed at presentation, in predicting the outcome of patients with early arthritis has been addressed in the present study. Methods: 39 patients with early arthritis, involving at least one wrist, were studied with clinical visits and laboratory investigations, every 3 months. Dynamic MRI was performed with a low-field (0.2T, extremity-dedicated machine (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy equipped with a permanent magnet and with a dedicated hand and wrist coil. During the intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA, twenty consecutive fast images of 3 slices of the wrist were acquired. The synovial contrast enhancement ratio was calculated both as rate of early enhancement (REE per second during the first 55” and as relative enhancement (RE at t seconds. Results: In our cohort of patients, REE and RE were significantly lower than those observed in a historical cohort of 36 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. In univariate analysis, low RE predicted complete remission of arthritis. In multivariate analysis, fulfillment of RA criteria during follow-up was predicted by high RE. The need for immunosuppressive treatment at the end of follow-up was predicted by both low RE and high REE. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI may be used to predict several outcomes of early arthritis involving the wrist

  15. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA).Methods. A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process......, 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR...... to each recommendation. The recommendations related to the efficacy and safety of various analgesic medications, pain measurement scales and pain management in the pre-conception period, pregnancy and lactation. Finally, an algorithm for the pharmacological management of pain in IA was developed. Twenty...

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, G; Brophy, D P; Gibney, R G; FitzGerald, O

    1996-06-01

    The authors examined the role of ultrasound (US) in diagnosis and management of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis. Nineteen patients underwent US examination. Eight patients (2 with previously unsuccessful nonguided injections), had 11 US-guided corticosteroid injections for treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 6), plantar fasciitis (n = 3), and posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 2). US-demonstrated Achilles tendon rupture (n = 2), Achilles tendinitis (n = 8), posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 6), peroneus longus tenosynovitis (n = 2), retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 13), and plantar fasciitis (n = 4). Loss of smooth bone contour (n = 13) correlated with bone erosions on plain radiographs in all but one case. Ten of 11 guided injections resulted in full resolution of heel pain. The diverse causes of heel pain are highlighted, and the ability of US to provide information with management implications is confirmed. US-guided corticosteroid injection is beneficial, especially after failure of nonguided injection.

  17. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Christensen, Robin; Dreyer, Lene

    2016-01-01

    ) and erroneous treatments. Ultrasonography (US) is a highly sensitive method to detect tissue inflammation. Evaluating pain mechanisms in relation to US measures may prove valuable in predicting response to treatment in PsA. AIMS: To study the association and prognostic value of pain mechanisms, ultrasonic...... activity and clinical outcomes in patients with PsA who intensify antirheumatic treatment. METHODS AND ANALYSES: 100 participants >18 years of age with PsA who initiate or switch antirheumatic treatment (biologicals and/or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs......INTRODUCTION: Persistent pain is a major concern for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Pain may be due to inflammatory activity or augmented central pain processing. Unawareness of the origin and mechanisms of pain can lead to misinterpretation of disease activity (by composite scores...

  18. Power Doppler ultrasound phenotyping of expanding versus collapsed popliteal lymph nodes in murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echoe M Bouta

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease manifested by episodic flares in affected joints that are challenging to predict and treat. Longitudinal contrast enhanced-MRI (CE-MRI of inflammatory arthritis in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic (TNF-Tg mice has demonstrated that popliteal lymph nodes (PLN increase in volume and contrast enhancement during the pre-arthritic "expanding" phase of the disease, and then suddenly "collapse" during knee flare. Given the potential of this biomarker of arthritic flare, we aimed to develop a more cost-effective means of phenotyping PLN using ultrasound (US imaging. Initially we attempted to recapitulate CE-MRI of PLN with subcutaneous footpad injection of US microbubbles (DEFINITY®. While this approach allowed for phenotyping via quantification of lymphatic sinuses in PLN, which showed a dramatic decrease in collapsed PLN versus expanding or wild-type (WT PLN, electron microscopy demonstrated that DEFINITY® injection also resulted in destruction of the lymphatic vessels afferent to the PLN. In contrast, Power Doppler (PD US is innocuous to and efficiently quantifies blood flow within PLN of WT and TNF-Tg mice. PD-US demonstrated that expanding PLN have a significantly higher normalized PD volume (NPDV versus collapsed PLN (0.553 ± 0.007 vs. 0.008 ± 0.003; p0.030 and lower (<0.016 quartile NPDVs in this cohort of mice, which serve as conservative thresholds to phenotype PLN as expanding and collapsed, respectively. Interestingly, of the 12 PLN phenotyped by the two methods, there was disagreement in 4 cases in which they were determined to be expanding by CE-MRI and collapsed by PD-US. Since the adjacent knee had evidence of synovitis in all 4 cases, we concluded that the PD-US phenotyping was correct, and that this approach is currently the safest and most cost-effective in vivo approach to phenotype murine PLN as a biomarker of arthritic flare.

  19. The synovial prostaglandin system in chronic inflammatory arthritis: differential effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardieri, S.; Cattani, P.; Ciabattoni, G.; Di Munno, O.; Pasero, G.; Patrono, C.; Pinca, E.; Pugliese, F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The present study was undertaken to characterize the spectrum of arachidonic acid metabolites present in synovial effusions of patients with rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, and to compare changes in their concentration following a short-term treatment with 6α-methyl-prednisolone (6-MeP: 4-8 mg/day) or indoprofen (1.2 g/day), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with proven synovial prostaglandin inhibitory effect. 2 Measurements of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane (TX) B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and PGF2α were performed by radioimmunoassay techniques in synovial effusions obtained from 23 patients, and validated by thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the extracted immunoreactivity. 3 PGE2 and TXB2 accounted for more than 60% of the total immunoreactivity in untreated patients. The absence of any constant ratio between the different arachidonic acid metabolites detected in synovial fluid is consistent with a heterogeneous cellular origin of these compounds. 4 Indoprofen treatment was associated with a consistent reduction of synovial prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations, ranging from 36% in the case of 6-keto-PGF1α to 90% in the case of PGE2. 5 In contrast, 6-MeP caused opposite changes on different metabolites originating via the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. Thus, 6-keto-PGF1α concentrations were reduced by 35%, PGF2α concentrations were increased by 30%, while PGE2 and TXB2 were unchanged following 6-MeP. 6 Although the mechanism(s) underlying the failure of 6-MeP to reduce synovial PGE2 and TXB2 levels are uncertain, the results of the present study clearly indicate that therapeutic doses of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause quite distinct changes in arachidonic acid metabolism, which might be relevant to their specific therapeutic actions and side-effects. PMID:6895043

  20. Automated measurement of joint space width in early rheumatoid arthritis hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, YH

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, affecting predominantly small joints of hands and feet. The current gold standard for assessment of radiographic progression in RA is the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SvdH), scoring both bone erosions and joint space narrowing (JSN

  1. Automated measurement of joint space width in early rheumatoid arthritis hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, YH

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, affecting predominantly small joints of hands and feet. The current gold standard for assessment of radiographic progression in RA is the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SvdH), scoring both bone erosions and joint space narrowing

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Efficiency of teaching patients with early-stage rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Vladislavovna Orlova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Education programs are an important part of the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Objective: to develop a unified model of an education program for RA patients and to evaluate its efficiency at the early stage of the disease.Material and methods. A group education program was worked out with the support of the All-Russian public organization of the disabled “The Russian rheumatology organization “Nadezhda” (Hope” and encompassed 4 daily classes lasting 90 min. All information was presented by a multidisciplinary team of specialists (rheumatologists, a cardiologist, a psychologist, a physiotherapist, and a physical trainer. The study included 55 patients with early RA (89.1% of women aged 18 to 62 years; the duration of the disease was 2 to 22 months; of them 25 were taught using the education program (a study group; 30 received drug therapy only (a control group. Following 3 and 6 months, the number of tender and swollen joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and pain were determined applying a 100-ml VAS, DAS28, HAQ, and RAPID3. Adherence to non-drug treatments was assessed employing a special patient questionnaire.Results. Three and six months after being taught, two patient groups showed increases in adherence to joint protection methods by 13 and 10 times (p<0.01, regular physical training by 4 and 3.25 times (p<0.01, uses of orthoses for the wrist joint by 2 times and 75% (p<0.01 and knee orthoses by 33.3 and 50.0% (p<0.01, and orthopedic insoles by 71.4 and 57.1% (p<0.01, respectively. Following 6 months, there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in most parameters (p<0.05, except for ESR, CRP, and DAS28 (p>0.05. Further more, a good response to treatment was significantly more common in these periods, as shown by the EULAR response criteria (DAS28: 56.3% versus 40% in the control group (p<0.05.Conclusion. The education program decreases the intensity

  4. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-02-18

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment.

  5. Quality of Life in Arthritis Patients Using Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingela Wiklund

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a painful and disabling condition. To suppress the pain and the inflammatory process, patients are often chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID users. Chronic use of NSAIDs may induce peptic ulcer, dyspeptic problems and heartburn. Therefore, these patients are often provided with treatment to relieve and/or protect against gastrointestinal problems. Rheumatic disorders also affect a range of health-related quality of life domains. In one study, patients with NSAID-associated gastroduodenal lesions complained about lack of energy, sleep disturbances, emotional distress and social isolation in addition to pain and mobility limitations. The degree of distress and dysfunction differed markedly from scores in an unselected population. Clinical trial data suggest that acid-suppressing therapy with omeprazole is superior to therapy with misoprostol and ranitidine in healing gastroduodenal lesions and preventing abdominal pain, heartburn and indigestion symptoms during continued NSAID treatment. Because arthritic patients are severely incapacitated by their condition regarding most aspects of health-related quality of life, it is important to offer a treatment that is effective in healing and preventing NSAID-induced ulcers and gastrointestinal symptoms during continued NSAID treatment without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. Treatment with omeprazole once daily has been shown to be superior to that with ranitidine and misoprostol in this respect.

  6. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yi Chien

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment.

  7. Effects of cigarette smoking on early arthritis: a cross-sectional study-data from the Argentine Consortium for Early Arthritis (CONAART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haye Salinas, María Jezabel; Retamozo, Soledad; Alvarez, Ana Cecilia; Maldonado Ficco, Hernán; Dal Pra, Fernando; Citera, Gustavo; Benegas, Mariana; Chaparro del Moral, Rafael; Rillo, Oscar; Secco, Anastasia; Marino Claverie, Lucila; Catalan Pellet, Antonio; Marcos, Josefina; García, Mercedes Argentina; Marcos, Juan Carlos; Barbaglia, Ana; Bellomio, Verónica; Berman, Alberto; Quiroz, Cristian; Soriano, Enrique R; Ceccato, Federico; Paira, Sergio; Vazquez, Doralia; Juarez, Vicente Ricardo; Velozo, Edson Javier; Salvatierra, Gabriela; Caeiro, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Our objective was to analyze the effects of cigarette smoking on disease activity, functional capacity, radiographic damage, serology and presence of extraarticular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and undifferentiated arthritis. This is a cross-sectional study of 1,305 patients (729 with rheumatoid arthritis and 576 with undifferentiated arthritis) from CONAART, the Argentine Consortium for Early Arthritis that includes patients older than 16 years with <2 years of disease. Sociodemographic data, clinical characteristics of the disease and smoking history were collected. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the disease activity score of 28 joints was 5.4 ± 1.3 in current smokers, 5.2 ± 1.4 in former smokers and 5.1 ± 1.4 in never smokers (p = 0.011). The simple erosion narrowing score was higher in current smokers and former smokers than in never smokers (M 14.0, R Q 6.0-21.0; M 15.0, R Q 7.0-24.0; M 10.0, R Q 5.0-17.0; p = 0.006). Current smokers had higher rheumatoid factor titer (M 160.0, R Q 80.0-341.0) than former smokers (M 146.8, R Q 6.03-255.5) and never smokers (M 15.0, R Q 9.0-80.0) (p = 0.004). The variable independently associated with tobacco exposure was simple erosion narrowing score (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.012). In patients with undifferentiated arthritis, an association between smoking status and parameters of activity or radiographic damage was not observed. Neither was tobacco exposure related to the presence of extraarticular manifestations or to the degree of disability in any of the two groups of patients. No relation was found between disease activity and severity, and number of packs smoked per year. Tobacco.

  8. Early identification of 'acute-onset' chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy could be clearly separated into two non-overlapping groups. Studies of nerve excitability may be able to

  9. Early detection of temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - the role of contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Stuber, Tina; Winkler, Peter [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, Jan; Hospach, Toni [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Rheumatology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Early treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is crucial in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to prevent permanent functional impairment. As involvement of TMJs is often asymptomatic, contrast-enhanced MRI is regarded as the most sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tool. To evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement in TMJs of children and adolescents with JIA in comparison to normal controls from a previous study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of 50 children and adolescents with JIA (6.3 to 18 years of age; mean: 12 years) were retrospectively analysed. We assessed morphological abnormalities and postcontrast time-intensity curves of the soft joint tissue and the mandibular condyle. Ratios were calculated to quantify postcontrast signal intensities (SI) in relation to precontrast SI at initial (1 min postcontrast) and maximum (6 min postcontrast) increase. Time-intensity curves followed similar biphasic patterns in normal and pathological joints. In joints with morphological signs of arthritis, mean SI ratios were on average higher than in normal joints of the reference group, but ranges of values widely overlapped. Arthritis: mean initial increase of SI 62% (±2 S.D. 18-105%), mean maximum SI 106% higher than precontrast (±2 S.D. 46-166%). Normal: mean initial increase of SI 49% (±2 S.D. 14- 85%), mean maximum of SI 73% (±2 S.D. 23-123%). Given this considerable overlap of results in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of contrast enhancement alone did not allow differentiation between TMJs with and without signs of inflammation. Thickening of the soft joint tissue seems to remain the earliest sign to reliably indicate TMJ arthritis. (orig.)

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Essential Oils of Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) in Experimental Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Janet L; Frye, Jennifer B; Oyarzo, Janice N; Chen, Jianling; Zhang, Huaping; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2016-07-01

    Ginger and its extracts have been used traditionally as anti-inflammatory remedies, with a particular focus on the medicinal properties of its phenolic secondary metabolites, the gingerols. Consistent with these uses, potent anti-arthritic effects of gingerol-containing extracts were previously demonstrated by our laboratory using an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis, streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis. In this study, anti-inflammatory effects of ginger's other secondary metabolites, the essential oils (GEO), which contain terpenes with reported phytoestrogenic activity, were assessed in female Lewis rats with SCW-induced arthritis. GEO (28 mg/kg/d ip) prevented chronic joint inflammation, but altered neither the initial acute phase of joint swelling nor granuloma formation at sites of SCW deposition in liver. Pharmacologic doses of 17-β estradiol (200 or 600 μg/kg/d sc) elicited the same pattern of anti-inflammatory activity, suggesting that GEO could be acting as a phytoestrogen. However, contrary to this hypothesis, GEO had no in vivo effect on classic estrogen target organs, such as uterus or bone. En toto, these results suggest that ginger's anti-inflammatory properties are not limited to the frequently studied phenolics, but may be attributable to the combined effects of both secondary metabolites, the pungent-tasting gingerols and as well as its aromatic essential oils.

  11. Acute phase protein haptoglobin as inflammatory marker in serum and synovial fluid in an equine model of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrachina, Laura; Remacha, Ana Rosa; Soler, Lourdes; García, Natalia; Romero, Antonio; Vázquez, Francisco José; Vitoria, Arantza; Álava, María Ángeles; Lamprave, Fermín; Rodellar, Clementina

    2016-12-01

    Acute phase proteins are useful inflammatory markers in horses. Haptoglobin (Hp) serum level is increased in horses undergoing different inflammatory processes, including arthritis. However, Hp concentration has not been assessed in inflammatory synovial fluid (SF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the Hp response in serum and SF in horses undergoing experimentally induced arthritis. For this purpose, serum and SF samples were collected from 12 animals before amphotericin B-induced arthritis was created (T0, healthy) and 15days after the lesion induction (T1, joint inflammation) and Hp was determined by single radial immunodiffusion. The Hp increase between T0 and T1 was significant in both serum and SF, and serum Hp concentration at T0 was significantly higher than in SF, but significant differences were not found at T1, indicating a higher Hp increase in SF. A significant positive correlation for Hp concentration between serum and SF samples was found. These results highlight the potential usefulness of Hp as inflammatory marker in horses, showing for the first time the increase of Hp in SF from joint inflammation in the horse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Hany H., E-mail: hany_h_arab@yahoo.com [Biochemistry Division, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Taif University, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Sawalhi, Maha M. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  14. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of heel fat pad inflammatory-oedematous lesions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsetti, P; Frediani, B; Acciai, C; Baldi, F; Filippou, G; Galeazzi, M; Marcolongo, R

    2006-01-01

    To study heel fat pad (HFP) inflammatory-oedematous lesions in selected patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using ultrasonography (US) and power Doppler US (PDUS), to describe and compare US features of these lesions with those obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to describe changes in the lesions after a short-term follow-up with conventional or anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) therapy. Twelve heels of eight RA outpatients with HFP inflammatory-oedematous lesions were studied by US, PDUS, and unenhanced MRI. All the patients were followed up and US was performed after 3 months. Five patients started on anti-TNFalpha therapy. HFP lesions appeared at US as a heterogeneous and hypoechoic subcalcaneal mass, with loss of normal lobular structure and increased thickness of HFP, because of focal rupture of fibrous septae with oedema and fluid. PDUS showed peripheral vascularization of HFP lesions in 9/12 heels. In 3/12 heels some vascular signals was also detectable inside the lesion, always along the residual echoic septa. No detectable flow was observed within the central fluid-filled spaces. MRI of the HFP lesions showed areas of mean intensity in T1-weighted sequences and high intensity in T2-weighted sequences, with poorly or well-defined margins. After 3 months, PDUS showed reduction in HFP lesion vascularity (associated with reduction in pain) in 10/12 heels, while poor regression of grey-scale US abnormalities was observed. Both US and MRI are capable of demonstrating structural abnormalities in the HFP. PDUS is useful to assess and monitor inflammatory vascularization of the HFP lesions.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effect of an extract of Coccidioides posadasii in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Carolina Matias Dinelly; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Julio Costa; Leite, Ana Karine Rocha de Melo; Leite, Ana Caroline Rocha de Melo; Girão, Virgínia Cláudia Carneiro; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Cunha, Fernando de Queiroz; Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro

    2013-04-01

    Trying to surpass host defenses, fungal infections alter the immune response. Components from nonpathogenic fungi present therapeutic anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating activities. This study reveals that proteins present in a Coccidioides posadasii extract provide anti-inflammatory benefit in experimental arthritis. Zymosan was given intra-articularly to rats and mice, and groups were pretreated with C. posadasii extract either per os or intraperitoneally. Controls received the vehicle. Acute hypernociception was evaluated using articular incapacitation and von Frey methods. Cell influx and cytokine levels were assessed in joint exudates. Joint damage was evaluated by histopathology and determination of glycosaminoglycan content of the cartilage. Synovia was evaluated for cell death and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression using TUNEL and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Pretreatment with C. posadasii extract significantly inhibited acute and chronic cell influx, hypernociception, and provoked reduction of glycosaminoglycan loss while reducing chronic synovitis, cell death, and iNOS expression. Reduction/alkylation of C. posadasii extract abrogated these effects. C. posadasii administration did not alter TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and γ-interferon levels, whereas IL-10 levels were significantly reduced. Data reveal that a C. posadasii extract reduces iNOS expression that is associated with inhibition of synovial apoptosis and decrease in IL-10 levels released into zymosan-inflamed joints. Characterization of active components excluded charged carbohydrates while pointing to a protein as responsible for these effects. In summary, systemic administration of components from a pathogenic fungus provides anti-inflammatory effects, being species-independent and orally active. Besides adding to understand host response against fungi, the results may lead to therapeutic implications.

  16. Diagnostic value of high-frequency ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Yu; Wang, Xian-Bin; Sun, Xue-Hui; Liu, Feng-Li; Huang, Sheng-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Early diagnosis and management improve the outcome of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study explored the application of high-frequency ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of early RA. Thirty-nine patients (20 males and 19 females) diagnosed with early RA were enrolled in the study. A total of 1,248 positions, including 858 hand joints and 390 tendons, were examined by high-frequency US and MRI to evaluate the presence of bone erosion, bone marrow edema (BME), synovial proliferation, joint effusion, tendinitis and tendon sheath edema. The imaging results of the above abnormalities, detected by US, were compared with those identified using MRI. No statistically significant overall changes were observed between high-frequency US and MRI in detecting bone erosion [44 (5.1%) vs. 35 (4.1%), respectively; P>0.05], tendinitis [18 (4.6%) vs. 14 (1.5%), respectively; P>0.05] and tendon sheath edema [37 (9.5%) vs. 30 (7.7%), respectively; P>0.05]. Significant differences were observed between high-frequency US and MRI with regards to the detection of synovial proliferation [132 (15.4%) vs. 66 (7.7%), respectively; Phigh-frequency US (5.5 vs. 0%, respectively; Phigh-frequency US of the dominant hand and wrist joints were comparably sensitive to bone erosion, tendinitis and tendon sheath edema. However, MRI was more sensitive in detecting bone marrow edema in early RA, while US was more sensitive in the evaluation of joint effusion and synovial proliferation. In conclusion, US and MRI are promising for the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory activity in patients with RA.

  17. Serum levels of IL-17, IL-4, and INFγ in Serbian patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disease with autoimmune etiology, characterized by synovial inflammation and destruction of joint cartilage and bone. There are controversial data about the profile of interleukin-17 (IL-17A, interleukin-4 (IL-4, and interferon-gamma (INFγ, indicating in some studies the key role of IL-17, while in others the Th1 cytokines. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of 31 early RA patients were evaluated for erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR, rheumatoid factor (RF, C-reactive protein (CRP, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP, and for the tested cytokines (IL-17A, IL-4, and INFγ. Disease activity score (DAS28 calculation was done for all patients. Control serum samples were obtained from 29 healthy volunteers. Results: The levels of tested cytokines were significantly higher (IL-17A, p < 0.001; INFγ, p < 0.001; IL-4, p < 0.01 in patients with early RA, compared to the healthy controls. In early RA patients, a strong correlation of serum IL-17A was found with DAS28, ESR, and CRP. Also, significant negative correlation was found between serum INFγ levels and the DAS28 score, indicating that INFγ may play a key role in maintaining immune homeostasis in patients with RA. Conclusion: The mean serum IL-17A levels in patients with early RA, corresponded with the disease activity and severity. This might highlight the usefulness of the serum IL-17A level in defining the activity and predictive patterns, for aggressive disease therapy, and it might express specific therapeutically targets.

  18. Serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 in early rheumatoid arthritis is correlated with disease activity and radiological progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthumus, MD; Limburg, PC; Westra, J; van Leeuwen, MA; van Rijswijk, MH

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the clinical significance of serial measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) levels in relation to markers of disease activity and radiological progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. In a 3 year prospective study of 33 patients with early RA (s

  19. A prospective comparison of telemedicine versus in-person delivery of an interprofessional education program for adults with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Carol A; Warmington, Kelly; Flewelling, Carol; Shupak, Rachel; Papachristos, Angelo; Jones, Caroline; Linton, Denise; Beaton, Dorcas E; Lineker, Sydney; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2017-02-01

    Introduction We evaluated two modes of delivery of an inflammatory arthritis education program ("Prescription for Education" (RxEd)) in improving arthritis self-efficacy and other secondary outcomes. Methods We used a non-randomized, pre-post design to compare videoconferencing (R, remote using telemedicine) versus local (I, in-person) delivery of the program. Data were collected at baseline (T1), immediately following RxEd (T2), and at six months (T3). Self-report questionnaires served as the data collection tool. Measures included demographics, disorder-related, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (SE), previous knowledge (Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit (ACREU) rheumatoid arthritis knowledge questionnaire), coping efficacy, Illness Intrusiveness, and Effective Consumer Scale. Analysis included: baseline comparisons and longitudinal trends (R vs I groups); direct between-group comparisons; and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) analysis. Results A total of 123 persons attended the program (I: n = 36; R: n = 87) and 111 completed the baseline questionnaire (T1), with follow-up completed by 95% ( n = 117) at T2 and 62% ( n = 76) at T3. No significant baseline differences were found across patient characteristics and outcome measures. Both groups (R and I) showed immediate effect (improved arthritis SE, mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)): R 1.07 (0.67, 1.48); I 1.48 (0.74, 2.23)) after the program that diminished over six months (mean change (95% CI): R 0.45 (-0.1, 0.1); I 0.73 (-0.25, 1.7)). For each of the secondary outcomes, both groups showed similar trends for improvement (mean change scores (95% CI)) over time. GEE analysis did not show any meaningful differences between groups (R vs I) over time. Discussion Improvements in arthritis self-efficacy and secondary outcomes displayed similar trends for I and R participant groups.

  20. Antinociceptive effects of AS1892802, a novel Rho kinase inhibitor, in rat models of inflammatory and noninflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Eiji; Kumakura, Fumiyo; Hatori, Chie; Hamachi, Emi; Iwashita, Akinori; Ishii, Noe; Terasawa, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuaki; Takeshita, Nobuaki

    2010-09-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) is involved in various physiological functions, including cell motility, vasoconstriction, and neurite extension. Although a functional role of ROCK in nociception in the central nervous tissue has been reported in neuropathy, the peripheral function of this protein in hyperalgesia is not known. In this study, antinociceptive effects of AS1892802 [1-[(1S)-2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl]-3-[4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl]urea], a novel and highly selective ROCK inhibitor, were investigated in two rat models of arthritis. Orally administered AS1892802 exhibited potent antinociceptive effect in both an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model (inflammatory arthritis model) and a monoiodoacetate-induced arthritis (MIA) model (noninflammatory arthritis model), with an ED(50) of 0.15 mg/kg (MIA model). Fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor, and tramadol were also effective in both models; however, diclofenac was effective only in the AIA model. The onset of antinociceptive effect of AS1892802 was as fast as those of tramadol and diclofenac. AS1892802 did not induce gastric irritation or abnormal behavior. Because AS1892802 rarely penetrates the central nervous tissue and is also effective by intra-articular administration, it seemed to function peripherally. These results suggest that AS1892802 has an attractive analgesic profile for the treatment of severe osteoarthritis pain.

  1. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s). The pathogenesis of rheumatoid a...

  2. Risk factors and early detection of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Lodewijk; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2010-01-01

    P>Background Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This cannot be explained alone by the increased prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors like smoking and hypertension. Other factors therefore seem to be

  3. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze u

  4. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothova (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  5. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  6. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothová (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  7. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140201890

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  8. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze u

  9. The tyrosine kinase BMX is an essential mediator of inflammatory arthritis in a kinase-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottar-Guillier, Marie; Dodeller, Francis; Huesken, Dieter; Iourgenko, Vadim; Mickanin, Craig; Labow, Mark; Gaveriaux, Samuel; Kinzel, Bernd; Mueller, Matthias; Alitalo, Kari; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Cenni, Bruno

    2011-05-15

    Inflammatory cytokines like TNF play a central role in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. We identified the tyrosine kinase bone marrow kinase on chromosome X (BMX) as an essential component of a shared inflammatory signaling pathway. Transient depletion of BMX strongly reduced secretion of IL-8 in cell lines and primary human cells stimulated by TNF, IL-1β, or TLR agonists. BMX was required for phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK, as well as activation of NF-κB. The following epistasis analysis indicated that BMX acts downstream of or at the same level as the complex TGF-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-TAK1 binding protein. At the cellular level, regulation of the IL-8 promoter required the pleckstrin homology domain of BMX, which could be replaced by an ectopic myristylation signal, indicating a requirement for BMX membrane association. In addition, activation of the IL-8 promoter by in vitro BMX overexpression required its catalytic activity. Genetic ablation of BMX conferred protection in the mouse arthritis model of passive K/BxN serum transfer, confirming that BMX is an essential mediator of inflammation in vivo. However, genetic replacement with a catalytically inactive BMX allele was not protective in the same arthritis animal model. We conclude that BMX is an essential component of inflammatory cytokine signaling and that catalytic, as well as noncatalytic functions of BMX are involved.

  10. Diurnal variation of connective tissue metabolites in early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottenburger, T; Junker, P; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2011-01-01

    To study the circadian variability of circulating connective tissue metabolites in patients with very early (VERA) and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (LRA) and in healthy control individuals.......To study the circadian variability of circulating connective tissue metabolites in patients with very early (VERA) and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (LRA) and in healthy control individuals....

  11. Circulating T helper and T regulatory subsets in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Jayesh M; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Hallström, Magnus; Andersson, Kerstin; Nordström, Inger; Rudin, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenic role and frequency of T cell subtypes in early rheumatoid arthritis are still unclear. We therefore performed a comprehensive analysis of the circulating T cell subtype pattern in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis compared to healthy control subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 26 patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and from with 18 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. T helper cell types Th0, Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th1/17 and nonclassic T helper subsets were defined by flow cytometry based on the expression of chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR6, and CXCR3. Regulatory T cells were defined by expression of CD25(+) CD127(low) and also FOXP3 CXCR5(+) cells among regulatory and nonregulatory T cells were defined as T follicular regulatory and T follicular helper cells, respectively. The phenotype of T cell subsets was confirmed by transcription factor and cytokine secretion analyses. Multivariate discriminant analysis showed that patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis were segregated from healthy control subjects based on the circulating T cell subset profile. Among the discriminator subsets, CCR4(+)CXCR3(-) (Th2 and Th17), CTLA4(+) and FOXP3(+) subsets were present in significantly higher frequencies, whereas CCR4(-) (Th1/Th17, CCR6(+)CCR4(-)CXCR3(-), and Th1) subsets were present in lower frequencies in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis compared with healthy control subjects. The proportions of Th2 and Th17 subsets associated positively with each other and negatively with the CXCR3(+)/interferon γ-secreting subsets (Th1 and Th1/Th17) in patients with untreated rheumatoid arthritis. The proportions of Th2 cells increased with age in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control subjects. The dominance of circulating CCR4(+)CXCR3(-) T helper subsets (Th2 and Th17) in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis point toward a pathogenic role of

  12. Association of allograft inflammatory factor-1 gene polymorphism with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, A; Kurzawski, M; Szczepanik, T; Dziedziejko, V; Safranow, K; Borowiec-Chłopek, Z; Giedrys-Kalemba, S; Drozdzik, M

    2008-08-01

    Human allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic protein primarily identified in human and rat allografts, and data from several studies suggest an important role for AIF-1 in inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to examine the association between AIF1 rs2269475:C>T polymorphism and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AIF1 genotype was determined by means of the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in 276 White patients with RA and 236 healthy subjects. The frequency of the AIF1 rs2269475 TT genotype was significantly higher in the patients with RA than in the controls (OR=5.59, 95% CI: 1.22-25.55). The frequency of T allele carriers in the patient group with RA was 31.9% vs 19.1% among controls (P=0.0003). Moreover, the frequency of individuals positive for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies was significantly elevated in the T allele carriers (OR=8.82, 95% CI: 2.06-37.7). It is noteworthy that no significant linkage disequilibria between the AIF1 C/T and DRB1 alleles associated with RA development and anti-CCP antibody production [including the most frequent, i.e. *04 (32.7%) and *01 (23.5%)] (P>0.1) were found. Our results show that the AIF1 rs2269475 T allele is associated with increased risk of RA development. Moreover, the frequency of individuals positive for anti-CCP antibodies is significantly increased among T allele carriers.

  13. The Role of miRNAs in Common Inflammatory Arthropathies: Osteoarthritis and Gouty Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Stivarou, Theodora; Tsironi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA species that are highly evolutionarily conserved, from higher invertebrates to man. Up to 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells thus far, where they are key regulators of the expression of numerous targets at the post-transcriptional level. They are implicated in various processes, including cell differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. An expanding list of miRNAs is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of common, non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Interestingly, osteoarthritis (OA) is now being conceptualized as a metabolic disease, as there is a correlation among hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experimental evidence suggests that metabolic deregulation is a commonality between these different pathological entities, and that miRNAs are key players in the modulation of metabolic routes. In light of these findings, this review discusses the role of miRNAs in OA and gouty arthritis, as well as the possible therapeutic targetability of miRNAs in these diseases. PMID:27845712

  14. Genetic linkage of familial granulomatous inflammatory arthritis, skin rash, and uveitis to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Ala-Kokko, L. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Blau syndrome (MIM 186580), first described in a large, three-generation kindred, is an autosomal, dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiorgan, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous arthritis, skin rash, and uveitis and probably represents a subtype of a group of clinical entities referred to as {open_quotes}familial granulomatosis.{close_quotes} It is the sole human model with recognizably Mendelian inheritance for a variety of multisystem inflammatory diseases affecting a significant percentage of the population. A genomewide search for the Blau susceptibility locus was undertaken after karyotypic analysis revealed no abnormalities. Sixty-two of the 74-member pedigree were genotyped with dinucleotide-repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed under dominant model of inheritance with reduced penetrance. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum LOD score of 3.75 at {theta} = .04, with two-point analysis. LOD scores for flanking markers were consistent and placed the Blau susceptibility locus within the 16p12-q21 interval. 46 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Inflammatory arthritis-like and other MR findings in wrists of asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, P.L.; Page, P.J.; McColl, G.J. [University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Radiology Department, Parkville (Australia)

    2006-10-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects that might be confused with pathologic findings. MR examination of the dominant wrist was performed in 30 asymptomatic volunteers aged 22-49 years using pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in the coronal and axial planes. The bases of the metacarpals, the carpus and the distal radius and ulna were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists for lesions, notches, blood vessels and synovial enhancement. There were 24 bright osseous lesions (erosions, intraosseous ganglia, oedema or cysts) in 14 subjects. Intraosseous blood vessels were seen in all but one wrist examined, most commonly in the capitate and lunate bones. Enhancement was present in 26 of 27 notches identified at the base of the second metacarpal and less commonly in the capitate, hamate and triquetral notches. A small joint effusion was present in 14 subjects. Joint or soft-tissue enhancement was identified in 16 wrists. Many MR abnormalities and variants may be detected in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects. Many of these could be confused with pathologic findings usually associated with inflammatory arthritis. (orig.)

