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Sample records for early inflammatory arthritis

  1. Role overload, pain and physical dysfunction in early rheumatoid or undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Sally; Looper Karl; Zelkowitz Phyllis; Purden Margaret; Baron Murray

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory arthritis impairs participation in societal roles. Role overload arises when the demands by a given role set exceed the resources; time and energy, to carry out the required tasks. The present study examines the association between role overload and disease outcomes in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Methods Patients (n = 104) of 7.61 months mean duration of inflammatory arthritis completed self-report questionnaires on sociodemographics, disease character...

  2. The role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and follow-up of early inflammatory arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, S.P.; Ganeshalingam, S.; Kelly, S.; Ahmad, M.

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory arthritides are a group of chronic, often debilitating disorders characterized by synovial inflammation and progressive joint destruction. The primary diagnostic aim is to recognize the inflammatory arthritis at an early stage, such that therapies may be implemented before irreversible joint destruction has occurred. The radiologist now plays a pivotal role both in making an accurate and early diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis as well as assessing treatment response. This article reviews the current literature and presents our approach to the sonographic assessment of early inflammatory arthritis.

  3. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Parenting disability, parenting stress and child behaviour in early inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkowitz, P; Looper, K J; Mustafa, S S; Purden, M; Baron, M

    2013-03-01

    Our study examines the association between the disease characteristics of inflammatory arthritis and patients' self-perception of mental health, parenting disability, parenting stress and child behaviour in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Patients in the early phase (more than 6 weeks, less than 18 months) of inflammatory arthritis were recruited from a larger EIA registry that recorded sociodemographic data and measures of pain, physical functioning and disease activity. Patient-perceived parenting disability, parenting stress, depression and children's behaviour problems were assessed using the Parenting Disability Index, Parenting Stress Index, Center for Epidemiologic Studies--Depression Mood Scale and Child Behavior Checklist, respectively. Pain, physical dysfunction, number of tender joints and physician global assessment of disease activity were associated with parenting disability. Self-report measures of parenting disability were associated with those of depression and parenting stress. Parenting stress was associated with children internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems while parenting disability was associated with children externalizing behaviour problems. This study suggests a possible reciprocal relationship among physical aspects of disease activity, parenting disability and parent and child distress in EIA.

  5. Role overload, pain and physical dysfunction in early rheumatoid or undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Sally Sabry; Looper, Karl Julian; Zelkowitz, Phyllis; Purden, Margaret; Baron, Murray

    2012-05-03

    Inflammatory arthritis impairs participation in societal roles. Role overload arises when the demands by a given role set exceed the resources; time and energy, to carry out the required tasks. The present study examines the association between role overload and disease outcomes in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Patients (n = 104) of 7.61 months mean duration of inflammatory arthritis completed self-report questionnaires on sociodemographics, disease characteristics and role overload. Pain was assessed using the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and physical functioning was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical functioning score. Role overload was measured by the Role Overload Scale. Patients indicated the number of social roles they occupied from a total of the three typical roles; marital, parental and paid work. Participants' mean age was 56 years and 70.2% were female. Role overload was not correlated to the number of social roles, however, it was positively associated with pain (p = 0.004) and negatively associated with physical functioning (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, role overload was negatively associated with physical functioning after controlling for the relevant sociodemographic variables. This study identifies a possible reciprocal relationship between role overload and physical functioning in patients with EIA.

  6. Peer-to-peer mentoring for individuals with early inflammatory arthritis: feasibility pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sharron; Veinot, Paula; Embuldeniya, Gayathri; Brooks, Sydney; Sale, Joanna; Huang, Sicong; Zhao, Alex; Richards, Dawn; Bell, Mary J

    2013-03-01

    To examine the feasibility and potential benefits of early peer support to improve the health and quality of life of individuals with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Feasibility study using the 2008 Medical Research Council framework as a theoretical basis. A literature review, environmental scan, and interviews with patients, families and healthcare providers guided the development of peer mentor training sessions and a peer-to-peer mentoring programme. Peer mentors were trained and paired with a mentee to receive (face-to-face or telephone) support over 12 weeks. Two academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Nine pairs consisting of one peer mentor and one mentee were matched based on factors such as age and work status. Mentee outcomes of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)/biological treatment use, self-efficacy, self-management, health-related quality of life, anxiety, coping efficacy, social support and disease activity were measured using validated tools. Descriptive statistics and effect sizes were calculated to determine clinically important (>0.3) changes. Peer mentor self-efficacy was assessed using a self-efficacy scale. Interviews conducted with participants examined acceptability and feasibility of procedures and outcome measures, as well as perspectives on the value of peer support for individuals with EIA. Themes were identified through constant comparison. Mentees experienced improvements in the overall arthritis impact on life, coping efficacy and social support (effect size >0.3). Mentees also perceived emotional, informational, appraisal and instrumental support. Mentors also reported benefits and learnt from mentees' fortitude and self-management skills. The training was well received by mentors. Their self-efficacy increased significantly after training completion. Participants' experience of peer support was informed by the unique relationship with their peer. All participants were unequivocal about the need for

  7. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Arterial Hypertension and Its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajraktari, Ismet H; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Berisha, Idriz; Lahu, Ali; Kryeziu, Avni; Durmishi, Bastri; Bajraktari, Halit; Bahtiri, Elton

    2017-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that worsens during the course of the disease and can cause disability. Early RA refers to the onset of symptoms within the past 3 months. In RA, increased levels of mediators of inflammation may cause arterial stiffness consequently leading to arterial hypertension. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic arterial hypertension in early RA patients as well as the correlation with parameters of inflammation. One hundred and seventy-nine early RA patients diagnosed in agreement with ACR/EULAR (American College of Rheumatology/ European League against Rheumatism) 2010 criteria were consecutively included in the study. CRP (C-reactive protein) and anti CCP (Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides) serum levels, WBC (white blood cells) count and ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate), likewise DAS-28 (28-joint disease activity score) were determined in all included patients. Parametric tests were used to compare the characteristics of the groups and to test the correlation of the variables. Statistical data analysis revealed that a majority of the patients were females (n = 141; 78.7%); the mean age at RA onset was 49.13 ± 12.13 years. Overall prevalence of hypertension was 44.13 % (n = 79). In comparison with the normotensive patients, the hypertensive patients were older and had significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28. A highly significant positive correlation between all the study parameters and systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed. Presence of significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28 in hypertensive patients indicate that inflammation is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. In this context, early screening for arterial hypertension and adequate therapeutic measures should be considered in early RA patients.

  8. Low prevalence of work disability in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) and early rheumatoid arthritis at enrollment into a multi-site registry: results from the catch cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussen, Lauren; Boyd, Tristan; Bykerk, Vivian; de Leon, Faye; Li, Lihua; Boire, Gilles; Hitchon, Carol; Haraoui, Boulos; Thorne, J Carter; Pope, Janet

    2013-02-01

    We determined the prevalence of work disability in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) and undifferentiated early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) patients at first enrollment into the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) who met the 2010 ACR criteria versus those not meeting criteria, to determine the impact of meeting new criteria on work disability status. Data at first visit into the cohort were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association of other variables in our database with work disability. 1,487 patients were enrolled in the CATCH study, a multi-site observational, prospective cohort of patients with EIA. 934 patients were excluded (505 based on missing criteria for ACR 2010 classification, as anti-CCP was absent, and 429 were not working for other reasons). Of the 553 patients included, 71 % were female with mean disease duration of 6.4 months. 524 (94.8 %) were employed while 29 (5.2 %) reported work disability at first visit. There were no differences between those meeting 2010 ACR criteria versus those who did not. Baseline characteristics associated with work disability were male gender, age, education, income, HAQ, and positive RF status. The mean HAQ score in work disabled patients was 1.4 versus 0.9 in those who were working (p 50 years; p = 0.3), lower education (p = 0.3) or RF positivity (p = 0.6). We found rates of work disability to be low at entry into this EIA cohort compared to previous studies. There may be potential for intervention in ERA to prevent the development of work disability.

  9. Peer-to-peer mentoring for individuals with early inflammatory arthritis: feasibility pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sharron; Veinot, Paula; Embuldeniya, Gayathri; Brooks, Sydney; Sale, Joanna; Huang, Sicong; Zhao, Alex; Richards, Dawn; Bell, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the feasibility and potential benefits of early peer support to improve the health and quality of life of individuals with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Design Feasibility study using the 2008 Medical Research Council framework as a theoretical basis. A literature review, environmental scan, and interviews with patients, families and healthcare providers guided the development of peer mentor training sessions and a peer-to-peer mentoring programme. Peer mentors were trained and paired with a mentee to receive (face-to-face or telephone) support over 12 weeks. Setting Two academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants Nine pairs consisting of one peer mentor and one mentee were matched based on factors such as age and work status. Primary outcome measure Mentee outcomes of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)/biological treatment use, self-efficacy, self-management, health-related quality of life, anxiety, coping efficacy, social support and disease activity were measured using validated tools. Descriptive statistics and effect sizes were calculated to determine clinically important (>0.3) changes. Peer mentor self-efficacy was assessed using a self-efficacy scale. Interviews conducted with participants examined acceptability and feasibility of procedures and outcome measures, as well as perspectives on the value of peer support for individuals with EIA. Themes were identified through constant comparison. Results Mentees experienced improvements in the overall arthritis impact on life, coping efficacy and social support (effect size >0.3). Mentees also perceived emotional, informational, appraisal and instrumental support. Mentors also reported benefits and learnt from mentees’ fortitude and self-management skills. The training was well received by mentors. Their self-efficacy increased significantly after training completion. Participants’ experience of peer support was informed by the unique

  10. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Arterial Hypertension and Its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet H. Bajraktari

    2017-08-01

    CONCLUSION: Presence of significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28 in hypertensive patients indicate that inflammation is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. In this context, early screening for arterial hypertension and adequate therapeutic measures should be considered in early RA patients.

  11. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  12. Improvements in diagnostic tools for early detection of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Salvatore; Palazzi, Carlo; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Padula, Angela; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a wide clinical spectrum. The early diagnosis of PsA is currently a challenging topic. Areas covered: The literature was extensively reviewed for studies addressing the topic area "diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis". This review will summarize improvements in diagnostic tools, especially referral to the rheumatologist, the role of patient history and clinical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging techniques in getting an early and correct diagnosis of PsA. Expert commentary: Due to the heterogeneity of its expression, PsA may be easily either overdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. A diagnosis of PsA should be taken into account every time a patient with psoriasis or a family history of psoriasis shows peripheral arthritis, especially if oligoarticular or involving the distal interphalangeal joints, enthesitis or dactylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful for diagnosing PsA early, particularly when isolated enthesitis or inflammatory spinal pain occur.

  13. Rapidly Destructive Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Shu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC is a rare syndrome that involves aggressive hip joint destruction within 6–12 months of symptom onset with no single diagnostic laboratory, pathological, or radiographic finding. We report an original case of RDC as an initial presentation of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA in a 57-year-old Caucasian woman presenting with 6 months of progressive right groin pain and no preceding trauma or chronic steroid use. Over 5 months, she was unable to ambulate and plain films showed complete resorption of the right femoral head and erosion of the acetabulum. There were inflammatory features seen on computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. She required a right total hip arthroplasty, but arthritis in other joints showed improvement with triple disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD therapy and almost complete remission with the addition of adalimumab. We contrast our case of RDC as an initial presentation of RA to 8 RDC case reports of patients with established RA. Furthermore, this case highlights the importance of obtaining serial imaging to evaluate a patient with persistent hip symptoms and rapid functional deterioration.

  14. Inflammatory Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Morphea: Evidence of a Systemic Inflammatory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Omair, Mohammed A.; Johnson, Sindhu R.

    2013-01-01

    Morphea is a skin disease characterized by local skin inflammation and fibrosis. Extracutaneous manifestations have been described with this disease including inflammatory arthritis. We describe a case of morphea who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and sacroiliitis coincident with new skin lesions.

  15. Dual energy CT iodine map for delineating inflammation of inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Umezawa, Yoshinori; Asahina, Akihiko; Nakagawa, Hidemi [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Tokyo (Japan); Furuya, Kazuhiro [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-12-15

    Iodine mapping is an image-processing technique used with dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) to improve iodine contrast resolution. CT, because of its high spatial resolution and thin slice reconstruction, is well suited to the evaluation of the peripheral joints. Recent developments in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis that require early diagnosis and precise therapeutic assessment encourage radiological evaluation. To facilitate such assessment, we describe DECT iodine mapping as a novel modality for evaluating rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis of the hands and feet. (orig.)

  16. Targeted treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Naomi Bertine

    2013-01-01

    With the implementation of new treatment options, including biologicals and the early, agressive start of target-steered treatment the outlook for rheumatoid arthritis patients improved considerably the past decades. This thesis describes several aspects of modern rheumatoid arthritis treatment from

  17. Footwear characteristics in people with inflammatory arthritis in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, K; Lahiri, M; Cheung, P P; Santosa, A; Rome, K

    2016-01-01

    Foot problems are common in people with inflammatory arthritis. Despite suitable footwear having the potential to alleviate pain, improve mobility and maintain independence, previous studies have found many people with inflammatory arthritis wearing poorly fitting and inappropriate footwear. Footwear styles and characteristics have not been reported in a Singapore inflammatory arthritis population. The objective of this study was to identify current footwear styles and characteristics of footwear worn by people with inflammatory arthritis in Singapore. One-hundred-and-one participants with inflammatory arthritis were recruited from the rheumatology outpatient clinic of a large public hospital in Singapore. Disease and clinical characteristics were recorded. A patient-reported outcome included current foot pain. An objective footwear assessment of style, age of shoe, fit and construction was conducted. The majority of participants were Chinese women with a mean (SD) age was 52.0 (15.0) years old and a mean (SD) disease duration of 9.3 (0.3) years. We found 50 % of participants (n = 51) reported footwear problems. Sandals (n = 27, 26 %), flip-flops (n = 19, 19 %) and moccasin type (n = 19, 19 %) was the most common footwear choice. Evaluation of footwear characteristics found that there was a lack of motion control features. Only 32 (32 %) participants had correctly fitting footwear with regard to length, width and depth. No participant was wearing therapeutic footwear. This study provides the first insight into footwear preferences of people with inflammatory arthritis in Singapore. Use of slip-on and poorly fitting footwear was found to be common in people with inflammatory arthritis. Further research on footwear preferences in Southeast-Asian communities needs to take into account cultural habit and preference, socio-economic status, footwear options and affordability.

  18. Proteinuria in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Making the case for early urinary screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Saha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SOJIA can be associated with proteinuria due to various renal pathologies. We report two pediatric cases with SOJIA and nephrotic syndrome secondary to renal amyloidosis, a very rare complication in children. Once present, amyloidosis heralds a poor prognosis for the patient, though early detection may allow some improvement if the inflammatory arthritis is controlled.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenols in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Punzi, Leonardo; Spinella, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Polyphenols have been extensively investigated with regard to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulant properties in many inflammatory chronic conditions. The aim of this review is to summarise how these compounds can modulate the inflammatory pathways which characterise the most prevalent arthropathies including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and crystal-induced arthritis. Among polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate, carnosol, hydroxytyrosol, curcumin, resveratrol, kaempferol and genistein have been the most widely investigated in arthritis. The most important results of the studies outlined in this article show how polyphenolic compounds are able to inhibit the expression and the release of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes, the activity of different transcriptional factors and the production of reactive oxygen species in vitro. Studies on animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout show interesting results in terms of reduced tissue damage, restored cartilage homeostasis, and decreased levels of uric acid, respectively. Despite the multiple protective effects of polyphenols, there are no dietary recommendations for patients affected by rheumatic diseases. Future studies, including intervention trials, should be conducted to determine the relevance of polyphenols consumption or supplementation in arthritis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) is a relatively new technique that can enable assessment of the overall inflammatory status of people with arthritis, but standards for image acquisition, definitions of key pathologies, and a quantification system are required. Our aim...... was to perform a systematic literature review (SLR) and to develop consensus definitions of key pathologies, anatomical locations for assessment, a set of MRI sequences and imaging planes for the different body regions, and a preliminary scoring system for WB-MRI in inflammatory arthritis. Methods: An SLR...