  16. The Role of miRNAs in Common Inflammatory Arthropathies: Osteoarthritis and Gouty Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Papanagnou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding RNA species that are highly evolutionarily conserved, from higher invertebrates to man. Up to 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells thus far, where they are key regulators of the expression of numerous targets at the post-transcriptional level. They are implicated in various processes, including cell differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. An expanding list of miRNAs is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of common, non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Interestingly, osteoarthritis (OA is now being conceptualized as a metabolic disease, as there is a correlation among hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome (MetS. Experimental evidence suggests that metabolic deregulation is a commonality between these different pathological entities, and that miRNAs are key players in the modulation of metabolic routes. In light of these findings, this review discusses the role of miRNAs in OA and gouty arthritis, as well as the possible therapeutic targetability of miRNAs in these diseases.

  17. Detection of autoantibodies to citrullinated BiP in rheumatoid arthritis patients and pro-inflammatory role of citrullinated BiP in collagen-induced arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPAs) are highly specific to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are thought to have a close relationship with the pathogenesis of arthritis. Several proteins, including fibrinogen, vimentin, and alpha-enolase, were reported as ACPA-target antigens, and their importance in RA pathogenesis was widely proposed. We identified citrullinated immunoglobulin binding protein (citBiP) as another ACPA target in RA patients and examined its pro-inflammatory role in arthritis. Methods We measured the levels of anti-citBiP, anti-BiP, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies in the serum of RA patients (n = 100), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients (n = 60), and healthy controls (n = 30) using ELISA and immunoblotting. Epitope mapping was performed using 27 citBiP-derived peptides. In the mouse study, after DBA/1J mice were immunized with BiP or citBiP, serum titers of ACPAs were measured by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. The development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was observed in BiP- or citBiP-pre-immunized mice. Results The serum levels of anti-BiP and anti-citBiP antibodies were significantly increased in RA patients, although only anti-BiP antibodies were slightly increased in SLE patients. Interestingly, anti-citBiP antibody levels were higher than anti-BiP antibody levels in 72% of RA patients, whereas no significant increase in anti-citBiP antibody levels was detected in SLE patients and healthy controls. The serum levels of anti-CCP antibodies were correlated with those of anti-citBiP antibodies in RA patients (R2 = 0.41). Several citrulline residues of citBiP were determined to be major epitopes of anti-citBiP antibodies, one of which showed cross-reactivity with CCP. Immunization of DBA/1J mice with citBiP induced several kinds of ACPAs, including anti-CCP and anti-citrullinated fibrinogen antibodies. Pre-immunization with citBiP exacerbated CIA, and anti-CCP antibody levels

  18. 2016 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Bernard; Landewe, Robert; Daien, Claire I; Hua, Charlotte; Aletaha, Daniel; Álvaro-Gracia, Jose María; Bakkers, Margôt; Brodin, Nina; Burmester, Gerd R; Codreanu, Catalin; Conway, Richard; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Fonseca, Joao; Raza, Karim; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Smolen, Josef S; Skingle, Diana; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Kvien, Tore K; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Since the 2007 recommendations for the management of early arthritis have been presented, considerable research has been published in the field of early arthritis, mandating an update of the 2007 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for management of early arthritis. In accordance with the 2014 EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures, the expert committee pursued an approach that was based on evidence in the literature and on expert opinion. The committee involved 20 rheumatologists, 2 patients and 1 healthcare professional representing 12 European countries. The group defined the focus of the expert committee and target population, formulated a definition of 'management' and selected the research questions. A systematic literature research (SLR) was performed by two fellows with the help of a skilled librarian. A set of draft recommendations was proposed on the basis of the research questions and the results of the SLR. For each recommendation, the categories of evidence were identified, the strength of recommendations was derived and the level of agreement was determined through a voting process. The updated recommendations comprise 3 overarching principles and 12 recommendations for managing early arthritis. The selected statements involve the recognition of arthritis, referral, diagnosis, prognostication, treatment (information, education, pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions), monitoring and strategy. Eighteen items were identified as relevant for future research. These recommendations provide rheumatologists, general practitioners, healthcare professionals, patients and other stakeholders with an updated EULAR consensus on the entire management of early arthritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Joint functional disability in children of early age with olygoarticular juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A Shelepina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study functional status, character of functional disturbances and possibilities of their correction in children of early age with juvenile arthritis (JA. Material and methods. 42 pts with oligoarticular (at presentation variant of JA with onset before 4 years of age admitted to pediatric department of the Institute of rheumatology of RAMS were included. Mean age of children at the disease onset was 22,4+10 months (from 9 to 46 months, mean disease duration at the first hospitalization — 9,5±5,5 months. Functional status and daily activities limitations (decrease of moving capacity and hand performance were assessed at the beginning of the disease, at admission to the institute and at discharge after drug and rehabilitation treatment. Results. At the disease onset 40 pts (95,2% had knee joint damage (one sided in 28 — 66,6%. 30 from these 40 pts (75% had flexion deformity and daily activities limitations and two pts had anlde joint damage. 12 pts (28,6% received courses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSA1D and 5 pts (11,9% — disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD before admission. All pts had active joint syndrome at admission. Daily activities limitations were present in 41 pts (97,6%. DMARD were prescribed to 41 pts (with glucocorticoids (GC in 12 cases. Intra-articular injections of GC were performed in 15 pts. Individual exercise therapy (passive joint movement was applied in all pts, postural treatment — in 41 (97,6%. One pt received exercise therapy in a group. Splints were done for 6 pts. Stepped correction in plaster was performed in 4 from them. In all pts after treatment arthritis subsided and functional status improved. In 18 (42,8% from them function of damaged joint was fully restored and in 19 (45,2% — improved. After several stages of hospital treatment deformation was corrected and function restored in 4 (9,5% pts Conclusion. Клее joints are frequently involved in children of early age

  20. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of the multidrug herbomineral formulation in male Wistar rats against rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal S Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, which may play a role in a number of disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Ancient ayurvedic physicians had developed certain dietary and therapeutic measures to arrest or prevent these disorders. Objective: Rheuma off gold (RG is a herbomineral formulation recommended by ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of RA. This study was carried out to lend scientific evidence to the efficacy claim for RG in the management of RA in folklore medicine. Materials and Methods: Arthritis was induced by complete Freund′s adjuvant. Treatment with formulation 100 mg/kg and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given to rats intragastrically once a day from day 1 to day 21 and after which estimation of physical, biochemical, and hematological parameters were carried out. Results: Treatment of formulation to adjuvant induced arthritic animal showed statistically significant ( P < 0.05 improvement in physical parameters like arthritic index, paw edema, paw thickness as well as reduction of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein, serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The treatment also produced statistically significant ( P < 0.05 increase in hemoglobin percent and improvement in splenomegaly and thymus index. In the histopathological examination, ameliorative effect of formulation was observed in hyperplasia of synovium, pannus formation, and destruction of the joint space. Conclusion: The results obtained in experiments indicated that the formulation significantly inhibited the adjuvant-induced arthritis which was comparable to dexamethasone and had preferable anti-inflammatory effect without significant side effect. Thus, the formulation may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis.

  1. Clinical Relevance of VPAC1 Receptor Expression in Early Arthritis: Association with IL-6 and Disease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iria V Seoane

    Full Text Available The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 mediate anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Data on the expression of these receptors could complement clinical assessment in the management of RA. Our goal was to investigate the correlation between expression of both receptors and the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from patients with early arthritis (EA. We also measured expression of IL-6 to evaluate the association between VIP receptors and systemic inflammation.We analyzed 250 blood samples collected at any of the 5 scheduled follow-up visits from 125 patients enrolled in the Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal study. Samples from 22 healthy donors were also analyzed. Sociodemographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were systematically recorded. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time PCR. Then, longitudinal multivariate analyses were performed.PBMCs from EA patients showed significantly higher expression of VPAC2 receptors at baseline compared to healthy donors (p<0.001. With time, however, VPAC2 expression tended to be significantly lower while VPAC1 receptor expression increased in correlation with a reduction in DAS28 index. Our results reveal that more severe inflammation, based on high levels of IL-6, is associated with lower expression of VPAC1 (p<0.001 and conversely with increased expression of VPAC2 (p<0.001. A major finding of this study is that expression of VPAC1 is lower in patients with increased disease activity (p = 0.001, thus making it possible to differentiate between patients with various degrees of clinical disease activity.Patients with more severe inflammation and higher disease activity show lower levels of VPAC1 expression, which is associated with patient-reported impairment. Therefore, VPAC1 is a biological marker in EA.

  2. Clinical Relevance of VPAC1 Receptor Expression in Early Arthritis: Association with IL-6 and Disease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Iria V.; Ortiz, Ana M.; Piris, Lorena; Lamana, Amalia; Juarranz, Yasmina; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Gomariz, Rosa P.; Martínez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 mediate anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data on the expression of these receptors could complement clinical assessment in the management of RA. Our goal was to investigate the correlation between expression of both receptors and the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with early arthritis (EA). We also measured expression of IL-6 to evaluate the association between VIP receptors and systemic inflammation. Methods We analyzed 250 blood samples collected at any of the 5 scheduled follow-up visits from 125 patients enrolled in the Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal study. Samples from 22 healthy donors were also analyzed. Sociodemographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were systematically recorded. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time PCR. Then, longitudinal multivariate analyses were performed. Results PBMCs from EA patients showed significantly higher expression of VPAC2 receptors at baseline compared to healthy donors (p<0.001). With time, however, VPAC2 expression tended to be significantly lower while VPAC1 receptor expression increased in correlation with a reduction in DAS28 index. Our results reveal that more severe inflammation, based on high levels of IL-6, is associated with lower expression of VPAC1 (p<0.001) and conversely with increased expression of VPAC2 (p<0.001). A major finding of this study is that expression of VPAC1 is lower in patients with increased disease activity (p = 0.001), thus making it possible to differentiate between patients with various degrees of clinical disease activity. Conclusion Patients with more severe inflammation and higher disease activity show lower levels of VPAC1 expression, which is associated with patient-reported impairment. Therefore, VPAC1 is a biological marker in EA. PMID:26881970

  3. The role of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCX® in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ECBio has developed proprietary technology to consistently isolate, expand and cryopreserve a well-characterized population of stromal cells from human umbilical cord tissue (UCX® cells. The technology has recently been optimized in order to become compliant with Advanced Medicine Therapeutic Products. In this work we report the immunosuppressive capacity of UCX® cells for treating induced autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Methods UCX® cells were isolated using a proprietary method (PCT/IB2008/054067 that yields a well-defined number of cells using a precise proportion between tissue digestion enzyme activity units, tissue mass, digestion solution volume and void volume. The procedure includes three recovery steps to avoid non-conformities related to cell recovery. UCX® surface markers were characterized by flow cytometry and UCX® capacity to expand in vitro and to differentiate into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells was evaluated. Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR assays were performed to evaluate the effect of UCX® cells on T-cell activation and Treg conversion assays were also performed in vitro. Furthermore, UCX® cells were administered in vivo in both a rat acute carrageenan-induced arthritis model and rat chronic adjuvant induced arthritis model for arthritic inflammation. UCX® anti-inflammatory activity was then monitored over time. Results UCX® cells stained positive for CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105; and negative for CD14, CD19 CD31, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR; and were capable to differentiate into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells. UCX® cells were shown to repress T-cell activation and promote the expansion of Tregs better than bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. Accordingly, xenogeneic UCX® administration in an acute carrageenan-induced arthritis model showed that human UCX® cells can reduce paw edema in vivo more efficiently than BM-MSCs. Finally, in a chronic adjuvant

  4. Grape polyphenols and propolis mixture inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human leukocytes and reduces clinical scores in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossalayi, M D; Rambert, J; Renouf, E; Micouleau, M; Mérillon, J M

    2014-02-15

    Polyphenols from red fruits and bee-derived propolis (PR) are bioactive natural products in various in vitro and in vivo models. The present study shows that hematotoxicity-free doses of grape polyphenols (GPE) and PR differentially decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated human peripheral blood leucocytes. While GPE inhibited the monocytes/macrophage response, propolis decreased both monokines and interferon γ (IFNγ) production. When used together, their distinct effects lead to the attenuation of all inflammatory mediators, as supported by a significant modulation of the transcriptomic profile of pro-inflammatory genes in human leukocytes. To enforce in vitro data, GPE+PR were tested for their ability to improve clinical scores and cachexia in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Extracts significantly reduced arthritis scores and cachexia, and this effect was more significant in animals receiving continuous low doses compared to those receiving five different high doses. Animals treated daily had significantly better clinical scores than corticoid-treated rats. Together, these findings indicate that the GPE+PR combination induces potent anti-inflammatory activity due to their complementary immune cell modulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term safety and efficacy of biosimilar infliximab among patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Abuelmagd; Byrne, Niamh; Conway, Richard; Walsh, Thomas; Mannion, Geraldine; Hanly, Michael; O'Sullivan, Miriam; Curran, Ann Maria; Carey, John J

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar infliximab in adult patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product in our center. In April 2014, patients attending our rheumatology service for infliximab infusions were switched from reference product to the biosimilar infliximab following consent and hospital approval. Around 34 patients with inflammatory arthritis were switched from reference product to biosimilar infliximab in 2014: 50% female, mean age 55 years (standard deviation=12.9), mean disease duration 14.79 years (9.7), median duration on infliximab 57 months, and two-thirds on oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. There was no difference in efficacy or safety in the first 6 months of therapy. By the end of 2015, the mean follow-up on biosimilar infliximab was 15.8 (standard deviation=6.3) months. Our results showed no significant difference in Health Assessment Questionnaire score, patient global assessment of disease activity, number of disease flares, or the medication dose between the originator and the biosimilar infliximab. However, reported pain and C-reactive protein values were significantly higher during the longer follow-up period (p=0.043, 0.001 respectively). There was no significant difference in the number of adverse events or infusion reactions during follow-up periods. Only five (14.7%) patients discontinued the biosimilar infliximab. Our patients experienced similar efficacy and safety for managing their arthritis with the biosimilar infliximab as the reference product infliximab, but at a much lower cost.

  6. Early effective suppression of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis reduces radiographic progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenger, AAME; Van Leeuwen, MA; Houtman, PM; Bruyn, GAW; Speerstra, F; Barendsen, BC; Velthuysen, E; Van Rijswijk, MH

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of early 'aggressive' drug treatment on radiographic progression in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA), compared to conventional stepwise increasing intensity of treatment. Design. Prospective follow-up study with an experimental group and a histor

  7. Is Coping Self-Efficacy Related to Psychological Distress in Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benka, Jozef; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Macejova, Zelmira; Lazurova, Ivica; Van der Klink, Jac; Groothoff, Johan; Van Dijk, Jitse

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to explore associations between coping self-efficacy and psychological distress in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Two samples differing in disease duration were collected at outpatient rheumatology clinics in Eastern Slovakia. The first sample consisted of

  8. Early rheumatoid arthritis, personality and psychological status : A follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, B; Sanderman, R; Suurmeijer, T; Doeglas, D; Van Sonderen, E; Van Rijswijk, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Van den Heuvel, W

    1998-01-01

    This article presents results from a follow-up study in the Netherlands among 292 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The main focus of this paper is on (changes in) personality characteristics, coping strategies and psychological status between the first and second wave (T1 and T2). On p

  9. Early rheumatoid arthritis, personality and psychological status : A follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, B; Sanderman, R; Suurmeijer, T; Doeglas, D; Van Sonderen, E; Van Rijswijk, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Van den Heuvel, W

    1998-01-01

    This article presents results from a follow-up study in the Netherlands among 292 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The main focus of this paper is on (changes in) personality characteristics, coping strategies and psychological status between the first and second wave (T1 and T2). On

  10. Antibodies to mutated citrullinated vimentin and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease and related arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarallah, Khaled; Shehab, Diaa; Al-Attiyah, Rajaa; Al-Azmi, Waleed; Al-Fadli, Ahmad; Zafar Haider, Mohammed; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata

    2012-09-01

    Antibodies that react with citrullinated proteins (anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin [anti-MCV] and second-generation anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies [anti-CCP2]) are markers for rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies have demonstrated that these antibodies are present in other arthropathies including the spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) takes various forms, with some shared similarities with classic spondylarthropathies. Our objective was to investigate the role of anti-MCV and anti-CCP2 as potential biomarkers in IBD and related arthritis. In all, 125 IBD patients (71 males, 54 females) were compared to 81 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Anti-MCV and Anti-CCP2 IgG were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. In the 125 IBD patients (mean age 32.6 ± 12.3 years), 44 (35.2%) had ulcerative colitis and 81 (64.8%) had Crohn's disease. Forty-four (35.2%) IBD patients developed arthritic manifestations. Antibody positivity was observed in 24/125 (19.2%) IBD patients and in 18/81 (22.2%) healthy subjects. The proportion of anti-MCV positivity among IBD patients and healthy individuals were similar: 16.8% vs. 16.0%, P = 0.887. Anti-CCP2 positivity among IBD patients and healthy individuals was also comparable: 6.4% vs. 6.2%, P = 0.948. Similarly, the presence of anti-MCV and anti-CCP2 antibodies was not different among IBD patients with and without arthritis. The mean titers of antibodies were low: anti-MCV (29.6 ± 7.5 U/mL) and anti-CCP2 (27.6 ± 4.0 U/mL) in IBD patients with arthritis. Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins were low in IBD-related arthritis. These findings suggest that these antibodies are not useful biomarkers in IBD to predict who may develop IBD-related arthropathy. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  11. A comparative study of renal dysfunction in patients with inflammatory arthropathies: strong association with cardiovascular diseases and not with anti-rheumatic therapies, inflammatory markers or duration of arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among comparable patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and to explore any predictive factors for renal impairment. METHODS: Consecutive patients with peripheral joint disease (oligo and polyarthritis) were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. We divided patients in two groups: RA group and seronegative inflammatory arthritis group. The cohort consisted of 183 patients (RA = 107, seronegative arthritis = 76 [psoriatic arthritis = 69, undifferentiated oligoarthritis = 7]). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the established Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Demographic details, disease-specific characteristics, anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of cardiovascular diseases were recorded. RESULTS: In total, 17.48% (n = 32) of the cohort had CKD. There was no statistically significant variation between the two groups as regards baseline demographics, disease characteristics, use of anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of individual cardiovascular diseases. We found that eGFR and the presence of CKD were similar among these groups. Among patients with CKD, 72% had undiagnosed CKD. No association of statistical significance was noted between CKD and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. The association of cardiovascular diseases with CKD remained significant after adjusting for confounders (age, gender, duration of arthritis, high C-reactive protein, use of anti-rheumatic drugs). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis are more prone to have CKD. This could have serious implications, as the majority of rheumatology patients use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and different immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate. No association of kidney dysfunction was noted with inflammatory disease

  12. Th17 plasticity in human autoimmune arthritis is driven by the inflammatory environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nistala, Kiran; Adams, Stuart; Cambrook, Helen; Ursu, Simona; Olivito, Biagio; de Jager, Wilco; Evans, Jamie G.; Cimaz, Rolando; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2010-01-01

    In several murine models of autoimmune arthritis, Th17 cells are the dominant initiators of inflammation. In human arthritis the majority of IL-17-secreting cells within the joint express a cytokine phenotype intermediate between Th17 and Th1. Here we show that Th17/1 cells from the joints of childr

  13. Are rheumatoid arthritis patients discernible from other early arthritis patients using 1.5T extremity magnetic resonance imaging? a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Bloem, Johan L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Reijnierse, Monique

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research. A European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recently suggested that MRI can improve the certainty of RA diagnosis. Because this recommendation may reflect a tendency to use MRI in daily practice, thorough studies on the value of MRI are required. Thus far no large studies have evaluated the accuracy of MRI to differentiate early RA from other patients with early arthritis. We performed a large cross-sectional study to determine whether patients who are clinically classified with RA differ in MRI features compared to patients with other diagnoses. In our study, 179 patients presenting with early arthritis (median symptom duration 15.4 weeks) underwent 1.5T extremity MRI of unilateral wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints according to our arthritis protocol, the foot without contrast. Images were scored according to OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) by 2 independent readers. Tenosynovitis was also assessed. The main outcome was fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. Test characteristics and areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. In subanalyses, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria were used as outcome, and analyses were stratified for anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). The ACR 1987 criteria were fulfilled in 43 patients (24.0%). Patients with RA had higher scores for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and bone marrow edema (BME) than patients without RA (p arthritis patients.

  14. “Employment and arthritis: making it work” a randomized controlled trial evaluating an online program to help people with inflammatory arthritis maintain employment (study protocol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of long-term work disability (WD), an outcome with a major impact on quality of life and a high cost to society. The importance of decreased at-work productivity has also recently been recognized. Despite the importance of these problems, few interventions have been developed to reduce the impact of arthritis on employment. We have developed a novel intervention called “Making It Work”, a program to help people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) deal with employment issues, prevent WD and improve at-work productivity. After favorable results in a proof-of-concept study, we converted the program to a web-based format for broader dissemination and improved accessibility. The objectives of this study are: 1) to evaluate in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) the effectiveness of the program at preventing work cessation and improving at-work productivity; 2) to perform a cost-utility analysis of the intervention. Methods/Design 526 participants with IA will be recruited from British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario in Canada. The intervention consists of a) 5 online group sessions; b) 5 web-based e-learning modules; c) consultations with an occupational therapist for an ergonomic work assessment and a vocational rehabilitation counselor. Questionnaires will be administered online at baseline and every 6 months to collect information about demographics, disease measures, costs, work-related risk factors for WD, quality of life, and work outcomes. Primary outcomes include at-work productivity and time to work cessation of > 6 months for any reason. Secondary outcomes include temporary work cessation, number of days missed from work per year, reduction in hours worked per week, quality adjusted life year for the cost utility analysis, and changes from baseline in employment risk factors. Analysis of Variance will evaluate the intervention’s effect on at-work productivity, and multivariable

  15. Update on interleukin-17: a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis and implication for clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miossec, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17A) is a cytokine critical for the acute defence against extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. Excess production during chronic inflammation has been associated with many inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The present review describes the key molecules of the IL-17 pathway, which are or could be targeted for treatment. Since targeting of IL-17A may affect defence mechanisms, the pathogenesis of such possible adverse events is analysed. Then the contributions of IL-17 to bone changes in various forms of arthritis are discussed. Finally, the results of current inhibitors of the IL-17 pathway in clinical trials are detailed. IL-17A inhibition has been first registered for the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Other therapeutic options are now tested in a long list of diseases. PMID:28243466

  16. Identifying real and perceived barriers to therapeutic education programs for individuals with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lorna; Sangrar, Ruheena; Bornstein, Carolyn; Lukmanji, Sara; Hapuhennedige, Sandani; Thorne, Carter; Beattie, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic Education Programs (TEPs) grounded in self-management principles have been shown to improve quality of life of patients with chronic conditions and reduce patient-related healthcare costs. Though these programs are becoming more readily available, patients often experience barriers in participating. This study sought to identify barriers faced by inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients in attending a TEP and understand how patients overcame perceived barriers. A mixed-method study design was used. Questionnaires were distributed to individuals with IA who were invited to attend a TEP between 2010 and 2013. Respondents were those that chose not to attend (group A), individuals who attended ≤4 of 10 sessions (group B), individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions prior to May 2013 (group C), and individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions from June 2013 to November 2013 (group D). Individuals in group D were also invited to participate in focus groups to discuss how they had overcome perceived barriers. Real barriers identified by individuals in groups A and B included time, distance, and cost associated with attendance. Individuals who overcame perceived barriers (groups C and D) discussed strategies they used to do so. Aspects of the overall program experience and access to clinic and program also contributed to patients being able to overcome barriers. Time, distance, and cost are external barriers that prevented individuals from utilizing self-management education opportunities. These barriers were overcome if and when individuals had resources available to them. Readiness for behavior change also influenced commitment to participate in the program.

  17. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasui, Otilia C.; Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Zhong, Anguo [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Miller, Elka [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Belik, Jaques [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheng, Hai-Ling; Kassner, Andrea; Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Department of Public Health, Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jong, Roland; Rogers, Marianne [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO{sub 2}) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. (orig.)

  18. Potential anti-inflammatory effect of lemon and hot pepper extracts on adjuvant-induced arthritis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend M. Tag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis and related disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, are common diseases affecting millions of people. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of lemon and hot pepper extracts on adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA in mice. Arthritis was induced by injection of complete Freund adjuvant (CFA subcutaneously at the planter surface of hind paw, the lemon and hot pepper extracts were administered subcutaneously at the same site twice weekly (100 mg/kg, for 2 weeks starting 2 days after CFA injection. Arthritic scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C reactive protein (CRP, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and paw histopathology were assessed at the end of the experiment. The extract treatments reduced the severity of arthritic scores in the following order: lemon fruit peel (LFP > lemon leaf (LL > hot pepper leaf (HL during the experimental period as compared with positive control (RA. LFP, LL and HL extracts significantly suppressed ESR, ANA, CRP and TNF-α as compared with RA group. HL, LFP and LL reduced the IL-1β by 63.02%, 47.22%, 44.92%, while IL-6 cytokine production significantly decreased by 29.74%, 28.96%, and 23.93% for IL 6 as compared with RA. Hot pepper fruit (HF extract treated-group showed a significant decrease for ESR on the other hand there was non-significant difference for TNF-α, IL-6, IL1β, CRP and ANA as compared with RA. Histopathological examination indicated that LFP, LL and HL extracts alleviated infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia as well as protected joint destruction. The data showed that all extracts except HF have significant anti-arthritic and anti-inflammation effects and suggest that these effects may be mediated via the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Presence of Arp specifically contributes to joint tissue edema associated with early-onset Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, Petronella R; Haldorson, Gary J; Magunda, Forgivemore; Bankhead, Troy

    2014-01-01

    Antiserum to the Borrelia burgdorferi arthritis-related protein, Arp, has been shown to prevent or reduce arthritis in immunodeficient mice. To directly investigate the requirement for this lipoprotein in the generation of Lyme arthritis, we utilized targeted deletion to generate a B. burgdorferi clone that lacked only the arp gene locus. Infection of Lyme disease-susceptible C3H/HeN mice with the arp deletion mutant demonstrated significantly reduced tibiotarsal joint swelling during the first 6 weeks of infection compared to a wild-type control. The severity of joint swelling was restored to wild-type levels in mice infected with an arp mutant clone complemented in cis. Interestingly, the reduced swelling of joint tissues exhibited by mice infected with the arp deletion mutant did not directly correspond to reduced underlying arthritis. Histopathology data at 2 weeks postinfection showed some reduction in arthritis severity caused by the arp mutant clone; however, by 8 weeks, no significant difference was observed between joint tissues infected by the wild-type or arp mutant clones. The spirochete load in the joint tissues of mice infected with the arp mutant was found to be greater than that exhibited by the wild-type control. Our findings demonstrate that this lipoprotein contributes to the generation of early-onset joint swelling and suggests that arp expression has a negative secondary effect on total spirochete numbers in joint tissues.

  20. Anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics for managing symptoms in people with cystic fibrosis-related arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Judith; Rangaraj, Satyapal

    2016-01-21

    Arthritis remains a relatively infrequent complication of cystic fibrosis, but is a cause of significant morbidity when it does occur. Two distinct types of arthritis are described in cystic fibrosis: cystic fibrosis-related arthropathy (CFA) and hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPO). Management of arthritis in people with cystic fibrosis is uncertain and complex because of the underlying disease and its intense treatment. This is an update of a previously published review. To review the effectiveness and safety of pharmacological agents for the symptomatic management of cystic fibrosis-related arthritis in adults and children with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: 19 January 2016. Randomised controlled studies which compared the efficacy and safety of anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents (e.g. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, systemic corticosteroids, intra-articular corticosteroids) with each other, with no treatment or with placebo for CFA and HPO. No relevant studies were identified. No studies were included in this review. Although it is generally recognised that CFA may be episodic and resolve spontaneously, treatment with analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents may be needed. While this approach may be sufficient to manage symptoms, it is disappointing that no randomised controlled trials to rigorously evaluate these agents were found, nor could the authors identify any quasi-randomised. This systematic review has identified the need for a well-designed adequately-powered randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents for the symptomatic management of cystic fibrosis-related arthritis (CFA and HPO) in adults and children with cystic fibrosis

  1. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p gouty arthritis model.

  2. Early intervention in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on tocilizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sedat Yilmaz, Ismail Simsek Division of Rheumatology, Gulhane School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Tocilizumab is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody against interleukin-6 receptors that was approved for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Several lines of evidence, obtained both from conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, have supported the concept of "window of opportunity" as showing that these therapies consistently work better in early disease as compared to established RA. This review addresses the question of whether a window of opportunity gained with conventional DMARDs and TNF inhibitors can also be achieved with tocilizumab. To this end, data regarding the use of tocilizumab in early RA patients are summarized. Currently available data suggest that the earlier the treatment with tocilizumab, the better the clinical outcome can be, which may have implications for various aspects of RA treatment strategies. Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, tocilizumab, early intervention

  3. Is it easy to clinically distinguish inflammatory arthritis of bacterial origin from monoarthritis attacks of gout disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, O Şahap; Ergişi, Yılmaz; Ayanoğlu, Tacettin; Tokgöz, Mehmet Ali; Sezgin, Erdem Aras; Göçün, Pınar Uyar

    2016-12-01

    Acute monoarthritis is a common situation in orthopedic emergency where the patient presents with typical inflamed joint. It is hard to clinically distinguish inflammatory arthritis of bacterial origin from monoarthritis attacks of gout disease. If these two situations, which are the most common causes of acute monoarthritis, are misdiagnosed, outcomes might be catastrophic and costly. Synovial fluid analysis is the most reliable method for confirming the diagnosis although it might not always lead to definitive diagnosis. If there is clinical suspicion for crystal arthropathy, repeated examinations may provide benefits for confirming the diagnosis.

  4. Current studies of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekara S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available S Chandrashekara ChanRe Rheumatology and Immunology Center and Research, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore, India Abstract: Early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs will improve the outcome significantly. Early diagnosis of RA continues to be a challenge. The disease needs to be distinguished from other self-limiting arthritis and connective tissue disease. Currently available autoantibodies like rheumatoid factors and anticitrullinated cyclic peptide have limited sensitivity and specificity. RA, being a heterogeneous disease, with no unique or distinct defect that has been described, is less likely to have a single pathognomonic marker. There are defined predisposing genetic factors, cell characteristics, cytokine changes, autoantibodies, and products of disease process that have been demonstrated to distinguish rheumatoid from normal and other arthritis. Studies have demonstrated that combinations of factors allow for more specific RA diagnosis; however, when considerations are given to the factors separately, sensitivity increases at the cost of specificity. The present review briefly describes the value of some of the candidate factors and their combinations as diagnostic markers of early RA. Well-designed multicenter studies to evaluate these combinations using a scoring system are recommended for the development of precise and widely applicable biomarkers for early diagnosis of RA. Keywords: autoantibodies, combination, early RA, specificity

  5. Modern methods of early diagnostics of juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Y.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory diseases of joints is one of the most important issues in the pediatrics. Nowadays the significant attention in this sphere is paid to the search of new accurate criteria of diagnostics. It will help estimate the severity of disease, determine the prognosis, choose the method of treatment and monitoring and evaluate the efficacy of the therapy.

  6. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed...... lymph node is also reduced following a single dose of anti-C5aR, suggesting that modulation of the C5a/C5aR axis results in effects on the T cell compartment in inflammatory arthritis. In summary, these data demonstrate that blockade of C5aR leads to rapid and significant effects on arthritic disease......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...

  7. The surgical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiphorou, E; Konan, S; MacGregor, A J; Haddad, F S; Young, A

    2014-10-01

    There has been an in increase in the availability of effective biological agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis as well as a shift towards early diagnosis and management of the inflammatory process. This article explores the impact this may have on the place of orthopaedic surgery in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) improve pain in inflammatory arthritis (IA): a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiman, Amanda J; Pope, Janet E; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Li, Lihua; Barnabe, Cheryl; Kalache, Fares; Kung, Tabitha; Bessette, Louis; Flanagan, Cathy; Haraoui, Boulos; Hochman, Jacqueline; Leclercq, Sharon; Mosher, Dianne; Thorne, Carter; Bykerk, Vivian

    2013-05-01

    Evidence supports early use of non-biologic DMARDs to prevent irreversible damage in inflammatory arthritides, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and possibly ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, there is a paucity of data exploring their effects on pain as a primary outcome in these conditions. This systematic literature review investigated the effect of non-biologic DMARDs on pain levels in IA and examined whether disease duration impacted efficacy. We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, abstracts from the 2008 to 2010 American College of Rheumatology annual congresses, and citation lists of retrieved publications. Only randomized, double-blind controlled trials were analyzed. Quality was assessed with the Risk of Bias tool. Descriptive statistics were used in meta-analysis. 9,860 articles were identified, with 33 eligible for inclusion: 8 in AS, 6 in PsA, 9 in early RA (ERA), and 10 in established RA. In ERA and established RA, all studies of DMARDs (monotherapy and combination therapies) consistently revealed statistically significant reductions in pain except three oral gold studies. In AS, sulfasalazine studies showed significant pain reduction, whereas use of other DMARDs did not. In PsA, 5 of 6 studies reported VAS-pain improvement. From the studies included, we were unable to assess the influence of disease duration on pain outcomes in these rheumatic conditions. DMARDs improve pain in early and established RA. Sulfasalazine may improve pain in AS and PsA. Further study is needed to assess the relationship between disease duration and DMARD efficacy in reducing pain in these conditions.

  9. Lipid management among individuals with inflammatory arthritis in the national REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Gamboa, Christopher M; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Safford, Monika M

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hyperlipidemia guidelines do not currently identify inflammatory arthritis (IA) as a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. We compared hyperlipidemia treatment of individuals with and without IA (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis) in a large national cohort. Methods Participants from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study were classified as having IA (without diabetes or hypertension); diabetes (but no IA); hypertension (but no diabetes or IA); or no IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the odds of medical treatment among those with hyperlipidemia. Results Thirty-nine participants had IA, 5423 had diabetes, 7534 had hypertension, and 5288 had no diabetes, hypertension, or IA. The fully adjusted odds of treatment were similar between participants with IA and those without IA, hypertension, or diabetes. Participants with diabetes and no IA and participants with hypertension and no IA were twice as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Conclusion Despite their higher CVD risk, patients with IA were as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without diabetes, hypertension, or IA. Lipid guidelines should identify IA as a CVD risk factor to improve CVD risk optimization in IA.