  1. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  2. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of 15-lipoxygenase in the inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Liou, Houng-Chi; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2012-07-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LOX) is involved in many pathological processes. The aim of this study is to examine the role of 15-LOX in the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and inflammatory arthritis. It was found that treatment of 15-LOX downstream product of 15-(S)-HETE (15-S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) increased the mRNA and protein levels of MMP-2 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast (RASF) derived from rheumatoid arthritis patients. The enhancement effect of 15-(S)-HETE was antagonized by the addition of LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) and PDTC (NF-κB inhibitor). Treatment of 15-(S)-HETE increased the phosphorylation of AKT, nuclear translocation of p65 and the breakdown of IκBα. TNF-α and IL-1β are the key cytokines involved in arthritis and also increase the activity of MMP-2 in RASF, which was antagonized by pretreatment with 15-LOX inhibitor PD146176 or knockdown of 15-LOX. It was also found that these two cytokines increased the expression of 15-LOX in RASF. Treatment of glucocorticoid but not NSAIDs inhibited 15-(S)-HETE-induced expression of MMP-2. In comparison with wild-type mice, adjuvant-induced arthritis and MMP-2 expression in synovial membrane were markedly inhibited in 15-LOX knockout (KO) mice. These results indicate that 15-LOX plays an important role in the disease progression of arthritis and may be involved in the inflammatory action induced by TNF-α and IL-1β. 15-LOX is thus a good target for developing drugs in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis (IA) in the general practice and compare this to a group of control patients without IA. Methods: In this nested-case-control study, data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of eneral

  5. Inflammatory Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Morphea: Evidence of a Systemic Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Omair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphea is a skin disease characterized by local skin inflammation and fibrosis. Extracutaneous manifestations have been described with this disease including inflammatory arthritis. We describe a case of morphea who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and sacroiliitis coincident with new skin lesions.

  6. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients wer...

  7. The Relationship Between Function and Disease Activity as Measured by the HAQ and DAS28 Varies Over Time and by Rheumatoid Factor Status in Early Inflammatory Arthritis (EIA). Results from the CATCH Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Tristan A; Bonner, A; Thorne, C; Boire, G; Hitchon, C; Haraoui, B P; Keystone, E C; Bykerk, V P; Pope, J E

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between function and disease activity in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) (n=1143) is a multi-site EIA cohort. Correlations between the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ) and DAS28 were done at every 3 months for the first year and then at 18 and 24 months. We also investigated the relationship between HAQ and DAS28 by age (<65 versus ≥65) and RF (positive vs negative). Mean HAQ and DAS28 scores were highest at the initial visit with HAQ decreasing over 24 months from a baseline of 0.94 to 0.40 and DAS28 scores decreasing from 4.54 to 2.29. All correlations between HAQ and DAS28 were significant at all time points (p<0.01). The correlations between HAQ and DAS28 were variable over time. The strongest correlation between HAQ and DAS28 occurred at initial visit (most DMARD naive) (n=1,143) and 18 months (r=0.57, n=321) and 24 months (r=0.59, n=214). The baseline correlation between HAQ and DAS28 was significantly different than correlations obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months (p=0.02, 0.01, and 0.01, respectively). Age did not change the association between HAQ and DAS28 {<65 years old (r=0.50, n=868) versus ≥65 (r=0.48, n=254), p=0.49}. The correlation between HAQ and DAS28 was stronger with RF+ patients (r=0.63, n=636) vs RF negative (r=0.47, n=477), p=0.0043. Over 2 years in EIA, HAQ and DAS both improved; correlations at time points were different over 2 years and RF status affected the correlations.

  8. Identification of health problems in patients with acute inflammatory arthritis, using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochling, J; Grill, E; Scheuringer, M; Liman, W; Stucki, G; Braun, J

    2006-01-01

    To identify the most common health problems experienced by patients with acute inflammatory arthritis using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and to provide empirical data for the development of an ICF Core Set for acute inflammatory arthritis. Cross-sectional survey of patients with acute inflammatory arthritis of two or more joints requiring admission to an acute hospital. The second level categories of the ICF were used to collect information on patients' health problems. Relative frequencies of impairments, limitations and restrictions in the study population were reported for the ICF components Body Functions, Body Structures, and Activities and Participations. For the component Environmental Factors absolute and relative frequencies of perceived barriers or facilitators were reported. In total, 130 patients were included in the survey. The mean age of the population was 59.9 years (median age 63.0 years), 75% of the patients were female. Most had rheumatoid arthritis (57%) or early inflammatory polyarthritis (22%). Fifty-four second-level ICF categories had a prevalence of 30% or more: 3 (8%) belonged to the component Body Structures and 10 (13%) to the component Body Functions. Most categories were identified in the components Activities and Participation (19; 23%) and Environmental Factors (22; 56%). Patients with acute inflammatory arthritis can be well described by ICF categories and components. This study is the first step towards the development of an ICF Core Set for patients with acute inflammatory arthritis.

  9. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. PREMs in inflammatory arthritis: from guidelines to standard practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Deborah; Miedany, Y El

    There is now a widespread realisation that patients' views are not incidental to, but essential to, achieving high-quality care. However, despite increasing awareness of its potential value, patient experience is not routinely assessed in inflammatory arthritis patients at present. In fact, use of patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) to evaluate the patients' management and the quality of services remains a challenge. In contrast with cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), adopting a PREMs approach in inflammatory arthritis patients is difficult because of a lack of tools and approach. This article discusses how the guidelines can be translated into standard clinical practice, creating a 'therapeutic alliance' between the health professional and patients. It will also present a novel tool for use of PREMs, which can be used in routine clinical care.

  11. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and ly...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Early diagnosis and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory progressive disease which in the absence of appropriate treatment can lead to joint destruction and disability. Prognosis of RA may be predicted based on the presence of some clinical and laboratory evidences. New criteria for classification of RA provide opportunity for earlier treatment. Initiation of treatment particularly by combination of DMARDs concurrent with short duration of corticosteroid is expected to prevent progressive course and even change the natural course of RA. At present any patients with clinical synovitis in at least one joint may have definite RA, requiring agressive treatment.

  13. How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Henk; le Cessie, Saskia; Vos, Koen; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis.

  14. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujani Yadlapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren’s syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  15. Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this issue Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key En español Send us your comments ... type of arthritis. It’s far more common than rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear on ...

  16. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9 the g...

  17. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Carmo, Clarissa Canella Moraes do; Flipo, Rene-Marc; Cotten, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  18. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  19. Angiogenesis and blood vessel stability in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Aisling

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess blood vessel stability in inflammatory synovial tissue (ST) and to examine neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), oxidative DNA damage, and hypoxia in vivo. METHODS: Macroscopic vascularity and ST oxygen levels were determined in vivo in patients with inflammatory arthritis who were undergoing arthroscopy. Vessel maturity\\/stability was quantified in matched ST samples by dual immunofluorescence staining for factor VIII (FVIII)\\/alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). NCAM and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Angiogenesis was assessed in vitro, using human dermal endothelial cells (HDECs) in a Matrigel tube formation assay. RESULTS: A significant number of immature vessels (showing no pericyte recruitment) was observed in tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis (P < 0.001), in contrast to osteoarthritic and normal tissue, which showed complete recruitment of pericytes. Low in vivo PO(2) levels in the inflamed joint (median [range] 22.8 [3.2-54.1] mm Hg) were inversely related to increased macroscopic vascularity (P < 0.04) and increased microscopic expression of FVIII and alpha-SMA (P < 0.04 and P < 0.03, respectively). A significant proportion of vessels showed focal expression of NCAM and strong nuclear 8-oxodG expression, implicating a loss of EC-pericyte contact and increased DNA damage, levels of which were inversely associated with low in vivo PO(2) (P = 0.04 for each comparison). Circulating cells were completely negative for 8-oxodG. Exposure of HDEC to 3% O(2) (reflecting mean ST in vivo measurements) significantly increased EC tube formation (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate the presence of unstable vessels in inflamed joints associated with hypoxia, incomplete EC-pericyte interactions, and increased DNA damage. These changes may further contribute to persistent hypoxia in the inflamed joint to further drive this unstable microenvironment.

  20. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytok...

  1. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  2. EULAR recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, Rinie; Overman, Cécile L; Christensen, Robin; Åsenlöf, Pernilla; Capela, Susana; Huisinga, Karen L; Husebø, Mai Elin P; Köke, Albère J A; Paskins, Zoe; Pitsillidou, Irene A; Savel, Carine; Austin, Judith; Hassett, Afton L; Severijns, Guy; Stoffer-Marx, Michaela; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ryan, Sarah J; Bergman, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Pain is the predominant symptom for people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA) mandating the development of evidence-based recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management. A multidisciplinary task force including professionals and patient

  3. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levine, Yaakov A.; Koopman, Frieda A.; Faltys, Michael; Caravaca, April; Bendele, Alison; Zitnik, Ralph; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul Peter

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

  4. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł‑Szopińska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is complex and involves cells of both innate and adaptive immunity, a network of various cytokines and an immunoregulatory dysfunction. An important role in the discovery of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis was played by magnetic resonance imaging, which showed the disease process to extend beyond the synovium into the bone marrow. Many studies have shown a strict correlation between the vascularity of the synovium (assessed through the power Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations, bone marrow edema and the clinical, laboratory and histopathological parameters of rheumatoid arthritis. From the current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis, bone erosions could occur from two directions: from the joint cavity and from the bone marrow. With power Doppler ultrasound, as well as in magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to visualize the well-vascularized pannus and its destructive effects on joint structures and ligaments. In addition, the magnetic resonance study shows inflammatory and destructive changes within the bone marrow (bone marrow edema, inflammatory cysts, and erosions. Bone marrow edema occurs in 68–75% of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and is considered to be a predictor of rapid disease progression.

  5. The effects of arthritis gloves on people with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Inflammatory Arthritis with hand pain: a study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (the A-GLOVES trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Yeliz; Sutton, Chris; Cotterill, Sarah; Adams, Jo; Camacho, Elizabeth; Arafin, Nazina; Firth, Jill; O'Neill, Terence; Hough, Yvonne; Jones, Wendy; Hammond, Alison

    2017-05-30

    Arthritis gloves are regularly provided as part of the management of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated (early) inflammatory arthritis (IA). Usually made of nylon and elastane (i.e. Lycra®), these arthritis gloves apply pressure with the aims of relieving hand pain, stiffness and improving hand function. However, a systematic review identified little evidence supporting their use. We therefore designed a trial to compare the effectiveness of the commonest type of arthritis glove provided in the United Kingdom (Isotoner gloves) (intervention) with placebo (control) gloves (i.e. larger arthritis gloves providing similar warmth to the intervention gloves but minimal pressure only) in people with these conditions. Participants aged 18 years and over with RA or IA and persistent hand pain will be recruited from National Health Service Trusts in the United Kingdom. Following consent, participants will complete a questionnaire booklet, then be randomly allocated to receive intervention or placebo arthritis gloves. Within three weeks, they will be fitted with the allocated gloves by clinical specialist rheumatology occupational therapists. Twelve weeks (i.e. the primary endpoint) after completing the baseline questionnaire, participants will complete a second questionnaire, including the same measures plus additional questions to explore adherence, benefits and problems with glove-wear. A sub-sample of participants from each group will be interviewed at the end of their participation to explore their views of the gloves received. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention, compared to placebo gloves, will be evaluated over 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is hand pain during activity. Qualitative interviews will be thematically analysed. This study will evaluate the commonest type of arthritis glove (Isotoner) provided in the NHS (i.e. the intervention) compared to a placebo glove. The results will help

  6. Is early rheumatoid arthritis the same disease process as late rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, P. P.

    2001-01-01

    Thoughts on treatment for the early control of synovitis have stimulated research on pathobiological events at the site of inflammation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Several studies have thus been conducted to examine synovial biopsy samples at various stages of the disease. The most

  7. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  8. Therapeutic effect of cortistatin on experimental arthritis by downregulating inflammatory and Th1 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Chorny, Alejo; Del Moral, Raimundo G; Varela, Nieves; Delgado, Mario

    2007-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic inflammation in the joints and subsequent destruction of the cartilage and bone. To propose a new strategy for the treatment of arthritis based on the administration of cortistatin, a newly discovered neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory actions. DBA/1J mice with collagen-induced arthritis were treated with cortistatin after the onset of disease, and the clinical score and joint histopathology were evaluated. Inflammatory response was determined by measuring the levels of various inflammatory mediators (cytokines and chemokines) in joints and serum. T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-mediated autoreactive response was evaluated by determining the proliferative response and cytokine profile of draining lymph node cells stimulated with collagen and by assaying the content of serum autoantibodies. Cortistatin treatment significantly reduced the severity of established collagen-induced arthritis, completely abrogating joint swelling and destruction of cartilage and bone. The therapeutic effect of cortistatin was associated with a striking reduction in the two deleterious components of the disease-that is, the Th1-driven autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Cortistatin downregulated the production of various inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, decreased the antigen-specific Th1-cell expansion, and induced the production of regulatory cytokines, such as interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor beta1. Cortistatin exerted its effects on synovial cells through both somatostatin and ghrelin receptors, showing a higher effect than both peptides protecting against experimental arthritis. This work provides a powerful rationale for the assessment of the efficacy of cortistatin as a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. The Role of Intracellular Organisms in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis is a condition which is characterised by recurrent episodes of joint pain and swelling. It encompasses a spectrum of disorders ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to ankylosing spondylitis. In these conditions, for reasons that are poorly understood, the immune system raises an inflammatory response within the joint space. In some cases, autoantigens have been identified (e.g., anticitrullinated peptides in rheumatoid arthritis, but the absence of these, in the seronegative arthritides, for example, raises question as to the underlying pathogenesis. Interest has, therefore, turned to host-pathogen interactions and whether aberrant immune responses to these could explain the development of arthritis. This has been most widely studied in reactive arthritis (ReA, where an infectious episode precedes the development of the joint symptoms. In this review, we present the evidence for the role of host-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation with particular emphasis on ReA. We discuss a range of possible mechanisms including molecular mimicry, persistent low grade infections, and abnormal host responses to common bacterial causes of reactive arthritis as well as discussing some of the clinical challenges that we face in making the diagnosis and in treatment of persistent symptoms.

  10. Aggressive treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, CHM; Jacobs, JWG; van der Veen, MJ; Blaauw, AAM; Kruize, AA; Hofman, DM; Brus, HLM; van Albada-Kuipers, GA; Heurkens, AHM; ter Borg, EJ; Haanen, HCM; van Booma-Frankfort, C; Schenk, Y; Bijlsma, JWJ

    Objectives-To compare three therapeutic strategies using slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), for their disease modifying properties, toxicity, and lag time until treatment effect. Methods-Patients with recent onset RA from six hospitals were randomly assigned

  11. Systemic immune markers characterizing early stages of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalan, Paulina Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease occurring in ~1% of the world population. The main feature of the disease is ongoing joint inflammation, caused by immune cells and their soluble factors, leading to irreversible bone erosions and cartilage damage. Early treatment can halt

  12. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model.Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed.Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01.The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  13. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-10-18

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines regulate DKK1 synthesis in synovial fibroblasts during inflammatory arthritis. We examined expression and regulation of DKK1 in primary cultures of human synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with inflammatory arthritis. The effect of TNFα, IL-1β and glucocorticoids on DKK1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. The ability of inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to sensitise fibroblasts to endogenous glucocorticoids was explored. Global expression of Wnt signalling and target genes in response to TNFα and glucocorticoids was assessed using a custom array. DKK1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts was directly regulated by glucocorticoids but not proinflammatory cytokines. Glucocorticoids, but not TNFα, regulated expression of multiple Wnt agonists and antagonists in favour of inhibition of Wnt signalling. However, TNFα and IL-1β indirectly stimulated DKK1 production through increased expression of 11β-HSD1. These results demonstrate that in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, DKK1 expression is directly regulated by glucocorticoids rather than TNFα. Consequently, the links between synovial inflammation, altered Wnt signalling and bone remodelling are not direct but are dependent on local activation of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  14. The antioxidants curcumin and quercetin inhibit inflammatory processes associated with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J K; Higo, T; Hunter, W L; Burt, H M

    2006-04-01

    Curcumin and quercetin are antioxidant molecules with anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory activity of these agents using four assays of inflammatory aspects of arthritis. Crystal-induced neutrophil activation was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Synoviocyte proliferation was measured by an MTS assay using HIG-82 rabbit synoviocytes in cell culture. Chondrocyte (cultured primary cells) expression of the matrix metalloproteinases collagenase and stromelysin was measured by Northern Blot analysis. Angiogenesis was measured using the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. Both agents inhibited neutrophil activation, synoviocyte proliferation and angiogenesis. Curcumin strongly inhibited collagenase and stromelysin expression at micromolar concentrations whereas quercetin had no effect in this assay. These studies suggest that curcumin and to a lesser extent quercetin may offer therapeutic potential for the treatment of crystal-induced arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Role of Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound in the Evaluation of Inflammatory Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yang Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: CEUS may be a new choice for the rheumatologists to evaluate inflammatory arthritis, because of its low price, ability to provide dynamic pictures, and high sensitivity to angiogenesis. It can also be applied in disease classification and therapeutic monitoring. More studies about CEUS need to be done to set up the diagnostic standards.

  16. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis: a population-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Little is known about the presence of chronic morbidity in inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients at disease onset. Previous studies have been mainly performed in established IA patients or they focus on isolated co-morbid diseases. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of chronic

  17. Cardiovascular diseases-related hospital admissions of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), suggesting a high rate of CVD-related hospitalizations, but data on this topic are limited. Our study addressed hospital admissions for CVD in a primary care-based population of patients

  18. The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Arthritis Group - advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Bird, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article updates the work and research priorities of the OMERACT working group on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis, as presented to the OMERACT 8 meeting in Malta in May 2006. This work focused on testing the reliability of dedicated extremity MRI in rheumatoid arthr...

  19. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination and varicella status in inflammatory arthritis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, E M

    2011-11-15

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections. This risk is increased by immunomodulatory therapies. Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcal disease reduces the risk. Severe cases of varicella infection have occurred in patients on biologic therapies. We sought to identify vaccination rates for commonly acquired infections and to ascertain varicella immune status in patients with inflammatory arthritis. 100 patients with inflammatory arthritis were administered a standardised questionnaire. Data collected included age, diagnosis, vaccination history, history of varicella, treatment and the presence of other indications for vaccination. 58 patients (58%) had not received the influenza vaccine in the past year. Only 19 patients (19%) had ever received pneumococcal vaccine. Anti TNF use did not predict vaccination (p = .46). An increasing number of co morbid conditions predicted both pneumococcal (p < 0.003) and influenza vaccine (p < 0.03) administration. Nineteen patients (19%) gave no history of varicella infection, none having had varicella titres checked pre treatment. Immunisation rates in patients with inflammatory arthritis on immunosuppressive therapies are low. Immunisation schedules should be available for each patient during rheumatology and general practice consultations.

  20. Non-pharmacological interventions for preventing job loss in workers with inflammatory arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan L.; Lacaille, Diane; Urquhart, Donna M.; Hannu, Timo J.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2014-01-01

    Work participation of patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is important not only economically but also for physical and psychological health. There is no Cochrane Review to date on studies of non-pharmacological interventions specifically aimed at preventing job loss in people with IA. To

  1. Coexistence of hypothyroidism with inflammatory arthritis is associated with cardiovascular disease in women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raterman, H.G.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Peters, M.J.L.; Verheij, R.A.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypothyroidism and inflammatory arthritis tend to coexist, but data on this association are sparse. In terms of cardiovascular risk, this association may have clinical relevance as this coexistence may carry an additional cardiovascular risk. This study calculates, first, the prevalence

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis and p53: how oxidative stress might alter the course of inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, P. P.; Zvaifler, N. J.; Green, D. R.; Firestein, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidative stress at sites of chronic inflammation can cause permanent genetic changes. The development of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and other key regulatory genes could help convert inflammation into chronic disease in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders

  3. The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Arthritis Group - advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Bird, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article updates the work and research priorities of the OMERACT working group on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis, as presented to the OMERACT 8 meeting in Malta in May 2006. This work focused on testing the reliability of dedicated extremity MRI in rheumatoid...

  4. Baseline patient reported outcomes are more consistent predictors of long-term functional disability than laboratory, imaging or joint count data in patients with early inflammatory arthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinnutt, James M; Sharp, Charlotte A; Symmons, Deborah P M; Lunt, Mark; Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2018-03-15

    To assess baseline predictors of long-term functional disability in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). We conducted a systematic review of the literature from 1990 to 2017 using MEDLINE and EMBASE. Studies were included if (i) they were prospective observational studies, (ii) all patients had IA with symptom duration ≤2 years at baseline, (iii) follow-up was at least 5 years, and (iv) baseline predictors of HAQ score at long-term follow-up (i.e., ≥5 years following baseline) were assessed. Information on the included studies and estimates of the association between baseline variables and long-term HAQ scores were extracted from the full manuscripts. Of 1037 abstracts identified by the search strategy, 37 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the review. Older age at baseline and female gender were reported to be associated with higher long-term HAQ scores in the majority of studies assessing these relationships, as were higher baseline HAQ and greater pain scores (total patients included in analyses reporting significant associations/total number of patients analysed: age 9.8k/10.7k (91.6%); gender 9.9k/11.3k (87.4%); HAQ 4.0k/4.0k (99.0%); pain 2.8k/2.9k (93.6%)). Tender joint count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and DAS28 were also reported to predict long-term HAQ score; other disease activity measures were less consistent (tender joints 2.1k/2.5k (84.5%); erythrocyte sedimentation rate 1.6k/2.2k (72.3%); DAS28 888/1.1k (79.2%); swollen joints 684/2.6k (26.6%); C-reactive protein 279/510 (54.7%)). Rheumatoid factor (RF) and erosions were not useful predictors (RF 546/4.6k (11.9%); erosions 191/2.7k (7.0%)), whereas the results for anti-citrullinated protein antibody positivity were equivocal (ACPA 2.0k/3.8k (52.9%)). Baseline age, gender, HAQ and pain scores are associated with long-term disability and knowledge of these may aid the assessment of prognosis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  5. PHENOTYPIC FEATURES OF T REGULATORY CELLS IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the count and characteristics of the phenotype of T regulatory cells (Treg in the peripheral blood of healthy donors and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA, by using multicolor flow cytometry.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 39 patients with early RA. The percentage and absolute count of Treg (FoxP3+CD25+, surface CD152+, intracellular CD152+, FoxP3+CD127, CD25+CD127, FoxP3+ICOS+, FoxP3+CD154+; and FoxP3+CD274+ was determined by multicolor flow-cytometry. A control group consisted of 20 healthy donors matched for sex and age with the examined patients.Results and discussion. In the patients included in the study, the median [25th; 75th percentiles] DAS28 was 5.01 [4.2; 5.8]; high, moderate, and low activity showed 22 (48.9%, 20 (44.4%, and 3 (6.7% patients, respectively. The patients with early RA had a lower percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ cells and a lower percentage and absolute count of FoxP3+ICOS+, FoxP3+CD154+, and FoxP3+CD274+ T cells than the healthy donors (p<0.05 in all cases. There was a negative correlation of the percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ cells with C-reactive protein (CRP (r = -0.4, that of intracellular CD152+ with DAS28 (r = -0.35, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR (r = -0.46, and CRP (r=-0.54; that of FoxP3+CD127 with CRP (r = -0.42; that of CD25+CD127 with DAS28 (r = -0.38, Simplified Disease Activity Index (r = -0.41, Clinical Disease Activity Index (r = -0.36, ESR (r = -0.39, and CRP (r = -0.47 (p < 0.05 in all cases.Conclusion. The findings suggest that the functional activity of Treg is impaired in early RA, which has an impact on the activity of the inflammatory process.

  6. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  7. Prevalence of Coxitis and its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajraktari, Ismet H; Krasniqi, Blerim; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Bexheti, Sadi; Bahtiri, Elton; Bajraktari, Halit; Luri, Besim

    2018-02-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease characterised by intra-articular and extra-articular manifestations but very rarely with coxitis. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of coxitis, clinical changes, and its correlation with the parameters of inflammatory activity. A cohort of 951 patients diagnosed with ACR/EULAR (American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism) 2010 criteria was enrolled in this prospective, observational and analytic research study. The CBC (Complete Blood Count), ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate), CRP(C - reactive protein), Anti CCP (Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides), X-ray examination of palms and pelvis, and the activity of the disease as measured by DAS - 28 (28 - joint disease activity score) were carried out in all subjects. Independent samples t-test was used to compare the group's characteristics, whereas Pearson correlation test was used to analyse the correlation between study variables. Of the total number of the subjects, 730 (76.8 %) were females, whereas 221 (23.2%) were males. The average age was 51.3, y/o while the most of them were between 40 - 49 y/o (32.6%). The prevalence of coxitis was 14.2%, mostly found in males (19.46%). The echosonografic prevalence of changes was 21.45%, while the radiological changes were 16.3%; in both cases, the changes were more expressed in males. The analysis showed that inflammatory parameters were significantly higher in patients with coxitis. Coxitis has high economic cost because it ends up with a mandatory need for a total hip joint prosthesis. Thus the results of this study can serve to plan and initiate early preventive measures.

  8. The Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Toonaciliatin K against Adjuvant Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiXing Gou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toonaciliatin K is a natural limonoid purified from the Toona ciliata Roem. var. ciliata (Meliaceae. This study is to reveal the inflammatory suppression effect of toonaciliatin K and further the intrinsic mechanism. Firstly, anti-inflammatory effect of toonaciliatin K was evaluated in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced RAW264.7 cells. RT-PCR results indicated that the mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were downregulated by toonaciliatin K. The toonaciliatin K inhibited TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels stimulated by LPS. Furthermore, LPS elicited the excess iNOS and COX-2 mRNA and protein production and toonaciliatin K attenuated the excess production. Western blot assay demonstrated that MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways play critical roles in the toonaciliatin K’s anti-inflammatory activity. Secondly, toonaciliatin K inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. Thirdly, toonaciliatin K alleviated the paw swelling and improved arthritis clinical scores in the adjuvant arthritis rats. Toonaciliatin K decreased the proinflammatory cytokines levels and Mankin scores in adjuvant arthritis rats. The HE staining, safranin O-fast green, and toluidine blue staining results demonstrated that toonaciliatin K alleviated the histological changes of paw, for example, pannus formation, focal loss of cartilage, bone erosion, and presence of extra-articular inflammation. Hence, toonaciliatin K is a promising agent for treatment of arthritis.

  9. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  10. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  11. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb

  12. Pain and pain mechanisms in patients with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, S; Christensen, A W; Christensen, R

    2017-01-01

    completed the PDQ (RA: 3,826, PsA: 1,180, SpA: 1,093). 52% of all patients and 63% of PDQ-completers had VAS pain score ≥ 30 mm. The distribution of the PDQ classification-groups (18) were; RA: 56%/24%/20%. PsA: 45%/ 27%/ 28%. SpA: 55% / 24%/ 21%. More patients with PsA had PDQ score >18....... The objectives were to quantify and characterize pain phenotypes (non-neuropathic vs. neuropathic features) among Danish arthritis patients using the PDQ, and to assess the association with on-going inflammation. METHODS: The PDQ was included onto the DANBIO touch screens at 22 departments of Rheumatology......28-CRP and VAS pain but not with indicators of peripheral inflammation (CRP and SJC). Thus, pain classification by PDQ may assist in mechanism-based pain treatment....

  13. Effect of radiosynovectomy in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, S.; Klutmann, S.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Clausen, M.; Sawula, J.A.; Brenner, W.; Henze, E.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Effect of radiosynovectomy (RS) should be evaluated both by subjective and objective parameters in patients with osteoarthritis and in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A total of 98 joints in 61 patients were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group included 35 patients with therapy-resistant effusions caused by severe osteoarthritis (46 joints). The second group consisted of 26 patients (52 joints) with ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis, and recurrent synovitis following surgery. Effect of RS was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire and quantified by T/B-ratios derived from blood pool images prior to and after RS. Results: Within the first patient group suffering from osteoarthritis, 40% showed a good or excellent improvement of clinical symptoms, 51% were unchanged, and in 9% symptoms worsened. Similar results were found in the second patient group. The majority of unchanged results were small finger joints. In contrast, wrist and knee joints showed a better improvement. Good correlation between results of bone scan and patients subjective impression was found in 38% and 67% in the first and the second patient group, respectively. Conclusion: Radiosynovectomy might be an effective treatment in osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.) [de

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Hauer, M.P.; Laubenberger, J.; Kempis, J. v.; Langer, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography (MRI) represents essential progress in the diagnostic means for evaluation of lesions of the muskuloskeletal system. The imaging of bone joints including material and structures like cartilage, tendons, ligaments, effusions, pannus, cortical bone and marrow offers essential advantages for diagnosis, differential diagnosis, follow-up control and detection of local complications in rheumatics radiology. The review article discusses the achievements of MRI for detection of early signs of rheumatoid arthritis and the current indications for MRI examination for early diagnosis. (Orig./AJ) [de

  15. How early should psoriatic arthritis be treated with a TNF-blocker?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harty, Leonard

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most commonly identified inflammatory arthropathy in early arthritis clinics. It is a complex multisystem disease involving the skin and joints, but may also present with inflammation of the spine - spondylitis, digits - dactylitis, eyes - uveitis and ligamentous insertions - enthesitis. The skin manifestations may be mild or patchy and often precede the joint inflammation. Joint erosions, however, may occur within the first 2 years in up to half of PsA patients and an erosion rate of 11% per annum has been reported suggesting it is not a benign disease as it was once regarded. RECENT FINDINGS: Therapy with mild anti-inflammatories is only beneficial in very mild or localized disease. In cases of more widespread joint involvement systemic therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate may be required and in the case of extra-articular or spinal disease, in which DMARDs have failed to show efficacy, biologic therapy may be highly effective. SUMMARY: The question of how early treatment should be instituted should be decided in a specialist rheumatology referral centre following appropriate assessment. Optimal therapy with combination DMARD and biologics may result in remission rates of up to 60%.

  16. Acute gouty arthritis as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS in HIV-infected subjects initiating antiretroviral therapy most commonly involves new or worsening manifestations of previously subclinical or overt infectious diseases. Reports of non-infectious IRIS are much less common but represent important diagnostic and treatment challenges. We report on a 34-year-old HIV-infected male patient with no history of gout who developed acute gouty arthritis in a single joint one month after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  17. Patient preferences for psychological support in inflammatory arthritis: A multicentre survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dures, E.; Almeida, C.; Caesley, J.; Peterson, A.; Ambler, N.; Morris, M.; Pollock, J.; Hewlett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammatory arthritis (IA) can lead to anxiety, depression, pain and fatigue. Psychological support can improve quality of life and self-management; and European and American guidelines recommend support be offered. This study examined patient views on psychological support for their IA.\\ud \\ud Methods: A questionnaire designed by researchers, patient partners and clinicians was administered to 2280 patients with IA.\\ud \\ud Results: 1210 patients responded (53%): 74% women; mean ...

  18. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook [College of Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 1, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Youngsook, E-mail: ysson@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Biotechnology and Department of Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus, Seochun-dong, Kiheung-ku, Yong In 441-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  19. The Stop Arthritis Very Early (SAVE) trial, an international multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on glucocorticoids in very early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machold, Klaus P.; Landewé, Robert; Smolen, Josef S.; Stamm, Tanja A.; van der Heijde, Désirée M.; Verpoort, Kirsten N.; Brickmann, Kerstin; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Karateev, Dimitri E.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Emery, Paul; Huizinga, Thomas W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are often used as early arthritis treatment and it has been suggested that they induce remission or at least delay the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the need to start disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). To test the effect of GCs on patients with very

  20. EXPERIENCE OF THE ADALIMUMAB APPLICATION FOR THE PATIENT WITH EARLY DEBUT OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS AND UVEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of early debut and heavy course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the patient at the age of 1 year and 8 months, associated with uveitis refractory to the therapy by methotrexate and nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations is presented. The given clinical example shows high therapeutic efficiency of the adalimumab. To the 8th week of treatment inflammatory changes in conjunctiva were stopped, to the 12th week the stage of inactive illness was registered, i.e. the patient had no inflammatory changes in joints, uveitis activity signs, increase of laboratory indicators of illness activity. Duration of remission of articulate syndrome and uveitis made 9 months.

  1. Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Ardle, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rutger Persson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001. Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusion s: Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis; Magnetresonanztomographie in der Fruehdiagnostik der rheumatoiden Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Allmann, K.H. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Hauer, M.P. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Laubenberger, J. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Kempis, J. v. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie; Langer, M. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1997-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography (MRI) represents essential progress in the diagnostic means for evaluation of lesions of the muskuloskeletal system. The imaging of bone joints including material and structures like cartilage, tendons, ligaments, effusions, pannus, cortical bone and marrow offers essential advantages for diagnosis, differential diagnosis, follow-up control and detection of local complications in rheumatics radiology. The review article discusses the achievements of MRI for detection of early signs of rheumatoid arthritis and the current indications for MRI examination for early diagnosis. (Orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ist ein bedeutender Fortschritt in der Diagnostik von Erkrankungen des muskuloskelettalen Systems. Die Darstellung von Gelenkstrukturen einschliesslich Knorpel, Sehnen, Baendern, Erguessen, Pannus, kortikalem Knochen und Mark ist in der Diagnostik, Differentialdiagnostik, Verlaufsbeurteilung und der Aufdeckung von lokalen Komplikationen in der Rheumaradiologie von erheblichem Vorteil. In der Uebersicht werden die Fruehveraenderungen der rheumatoiden Arthritis in der MRT-Bildgebung und die heute aktuellen Indiakationen fuer den Einsatz der MRT in der Fruehdiagnostik diskutiert. (Orig./AJ)

  4. Nutraceuticals of anti-inflammatory activity as complementary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Okbi, Sahar Y

    2014-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by elevated oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. The severe side effects of drug used during such disease necessitate the search for new and safe approaches. Food is a rich source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory bioactive constituents including phenolic compounds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, phytosterols, toccopherols, and carotenoids. We have a series of publications dealing with the anti-inflammatory activity of different food extracts (as nutraceuticals) in experimental animals (acute and chronic inflammation model) and in clinical study (RA patients). Fish oil, primrose oil, extracts of black cumin, fenugreek, liquorice, coriander, tomato, carrot, sweet potato, broccoli, green tea, rosemary, hazelnut, walnut, wheat germ, and date in addition to the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum were the nutraceuticals studied. During these studies, changes in inflammatory biomarkers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), seromucoids, fibrinogen, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), prostaglandin E2), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), antioxidant status (total antioxidant capacity, vitamin C, vitamin E, retinol, β-carotene), the level of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) and colonic microflora in response to the administration of nutraceuticals have been assessed. Results of these studies showed that the majority of nutraceuticals studied possess beneficial effect toward chronic inflammatory diseases, which might be due to the presence of one or more of the above-mentioned phytochemicals. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutraceuticals may serve as complementary medicine for the management of RA. © The Author(s) 2012.