  10. Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Daniël; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Wezel, Anouk; Launay, Pierre; Kuiper, Johan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Bot, Ilze; Stoop, Jeroen N

    2016-06-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore we have studied the role of mast cells during different phases of experimental arthritis. We induced collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most frequently used animal model of arthritis, in an inducible mast cell knock-out mouse and determined the effect of mast cell depletion on the development and severity of arthritis. Depletion of mast cells in established arthritis did not affect clinical outcome. However, depletion of mast cells during the preclinical phase resulted in a significant reduction in arthritis. This reduction coincided with a decrease in circulating CD4(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes but not in the collagen-specific antibody levels. Mast cell depletion resulted in reduced levels of IL-6 and IL-17 in serum. Furthermore, stimulation of splenocytes from mast cell-depleted mice with collagen type II resulted in reduced levels of IL-17 and enhanced production of IL-10. Here we show that mast cells contribute to the preclinical phase of CIA. Depletion of mast cells before disease onset resulted in an altered collagen-specific T cell and cytokine response. These data may suggest that mast cells play a role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response during the development of arthritis.

  11. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis - A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, F.A. van; Linn-Rasker, S.P.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Jong, B.A. de; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  12. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, van FA; Linn-Rasker, SP; Venrooij, W.J.; Jong, B.A.; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, RE; Huizinga, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  13. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF INFLIXIMAB IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY AND LATE JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of infliximab — monoclonal antibodies to the tumor necrotizing factor (TNF in treatment of 100 patients11 months — 17 years old with early and late articular types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The duration of treatment was 3 months — 2 years. Infliximap was delivered intravenously by scheme: infusion on 0, 2nd, 6th weeks and then every 8th week. The single dose of infliximab in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis was 6.7 (5.5; 9.0 mg/kg, with late type — 6.0 (5.0; 7.0 mg/kg of body weight. 102 weeks of treatment with anti-TNF-agent provided development of clinical remission, decrease and normalization of laboratory tests of disease’s activity, total restoration of joint’s function, increase of quality of life (on 97% in patients with early type, and 72% 0 in ones with late type. The drug was abolished in 39 (39% of patients, 23% — due to the development of secondary inefficiency, and 11% — due to the development of unfavorable effects.Key words: children, early and late rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, infliximab.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:30-42

  14. Gratitude uniquely predicts lower depression in chronic illness populations: A longitudinal study of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Wood, Alex M

    2017-02-01

    Although gratitude has been identified as a key clinically relevant trait for improving well-being, it is understudied within medical populations. The current study addressed this gap and extended previous and limited cross-sectional research by examining the longitudinal associations of gratitude to depression in 2 chronic illness samples, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two chronic illness samples, arthritis (N = 423) and IBD (N = 427), completed online surveys at Time 1 (T1). One hundred sixty-three people with arthritis and 144 people with IBD completed the 6-month follow-up survey (T2). Depression, gratitude, illness cognitions, perceived stress, social support, and disease-related variables were assessed at T1 and T2. At T2, 57.2% of the arthritis sample and 53.4% of the IBD sample met the cut off scores for significant depression. T1 gratitude was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at T1 and T2 in both samples (rs from -.43 to -.50). Regression analyses revealed that T1 gratitude remained a significant and unique predictor of lower T2 depression after controlling for T1 depression, relevant demographic variables, illness cognitions, changes in illness-relevant variables, and another positive psychological construct, thriving, in both samples. As the first investigation of the longitudinal associations of gratitude to psychological well-being in the context of chronic illness, the current study provides important evidence for the relevance of gratitude for health-related clinical populations. Further intervention-based research is warranted to more fully understand the potential benefits of gratitude for adjustment to chronic illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Monocarboxylate transporter 4, associated with the acidification of synovial fluid, is a novel therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Wataru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Nagahara, Hidetake; Kukida, Yuji; Seno, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Kohno, Masataka; Oda, Ryo; Taniguchi, Daigo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Ejima, Akika; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Ashihara, Eishi

    2015-11-01

    Synovial fluid pH is decreased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We undertook this study to examine the mechanism by which synovial fluid pH is regulated and to explore the possibility of a therapeutic strategy by manipulating this mechanism. We determined the pH and lactate concentration in synovial fluid from 16 RA patients. Cultured synovial fibroblasts (SFs) from the inflamed joints of 9 RA patients (RASFs) were examined for the expression of ion transporters that regulate intracellular and extracellular pH. The ion transporter up-regulated in RASF lines was then suppressed in RASFs by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the effect of transfection on viability and proliferation was investigated. Finally, we examined the therapeutic effect of electrotransfer of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4)-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Synovial fluid pH correlated inversely with both the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the C-reactive protein level and the synovial fluid lactate levels. RASFs exhibited up-regulated transcription of MCT4 messenger RNA. MCT4 exported intracellular lactate into the extracellular space. RASFs had significantly higher MCT4 protein levels than did SFs from patients with osteoarthritis. Knockdown of MCT4 induced intrinsic apoptosis of RASFs, thereby inhibiting their proliferation. Moreover, electrotransfer of MCT4-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with CIA significantly reduced the severity of arthritis. RA activity correlated with decreased synovial fluid pH. This may be due to increased MCT4 expression in RASFs. Silencing MCT4 induced apoptosis in RASFs and reduced the severity of CIA, suggesting that MCT4 is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Comparison of speed of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect appearance of nimesulid and diclofenac sodium tablets in gout arthritis: a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Kudaeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess speed of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect appearance of nimesulid and diclofenac sodium tablets in gout arthritis. 90 male pts with gout were included in an open clinical study. They were randomly assigned into three groups (30 pts in each. Group 1 pts received nimesulid tablets (Nise 100 mg twice a day, group 2 pts — tablets of an other nimesulid preparation and group 3 pts — diclofenac sodium 75 mg twice a day. Duration of treatment was 7 days. Nise significantly earlier provided anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect, gout arthritis, nimesulid, period till effect appearance, tolerability.

  17. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163 is a marker of disease activity and progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Moller, H J; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  18. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increased risk of developing an inflammatory eye problem (iritis or uveitis). Eye inflammation may persist independently of the arthritis. Because iritis usually does not cause symptoms, regular exams by ...

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmood Ally

    ... therapy in RA. Keywords: immune, inflammatory, rheumatoid arthritis, therapy ... are more sensitive and care needs to be taken to exclude viral infections, conditions .... RF is an antibody to immunoglobulin G, seen in 80–90% of patients with ...

  20. Low-cost, low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Hanne Merete; Valloe, J.; Hørslev-Petersen, K.

    2006-01-01

    with rheumatoid arthritis with joint symptoms for hands and wrists, and E-MRI of the dominant wrist and MCP joints. RESULTS: At baseline, all......OBJECTIVE: To study the ability of low-cost low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) to assess and predict erosive joint damage in the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 24 previously untreated patients...... were excluded, the relative risk was 5.2. In patients with baseline MRI bone erosion or oedema, the relative risk of having x ray erosions at 1 year was 4.0, compared with patients without these signs at baseline (patient-centred analysis). CONCLUSION: In this group of patients with early rheumatoid...

  1. Stepwise inhibition of T cell recruitment at post-capillary venules by orally active desulfated heparins in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Faruque, Hasan; Kang, Jin Hee; Hwang, Seung Rim; Sung, Shijin; Alam, Md. Mahmudul; Sa, Keum Hee; Nam, Eon Jeong; Byun, Young Ro; Kang, Young Mo

    2017-01-01

    Identification of the structure-function relationship of heparin, particularly between 2-O-, 6-O-, and N-sulfation and its anticoagulant or anti-inflammatory activities, is critical in order to evaluate the biological effects of heparin, especially in conjunction with modifications for oral formulation. In this study, we demonstrated that removal of 2-O, 6-O, or N-desulfation and their hydrophobic modifications have differential effects on the blocking of interactions between sLeX and P-and L-selectins, with highest inhibition by 6-O desulfation, which was consistent with their in vivo therapeutic efficacies on CIA mice. The 6-O desulfation of lower molecular weight heparin (LMWH) retained the ability of LMWH to interfere with T cell adhesion via selectin-sLeX interactions. Furthermore, 6DSHbD coated on the apical surface of inflamed endothelium directly blocked the adhesive interactions of circulating T cells, which was confirmed in vivo by suppressing T cell adhesion at post-capillary venular endothelium. Thus, in series with our previous study demonstrating inhibition of transendothelial migration, oral delivery of low anticoagulant LMWH to venular endothelium of inflamed joint tissues ameliorated arthritis by the stepwise inhibition of T cell recruitment and provides a rationale for the development of modified oral heparins as innovative agents for the treatment of chronic inflammatory arthritis. PMID:28419144

  2. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Selaginella moellendorffii in Gouty Arthritis: Antihyperuricemic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Chen, Ke-li; Zhang, Guo-li

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. (SM) on gouty arthritis and getting an insight of the possible mechanisms. HPLC method was developed for chemical analysis. The paw oedema, the neutrophil accumulation, inflammatory mediators, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes of the joints were analyzed in gouty arthritis rat model, and the kidney injury and serum urate were detected in hyperuricemic mice. Pharmacokinetic result demonstrated that the main apigenin glycosides might be quantitatively transformed into apigenin in the mammalian body. Among these compounds, the apigenin exhibited the strongest effect on xanthine oxidase (XOD). SM aqueous extract has proved to be active in reducing hyperuricemia in dose-dependent manner, and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in high dose group were decreased significantly as compared with hyperuricemic control group (P < 0.01). The high dose of SM extract could significantly prevent the paw swelling, reduce gouty joint inflammatory features, reduce the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) level (P < 0.01). For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of SM aqueous extract against gout in folk medicine. PMID:28250791

  3. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Selaginella moellendorffii in Gouty Arthritis: Antihyperuricemic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. (SM on gouty arthritis and getting an insight of the possible mechanisms. HPLC method was developed for chemical analysis. The paw oedema, the neutrophil accumulation, inflammatory mediators, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes of the joints were analyzed in gouty arthritis rat model, and the kidney injury and serum urate were detected in hyperuricemic mice. Pharmacokinetic result demonstrated that the main apigenin glycosides were almost quantitatively transformed into apigenin in the mammalian body. Among these compounds, the apigenin exhibited the strongest effect on xanthine oxidase (XOD. SM aqueous extract has proved to be active in reducing hyperuricemia in dose-dependent manner, and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr in high dose group were decreased significantly as compared with hyperuricemic control group (P<0.01. The high dose of SM extract could significantly prevent the paw swelling, reduce gouty joint inflammatory features, reduce the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, lower malondialdehyde (MDA and myeloperoxidase (MPO levels, and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD level (P<0.01. For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of SM aqueous extract against gout in folk medicine.

  4. Long-term safety and efficacy of biosimilar infliximab among patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abuelmagd Abdalla, Niamh Byrne, Richard Conway, Thomas Walsh, Geraldine Mannion, Michael Hanly, Miriam O’Sullivan, Ann Maria Curran, John J Carey Department of Rheumatology, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar infliximab in adult patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product in our center. Patients and methods: In April 2014, patients attending our rheumatology service for infliximab infusions were switched from reference product to the biosimilar infliximab following consent and hospital approval. Results: Around 34 patients with inflammatory arthritis were switched from reference product to biosimilar infliximab in 2014: 50% female, mean age 55 years (standard deviation=12.9, mean disease duration 14.79 years (9.7, median duration on infliximab 57 months, and two-thirds on oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. There was no difference in efficacy or safety in the first 6 months of therapy. By the end of 2015, the mean follow-up on biosimilar infliximab was 15.8 (standard deviation=6.3 months. Our results showed no significant difference in Health Assessment Questionnaire score, patient global assessment of disease activity, number of disease flares, or the medication dose between the originator and the biosimilar infliximab. However, reported pain and C-reactive protein values were significantly higher during the longer follow-up period (p=0.043, 0.001 respectively. There was no significant difference in the number of adverse events or infusion reactions during follow-up periods. Only five (14.7% patients discontinued the biosimilar infliximab. Conclusion: Our patients experienced similar efficacy and safety for managing their arthritis with the biosimilar infliximab as the reference product infliximab, but at a much lower cost. Keywords: biologic therapy, rheumatic diseases, biosimilar exchange, infliximab, adult

  5. Expression of Prostaglandin E2 Enzymes in the Synovium of Arthralgia Patients at Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Early Arthritis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J H de Hair

    Full Text Available Arthralgia may precede the development of synovial inflammation in autoantibody-positive individuals at risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA. A major pathway involved in pain is the prostaglandin (PG E2 pathway. We investigated this pathway in the synovium of individuals with RA-specific autoantibodies and in early arthritis patients.Nineteen autoantibody-positive individuals (IgM-rheumatoid factor and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies with arthralgia (n=15 and/or a positive family history of RA (n=8, who had been prospectively followed for at least 2 years, were included. In addition, we included early arthritis patients (disease-modifying antirheumatic drug naïve who after 2 years follow up fulfilled classification criteria for RA (n=63, spondyloarthritis (SpA; n=14, or had unclassified arthritis (UA; n=27. In all subjects we assessed pain and performed synovial biopsy sampling by mini-arthroscopy at baseline. Tissue sections were examined by immunohistochemistry to detect and quantify PGE2 pathway enzymes expression levels (mPGES-1; COX-1 and -2; 15-PGDH.In both study groups synovial expression of PGE2 enzymes was not clearly related to pain sensation. Expression levels at baseline were not associated with the development of arthritis after follow up (6 out of 19 autoantibody-positive individuals. However, in early SpA patients the expression levels of mPGES-1 and COX-1 were significantly increased compared to RA and UA patients.Pain in autoantibody-positive individuals without synovial inflammation who are at risk of developing RA and in early arthritis patients may be regulated by pathways other than the PGE2 pathway or originate at sites other than the synovium. In contrast, in SpA, the PGE2 pathway may be inherently linked to the pathophysiology/etiology of the disease.

  6. AUTOANTIBODIES TO CIRTULLINATED ANTIGENS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF CLINICAL COURSE IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Belyaeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. To study the value of antibodies to cirtullinated antigens in diagnosis and their significance in prediction of erosion formation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, we examined serological status in 129 patients with early RA (ERA and 55 cases of undifferentiated arthritis, lasting less than 12 months. Another group consisted of 39 patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis, in whom the disease persisted for > 2 years. Control group included 39 patients with osteoarthrosis and 29 patients with reactive arthritis. The titers of rheumatoid factor (RF, antikeratin antibodies (AKA, antiperinuclear factor (APF and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP were studied during initial examination and 12 months later. Serial cryosections of rat esophagus and normal human buccal epithelial cells served as substrates for AKA and APF detection. AntiCCPs were revealed by means of DIASTAT technique (Axis Shield, UK.Upon initial observation of the patients with ERA, sensitivity and specificity of anti-CCP was, resp., 63.5% and 97,8%, thus exceeding both parameters for RF (48,8% и 86,7%. Sensitivity of AKA and APF for the same group was 17% and 24 %, with specificity of 97.7%. In RF-seronegative cases of early RA, anti-CCP were detected in 37% with ERA and 42% long-standing RA. In patients with non-differentiated arthritis who developed RA within one year, RF and anti-CCP were found in 12,2% and 45,5%. Following a one-year observation, a statistically significant increase was found in incidence of RF and anti-CCP in ERA patients.Positivity for anti-citrulline antibodies (AKA, APF and anti-CCP in ERA patients were associated with higher levels of CRP, increased HAQ, DAS4, Sharp scores, as compared to the patients who were seronegative. In ERA patients positive for anti-citrulline antibodies, higher frequencies of synovitis and erosive arthritis were detected by means of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. In the patients with ERA

  7. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  8. Successful tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy suppresses oxidative stress and hypoxia-induced mitochondrial mutagenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2011-07-25

    Abstract Introduction To examine the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy on the levels of early mitochondrial genome alterations and oxidative stress. Methods Eighteen inflammatory arthritis patients underwent synovial tissue oxygen (tpO2) measurements and clinical assessment of disease activity (DAS28-CRP) at baseline (T0) and three months (T3) after starting biologic therapy. Synovial tissue lipid peroxidation (4-HNE), T and B cell specific markers and synovial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Synovial levels of random mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were assessed using Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay. Results 4-HNE levels pre\\/post anti TNF-α therapy were inversely correlated with in vivo tpO2 (P < 0.008; r = -0.60). Biologic therapy responders showed a significantly reduced 4-HNE expression (P < 0.05). High 4-HNE expression correlated with high DAS28-CRP (P = 0.02; r = 0.53), tender joint count for 28 joints (TJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.49), swollen joint count for 28 joints (SJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.50) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (P = 0.04; r = 0.48). Strong positive association was found between the number of 4-HNE positive cells and CD4+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.60), CD8+ cells (P = 0.001; r = 0.70), CD20+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.68), CD68+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.47) and synovial VEGF expression (P = 0.01; r = 063). In patients whose in vivo tpO2 levels improved post treatment, significant reduction in mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP was observed (P < 0.05). In contrast in those patients whose tpO2 levels remained the same or reduced at T3, no significant changes for mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP were found. Conclusions High levels of synovial oxidative stress and mitochondrial mutation burden are strongly associated with low in vivo oxygen tension and synovial inflammation. Furthermore these significant mitochondrial genome alterations are rescued following successful anti TNF

  9. Significance of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Autoantibodies in Immune-mediated Inflammatory Skin Disorders with and without Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Chander; Kashyap, Bineeta; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Iqbal R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF), an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9]) were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%), followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was found to be statistically significant. Although anti-CCP, RF, and CRP levels are

  10. Significance of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies in immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorders with and without arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chander Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF, an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP, an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. Aims and Objectives: To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. Materials and Methods: About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9] were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Results: Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%, followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was

  11. Significance of Anti-cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Autoantibodies in Immune-mediated Inflammatory Skin Disorders with and without Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Chander; Kashyap, Bineeta; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Iqbal R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) are autoantibodies directed against citrullinated peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF), an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG, is known to form immune complexes and contribute to the etiopathogenesis of various skin disorders. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase protein, increases following secretion of interleukin-6 from macrophages and T cells. Anti-CCP, RF, and CRP are well-established immune-markers, their diagnostic potential in immune-mediated skin disorders remains less widely studied. Aims and Objectives: To determine the correlation between anti-CCP, RF, and CRP in immune-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. Materials and Methods: About 61 clinically diagnosed cases of various immune-mediated skin diseases (psoriasis [n = 38], connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis [n = 14], and immunobullous disorders including pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus [n = 9]) were included in the study. These patients were subclassified on the basis of presence or absence of arthritis. Arthritis was present in nine cases of psoriasis and seven connective tissue disorder patients. Detection of serum anti-CCP was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas CRP and RF levels were detected using latex agglutination technique. Results: Of the 61 specimens, 14.75% had elevated serum anti-CCP levels. RF and CRP levels were elevated in 18.03% and 39.34% specimens, respectively. RF was elevated in 13.16% of inflammatory and 42.88% of connective tissue disorders, whereas anti-CCP was raised in 10.53% of inflammatory and 35.71% of connective tissue disorders. CRP positivity was highest in connective tissue disorders (50%), followed by 39.47% in inflammatory and 22.22% in immunobullous conditions. In none of the immunobullous patients, anti-CCP or RF levels were found to be elevated. Association of the presence of arthritis with elevated anti-CCP was found to be

  12. Gastrodia elata attenuates inflammatory response by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Li-Min; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Tian, Ke; Gu, Chen-Xi; Li, Zhi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Gastrodia elata (GE), which belongs to the Orchidaceae family, was found to possess anti-inflammatory activity. However, the effect of GE on inflammatory response in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) remains largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GE on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced inflammatory response in RA-FLS and the underlying molecular mechanism was also explored. Our results demonstrated that GE significantly attenuated TNF-α-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production in RA-FLS. GE also inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 expression in RA-FLS. Furthermore, pretreatment with GE significantly attenuated TNF-α-induced the expression of p-p65 and IκBα degradation in RA-FLS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated for the first time that GE attenuated inflammatory response by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway signaling in RA-FLS. Thus, GE might have a therapeutic potential towards the treatment of RA.

  13. Xanthoma disseminatum associated with inflammatory arthritis and synovitis--a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prashant; Khandpur, Sujay; Vedi, Kamal; Singh, Manoj K; Walia, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Xanthoma disseminatum (XD) is a rare, benign, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by disseminated xanthomatous lesions with a predilection for the face, flexures, and mucosae. Approximately 100 cases have been reported in the literature. We report XD in an 8-year-old boy with symmetric synovitis and arthritis involving the wrists and knees. This case is interesting in view of the association between arthritis and synovitis and XD, which to our knowledge has not been reported in the literature. This case has to be differentiated from multicentric histiocytosis, another non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, in which joint involvement is common. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Diagnostic performance of the ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria for rheumatoid arthritis and two diagnostic algorithms in an early arthritis clinic (REACH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Alves (Celina); J.J. Luime (Jolanda); D. van Zeben (Derkjen); M.A.M. Huisman (Margriet); A.E.A.M. Weel (Angelique); P.J. Barendregt (Pieternella); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: An ACR/EULAR task force released new criteria to classify rheumatoid arthritis at an early stage. This study evaluates the diagnostic performance of these criteria and algorithms by van der Helm and Visser in REACH. Methods: Patients with symptoms ≤12 months from REACH were

  15. Assessing the likelihood of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease following tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Asha; Stobaugh, Derrick J; Deepak, Parakkal

    2015-04-01

    The association between inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We sought to evaluate this association by analyzing adverse events (AEs) reported to the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) with a standardized scoring tool for drug-induced AEs. A search of the FAERS for RA or JRA (January 2003-December 2011) reported with adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, or infliximab was performed. This dataset was then queried for cases indicating IBD. Full-length reports were accessed using the Freedom of Information Act and organized by age, sex, concomitant medications, co-morbidities, type of TNF-α inhibitor used, and diagnosis/treatment details. The Naranjo score was used to determine whether the drug-induced AEs were definite, probable, possible, or doubtful. There were 158 cases of IBD after TNF-α inhibitor exposure in RA or JRA patients. Use of the Naranjo score revealed that, in a majority of the cases (71.5 %), TNF-α inhibitor exposure was considered a 'possible' cause. A majority of the 'probable cases' in JRA were reported with etanercept (40 patients, 90.91 %). There were no 'definite' cases of anti-TNF-induced IBD. After applying the Naranjo scale, a weak association between new-onset IBD and TNF-α inhibitor therapy in RA patients and a moderately strong association especially with etanercept exposure in JRA patients was observed. However, causality cannot be determined due to limitations of the FAERS and the Naranjo score.

  16. The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of water-soluble fraction of bee venom on rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hern Lee

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that bee venom (BV injection into acupoint (i.e. Zusanli produced more potent anti-inflammatory and antinociciptive effect in Freunds adjuvant induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA model as compared with that of non-acupoint injection(i.e back. However, the precise components underlying BV-induced antinociceptive and/or anti-inflammatory effects have not been fully understood. Therefore, we further investigated the anti-arthritic effect of BV after extracting the whole BV according to solubility (water soluble: BVA, ethylacetate soluble: BVE. Subcutaneous BVA treatment (0.9 mg/kg/day into Zusanli acupoint was found to dramatically inhibit paw edema and radiological change (i.e. new bone proliferation and soft tissue swelling caused by Freunds adjuvant injection. In addition, the increase of serum interleukin-6 by RA induction was normalized by the BVA treatment as similar with that of non-arthritic animals. On the other hand, BVA therapy significantly reduced arthritis induced nociceptive behaviors (i.e., nociceptive score for mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hyperalgesia. Furthermore, BVA treatment significantly suppressed adjuvant induced Fos expression in the lumbar spinal cord at 3 weeks post-adjuvant injection. However, BVE treatment (0.05 mg/kg/day has not any anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effect on RA. Based on the present results, we demonstrated that BVA might be a effective fraction in whole BV for long-term treatment of RA-induced pain and inflammation. However, it is clear necessary that further fraction study about BVA was required for elucidating an effective component of BVA.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic medication for the treatment of major depression and comorbid arthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyre Harris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case report describes the effects of psychotropic treatment, quetiapine in particular, on systemic inflammation, pain, general functioning and major depression in the treatment of a woman with arthritis. Case presentation A 49-year-old Caucasian Australian woman with arthritis, pain and depression was treated with a course of escitalopram, mirtazapine and quetiapine. Pain levels, general functioning and degree of depressive symptoms were evaluated with a visual analogue scale. Systemic inflammation had been assessed by C-reactive protein serum levels since 2003. C-reactive protein levels, physical pain, symptoms of arthritis and depression decreased significantly during the past 12 months of treatment with quetiapine, while treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and mirtazapine remained the same. Conclusions We suggest that the treatment particularly with quetiapine may have anti-inflammatory effects in arthritis and comorbid major depression, which eventually led to a remission of pain and depression and to normal general function.

  18. Intra-articular methotrexate associated to lipid nanoemulsions: anti-inflammatory effect upon antigen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello SB

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suzana BV Mello,1 Elaine R Tavares,2 Adriana Bulgarelli,2 Eloisa Bonfá,1 Raul C Maranhão2,31Rheumatology Division, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, the Heart Institute (INCOR of the Medical School Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilObjective: Commercial methotrexate formulations (MTX have poor anti-inflammatory action for intra-articular treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Our aim was to investigate whether an association between methotrexate and lipidic nanoemulsions (LDE could improve MTX intra-articular action.Methods: For its association to LDE, MTX was previously esterified with dodecyl bromide. LDE-MTX was prepared by high pressure homogenization. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA was achieved in rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin, and the rabbits were subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. Twenty-four hours after AIA induction, groups of four to nine rabbits were intra-articularly injected with increasing doses (0.0625–0.5 µmol/kg of LDE-MTX, and were compared to treatment with 0.5 µmol/kg commercial MTX, LDE alone, and saline (controls. Synovial fluid was collected 48 hours after AIA induction for analysis of protein leakage and cell content. Synovial membranes were collected for histopathology. Uptake of LDE labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether by the synovial tissue was also determined.Results: Uptake of radioactive LDE by arthritic joints was 2.5-fold greater than by normal joints. Treatment with intra-articular LDE-MTX elicited a clear dose response pattern by reducing the synovial leukocyte infiltrate (P = 0.004 and protein leakage (P = 0.032 when compared with arthritic non-treated joints. In contrast, the intra-articular injection of commercial MTX and LDE did not reduce leukocyte infiltrate or protein leakage. Toxicity to treatment was not observed

  19. The initial ultrasonographic examination of hands and feet joints in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ponikowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim was to assess of the morphology, intensity, and activity of changes in the first ultrasonographic (US examination of hands and feet in patients with early arthritis (lasting up to 12 months who were ultimately diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. An attempt was made to demonstrate a correlation between the intensity of lesions in US and selected laboratory parameters. Material and methods : Ultrasonographic examination was performed using a LOGIC GE 500 device on a group of 60 patients with arthritis (46 women, 14 men aged 18–80, previously untreated. In total, 3120 hand and feet joints were examined. The assessment focused on the presence of joint effusion, synovial proliferation and power Doppler signals (assessed on a semi-quantitative scale. Each patient underwent laboratory tests, necessary for making a diagnosis. In order to analyze the correlations between changes in US and laboratory parameters, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, reactive protein test (CRP, rheumatoid factor (RF, and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs were used. Results : In the study group, the average duration of arthritis symptoms until the first US examination was 5.6 months. Among the 3120 examined hand and foot joints, deviations from the norm appeared in 1093 joints, synovial hypertrophy was found in 471 joints (grade 1 synovial hypertrophy was reported most frequently, while presence of signal in Power Doppler was revealed in 261 joints (grade 1 was observed most frequently. A statistically significant correlation was found between the intensity of changes in Power Doppler and CRP concentration. Conclusions : In patients with increased concentrations of CRP, we may expect arthritis of higher intensity, therefore, in order to prevent the progression of destructive changes, it is necessary to quickly implement effective disease-modifying antirheumatic treatment. The conducted research showed that the activity of joint

  20. Determining a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Activity Acceptable State Without Subsequent Radiographic Progression in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Conaghan, Philip G;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected subclinical inflammation for subsequent radiographic progression in a longitudinal study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission or low disease activity (LDA), and to determine cutoffs...

  1. Recommendations of the ESSR Arthritis Subcommittee on Ultrasonography in Inflammatory Joint Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plagou, Athena; Teh, James; Grainger, Andrew J;

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the recommendations of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology Arthritis Subcommittee on the use of ultrasonography (US) in rheumatic disease, focused on the examination of joints in the adult population. The recommended examination technique and protocols used in ...

  2. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul;

    2011-01-01

    The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation...

  3. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Boesen, Mikael; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity, little is known regarding the association of imaging-detected activity and synovial pathology. The purpose of this study was to comp...

  4. Severe Pulmonary Suppuration with Infection-Induced Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome following Tongue Cancer Surgery in a Patient Undergoing Tocilizumab Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yamagata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis treated by tocilizumab (TCZ presented with tongue squamous cell carcinoma. While surgery was performed without any complications the aspiration pneumonia rapidly worsened by postoperative day 2 and severe pulmonary suppuration in the right lung field with infection-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS was diagnosed. Antibiotic and respirator treatment improved her condition. The anti-inflammatory effect of TCZ may mask the symptoms and signs of severe infection with SIRS.

  5. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  6. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Oestergaard, Mikkel [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spinal Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  7. A commentary on TREAT: The trial of early aggressive drug therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Baildam Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a category of JIA where multiple joints are affected by chronic inflammation, and where serious and lasting damage to joints is the expected natural history in untreated disease. There is evidence of response to disease-modifying antirheumatic and biologic drugs, but little evidence of permanent remission from any of the existing therapeutic trials. The TREAT trial by Wallace et al., recently published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, used a collaborative multicenter approach to studying early aggressive treatment of polyarticular JIA in an attempt to achieve full clinical inactive disease after 6 months of treatment. The study's main finding that the earlier in the disease course that treatment is started, the better the chance of disease control, has provided evidence that there is a 'window of opportunity' for treating JIA as there is in adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The study provides both a platform and an impetus for concentrating future treatment trials on early rather than established disease and investigating a standard of starting treatment within 10 to 12 weeks.

  8. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  9. Reactive Arthritis

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    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  10. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  11. Ginsenoside Rc from Korean Red Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) Attenuates Inflammatory Symptoms of Gastritis, Hepatitis and Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Rhee, Man Hee; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Seung Hyung; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Han Gyung; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is an herbal medicine prescribed worldwide that is prepared from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae). Out of ginseng's various components, ginsenosides are regarded as the major ingredients, exhibiting anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Although recent studies have focused on understanding the anti-inflammatory activities of KRG, compounds that are major anti-inflammatory components, precisely how these can suppress various inflammatory processes has not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to identify inhibitory saponins, to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the saponins, and to understand the inhibitory mechanisms. To do this, we employed in vitro lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages and in vivo inflammatory mouse conditions, such as collagen (type II)-induced arthritis (CIA), EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis. Molecular mechanisms were also verified by real-time PCR, immunoblotting analysis, and reporter gene assays. Out of all the ginsenosides, ginsenoside Rc (G-Rc) showed the highest inhibitory activity against the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], and interferons (IFNs). Similarly, this compound attenuated inflammatory symptoms in CIA, EtOH/HCl-mediated gastritis, and LPS/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis without altering toxicological parameters, and without inducing gastric irritation. These anti-inflammatory effects were accompanied by the suppression of TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6 production and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in mice with CIA. G-Rc also attenuated the increased levels of luciferase activity by IRF-3 and AP-1 but not NF-[Formula: see text]B. In support of this phenomenon, G-Rc reduced TBK1, IRF-3, and ATF2 phosphorylation in the joint and liver tissues of mice with hepatitis. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that

  12. A randomized, double-blind, controlled study of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection into the joint of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cunnington, Joanna

    2010-07-01

    Most corticosteroid injections into the joint are guided by the clinical examination (CE), but up to 70% are inaccurately placed, which may contribute to an inadequate response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasound (US) guidance improves the accuracy and clinical outcome of joint injections as compared with CE guidance in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  14.  Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Trine Bay

      Dato 31. januar 2006Title Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritisAuthors:Trine Bay Laurberg,Torkell Ellingsen,Jan Frystyk,Ib Hansen,Anette Jørgensen,Ulrik Tarp,Merete Lund Hetland,Kim Hørslev-Petersen,Nete Hornung,Jørgen Hjelm Poulsen,Allan Flyvbjerg......,Kristian Stengaard-PedersenBackground: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease, which affects the joints with inflammation leading to destruction of cartilage and bone. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterised by low level of chronic inflammation, slow...... diabetes mellitus. It is unknown if adiponectin is involved in the disease process of RA and OA.Objectives:  The aim was to quantify plasma adiponectin (p-adiponectin) from RA and OA patients and to evaluate p-adiponectin as a marker of treatment response to methotrexate (MTX) and disease activity in RA...

  15. Identification of NR4A2 as a transcriptional activator of IL-8 expression in human inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, Carol M

    2009-10-01

    Expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 is controlled by pro-inflammatory mediators, suggesting that NR4A2 may contribute to pathological processes in the inflammatory lesion. This study identifies the chemoattractant protein, interleukin 8 (IL-8\\/CXCL8), as a molecular target of NR4A2 in human inflammatory arthritis and examines the mechanism through which NR4A2 modulates IL-8 expression. In TNF-alpha-activated human synoviocyte cells, enhanced expression of IL-8 mRNA and protein correspond to temporal changes in NR4A2 transcription and nuclear distribution. Ectopic expression of NR4A2 leads to robust changes in endogenous IL-8 mRNA levels and co-treatment with TNF-alpha results in significant (p<0.001) secretion of IL-8 protein. Transcriptional effects of NR4A2 on the human IL-8 promoter are enhanced in the presence of TNF-alpha, suggesting molecular crosstalk between TNF-alpha signalling and NR4A2. A dominant negative IkappaB kinase antagonizes the combined effects of NR4A2 and TNF-alpha on IL-8 promoter activity. Co-expression of NR4A2 and the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB enhances IL-8 transcription and functional studies indicate that transactivation occurs independently of NR4A2 binding to DNA or heterodimerization with additional nuclear receptors. The IL-8 minimal promoter region is sufficient to support NR4A2 and NF-kappaB\\/p65 co-operative activity and NR4A2 can interact with NF-kappaB\\/p65 on a 39bp sequence within this region. In patients treated with methotrexate for active inflammatory arthritis, a reduction in NR4A2 synovial tissue levels correlate significantly (n=10, r=0.73, p=0.002) with changes in IL-8 expression. Collectively, these data delineate an important role for NR4A2 in modulating IL-8 expression and reveal novel transcriptional responses to TNF-alpha in human inflammatory joint disease.