  5. Correlation of Periodontal Disease With Inflammatory Arthritis in the Time Before Modern Medical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Bruce

    2017-03-01

    Controversy exists regarding possible correlation of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Confounding factors may relate to stringency of inflammatory disease diagnosis and the effect of therapeutic intervention for RA on periodontal disease. These factors are investigated in this study. Forty-five individuals with documented RA (n = 15), spondyloarthropathy (n = 15), and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) (n = 15), from the Hamann-Todd collection of human skeletons compiled from 1912 to 1938, and 15 individuals contemporarily incorporated in the collection were examined for tooth loss, cavity occurrence, average and maximum lingual and buccal depth of space between tooth and bone, periosteal reaction, serpentine bone resorption, abscess formation, and root penetration of the bone surface and analyzed by analysis of variance. Tooth loss was common, but actual number of teeth lost, cavity occurrence, average and maximum lingual and buccal depth of space between tooth and bone, periosteal reaction, serpentine grooving surrounding teeth (considered a sign of inflammation), abscess formation, and root exposure (penetration of bone surface) were indistinguishable among controls and individuals with RA, spondyloarthropathy, and CPPD. Although many factors can affect periodontal disease, presence of inflammatory arthritis does not appear to be one of them. The implication is that dental disease was common in the general population and not necessarily associated with arthritis, at least before the advent of modern rheumatologic medications. As specific diagnosis did not affect prevalence, perhaps current prevalence controversy may relate to current intervention, a subject for further study.

  6. Case report physiotherapy care of a patient diagnosed with polyarthritis with early rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Michálková, Kateřina

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report physiotherapy care of a patient diagnosed with polyarthritis with early rheumatoid arthritis. Summary: The bachelor thesis deals with polyarthritis disease with early rheumatoid arthritis and its physiotherapy care. It consists of two parts. The general part contains a general joint anatomy, deals with the major problems of disease and polyarthritis rheumatoid arthritis, its diagnosis, treatment and physiotherapy care. Special part includes a case repor...

  7. Focus on Chronic Disease through Different Lenses of Expertise : Towards Implementation of Patient-Focused Decision Support Preventing Disability: The Example of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Örjan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease. Treatment strategies emphasize early multi-professional interventions to reduce disease activity and to prevent disability, but there is a lack of knowledge on how optimal treatment can be provided to each individual patient. Aim: To elucidate how clinical manifestations of early RA are associated to disease and disability outcomes, to strive for greater potential to establish prognosis in early RA, and to facilitate i...

  8. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions in patients with early arthritis: a systematic literature review informing the 2016 update of EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daien, Claire Immediato; Hua, Charlotte; Combe, Bernard; Landewe, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To perform a systematic literature review (SLR) on pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, in order to inform the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of early arthritis (EA). The expert committee defined research questions concerning

  9. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Døhn, Uffe M; Ejbjerg, Bo J

    2006-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring, and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis. Data on the value of ultrasonography and MRI are accumulating rapidly, fueling their increasing use in early rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on recent advances in the clinical...

  10. Brief Report: Predicting Functional Disability: One-Year Results From the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Inception Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronisch, Caroline; McLernon, David J; Dale, James; Paterson, Caron; Ralston, Stuart H; Reid, David M; Tierney, Ann; Harvie, John; McKay, Neil; Wilson, Hilary E; Munro, Robin; Saunders, Sarah; Richmond, Ruth; Baxter, Derek; McMahon, Mike; Kumar, Vinod; McLaren, John; Siebert, Stefan; McInnes, Iain B; Porter, Duncan; Macfarlane, Gary J; Basu, Neil

    2016-07-01

    To identify baseline prognostic indicators of disability at 1 year within a contemporary early inflammatory arthritis inception cohort and then develop a clinically useful tool to support early patient education and decision-making. The Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (SERA) inception cohort is a multicenter, prospective study of patients with newly presenting RA or undifferentiated arthritis. SERA data were analyzed to determine baseline predictors of disability (defined as a Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ] score of ≥1) at 1 year. Clinical and psychosocial baseline exposures were entered into a forward stepwise logistic regression model. The model was externally validated using newly accrued SERA data and subsequently converted into a prediction tool. Of the 578 participants (64.5% female), 36.7% (n = 212) reported functional disability at 1 year. Functional disability was independently predicted by baseline disability (odds ratio [OR] 2.67 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.98, 3.59]), depression (OR 2.52 [95% CI 1.18, 5.37]), anxiety (OR 2.37 [95% CI 1.33, 4.21]), being in paid employment with absenteeism during the last week (OR 1.19 [95% CI 0.63, 2.23]), not being in paid employment (OR 2.36 [95% CI 1.38, 4.03]), and being overweight (OR 1.61 [95% CI 1.04, 2.50]). External validation (using 113 newly acquired patients) evidenced good discriminative performance with a C statistic of 0.74, and the calibration slope showed no evidence of model overfit (P = 0.31). In the context of modern early inflammatory arthritis treatment paradigms, predictors of disability at 1 year appear to be dominated by psychosocial rather than more traditional clinical measures. This indicates the potential benefit of early access to nonpharmacologic interventions targeting key psychosocial factors, such as mental health and work disability. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis, early unclassified polyarthritis, and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Rostrup, Egill

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an indicator of inflammatory activity in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or early unclassified polyarthritis, and to compare the results with a healthy control group. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: We examined 42 RA and 23 early unclassified polyarthritis patients, and 12 healthy controls in a cross-sectional study. Dynamic MRI (repeated FLASH-MR images after injection of a contrast agent) was performed through the 2nd to the 5th MCP joint. Two methods for identification of the enhancing...

  12. Deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care for patients with inflammatory arthritis: a UK district general hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, M; Price, E; Collins, D; Williamson, L

    2010-01-01

    Foot problems are highly prevalent in inflammatory arthritis (IA), especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Chronic inflammation can lead to permanent structural changes, deformity and disability. Early podiatry intervention in RA improves long term outcomes. National guidelines recommend that patients should be treated by a multidisciplinary team with dedicated podiatry services. In clinical practice funding constraints limit availability of these services. To assess prevalence of foot problems and quality and availability of foot care services at a UK district general hospital. 1200 IA patients in Swindon (Wiltshire, UK) were invited to complete an anonymised questionnaire regarding access to foot care services and education/information on foot problems. 448 patients. Prevalence of foot problems: 68%. Only 31% of patients had access to appropriate foot specialist. 24% had received foot assessment within 3 months of diagnosis of IA and 17% yearly review thereafter. Despite high prevalence of foot problems in our population we identified significant deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care. The data we present could be used by others to support business cases to obtain funding to improve the links between rheumatology and podiatry services. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  14. Nonclassical Ly6C− Monocytes Drive the Development of Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Misharin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Different subsets and/or polarized phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages may play distinct roles during the development and resolution of inflammation. Here, we demonstrate in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis that nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes are required for the initiation and progression of sterile joint inflammation. Moreover, nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes differentiate into inflammatory macrophages (M1, which drive disease pathogenesis and display plasticity during the resolution phase. During the development of arthritis, these cells polarize toward an alternatively activated phenotype (M2, promoting the resolution of joint inflammation. The influx of Ly6C− monocytes and their subsequent classical and then alternative activation occurs without changes in synovial tissue-resident macrophages, which express markers of M2 polarization throughout the course of the arthritis and attenuate joint inflammation during the initiation phase. These data suggest that circulating Ly6C− monocytes recruited to the joint upon injury orchestrate the development and resolution of autoimmune joint inflammation.

  15. Role of erosions typical of rheumatoid arthritis in the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: results from a very early arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Gina Hetland; Norli, Ellen S; Bøyesen, Pernille; van der Heijde, Désirée; Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Kvien, Tore K; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    To determine how the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) definition of erosive disease (erosion criterion) contributes to the number of patients classified as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/EULAR RA classification criteria (2010 RA criteria) in an early arthritis cohort. Patients from the observational study Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic with joint swelling ≤16 weeks, a clinical diagnosis of RA or undifferentiated arthritis, and radiographs of hands and feet were included. Erosive disease was defined according to the EULAR definition accompanying the 2010 RA criteria. We calculated the additional number of patients being classified as RA based on the erosion criteria at baseline and during follow-up. Of the 289 included patients, 120 (41.5%) fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria, whereas 15 (5.2%) fulfilled only the erosion criterion at baseline. 118 patients had radiographic follow-up at 2 years, of whom 6.8% fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria and only one patient fulfilled solely the erosion criterion during follow-up. Few patients with early arthritis were classified as RA based on solely the erosion criteria, and of those who did almost all did so at baseline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Optimizing the optical wavelength for the photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Hu, Jack; Francis, Sheeja; Marquardt, April; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    With the capability of assessing high resolution optical information in soft tissues at imaging depth up to several centimeters, innovative biomedical photoacoustic imaging (PAI) offers benefits to diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis, particularly in combination with more established ultrasonography (US). In this work, a PAI and US dual-modality system facilitating both imaging functions in a real-time fashion was developed and initially tested for its clinical performance on patients with active inflammatory arthritis. Photoacoustic (PA) images of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were acquired at 580-nm wavelength that provides a desired balance between optical absorption of blood and attenuation in background tissue. The results from six patients and six normal volunteers used as a control demonstrated the satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing the physiological changes in the joints, specifically enhanced blood flow as a result of active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that PAI, by revealing vascular features suggestive of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US for rheumatology clinic.

  17. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ulva lactuca hydroethanolic extract suppresses experimental arthritis via its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama M. Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Ulva lactuca hydroethanolic extract on rheumatoid arthritis in male Wistar rats. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced in rats by subcutaneous injection of 200 µl Freund’s complete adjuvant into a footpad of the right hind leg of male rats at two consecutive days. Arthritic rats were orally treated with Ulva lactuca hydroethanolic extract at dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt /day for 1, 2 and 3 weeks and were compared with corresponding arthritic control at the same periods. The increased right hind paw circumference at tarsal pad, deleteriously affected ankle joint histological architecture, articular inflammatory cell infiltration and focal necrosis in arthritic rats were counteracted by hydroethanolic extract treatment at the three tested periods. Elevated leukocytes count in arthritic rats connected with changes of spleen and thymus histological architecture, extramedullary megakaryocytes, lymphoblasts activation and mitotic figures were significantly improved by Ulva lactuca hydroethanolic extract treatment at the three tested peroids. The elevated rheumatoid factor (RF, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-17 (IL-17 and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β levels and the lowered interleukin-4 (IL-4 level in arthritic rats were markedly ameliorated as a result of Ulva lactuca administration. The lowered glutathione level and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase activities as well as the elevated lipid peroxides level in serum of arthritic rats were potentially alleviated as a result of Ulva lactuca treatment. In conclusion, Ulva lactuca could have anti-arthritic efficacies which may be mediated via its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant potentials. Keywords: Ulva lactuca, Joints, Spleen, Thymus, Rheumatoid arthritis, Inflammation, Oxidative stress

  19. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  20. Foxo4- and Stat3-dependent IL-10 production by progranulin in regulatory T cells restrains inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wenyu; Hu, Wenhuo; Shi, Lei; Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Xiao, GuoZhi; Dustin, Michael L.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2017-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) restrains inflammation and is therapeutic against inflammatory arthritis; however, the underlying immunological mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was a critical mediator for PGRN-mediated anti-inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis by using PGRN and IL-10 genetically modified mouse models. IL-10 green fluorescent protein reporter mice revealed that regulatory T (Treg) cells were the predominant source of IL-10 in response to PGRN. In addition, PGRN-mediated expansion and activation of Treg cells, as well as IL-10 production, depends on JNK signaling, but not on known PGRN-activated ERK and PI3K pathways. Furthermore, microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing screens led to the discovery of forkhead box protein O4 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as the transcription factors required for PGRN induction of IL-10 in Treg cells. These findings define a previously unrecognized signaling pathway that underlies IL-10 production by PGRN in Treg cells and present new insights into the mechanisms by which PGRN resolves inflammation in inflammatory conditions and autoimmune diseases, particularly inflammatory arthritis.—Fu, W., Hu, W., Shi, L., Mundra, J. J. Xiao, G., Dustin, M. L., Liu, C. Foxo4- and Stat3-dependent IL-10 production by progranulin in regulatory T cells restrains inflammatory arthritis. PMID:28011648

  1. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Can Monitor the Very Early Inflammatory Treatment Response upon Intra-Articular Steroid Injection in the Knee Joint: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Kubassova, Olga; Cimmino, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in inflammatory arthritis, especially in conjunction with computer-aided analysis using appropriate dedicated software, seems to be a highly sensitive tool for monitoring the early inflammatory treatment response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This paper give...... a review of the current knowledge of the emerging technique. The potential of the technique is demonstrated and discussed in the context of a case report following the early effect of an intra-articular steroid injection in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis flare in the knee....

  2. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Ivy Y.; Karpus, Olga N.; Turner, Jason D.; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Maijer, Karen I.; Tak, Paul P.; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included

  3. Bone scintigraphy compared to MRI and ultrasound in the early diagnosis of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrock, D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritis is recognized specifically by bone erosions, caused by characteristic pannus tissue. In the finger joints dynamic low-Tesla MRI is nearly double but not completely sensitive in the detection of erosions than conventional radiography, sonography takes an intermediate position. Less specific signs of synovitis and tenosynovitis are shown with high sensitivity by both 3(2)-phase bone scintigraphy and ultrasound, MRI is less sensitive in this respect. However, standard situation of inflammation in bone scintigraphy - positive finding in early as well as late phase - is of surprisingly low sensitivity, any singular finding in the early or late phase has to be regarded as positive. Specificity of these singular findings is nevertheless sufficiently high, acute inflammatory joint changes and even erosions are also seen with MRI in obviously healthy persons. Only 2-phase bone scintigraphy is easily able to present a simultaneous survey of all joints of the body. For this reason 2-phase bone scintigraphy is most suitable for exclusion but also for primary diagnosis of disease, specification must be done afterwards by other imaging modalities or by laboratory findings. (orig.)

  4. Clinical course and outcome of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, I A; Katsimbri, P; Katsaraki, A; Temekonidis, T; Georgiadis, A; Drosos, A A

    2001-07-01

    We studied whether patients with seropositivity in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) comprise a different clinical group than those with seronegativity. Four hundred seventeen patients with early RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (disease duration less than 1 year) were retrospectively studied by analysis of demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and therapeutic disease characteristics from the time of diagnosis until the end of the study period (1981 1999) using a data base. There were 248 seropositive patients and 169 seronegative patients with RA. No statistically significant differences were seen between the two groups before commencement of the study period in relation to age of disease onset, male:female ratio, and disease duration. However, seropositive patients showed longer medical follow-up. In addition, at disease onset, seropositive RA patients presented more frequently with symmetrical polyarthritis and small joint involvement than seronegative patients. The seropositive group also had more tender and swollen joints, weaker grip strength, and higher erythrocyte sedimentation and C-reactive protein rates during the follow-up period. In contrast, the seronegative group had less severe radiological findings and greater functional ability at the end of the study. In Greek patients with early RA, rheumatoid factor seems to be a predictor of more severe disease activity.

  5. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto; Toma, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of hand and foot MRI for early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Mangnus, Lukas; Newsum, Elize C; Bloem, Johan L; Huizinga, Tom W J; le Cessie, Saskia; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2017-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI for early RA. In some RA patients, a classifiable diagnosis cannot be made at first presentation; these patients present with unclassified arthritis (UA). The use of MRI for early diagnosis of RA is recommended, yet the evidence for its reliability is limited. MRI of hand and foot was performed in 589 early arthritis patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (229 presented with RA, 159 with other arthritides and 201 with UA). Symptom-free controls provided a reference for defining an abnormal MRI. In preliminary investigations, MRI of patients who presented with RA was compared with MRI of symptom-free controls and of patients with other arthritides. Thereafter, the value of MRI in early RA diagnosis was determined in UA patients using the 1-year follow-up on fulfilling the 1987 RA criteria and start of disease-modifying drugs as outcomes. Preliminary investigations were promising. Of the UA patients, 14% developed RA and 37% started disease-modifying treatment. MRI-detected tenosynovitis was associated with RA development independent of other types of MRI-detected inflammation [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, 95% CI: 2.4, 23] and also independent of age and other inflammatory measures (swollen joints, CRP) (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12.9). Within UA patients, the negative predictive value of abnormal tenosynovitis was 95% (95% CI: 89%, 98%) and the positive predictive value 25% (95% CI: 17%, 35%). The performance was best in the subgroup of UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis (18% developed RA): the positive predictive value was 36% (95% CI: 23%, 52%), the negative predictive value was 98% (95% CI: 88%, 100%), the sensitivity was 93% (95% CI: 70%, 99%) and the specificity was 63% (95% CI: 51%, 74%). MRI contributes to the identification of UA patients who will develop RA, mostly in UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  7. Applicability of the EULAR recommendations on the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal Applicability of the EULAR recommendations on the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa, L.; Ramiro, S.; Santos, M. J.; Canas da Silva, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the level of agreement and applicability of the EULAR recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal. Methods: Nurses from all Portuguese rheumatology centers were invited to fill-in a questionnaire addressing the

  8. A pilot evaluation of Arthritis Self-Management Program by lay leaders in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Kwan, Jackie; Chan, Patsy; Poon, Peter K K; Leung, Christine; Tam, Lai-Shan; Li, Edmund K; Kwok, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the efficacy of a community-based lay-led Arthritis Self-Management Program (ASMP) among patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and evaluate the effectiveness of "shared care collaboration" between hospital and community. We trained 17 lay leaders and recruited patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis via a new shared-care model between hospital rheumatology centers and community organizations. Participants were allocated to interventional group or a wait list control group. Evaluations were completed before, after (6 weeks), and 3 months after ASMP. We performed analysis of covariance with adjustment with age, sex, marital status, education, employment, duration of illness, and disability at baseline. A total of 65 participants and 32 controls completed the study. The mean (SD) age and duration of illness were 52.0 (11.4) and 5.6 (7.3) years, 90.7 % were female, 80.4 % had rheumatoid arthritis; 25.8, 53.6, and 12.4 % referrals were from hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups, respectively. The interventional group had significantly less pain (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks), used more cognitive coping methods (p = 0.008 at 6 weeks, p = 0.041 at 3 months) and practiced more aerobic exercise (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks, p = 0.008 at 3 months) after adjustment of covariance. The interventional group had a trend of improvement in self-efficacy, fatigue, self-rated health, and health distress. A community-based lay-led ASMP showed positive beneficial effects on participants with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Shared-care collaboration between hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups was demonstrated.

  9. Synovitis in mice with inflammatory arthritis monitored with quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced NIR fluorescence imaging using iRGD-targeted liposomes as fluorescence probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hao Wu,1,2,* Haohan Wu,1,2,* Yanni He,1 Zhen Gan,2 Zhili Xu,1,2 Meijun Zhou,1,2 Sai Liu,1,2 Hongmei Liu1 1Department of Ultrasonography, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital Affiliated to Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China; 2Department of Ultrasonography, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common inflammatory disorder characterized primarily by synovitis and pannus formation in multiple joints, causing joints destruction and irreversible disability in most cases. Early diagnosis and effective therapy monitoring of RA are of importance for achieving the favorable prognosis. Methods: We first prepared the targeted fluorescence probes, and then explored the feasibility of near-infrared (NIR fluorescence molecular imaging to detect and evaluate the RA via the targeted fluorescence probes by quantitative analysis in this study. Results: The targeted fluorescence probes (indocyanine green-liposomes decorated with iRGD peptide [iLPs] was successfully prepared. The quantitative analysis found that strong fluorescence signal was detected in inflamed paws and the fluorescence signal in iLPs group was 3.03-fold higher than that in non-targeted (indocyanine green-liposomes decorated without iRGD peptide [LPs] group (P<0.01 at 15 min after injection, whereas the fluorescence signal from iLPs signal can almost not be observed in the non-inflamed paws, showing the high sensitivity and accuracy for arthritis by the NIR fluorescence imaging based on iLPs. Conclusion: The NIR fluorescence imaging by iLPs may facilitate improved arthritis diagnosis and early assessment of the disease progression by providing an in vivo characterization of angiogenesis in inflammatory joint diseases. Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, synovitis, diagnosis, near-infrared fluorescence imaging, iRGD-targeted probes

  10. The early magnetic resonance imaging features of the knee in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Karl; Wittkop, Berndt; Haigh, Fiona; Ryder, Clive; Gardner-Medwin, Janet M.

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Early diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) facilitates earlier more aggressive therapy, and improved outcome. Recognition of the features of early, untreated JIA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will improve disease detection and expedite treatment. This study aims to highlight the relevant MRI features. METHODS: MRI examinations of the knee joint were performed on 11 children with clinically confirmed, early, untreated JIA. The MRI images were obtained at a mean of 2 months after symptom onset and independently evaluated by two consultant paediatric radiologists. RESULTS: Abnormalities were found on all MRI examinations. Synovial hypertrophy, joint effusions, popliteal lymph nodes and soft tissue swelling were present in all patients. Gadolinium DTPA enhancement improved the detection of synovial hyperplasia. Metaphyseal splaying and condylar overgrowth were seen in five cases (41%), oedema of the lateral collateral ligament in two cases (18%) and superficial cartilage thinning in one case. Bony erosions and deep cartilage destruction were not demonstrated. CONCLUSION: MRI of the knee joint identifies early joint changes which are distinct from those in later disease. The presence of these features should alert the radiologist to the possible diagnosis of JIA and post gadolinium DTPA sequences should be performed. Gadolinium DPTA enhancement increases the sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory changes in JIA. Johnson, K. et al. (2002)

  11. Up-Regulation of the Inflammatory Response by Ovariectomy in Collagen-Induced Arthritis. Effects of Tin Protoporphyrin IX.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibanez, L.; Alcaraz, M.J.; Maicas Blasco, N.; Guede, D.; Caeiro, J.R.; Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den; Ferrandiz, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the influence of ovariectomy on the inflammatory response and bone metabolism on CIA as a model of postmenopausal arthritis as well as the effects of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), a heme oxygenase inhibitor. Ovariectomy in non-arthritic mice produced increased serum PGD(2) levels and

  12. Insight into the Endocrine System and the Immune System: A Review of the Inflammatory Role of Prolactin in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man W. Tang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects females three times more frequently than males. A potential role for hormones, such as prolactin (PRL, may in part explain this phenomenon. The risk of developing RA is increased in women who are lactating after the first pregnancy, which might be related to breastfeeding and the release of PRL. Other studies found a protective effect of PRL on RA development. Some studies have reported that hyperprolactinemia is more common in RA and serum PRL levels are correlated with several disease parameters, although others could not confirm these findings. Overall the plasma PRL levels are on average not elevated in RA. Previously, a small number of open-label clinical trials using bromocriptine, which indirectly decreases PRL levels, were performed in RA patients and showed clinical benefit, although others found the opposite effect. Locally produced PRL at the site of inflammation may have a crucial role in RA as well, as it has been shown that PRL can be produced by synovial macrophages. Locally produced PRL has both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is also an autoinflammatory disease, in which the prolactin receptor is also expressed in macrophages. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential role of PRL signaling in inflammatory joint diseases (RA and PsA and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  13. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier M Thurlings

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man.We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion.The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  14. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA).Methods. A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process......, 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR...... to each recommendation. The recommendations related to the efficacy and safety of various analgesic medications, pain measurement scales and pain management in the pre-conception period, pregnancy and lactation. Finally, an algorithm for the pharmacological management of pain in IA was developed. Twenty...

  15. Nurses' Role in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in People with Inflammatory Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Jette; Ferreira, Ricardo J O; Garcia-Diaz, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    , in order to suggest topics for practice development and research in this area regarding persons with IA. METHODS: We searched Embase, Cinahl, Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases and included European articles from the past ten years if they described how nurses assess and/or manage CVR. In addition...... to the systematic review, we provided case studies from five different countries to illustrate national guidelines and nurses' role regarding CVR assessment and management in patients with IA. RESULTS: Thirty-three articles were included. We found that trained nurses were undertaking CVR assessment and management......INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment and management in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is recommended but European nurses' involvement in this role has not been well studied. AIM: The aim of the present study was to explore European nurses' role in assessing and managing CVR...

  16. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging for early rheumatoid arthritis activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Y Pogozeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess possibility of magnetic resonance image (MRI application for rheu- matoid arthritis (RA activity and severity assessment.Material and methods. 100 pts with RA who fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria with disease duration less than 12 months were included. Standard clinical examination with evaluation of tender and swollen joint counts, acute phase markers, hand and foot X-ray and hand MRI with 0,2 T Artoscan apparatus (ESAOTE Biomedica, Italy were performed.Results. MRI showed hand joint synovitis in 94,5%, erosions – in 67,3% of cases. X-ray examination revealed erosions in only 20,8% of pts. Localization of erosions revealed by X-ray and MRI coincided in 36,4% of cases and in 61,8% of pts erosions were detected only by MRI. MRI confirmed clinical conclusion about presence or absence of metacarpophalangeal and wrist joint synovitis in 64,5% and 74,5% of cases respectively. In8,2% and 21,8% MRI revealed signs of synovitis in clinically intact joints. MRI synovitis score correlated with clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity – DAS 28 (r=0,37, p=0,001, CRP(r=0,30, p=0,001, ESR (r=0,42, p=0,001, HAQ (r=0,24, p=0,001. Weak correlation was revealed between ESR and presence of erosions (r=0,29, CRP, ESR and MRI signs of bone marrow edema (r=0,27, p=0,005 and r=0,29, p=0,002 respectively. Relationship between laboratory and clinical features was weaker and referred only to CRP level and swollen joint count (p=0,05.Conclusion. MRI signs may be used as additional and independent measures of inflammatory activity (particularly synovitis score and severity of RA

  17. Power Doppler ultrasound phenotyping of expanding versus collapsed popliteal lymph nodes in murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echoe M Bouta

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease manifested by episodic flares in affected joints that are challenging to predict and treat. Longitudinal contrast enhanced-MRI (CE-MRI of inflammatory arthritis in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic (TNF-Tg mice has demonstrated that popliteal lymph nodes (PLN increase in volume and contrast enhancement during the pre-arthritic "expanding" phase of the disease, and then suddenly "collapse" during knee flare. Given the potential of this biomarker of arthritic flare, we aimed to develop a more cost-effective means of phenotyping PLN using ultrasound (US imaging. Initially we attempted to recapitulate CE-MRI of PLN with subcutaneous footpad injection of US microbubbles (DEFINITY®. While this approach allowed for phenotyping via quantification of lymphatic sinuses in PLN, which showed a dramatic decrease in collapsed PLN versus expanding or wild-type (WT PLN, electron microscopy demonstrated that DEFINITY® injection also resulted in destruction of the lymphatic vessels afferent to the PLN. In contrast, Power Doppler (PD US is innocuous to and efficiently quantifies blood flow within PLN of WT and TNF-Tg mice. PD-US demonstrated that expanding PLN have a significantly higher normalized PD volume (NPDV versus collapsed PLN (0.553 ± 0.007 vs. 0.008 ± 0.003; p0.030 and lower (<0.016 quartile NPDVs in this cohort of mice, which serve as conservative thresholds to phenotype PLN as expanding and collapsed, respectively. Interestingly, of the 12 PLN phenotyped by the two methods, there was disagreement in 4 cases in which they were determined to be expanding by CE-MRI and collapsed by PD-US. Since the adjacent knee had evidence of synovitis in all 4 cases, we concluded that the PD-US phenotyping was correct, and that this approach is currently the safest and most cost-effective in vivo approach to phenotype murine PLN as a biomarker of arthritic flare.

  18. Transient anorexia, hyper-nociception and cognitive impairment in early adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurlova, M; Stofkova, A; Kiss, A; Belacek, J; Pecha, O; Deykun, K; Jurcovicova, J

    2010-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, pain, anorexia, and cognitive changes. The enhanced production of cytokines appears before the full manifestation of the disease. So far, any experimental data on behavioral effects of early arthritis are lacking. In the present series we describe anorexia early changes in, pain hyper-sensitivity and altered cognitive behavior during the first four days of adjuvant arthritis in rats (AA), when no clinical signs are yet apparent. AA was induced to male Lewis rats by a single injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (cFA) at the base of the tail. Plasma leptin and ghrelin were measured using specific RIA methods. Gene expressions for food-regulatory peptides, neuropeptide-Y (NPY) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the hypothalamic arcuate nuclei (nARC), were quantitated by TaqMan real-time PCR. Pain sensation was measured on all four limbs and tail by the plantar test. Cognitive functions were tested in the Morris water maze (MWM). Levels of orexigenic ghrelin as well as mRNA expression of orexigenic NPY in nucleus arcuatus (nRC)re significantly enhanced on day 2 of AA only. Reduced body weight and food intake persisted by day 4 with the most profound reduction on day 2. The mRNA for anorexigenic IL-1β in the nARC was significantly enhanced on days 2 and 4. Enhanced pain sensitivity was observed on day 2, as was the cognitive impairment given by longer time to find the hidden platform, longer time spent in thigmotaxis zone, and longer trajectory. The less effective strategy used to find the hidden platform was observed up to the day 4 of AA. Early stage of AA brings about reduced body weight, food intake, and activation of central orexigenic pathways. The observed anorexia could be ascribed to the over-expression of anorexigenic IL-1β which dominates over the NPY orexigenic effects. On day 2 of AA higher pain sensitivity and cognitive impairment appear. All the observed change tend

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of two varieties of pumpkin seed oil in an adjuvant arthritis model in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Okbi, S.Y.; Mohamed, D.A.; Kandil, E.; Abo-Zeid, M.A.; Mohammed, S.E.; Ahmed, E.K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of pumpkin seed oils (PSOs) of an Egyptian and European variety, in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. Edema thickness, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined as inflammatory biomarkers while malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were assessed as indicative of oxidative stress. Chromosomal aberration, sperm shape abnormalities, and DNA fragmentations are cytogenetic parameters which aid in tracing inflammatory and oxidative activity. Phenolic contents and β-carotene were determined in PSOs. The results showed elevated ESR, plasma TNF-α, plasma MDA, liver cellular DNA fragmentation, bone marrow chromosomal aberration, sperm shape abnormalities with a reduction in plasma TAC and body weight gain in an adjuvant arthritis control compared to a healthy control. Administration of low and high doses of either Egyptian or European PSO improved all the aforementioned parameters with variable degrees. [es

  20. Interleukin-23 in early disease development in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, M; Johansen, C

    2015-01-01

    randomized to methotrexate (MTX) plus adalimumab (ADA; n = 75) or MTX plus placebo-ADA (PLA; n = 76). Plasma samples were obtained at baseline and at months 3, 6, and 12 together with values for C-reactive protein (CRP), the 28-joint Disease Activity Score based on CRP (DAS28CRP), scores on the Clinical......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the levels of interleukin (IL)-23 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) and the effect of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-α treatment on IL-23 levels. METHOD: Treatment-naïve eRA patients from the OPERA cohort were included (n = 151). Patients were...... Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain/fatigue/physician global and total Sharp/van der Heijde score (TSS). IL-23 was measured at each time point. RESULTS: IL-23 levels decreased significantly in the ADA group from 20.6 pg...