  16. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  17. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS WITHIN THE REMARCA STUDY: PRELIMINARY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Novikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA have a high or very high cardiovascular risk (CVR before therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Objective: to evaluate the impact of antirheumatic therapy performed in accordance with the Treat-to-Target strategy on the progression of atherosclerosis and CVR in patients with early RA. Subjects and methods. This investigation enrolled 74 patients (72% women; median age, 56 years with early RA having moderate to high activity (median DAS28, 5.6 who had not previously received DMARDs and glucocorticoids (GCs. All patients were anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive and 87% of the patients were rheumatoid factor-positive. All patients received methotrexate (MT subcutaneously with dose escalation up to 25–30 mg/week, in case of its inefficiency at 3 months a biological agent (BA was added. After 6 months, 39% of the patients achieved remission; 19% had low; 35 and 7% had moderate and high disease activity, respectively. The majority (n = 20 (69% who achieved remission received MT monotherapy; 9 (31% – MT + BA whereas among the patients who did not achieve remission 15 (33% and 30 (67% respectively. At baseline and after 6 months of treatment, traditional CVR factors were assessed in all patients, by determining the total coronary risk by the SCORE scale, including that modified by EULAR (mSCORE, carotid artery atherosclerosis (CAA by duplex scanning data, coronary calcification (CC by multislice spiral computed tomography and by estimating the degree of CVR.Results and discussion. The rates of hypertension, overweight, abdominal obesity, low activity, smoking, and type 2 diabetes mellitus did not change significantly after 6 months. There were increases in the levels of total cholesterol by 7% (p < 0.05, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 9% (p<0.01, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 26% (p < 0.005, and body mass index (BMI by 1% (p < 0.01 and a decrease

  18. Anti-inflammatory and joint protective effects of extra-virgin olive-oil polyphenol extract in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosillo, María Ángeles; Alcaraz, María José; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Fernández-Bolaños, José G; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, Catalina; Ferrándiz, María Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of EVOO-polyphenol extract (PE) in a model of rheumatoid arthritis, the collagen-induced arthritis model in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen. On day 21, mice received a booster injection. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day from days 29 to 41 to arthritic mice. We have demonstrated that PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. PE significantly reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2 in the joint as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Our data indicate that PE inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. In addition, PE decreases nuclear factor κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies suppress let-7a expression in monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and facilitate the inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ning-Sheng; Yu, Hui-Chun; Yu, Chia-Li; Koo, Malcolm; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lu, Ming-Chi

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesized that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) could affect the expression of miRNAs in monocytes and contribute to the inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The expression profiles of 270 human miRNAs, co-cultured with ACPAs or human immunoglobulin G (IgG), were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Ten miRNAs exhibited differential expression in U937 cells after co-cultured with ACPAs compared with human IgG. The expression levels of these miRNAs were investigated in monocytes from 21 ACPA-positive RA patients and 13 controls. Among these miRNAs, the expression levels of let-7a was decreased in monocytes from ACPA-positive RA patients. The expression levels of let-7a showed a negative correlation with positivity of rheumatoid factor in patients sampled. We found that transfection of U937 cells with let-7a mimic suppressed K-Ras protein expression. In the ACPA-mediated signaling pathway, transfection of U937 cells with let-7a mimic suppressed the ACPA-enhanced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β. In conclusion, ACPA-mediated decreased let-7a expression in monocytes from ACPA-positive RA patients. Decreased let-7a expression was associated with the positivity of RF in ACPA-positive RA patients. The decreased expression of let-7a could facilitate the inflammatory pathway via enhanced ACPA-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK and increased expression of IL-1β through an increase in the expression of Ras proteins.

  20. Remission-induction therapies for early rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Francisco; Fabre, Sylvie; Pers, Yves-Marie

    2016-08-01

    Recent guidelines on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) point to the importance of achieving remission as soon as possible during the course of the disease. The appropriate use of antirheumatic drugs is critical, particularly in early RA patients, before 24 weeks, since this is a 'window of opportunity' for treatment to modify disease progression. A treat-to-target strategy added to an aggressive therapeutic approach increases the chance of early remission, particularly in early RA patients. We conducted an overview of current therapeutic strategies leading to remission in early RA patients. We also provide interesting predictive factors that can guide the RA management strategy with regard to disease-modifying treatment and/or drug-free remission.

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Jacobsen, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    -level registry data on inpatient and outpatient health care provision, pharmacotherapy and income during 1997-2009. 17 320 RA patients were identified and matched with 69 280 controls (4 : 1) by age and sex. NSAID-associated risk of major cardiovascular disease defined as the combined endpoint of myocardial......OBJECTIVE: To examine the risk of major cardiovascular disease associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in a large 'real-world' contemporary rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohort. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted with use of Danish nationwide individual...... infarction, stroke or cardiovascular mortality was assessed in multivariable survival models. RESULTS: During follow-up (median 4.9 years) 6283 events occurred. The cardiovascular risk associated with overall NSAID use was significantly lower in RA patients than in controls (HR 1.22 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.37) vs...

  2. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S

    2017-01-01

    and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing...... was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist...... is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which...

  3. Being as Normal as Possible: How Young People Ages 16-25 Years Evaluate the Risks and Benefits of Treatment for Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ruth I; McDonagh, Janet E; Thompson, Ben; Foster, Helen E; Kay, Lesley; Myers, Andrea; Rapley, Tim

    2016-09-01

    To explore how young people (ages 16-25 years) with inflammatory arthritis evaluate the risks and benefits of treatment, particularly treatment with biologic therapies. This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews (n = 44) with young people, trusted others (e.g., parents), and health professionals; audio-recordings (n = 4) of biologic therapy-related consultations; and focus groups (n = 4). Analysis used techniques from grounded theory (open and focused coding, constant comparison, memoing, and mapping). Young people aspired to live what they perceived as a "normal" life. They saw treatment as presenting both an opportunity for and a threat to achieving this. Treatment changes were therefore subject to complex and ongoing evaluation, covering administration, associated restrictions, anticipated effects, and side effects. Information sources included expert opinion (of professionals and other patients) and personal experience. Previous treatments provided important reference points. Faced with uncertain outcomes, young people made provisional decisions. Both trusted others and health professionals expressed concern that young people were too focused on short-term outcomes. Young people value treatment that helps them to live a "normal" life. There is more to this than controlling disease. The emotional, social, and vocational consequences of treatment can be profound and lasting: opportunities to discuss the effects of treatment should be provided early and regularly. While making every effort to ensure understanding of the long-term clinical consequences of taking or not taking medication, the wider impact of treatment should not be dismissed. Only through understanding young people's values, preferences, and concerns can a sustainable balance between disease control and treatment burden be achieved. © 2016 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. In Vivo Quantitative Measurement of Arthritis Activity Based on Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan in Inflammatory Arthritis: More Active than Passive Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong Soon Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that arthritis could be visualized noninvasively using hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles labeled with Cy5.5 (HGC-Cy5.5 and an optical imaging system. Activated macrophages expressing Mac-1 molecules effectively phagocytosed HGC-Cy5.5, which formed spherical nanoparticles under physiologic conditions. We estimated the applicability of HGC-Cy5.5 to quantitative analysis of arthritis development and progression. Near-infrared fluorescence images, captured after HGC-Cy5.5 injection in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, showed stronger fluorescence intensity in the active arthritis group than in the nonarthritis group. According to the progression of arthritis in both collagen-induced arthritis and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models, total photon counts (TPCs increased in parallel with the clinical arthritis index. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence after treatment with methotrexate showed a significant decrease in TPC in a dose-dependent manner. Histologic evaluation confirmed that the mechanism underlying selective accumulation of HGC-Cy5.5 within synovitis tissues included enhanced phagocytosis of the probe by Mac-1-expressing macrophages as well as enhanced permeability through leaky vessels. These results suggest that optical imaging of arthritis using HGC-Cy5.5 can provide an objective measurement of disease activity and, at the same time, therapeutic responses in rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. The patient experience of musculoskeletal imaging tests for investigation of inflammatory arthritis: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Sandra; Taylor, William J; Doyle, Anthony J; Gott, Merryn; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2017-07-20

    The objective of this study was to understand the patient experience of musculoskeletal imaging tests for investigation of inflammatory arthritis and factors that contribute to this experience. We conducted a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 33 patients who had a recent peripheral joint musculoskeletal imaging test for investigation of inflammatory arthritis. Data from these interviews were used to generate an 18-item questionnaire which was posted to rheumatology clinic patients within 6 weeks of peripheral joint imaging. Variables associated with the overall experience of the test were analysed using stepwise linear regression. Analysis of the interviews identified six themes: knowledge about the test, awareness of potential harm, the role of imaging in clinical care, discomfort, experience of waiting and 'seeing is believing'. Completed questionnaires were available from 132 patients. In regression analysis, a strong negative association was observed between the 'discomfort during the test' item and the overall experience of the test (standardised beta -0.35, p experience better' (0.26, p experience of the test. For those who viewed their images, 'looking at the images with my doctor made me feel more involved in my care' (0.24, p = 0.022) was also associated positively with overall experience. Factors before, during and after a musculoskeletal imaging test contribute to the patient experience. The overall experience is most influenced by patient discomfort and interactions with staff during the test, information provided and viewing images to improve patient involvement in clinical care.

  6. The dimeric form of HLA-G molecule is associated with the response of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients to methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Farina, Ilaria; Bortolotti, Daria; Galuppi, Elisa; Padovan, Melissa; Di Luca, Dario; Govoni, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates a possible involvement of HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-G antigens in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mainly in the HLA-G dimeric isoform, the most active HLA-G form with the strongest immunosuppression, that showed an excellent anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis model mice. However, the relevance of HLA-G dimers in RA response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment is still unknown. We analyzed the HLA-G dimers' amount in plasma samples from early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients before MTX therapy and evaluated the role of these molecules as biomarker of the different response to the treatment. Plasma sHLA-G levels were detected by ELISA, and HLA-G dimeric and monomeric forms were revealed by Western blot in 12 MTX responder (reaching DAS28 remission G levels and the 78 kDa HLA-G dimeric form. Unresponsive ERA patients were characterized by lower plasma sHLA-G levels, and only one patient presented the 78 kDa HLA-G dimeric form (DAS28 5.1). Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that in ERA patients, sHLA-G and, in particular, the presence of the dimeric form in plasma samples before MTX therapy could be an a priori biomarker for the response to MTX treatment.

  7. Role of inflammatory factors and adipose tissue in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Part I: Rheumatoid adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Prohorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Saied, Fadhil; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2013-06-01

    For many years, it was thought that synovial cells and chondrocytes are the only sources of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors found in the synovial fluid in patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, it is more and more frequently indicated that adipose tissue plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as that a range of pathological processes that take place in the adipose tissue, synovial membrane and cartilage are interconnected. The adipose tissue is considered a specialized form of the connective tissue containing various types of cells which produce numerous biologically active factors. The latest studies reveal that, similarly to the synovial membrane, articular adipose tissue may take part in the local inflammatory response and affect the metabolism of the cartilage and subchondral osseous tissue. In in vitro conditions, the explants of this tissue obtained from patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis produce similar pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to the explants of the synovial membrane. At this stage already, knowledge translates into imaging diagnostics. In radiological images, the shadowing of the periarticular soft tissues may not only reflect synovial membrane pathologies or joint effusion, but may also suggest inflammatory edema of the adipose tissue. On ultrasound examinations, abnormal presentation of the adipose tissue, i.e. increased echogenicity and hyperemia, may indicate its inflammation. Such images have frequently been obtained during ultrasound scanning and have been interpreted as inflammation, edema, hypertrophy or fibrosis of the adipose tissue. At present, when the knowledge concerning pathogenic mechanisms is taken into account, abnormal echogenicity and hyperemia of the adipose tissue may be considered as a proof of its inflammation. In the authors' own practice, the inflammation of the adipose tissue usually accompanies synovitis

  8. Understanding the relationship between the EQ-5D, SF-6D, HAQ and disease activity in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The growth of economic analyses and in particular cost-utility analyses (CUA), which use the QALY as a measure of outcome, has heightened the interest in the methodologies used to calculate the QALY. The EQ-5D has produced quite different utility values from that of the SF-6D. This article seeks to understand these differences using a cohort of patients with inflammatory arthritis. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the disease-specific measure, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) disability index (DI) and the preference-based measures, SF-6D, EQ-5D and European League Against Arthritis (EULAR) Disease Activity Score (DAS) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Patients with RA and PsA (n = 504) attending a tertiary rheumatology referral centre completed the HAQ, SF-6D and the EQ-5D before starting biological therapy and again 12 months later. The SF-36 was converted into a utility using the preference-based SF-6D. Clinical outcomes such as the DAS, joint counts and laboratory measures were also recorded. We calculated single index utility scores from the preference-based instruments using UK population norms. We used regression analysis to derive a mapping function and calculated utility scores from the HAQDI and the DAS 28. RESULTS: The mean utility observed at baseline for RA was 0.43 for the EQ-5D and 0.54 for the SF-6D and for PsA was 0.49 for the EQ-5D and 0.57 for the SF-6D. The utility gain demonstrated by the EQ-5D was over twice that of the SF-6D. The EQ-5D scored 17% of the RA group as less than 0 (state defined as worse than death); 7% of this group remained less than 0 at follow-up. The distribution of the utility estimates was similar for both RA and PsA. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings draw attention to the impact of states worse than death on the overall distribution for the EQ-5D derived utilities and how these impact on its use in practice. EQ-5D-derived QALY changes are over twice

  9. The impact of a revised EQ-5D population scoring on preference-based utility scores in an inflammatory arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is well established that there are problems with the EQ-5D. This is due to the original scoring methods used and how negative time trade-off (TTO) values were treated. A revised scoring method has been published. This article applies this to an inflammatory arthritis cohort. The objective is to examine the impact of a revised scoring system for the EQ-5D (UK) TTO on the utility estimates and in the case of rheumatoid arthritis, to explore the impact of using different utility metrics on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) results of an economic model. METHODS: A total of 504 patients with inflammatory arthritis were rescored using revised EQ-5D scoring, which uses an episodic random utility model to deal with negative TTO values. Differences in utility scores were compared and the new mapping coefficients were obtained. These were then used in an economic model to examine the impact on the ICER. RESULTS: In rheumatoid arthritis, the overall change is less for the revised EQ-5D scoring than with the original EQ-5D (TTO) but greater than the SF-6D: EQ-5D UK -0.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.30 to -0.15), revised EQ-5D UK -0.16 (95% CI -0.21 to -0.10) and SF-6D -0.08 (95% CI -0.11 to -0.05). A similar trend is seen in the psoriatic arthritis group. The economic model produced different ICERs, when different utility measures were used; EQ-5D (TTO) euro42,402, SF-6D euro111,788, and revised EQ-5D (TTO) euro57,747. CONCLUSION: In the context of inflammatory arthritis, this article demonstrates that a revised scoring for EQ-5D may have a significant impact on utility estimates and on the output of the economic model.

  10. Comprehensive rehabilitation of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: results of 6-month program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Vladislavovna Orlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of a comprehensive rehabilitation program (CRP in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA for 6 months. Subjects and methods. Sixty patients with early RA were examined. During medical therapy, 6-month CRP was implemented in 34 patients in the study group. The 2-week in-hospital stage involved ten sessions of 15-min local air cryotherapy (-60 °C of the hands, knee or ankle joints; ten classes of 45-min therapeutic exercises (TE under the supervision of a trainer; ten sessions of 45-min ergotherapy (training people how to therapeutically position their joints, to apply their protective methods, to lift and move things, to use assistive devices, and to do hand exercises; orthotics (working wrist orthoses, knee ones, or individual orthopedic insoles; and four 90-min educational program classes. The outpatient and domiciliary stages included 45-min TE thrice weekly; creation of a correct functional stereotype; and orthotics. Twenty-six patients received medical therapy only (a control group. The authors estimated tender joint count (TJC, swollen joint count (SJC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, joint pain on 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS, DAS28, HAQ, RAPID3, hand grip strength, average maximum knee extension and ankle flexion by the EN-TreeM movement analysis, and compliance with drug and non-drug treatments. Results. The study group showed a stably high compliance with therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, less need for symptomatic agents, higher adherence to the methods of creating a correct functional stereotype, orthotics, and regular TE. Twenty-two patients completed 6-month CRP; 12 patents did not complete the treatment because of non-compliance with nondrug methods, primarily TE. Upon completion of the in-hospital stage of CRP, the study group exhibited significant positive changes in pain and functional status and no significant impact on global

  11. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis.

  12. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maijer, Karen I; Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP...

  13. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC)-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmington, Kelly; Flewelling, Carol; Kennedy, Carol A; Shupak, Rachel; Papachristos, Angelo; Jones, Caroline; Linton, Denise; Beaton, Dorcas E; Lineker, Sydney

    2017-01-01

    Objective Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA) living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd) program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities. Materials and methods Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented. Results In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites) participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the video-conference (% agree/strongly agree): could hear the presenter (92.9%) and discussion between sites (82.4%); could see who was speaking at other remote sites (85.7%); could see the slides (95.3%); and interaction between sites adequately facilitated (94.0%). Educator and participant feedback were consistent. Suggested improvements included: use of two screens (speaker and slides); frontal camera angles; equal interaction with remote sites; and slide modifications to improve the readability on screen. Interview data included similar constructive feedback but highlighted the educational and social benefits of the program, which participants noted would have been inaccessible if not offered via telemedicine. Conclusion Study findings confirm the feasibility of delivering the RxEd program

  14. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... in fingers and toes of patients with PsA. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  15. Periarticular and generalised bone loss in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T W; Hansen, M S; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim;

    2014-01-01

    )). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A hundred and sixty patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) received methotrexate, intra-articular betamethasone and ciclosporin /placebo-ciclosporin. Patients with Z-score ≤0 also started alendronate 10 mg/day. BMD of the hand (digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR......OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of alendronate and intra-articular betamethasone treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) changes in hand, lumbar spine and femoral neck during 1 year of a treat-to-target study (Cyclosporine, Methotrexate, Steroid in RA (CIMESTRA...

  16. My Treatment Approach to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John M.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has brought important advances in the understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and its management and treatment. New classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, better definitions of treatment outcome and remission, and the introduction of biologic response-modifying drugs designed to inhibit the inflammatory process have greatly altered the approach to managing this disease. More aggressive management of rheumatoid arthritis early after diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease has resulted in improvement in patient functioning and quality of life, reduction in comorbid conditions, and enhanced survival. PMID:22766086

  17. The influence of family pattern abnormalities in the early stages of life on the course of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Marcin; Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) belong to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), chronic immune mediated diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with significant negative impact on patients' quality of life. CD and UC are related with the development of chronic inflammatory lesions in the GI tract, causing digestive and absorption disorders. Typical symptoms of IBD are: abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and weight loss. In addition, IBD are often associated with the extraintestinal manifestations, including arthritis and dermatoses. While the cause of IBD is still not fully understood, the psychological aspects are regarded as possible trigger factors. Moreover, most recent studies suggest that family pattern abnormalities associated with stress at the early stages of life may strongly affect health balance. In this paper, the most relevant studies focusing on the association between early life stress and IBD, found in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and EMBASE are discussed. Possible effects of the early life stress on IBD progression and response to undertaken therapies are analyzed. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of mesenchymal precursor cells on the systemic inflammatory response and endothelial dysfunction in an ovine model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Dooley

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC are reported to possess immunomodulatory properties that may prove beneficial in autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. A collagen-induced arthritis model has been previously developed which demonstrates local joint inflammation and systemic inflammatory changes. These include not only increased levels of inflammatory markers, but also vascular endothelial cell dysfunction, characterised by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to characterise the changes in systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function following the intravenous administration of MPC, in the ovine model.Arthritis was induced in sixteen adult sheep by administration of bovine type II collagen into the hock joint following initial sensitisation. After 24h, sheep were administered either 150 million allogeneic ovine MPCs intravenously, or saline only. Fibrinogen and serum amyloid-A were measured in plasma to assess systemic inflammation, along with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Animals were necropsied two weeks following arthritis induction. Coronary and digital arterial segments were mounted in a Mulvaney-Halpern wire myograph. The relaxant response to endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators was used to assess endothelial dysfunction.Arthritic sheep treated with MPC demonstrated a marked spike in plasma IL-10, 24h following MPC administration. They also showed significantly reduced plasma levels of the inflammatory markers, fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, and increased HDL. Coronary arteries from RA sheep treated with MPCs demonstrated a significantly greater maximal relaxation to bradykinin when compared to untreated RA sheep (253.6 ± 17.1% of pre-contracted tone vs. 182.3 ± 27.3% in controls, and digital arteries also demonstrated greater endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study demonstrated that MPCs

  19. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul;

    2011-01-01

    The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation...... as a potential RAMRIS addendum, although responsiveness will need to be evaluated. One of the strengths of MRI is the ability to detect subclinical synovitis, so the group worked on obtaining low disease activity/clinical remission datasets from a number of international centers and presented cross...

  20. Early lessons from the recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis cohort ESPOIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Bernard; Rincheval, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    ESPOIR is a French multicenter cohort of patients with undifferentiated arthritis enrolled within six months of symptom onset, naive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and corticosteroid therapy, and either having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or being at risk for progression to RA. The cohort is sponsored by the French Society for Rheumatology (Société française de rhumatologie [SFR]). Between December 2002 and March 2005, 813 patients were enrolled at 14 regional university hospitals, with the participation of a network of community-based rheumatologists. The objective was to establish a database on recent-onset inflammatory joint disease and, more specifically, on RA to serve for scientific research in the clinical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, and healthcare-cost fields. Ten years after enrolment were started, the cohort still has about 500 patients. The scientific committee has approved 104 clinical research projects, of which many are ongoing, and 54 original articles written by numerous French and international groups have been published. These projects cover a vast spectrum of topics including environmental factors, diagnosis, outcomes, prognosis, disease evaluation, imaging, genetics, biomarkers, costs, and RA management strategies.

  1. The type I interferon signature in leukocyte subsets from peripheral blood of patients with early arthritis: a major contribution by granulocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The type I interferon (IFN) signature in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has shown clinical relevance in relation to disease onset and therapeutic response. Identification of the cell type(s) contributing to this IFN signature could provide insight into the signature’s functional consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of peripheral leukocyte subsets to the IFN signature in early arthritis. Methods Blood was collected from 26 patients with early arthritis ...

  2. MRI appearances of inflammatory vertebral osteitis in early ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurugoglu, Sebuh; Kanberoglu, Kaya; Mihmanli, Ismail; Cokyuksel, Oktay [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University (Turkey); Kanberoglu, Ayfer [Department of Physical Medicine, SSK Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2002-03-01

    Background: Undiagnosed and early ankylosing spondylitis (AS), especially in adolescent patients suffering from back pain, may present with the finding of vertebral osteitis on MRI. Aims: To identify the early MRI changes of vertebral osteitis in AS. Patients and methods: Five patients (three boys, two girls) aged 11-20 years (mean 15.4 years) suffering from back pain underwent MRI of the thoracolumbar spine. There was no initial diagnosis of AS. After clinical and radiological suspicion of AS, MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints was performed. Results: During the course of AS, destructive and reactive changes affect the discovertebral junctions that are initially seen in the thoracolumbar area. At this stage plain radiography of the spinal column may be normal. On MR images, inflammatory osteitis of the vertebrae is seen as hypointense areas on T1-weighted images and hyperintense areas on T2-W images. The lesions enhance homogenously with contrast material. Conclusions: Awareness of the MRI appearances of vertebral osteitis is helpful in suspecting AS. Radiological examination of the SI facilitates the diagnosis and unnecessary further imaging can be avoided. (orig.)

  3. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty;

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Ocimum americanum L. essential oil in experimental model of zymosan-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Alciléia Nunes; Grespan, Renata; Yamada, Áureo Tatsumi; Silva, Expedito Leite; Silva-Filho, Saulo Euclides; Damião, Marcio José; de Oliveira Dalalio, Márcia Machado; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Essential oils are potential sources of novel components for medicinal use. The present study was performed to investigate the composition and anti-inflammatory activity of Ocimum americanum L. essential oil (OEO) and its components in an experimental model of zymosan-induced arthritis and paw edema. The essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Twenty-six components, representing 98.9% of the total oil, were characterized, with linalool (19.63%) and 1,8-cineole (17.27%) as the main components. The OEO and its two constituents inhibited leukocyte influx into the synovial space and reduced paw edema induced by zymosan. The OEO also inhibited interferon-γ levels but did not reduce transforming growth factor-β levels. Additionally, the OEO protected against leukocyte influx into the synovial membrane and cartilage destruction in knee joints in arthritic mice. These findings indicate that the essential oil of Ocimum americanum L. exerted significant anti-inflammatory effects, likely related to its main compounds.

  5. Gingival crevicular fluid MMP-8 and -13 and TIMP-1 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikoğlu, Başak; Buduneli, Nurcan; Kardeşler, Levent; Aksu, Kenan; Pitkala, Marjut; Sorsa, Timo

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 and -13 and tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemically healthy counterparts with inflammatory periodontal disease. Subjects (N = 74) were divided into five groups: 12 patients with RA and gingivitis; 13 patients with RA and periodontitis; 12 systemically healthy patients with gingivitis; 13 systemically healthy patients with periodontitis; and 24 periodontally and systemically healthy volunteers. Full-mouth clinical periodontal measurements were performed at six sites/tooth. GCF samples obtained from two sites in single-rooted teeth were analyzed by immunofluorometric assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were assessed statistically by parametric tests. The total amounts of MMP-8 were lower in the healthy control group than in RA-gingivitis, RA-periodontitis, and healthy-periodontitis groups (P 0.05). Patients with RA and gingivitis or periodontitis exhibited levels of MMP-8 and -13 and TIMP-1 that were similar to systemically healthy counterparts (P >0.05). The coexistence of RA and periodontitis did not significantly affect the investigated parameters. GCF MMP-8 levels increased with periodontal inflammation. Despite the long-term usage of corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, similar GCF MMP-8 and -13 levels in patients with RA and systemically healthy counterparts suggest that RA may create a tendency to overproduce these enzymes.

  6. Grape-seed proanthocyanidin extract as suppressors of bone destruction in inflammatory autoimmune arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Sil Park

    Full Text Available Chronic autoimmune inflammation, which is commonly observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, disrupts the delicate balance between bone resorption and formation causing thedestruction of the bone and joints. We undertook this study to verify the effects of natural grape-seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE, an antioxidant, on chronic inflammation and bone destruction. GSPE administration ameliorated the arthritic symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, which are representative of cartilage and bone destruction. GSPE treatment reduced the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and osteoclast activity and increased differentiation of mature osteoblasts. Receptor activator of NFκB ligand expression in fibroblasts from RA patients was abrogated with GSPE treatment. GSPE blocked human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived osteoclastogenesis and acted as an antioxidant. GSPE improved the arthritic manifestations of CIA mice by simultaneously suppressing osteoclast differentiation and promoting osteoblast differentiation. Our results suggest that GSPE may be beneficial for the treatment of inflammation-associated bone destruction.

  7. Anti-MCV antibodies predict radiographic progression in Greek patients with very early (rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouta, Georgia; Katsiari, Christina G; Alexiou, Ioannis; Liaskos, Christos; Varna, Areti; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Germenis, Anastasios E; Sakkas, Lazaros I

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) antibodies in very early rheumatoid arthritis (VERA) and in established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventy-one patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) of rheumatoid factor (RF) were determined and hand radiographs were recorded. Patients were assessed prospectively for 2 years, and hand radiographs were repeated. Diagnostic performance of anti-MCV was studied with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Forty-six percent of UA patients progressed to RA at 2 years. In VERA patients, sensitivity of anti-MCV was 52 %, compared to 44 % of anti-CCP and 37 % of RF, while specificity was 91 %, compared to 91 % of RF and 84 % of anti-CCP. Anti-MCV were detected in 25 % of VERA patients negative for both anti-CCP and RF. In established RA, anti-MCV did not sustain its diagnostic performance. By multivariable analysis, anti-MCV, but not anti-CCP or RF, showed significant correlation with radiographic progression in VERA patients. In established RA, anti-MCV, anti-CCP, and RF were associated with active disease (p ≤ 0.03) and joint damage (p ≤ 0.004). By multivariate analysis, the strongest factors for radiographic damage were disease duration (p = 0.000), HAQ score (p = 0.000), and RF (p = 0.002). In conclusion, in patients with very early UA, anti-MCV predict both progression to RA and radiological damage, and therefore, anti-MCV antibody testing may be useful in every day practice.

  8. Posttraumatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pickering, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Posttraumatic arthritis (i.e., degenerative joint disease secondary to injury) is a particular problem in young, active patients. It limits the activities of these vigorous individuals, and the compromised joint must be endured for a long time. The knee is used as an example of a joint commonly involved in this process. Conditions predisposing patients to posttraumatic arthritis are discussed, as are some treatment modalities, including rest, ice therapy, anti-inflammatory medications, physio...

  9. TNFR1 and TNFR2 differentially mediate TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongfeng; Xiao, Weiguo

    2017-04-01

    TNF-α has long been implicated in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, how the receptors of TNF-α, namely TNFR1 and TNFR2, mediate TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in RA has not been elucidated. In the present study, primary FLS cells were isolated from RA patients and treated with TNF-α in vitro. The exogenous TNF-α induced the expression and release of endogenous TNF-α in FLS. In addition, TNF-α led to gradual downregulation of TNFR1 following 1 h treatment. By contrast, the expression of TNFR2 was markedly upregulated after 12 h treatment with TNF-α. Moreover, following TNF-α treatment, the expression of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, and IL-8 was gradually increased with time, but their mRNA levels dropped significantly at 48 h. We further investigated the differential functions of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in FLS by conducting siRNA-mediated knockdown. The TNF-α autocrine was inhibited to a greater extent in TNFR1-silenced FLS compared with TNFR2-silenced FLS. Silencing of TNFR1, not TNFR2, activated intrinsic apoptosis and inhibited TNF-α-induced cytokine production in FLS. These results suggest that TNFR1 is the major pro-inflammatory mediator of TNF-α in FLS, whereas TNFR2, which is upregulated in response to prolonged TNF-α stimulation, may act as an immunosuppressor in FLS for the prevention of overwhelming inflammatory reactions.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects and hepatotoxicity of Tripterygium-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mei; Jiang, Zhen-zhou; Wu, Tao; Li, Ji; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Xue-jun; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yang, Shu-yu

    2012-08-15

    Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. (TWHF) has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive effects and its clinical use was restricted to some extent due to some toxic effects on the digestive, urogenital, and blood circulatory systems, especially the male reproductive system. In the previous study, we had confirmed that TWHF-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have protective effects on male reproductive toxicity in rats. Anti-inflammatory effects and hepatotoxicity of TWHF-SLN remain to be unidentified. The present study was focused on the anti-inflammatory effect of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats treated with TWHF-SLN as well as the effects of SLN delivery system on decreasing the hepatotoxicity induced by tripterygium. Sixty-four healthy male rats were randomly divided into eight groups with eight rats each. From day 18 after FCA injection, TWHF-SLN group (120, 60, 30 mg/kg) and TWHF group (120, 60, 30 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage for 24 consecutive days. The control group was with saline and model control group was without any treatment. The volume of the right hind paws was evaluated at 0, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 days post-injection of FCA by a home-made connected device. The serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin (TBIL) and albumin (ALB) levels were evaluated by an autoanalyzer. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) malondialdehyde (MDA) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) levels were determined using commercial kits. The PG level in sera was examined by double antibody sandwich method. Tissue histopathology was evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The results show that TWHF-SLN can significantly reduce rat paw volume at 60 mg/kg (pinduced hepatotoxicity.

  11. Secular Changes in Clinical Features at Presentation of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Increase in Comorbidity But Improved Inflammatory States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiphorou, Elena; Norton, Sam; Carpenter, Lewis; Dixey, Josh; Andrew Walsh, David; Kiely, Patrick; Young, Adam

    2017-01-01

    To examine secular trends in demographics, clinical manifestations, and comorbidity on first presentation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) prior to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment. A total of 2,701 patients were recruited over 25 years to 2 UK-based RA inception cohorts: the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study (9 centers; 1986-2001) and the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network (23 centers; 2002-2012). Trends in demographic and baseline clinical/laboratory and radiographic variables and comorbidities were estimated using mixed-effects models, including random effects for recruitment center. Age at onset increased from 53.2 to 57.7 years in 1990 and 2010, respectively (2.6 months/year; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.2, 4.1). Sex ratio, the proportion living in deprived areas, and smoking status were unchanged (P > 0.05) and there were no changes in the proportion seropositive or erosive at baseline (P > 0.05). After controlling for treatment at the time of assessment, erythrocyte sedimentation rate decreased and hemoglobin increased over time (P > 0.05); however, the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the Disease Activity Score (DAS), the DAS in 28 joints, and joint counts were unchanged (P > 0.05). The overall prevalence of comorbidity increased from 29.0% in 1990 to 50.7% in 2010, mainly due to cardiovascular and non-cardiac vascular conditions, including hypertension. There was a significant increase in body mass index (0.15 units/year; 95% CI 0.11, 0.18), resulting in an increase in the prevalence of obesity from 13.3% in 1990 to 33.6% in 2010. Age at onset and comorbidity burden, especially obesity, have increased at RA presentation over 25 years, reflecting wider demographic trends at the population level. In contrast, there were no accompanying changes in disease severity assessed by composite markers of disease activity, radiographic erosions, seropositivity, or HAQ at presentation. Treatment strategies in early RA should take

  12. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect of polysaccharides from Lobophora variegata on zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Almino Afonso de O; Castro, Allisson J G; Nascimento, Marília S; Will, Luiza Sheyla E P; Santos, Nednaldo D; Araújo, Renata M; Xavier, Caroline A C; Rocha, Francisco Airton; Leite, Edda Lisboa

    2011-09-01

    This study analyzes the action of sulfated polysaccharides, fucans, from algae Lobophora variegata on zymosan-induced arthritis in rats. Groups of fucans, obtained after acetone fractionation (0.3-2.0 volumes), were denominated F0.3, F0.5, F0.8, F1, F1.5, and F2. The results that F1 contained a high yield in relation to other fractionated fucans. Chemical and structure analysis of F1 was performed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies. The in vitro antioxidant activities of the fraction F1 were also observed. Thus, 2 mg/mL of F1 inhibited the phosphomolybdate in the total antioxidant activity assay. The EC(50) values were 0.3 mg/mL and 0.12 mg/mL for superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Fucan F1 (25, 50, and 75 mg/kg by body weight), diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg), and L-NAME (25 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) in rats, according to body weight of different groups of animals (n=6). After 6 h, analyses of cell influx and nitrite levels were conducted. Then after 96 h, analysis of edema and concentration of serum TNF-α was carried out along with histopathological analysis. F1 at 25, 50, and 75 mg/kg i.p. by body weight reduced cell influx in 52.1-96.7% and nitric oxide level in 27.2-39% compared with the control group. The reduction of edema and serum TNF-α was observed at 50 mg/kg i.p. (p<0.001). These results suggest that this heterofucan from the brown algae L. variegata has potential anti-inflammatory activity in acute zymosan-induced arthritis in rats and that antioxidant activity promotes modulation in the cellular redox state.