  1. The impact of arthritis on the early employment experiences of young adults: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif

    2015-07-01

    Young adulthood is an important transitional life phase that can determine a person's career trajectory. To date, little research has examined the influence of arthritis on early work experiences. This literature review aims at examining the impact of arthritis on the early career phase of young adults and identifying the barriers to employment. Two independent reviewers searched bibliographic databases for arthritis conditions and a series of employment-related keywords and subject headings. Information on authors, publication year; study design, sample characteristics (e.g., number of participants, age, gender, arthritis type); work outcomes measured; and specific barriers to employment was recorded. Nine studies were uncovered in the review. All studies examined young people with juvenile arthritis (9 of 9 studies) and consisted of sample sizes with less then 150 participants (6 of 9 studies) who were primarily recruited from clinics (7 of 9 studies). All were cross-sectional designs. Employment status was primarily examined and ranged from 11% to 71%. Although not always statistically significant, young adults with arthritis were less likely to be employed when compared to their healthy peers. Greater disease severity, less educational attainment and being female were related to not participating in paid work. This review brings to light the paucity of studies examining the early employment experiences of young adults with arthritis. There is a need to expand research to contribute to recommendations for sustained and productive employment across the working life course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral administration of curcumin (Curcuma longa) can attenuate the neutrophil inflammatory response in zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonose, Nilson; Pereira, José Aires; Machado, Paulo Roberto Moura; Rodrigues, Murilo Rocha; Sato, Daniela Tiemi; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of curcumin in the acute phase of zymosan-induced arthritis. Twenty-eight male rats were subjected to intra-articular infiltration of zymosan of both knees and, in four the infiltration was made with saline. The animals were divided into five groups second received every six hours by gavage: corn oil by (positive and negative control); curcumin (100 mg/kg); prednisone 1 mg/kg/day; prednisone 8 mg/kg. All animals were sacrificed after six, 12, 24 and 48 hours of the infiltration. The knees were removed for evaluation of neutrophil infiltration. The number of neutrophils was counted by computer-assisted analysis of the images. The neutrophil infiltrate was stratified into four grades: 0 = normal; + = mild; ++/+++ = moderate; > ++++ = severe. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney test and the variance by Kruskal-Wallis test adopting a significance level of 5% (pCurcumin reduces inflammatory activity in the first six hours after zymosan-induced arthritis when compared to saline (pCurcumin was more effective than lower doses of prednisone in the first six hours after induction of the arthritis. After 12, 24 and 48 hours, curcumin does not have the same anti-inflammatory effects when compared to prednisone. After 48 hours, prednisone is more effective than curcumin in reducing the inflammatory infiltrate regardless of the dose of prednisone used. Oral administration of curcumin reduces inflammation in the first six hours after experimentally zymosan-induced arthritis.

  3. Contemporary treatment principles for early rheumatoid arthritis: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Patrick D W; Brown, Andrew K; Edwards, Christopher J; O'Reilly, David T; Ostör, Andrew J K; Quinn, Mark; Taggart, Allister; Taylor, Peter C; Wakefield, Richard J; Conaghan, Philip G

    2009-07-01

    RA has a substantial impact on both patients and healthcare systems. Our objective is to advance the understanding of modern management principles in light of recent evidence concerning the condition's diagnosis and treatment. A group of practicing UK rheumatologists formulated contemporary management principles and clinical practice recommendations concerning both diagnosis and treatment. Areas of clinical uncertainty were documented, leading to research recommendations. A fundamental concept governing treatment of RA is minimization of cumulative inflammation, referred to as the inflammation-time area under the curve (AUC). To achieve this, four core principles of management were identified: (i) detect and refer patients early, even if the diagnosis is uncertain: patients should be referred at the first suspicion of persistent inflammatory polyarthritis and rheumatology departments should provide rapid access to a diagnostic and prognostic service; (ii) treat RA immediately: optimizing outcomes with conventional DMARDs and biologics requires that effective treatment be started early-ideally within 3 months of symptom onset; (iii) tight control of inflammation in RA improves outcome: frequent assessments and an objective protocol should be used to make treatment changes that maintain low-disease activity/remission at an agreed target; (iv) consider the risk-benefit ratio and tailor treatment to each patient: differing patient, disease and drug characteristics require long-term monitoring of risks and benefits with adaptations of treatments to suit individual circumstances. These principles focus on effective control of the inflammatory process in RA, but optimal uptake may require changes in service provision to accommodate appropriate care pathways.

  4. Inflammatory cytokines and hypoxia contribute to 18F-FDG uptake by cells involved in pannus formation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tamiko; Nakata, Norihito; Nagai, Shigenori; Nakatani, Akira; Takahashi, Miwako; Momose, Toshimitsu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Koyasu, Shigeo

    2009-06-01

    Assessment of the activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is important for the prediction of future articular destruction. (18)F-FDG PET is known to represent the metabolic activity of inflammatory disease, which correlates with the pannus volume measured by MRI or ultrasonography. To evaluate the correlation between (18)F-FDG accumulation and RA pathology, we assessed (18)F-FDG accumulation in vivo using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal models and (3)H-FDG uptake in vitro using various cells involved in arthritis. (18)F-FDG PET images of rats with CIA were acquired on days 10, 14, and 17 after arthritis induction. The specimens were subsequently subjected to macroautoradiography, and the (18)F-FDG accumulation was compared with the histologic findings. (3)H-FDG uptake in vitro in inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages, T cells, and fibroblasts) was measured to evaluate the contributions of these cells to (18)F-FDG accumulation. In addition, the influence on (3)H-FDG uptake of inflammatory factors, such as cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFalpha], interleukin 1 [IL-1], and IL-6), and hypoxia was examined. (18)F-FDG PET depicted swollen joints, and (18)F-FDG accumulation increased with the progression of arthritis. Histologically, a higher level of (18)F-FDG accumulation correlated with the pannus rather than the infiltration of inflammatory cells around the joints. In the in vitro (3)H-FDG uptake assay, fibroblasts showed the highest (3)H-FDG uptake, followed by neutrophils. Although only a small amount of (3)H-FDG was incorporated by resting macrophages, a dramatic increase in (3)H-FDG uptake in both fibroblasts and macrophages was observed when these cells were exposed to inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFalpha and IL-1, and hypoxia. Although neutrophils showed relatively high (3)H-FDG uptake without activation, no increase in (3)H-FDG uptake was observed in response to inflammatory cytokines. (3)H-FDG uptake by T cells was much lower than

  5. Automated measurement of joint space width in early rheumatoid arthritis hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, YH

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, affecting predominantly small joints of hands and feet. The current gold standard for assessment of radiographic progression in RA is the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SvdH), scoring both bone erosions and joint space narrowing

  6. Quality of Life in Arthritis Patients Using Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingela Wiklund

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a painful and disabling condition. To suppress the pain and the inflammatory process, patients are often chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID users. Chronic use of NSAIDs may induce peptic ulcer, dyspeptic problems and heartburn. Therefore, these patients are often provided with treatment to relieve and/or protect against gastrointestinal problems. Rheumatic disorders also affect a range of health-related quality of life domains. In one study, patients with NSAID-associated gastroduodenal lesions complained about lack of energy, sleep disturbances, emotional distress and social isolation in addition to pain and mobility limitations. The degree of distress and dysfunction differed markedly from scores in an unselected population. Clinical trial data suggest that acid-suppressing therapy with omeprazole is superior to therapy with misoprostol and ranitidine in healing gastroduodenal lesions and preventing abdominal pain, heartburn and indigestion symptoms during continued NSAID treatment. Because arthritic patients are severely incapacitated by their condition regarding most aspects of health-related quality of life, it is important to offer a treatment that is effective in healing and preventing NSAID-induced ulcers and gastrointestinal symptoms during continued NSAID treatment without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. Treatment with omeprazole once daily has been shown to be superior to that with ranitidine and misoprostol in this respect.

  7. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE 2 and LTB 4 ) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of arthritic rats

  9. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Hany H., E-mail: hany_h_arab@yahoo.com [Biochemistry Division, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Taif University, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Sawalhi, Maha M. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  10. Bone scintigraphy compared to MRI and ultrasound in the early diagnosis of arthritis; Skelettszintigraphie im Vergleich mit MRT und Sonographie beim Fruehnachweis der Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrock, D. [Klinikum Chemnitz gGmbH, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Chronic inflammatory arthritis is recognized specifically by bone erosions, caused by characteristic pannus tissue. In the finger joints dynamic low-Tesla MRI is nearly double but not completely sensitive in the detection of erosions than conventional radiography, sonography takes an intermediate position. Less specific signs of synovitis and tenosynovitis are shown with high sensitivity by both 3(2)-phase bone scintigraphy and ultrasound, MRI is less sensitive in this respect. However, standard situation of inflammation in bone scintigraphy - positive finding in early as well as late phase - is of surprisingly low sensitivity, any singular finding in the early or late phase has to be regarded as positive. Specificity of these singular findings is nevertheless sufficiently high, acute inflammatory joint changes and even erosions are also seen with MRI in obviously healthy persons. Only 2-phase bone scintigraphy is easily able to present a simultaneous survey of all joints of the body. For this reason 2-phase bone scintigraphy is most suitable for exclusion but also for primary diagnosis of disease, specification must be done afterwards by other imaging modalities or by laboratory findings. (orig.)

  11. Marked QTc prolongation and Torsades de Pointes in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis

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    Pietro Enea Lazzerini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence indicates that in chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA, QTc prolongation is frequent and correlates with systemic inflammatory activation. Notably, basic studies demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines induce profound changes in potassium and calcium channels resulting in a prolonging effect on cardiomyocyte action potential duration (APD, thus on the QT interval on the electrocardiogram. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that in RA patients the risk of SCD is significantly increased when compared to non-RA subjects. Conversely, to date no data are available about Torsades de Pointes (TdP prevalence in CIA, and the few case reported considered CIA only an incidental concomitant disease, not contributing factor to TdP development.We report three patients with active CIA developing marked QTc prolongation, in two cases complicated with TdP degenerating to cardiac arrest. In these patients, a blood sample was obtained within 24h from TdP/marked QTc prolongation occurrence and levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-1 were evaluated. In all three cases, IL-6 was markedly elevated, ~10 to 100 times more than reference values. Moreover, one patient also showed high circulating levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1. In conclusion, active CIA may represent a currently overlooked QT-prolonging risk factor, potentially contributing in the presence of other classical risk factors to TdP occurrence. In particular, a relevant role may be played by elevated circulating IL-6 levels via direct electrophysiological effects on the heart. This observation should be carefully kept in mind, particularly when recognizable risk factors are already present and/or the addition of QT-prolonging drugs is required.

  12. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pannus have similar qualitative metabolic characteristics and pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, J; Macip-Rodríguez, P M; Cabral, A R

    2008-01-01

    Pannus in osteoarthritis (OA) has only recently been characterized. Little is known, however, regarding the behavior of OA pannus in vitro compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pannus. The purpose of our study was to compare OA with RA pannus. Pannus and synovial tissue co-cultures from 5 patients with OA and 5 patients with RA obtained during arthroplasty were studied. Pannus was defined as the microscopic invasive granulation tissue covering the articular surface. Tissues were cultured for 7 days and stained with Alcian Blue technique. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were also determined in supernatants by ELISA. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), type II collagen, TNF-alpha, IL-10 and Ki-67 expression were also detected by immunohistochemistry. All patients had vascular or fibrous pannus. Synovial proliferation, inflammatory infiltrates and a decrease of extracellular matrix proteins were observed in all tissue samples. Chondrocyte proliferation was lower in OA than RA cartilage. OA synovial tissue expressed lower levels of proteoglycans than RA synoyium. Type II collagen levels were lower in OA than in RA cartilage. Significantly higher levels of IL-1beta were found in the supernatants of RA pannus compared to OA pannus (ppannus supernatants. IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma were undetectable. RA and OA pannus had similar pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile expression. OA cartilage, synovial tissue and pannus had lower production of proteoglycans, type II collagen and IL-1beta. It remains to be elucidated why OA pannus invades the cartilage surface but does not cause the marginal erosions typically seen in RA.

  13. Efficiency of teaching patients with early-stage rheumatoid arthritis

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    Evgenia Vladislavovna Orlova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Education programs are an important part of the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Objective: to develop a unified model of an education program for RA patients and to evaluate its efficiency at the early stage of the disease.Material and methods. A group education program was worked out with the support of the All-Russian public organization of the disabled “The Russian rheumatology organization “Nadezhda” (Hope” and encompassed 4 daily classes lasting 90 min. All information was presented by a multidisciplinary team of specialists (rheumatologists, a cardiologist, a psychologist, a physiotherapist, and a physical trainer. The study included 55 patients with early RA (89.1% of women aged 18 to 62 years; the duration of the disease was 2 to 22 months; of them 25 were taught using the education program (a study group; 30 received drug therapy only (a control group. Following 3 and 6 months, the number of tender and swollen joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and pain were determined applying a 100-ml VAS, DAS28, HAQ, and RAPID3. Adherence to non-drug treatments was assessed employing a special patient questionnaire.Results. Three and six months after being taught, two patient groups showed increases in adherence to joint protection methods by 13 and 10 times (p<0.01, regular physical training by 4 and 3.25 times (p<0.01, uses of orthoses for the wrist joint by 2 times and 75% (p<0.01 and knee orthoses by 33.3 and 50.0% (p<0.01, and orthopedic insoles by 71.4 and 57.1% (p<0.01, respectively. Following 6 months, there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in most parameters (p<0.05, except for ESR, CRP, and DAS28 (p>0.05. Further more, a good response to treatment was significantly more common in these periods, as shown by the EULAR response criteria (DAS28: 56.3% versus 40% in the control group (p<0.05.Conclusion. The education program decreases the intensity

  14. Early detection of temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - the role of contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Stuber, Tina; Winkler, Peter [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, Jan; Hospach, Toni [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Rheumatology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Early treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is crucial in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to prevent permanent functional impairment. As involvement of TMJs is often asymptomatic, contrast-enhanced MRI is regarded as the most sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tool. To evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement in TMJs of children and adolescents with JIA in comparison to normal controls from a previous study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of 50 children and adolescents with JIA (6.3 to 18 years of age; mean: 12 years) were retrospectively analysed. We assessed morphological abnormalities and postcontrast time-intensity curves of the soft joint tissue and the mandibular condyle. Ratios were calculated to quantify postcontrast signal intensities (SI) in relation to precontrast SI at initial (1 min postcontrast) and maximum (6 min postcontrast) increase. Time-intensity curves followed similar biphasic patterns in normal and pathological joints. In joints with morphological signs of arthritis, mean SI ratios were on average higher than in normal joints of the reference group, but ranges of values widely overlapped. Arthritis: mean initial increase of SI 62% (±2 S.D. 18-105%), mean maximum SI 106% higher than precontrast (±2 S.D. 46-166%). Normal: mean initial increase of SI 49% (±2 S.D. 14- 85%), mean maximum of SI 73% (±2 S.D. 23-123%). Given this considerable overlap of results in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of contrast enhancement alone did not allow differentiation between TMJs with and without signs of inflammation. Thickening of the soft joint tissue seems to remain the earliest sign to reliably indicate TMJ arthritis. (orig.)

  15. 14-3-3η Autoantibodies: Diagnostic Use in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksymowych, Walter P.; Boire, Gilles; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Wichuk, Stephanie; Turk, Samina; Boers, Maarten; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Bykerk, Vivian; Keystone, Ed; Tak, Paul Peter; van Kuijk, Arno W.; Landewé, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree; Murphy, Mairead; Marotta, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    To describe the expression and diagnostic use of 14-3-3η autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 14-3-3η autoantibody levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescent multiplexed assay in 500 subjects (114 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naive patients with early RA, 135 with

  16. FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY IN EARLY RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS - DESCRIPTION AND RISK-FACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GUILLEMIN, F; SUURMEIJER, T; KROL, B; BOMBARDIER, C; BRIANCON, S; DOEGLAS, D; SANDERMAN, R; VANDENHEUVEL, W

    Objective. To provide a description and identify risk factors for functional disability in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A cohort of 337 patients with early RA with disease duration under 5 years was constituted in 2 areas in Fiance and The Netherlands. Examination included the Ritchie

  17. Jobelyn® attenuates inflammatory responses and neurobehavioural deficits associated with complete Freund-adjuvant-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omorogbe, Osarume; Ajayi, Abayomi M; Ben-Azu, Benneth; Oghwere, Ejiroghene E; Adebesin, Adaeze; Aderibigbe, Adegbuyi O; Okubena, Olajuwon; Umukoro, Solomon

    2018-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of the patients and a major cause of work disability. Current drugs for its treatment only provide palliative effect, as cure for the disease still remains elusive. Jobelyn ® (JB), a potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory dietary supplement obtained from Sorghum bicolor, has been claimed to relieve arthritic pain. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate its effect on inflammatory and biochemical changes as well as neurobehavioural deficits associated with complete Freund-adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in mice. The effect of JB (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) on inflammatory oedema, neurobehavioural deficits, levels of biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) induced by 0.1 mL of CFA (10 mg/mL) was evaluated in male Swiss mice. Oral administration of JB (100 and 200 mg/kg) reduced inflammatory paw volume and reversed sensorimotor deficits induced by CFA. JB also reduced pain episodes, anxiety and depressive-like symptoms in CFA-mice. The increased level of oxidative stress in the joint and brain tissues of CFA-mice was reduced by JB. It also decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 levels induced by CFA in the joint tissue of mice. These findings suggest that Jobelyn ® attenuates inflammatory responses induced by CFA in mice via inhibition of oxidative stress and release of inflammatory cytokines. The ability of JB to attenuate CFA-induced nociception, sensorimotor deficits and depressive-like symptom suggests it might improve the quality of life of patients with arthritic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathologic features of early inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Sydney D; Sasatomi, Eizaburo; Regueiro, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    Often the pathologic changes of IBD are subtle and may not be present in a proportion of biopsy specimens. In cases of early disease, the changes may be missed, and additional specimens should be taken after a period of time. Modifying factors, such as prebiopsy treatment and coexisting disease, should be considered. A forum to review cases and allow for communication between gastroenterologists and pathologists is especially useful for clinicopathologic correlation and assignment of a working diagnosis to each case. Careful attention to the pathologic features of early UC and CD would be most useful when evaluating new therapies for IBD.