  13. A European chart review study on early rheumatoid arthritis treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Paul; Solem, Caitlyn; Majer, Istvan; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Tarallo, Miriam

    2015-11-01

    This retrospective medical chart review aimed to provide a current, real-world overview of biologic usage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Germany, Spain, and the UK, and estimate clinical and healthcare utilization outcomes associated with early versus late treatment. Adults (≥18 years) with a confirmed RA diagnosis between January 2008 and December 2010, who received biologic treatment for ≥3 months and had ≥12 months of follow-up were included. Early treatment was receipt of biologic agent ≤1 year after RA diagnosis. Outcomes included 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) reduction of ≥1.2 from biologic start and remission (DAS28 treatment, with a significant difference in Kaplan-Meier curves when indexing on time since diagnosis (p treatment.

  14. Diagnosis, prognosis and classification of early arthritis: results of a systematic review informing the 2016 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Charlotte; Daien, Claire I; Combe, Bernard; Landewe, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective To update the evidence pertaining to the diagnosis, prognosis and classification of patients with early arthritis (EA), and to inform the 2016 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of patients with EA. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched up to October 2015. The first part of the systematic literature review (SLR) involved a search for studies investigating the recognition and referral of EA. The second part involved a search for studies to identify the place of laboratory and imaging tests in establishing a diagnosis and a prognosis in patients with EA. Results Regarding the issue of referral of patients with EA (1643 hits), 4 studies were included. These studies were in support of early referral for patients with EA. Regarding the issue of diagnosis and prognosis of patients with EA (11 435 hits), 88 studies were included, evaluating mainly the value of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anticitrullinated-peptide antibodies (ACPAs). Sensitivity of these antibodies for a RA diagnosis in patients with EA was moderate (40–80%). Specificity was higher, notably for ACPAs (frequently >80%). ACPAs also showed better prognostic performance than RF (negative predictive values around 80%). We confirmed that structural damage on baseline X-rays is predictive of further radiographic progression in patients with EA. Regarding other imaging modalities, data are sparse. Conclusions This SLR highlights the importance of early referral for patients with EA and confirms that RF and mainly ACPAs as well as a search for structural X-rays changes may help in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with EA. PMID:28155923

  15. Association of Anti-Porphyromonas gingivalis Antibody Titers With Nonsmoking Status in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From the Prospective French Cohort of Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Cantagrel, Alain; Minet, Jacques; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Chanson, Philippe; Ravaud, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the possible link between Porphyromonas gingivalis infection and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to antibody profile, genetic and environmental factors, and RA severity. For assessing P gingivalis infection, serum levels of antibodies directed against P gingivalis lipopolysaccharide were measured in 694 patients with early RA who were not exposed to steroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Anti-P gingivalis antibody titers were compared between patients with early RA and various control groups, and according to various patient characteristics. Anti-P gingivalis antibody titers did not significantly differ between patients with RA and controls and did not significantly differ with anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA), rheumatoid factor (RF), or HLA shared epitope status. Anti-P gingivalis antibody titers were significantly higher among patients who had never smoked compared to patients who had ever smoked (P = 0.0049). Among nonsmokers, high anti-P gingivalis antibody levels were associated with a higher prevalence of erosive change (47.5% versus 33.3% with modified Sharp/van der Heijde score erosion subscale ≥1; P = 0.0135). In this large early RA cohort, we did not detect any association of anti-P gingivalis antibodies with RA or with ACPA status. These results suggest that the association of periodontitis and RA could be linked to bacterial species other than P gingivalis or to a mechanism other than citrullination. Nevertheless, we found higher anti-P gingivalis antibody titers in nonsmokers. In addition, in this population of nonsmokers, high anti-P gingivalis antibody titers were associated with more severe disease. We hypothesize that the role of tobacco in RA pathogenesis is so high that the effect of P gingivalis could be revealed only in a population not exposed to tobacco. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Licorice and Roasted Licorice Extracts on TPA-Induced Acute Inflammation and Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Rim Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory activity of licorice (LE and roated licorice (rLE extracts determined in the murine phorbol ester-induced acute inflammation model and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of human rheumatoid arthritis. rLE possessed greater activity than LE in inhibiting phorbol ester-induced ear edema. Oral administration of LE or rLE reduced clinical arthritis score, paw swelling, and histopathological changes in a murine CIA. LE and rLE decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in serum and matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression in the joints. Cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to type II collagen or lipopolysaccharide stimulation were suppressed in spleen cells from LE or rLE-treated CIA mice. Furthermore, LE and rLE treatment prevented oxidative damages in liver and kidney tissues of CIA mice. Taken together, LE and rLE have benefits in protecting against both acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis. rLE may inhibit the acute inflammation more potently than LE.

  17. Red ginseng saponin extract attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by reducing pro-inflammatory responses and matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Rim; Chung, Tae Yong; Shin, Heungsop; Son, Sung Ho; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Choi, Jong-Hoon; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C. A. MEYER, has been used as a food product and medicinal ingredient. In this study, we assessed the anti-arthritic effects of red ginseng saponin extract (RGSE), including ginsenosides Rg3, Rk1 and Rg5 as major components, on a murine type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), which is a valid animal model of human arthritis. Oral administration of RGSE at 10 mg/kg reduced the clinical arthritis score and paw swelling in the CIA mice, and inhibited joint space narrowing and histological arthritis, illustrating the severity of synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, and erosion of cartilage. RGSE inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 and nitrotyrosine formation, and recovered the expression of superoxide dismutase in the joints of the CIA mice. Orally administered RGSE also reduced the levels of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta in the CIA mice. CII- or lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cytokine production, in addition to CII-specific proliferation, was reduced in the spleen cells of the RGSE-treated CIA mice, as compared with those from vehicle-treated CIA mice. Furthermore, RGSE administration protected against CIA-induced oxidative tissue damage by restoring the increased malondialdehyde levels and the decreased glutathione levels and catalase activities almost to control levels. Therefore, RGSE may be a beneficial supplement which can improve human arthritis.

  18. A systematic review of infliximab in the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Martin Du Pan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Sophie Martin Du Pan, Cem Gabay, Axel FinckhDivision of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of GenevaBackground: Several health authorities have recently revised the indication of infliximab (IFX to include the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The aim of this systematic review of the literature was to appraise the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of early therapy with IFX.Methods: We identified published clinical trials from 1966 to May 2006. We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs in RA with disease duration of less than 3 years comparing the treatment of methotrexate-IFX (MTX-IFX with methotrexate-placebo (MTX-placebo.Results: A total of 8 studies met inclusion criteria. Three studies reported redundant data regarding the vdH Sharp Score. Out of the 5 remaining studies, 4 analyzed structural joint destruction (vdH Sharp Score and demonstrated a significant reduction in radiographic damage progression in favor of the combination of MTX-IFX compared with MTX-placebo (–4.1 vdH Sharp Score units (95% CI: 3.5; 4.6. Three studies also displayed a benefit of MTX-IFX on functional outcomes of RA (HAQ score and disease activity measures (DAS, ACR response criteria, although less markedly.Conclusions: Although data might be skewed because of only 2 existing large studies with concordant data, results from RCTs demonstrate improved efficacy of the combination MTXIFX compared with MTX-placebo in early RA. However, many early RA patients probably do not require the addition of IFX to achieve a satisfying clinical and radiological course. So far, no evidence has established the superiority of MTX-IFX over MTX-prednisone or other combinations of traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic agents.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, antirheumatic agents, infliximab

  19. Early arthritis in children – first results of prospective follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Salugina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform a prospective investigation of clinico-laboratory and sonographic picture of juvenile arthritis (JA onset, to follow up its evolution during the first years of the disease, to prove the program of appropriate treatment.Material and methods. 128 pts with early JA (61% girls and 39% boys aged 1,5 to 16 years were included. Disease duration varied from 2 weeks to 6 months. General health, joint status, disease activity, functional class (Steinbroker, systemic and organ disturbances, laboratory activity indices, immunologic parameters (ANF, RF were assessed. Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (ACCP were evaluated in 38 pts by immunofluorescence method (IFM with commercial kits “Axis Shild Diagnostics Limited, UK”, antibodies to modified citrullinated vimentin (MCV were assessed in 60 pts by IFM with commercial kits “Orgentec” (Germany. Pts were examined every 3 months, the main investigations were repeated after 6, 12 and 24 months. Accuracy of the diagnosis was checked at every examination.Results. Mono- oligoarticular variant of onset was found in 68,6% polyarticular – in 21,4%, systemic – in 10% of pts. Knee and ankle joints were involved first (61% and 24% respectively, later – wrist (13% and hand joints (17%. Morning stiffness was absent in 85% of pts. 37% of pts had ANF and 13,2% - RF. 10,5% were ACCP positive and 28,3% – MCV positive. Antibodies correlated with polyarticular variant of JA and RF. Reactive arthritis was the preliminary diagnosis in 39% and JRA – in 21% of pts at inclusion. Later Juvenile chronic arthritis was the most frequent diagnosis (73-80%. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs were prescribed early (before 6 months in 53% of pts. Exacerbations of the disease appeared in 1/3 of pts, more frequently – in pts with polyarthritis. After 12 months functional class 1 remained in 71,4% of pts.Conclusion. Stabilization of pathological process or remission can

  20. Functional limitations in the phase of clinically suspect arthralgia are as serious as in early clinical arthritis; a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brinck, Robin M; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Mangnus, Lukas; Burgers, Leonie E; Reijnierse, Monique; Huizinga, Tom Wj; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette Hm

    2017-01-01

    A phase of arthralgia may precede the emergence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although several studies have focused on biomarkers, the relevance of this phase for patients is less studied. It is unknown if patients already have functional limitations and if this is correlated to the extent of subclinical inflammation. Therefore, we assessed functional disability in patients with clinically suspect arthralgia (CSA), its association with MRI-detected subclinical inflammation and its course during progression to clinical arthritis. From April 2012 to March 2015, 241 patients had arthralgia for <1 year and were, based on clinical presentation, considered at risk for RA by their rheumatologists. At baseline, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores were determined and unilateral 1.5 T MRI of metacarpophalangeal, wrist and metatarsophalangeal joints were made. Presence of MRI-detected subclinical inflammation was assessed by summing synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone marrow oedema scores (range 0-189). Patients were followed on arthritis development and HAQ scores were repeated when clinical arthritis had developed. The median HAQ score at presentation with CSA was 0.50. Higher MRI-inflammation scores were associated with higher HAQ scores (β=0.017, 95% CI=0.004 to 0.030). During median 103 weeks follow-up, 44 patients progressed to clinical arthritis. HAQ scores ≥1.0 were associated with arthritis development (HR=2.50, 95% CI=1.03 to 6.10). Within converters, median HAQ scores did not increase from presentation with CSA to arthritis development (0.88 and 0.75, p=0.36). HAQ scores ≥1.0 at presentation were associated with the development of clinical arthritis. Functional limitations in the prearthritis phase of CSA were as serious as in the early clinical phase, demonstrating the relevance of CSA from patients' perspectives.

  1. Diagnostic performance of the ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria for rheumatoid arthritis and two diagnostic algorithms in an early arthritis clinic (REACH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Celina; Luime, Jolanda Jacoba; van Zeben, Derkjen; Huisman, Anne-Margriet; Weel, Angelique Elisabeth Adriana Maria; Barendregt, Pieternella Johanna; Hazes, Johanna Maria Wilhelmina

    2011-09-01

    An ACR/EULAR task force released new criteria to classify rheumatoid arthritis at an early stage. This study evaluates the diagnostic performance of these criteria and algorithms by van der Helm and Visser in REACH. Patients with symptoms ≤12 months from REACH were used. Algorithms were tested on discrimination, calibration and diagnostic accuracy of proposed cut-points. Two patient sets were defined to test robustness; undifferentiated arthritis (UA) (n=231) and all patients including those without synovitis (n=513). The outcomes evaluated were methotrexate use and persistent disease at 12 months. In UA patients all algorithms had good areas under the curve 0.79, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.83 for the ACR/EULAR criteria, 0.80, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.87 for van der Helm and 0.83, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.88 for Visser. All calibrated well. Sensitivity and specificity were 0.74 and 0.66 for the ACR/EULAR criteria, 0.1 and 1.0 for van der Helm and 0.59 and 0.93 for Visser. Similar results were found in all patients indicating robustness. The ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria showed good diagnostic properties in an early arthritis cohort reflecting daily practice, as did the van der Helm and Visser algorithms. All were robust. To promote uniformity and comparability the ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria should be used in future diagnostic studies.

  2. A qualitative evaluation of occupational therapy-led work rehabilitation for people with inflammatory arthritis: Perspectives of therapists and their line managers

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Y; Amanna, EA; Bodell, SJ; Hammond, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Occupational therapy-led work rehabilitation for employed people with inflammatory arthritis and work problems was piloted in five hospitals in the United Kingdom. This qualitative study explored the views of participating occupational therapists and their line managers about the work rehabilitation training received and conducting the intervention, with particular\\ud focus on the structured interview used, the Work Experience Survey – Rheumatic Conditions.\\ud Method: Face-to-fa...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  5. Early treatment with addition of low dose prednisolone to methotrexate improves therapeutic outcome in severe psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram K Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is increasingly being recognized to cause progressive joint damage and disability. PsA unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, the conventional first-line choice of treatment, is usually managed with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs especially methotrexate. An 18-year-old HIV-negative male had progressively severe PsA of 4-month duration that was nearly confining him to a wheel chair. He did not respond to multiple NSAIDs, alone or in combination with methotrexate (15 mg/week, given for 4 weeks. Addition of prednisolone (10 mg on alternate days controlled his symptoms within a week. The NSAIDs could be withdrawn after 4 weeks as the treatment progressed. The doses were tapered for methotrexate (5 mg/week and prednisolone (2.5 mg on alternate days every 8 weekly subsequently during 15 months of follow-up without recurrence/deformities or drug toxicity. For years, the use of corticosteroids in psoriasis has been criticized for their propensity to exacerbate the skin disease on withdrawal. However, monitored use of corticosteroids, even in low doses, combined with DMARDs may be a good therapeutic option in early stage of the PsA rather than ′steroid rescue′ later. This will help in early control of joint inflammation, prevent joint damage and maintain long-term good functional capacity and quality of life. This may be useful when the cost or availability of biologics precludes their use. However, we discourage the use of corticosteroids as monotherapy.

  6. New Therapeutic Approaches for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis may Rise from the Cholinergic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway and Antinociceptive Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hua Pan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complex etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, it is difficult to be completely cured at the current stage although many approaches have been applied in clinics, especially the wide application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. New drug discovery and development via the recently discovered cholinergic anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive pathways should be promising. Based on the above, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists maintain the potential for the treatment of RA. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches may rise from these two newly discovered pathways. More preclinical experiments and clinical trials are required to confirm our viewpoint.

  7. Evaluation of the Anti-inflammatory Effects of Atorvastatin on Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabi, Zhaleh Shariati; Saeidi, Mehran Ghazi; Khodashahi, Mandana; Rezaie, Ali Etemad; Hashemzadeh, Kamila; Khodashahi, Rozita; Heidari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder with unknown etiology. Atorvastatin is a lipid-lowering agent that affects the inflammatory processes. Objective This study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of atorvastatin on the Disease Activity Index and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations in RA patients. Methods This clinical trial was performed on 38 RA patients, who were referred to the Imam Reza and Ghaem Medical Centers of Mashhad, Iran between 2013 and 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) the intervention group, which received 40 mg of atorvastatin, and 2) the control group. Response to treatment and the clinical status of patients were evaluated using the Disease Activity Score (DAS-28) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at weeks zero, four, eight, and twelve, based on the 2010 ACR/EULAR Criteria by two rheumatologists. Disease activity and laboratory parameters, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), DAS-ESR, DAS- hs-CRP, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and liver function test (LFT) were measured in both groups. Results There was a significant difference in the mean number of swollen joints (p<0.011), ESR (p <0.005), DAS-ESR (P<0.043), LDL (0.036), and HDL (0.016) between the two groups. The changes in trend showed no significant difference in the mean number of tender joints (p =0.38), VAS (p =0.715), CRP (p =0.07), DAS-hs-CRP (p=0.431), total cholesterol (p=0.285), or TG (p =0.331) between the two groups. However, the Disease Activity Index decreased by 48.4% in the intervention group, compared to 35.5% in the control group. Conclusion As the results indicated, atorvastatin has a positive effect on the course of RA. In fact, atorvastatin, as an anti-inflammatory agent, could significantly influence inflammation in RA patients. Therefore, adding a lipid-lowering agent to standard medications in RA may be

  8. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

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    Na-Young Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness excisional wound model after 2-week treatments with control, 0.5%, or 1% CLA-supplemented diet. Mice fed dietary CLA supplementation had reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Moreover, the wound closure rate was improved significantly in mice fed a 1% CLA-supplemented diet during early stage of wound healing (inflammatory stage. We conclude that dietary CLA supplementation enhances the early stage of cutaneous wound healing as a result of modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  9. Effectiveness of a telemonitoring intensive strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with the conventional management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Ciapetti, Alessandro; Di Carlo, Marco; Gasparini, Stefania; Farah, Sonia; Gutierrez, Marwin

    2016-04-02

    The advent of Internet and World Wide Web has created new perspectives toward interaction between patients and healthcare professionals. Telemonitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an emerging concept to guide the collaborative management treatment and improve outcomes in patients. The objective of this study was to investigate whether an intensive treatment strategy, according to a telemonitoring protocol, is more effective than conventional management strategy in reaching remission and comprehensive disease control (CDC) after 1 year in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients. Forty-four ERA patients were randomly allocated into two groups: the telemonitoring intensive strategy (TIS) group (group 1) or the conventional strategy (CS) group (group 2). Three patients refused to participate. In group 1 (n = 21), a remote monitoring system of disease activity, in combination with protocolised treatment adjustments aiming for remission was applied. In group 2 (n = 20), patients were treated according to daily clinical practice, with regular evaluation of disease activity, but without protocolised treatment adjustments. A telemedical care called "REmote TElemonitoring for MAnaging Rheumatologic Condition and HEaltcare programmes" (RETE-MARCHE), was developed to perform the remote monitoring. A higher percentage of patients in the TIS group achieved CDAI remission vs patients in the CS group (38.1 % vs 25 % at year 1, p telemonitoring leads to more effective disease remission and more rapid CDC than treatment according to conventional management strategy in ERA. ISRCTN13142685 Date of registration: March, 17(th) 2016.

  10. Spanish cultural adaptation of the questionnaire Early Arthritis for Psoriatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gavín, J; Pérez-Pérez, L; Tinazzi, I; Vidal, D; McGonagle, D

    2017-08-10

    The Early Arthritis for Psoriatic patients (EARP) questionnaire is a screening tool for psoriatic arthritis with good measuring properties in its original Italian version but has not been culturally adapted to Spanish. This article presents the adaptation for Spanish population, prior to validation step. Application of the methodology recommended by the International Society Pharmacoeconomic and Outcome Research for cultural adaptations of measures focused on the patient and comprising the steps of: preparation, translation, reconciliation, back translation and review, harmonization, cognitive debriefing and review, proofreading. In preparing, the permission of the authors of the original questionnaire for cultural adaptation was obtained and they worked as a consultant during the process. The translation of the original questionnaire into Spanish was made by native translators who made minor modifications accepted by the authors of the original version. The back-translation into Italian was performed, obtaining an equivalent to the original EARP version. The Spanish version of the back-translation was answered by 35 patients in a cognitive debriefing. They answered all items without making additional contributions. The cultural adaptation of the questionnaire EARP for Spanish population is the first step for later use in routine clinical practice. The standardized methodology ensures the equivalence between the EARP in Spanish and the original one. In a second step, validation will take place in Spanish population. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Jacqueline; Toes, René E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; van der Woude, Diane

    2016-05-01

    This review provides an update on the recent discoveries on the role of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is characterized by an immune response against posttranslationally modified proteins, in particular citrullinated proteins. Recent studies have found that the ACPA response matures shortly before clinical disease manifests itself and is characterized by an increase in titre, isotype switching, antigen-recognition profile, and a change in the Fc-glycosylation pattern. To date, many citrullinated autoantigens have been identified and novel studies suggest that the human leucocyte antigen class II locus may directly influence the maturation of the ACPA response via antigen-specific T cells. Clinical studies have demonstrated that effective treatment of arthritis can lead to reduced ACPA levels or a change in composition of ACPA. In addition to ACPA, autoantibodies targeting other posttranslational modifications have been identified and may be associated with disease prognosis. Key studies have demonstrated that autoimmunity against citrullinated proteins is already present in preclinical RA and matures over time. Future studies are required to reveal whether autoantibodies and the B cells that produce them play a role in disease development or can function as biomarkers for disease maturation.

  12. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α is an essential catabolic regulator of inflammatory rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Hwang Ryu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disorder that manifests as chronic inflammation and joint tissue destruction. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of RA have not been fully elucidated. Here, we explored the role of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, HIF-1α (encoded by HIF1A and HIF-2α (encoded by EPAS1. HIF-2α was markedly up-regulated in the intimal lining of RA synovium, whereas HIF-1α was detected in a few cells in the sublining and deep layer of RA synovium. Overexpression of HIF-2α in joint tissues caused an RA-like phenotype, whereas HIF-1α did not affect joint architecture. Moreover, a HIF-2α deficiency in mice blunted the development of experimental RA. HIF-2α was expressed mainly in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS of RA synovium and regulated their proliferation, expression of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and various catabolic factors, and osteoclastogenic potential. Moreover, HIF-2α-dependent up-regulation of interleukin (IL-6 in FLS stimulated differentiation of TH17 cells-crucial effectors of RA pathogenesis. Additionally, in the absence of IL-6 (Il6-/- mice, overexpression of HIF-2α in joint tissues did not cause an RA phenotype. Thus, our results collectively suggest that HIF-2α plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of RA by regulating FLS functions, independent of HIF-1α.

  14. A maximum difference scaling survey of barriers to intensive combination treatment strategies with glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyfroidt, S.; Hulscher, M.; Cock, D. De; Elst, K. van; Joly, J.; Westhovens, R.; Verschueren, P.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the relative importance of barriers related to the provision of intensive combination treatment strategies with glucocorticoids (ICTS-GCs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) from the rheumatologists' perspective and to explore the relation between

  15. How age and sex affect the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, L.; Klooster, P.M. ten; Vonkeman, H.E.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Glas, C.A.; Laar, M.A. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are two commonly used measures of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As current RA treatment guidelines strongly emphasize early and aggressive treatment aiming at fast remission, optimal measurement of inflamm

  16. Decreased bacterial diversity characterizes the altered gut microbiota in patients with psoriatic arthritis, resembling dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U; Ubeda, Carles; Artacho, Alejandro; Attur, Mukundan; Isaac, Sandrine; Reddy, Soumya M; Marmon, Shoshana; Neimann, Andrea; Brusca, Samuel; Patel, Tejas; Manasson, Julia; Pamer, Eric G; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the diversity and taxonomic relative abundance of the gut microbiota in patients with never-treated, recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA). High-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing was utilized to compare the community composition of gut microbiota in patients with PsA (n = 16), patients with psoriasis of the skin (n = 15), and healthy, matched control subjects (n = 17). Samples were further assessed for the presence and levels of fecal and serum secretory IgA (sIgA), proinflammatory proteins, and fatty acids. The gut microbiota observed in patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis was less diverse when compared to that in healthy controls. This could be attributed to the reduced presence of several taxa. Samples from both patient groups showed a relative decrease in abundance of Coprococcus species, while samples from PsA patients were also characterized by a significant reduction in Akkermansia, Ruminococcus, and Pseudobutyrivibrio. Supernatants of fecal samples from PsA patients revealed an increase in sIgA levels and decrease in RANKL levels. Analysis of fatty acids revealed low fecal quantities of hexanoate and heptanoate in both patients with PsA and patients with psoriasis. Patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis had a lower relative abundance of multiple intestinal bacteria. Although some genera were concomitantly decreased in both conditions, PsA samples had a lower abundance of reportedly beneficial taxa. This gut microbiota profile in PsA was similar to that previously described in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and was associated with changes in specific inflammatory proteins unique to this group, and distinct from that in patients with skin psoriasis and healthy controls. Thus, the role of the gut microbiome in the continuum of psoriasis-PsA pathogenesis and the associated immune response merits further study. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Decreased Bacterial Diversity Characterizes an Altered Gut Microbiota in Psoriatic Arthritis and Resembles Dysbiosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U.; Ubeda, Carles; Artacho, Alejandro; Attur, Mukundan; Isaac, Sandrine; Reddy, Soumya M.; Marmon, Shoshana; Neimann, Andrea; Brusca, Samuel; Patel, Tejas; Manasson, Julia; Pamer, Eric G.; Littman, Dan R.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the diversity and taxonomic relative abundance of the gut microbiota in patients with never-treated, recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods High-throughput 16S rRNA pyrosequencing was utilized to compare community composition of gut microbiota in PsA patients (n=16), subjects with psoriasis of the skin (Ps) (n=15) and healthy, matched-controls (n=17). Samples were further assessed for the presence and levels of fecal and serum secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), pro-inflammatory proteins and fatty-acids. Results The gut microbiota observed in PsA and Ps patients was less diverse when compared to healthy controls. These could be attributed to the reduced presence of several taxa. While both groups showed a relative decrease in Coprococcus spp., PsA samples were characterized by a significant reduction in Akkermansia, Ruminococcus, and Pseudobutyrivibrio. Supernatants of fecal samples from PsA patients revealed an increase in sIgA and a decrease in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) levels. Fatty acid analysis revealed low levels of hexanoate and heptanoate in PsA and Ps patients. Conclusion PsA and Ps patients had a lower relative abundance of multiple intestinal bacteria. Although some genera were concomitantly decreased in both conditions, PsA samples had lower abundance of reportedly beneficial taxa. This gut microbiota profile in PsA was similar to that published for patients with IBD and was associated with changes in specific inflammatory proteins unique to this group, and distinct from Ps and controls. Thus, the role of gut microbiota in the continuum of Ps-PsA pathogenesis and the associated immune response merits further study. PMID:25319745

  18. Regulatory Effect of Iguratimod on the Balance of Th Subsets and Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhi Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To expand upon the role of iguratimod (T-614 in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, we investigated whether the Th1, Th17, follicular helper T cells (Tfh, and regulatory T cells (Treg imbalance could be reversed by iguratimod and the clinical implications of this reversal. Methods. In this trial, 74 patients were randomized into iguratimod-treated (group A and control (broup B group for a 24-week treatment period. In the subsequent 28 weeks, both groups were given iguratimod. Frequencies of Th1, Th17, Tfh, and Treg were quantified using flow cytometry, and serum cytokines were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. mRNA expression of cytokines and transcriptional factor were quantified by RT-PCR. The composite Disease Activity Score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were assessed at each visit. Result. The clinical scores demonstrated effective suppression of disease after treatment with iguratimod. In addition, iguratimod downregulated Th1, Th17-type response and upregulated Treg. Furthermore, the levels of Th1, Th17, and Tfh associated inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors were reduced after treatment with iguratimod, while the levels of Treg associated cytokines and transcription factors were increased.

  19. Evaluation of selected ergonomic assessment tools for use in providing job accommodation for people with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village, Judy; Backman, Catherine L; Lacaille, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (IA) is a leading cause of work disability, especially for those with jobs involving repetitive, hand-intensive or manual work. Ergonomic interventions may mediate against job loss. Our objective was to identify desirable features of an ergonomic tool for use in providing job accommodation for people with IA, and to evaluate a selection of ergonomic and rehabilitation tools against these features. Eight desirable features were compared across 16 assessment tools. None of the tools met all the pre-determined features. Ergonomic assessment tools should incorporate objective assessment of risk factors together with subjective perceptions of symptom aggravation, and identify risk factors that may not currently be causing problems, but may increase risk of aggravation or injury in the future. To accommodate the needs of people with IA, the tool should allow for evaluation of risks and generation of solutions without a worksite visit in situations where the client does not want to disclose their illness. Finally, an assessment tool needs to be applicable to a wide range of worksites, easy to use, valid, and reliable. Against these criteria, it appears that there is a lack of appropriate ergonomic assessment tools for use in people with IA.

  20. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  1. Extra-virgin olive oil and its phenolic extract prevent inflammatory response and joint damage in murine experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rosillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of EVOO in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that the phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of dietary EVOO and treatment with its phenolic extract (PE in a model of RA, the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine collagen type II (CII. On day 21, the mice received a booster injection. We have demonstrated that EVOO and its PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. Our data indicate that dietary EVOO and PE treatment inhibit JNK, p38 and signal transducer and STAT-3. In addition, both EVOO and PE decrease NF-κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions.

  2. Depression and inflammatory arthritis are associated in both Western and Non-Western countries: Findings from the World Health Survey 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbacher, Christian; Brandstetter, Susanne; Herr, Raphael; Ehrenstein, Boris; Loerbroks, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked arthritis to depression. However, it remains unclear to what degree the association between arthritis and depression extends to low income countries and whether it can be replicated for inflammatory arthritis (IA). We aimed to address these knowledge gaps based on a large multi-national sample. Cross-sectional data was drawn from the 2002 World Health Survey. IA was defined as reports of either a diagnosis or treatment of arthritis and morning stiffness for >30min. Self-reported depression was defined as positive if participants reported its prior diagnosis or treatment or if they were classified as suffering from a major depressive episode by a seven-item screening instrument. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the entire sample and stratified by sex and continent. The odds of IA was 2.6-fold increased in those with depression compared to those without (OR=2.64, 95% CI 2.18-3.21) in the entire sample. This association was observed in both men (OR=3.06, 95% CI 2.19-4.27) and women (OR=2.50, 95% CI 1.95-3.21). Similar associations were found on the continent level, but were generally stronger for the Americas and Asia compared to Africa and Europe. Although our definition of IA was limited by the use of self-reported morning stiffness, this study suggests that there is a positive association between inflammatory arthritis and depression in Western and Non-Western countries, suggesting that this relationship represents a universal phenomenon. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. SIRT1/Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase α Signaling Enhances Macrophage Polarization to an Anti-inflammatory Phenotype in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Sang Yeob; Hong, Ki Whan; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Koanhoi; Kim, Chi Dae

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Macrophages of the M1 phenotype act as pro-inflammatory mediators in synovium, whereas those of the M2 phenotype suppress inflammation and promote tissue repair. SIRT1 is a class 3 histone deacetylase with anti-inflammatory characteristics. However, the role played by SIRT1 in macrophage polarization has not been defined in RA. We investigated whether SIRT1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by modulating M1/M2 polarization in macrophages from RA patients. In this study, SIRT1 activation promoted the phosphorylation of an adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α/acetyl-CoA carboxylase in macrophages exposed to interleukin (IL)-4, and that this resulted in the expressions of M2 genes, including MDC, FcεRII, MrC1, and IL-10, at high levels. Furthermore, these expressions were inhibited by sirtinol (an inhibitor of SIRT1) and compound C (an inhibitor of AMPK). Moreover, SIRT1 activation downregulated LPS/interferon γ-mediated NF-κB activity by inhibiting p65 acetylation and the expression of M1 genes, such as CCL2, iNOS, IL-12 p35, and IL-12 p40. Macrophages from SIRT1 transgenic (Tg)-mice exhibited enhanced polarization of M2 phenotype macrophages and reduced polarization of M1 phenotype macrophages. In line with these observations, SIRT1-Tg mice showed less histological signs of arthritis, that is, lower TNFα and IL-1β expressions and less severe arthritis in the knee joints, compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, the study shows activation of SIRT1/AMPKα signaling exerts anti-inflammatory activities by regulating M1/M2 polarization, and thereby reduces inflammatory responses in RA. Furthermore, it suggests that SIRT1 signaling be viewed as a therapeutic target in RA.

  4. Comparative Expression Analyses of Pro- versus Anti-Inflammatory Mediators within Synovium of Patients with Joint Trauma, Osteoarthritis, and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaqura, Mohammed; John, Thilo; Likar, Rudolf; Ebied, Reham Said; Schäfer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Synovial injury and healing are complex processes including catabolic effects by proinflammatory cytokines and anabolic processes by anti-inflammatory mediators. Here we examined the expression of pro- versus anti-inflammatory mediators in synovium of patients with diagnostic arthroscopy (control), joint trauma (JT), osteoarthritis (OA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovial samples from these patients were subjected to RT-PCR and double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators as well as immune cell markers. Interestingly, pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators were expressed predominantly in granulocytes in patients with JT and in macrophages, lymphocytes, and plasma cells in patients with OA and RA. Interestingly, parallel to the severity of inflammation, proinflammatory mediators IL-1β, TNF-α, and 5-LOX specific mRNA as well as immunoreactive (IR) cells were significantly more abundant in patients with RA and JT than in those with OA. However, anti-inflammatory mediators 15-LOX, FPR2, and IL-10 specific mRNA as well as IR cells were significantly more abundant in patients with OA than in those with JT and RA. These findings show that upregulation of proinflammatory mediators contributes to the predominantly catabolic inflammatory process in JT and RA synovium, whereas upregulation of anabolic anti-inflammatory mediators counteracts inflammation resulting in the inferior inflammatory process in OA synovium.

  5. Treatment of early arthritis using arthrofoon (ultra-low doses of antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-α

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    Lyudmila V Sizova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA should be to achieve clinical remission to prevent structural damage and physical disability. Arthrofoon modifies production/activity of endogenous inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. The sublingual rout is the most acceptable to ambulatory treatment because it does not produce the adverse reactions associated with intravenous therapy. The treatment with arthrofoon in outpatient with early RA is analyzed here. This report is devoted to the 28-year-old Russian woman who received arthrofoon due to suspicion of early RA. The strategy of early prescription of ultra-low doses of TNF-α antibody within two years was confirmed by the clinical improvement and delay of radiological disease progression in patient with undifferentiated arthritis or probable RA initially.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 84 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: bone marrow oedema predicts erosive progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the spectrum and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the predictive value of MRI findings for subsequent development of conventional radiographic (CR) damage and MRI erosions. Methods: 84...... consecutive patients with RA with disease duration hands and wrists and MRI of the dominant wrist. MR...... images were scored according to the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS), and conventional radiographs according to the van der Heijde modified Sharp score. Results: MRI findings reflecting inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema and tenosynovitis) decreased during...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 84 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: bone marrow oedema predicts erosive progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, E.A.; Boyesen, P.; Østergaard, Morten

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the spectrum and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the predictive value of MRI findings for subsequent development of conventional radiographic (CR) damage and MRI erosions. METHODS: 84...... consecutive patients with RA with disease duration hands and wrists and MRI of the dominant wrist. MR...... images were scored according to the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS), and conventional radiographs according to the van der Heijde modified Sharp score. RESULTS: MRI findings reflecting inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema and tenosynovitis) decreased during...

  8. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SACROILIAC JOINT IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF EARLY POLYARTICULAR PSORIATIC AND RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (STUDY DATA REMARKA

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    Elena Yu Loginova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of lesions of the spine and sacroiliac joints may be helpful in discrimination between early psoriatic arthritis (ePsA and early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA.Objective. To assess the significance of inflammatory back pain (IBP, HLA-B27, and active sacroiliitis (ASI confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for differential diagnosis of polyarticular ePsA and eRA.Materials and Methods. The study included 29 patients with ePsA (13 males and 16 females, mean age 36.52 ± 11.27 years, average duration of the disease 13.03 ± 9.77 months and 25 patients with eRA (7 males and 18 females, mean age 52.68 ± 14.7 years, average duration of the disease 4.0 ± 1.72 months. Presence of IBP (according to the ASAS criteria and HLA-B27 were assessed (in 27 patients with PsA and in 20 patients with RA; ASI signs were assessed based on the MRI data (bone marrow edema/osteitis. DAS, DAS28, M ± SD, Fisher's exact test, t-test, χ2, the Yule coefficients of association (Q: level from -1 to +1 and Phi were calculated; differences were considered to be statistically significant at p <0.05.Results. In patients with ePsA, ASI was detected by MRI significantly more frequently than in patients with eRA (41.4% and 12% of cases respectively, p < 0.016. No correlation between the presence of ASI and DAS28 was observed in both groups. In the ePsA group, IBP was detected in 17 patients (58.6%; it was long-term in 10 (58.8% of the patients and episodic – in 7 (41.2% patients. Back pain with mechanical rhythm was observed in 3 (12% patients with eRA. HLA-B27 was detected in 9 (33.3% of 27 patients with ePsA and in 3 (15% of 20 patients with eRA (p < 0.014. In patients with ePsA, a very high level of association between ASI and IBP (Q = 0.91, Phi = 0.56; p < 0.003 and a high level of association between ASI and HLA-B27 (Q = 0.75, Phi = 0.56; p < 0.039 were detected. MRI showed no association between the presence of HLA-B27 and ASI signs in patients with RA

  9. Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

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    Abdul Hadi Mohd

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The aim of present research was to develop matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam filled in capsule for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods:Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam were prepared by direct compression method using microsomal enzyme dependent and pH-sensitive polymers which were further filled into an empty HPMC capsule. To assess the compatibility, FT-IR and DSC studies for pure drug, polymers and their physical mixture were performed. The formulated batches were subjected to physicochemical studies, estimation of drug content, in vitro drug release, drug release kinetics, and stability studies. Results:  When FTIR and DSC studies were performed it was found that there was no interaction between lornoxicam and polymers which used. All the physicochemical properties of prepared matrix-mini-tablets were found to be in normal limits. The percentage of drug content was found to be 99.60±0.07%. Our optimized matrix mini-tablets-filled-capsule formulation F30 released lornoxicam after a lag time of 5.02±0.92 hr, 95.48±0.65 % at the end of 8 hr and 99.90±0.83 % at the end of 12 hr. Stability was also found for this formulation as per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Conclusion: A novel colon targeted delivery system of lornoxicam was successfully developed by filling matrix-mini-tablets into an empty HPMC capsule shell for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Abdul Hadi; Raghavendra Rao, Nidagurthi Guggilla; Avanapu, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of present research was to develop matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam filled in capsule for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam were prepared by direct compression method using microsomal enzyme dependent and pH-sensitive polymers which were further filled into an empty HPMC capsule. To assess the compatibility, FT-IR and DSC studies for pure drug, polymers and their physical mixture were performed. The formulated batches were subjected to physicochemical studies, estimation of drug content, in vitro drug release, drug release kinetics, and stability studies. Results: When FTIR and DSC studies were performed it was found that there was no interaction between lornoxicam and polymers which used. All the physicochemical properties of prepared matrix-mini-tablets were found to be in normal limits. The percentage of drug content was found to be 99.60±0.07%. Our optimized matrix mini-tablets-filled-capsule formulation F30 released lornoxicam after a lag time of 5.02±0.92 hr, 95.48±0.65 % at the end of 8 hr and 99.90±0.83 % at the end of 12 hr. Stability was also found for this formulation as per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Conclusion: A novel colon targeted delivery system of lornoxicam was successfully developed by filling matrix-mini-tablets into an empty HPMC capsule shell for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24967065

  11. Gender and the treatment of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis: an observational study

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    Lesuis Nienke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and psoriasis are immune-mediated inflammatory diseases with similarities in pathophysiology, and all can be treated with similar biological agents. Previous studies have shown that there are gender differences with regard to disease characteristics in RA and IBD, with women generally having worse scores on pain and quality of life measurements. The relationship is less clear for psoriasis. Because treatment differences between men and women could explain the dissimilarities, we investigated gender differences in the disease characteristics before treatment initiation and in the biologic treatment prescribed. Methods Data on patients with RA or IBD were collected from two registries in which patients treated with biologic medication were enrolled. Basic demographic data and disease activity parameters were collected from a time point just before the initiation of the biologic treatment. For patients with psoriasis, the data were taken from the 2010 annual report of the Swedish Psoriasis Register for systemic treatment, which included also non-biologic treatment. For all three diseases, the prescribed treatment and disease characteristics were compared between men and women. Results In total, 4493 adult patients were included in the study (1912 with RA, 131 with IBD, and 2450 with psoriasis. Most of the treated patients with RA were women, whereas most of the patients with IBD or psoriasis were men. There were no significant differences between men and women in the choice of biologics. At treatment start, significant gender differences were seen in the subjective disease measurements for both RA and psoriasis, with women having higher (that is, worse scores than men. No differences in objective measurements were found for RA, but for psoriasis men had higher (that is, worse scores for objective disease activity measures. A similar trend to RA was seen in IBD

  12. Leflunomide monotherapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: Results of the Russian national Arava mono study

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    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA is usually started using one of the synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. The choice of these drugs is very limited and leflunomide (LEF is one of the most promising agents. The present study assessed the results of using the standard LEF regimen for patients with early RA in the everyday clinical practice of Russian health care facilities. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled the patients followed up in 20 medical centers of the Russian Federation in May 2008 to January 2010. The RA patients who met the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR classification criteria, had a less than 2-year history of the disease, and had not received LEF before were included. All the patients were above 18 years of age and they signed an informed consent form. The physicians were recommended to give the drug in a dose of 100 mg/day for the first 3 days, then 20 mg/day continuously. If adverse reactions occurred, the dose might be reduced to 10 mg/day. The patients were examined before and 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks after LEF therapy. The efficiency of the treatment was evaluated by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR classification criteria using DAS 28 scores, by the ACR criteria, and functional changes using HAQ scores and quality of life using the EQ-5D questionnaire. Results. The study included 484 patients with RA. Its diagnosis corresponded to the 1987 ACR criteria. There were 80 men and 404 women in this group. The patients’ mean age was 48.1±13.4 years; the mean duration of the disease at its onset was 14.1±12.8 months. A significant decrease in the number of patients with high DAS 28 scores was recorded every 12 weeks during the treatment. It reduced from 355 (73.3% to 41 (8.5% by the end of the observation. At the same time, there was a significant increase in the number of patients with low activity and remission every 12 weeks (p < 0.01. During the last visit, a remission

  13. Effect of radiosynovectomy in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis; Wirksamkeit der Radiosynoviorthese bei degenerativ-entzuendlichen und chronisch-entzuendlichen Gelenkerkrankungen

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    Kroeger, S.; Klutmann, S.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Clausen, M. [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Sawula, J.A.; Brenner, W.; Henze, E. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1999-07-01

    Aim: Effect of radiosynovectomy (RS) should be evaluated both by subjective and objective parameters in patients with osteoarthritis and in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A total of 98 joints in 61 patients were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group included 35 patients with therapy-resistant effusions caused by severe osteoarthritis (46 joints). The second group consisted of 26 patients (52 joints) with ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis, and recurrent synovitis following surgery. Effect of RS was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire and quantified by T/B-ratios derived from blood pool images prior to and after RS. Results: Within the first patient group suffering from osteoarthritis, 40% showed a good or excellent improvement of clinical symptoms, 51% were unchanged, and in 9% symptoms worsened. Similar results were found in the second patient group. The majority of unchanged results were small finger joints. In contrast, wrist and knee joints showed a better improvement. Good correlation between results of bone scan and patients subjective impression was found in 38% and 67% in the first and the second patient group, respectively. Conclusion: Radiosynovectomy might be an effective treatment in osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Der Therapieerfolg der Radiosynoviorthese (RSO) sollte bei aktivierter Arthrose und anderen chronisch-entzuendlichen Gelenkerkrankungen anhand der subjektiven Befindlichkeit und objektiver Parameter evaluiert werden. Methoden: Es wurden insgesamt 98 Gelenke bei 61 Patienten behandelt. Entsprechend der Grunderkrankung umfasste die erste Gruppe 35 Patienten mit einer therapieresistenten, aktivierten Arthrose (46 Gelenke). Die zweite Patientengruppe beinhaltete 26 Patienten (52

  14. Dynamics in serum of the inflammatory markers serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen and alpha2-globulins during induced noninfectious arthritis in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultén, C; Grönlund, U; Hirvonen, J; Tulamo, R-M; Suominen, M M; Marhaug, G; Forsberg, M

    2002-11-01

    Despite the importance of noninfectious joint diseases in equine medicine, little is known about the acute phase response which may be elicited if the local inflammatory process of noninfectious arthritis is sufficiently strong, Therefore the aim of this study was to monitor the systemic inflammatory response during experimentally-induced noninfectious arthritis by studying the dynamics in serum of the acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen and alpha2-globulins. Twenty-four Standardbred horses, age 3-7 years, found healthy on thorough clinical, radiological, haematological and serum biochemical examination, were injected aseptically into the right midcarpal joint with amphotericin B. Blood samples were drawn before induction of arthritis (0 h), and at 8, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h postinduction and then on Days 3, 4, 5 and 15 postinduction. All horses developed lameness with joint effusion and joint heat as well as increased respiratory rate, heart rate and body temperature. The lameness started to decline after 24-36 h and, in most animals, systemic signs disappeared on Day 2 postinjection. The concentration of the acute phase proteins increased following induction of arthritis. The SAA concentrations were higher than baseline concentrations from 16 h postinduction and were maximal at 36-48 h (227 times baseline concentration). The haptoglobin concentrations were higher than baseline concentrations from 24 h and were maximal at 48-96 h (1.14 times baseline concentration). The maximal concentrations of fibrinogen were seen between 36-72 h postinjection and increased on average 0.87 times from baseline concentrations. The fibrinogen concentrations were higher than baseline concentrations from 24 h postinjection. Alpha2-globulins concentrations showed a minor increase and increased 0.55 times from baseline concentrations. The markers had returned to baseline concentrations by Day 15. Our results demonstrate that amphotericin B-induced arthritis

  15. Inflammatory markers and extent and progression of early atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeit, Peter; Thompson, Simon G; Agewall, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    -IMT) in the general population. METHODS: Information on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, leucocyte count and CCA-IMT was available in 20 prospective cohort studies of the PROG-IMT collaboration involving 49,097 participants free of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Estimates of associations were...... inflammatory markers and baseline CCA-IMT. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, mean differences in baseline CCA-IMT per one-SD higher inflammatory marker were: 0.0082 mm for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (p ... for leucocyte count (p = 0.033). 'Inflammatory load', defined as the number of elevated inflammatory markers (i.e. in upper two quintiles), showed a positive linear association with baseline CCA-IMT (p 

  16. Efficacy of tofacitinib monotherapy in methotrexate-naive patients with early or established rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Roy M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kavanaugh, Arthur F; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Kwok, Kenneth; DeMasi, Ryan; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib monotherapy was previously shown to inhibit structural damage, reduce clinical signs and symptoms of RA, and improve physical functioning over 24 months in methotrexate (MTX)-naive adult patients with RA. In this post hoc analysis, we compared efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in patients with early (disease duration <1 year) versus established (≥1 year) RA. MTX-naive patients ≥18 years with active RA received tofacitinib monotherapy (5 or 10 mg two times a day, or MTX monotherapy, in a 24-month Phase 3 trial. Of 956 patients (tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day, n=373; tofacitinib 10 mg two times a day, n=397; MTX, n=186), 54% had early RA. Baseline disease activity and functional disability were similar in both groups; radiographic damage was greater in patients with established RA. At month 24, clinical response rates were significantly greater in patients with early versus established RA in the tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day group. Both tofacitinib doses had greater effects on clinical, functional and radiographic improvements at 1 and 2 years compared with MTX, independent of disease duration. No new safety signals were observed. Treatment response was generally similar in early and established RA; significantly greater improvements were observed at month 24 with tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day in early versus established RA. Tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg two times a day demonstrated greater efficacy versus MTX irrespective of disease duration. No difference in safety profiles was observed between patients with early or established RA. NCT01039688; Results.

  17. Mining disease risk patterns from nationwide clinical databases for the assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997-2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease.

  18. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  19. Exploring the Inflammatory Metabolomic Profile to Predict Response to TNF-α Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppen, Bart V J; Fu, Junzeng; van Wietmarschen, Herman A; Harms, Amy C; Koval, Slavik; Marijnissen, Anne C A; Peeters, Judith J W; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Tekstra, Janneke; van Laar, Jacob M; Hankemeier, Thomas; Lafeber, Floris P J G; van der Greef, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, approximately one-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) respond insufficiently to TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis). The aim of the study was to explore the use of a metabolomics to identify predictors for the outcome of TNFi therapy, and study the metabolomic fingerprint in active RA irrespective of patients' response. In the metabolomic profiling, lipids, oxylipins, and amines were measured in serum samples of RA patients from the observational BiOCURA cohort, before start of biological treatment. Multivariable logistic regression models were established to identify predictors for good- and non-response in patients receiving TNFi (n = 124). The added value of metabolites over prediction using clinical parameters only was determined by comparing the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative predictive value and by the net reclassification index (NRI). The models were further validated by 10-fold cross validation and tested on the complete TNFi treatment cohort including moderate responders. Additionally, metabolites were identified that cross-sectionally associated with the RA disease activity score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) or C-reactive protein (CRP). Out of 139 metabolites, the best-performing predictors were sn1-LPC(18:3-ω3/ω6), sn1-LPC(15:0), ethanolamine, and lysine. The model that combined the selected metabolites with clinical parameters showed a significant larger AUC-ROC than that of the model containing only clinical parameters (p = 0.01). The combined model was able to discriminate good- and non-responders with good accuracy and to reclassify non-responders with an improvement of 30% (total NRI = 0.23) and showed a prediction error of 0.27. For the complete TNFi cohort, the NRI was 0.22. In addition, 88 metabolites were associated with DAS28, ESR or CRP (p<0.05). Our study established an accurate prediction model

  20. Refractory polyarticular gouty arthritis as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeny, Peter J; Keith, Michael P; Love, Kathleen M; Dwyer, Terrence X; Ganesan, Anuradha

    2010-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) describes the initial clinical deterioration some patients manifest upon initiation of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection. In this report we describe a case of IRIS manifesting as polyarticular gout, a previously unreported rheumatological manifestation of IRIS. A 53-year-old HIV-infected man with a history of intermittent attacks of gout and an initial CD4 count of 112 cells/microL and a viral load of >100,000 copies/mL presented to our institution with severe, refractory, polyarticular gout approximately 4 weeks after initiating ART. At this point, the patient demonstrated significant gains in his CD4 counts (103 cells/microL) and a greater than 3 log decline in his HIV-1- viral load. This episode was prolonged lasting for approximately 10 weeks and required hospitalization for the management of pain and control of inflammation. The temporal associations of this attack with the initiation of ART and the observed immunologic reconstitution make IRIS a clinical possibility.Monosodium urate crystals through their interactions with interleukin 1- beta, and neutrophilic synovitis play a critical role in the pathophysiology of gout. Defects in both neutrophil and macrophage function and imbalances in the cytokine milieu are documented in HIV infected patients. The introduction of ART results in restoration of neutrophil and macrophage function, declines in levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and increases in levels of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1 beta, which may provide the necessary milieu for the precipitation of attacks of severe polyarticular gout in the context of ART initiation.

  1. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis), tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis) and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy). In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis), and the spine (spondylitis). In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Trikatu, an herbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by the suppression of inflammatory immune responses in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and on cultured fibroblast like synoviocytes via the inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Hari Madhuri; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-10-25

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of trikatu, an herbal compound and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Our results indicate that trikatu (1000 mg/kg/b.wt. oral) administration suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) and downregulated the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) and transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B 65 (NFкB-p65) and activator protein-1 (AP-1)) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats. Consistently, the protein expression of NFкB-p65, IL-17, TNF-α, COX-2, and RANKL was also dramatically reduced in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes and synovial tissue of AIA rats by trikatu treatment. In addition, trikatu suppressed the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 similar to the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in cultured AIA-fibroblast like synoviocytes. Furthermore, trikatu alleviated the histopathology of joint of arthritic rats. Overall, these data highlights that trikatu could be a promising alternative modality for the possible treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

  4. Inflammatory cytokine production predominates in early Lyme disease in patients with erythema migrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Lisa; Moore, Brian; Bledsoe, Tara; Damle, Nitin; Sikand, Vijay; Steere, Allen C

    2003-10-01

    In a study of cytokine production ex vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 27 patients with culture-positive erythema migrans, production of inflammatory cytokines predominated, particularly gamma interferon and, to a lesser degree, tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, with the exception of interleukin-13, anti-inflammatory cytokine production was negligible. Thus, B. burgdorferi antigens in early Lyme disease often induce a strong inflammatory response.

  5. A pruritic linear urticarial rash, fever, and systemic inflammatory disease in five adolescents: adult-onset still disease or systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis sine arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendiville, Julie S; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Crawford, Richard I

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic rash of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a transient erythematous eruption associated with a quotidian spiking fever. Usually asymptomatic, it can be pruritic, with dermatographism at sites of scratching or pressure. An illness similar to this entity in adults is designated adult-onset Still disease. The relationship between the pediatric and adult disease is uncertain and differences in case definition have evolved. Specifically, a sustained arthritis for at least 6 weeks is required for a diagnosis of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whereas transient arthritis and arthralgia are accepted criteria in adult-onset Still disease. We describe five patients less than 16 years of age who presented with an acute illness characterized by fever and a distinctive skin eruption. Intense pruritus and linear erythematous lesions flared with a spiking fever, usually in the late afternoon and evening. Periorbital edema/erythema and nonlinear urticarial lesions were also seen. Two children had splinter hemorrhages of the nail beds and one girl developed a fixed, scaling, pigmented, linear eruption. Severe malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and leukocytosis were present in every patient. Other systemic manifestations included sore throat, transient arthritis, abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, hyperferritinemia, and hepatic dysfunction. No patient had a sustained arthritis. The course of the disease was variable. One patient, diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome, recovered on oral naproxen. Two patients responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy. One girl developed status epilepticus and died from aspiration and asphyxia. A boy with severe hepatitis developed renal failure and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and was treated with plasmapheresis, dialysis, and systemic corticosteroids; he had recurrent episodes of rash and fever into adult life. These children did not fulfill the case definition of systemic

  6. Systematic protocol for assessment of the validity of BOLD MRI in a rabbit model of inflammatory arthritis at 1.5 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Kis, Antonella; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Zhong, Anguo; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Gahunia, Harpal [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI has the potential to identify regions of early hypoxic and vascular joint changes in inflammatory arthritis. There is no standard protocol for analysis of BOLD MRI measurements in musculoskeletal disorders. To optimize the following BOLD MRI reading parameters: (1) statistical threshold values (low, r > 0.01 versus high, r > 0.2); (2) summary measures of BOLD contrast (percentage of activated voxels [PT%] versus percentage signal difference between on-and-off signal intensities [diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff]); and (3) direction of BOLD response (positive, negative and positive + negative). Using BOLD MRI protocols at 1.5 T, arthritic (n = 21) and contralateral (n = 21) knees of 21 juvenile rabbits were imaged at baseline and on days 1, 14 and 28 after a unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenan. Nine non-injected rabbits served as external control knees (n = 18). By comparing arthritic to contralateral knees, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine diagnostic accuracy. Using diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff and positive + negative responses, a threshold of r > 0.01 was more accurate than r > 0.2 (P = 0.03 at day 28). Comparison of summary measures yielded no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Although positive + negative (AUC = 0.86 at day 28) and negative responses (AUC = 0.90 at day 28) for PT% were the most diagnostically accurate, positive + negative responses for diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff (AUC = 0.78 at day 28) also had acceptable accuracy. The most clinically relevant reading parameters included a lower threshold of r > 0.01 and a positive + negative BOLD response. We propose that diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff is a more clinically relevant summary measure of BOLD MRI, while PT% can be used as an ancillary measure. (orig.)

  7. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH USTEKINUMAB IN THE TREATMENT OF EARLY PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS USING TREAT-TO-TARGET STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Loginova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new Treat-to-Target (T2T strategy in the treatment of early psoriatic arthritis (PsA is aimed at achieving remission or low disease activity. As of now, the new biological agent ustekinumb (UST, anti-interleukin (IL 12/23 monoclonal antibodies, was used to treat psoriasis and PsA. The paper presents clinical observations of the efficacy of UST in early PsA treated according T2T strategy. The described clinical cases demonstrate that use of UST 45 mg both alone and in combination with methotrexate for early PsA with moderate and high activity reduced manifestations of peripheral arthritis and psoriasis, promoting rapid achievement of remission or minimal disease activity. Overall, UST is well tolerated by the patients.

  8. Multiparameter analysis of biomarkers in the laboratory diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Novikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects and methods. 102 patients with early RA (79 women and 23 men; median age 51 years [41 to 62, 25th to 75th percentile]; disease duration 4 months [2.5 to 6.0]; DAS28 5.4 [4.1 to 5.9] were examined. A comparison group consisted of 616 patients including 27 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 with Sjö gren’s syndrome, 25 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis; 33 with osteoarthritis, 20 with overlap syndrome, 9, 22, and 168 patients with gouty, psoriatic, and undifferentiated arthritis, respectively; as well as 297 healthy donors matched with the examinees for gender and age. The concentrations of 36 biomarkers were measured by an immunonephelometric method, enzyme immunoassay, and xMAP technology. The values of one variable from others were predicted using a multiple linear regression method (multivariate analysis. Results. The strongest predictors of early RA, such as the concentrations of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, granulo-cyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, IFN^-inducible protein, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, were identified and a candidate for MDI was developed for early RA (MIRRA. After thorough validation, MIRRA may be regarded as a precision serological assay for the early diagnosis of RA. Conclusion. The development of MDI having a higher diagnostic precision than routinely used biomarkers is imperative for early RA diagnosis that allows one to initiate active antirheumatic therapy that is able to effectively delay progressive joint injury.

  9. The Features of the Synovium in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis According to the 2010 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Marleen G. H.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Schuller, Yvonne; van de Sande, Gijs P. M.; Wijbrandts, Carla A.; Dinant, Huib J.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It has been shown in early arthritis cohorts that the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) enable an earlier diagnosis, perhaps at the cost of a somewhat more heterogeneous patient population. We describe the features of synovial inflammation in RA patients classified according to these new criteria. Methods At baseline, synovial tissue biopsy samples were obtained from disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naïve early RA patients (clinical signs and symptoms EULAR criteria was analyzed: 56 patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA at baseline and 13 who were initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis but fulfilled criteria for RA upon follow up. The synovium at baseline was infiltrated by plasma cells, macrophages, and T cells as well as other cells, and findings were comparable to those when patients were selected based on the 1987 ACR criteria for RA. There was no clear cut difference in the characteristics of the synovium between RA patients initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis and those who already fulfilled classification criteria at baseline. Conclusion The features of synovial inflammation are similar when the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria are used compared to the 1987 ACR criteria. PMID:22574210

  10. The features of the synovium in early rheumatoid arthritis according to the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen G H van de Sande

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It has been shown in early arthritis cohorts that the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA enable an earlier diagnosis, perhaps at the cost of a somewhat more heterogeneous patient population. We describe the features of synovial inflammation in RA patients classified according to these new criteria. METHODS: At baseline, synovial tissue biopsy samples were obtained from disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD-naïve early RA patients (clinical signs and symptoms <1 year. Synovial tissue was analyzed for cell infiltration, vascularity, and expression of adhesion molecules. Stained sections were evaluated by digital image analysis. Patients were classified according to the two different sets of classification criteria, autoantibody status, and outcome. FINDINGS: Synovial tissue of 69 RA patients according to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria was analyzed: 56 patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA at baseline and 13 who were initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis but fulfilled criteria for RA upon follow up. The synovium at baseline was infiltrated by plasma cells, macrophages, and T cells as well as other cells, and findings were comparable to those when patients were selected based on the 1987 ACR criteria for RA. There was no clear cut difference in the characteristics of the synovium between RA patients initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis and those who already fulfilled classification criteria at baseline. CONCLUSION: The features of synovial inflammation are similar when the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria are used compared to the 1987 ACR criteria.

  11. Risk of tuberculosis during infliximab therapy for inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthropathy: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenzhen; Cao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Infliximab is a promising drug with good outcomes demonstrated for diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthropathy (SpA). However, treatment with this drug may increase the risk of tuberculosis infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate infliximab-associated tuberculosis infection. Literature searches in PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were performed. Randomized controlled trials with >95% of the patients >18 years-old were included. Meta-analysis was performed to investigate the incidence of tuberculosis infection after infliximab infusion. A total of 24 RCTs were included in the present meta-analysis. In total, 21 (0.51%) tuberculosis infections were detected among 4,111 patients administered infliximab therapy, compared with 0 (0%) among 2,229 patients assigned to the placebo group. Pooled odds ratio (OR) of developing tuberculosis infection was significantly higher with infliximab therapy than with placebo [2.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–7.52]. The OR of tuberculosis infection was 3.93 (95% CI, 0.91–16.91) in RA, 2.46 (95% CI, 0.38–15.92) in SpA and 1.66 (95% CI, 0.26–10.57) in IBD. Rates of tuberculosis infection with infliximab therapy in RA, SpA and IBD were 0.70, 0.22 and 0.52%, respectively. Compared with placebo, infliximab therapy may increase the risk of developing tuberculosis. However, the ORs for the risk of infliximab-associated tuberculosis were not demonstrated to be significant in IBD, RA and SpA; therefore, these findings should be interpreted with caution. The risk of developing tuberculosis demonstrates the importance of the prevention and management of tuberculosis infection with infliximab therapy. PMID:27588089

  12. Functional outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis during various proceduresof anti-inflammatory therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2010-01-01

    Results. The early use of therapy with BAIDs without GCs in controlled therapy allows functional outcome improvement in patients in RA to greater extent. No therapy control leads to functional outcome worsening in RA. During a long follow-up, there is a reduction in the correlation of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ scores with the parameters reflecting disease activity and an increase in the correlation of the HAQ with those reflecting the progression of RA. The development of the structural and anatomic changes in hand periarticular tissues with the formation of irreversible deformities does not correlate with the HAQ score in patients with RA.

  13. Early juvenile arthritis – results of two-year follow up

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    S O Salugina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study clinical and laboratory manifestations of different variants of juvenile arthritis (JA at the disease onset and during prospective two-year follow up. Material and methods. The study was performed as a part of Institute of Rheumatology early arthritis examination program RADIKAL. 130 pts with early JA (60,7% - girls with disease duration from 2 weeks to 6 months (mean 2,9±1,6 months aged 1,5- 16 years (mean 7,9±5,0 years were included. 13 (10% pts had systemic, 45 (34,6% – polyarticular and 72 (55,4% – olygoarticular variant of JA. General state, joint status, systemic and organ manifestation as well as immunological parameters (ANF, RF, disease activity, functional class (by Steinbrocker and CHAQ were assessed at baseline, and after 6, 12, 24 months of follow up. Results. Oligoarticular variant prevailed at onset and after 2 years (57,6%-55,6%. Systemic features were noted in reduced form as single manifestations. Morning stiffness was absent in half of children and lasted more than 1 hour in 16,4% of pts. After 2 years number of pts with morning stiffness significantly decreased and its duration diminished. Rheumatoid nodules appeared in 1 pt after 1 year. Uveitis developed in 7 children (5,3% and to the end of follow up it appeared in 2 more pts. Most of pts had minimal or moderate functional disability (FK 1,2 and CHAQ 0,1-1,5 during follow up. Disease activity at onset did not exceed 1 or 2 stage (80,2% and after 2 years the disease was not active in half of pts. To the end of follow up remission was achieved in 59% of pts, more often in those who received disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. In 23,2% of pts mostly in those with polyarthritis JA continued to recur independently on treatment. Conclusion. Timely administered complex therapy hampered disease progression, induced remission and improved quality of life in most children with JA. Pts with olygoarthritis had most favorable course of the disease. Pts

  14. Presence of Arp Specifically Contributes to Joint Tissue Edema Associated with Early-Onset Lyme Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hove, Petronella R.; Haldorson, Gary J; Magunda, Forgivemore; Bankhead, Troy

    2014-01-01

    Antiserum to the Borrelia burgdorferi arthritis-related protein, Arp, has been shown to prevent or reduce arthritis in immunodeficient mice. To directly investigate the requirement for this lipoprotein in the generation of Lyme arthritis, we utilized targeted deletion to generate a B. burgdorferi clone that lacked only the arp gene locus. Infection of Lyme disease-susceptible C3H/HeN mice with the arp deletion mutant demonstrated significantly reduced tibiotarsal joint swelling during the fir...

  15. Inflammatory biomarkers, disease activity index, and self-reported disability may be predictors of chronic arthritis after chikungunya infection: brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Delgado, J; Vera-Lastra, O L; Trujillo-Murillo, K; Canseco-Ávila, L M; Sánchez-González, R A; Gómez-Cruz, O; Lugo-Trampe, A; Fernández-Salas, I; Danis-Lozano, R; Contreras-Contreras, A; Mendoza-Torres, A; Domínguez-Arrevillaga, S; Mena-Vela, B A; Ocaña-Sibilla, M; Ramirez-Valdespino, J C; Jara, L J

    2017-03-01

    The chikungunya virus (ChikV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that causes disabling chronic arthritis. The relationship between clinical evolution and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with ChikV-induced arthritis has not been fully described. We performed a prospective case series to evaluate the association among joint involvement, self-reported disability, and inflammatory biomarkers. Patients with ChikV infection were followed for 1 year. Joint involvement and self-reported disability were evaluated with disease activity index 28 (DAS-28) and World Health Organization Disablement Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS-II). Interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and rheumatoid factor (RF) were used as biomarkers. Ten patients with mean age 48 ±15.04 years were included. Symptoms at diagnosis were fever, arthralgias, myalgias, rash, arthritis, nausea, vomiting, and back pain. Polyarticular involvement was present in seven cases. At diagnosis, measures were as follows: DAS-28, 5.08±1.11; WHODAS-II score, 72.3±10.3 %; CRP, 5.09±7.23 mg/dL; ESR, 33.5±17.5 mm/h; RF, 64±21.7 IU/mL; and IL-6, 17.6±10.3 pg/mL. Six patients developed subacute and chronic symptoms. During follow-up, DAS-28 index, WHODAS-II score, ESR, and IL-6 were statistically different in patients with subacute and chronic symptoms compared to those who resolved in the acute phase (p arthritis.

  16. Radiological imaging in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; Radiologische Fruehdiagnostik der rheumatoiden Arthritis. Stellenwert von Ultraschall und Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzgummer, H.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [AKH, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    For optimal therapy management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) specific and sensitive diagnostic methods are essential for assessment of disease activity. In addition to projection radiography, imaging techniques, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) are becoming increasingly more important for the early diagnosis of RA. The MRI and US techniques play a key role in the early imaging diagnostics of RA. Measurement of inflammation activity represents the basis of therapeutic decision-making and can be quantitatively and qualitatively determined with MRI and US. Synovitis and bone marrow edema are predictors of erosion. (orig.) [German] Fuer das optimale Therapiemanagement bei Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis (RA) sind spezifische und sensible diagnostische Methoden zur Beurteilung der Krankheitsaktivitaet unerlaesslich. Neben der Projektionsradiographie gewinnen die bildgebenden Methoden zur Fruehdiagnostik der RA, insbesondere die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und der Ultraschall (US), zunehmend an Bedeutung. MRT und US spielen eine Schluesselrolle in der bildgebenden Fruehdiagnostik der RA. Die Messung der Entzuendungsaktivitaet stellt die Basis fuer die Therapieentscheidung dar. Sie kann mit dem US und der MRT quantitativ und semiquantitativ bestimmt werden. Synovialitis und Knochenmarkoedem sind Praediktoren fuer Erosionen. (orig.)