  19. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; v. d. Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as ‘JIA-uveitis’) has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze uveitis activity, complications and visual prognosis in adulthood. Methods In this multicenter study, 67 adult patients (129 affected eyes) with JIA-uveitis were retrospectively studied for best corrected visual acuity, visual fields, uveitis activity, topical/systemic treatments, ocular complications, and ocular surgeries during their 18th, 22nd and 30th year of life. Because treatment strategies changed after the year 1990, outcomes were stratified for onset of uveitis before and after 1990. Results Sixty-two of all 67 included patients (93%) had bilateral uveitis. During their 18th life year, 4/52 patients (8%) had complete remission, 28/52 (54%) had uveitis activity and 37/51 patients (73%) were on systemic immunomodulatory treatment. Bilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 2/51 patients (4%); unilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 17/51 patients (33%) aged 18 years. The visual prognosis appeared to be slightly better for patients with uveitis onset after the year 1990 (for uveitis onset before 1990 (n = 7) four patients (58%) and for uveitis onset after 1990 (n = 44) 13 patients (30%) were either visual impaired or blind). At least one ocular surgery was performed in 10/24 patients (42%) between their 18th and 22nd year of life. Conclusions Bilateral visual outcome in early adulthood in patients with JIA-uveitis appears to be fairly good, although one third of the patients developed one visually impaired or blind eye. However, a fair amount of the patients suffered from ongoing uveitis activity and needed ongoing treatment as well as surgical interventions. Awareness of these findings is important for ophthalmologists and

  20. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  1. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  2. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothová (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  3. Attending and non-attending patients in a real-life setting of an early arthritis clinic: why do people leave clinics and where do they go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell-Duxneuner, Valerie; Rezende, Lucila Stange; Stamm, Tanja A; Duer, Mona; Smolen, Josef S; Machold, Klaus P

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatologist assessment as early as possible is considered essential for patients with inflammatory joint disease. In our Very Early Arthritis Clinic (VEAC), a substantial proportion of initially included and followed patients later stop attendance in the clinic. We questioned attending (AP) and non-attending patients (NAP) regarding current health status and satisfaction with care as well as reasons for discontinuation and current care received by NAP. VEAC patients first seen between 1996 and 2003 were included. Assessment included the RADAI, HAQ, and visual analogue scales for pain, disease activity, fatigue, satisfaction with current health care. Current (DMARD) treatment was recorded. Among AP, 87% had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 13% non-RA. Of NAP, 37% had RA, 23% non-RA and 40% no more rheumatic disease. Satisfaction with health care concerning rheumatic disease was better in AP than NAP. Likewise, most outcome parameters were better in AP. Substantially more RA patients in the AP than NAP group received DMARDs. Apart from the disappearance of arthritis, logistic reasons were given most frequently for discontinuation of attendance. Less than 10% of NAP indicated dissatisfaction with medical care. We found advantages in both disease activity measures and satisfaction with health care for patients receiving continuous care in a highly specialised Rheumatology clinic. Furthermore, different DMARD usage in RA in AP and NAP may indicate significant deficits in treatment quality outside specialist care. Logistic issues associated with access to continuous Rheumatology care for early arthritis patients need improvement.

  4. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of the multidrug herbomineral formulation in male Wistar rats against rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal S Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, which may play a role in a number of disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Ancient ayurvedic physicians had developed certain dietary and therapeutic measures to arrest or prevent these disorders. Objective: Rheuma off gold (RG is a herbomineral formulation recommended by ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of RA. This study was carried out to lend scientific evidence to the efficacy claim for RG in the management of RA in folklore medicine. Materials and Methods: Arthritis was induced by complete Freund′s adjuvant. Treatment with formulation 100 mg/kg and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given to rats intragastrically once a day from day 1 to day 21 and after which estimation of physical, biochemical, and hematological parameters were carried out. Results: Treatment of formulation to adjuvant induced arthritic animal showed statistically significant ( P < 0.05 improvement in physical parameters like arthritic index, paw edema, paw thickness as well as reduction of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein, serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The treatment also produced statistically significant ( P < 0.05 increase in hemoglobin percent and improvement in splenomegaly and thymus index. In the histopathological examination, ameliorative effect of formulation was observed in hyperplasia of synovium, pannus formation, and destruction of the joint space. Conclusion: The results obtained in experiments indicated that the formulation significantly inhibited the adjuvant-induced arthritis which was comparable to dexamethasone and had preferable anti-inflammatory effect without significant side effect. Thus, the formulation may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis.

  5. Non-pharmacological interventions for preventing job loss in workers with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Jan L; Lacaille, Diane; Urquhart, Donna M; Hannu, Timo J; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2014-11-06

    Work participation of patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is important not only economically but also for physical and psychological health. There is no Cochrane Review to date on studies of non-pharmacological interventions specifically aimed at preventing job loss in people with IA. To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions that aim to prevent job loss, work absenteeism or improve work functioning for employees with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), other spondylarthritis (SpA) or IA associated with connective tissue diseases, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)). We searched the following databases from inception up to 30 April 2014; The Cochrane Library (including Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, i.e. CENTRAL and DARE), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (EbSCOhost), ClinicalTrials.gov and PsycINFO (ProQuest). We did not impose language restrictions in the search. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated interventions aimed at preventing job loss in adults of working age (18 to 65 years) diagnosed with IA, including RA, AS, PsA, SpA or other types of IA. Primary outcomes were job loss and sickness absenteeism and the secondary outcome was work functioning. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias in the included RCTs. We included three RCTs with a total of 414 participants at risk of job loss. The majority of participants had IA, most with RA and to a lesser degree AS. The interventions aimed to prevent job loss and improve work functioning in several ways: firstly by evaluating work changes or adaptations and secondly by providing any person-directed interventions including vocational counselling, advice or education. Interventions directly targeted at the work environment were minimal and included workplace visits (one trial) or any actions by an occupational

  6. Diurnal variation of connective tissue metabolites in early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottenburger, T; Junker, P; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2011-01-01

    To study the circadian variability of circulating connective tissue metabolites in patients with very early (VERA) and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (LRA) and in healthy control individuals.......To study the circadian variability of circulating connective tissue metabolites in patients with very early (VERA) and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (LRA) and in healthy control individuals....

  7. The role of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCX® in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis

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    Santos Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ECBio has developed proprietary technology to consistently isolate, expand and cryopreserve a well-characterized population of stromal cells from human umbilical cord tissue (UCX® cells. The technology has recently been optimized in order to become compliant with Advanced Medicine Therapeutic Products. In this work we report the immunosuppressive capacity of UCX® cells for treating induced autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Methods UCX® cells were isolated using a proprietary method (PCT/IB2008/054067 that yields a well-defined number of cells using a precise proportion between tissue digestion enzyme activity units, tissue mass, digestion solution volume and void volume. The procedure includes three recovery steps to avoid non-conformities related to cell recovery. UCX® surface markers were characterized by flow cytometry and UCX® capacity to expand in vitro and to differentiate into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells was evaluated. Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR assays were performed to evaluate the effect of UCX® cells on T-cell activation and Treg conversion assays were also performed in vitro. Furthermore, UCX® cells were administered in vivo in both a rat acute carrageenan-induced arthritis model and rat chronic adjuvant induced arthritis model for arthritic inflammation. UCX® anti-inflammatory activity was then monitored over time. Results UCX® cells stained positive for CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105; and negative for CD14, CD19 CD31, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR; and were capable to differentiate into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells. UCX® cells were shown to repress T-cell activation and promote the expansion of Tregs better than bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. Accordingly, xenogeneic UCX® administration in an acute carrageenan-induced arthritis model showed that human UCX® cells can reduce paw edema in vivo more efficiently than BM-MSCs. Finally, in a chronic adjuvant

  8. A novel selective prostaglandin E2 synthesis inhibitor relieves pyrexia and arthritis in Guinea pigs inflammatory models

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    Ryusuke Sugita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, one of the terminal products in the cyclooxygenase pathway, plays an important role in various inflammatory responses. To determine whether selective inhibition of PGE2 may relieve these inflammatory symptoms, we synthesized a selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound A [1-(6-fluoro-5,7-dimethyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl-N-[(1S,2R-2-(hydroxymethylcyclohexyl]piperidine-4-carboxamide], then investigated the effects on pyrexia, arthritis and inflammatory pain in guinea pigs. In LPS-stimulated guinea pig macrophages, compound A selectively inhibited inducible PGE2 biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner whereas enhanced the formation of thromboxane B2 (TXB2. Compound A suppressed yeast-evoked PGE2 production selectively and enhanced the production of TXB2 and 6-keto PGF1α in vivo. In addition, compound A relieved yeast-induced pyrexia and also suppressed paw swelling in an adjuvant-induced arthritis model. The effect on gastrointestinal (GI ulcer formation was also evaluated and compound A showed a lower GI adverse effect than indomethacin. However, compound A failed to relieve yeast-induced thermal hyperalgesia. These results suggest that selective inhibition of PGE2 synthesis may have anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory properties without GI side effect, but lack the analgesic efficacy.

  9. A comparative study of renal dysfunction in patients with inflammatory arthropathies: strong association with cardiovascular diseases and not with anti-rheumatic therapies, inflammatory markers or duration of arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among comparable patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and to explore any predictive factors for renal impairment. METHODS: Consecutive patients with peripheral joint disease (oligo and polyarthritis) were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. We divided patients in two groups: RA group and seronegative inflammatory arthritis group. The cohort consisted of 183 patients (RA = 107, seronegative arthritis = 76 [psoriatic arthritis = 69, undifferentiated oligoarthritis = 7]). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the established Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Demographic details, disease-specific characteristics, anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of cardiovascular diseases were recorded. RESULTS: In total, 17.48% (n = 32) of the cohort had CKD. There was no statistically significant variation between the two groups as regards baseline demographics, disease characteristics, use of anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of individual cardiovascular diseases. We found that eGFR and the presence of CKD were similar among these groups. Among patients with CKD, 72% had undiagnosed CKD. No association of statistical significance was noted between CKD and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. The association of cardiovascular diseases with CKD remained significant after adjusting for confounders (age, gender, duration of arthritis, high C-reactive protein, use of anti-rheumatic drugs). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis are more prone to have CKD. This could have serious implications, as the majority of rheumatology patients use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and different immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate. No association of kidney dysfunction was noted with inflammatory disease

  10. Effectiveness of early adalimumab therapy in psoriatic arthritis patients from Reuma.pt - EARLY PsA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Helena; Eusébio, Mónica; Borges, Joana; Gonçalves, Diana; Ávila-Ribeiro, Pedro; Faria, Daniela Santos; Lopes, Carina; Rovisco, João; Águeda, Ana; Nero, Patrícia; Valente, Paula; Cravo, Ana Rita; Santos, Maria José

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients initiating adalimumab (ADA), with short- and long-term disease duration and to evaluate the potential effect of concomitant conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) or glucocorticoids. Methods Analyses included adult PsA patients registered in the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) between June 2008-June 2016 who received ADA for ≥3 months. Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) response, tender and swollen joint count, inflammatory parameters, patient (PtGA) and physician global assessment (PhGA), Disease Activity Score-28 joints (DAS28), and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) were compared between patients with PsA) and those with ≥5 years of disease duration (late PsA). Time to achieving PsARC response was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Of 135 PsA patients treated with ADA, 126 had information on disease duration (earlyPsA, n=41). PsARC response was achieved by 72.9% of the patients (88.0% early PsA vs 62.2% late PsA; P=0.022) after 3 months and by 85.4% after 24 months (100% early PsA vs 75.9% late PsA; P=0.044). Early PsA patients achieved significantly less painful joints (2.7 vs 6.7, p=0.006), lower mean C-reactive protein (0.5 mg/dL vs 1.3 mg/dL; P=0.011), and PhGA (18.3 vs 28.1; P=0.020) at 3 months. In the long term, early PsA patients also had fewer swollen joints (0.3 vs 1.7; P=0.030) and lower PhGA (6.3 vs 21.9; PPsA, respectively. Early PsA patients obtained PsARC response more rapidly than late PsA (3.8 and 7.4 months, respectively; P=0.008). Concomitant csDMARDs showed clinical benefit (2-year PsARC response, 88.3% vs 60.0%; P=0.044). Concomitant glucocorticoids had no effect on PsARC response over 2 years of follow-up. Persistence on ADA was similar in both groups. Conclusion Early PsA patients had a greater chance of improvement after ADA therapy and better functional outcome, and

  11.  Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Trine Bay

      Dato 31. januar 2006Title Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritisAuthors:Trine Bay Laurberg,Torkell Ellingsen,Jan Frystyk,Ib Hansen,Anette Jørgensen,Ulrik Tarp,Merete Lund Hetland,Kim Hørslev-Petersen,Nete Hornung,Jørgen Hjelm Poulsen,Allan Flyvbjerg,Kristian St......  Dato 31. januar 2006Title Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritisAuthors:Trine Bay Laurberg,Torkell Ellingsen,Jan Frystyk,Ib Hansen,Anette Jørgensen,Ulrik Tarp,Merete Lund Hetland,Kim Hørslev-Petersen,Nete Hornung,Jørgen Hjelm Poulsen,Allan Flyvbjerg......,Kristian Stengaard-PedersenBackground: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease, which affects the joints with inflammation leading to destruction of cartilage and bone. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterised by low level of chronic inflammation, slow...

  12. Inflammatory markers and extent and progression of early atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeit, Peter; Thompson, Simon G; Agewall, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large-scale epidemiological evidence on the role of inflammation in early atherosclerosis, assessed by carotid ultrasound, is lacking. We aimed to quantify cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of inflammatory markers with common-carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT)...

  13. "Employment and arthritis: making it work" a randomized controlled trial evaluating an online program to help people with inflammatory arthritis maintain employment (study protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Erin C; Rogers, Pamela; Backman, Catherine L; Goldsmith, Charles H; Gignac, Monique A; Marra, Carlo; Village, Judy; Li, Linda C; Esdaile, John M; Lacaille, Diane

    2014-07-21

    Arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of long-term work disability (WD), an outcome with a major impact on quality of life and a high cost to society. The importance of decreased at-work productivity has also recently been recognized. Despite the importance of these problems, few interventions have been developed to reduce the impact of arthritis on employment. We have developed a novel intervention called "Making It Work", a program to help people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) deal with employment issues, prevent WD and improve at-work productivity. After favorable results in a proof-of-concept study, we converted the program to a web-based format for broader dissemination and improved accessibility. The objectives of this study are: 1) to evaluate in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) the effectiveness of the program at preventing work cessation and improving at-work productivity; 2) to perform a cost-utility analysis of the intervention. 526 participants with IA will be recruited from British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario in Canada. The intervention consists of a) 5 online group sessions; b) 5 web-based e-learning modules; c) consultations with an occupational therapist for an ergonomic work assessment and a vocational rehabilitation counselor. Questionnaires will be administered online at baseline and every 6 months to collect information about demographics, disease measures, costs, work-related risk factors for WD, quality of life, and work outcomes. Primary outcomes include at-work productivity and time to work cessation of > 6 months for any reason. Secondary outcomes include temporary work cessation, number of days missed from work per year, reduction in hours worked per week, quality adjusted life year for the cost utility analysis, and changes from baseline in employment risk factors. Analysis of Variance will evaluate the intervention's effect on at-work productivity, and multivariable Cox regression models will

  14. Diagnostic and prognostic value of history-taking and physical examination in undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Bindee; Villeneuve, Edith; Bombardier, Claire

    2011-03-01

    To review the diagnostic and prognostic value of history/physical examination among patients with undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis (UPIA). We conducted a systematic review evaluating the association between history/physical examination features and a diagnostic or prognostic outcome. Nineteen publications were included. Advanced age, female sex, and morning stiffness were predictive of a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from UPIA. A higher number of tender and swollen joints, small/large joint involvement in the upper/lower extremities, and symmetrical involvement were associated with progression to RA. Similar features were associated with persistent disease and erosions, while disability at baseline and extraarticular features were predictive of future disability. History/physical examination features are heterogeneously reported. Several features predict progression from UPIA to RA or a poor prognosis. Continued measurements in the UPIA population are needed to determine if these features are valid and reliable predictors of outcomes, especially as new definitions for RA and disease states emerge.