  17. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  18. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

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    Natalia P. Machado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%, parasitic (23.5%, fungal (20.6% and viral (8.8% agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab.

  19. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in inflammatory and joint destructive pathways in collagen-induced arthritis in DBA1J mice.

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    Matthias Pierer

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis, a significant proportion of cytokine and chemokine synthesis is attributed to innate immune mechanisms. TLR4 is a prominent innate receptor since several endogenous ligands known to activate the innate immune system bind to it and may thereby promote joint inflammation. We generated TLR4 deficient DBA1J mice by backcrossing the TLR4 mutation present in C3H/HeJ strain onto the DBA1J strain and investigated the course of collagen-induced arthritis in TLR4 deficient mice in comparison to wild type littermates. The incidence of collagen- induced arthritis was significantly lower in TLR4 deficient compared to wild type mice (59 percent vs. 100 percent. The severity of arthritis was reduced in the TLR4 deficient mice compared to wild type littermates (mean maximum score 2,54 vs. 6,25. Mice deficient for TLR4 were virtually protected from cartilage destruction, and infiltration of inflammatory cells was reduced compared to wt mice. In parallel to the decreased clinical severity, lower anti-CCP antibody concentrations and lower IL-17 concentrations were found in the TLR4 deficient mice. The study further supports the role of TLR4 in the propagation of joint inflammation and destruction. Moreover, since deficiency in TLR4 led to decreased IL-17 and anti-CCP antibody production, the results indicate a link between TLR4 stimulation and the adaptive autoimmune response. This mechanism might be relevant in human rheumatoid arthritis, possibly in response to activating endogenous ligands in the affected joints.

  20. Early rheumatoid arthritis therapy: comparative characteristic of delagil, sulphasalazine and methotrexate

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    T S Salnikova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess early administration and efficacy of 3 disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. Material and methods. 92 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA aged 17 to 45 years (mean age 34,9±8,5 years were included. Disease duration did not exceed 6 months (mean 3,5±1,9 months. All had 2-3 activity degree and did not received glucocorticoid therapy (systemic or local and did not have severe concomitant diseases of internal organs. Results. Diagnosis of RA was confirmed during follow up in 90 pts. In 2 pts after 6 months diagnosis was changed to systemic lupus erythematosus. 30 pts received delagil for 3 months without improvement. Treatment with sulphasalazine for 3 months was not effective in 23 from 30 pts. 7 pts had subjective improvement during first 3 months but at 6 month effect was lost. Methotrexate administration provided improvement (DAS change 1,6. Clinical and laboratory remission was achieved in 6 pts. Number of bone erosions in pts treated with methotrexate was significantly less and depended on time of therapy beginning and features of disease onset. Conclusion. Methotrexate was most effective from the 3 drugs in early RA particularly when administered during first 3 months of the disease.

  1. Pharmacotherapy: concepts of pathogenesis and emerging treatments. Optimising the strategy of care in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, James; Porter, Duncan

    2010-08-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), early use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), intensive follow-up and 'treating to target' to achieve low disease activity produce significant improvements in measures of disease activity, functional impairment and retard erosive radiographic progression. Step-up, parallel and step-down regimens are all significantly more effective than sequential monotherapy; although the most effective regimen has not been established. Minimising the period of exposure to synovitis, by including a rapidly acting agent (e.g., corticosteroids or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitor), may slow radiographic progression further. Biologic therapies, especially TNFalpha inhibitors, are effective in early RA; however, their exact role is unclear. Current measures may overestimate the number of patients in clinical remission; therefore, musculoskeletal ultrasound and/or novel biomarkers may also have a role. Pre-clinical immunological markers could possibly be used to trigger pre-emptive treatment in asymptomatic, 'at risk' individuals. Potential treatment developments include combining biologic agents or targeting alternative immunological pathways. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA' released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria.

  3. Interest of the scintigraphy PET {sup 18}F-F.D.G. for the evaluation of the early response to the treatment by adalimumab in the rheumatoid poly-arthritis; Interet de la scintigraphie TEP {sup 18}F-FDG pour l'evaluation de la reponse precoce au traitement par adalimumab dans la polyarthrite rhumatoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, V.; Courtehoux, M.; Baulieu, J.L. [Service de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Tours, (France); Mulleman, D.; Paintaud, G.; Goupille, P.; Ternant, D. [Service de rhumatologie, CHU de Tours, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interest of the follow-up of the {sup 18}F-F.D.G. uptake during the treatment of the rheumatoid poly-arthritis by 40 mg during 2 weeks of adalimumab (an anti-TNF-alpha human monoclonal antibody), comparatively to the usual clinical and biological follow-up. The PET with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. is a promising technique to enlighten early the anti inflammatory pharmaco-dynamic effect of the adalimumab in the rheumatoid poly-arthritis. (N.C.)

  4. EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis: report of a task force of the European Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Combe, B; Landewe, R; Lukas, C; Bolosiu, H D; Breedveld, F; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Ferraccioli, G; Hazes, J M W; Klareskog, L; Machold, K; Martin-Mola, E; Nielsen, H; Silman, A; Smolen, J; Yazici, H

    To formulate EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis. In accordance with EULAR's "standardised operating procedures", the task force pursued an evidence based approach and an approach based on expert opinion...

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of methyl ursolate obtained from a chemically derived crude extract of apple peels: potential use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, Tatiana A; de Abreu, Bianca S S C; Costa, Thadeu E M M; Nakamura, Marcos J; Valente, Lígia M M; Henriques, Maria das Graças; Siani, Antonio C; Rosas, Elaine C

    2014-11-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid found in apple peels (Malus domestica, Borkh, Rosaceae), has a large spectrum of pharmacological effects. However, the vegetal matrix usually produces highly viscous and poorly soluble extracts that hamper the isolation of this compound. To overcome this problem, the crude EtOH-AcOEt extract of commercial apple peels was exhaustively treated with diazomethane, after which methyl ursolate (MU) was purified by column chromatography and characterized spectrometrically. The anti-inflammatory effects of UA and MU (50 mg/kg) were analyzed by zymosan-induced paw edema, pleurisy and in an experimental arthritis model. After 4 h of treatment with UA and MU, paw edema was reduced by 46 and 44 %, respectively. Both UA and MU inhibited protein extravasation into the thoracic cavity; tibio-femoral edema by 40 and 48 %, respectively; and leukocyte influx into the synovial cavity after 6 h by 52 and 73 %, respectively. Additionally, both UA and MU decreased the levels of mediators related to synovial inflammation, such as KC/CXCL-1 levels by 95 and 90 %, TNF-α levels by 76 and 71 %, and IL-1β levels by 57 and 53 %, respectively. Both the compounds were equally effective when assayed in different inflammatory models, including experimental arthritis. Hence, MU may be considered to be a useful anti-inflammatory derivative to overcome the inherent poor solubility of UA for formulating pharmaceutical products.

  6. Ozone oxidative postconditioning ameliorates joint damage and decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and oxidative stress in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Jaqueline Dranguet; Fraga, Angela; Díaz, María Teresa; Mallok, A; Viebahn-Hänsler, Renate; Fahmy, Ziad; Barberá, Ariana; Delgado, Liván; Menéndez, Silvia; Fernández, Olga Sonia León

    2013-08-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most prevalent chronic condition present in ~1% of the adult population. Many pro-inflammatory mediators are increased in RA, including Reactive Oxygen Species such as nitric oxide NO, pro-inflammatory cytokines as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and other molecules. Ozone oxidative postconditioning has regulatory effects on some pathological targets associated with RA. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ozone therapy in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats in point of joints inflammation and morphology. Moreover, cytokines, nitric oxide and oxidative stress levels in spleen homogenates were evaluated. Ozone treatment ameliorated joint damage, reduced TNF-α concentrations as well as TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels. Besides, cellular redox balance, nitric oxide and fructolysine levels were reestablished after ozone oxidative postconditioning. It was concluded that pleiotropic ozone's effects clarify its therapeutic efficacy in RA. Decreasing inflammation and joint injury, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts and re-establishment of cellular redox balance after ozone treatment were demonstrated.

  7. CB1 and CB2 contribute to antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of electroacupuncture on experimental arthritis of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Delane Viana; Araújo, Joana Cláudia Bezerra; Cavalcante, André Luiz Cunha; Havt, Alexandre; Quetz, Josiane da Siva; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque; Lima Vale, Mariana

    2012-11-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) and cannabinoids have been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects in animal models of arthritis. Male Wistar rats were injected with saline or zymosan (2 mg) into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). EA (10 Hz, 30 min) was performed 2 h after or 1 h before zymosan administration. AM251 or AM630 (3 mg/kg, i.p.)were administered before EA treatment. Mechanical hypernociception was accessed after zymosan administration. Rats were sacrificed 6 h after zymosan administration and the joint was removed for histopathological analysis. The gene expression of CB₁ and CB₂ receptors was assessed after sacrifice of the TMJ arthritic animals. EA inhibited zymosan-induced hypernociception (p < 0.05). AM251 reversed significantly the antinociceptive effect of EA, suggesting that the CB₁ receptor is involved in this effect. AM630 reversed the anti-inflammatory effect of EA. CB₁ and CB₂ receptor gene expression was upregulated 6 h after zymosan-induced arthritis in the EA-treated group. We observed downregulation of CB₂ receptor gene expression in the EA group at the 24th hour compared with the 6th hour. Higher CB₁ receptor gene expression was also found compared with the 6th hour. EA produced antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects, and these effects appeared to be mediated through CB₁ and CB₂ receptor activation.

  8. The effects of Chamaecyparis obtusa essential oil on pain-related behavior and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hye Rim; Chung, Hyun Joo; Park, Eui Ho; Moon, Sun Wook; Park, Su Jin; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Yang In; Han, Hee Chul

    2015-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa essential oil (COE) has been widely used to treat allergic diseases and was suggested to exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. This study evaluated the effects of COE on pain-related behavior and pro-inflammatory cytokines in rats with carrageenan (CGN)-induced arthritis. Reduced dynamic weight load on inflamed joint in voluntarily walking rats was used as the behavior test for arthritic pain; 10% COE-treated group was significantly attenuated pain (6-8 h post-CGN injection) compared to VEH (mineral oil)-treated group. In addition, the protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 (6-8 h), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (8 h) within the synovial membrane, as well as IL-1β, COX-2 (6-8 h), and IL-6 (5-7 h) within the meniscus, of 10% COE-treated group were significantly reduced. The current results implicate that COE has anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects on arthritis in rats.

  9. Adenosine A2A Receptors Mediate Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Electroacupuncture on Synovitis in Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the role of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA on synovitis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, C57BL/6 mice were divided into five treatment groups: Sham-control, CIA-control, CIA-EA, CIA-SCH58261 (A2AR antagonist, and CIA-EA-SCH58261. All mice except those in the Sham-control group were immunized with collagen II for arthritis induction. EA treatment was administered using the stomach 36 and spleen 6 points, and stimulated with a continuous rectangular wave for 30 min daily. EA treatment and SCH58261 were administered daily from days 35 to 49 (n=10. After treatment, X-ray radiography of joint bone morphology was established at day 60 and mouse blood was collected for ELISA determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α levels. Mice were sacrificed and processed for histological examination of pathological changes of joint tissue, including hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry of A2AR expression. EA treatment resulted in significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α concentrations, and bone damage X-ray scores. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effect of EA treatment was reversed by coadministration of SCH58261. Thus, EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect resulting in significant protection of cartilage by activation of A2AR in the synovial tissue of CIA.

  10. MODERN APPROACHES TO CLINICAL AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS EARLY ONSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Rekalov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA leads not only to a rapid development of disability, but can influence the life of these patients. One-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis may have signs of disability during the first 3 years of the onset of the disease, while mortality in patients with RA almost two times higher in comparison with the general population. Analysis of recent prospective studies on the progression of the pathological process and predicting of the long-term outcomes in RA clearly indicate the need for clinical evaluation and a comprehensive laboratory and instrumental diagnosis of the disease in the initial manifestations of the most followed by early adequate pathogenetic therapy. The purpose of this survey was to determine modern clinical aspects of diagnosis, the possibility of standard and specialized instrumental examinations in patients with eRA, followed by predicting long-term results. We studied 52 specialized publications on clinical classification and a modern laboratory and diagnostic tests for eRA. This review presents the data of the importance of differentiation of several stages of RA in relation to the time factor. The data on the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic classification and clinical criteria of eRA and an algorithm for the identification of the disease were presented. It was shown prognostic value of the main serological markers of RA, and the predictive value for early detection of antibodies to the circulating peptide as a marker of the severity of bone-destructive changes in patients with certain clinical manifestations. Antibodies to the circulating peptide (ACPA can be detected many years before the onset of RA. Study of anti-citrulline mutated vimentin (anti-MCV in patients with eRA can be applied as a marker of activity of the process and the subsequent possibility of use for predicting long-term results. This review presents the major diagnostic errors using standard instrumental

  11. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of early inflammatory sacroiliitis according to ASAS criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Fatma Nur, E-mail: nursoylu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Kayhan, Arda, E-mail: arda_kayhan@yahoo.com [Health Services Vocational School, Esenyurt University, Dogan Arasli Bulvari No 120, Esenyurt, Istanbul (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer, E-mail: hakki.karakas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza, E-mail: feyzamd@yahoo.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Silte, Duygu, E-mail: drduygusilte@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktas, İlknur, E-mail: iaktas@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of multi-parametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including fat saturated (FS) T2-weighted, short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), diffusion-weighted (DW-MR), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging techniques in the diagnosis of early inflammatory sacroiliitis and determine the additional value of DW-MR and DCE-MR images according to recently defined ‘Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society’ criteria. Materials and methods: The study included 45 patients with back pain. Two radiologists estimated the likelihood of osteitis in 4 independent viewing sessions including FS T2-weighted, STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Of the 45 patients, 31 had inflammatory back pain. Of 31, 28 (90.3%) patients had inflammatory sacroiliitis diagnosed by clinical and laboratory analysis. FS T2-weighted MR images had the highest sensitivity (42.8% for both radiologists) for detecting osteitis in patients with inflammaory sacroiliitis when compared to other imaging sequences. For specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, and AUC levels there were no statistically significant difference between image viewing settings. However, adding STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images to the FS T2-weighted MR images did not improve the above stated indices. Conclusion: FS T2-weighted MR imaging had the highest sensitivity when compared to other imaging sequences. The addition of DW-MR and DCE-MR images did not significantly improve the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of osteitis for both experienced and less experienced radiologists.

  12. Up-regulated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (CD26) on monocytes was unaffected by effective DMARD treatment in early steroid and DMARD-naive rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, Torkell Juulsgaad; Hansen, I; Thorsen, J

    2012-01-01

    To study the CD26 density on monocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes in steroid and DMARD-naïve, early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to analyse for correlations with disease activity, including long-term radiographic progression.......To study the CD26 density on monocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes in steroid and DMARD-naïve, early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to analyse for correlations with disease activity, including long-term radiographic progression....

  13. Treatment of very early rheumatoid arthritis with symptomatic therapy, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or biologic agents: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, Axel; Bansback, Nick; Marra, Carlo A; Anis, Aslam H; Michaud, Kaleb; Lubin, Stanley; White, Marc; Sizto, Sonia; Liang, Matthew H

    2009-11-03

    Long-term control or remission of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be possible with very early treatment. However, no optimal first therapeutic strategy has been determined. To assess the potential cost-effectiveness of major therapeutic strategies for very early RA. Decision analytic model with probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Published data, the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, and actual 2007 hospital costs. U.S. adults with very early RA (symptom duration provider and societal. 3 management strategies were compared: a symptomatic or "pyramid" strategy with initial nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, patient education, pain management, and low-dose glucocorticoids, and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at 1 year for nonresponders; early DMARD therapy with methotrexate; and early therapy with biologics and methotrexate. Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. By reducing the progression of joint erosions and subsequent functional disability, both early intervention strategies increase quality-adjusted life more than the pyramid strategy and save long-term costs. When the cost of very early intervention is factored in, the cost-effectiveness ratio of the early DMARD strategy is $4849 per QALY (95% CI, $0 to $16 354 per QALY) compared with the pyramid strategy, whereas the benefits gained through the early biologic strategy come at a substantial incremental cost. The early DMARD strategy maximizes the effectiveness of early DMARDs and reserves the use of biologics for patients with more treatment-resistant disease of longer duration, for which the incremental benefit of biologics is greater. The early biologic strategy becomes more cost-effective if drug prices are reduced, risk for death is permanently lowered through biologic therapy, patients experience drug-free remission, responders can be selected before therapy initiation, or effective alternative antirheumatic agents are available for patients for whom several biologics

  14. The anti-inflammatory fungal compound (S)-curvularin reduces proinflammatory gene expression in an in vivo model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nadine; Art, Julia; Forsch, Ingrid; Werner, Anke; Erkel, Gerhard; Jung, Mathias; Horke, Sven; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    In previous studies, we identified the fungal macrocyclic lactone (S)-curvularin (SC) as an anti-inflammatory agent using a screening system detecting inhibitors of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether SC is able to decrease proinflammatory gene expression in an in vivo model of a chronic inflammatory disease. Therefore, the effects of SC and dexamethasone were compared in the model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Total genomic microarray analyses were performed to identify SC target genes. In addition, in human C28/I2 chondrocytes and MonoMac6 monocytes, the effect of SC on proinflammatory gene expression was tested at the mRNA and protein level. In the CIA model, SC markedly reduced the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of CIA as well as human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In almost all cases, the effects of SC were comparable with those of dexamethasone. In microarray analyses, we identified additional new therapeutic targets of SC. Some of them, such as S100A8, myeloperoxidase, or cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide, are known to be implicated in pathophysiological processes in RA. Similar anti-inflammatory effects of SC were also observed in human C28/I2 chondrocyte cells, which are resistant to glucocorticoid treatment. These data indicate that SC and glucocorticoid effects are mediated via independent signal transduction pathways. In summary, we demonstrate that SC is a new effective anti-inflammatory compound that may serve as a lead compound for the development of new drugs for the therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  15. Circulating Dickkopf-1 and osteoprotegerin in patients with early and longstanding rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-ying; LONG Li; WANG Shi-yao; GUO Jian-ping; YE Hua; CUI Liu-fu; YUAN Guo-hua; LI Zhan-guo

    2010-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane, leading to invasion of synovial tissue into the adjacent cartilage matrix with degradation of articular cartilage and bone as a consequence. Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been demonstrated to be key molecules involved in bone erosion and bone remodeling. The aim of this study was to explore the potential role of DKK-1 and OPG in different stage of RA.Methods The protein levels of DKK-1 and OPG were detected by ELISA. The serum samples were collected from 300 patients with RA and 60 healthy controls. Of which, 150 RA patients were defined as early RA (disease duration ≤1 year), and other 150 RA patients were defined as longlasting RA (disease duration ≥5 years). At the time of serum sampling, various clinical and laboratory parameters were assessed. The correlations of DKK-1 or OPG and clinical/laboratory parameters were analyzed.Results The serum level of DKK-1 was elevated in patients with longstanding RA compared with healthy controls, while no significant difference was observed between the two groups in the level of OPG.In contrast, in early RA patients, the circulating OPG was elevated, while there was no significant difference between the two groups in expression of DKK-1. The serum DKK-1 was correlated with Sharp score and DAS28 in longstanding RA patients. In early RA, age was the only parameter that was significantly related to serum OPG.Conclusions There was a cross-talk between DKK-1 and OPG,which involved in bone destruction in RA. In different stage of RA, DKK-1 and OPG may play different roles in the pathogenesis of RA.

  16. COMPARATIVE EFFICIENCY AND TOLERABILITY OF CURRENT THERAPIES FOR EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Fedorenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the efficiency and safety of four treatment regimens using methotrexate (MT,  leflunomide (LEF,  and a combination  of MT and glucocorticoids  (GC  for early rheumatoid  arthritis (RA (disease duration <2 years.Subjects and methods. 141 patients with early RA (of them there were 122 women; mean age 51 years; mean disease duration  7.8 months;  mean DAS28 6.0 were randomized  to 4 treatment groups: 1 MT 10–20 mg/week (n = 35; 2 MT 10–20 mg/week + oral GC equivalent to 10 mg/day of prednisolone  (n = 34; 3 MT 10–20 mg/week + oral CG + single intravenous administration of methylprednisolone (MP 1000 mg at baseline (n = 35; 4 LEF 20 mg/day (n = 37. The patients were matched for main clinical and demographic  characteristics. The duration of treatment was 1 year. Its efficiency was evaluated according to the European  League Against Rheumatism (EULAR  criteria.Results. 125 patients completed one-year treatment. At this time, 11.4% of the patients achieved remission (DAS28 <2.6 in the MT group, 37.5% in the MT+GC group, 29.4% in the MT+GC+MP group, and 16.2% in the LEF group. Adverse events, mainly of mild intensity, were recorded in 9 patients in each MT group. A total of 7 patients had to discontinue treatment because of its inefficiency.Conclusion. All the four therapy regimens demonstrated a significant efficiency in patients with early RA; the total remission rate was 24%. The combination  of MT and GC produced the most pronounced effect. The tolerability of treatment was good in all groups.

  17. Candidate autoantigens identified by mass spectrometry in early rheumatoid arthritis are chaperones and citrullinated glycolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goëb, Vincent; Thomas-L'Otellier, Marlène; Daveau, Romain; Charlionet, Roland; Fardellone, Patrice; Le Loët, Xavier; Tron, François; Gilbert, Danièle; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to identify new early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) autoantibodies. Methods Sera obtained from 110 early untreated RA patients (citrullination in each of these proteins was evaluated. FT-ICR mass spectrometry was used to verify experimentally the effect of citrullination upon the mass profile observed by MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The 110 1-DE patterns allowed detection of 10 recurrent immunoreactive bands of 33, 39, 43, 46, 51, 54, 58, 62, 67 and 70 kDa, which were further characterized by 2-DE and proteomic analysis. Six proteins were already described RA antigens: heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, aldolase, α-enolase, calreticulin, 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) and BiP. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and the far upstream element-binding proteins (FUSE-BP) 1 and 2 were identified as new antigens. Post-translational protein modifications were analyzed and potentially deiminated peptides were found on aldolase, α-enolase, PGK1, calreticulin, HSP60 and the FUSE-BPs. We compared the reactivity of RA sera with citrullinated and noncitrullinated α-enolase and FUSE-BP linear peptides, and showed that antigenicity of the FUSE-BP peptide was highly dependent on citrullination. Interestingly, the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP2) status in RA serum at inclusion was not correlated to the reactivity directed against FUSE-BP citrullinated peptide. Conclusions Two categories of antigens, enzymes of the glycolytic family and molecular chaperones are also targeted by the early untreated RA autoantibody response. For some of them, and notably the FUSE-BPs, citrullination is involved in the immunological tolerance breakdown observed earlier in RA patients. Autoantibodies recognizing a citrullinated peptide from FUSE-BP may enhance the sensibility for RA of the currently available anti-CCP2 test. PMID:19284558

  18. CHANGES OF CYTOKINE LEVELS DURING THERAPY WITH METHOTREXATE AND ADALIMUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (REMARCA STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate changes in cytokine profile versus disease activity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA who use methotrexate (MTX and adalimumab (ADA in accordance with the treat-to-target concept. Subjects and methods. Forty-five patients (35 women; median age 53.5 [46; 59.5] years with early RA (median dura- tion 7.0 [4.0; 11.5] months; DAS28 5.8 [4.9; 6.4]; rheumatoid factor positivity (RF+ 91%; anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity (ACCP + 96% were examined. In all the patients, MTX as the first agent was subcuta- neously used in a dose of 10 mg/week with its rapid escalation up to 20-25 mg/week. Serum cytokine concentrations were determined using the xMAP multiplexing technology before and 12 and 24 weeks after therapy. Results. Following 12 weeks of therapy, DAS28 mean value decreased to 4.33 [3.5; 5.2] (p < 0.05 vs baseline. Twenty- nine (64.4% patients responded to treatment. It was decided to continue MTX monotherapy in 23 patients (a monotherapy group and in 22 patients ADA was added to therapy due to its inadequate effect in accordance with the standard regimen (a combined therapy group. At 24 weeks, mean DAS28 was 2.9 [2.1; 3.6] and 19 (82.6% patients responded to treatment in the monotherapy group. In the combined therapy group, DAS28 was 3.4 [3.2; 4.4]; nearly 30% of the patients achieved remission/low disease activity and the number of patients with the high activity of a pathological process also declined significantly (from 59.1 to 13.6%. At 12 weeks, the monotherapy group showed reduction of the level of proinflammatory (interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13 cytokines, chemokines (interferon induced protein-10 (IP-10, and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF (p<0.05; at 24 weeks, there were reductions in IL-6, IL-9, and IL-10, and transforming GF-bb and an increase in IL-10 concentration (p<0.05. At 12 weeks of MTX therapy

  19. Collagen Autoantibodies and Their Relationship to CCP Antibodies and Rheumatoid Factor in the Progression of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senga F. Whittingham

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Serum autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor (RF are important markers for diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but their autoantigens are not cartilage-specific. Autoantibodies to joint-specific type II collagen (CII also occur in RA, and monoclonal antibodies of similar specificity induce collagen antibody-induced arthritis in animals, but their role in RA is uncertain. We utilized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with the CB10 peptide of CII to compare the frequency of autoantibodies with those of anti-CCP and RF in stored sera from a prospective study of 82 patients with early RA to examine the outcome, defined as remission (n = 23, persisting non-erosive arthritis (n = 27, or erosions (n = 32. Initial frequencies of anti-CB10, anti-CCP and RF were 76%, 54%, and 57% in RA, and 4%, 0%, and 9% in 136 controls. The frequency of anti-CB10 was unrelated to outcome, but anti-CCP and RF increased with increasing severity, and the number of autoantibodies mirrored the severity. We suggest RA is an immune complex-mediated arthritis in which the three antibodies interact, with anti-CII inducing localized cartilage damage and inflammation resulting in citrullination of joint proteins, neoepitope formation, and a strong anti-CCP response in genetically-susceptible subjects, all amplified and modified by RF.

  20. [Characteristics of early arthritis units that may be associated with better referral efficiency: survey of SERAP units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Virginia; Descalzo, Miguel Ángel; Carmona, Loreto; Bascones, Miriam; Carbonell, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    To identify characteristics of early arthritis units, that may be associated with better referral eficiency. A national survey of the 36 early arthritis units (EAU) in Spanish Rheumatology Units in 2004 (SERAP project). Survey collected information about general practitioners (GP) educational program to improve knowledge and practical skills of early arthritis, networking and feed-back system and referral efficiency. EAU were classified in two groups according to 25 and 50% of inappropriate referral process, respectively. Thirty four of the 36 (94%) EAU, answered the survey. GP were trained in only 1 medical meeting in the primary care clinic, with one or more rheumatologists responsible of GP education. Fourteen of the 34 EAU (42.4%) regularly interacted with GP and only 20 (39.4%) contacted the GP who were responsible for the wrong referral process. Median lag time for referral to the Rheumatology out-patient clinic, was 73 days (15-365 days). The percentage of wrongly referred patients was between 0 and 80% (38% ± 21). Only 10 EAU (27.8%) referred patients appropriately according to the most strict criteria (25% of inappropriate referral) and 27 EAU (75%), according to 50% of inappropriate referral criteria. Only two aspects of the EAU implementation strategy were associated with better referral efficiency: 1) interaction with the GP responsible of the inappropriate referral process and 2) a lower median lag time for referral to the Rheumatology out-patient clinic. 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

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    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  2. CTLA-4 expressed by FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells prevents inflammatory tissue attack and not T-cell priming in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Katrin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Wing, Kajsa

    2017-09-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) -mediated regulation of already tolerized autoreactive T cells is critical for understanding autoimmune responses. Although defects in CTLA-4 contribute to abnormal FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell function in rheumatoid arthritis, its role in autoreactive T cells remains elusive. We studied immunity towards the dominant collagen type II (CII) T-cell epitope in collagen-induced arthritis both in the heterologous setting and in the autologous setting where CII is mutated at position E266D in mouse cartilage. CTLA-4 regulated all stages of arthritis, including the chronic phase, and affected the priming of autologous but not heterologous CII-reactive T cells. CTLA-4 expression by both conventional T (Tconv) cells and Treg cells was required but while Tconv cell expression was needed to control the priming of naive autoreactive T cells, CTLA-4 on Treg cells prevented the inflammatory tissue attack. This identifies a cell-type-specific time window when CTLA-4-mediated tolerance is most powerful, which has important implications for clinical therapy with immune modulatory drugs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Plass, Anne Marie C; Lems, Willem F; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Background The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, 5 years of follow‐up proved that COBRA therapy results in sustained reduction of the rate of radiological progression. Despite this evidence, Dutch rheumatologists seem reluctant to prescribe COBRA therapy. Objective To explore the reasons for the reluctance in Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe COBRA therapy. Methods A short structured questionnaire based on social–psychological theories of behaviour was sent to all Dutch rheumatologists (n = 230). Results The response rate was 50%. COBRA therapy was perceived as both effective and safe, but complex to administer. Furthermore, rheumatologists expressed their concern about the large number of pills that had to be taken, the side effects of high‐dose prednisolone and the low dose of methotrexate. Although the average attitude towards the COBRA therapy was slightly positive (above the neutral point), the majority of responding rheumatologists had a negative intention (below the neutral point) to prescribe COBRA therapy in the near future. Conclusion The reluctance of Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe effective COBRA therapy may be due to perceptions of complexity of the treatment schedule and negative patient‐related consequences of the therapy. PMID:17392349

  4. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Plass, Anne Marie C; Lems, Willem F; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2007-07-01

    The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, 5 years of follow-up proved that COBRA therapy results in sustained reduction of the rate of radiological progression. Despite this evidence, Dutch rheumatologists seem reluctant to prescribe COBRA therapy. To explore the reasons for the reluctance in Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe COBRA therapy. A short structured questionnaire based on social-psychological theories of behaviour was sent to all Dutch rheumatologists (n = 230). The response rate was 50%. COBRA therapy was perceived as both effective and safe, but complex to administer. Furthermore, rheumatologists expressed their concern about the large number of pills that had to be taken, the side effects of high-dose prednisolone and the low dose of methotrexate. Although the average attitude towards the COBRA therapy was slightly positive (above the neutral point), the majority of responding rheumatologists had a negative intention (below the neutral point) to prescribe COBRA therapy in the near future. The reluctance of Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe effective COBRA therapy may be due to perceptions of complexity of the treatment schedule and negative patient-related consequences of the therapy.

  5. Optimization of antiaggregant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis and coronary heart disease patients receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Vladimirovna Kropotina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study coagulative and vascular-thrombocytic hemostases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and coronary heart disease (CHD depending on therapy with different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs alone and in combination with low-dose aspirin. Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 58 patients (43 women and 15 men with a valid diagnosis of RA. The patients' mean age was 61.2 years; the disease duration averaged 10 years. All the patients received therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and NSAIDs. All had CHD; 52 of the 58 patients presented with arterial hypertension; 30 had noncoronary atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular diseases were first identified in 18 patients. All took heart medications. Coagulative and vascular-thrombocytic hemostases were studied in all the patients and the results were compared depending on to the taken NSAID (diclofenac, tenoxicam, nimesulide, meloxicam. Thirty-seven patients who had not previously received antiaggregant therapy were given aspirin in a dose of 100 mg when they were found to have platelet hyperaggregation and aggregation was restudied on aspirin therapy days 7-8. A control group consisted of 26 healthy men (mean age 55 years who received no medications. Results. In patients with RA and CHD, activated coagulative hemostasis was identified in 65.5% of cases. The signs of hypercoagulation were observed in 35 of the 58 patients. When different NSAIDs were used, the coagulative hemostatic changes were unidirectional and no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The patients taking diclofenac, nimesulide, or meloxicam were found to have activated vascular-thrombocytic hemostasis. Those receiving tenoxicam showed a tendency towards decreased adrenaline-induced platelet aggregation (the drug's aspirin-like effect; however, no statistical processing was made because of few cases. The use of aspirin in the patients taking diclofenac

  6. Atopic dermatitis is associated with an increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease, and a decreased risk for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Schwarz, Kristin; Baurecht, Hansjörg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal barrier failure and immune-mediated inflammation. Evidence on AD as a potential risk factor for inflammatory comorbidities is scarce. OBJECTIVES: We sought to test the hypothesis that prevalent AD is a risk factor for incident...... rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC]) and is inversely related to type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to investigate established RA, IBD, and T1D susceptibility loci in AD. METHODS: This cohort study used data from German National Health Insurance......, 1.03-1.53). After adjusting for health care utilization, there was a nominally significant inverse effect on T1D risk (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.53-0.998). There was no disproportionate occurrence of known RA, CD, UC, or T1D risk alleles in AD. CONCLUSIONS: AD is a risk factor for the development of RA...

  7. Infections and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Triple Therapy Versus Etanercept Plus Methotrexate in Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Hawre; O'Dell, James R; Bridges, S Louis; Cofield, Stacey; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Mikuls, Ted R; Moreland, Larry W; Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of all 4 interventions in the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis (TEAR) clinical trial: immediate triple (IT), immediate etanercept (IE), step-up triple (ST), and step-up etanercept (SE). Step-up interventions started with methotrexate and added either etanercept or sulfasalazine plus hydroxychloroquine to patients with persistent disease activity. We built a Markov cohort model that uses individual-level data from the TEAR trial, published literature, and supplemental clinical data. Costs were in US dollars, benefits in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), perspective was societal, and the time horizon was 5 years. The immediate strategies were more efficacious than step-up strategies. SE and IE were more costly than ST and IT, primarily due to treatment cost differences. In addition, IT was the least expensive and most effective strategy when the time horizon was 1 and 2 years. When the time horizon was 5 years, IE was marginally more effective than IT (3.483 versus 3.476 QALYs), but IE was substantially more expensive than IT ($148,800 versus $52,600), producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $12.5 million per QALY. These results were robust to both one-way deterministic and joint probabilistic sensitivity analyses. IT was highly cost-effective in the majority of scenarios. Although IE was more effective in 5 years, a substantial reduction in the cost of biologic agents was required in order for IE to become cost-effective in early aggressive RA under willingness-to-pay thresholds that most health care settings may find acceptable. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Megna, Matteo; Patrì, Angela; Balato, Nicola; Costa, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Psoriasis frequency ranges from 1 to 3 % in white population, and arthritis occurs in 10-40 % of psoriasis patients, representing a relevant health issue. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthropathy, associated with psoriasis, in which ocular-, intestinal-, metabolic-, and cardiovascular-related manifestations can variably coexist. In order to favor early PsA and psoriasis diagnosis, it is crucial to rule out other conditions that can resemble the disease and delay appropriate therapeutic approach. Therefore, the aim of this review is to focus on PsA and psoriasis differential diagnosis.

  10. Herbal formula Xian-Fang-Huo-Ming-Yin regulates differentiation of lymphocytes and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in collagen-induced arthritis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyu; Wei, Yi; Li, Xue; Zhu, Dashuai; Nie, Bo; Zhou, Jingwei; Lou, Lixia; Dong, Bin; Wu, Aiming; Che, Yongzhe; Chen, Meng; Zhu, Lingqun; Mu, Mingwei; Chai, Limin

    2017-01-05

    Xian-Fang-Huo-Ming-Yin (XFHM), a traditional herbal formula, has been used to treat sores and carbuncles for hundreds of years in Asia. Nowadays, its clinical effects in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been validated. In this study, we want to study its possible molecular mechanisms of regulating the differentiation of lymphocytes and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice for RA treatment. A high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI/MS(n)) system was used to analyze the constituents of XFHM granules. An arthritics mouse model was induced by collagen and leflunomide (LEF) was used as a positive control medicine. Pathological changes at the metatarsophalangeal joint were studied through Safranin O and immunohistochemical staining. The differentiation of T, B and NK cells was examined by flow cytometry and pro-inflammatory cytokines were assayed using an Inflammation Antibody Array assay. The expression of key molecules of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathways in spleen were studied by western-blot analysis. In our study. 21 different dominant chemical constituents were identified in XFHM. Treatment with XFHM suppressed the pathological changes in arthrosis of CIA. Additionally, XFHM down-regulated the proliferation and differentiation of CD3(+) T cells and CD3(-)CD19(+) B cells significantly. However, XFHM had no significant effect on CD3(-)NK1.1(+) NK cells. Further study showed that the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines had been suppressed by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and JAK/STAT signaling. XFHM can regulate and maintain the immunologic balance of lymphocytic immunity and inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus suppressing the pathological changes of RA. Therefore, XFHM may be used as an application of traditional medicine against RA

  11. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  12. Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor 8 (MFG-E8) Is a Novel Anti-inflammatory Factor in Rheumatoid Arthritis in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, Elise; Sinningen, Kathrin; Winzer, Maria; Thiele, Sylvia; Baschant, Ulrike; Hannemann, Anke; Fantana, Julia; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Wallaschofski, Henri; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Udey, Mark C; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rauner, Martina

    2016-03-01

    Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is an anti-inflammatory glycoprotein that mediates the clearance of apoptotic cells and is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Because MFG-E8 also controls bone metabolism, we investigated its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), focusing on inflammation and joint destruction. The regulation of MFG-E8 by inflammation was assessed in vitro using osteoblasts, in arthritic mice and in patients with RA. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis (STA) was applied to MFG-E8 knock-out mice to assess its role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Stimulation of osteoblasts with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α downregulated the expression of MFG-E8 by 30% to 35%. MFG-E8-deficient osteoblasts responded to LPS with a stronger production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In vivo, MFG-E8 mRNA levels were 52% lower in the paws of collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) mice and 24% to 42% lower in the serum of arthritic mice using two different arthritis models (CIA and STA). Similarly, patients with RA (n = 93) had lower serum concentrations of MFG-E8 (-17%) compared with healthy controls (n = 140). In a subgroup of patients who had a moderate to high disease activity (n = 21), serum concentrations of MFG-E8 rose after complete or partial remission had been achieved (+67%). Finally, MFG-E8-deficient mice subjected to STA exhibited a stronger disease burden, an increased number of neutrophils in the joints, and a more extensive local and systemic bone loss. This was accompanied by an increased activation of osteoclasts and a suppression of osteoblast function in MFG-E8-deficient mice. Thus, MFG-E8 is a protective factor in the pathogenesis of RA and subsequent bone loss. Whether MFG-E8 qualifies as a novel biomarker or therapeutic target for the treatment of RA is worth addressing in further studies.

  13. Biomarkers of inflammation in patients with unclassified polyarthritis and early rheumatoid arthritis. Relationship to disease activity and radiographic outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L.S.; Klarlund, M.; Skjodt, H.

    2008-01-01

    persons (p value of pIL-6......OBJECTIVE: To determine plasma interleukin 6 (pIL-6), plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (pVEGF), and serum (s) YKL-40 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and unclassified polyarthritis (PA), and investigate their relationship with radiographic outcome. METHODS: pIL-6 and p......VEGF were determined by ELISA and sYKL-40 by an in-house radioimmunoassay in 51 patients with early RA and 21 with PA. Patients were followed with clinical and biochemical measurement every month for 2 years. Conventional radiographs of hands, wrists, and forefeet were scored according to the Larsen method...

  14. A soft coral-derived compound, 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate suppresses inflammatory response and bone destruction in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-You; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Wu-Fu; Sun, Yu-Min; Su, Jui-Hsin; Lu, Yi; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a significant number of metabolites with potent anti-inflammatory properties have been discovered from marine organisms, and several of these compounds are now under clinical trials. In the present study, we isolated 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (Ya-s11), a cembrane-type compound with anti-inflammatory effects, from the Formosa soft coral Sinularia querciformis. Preliminary screening revealed that Ya-s11 significantly inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory proteins induced nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. We also examined the therapeutic effects of Ya-s11 on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in female Lewis rats, which demonstrate features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Animal experiments revealed that Ya-s11 (subcutaneously 9 mg/kg once every 2 days from day 7 to day 28 postimmunization) significantly inhibited AIA characteristics. Moreover, Ya-s11 also attenuated protein expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ankle tissues of AIA-rats. Based on its attenuation of the expression of proinflammatory proteins and disease progression in AIA rats, the marine-derived compound Ya-s11 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  15. Blocking the effects of interleukin-6 in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory rheumatic diseases: systematic literature review and meta-analysis informing a consensus statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoels, Monika M; van der Heijde, Désirée; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Gabay, Cem; Gibofsky, Allan; Gomez-Reino, Juan Jesus; Jones, Graeme; Kvien, Tore K; Murikama, Miho M; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Smolen, Josef S

    2013-01-01

    Background Suppression of the immunoinflammatory cascade by targeting interleukin 6 (IL-6) mediated effects constitutes a therapeutic option for chronic inflammatory diseases. Tocilizumab is the only IL-6 inhibitor (IL-6i) licensed for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but also other agents targeting either IL-6 or its receptor are investigated in various indications. Objective To review published evidence on safety and efficacy of IL-6i in inflammatory diseases. Methods We performed systematic literature searches in Medline and Cochrane, screened EULAR and American College of Rheumatology meeting-abstracts, and accessed http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Results Comprehensive evidence supports the efficacy of tocilizumab in RA in DMARD-naïve patients, and after DMARD- and TNFi-failure. Randomised comparisons demonstrate superiority of tocilizumab in JIA, but not ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Other indications are currently investigated. Additional IL-6i show similar efficacy; safety generally appears acceptable. Conclusions IL-6i is effective and safe in RA and JIA, but not in AS. Preliminary results in other indications need substantiation. PMID:23144446

  16. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Pu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days. Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  17. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  18. Suppression of inflammatory responses after onset of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by oral administration of the Citrus flavanone naringin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kiichiro; Maruyama, Hiroko; Hasunuma, Ryoichi; Kumazawa, Yoshio

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is closely related to the pathogenesis of tumor necrosis factor α in lesions. We investigated the suppressive effects of a Citrus flavanone naringin on inflammatory responses in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model for RA. To investigate potential preventive and therapeutic effects of naringin, mice were given naringin orally three times a week from the second immunization with collagen (day 21) and from day 31, when symptoms of CIA had reached a plateau, respectively. In both cases, inflammation-related clinical scores for knee joints were significantly reduced by administration of naringin. Histological analyses demonstrated that representative phenomena, such as damage to interchondral joints, infiltration of inflammatory cells and pannus formation, were significantly depressed by treatment with naringin. In addition, increases in the expression of high-mobility group box-1 protein in the joints of mice with CIA were suppressed by naringin. These results suggest that oral administration of naringin might be effective for treating human patients with RA.

  19. A Polytropic Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Promoter Isolated from Multiple Tissues from a Sheep with Multisystemic Lentivirus-Associated Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Murphy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV is a lentivirus that infects both goats and sheep and is closely related to maedi-visna virus that infects sheep; collectively, these viruses are known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV. Infection of goats and sheep with SRLV typically results in discrete inflammatory diseases which include arthritis, mastitis, pneumonia or encephalomyelitis. SRLV-infected animals concurrently demonstrating lentivirus-associated lesions in tissues of lung, mammary gland, joint synovium and the central nervous system are either very rare or have not been reported. Here we describe a novel CAEV promoter isolated from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease including interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, polyarthritis and leukomyelitis. A single, novel SRLV promoter was cloned and sequenced from five different anatomical locations (brain stem, spinal cord, lung, mammary gland and carpal joint synovium, all of which demonstrated lesions characteristic of lentivirus associated inflammation. This SRLV promoter isolate was found to be closely related to CAEV promoters isolated from goats in northern California and other parts of the world. The promoter was denoted CAEV-ovine-MS (multisystemic disease; the stability of the transcription factor binding sites within the U3 promoter sequence are discussed.

  20. Comparative characterization of the data of magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and clinical studies of the hand and foot joints in patients with early psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Olegovna Krasnenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA at its early stage may be inadequately informative. In this connection, radiological techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray study of peripheral joints, in addition to clinical examination are of paramount importance in the diagnosis of early PsA. Objective: To compare the data of clinical examination and various imaging methods (MRI and X-ray of the hand and foot joints in early peripheral PsA. Subjects and methods. The trial included 45 patients (14 men and 31 women; mean age 42.08±13.7 years; median PsA duration 1 year [range 0.55 to 2] with early peripheral PsA without previous therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, who met the CASPAR criteria (2006. A standard clinical examination was performed and the activity of peripheral arthritis and the presence of enthesitis and dactylitis were determined in the patients. Not later than 2 days after the clinical examination, a standard X-ray examination of the hands and feet in the direct projection and MRI of the same areas were made. Results. When included into the study, the entire group of patients was found to have a moderate PsA by DAS; its median was 3.12 [2.21 to 3.89]. Cutaneous PsA was noted in 40 patients; 5 persons had a family history of PsA; one female patient had ungual PsA only. In the study group, the clinical signs of enthesitis in the tendon attachments at different sites were revealed in 33 (75.3% patients. Dactylitis was found in 34 (75% patients. The clinical examination showed inflammatory changes in the hand and foot joints in 36 (80% and 38 (84% patients, respectively; while MRT revealed them in 31 (69% and 32 (71% patients. Hand MRI displayed arthritis of the proximal interpha-langeal (PIP, metacarpophalangeal (MCP, and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints in 27 (87%, 21 (68%, and 12 (40% of the 31 patients, respectively. Foot MRI exhibited MCP, PIP, and DIP joint arthritis in

  1. IDO2 is a critical mediator of autoantibody production and inflammatory pathogenesis in a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Lauren M F; Pigott, Elizabeth; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Metz, Richard; Prendergast, George C; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders are associated with altered activity of the immunomodulatory enzyme IDO. However, the precise contributions of IDO function to autoimmunity remain unclear. In this article, we examine the effect of two different IDO enzymes, IDO1 and IDO2, on the development of autoimmune arthritis in the KRN preclinical model of rheumatoid arthritis. We find that IDO2, not IDO1, is critical for arthritis development, providing direct evidence of separate in vivo functions for IDO1 and IDO2. Mice null for Ido2 display decreased joint inflammation relative to wild-type mice owing to a reduction in pathogenic autoantibodies and Ab-secreting cells. Notably, IDO2 appears to specifically mediate autoreactive responses, but not normal B cell responses, as total serum Ig levels are not altered and IDO2 knockout mice are able to mount productive Ab responses to model Ags in vitro and in vivo. Reciprocal adoptive transfer studies confirm that autoantibody production and arthritis are modulated by IDO2 expression in a cell type extrinsic to the T cell. Taken together, our results, provide important insights into IDO2 function by defining its pathogenic contributions to autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity.

  2. Very Early-Onset Inflammatory Manifestations of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

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    Roxane Labrosse

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a rare primary immune deficiency caused by mutations in genes coding for components of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, characterized by severe and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, together with inflammatory complications. Dysregulation of inflammatory responses are often present in this disease and may lead to granulomatous lesions, most often affecting the gastrointestinal (GI and urinary tracts. Treatment of inflammatory complications usually includes corticosteroids, whereas antimicrobial prophylaxis is used for infection prevention. Curative treatment of both infectious susceptibility and inflammatory disease can be achieved by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We report herein three patients with the same mutation of the CYBB gene who presented with very early-onset and severe GI manifestations of X-linked CGD. The most severely affected patient had evidence of antenatal inflammatory involvement of the GI and urinary tracts. Extreme hyperleukocytosis with eosinophilia and high inflammatory markers were observed in all three patients. A Mycobacterium avium lung infection and an unidentified fungal lung infection occurred in two patients both during their first year of life, which is indicative of the severity of the disease. All three patients underwent bone marrow transplantation and recovered fully from their initial symptoms. To our knowledge, these are the first reports of patients with such an early-onset and severe inflammatory manifestations of CGD.

  3. Early detection of patients at risk for rheumatoid arthritis : A challenge for primary and secondary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Alves (Celina)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic auto-immune disease mainly characterized by articular manifestations [1]. Patients present initially with synovitis and joint damage, while extra-articular manifestations such as vasculitis, pleuritis and pericarditis are manifest

  4. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  5. In Vitro TNF-α Inhibitory Activity of Brazilian Plants and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Stryphnodendron adstringens in an Acute Arthritis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bárbara O.; Corrêa, Olívia; Azevedo, Elaine Patrícia C.; Pádua, Rodrigo M.; de Oliveira, Vívian Louise S.; Oliveira, Thiago Henrique C.; Boff, Daiane; Dias, Ana Carolina F.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Castilho, Rachel O.

    2016-01-01

    Stryphnodendron species, popularly named “barbatimão,” are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory agents. This study aimed to investigate the effect of barbatimão and 11 other species on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells, as well as their anti-arthritis activity. The extracts of Stryphnodendron adstringens, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Campomanesia lineatifolia, and Terminalia glabrescens promoted a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α. Mice injected with LPS in the knee joint were treated per os with fractions from the selected extracts. Both the organic (SAO) and the aqueous (SAA) fractions of S. adstringens promoted a dose-dependent reduction of leukocyte migration and neutrophil accumulation into the joint, but none of them reduced CXCL1 concentration in the periarticular tissue. In contrast, treatment with C. lineatifolia and T. glabrescens fractions did not ameliorate the inflammatory parameters. Analyses of SAO by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) led to the identification of gallic acid along with 11 prodelphinidins, characterized as monomers and dimers of the B-type. Our findings contribute to some extent to corroborating the traditional use of S. adstringens as an anti-inflammatory agent. This activity is probably related to a decrease of leukocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Polyphenols like gallic acid and prodelphinidins, identified in the active fraction, may contribute to the observed activity. PMID:27867403

  6. In Vitro TNF-α Inhibitory Activity of Brazilian Plants and Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Stryphnodendron adstringens in an Acute Arthritis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara O. Henriques

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stryphnodendron species, popularly named “barbatimão,” are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory agents. This study aimed to investigate the effect of barbatimão and 11 other species on the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated THP-1 cells, as well as their anti-arthritis activity. The extracts of Stryphnodendron adstringens, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Campomanesia lineatifolia, and Terminalia glabrescens promoted a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α. Mice injected with LPS in the knee joint were treated per os with fractions from the selected extracts. Both the organic (SAO and the aqueous (SAA fractions of S. adstringens promoted a dose-dependent reduction of leukocyte migration and neutrophil accumulation into the joint, but none of them reduced CXCL1 concentration in the periarticular tissue. In contrast, treatment with C. lineatifolia and T. glabrescens fractions did not ameliorate the inflammatory parameters. Analyses of SAO by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS led to the identification of gallic acid along with 11 prodelphinidins, characterized as monomers and dimers of the B-type. Our findings contribute to some extent to corroborating the traditional use of S. adstringens as an anti-inflammatory agent. This activity is probably related to a decrease of leukocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Polyphenols like gallic acid and prodelphinidins, identified in the active fraction, may contribute to the observed activity.

  7. LINE-1 and inflammatory gene methylation levels are early biomarkers of metabolic changes: association with adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Júlia Cristina Cardoso; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Milagro, Fermin Ignacio; Chaves, Larissa Oliveira; Vidigal, Fernanda Carvalho; Bressan, Josefina; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed whether global and inflammatory genes methylation can be early predictors of metabolic changes and their associations with the diet, in a cross-sectional study (n = 40). Higher global methylation was associated to adiposity, insulin resistance, and lower quality of the diet. Methylation of IL-6, SERPINE1 and CRP genes was related to adiposity traits and macronutrients intake. SERPINE1 hypermethylation was also related to some metabolic alterations. CRP methylation was a better predictor of insulin resistance than CRP plasma concentrations. Global and inflammatory gene promoter hypermethylation can be good early biomarkers of adiposity and metabolic changes and are associated to the quality of the diet.

  8. Nociception contributes to the formation of myogenic contracture in the early phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis in a rat knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneguchi, Akinori; Ozawa, Junya; Moriyama, Hideki; Yamaoka, Kaoru

    2017-07-01

    It is unknown how joint contracture is generated in inflamed joints. This study aimed to clarify the role of nociception on the formation of joint contracture secondary to arthritis. Monoarthritis was induced by intra-articular injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into rat knees. On day 5 after CFA injection, the passive extension range of motion (ROM) of knee joints were measured, both before and after myotomy of knee flexors, to evaluate the extent of muscular contribution to CFA-induced joint contracture. The steroidal anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone could prevent ROM restrictions completely, both before and after myotomy. On the other hand, the opioid analgesic drug morphine did not prevent the development of restricted ROM observed after myotomy, while it did before myotomy. This indicates that nociception contributes to joint contracture through alterations in muscular structure (myogenic factors). Next, we tested the hypothesis that nociception-induced reflexive flexor muscle contractions cause myogenic contracture in arthritic joints. To do this, chemical denervation was performed by Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections into knee flexor muscles, simultaneously with CFA injections into the knee. As expected, BTX-A could alleviate ROM restrictions observed before myotomy. These findings suggest that nociceptive-related muscle contractions play an essential role in the formation of joint contracture. Thus, our study indicates that analgesic management during an early stage of joint arthritis is an essential mean to prevent the formation of joint contracture. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1404-1413, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Relationship of Cytokines IL-13 and IL-17 with Autoantibodies Profile in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Isabela Siloşi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. In the present study, we aimed to assess the concentrations of IL-13 and IL-17 in serum of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA, the investigation of correlation between the concentrations of these cytokines and disease activity score, and the concentration of some autoantibodies and the evaluation of the utility of IL-13 and -17 concentration measurements as markers of disease activity. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 30 patients and from 28 controls and analysed parameters. Results. The serum concentrations of IL-13, IL-17, anti-CCP, and IgM-RF were statistically significantly higher in patients with eRA, compared to the controls. IL-13 concentrations in the severe and moderate groups with eRA were statistically higher than in the mild and control groups. Also, in the case of IL-17, serum concentrations increased proportionally with the disease activity of eRA. We observe that concentrations of IL-13 and -17 did not correlate with autoantibodies. IL-17 concentration significantly positively correlated with CRP, while IL-13 concentration significantly negatively correlated with CRP. Disease activity score, DAS28, was strongly positively correlated with levels of ESR and weakly positively correlated with concentrations of anti-RA33 autoantibodies. IL-13 has a higher diagnostic utility than IL-17, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, and anti-CCP as markers of disease activity. Conclusions. The presence of higher IL-13 and IL-17 serum levels in patients, compared with those of controls, confirms that these markers, found with high specificity, might be involved in the pathogenesis of eRA. IL-13 and IL-17 might be of better usefulness in the prediction of eRA activity status than IgM-RF and anti-CCP.

  10. ACR/EULAR Definitions of Remission Are Associated with Lower Residual Inflammatory Activity Compared with DAS28 Remission on Hand MRI in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Solano, Albert; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Salman-Monte, Tarek Carlos; Maymó, Joan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the level of residual inflammation [synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), tenosynovitis, and total inflammation] quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (h-MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission according to 3 different definitions of clinical remission, and to compare these remission definitions. A cross-sectional study. To assess the level of residual MRI inflammation in remission, cutoff levels associated to remission and median scores of MRI residual inflammatory lesions were calculated. Data from an MRI register of patients with RA who have various levels of disease activity were used. These were used for the analyses: synovitis, BME according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring system, tenosynovitis, total inflammation, and disease activity composite measures recorded at the time of MRI. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best cutoffs associated with remission for each inflammatory lesion on h-MRI. Median values of each inflammatory lesion for each definition of remission were also calculated. A total of 388 h-MRI sets of patients with RA with different levels of disease activity, 130 in remission, were included. Cutoff values associated with remission according to the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤ 3.3 and the Boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) definitions for BME and tenosynovitis (1 and 3, respectively) were lower than BME and tenosynovitis (2 and 5, respectively) for the Disease Activity Score on 28 joints (DAS28) ≤ 2.6. Median scores for synovitis, BME, and total inflammation were also lower for the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR remission criteria compared with DAS28. Patients with RA in remission according to the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR definitions showed lower levels of MRI-detected residual inflammation compared with DAS28.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of oxymatrine on rheumatoid arthritis in rats via regulating the imbalance between Treg and Th17 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ailing; Yang, Yongya; Wang, Qiuyang; Wang, Yin; Wen, Jing; Zhang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT), a monosomic alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb, Sophora flavescens Ait, has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of OMT, and its modulation on imbalance between regulatory T (Treg) cells and T helper (Th) 17 cells in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Sprague-Dawley rats were immunized with type II collagen and following a second collagen immunization, the rats were treated with OMT or dexamethasone (DXM) intraperitoneally once a day for 43 days. Paw swelling, arthritic score and joint histopathology were evaluated. The Treg/Th17-mediated autoreactive response was assessed by determining serum levels of inflammatory response cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-17, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA levels of forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt in spleen cells stimulated with type II collagen were determined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, the protein expression levels of FOXP3 and RORγt were measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that OMT treatment significantly reduced the severity of CIA, markedly abrogating paw swelling, arthritic scores and synovial hyperplasia, and the increased loss in body weight. OMT significantly reduced the production of TNF-α and IL-17A, upregulated FOXP3 and downregulated RORγt in rats with CIA. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that OMT exhibited a protective effect on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the inhibition of inflammation and regulation of Treg/Th17 in the CIA rats, suggesting that OMT may be used as an immune suppressive and cartilage protective medicine in human RA. PMID:28440447

  12. Perinatal and early life risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen E Roberts; Clare J Wotton; John G Williams; Myfanwy Griffith; Michael J Goldacre

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate associations between perinatal risk factors and subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and young adults.METHODS: Record linked abstracts of birth registrations,maternity, day case and inpatient admissions in a defined population of southern England. Investigation of 20 perinatal factors relating to the maternity or the birth: maternal age, Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in the mother, maternal social class, marital status, smoking in pregnancy, ABO blood group and rhesus status, pre-eclampsia, parity, the infant's presentation at birth, caesarean delivery, forceps delivery, sex, number of babies delivered, gestational age, birthweight, head circumference, breastfeeding and Apgar scores at one and five minutes.RESULTS: Maternity records were present for 180 children who subsequently developed IBD. Univariate analysis showed increased risks of CD among children of mothers with CD (P = 0.011, based on two cases of CD in both mother and child) and children of mothers who smoked during pregnancy. Multivariate analysis confirmed increased risks of CD among children of mothers who smoked (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% CI =1.06-3.92) and for older mothers aged 35+ years (4.81,2.32-9.98). Multivariate analysis showed that there were no significant associations between CD and 17 other perinatal risk factors investigated. It also showed that, for UC, there were no significant associations with the perinatal factors studied.CONCLUSION: This study shows an association between CD in mother and child; and elevated risks of CD in children of older mothers and of mothers who smoked.

  13. Early inflammatory markers in elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis

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    Daraio María

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD is regarded as a T-cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. We studied the kinetics of the expression of CS-1 fibronectin, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (CCL17/ TARC and different chemokine receptors (CR in skin biopsies from individuals suffering from back problems, with the antigen responsible of their contact dermatitis and an irrelevant antigen. Methods Samples were taken at 2, 10, and 48 hours for histological and immunohistochemical studies using monoclonal antibodies against human CS-1 fibronectin, CCL17, CD3, CD68, CD49d, CXCR3, CCR5, and CCR3. Results At positive antigen stimulated sites there was an early expression of CS-1 fibronectin (2 hours, followed by CCL17 and a later accumulation of alplha4/beta1+ (CD49d, CD3+, CD68+, CXCR3+ and CCR5+ mononuclear cells. At 48 hours, approximately 59 % of infiltrating cells were CXCR3+, 42% CCR5+, and only 14 % CCR3+. Conclusions These results showed for the first time a very early expression of CS-1 fibronectin which preceded production of CCL17 in blood endothelial cells (BCEs from patients' skin with ACD. The role of these molecules in recruitment of monocytes and effector T cells in ACD is discussed.

  14. Recommendations for the coordinated management of psoriatic arthritis by rheumatologists and dermatologists: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, J D; Daudén, E; Queiro, R; Aguilar, M D; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Carrascosa, J M; Carretero, G; García-Vivar, M L; Lázaro, P; López-Estebaranz, J L; Montilla, C; Ramírez, J; Rodríguez-Moreno, J; Puig, L

    2014-04-01

    Psoriatic arthritis, a chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal disease that is associated with psoriasis, causes joint erosions, accompanied by loss of function and quality-of-life. The clinical presentation is variable, with extreme phenotypes that can mimic rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. Because psoriasis usually presents before psoriatic arthritis, the dermatologist plays a key role in early detection of the latter. As many treatments used in psoriasis are also used in psoriatic arthritis, treatment recommendations should take into consideration the type and severity of both conditions. This consensus paper presents guidelines for the coordinated management of psoriatic arthritis by rheumatologists and dermatologists. The paper was drafted by a multidisciplinary group (6rheumatologists, 6dermatologists, and 2epidemiologists) using the Delphi method and contains recommendations, tables, and algorithms for the diagnosis, referral, and treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Design Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. Settings and participants The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Outcome measures Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Results Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem

  16. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-31

    To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem to affect the results. Moderate periodontitis was more frequent in

  17. How citrullination invaded rheumatoid arthritis research

    OpenAIRE

    van Venrooij, W J; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Citrullination and the immune response to citrullinated proteins have been fundamental for the early recognition of rheumatoid arthritis by serological tests and a better understanding of its pathophysiology. In the first years after the initial publications, the focus was on the antibodies directed to citrullinated proteins. It is now realized that citrullinating enzymes and citrullinated proteins may have important roles in the maintenance of the inflammatory processes in the joints. There ...

  18. Leucopenia during sulphasalazine treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Marabani, M; Madhok, R; Capell, H A; Hunter, J A

    1989-01-01

    Leucopenia appears to be a more frequent complication of sulphasalazine treatment in rheumatoid arthritis than in inflammatory bowel disease and poses a management problem. In this study leucopenia was found in 20 patients, 14 of whom were participating in prospective studies (252 patients), giving an incidence of 5.6%. Treatment had to be discontinued in half of these patients. Most (14) episodes of leucopenia occurred early in treatment (less than 24 weeks) but some occurred late and sustai...

  19. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  20. Use of amplified Mycobacterium tuberculosis direct test (Gen-probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA in the diagnosis of tubercular synovitis and early arthritis of knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aggarwal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: AMTDT or Genprobe is a rapid diagnostic test for early diagnosis of tubercular arthritis, but has low sensitivity in knee joint tuberculosis. Nuclear amplification tests are still far from being a single promising alternative to conventional tests in cases of joint tuberculosis. Routine use of arthroscopic biopsies in all suspected cases is helpful in the early diagnosis of knee joint tuberculosis.

  1. CXCL13 predicts disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis and could be an indicator of the therapeutic 'window of opportunity'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Schelde, Karen Kræmmer; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionA key phenomenon in rheumatoid arthritis is the formation of lymphoid follicles in the inflamed synovial membrane. C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13) is central in this process as it attracts C-X-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CXCR5)-expressing B cells and T follicular helper cells...... of remission after 2 years. We propose that high CXCL13 concentrations indicate recent onset of inflammation that may respond better to early aggressive treatment. Thus, high levels of CXCL13 could reflect the ¿the window of opportunity¿ for optimal treatment effect.Trial registrationClinicaltrial.gov NCT...

  2. Initial high-dose prednisolone combination therapy using COBRA and COBRA-light in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Linda A; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with initial high-dose prednisolone and a combination of methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SSZ) according to the COBRA regimen (Dutch acronym for combinatietherapie bij reumatoide artritis, 'combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis'), has repeatedly been demonstrated to be very effective in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). COBRA combination therapy is superior to initial monotherapy of SSZ and MTX, is also associated with a good long-term outcome, is as safe as other treatment regimes, and performs as well as the combination of high-dose MTX and the tumor necrosis factor antagonist infliximab. A pilot study with an intensified version of the COBRA combination therapy showed that strict monitoring and aggressive treatment intensification based on the Disease Activity Score can result in a remission rate of 90% in patients with active early RA. Also, the first results indicate that an attenuated variation on COBRA combination therapy, called 'COBRA-light', is effective in decreasing disease activity and is generally well tolerated. Based on these results, we conclude that initial high-dose prednisolone in combination with MTX and SSZ could or should be the first choice in early active RA since it is effective and safe, and the cost price of the drugs is low.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of N-acylethanolamines in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells are mediated by TRPV1 and TRPA1 in a COX-2 dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowin, Torsten; Apitz, Martin; Anders, Sven; Straub, Rainer H

    2015-11-14

    The endocannabinoid system modulates function of immune cells and mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts, which contribute to cartilage destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to determine the influence of N-acylethanolamines anandamide (AEA), palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and oleylethanolamine (OEA) on several features of arthritic inflammation in vitro (human material) and in vivo (a mouse model). Immunofluorescence and western blotting were used to detect cannabinoid receptors and related enzymes. Cytokines and MMP-3 were measured by ELISA. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by proteome profiling. Proliferation was quantified by CTB reagent. Adhesion was assessed by the xCELLigence system. After onset of collagen type II arthritis, mice were treated daily with the FAAH inhibitor JNJ1661010 (20 mg/kg) or vehicle. IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 (determined only in synovial fibroblasts (SFs)) were downregulated in primary synoviocytes and SFs of RA and OA after AEA, PEA and OEA treatment. In SFs, this was due to activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in a COX-2-dependent fashion. FAAH inhibition increased the efficacy of AEA in primary synoviocytes but not in SFs. The effects of OEA and PEA on SFs were diminished by FAAH inhibition. Adhesion to fibronectin was increased in a CB1-dependent manner by AEA in OASFs. Furthermore, elevation of endocannabinoids ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis in mice. N-acylethanolamines exert anti-inflammatory effects in SFs. A dual FAAH/COX-2 inhibitor, increasing N-acylethanolamine levels with concomitant TRP channel desensitization, might be a good candidate to inhibit the production of proinflammatory mediators of synovial cells and to reduce erosions.

  4. Circulating surfactant protein -D is low and correlates negatively with systemic inflammation in early, untreated rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    changes in SP-D and CRP (zero to four years). SP-D was not associated to x-ray findings. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that circulating SP-D is persistently subnormal in early and untreated RA despite a favourable therapeutic response obtained during four years of follow-up. SP-D correlated negatively...... inflammation. Previously, we reported low circulating SP-D in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the present investigation aims to extend these data by serial SP-D serum measurements, studies on synovial fluid, SP-D size distribution and genotyping in patients with early RA. METHODS: One......-hundred-and-sixty disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naïve RA patients with disease duration less than six months were studied prospectively for four years (CIMESTRA (Ciclosporine, Methotrexate, Steroid in RA) trial) including disease activity measures (C-reactive protein, joint counts and Health Assessment...

  5. Salmonella enteridis Septic Arthritis: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Uygur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nontyphoidal salmonellosis causes significant morbidity, is transmitted via fecal-oral route, and is a worldwide cause of gastroenteritis, bacteremia, and local infections. Salmonella is a less common etiologic factor for septic arthritis compared with other gram-negative bacteria. Cases. We present two septic arthritis cases with Salmonella enteridis as a confirmed pathogen and also discuss the predisposing factors and treatment. Discussion. Septic arthritis is an orthopedic emergency. The gold standard treatment of septic arthritis is joint debridement, antibiotic therapy according to the culture results, and physiotherapy, which should start in the early postoperative period to prevent limitation of motion. Salmonella is an atypical agent for septic arthritis. It must be particularly kept in mind as an etiologic factor for the acute arthritis of a patient with sickle cell anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should be cautious that the white blood cell count in synovial fluid can be under 50.000/mm3 in immune compromised individuals with septic arthritis. The inflammatory response can be deficient, or the microorganism may be atypical. Conclusion. Atypical bacteria such as Salmonella species in immune compromised patients can cause joint infections. Therefore, Salmonella species must always be kept in mind for the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in a clinically relevant setting.

  6. Survey on attitudes regarding EULAR recommendations for the role of nurses involved in medical care of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in Japan.