  15. Discordant inflammatory changes in the apophyseal and sacroiliac joints: serial observations in enthesitis-related arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amies, Thomas; Vendhan, Kanimozhi; Humphries, Paul; Sen, Debajit; Ioannou, Yiannis; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent to which inflammation of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) and apophyseal joints (AJs) changes concordantly after treatment in enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA). Methods: A retrospective study was performed with institutional review board approval. 31 young patients with ERA who had been scanned between March 2009 and November 2014 were included. All patients had post-contrast imaging of the SIJs and lumbar spine and short tau inversion-recovery (STIR) images of the SIJs. The severity of sacroiliitis was scored using a modification of an established technique, and inflammation of the AJs was evaluated using a recently described grading system. The changes in SIJ and AJ scores after treatment were classified as either concordant or discordant, and the proportion of scan pairs in these groups was recorded. In addition, the correlation between change in SIJ STIR score (Δnfla) and change in AJ score (ΔAJ) was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results: Of a total of 43 scan pairs, the changes in inflammation were concordant in 16 scan pairs and discordant in 27 scan pairs. There was no significant correlation between Δnfla and ΔAJ (R = 0.14, p = 0.37). Conclusion: Inflammatory changes in the SIJs and AJs are often discordant. This may be a reason why patients experience ongoing back pain despite apparent improvement in one or the other site. Advances in knowledge: Inflammation may behave differently at different anatomical sites. The SIJs and AJs should both be imaged in patients with ERA with back pain. PMID:27376529

  16. A survey of psychological support provision for people with inflammatory arthritis in secondary care in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dures, Emma; Almeida, Celia; Caesley, Judy; Peterson, Alice; Ambler, Nicholas; Morris, Marianne; Pollock, Jon; Hewlett, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    The consequences of inflammatory arthritis can include depression, anxiety and low mood, reducing patients' quality of life and increasing pressure on the healthcare system. Treatment guidelines recommend psychological support, but data are lacking on the provision available. A postal survey concerning psychological support provision was sent to rheumatology units in 143 acute trusts across England. Nurses from 73 rheumatology units (51%) responded. Overall, 73% rated their unit's psychological support provision as 'inadequate' and only 4% rated it as 'good'. Few units believed that psychological support did not fall within their remit (12%), yet only 8% had a psychologist in the team. Most units (68%) did not routinely screen patients to identify psychological difficulties. Referral to other service providers was reported in 42% of units, with 3% very satisfied with this provision. Within units, services containing elements of psychological support ranged from occupational therapy (81%) to psychology/counselling (14%). Psychological approaches used by team members ranged from shared decision making (77%) to cognitive-behavioural approaches (26%). The current barriers to providing psychological support were lack of clinical time and available training (86% and 74%, respectively), and delivery costs (74%). Future facilitators included management support (74%) and availability of skills training (74%). Rheumatology units viewed psychological support provision as part of their remit but rated their overall provision as inadequate, despite some team members using psychological skills. To improve provision, clinicians' training needs must be addressed and organizational support generated, and further research needs to define adequate psychological support provision from the patient perspective. © 2014 The Authors. Musculoskeletal Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Identifying real and perceived barriers to therapeutic education programs for individuals with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lorna; Sangrar, Ruheena; Bornstein, Carolyn; Lukmanji, Sara; Hapuhennedige, Sandani; Thorne, Carter; Beattie, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic Education Programs (TEPs) grounded in self-management principles have been shown to improve quality of life of patients with chronic conditions and reduce patient-related healthcare costs. Though these programs are becoming more readily available, patients often experience barriers in participating. This study sought to identify barriers faced by inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients in attending a TEP and understand how patients overcame perceived barriers. A mixed-method study design was used. Questionnaires were distributed to individuals with IA who were invited to attend a TEP between 2010 and 2013. Respondents were those that chose not to attend (group A), individuals who attended ≤4 of 10 sessions (group B), individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions prior to May 2013 (group C), and individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions from June 2013 to November 2013 (group D). Individuals in group D were also invited to participate in focus groups to discuss how they had overcome perceived barriers. Real barriers identified by individuals in groups A and B included time, distance, and cost associated with attendance. Individuals who overcame perceived barriers (groups C and D) discussed strategies they used to do so. Aspects of the overall program experience and access to clinic and program also contributed to patients being able to overcome barriers. Time, distance, and cost are external barriers that prevented individuals from utilizing self-management education opportunities. These barriers were overcome if and when individuals had resources available to them. Readiness for behavior change also influenced commitment to participate in the program.

  18. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasui, Otilia C.; Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Zhong, Anguo [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Miller, Elka [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Belik, Jaques [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheng, Hai-Ling; Kassner, Andrea; Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Department of Public Health, Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jong, Roland; Rogers, Marianne [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO{sub 2}) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. (orig.)

  19. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: roles of magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, conventional radiography and computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, Bo; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While conventional X-rays only visualize the late signs of preceding disease activity, there is evidence for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography being highly sensitiv...

  20. M-ficolin levels reflect disease activity and predict remission in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Christian Gytz; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2013-01-01

    To assess plasma M-ficolin concentrations in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to investigate the correlation of M-ficolin concentrations with disease activity markers, and to determine the predictive value of M-ficolin with respect...... to the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28)....

  1. In vitro and in vivo spin echo diffusion imaging characteristics of synovial fluid: potential non-invasive differentiation of inflammatory and degenerative arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustace, S.; DiMasi, M.; Adams, J.; Ward, R.; Caruthers, S.; McAlindon, T.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to analyse the diffusion characteristics of synovial fluid in degenerative and inflammatory arthropathies.Design and patients. Ten in vitro specimens of synovial fluid from patients with both degenerative and inflammatory arthropathy were studied at body temperature with a navigator-corrected spin echo diffusion sequence (B values 0-512 s/mm 2 ), on a Philips 1.5-T Gyroscan. Subsequently synovial fluid from knee joint effusions of 25 patients (10 patients with osteoarthritis, 10 patients with effusions following trauma and 5 patients with effusions secondary to inflammatory arthritis) was evaluated with the same navigator-corrected spin echo diffusion sequence.Results. Both in vitro and in vivo study demonstrated decreased diffusion in patients with effusions secondary to degenerative joint disease (less than 2.40 x 10 -5 cm 2 /s) relative to patients with effusions accompanying knee trauma (greater than 2.75 x 10 -5 cm 2 /s) and inflammatory arthritis (in vitro and in vivo greater than 3.00 x 10 -5 cm 2 /s).Conclusion. Synovial fluid in degenerative arthritis shows less diffusion or free water movement than synovial fluid in inflammatory arthritis. Diffusion characteristics of synovial fluid may be used to predict the nature of the underlying form of arthritis in patients presenting with knee joint effusions. (orig.)

  2. Are rheumatoid arthritis patients discernible from other early arthritis patients using 1.5T extremity magnetic resonance imaging? a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Bloem, Johan L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Reijnierse, Monique

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research. A European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recently suggested that MRI can improve the certainty of RA diagnosis. Because this recommendation may reflect a tendency to use MRI in daily practice, thorough studies on the value of MRI are required. Thus far no large studies have evaluated the accuracy of MRI to differentiate early RA from other patients with early arthritis. We performed a large cross-sectional study to determine whether patients who are clinically classified with RA differ in MRI features compared to patients with other diagnoses. In our study, 179 patients presenting with early arthritis (median symptom duration 15.4 weeks) underwent 1.5T extremity MRI of unilateral wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints according to our arthritis protocol, the foot without contrast. Images were scored according to OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) by 2 independent readers. Tenosynovitis was also assessed. The main outcome was fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. Test characteristics and areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. In subanalyses, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria were used as outcome, and analyses were stratified for anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). The ACR 1987 criteria were fulfilled in 43 patients (24.0%). Patients with RA had higher scores for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and bone marrow edema (BME) than patients without RA (p arthritis patients.

  3. Job retention vocational rehabilitation for employed people with inflammatory arthritis (WORK-IA): a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Alison; O'Brien, Rachel; Woodbridge, Sarah; Bradshaw, Lucy; Prior, Yeliz; Radford, Kate; Culley, June; Whitham, Diane; Ruth Pulikottil-Jacob

    2017-07-21

    Inflammatory arthritis leads to work disability, absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e. at-work productivity loss) at high cost to individuals, employers and society. A trial of job retention vocational rehabilitation (VR) in the United States identified this helped people keep working. The effectiveness of this VR in countries with different socioeconomic policies and conditions, and its impact on absenteeism, presenteeism and health, are unknown. This feasibility study tested the acceptability of this VR, modified for the United Kingdom, compared to written advice about managing work problems. To help plan a randomized controlled trial, we tested screening, recruitment, intervention delivery, response rates, applicability of the control intervention and identified the relevant primary outcome. A feasibility randomized controlled trial with rheumatoid, psoriatic or inflammatory arthritis patients randomized to receive either job retention VR or written information only (the WORK-IA trial). Following three days VR training, rheumatology occupational therapists provided individualised VR on a one to one basis. VR included work assessment, activity diaries and action planning, and (as applicable) arthritis self-management in the workplace, ergonomics, fatigue and stress management, orthoses, employment rights and support services, assistive technology, work modifications, psychological and disclosure support, workplace visits and employer liaison. Fifty five (10%) people were recruited from 539 screened. Follow-up response rates were acceptable at 80%. VR was delivered with fidelity. VR was more acceptable than written advice only (7.8 versus 6.7). VR took on average 4 h at a cost of £135 per person. Outcome assessment indicated VR was better than written advice in reducing presenteeism (Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) change score mean: VR = -12.4 (SD 13.2); control = -2.5 (SD 15.9), absenteeism, perceived risk of job loss and improving pain and health status

  4. Increasing podiatry referrals for patients with inflammatory arthritis at a tertiary hospital in Singapore: A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, K; Cheung, P P; Rome, K; Santosa, A; Lahiri, M

    2017-06-01

    Foot disease is highly prevalent in people with inflammatory arthritis and is often under-recognized. Podiatry intervention can significantly reduce foot pain and disability, with timely access being the key factor. The aim of this study was to plan and implement a quality improvement project to identify the barriers to, and improve, uptake of podiatry services among patients with inflammatory arthritis-related foot problems seen at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. A 6-month quality improvement program was conducted by a team of key stakeholders using quality improvement tools to identify, implement and test several interventions designed to improve uptake of podiatry services. The number of patients referred for podiatry assessment was recorded on a weekly basis by an experienced podiatrist. The criterion for appropriate referral to podiatry was those patients with current or previous foot problems such as foot pain, swelling and deformity. Interventions included education initiatives, revised workflow, development of national guidelines for inflammatory arthritis, local podiatry guidelines for the management of foot and ankle problems, routine use of outcome measures, and introduction of a fully integrated rheumatology-podiatry service with reduced cost package. Referral rates increased from 8% to 11%, and were sustained beyond the study period. Complete incorporation of podiatry into the rheumatology consultation as part of the multidisciplinary team package further increased referrals to achieve the target of full uptake of the podiatry service. Through a structured quality improvement program, referrals to podiatry increased and improved the uptake and acceptance of rheumatology-podiatry services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation of serum Dickkopf-1 content with bone destruction, inflammatory response and oxidation reaction in patients with gouty arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei He

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of serum Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1 content with bone destruction, inflammatory response and oxidation reaction in patients with gouty arthritis. Methods: A total of 40 patients with acute gouty arthritis who were treated in our hospital between 2013 and 2016 were selected as the group A of the study, 56 patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia who were treated in our hospital during the same period were selected as the group B of the study, and 60 healthy volunteers who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as the control group of the study. The serum was collected to detect the contents of DKK-1, bone destruction indexes, inflammatory response indexes and oxidation reaction indexes. Results: Serum DKK-1, TRACP5b, RANKL, β-CTX, PGE2, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sCD14, MDA, 8-OHdG and 3-NT levels of group A and group B were significantly higher than those of control group while SOD and GSH-Px levels were significantly lower than those of control group; serum DKK-1, TRACP5b, RANKL, β-CTX, PGE2, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sCD14, MDA, 8-OHdG and 3-NT levels of group A were significantly higher than those of group B while SOD and GSH-Px levels were significantly lower than those of group B; serum DKK-1 level was positively correlated with TRACP5b, RANKL, β-CTX, PGE2, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sCD14, MDA, 8-OHdG and 3-NT levels, and negatively correlated with SOD and GSH-Px levels. Conclusion: Abnormally elevated DKK-1 in patients with gouty arthritis can induce articular bone destruction as well as inflammatory response and oxidative stress response activation.

  6. Inflammatory arthritis mimicking Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) in a child: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilmez, Zeliha; Turgut, Selin Turan; Icagasioglu, Afitap; Bicakci, Irem

    2016-01-01

    Joint complaints in childhood are seen frequently and differential diagnosis can be difficult. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatological disease of childhood. It involves peripheral joint arthritis, chronic synovitis, and extra-articular manifestations. Accurate diagnosis can take a long time and sometimes multiple diagnoses are used while following the patient until a final diagnosis can be reached. Arthritis may be triggered by trauma and confused with other diseases like complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), in which trauma plays a role in the etiology. In the present case, ankle pain in an 8-year-old girl was misdiagnosed as CRPS.

  7. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan; Su, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Fang; Chu, Jing-Xue; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdow...

  8. Suggested MR staging classification of early rheumatoid arthritis at the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheck, R.J.; Hoischen, S.H.; Willemsen, U.F.; Pfluger, T.; Kueffer, G.; Krueger, K.; Schattenkirchner, M.; Hahn, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: MRI can demonstrate pathology of joint disease in the early course of rheumatoid arthritis prior to destructions seen on conventional radiographs. In a prospective study, we tried to develop a systematical classification of joint pathology demonstrated by MRI, which would be essential for scoring the course of the disease. Patients and method: Metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of 48 patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis (mean disease duration: 6.4 months) were evaluated by MRI using a high-resolution transmitter-receiver coil. Examinations included 2 mm sliced T 2 -, T 1 - and gadolinium enhanced T 1 -SE sequences in coronal and axial orientation. In consideration of pathological findings on MRI and histopathogenetical pathways of destruction in rheumatoid arthritis a MR-score (0-5) was established. Results: This allowed to score each joint examined: Score 0 (normal) in 47.8%/49.5%, score 1 in 35.5%/50.5%, score 2 in 4.2%/0%, score 3 in 10.8%/0%, score 4 in 1.5%/0% of the metacarpophalangeal/interphalangeal joints, respectively. Conclusions: Using the MR-score a relative individual destruction number can be calculated, which may be used to follow up patients in the early course of rheumatoid arthritis (e.g. drug therapy studies). The presented MR scoring system has to be evaluated further in longitudinal studies and must be correlated to radiographical and clinical findings. (orig.) [de

  9. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ..., crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of... Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... solicits comments on information needed to adjudicate the claim for VA disability benefits related to a...

  10. Fasitibant chloride, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone interact to inhibit carrageenan-induced inflammatory arthritis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Claudio; Giuliani, Sandro; Cialdai, Cecilia; Tramontana, Manuela; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bradykinin, through the kinin B2 receptor, is involved in inflammatory processes related to arthropathies. B2 receptor antagonists inhibited carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats in synergy with anti-inflammatory steroids. The mechanism(s) underlying this drug interaction was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Drugs inhibiting inflammatory mediators released by carrageenan were injected, alone or in combination, into the knee joint of pentobarbital anaesthetized rats 30 min before intra-articular administration of carrageenan. Their effects on the carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses (joint pain, oedema and neutrophil recruitment) and release of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandins, IL-1β, IL-6 and the chemokine GRO/CINC-1), were assessed after 6 h. KEY RESULTS The combination of fasitibant chloride (MEN16132) and dexamethasone was more effective than each drug administered alone in inhibiting knee joint inflammation and release of inflammatory mediators. Fasitibant chloride, MK571, atenolol, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin (B2 receptor, leukotriene, catecholamine and B1 receptor antagonists, respectively) and dexketoprofen (COX inhibitor), reduced joint pain and, except for the latter, also diminished joint oedema. A combination of drugs inhibiting joint pain (fasitibant chloride, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin, dexketoprofen, MK571 and atenolol) and oedema (fasitibant chloride, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin, MK571 and atenolol) abolished the respective inflammatory response, producing inhibition comparable with that achieved with the combination of fasitibant chloride and dexamethasone. MK571 alone was able to block neutrophil recruitment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Bradykinin-mediated inflammatory responses to intra-articular carrageenan were not controlled by steroids, which were not capable of preventing bradykinin effects either by direct activation of the B2 receptor, or through the indirect effects mediated by release of eicosanoids

  11. Lipid management among individuals with inflammatory arthritis in the national REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Gamboa, Christopher M; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Safford, Monika M

    2018-01-01

    Objective Hyperlipidemia guidelines do not currently identify inflammatory arthritis (IA) as a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. We compared hyperlipidemia treatment of individuals with and without IA (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis) in a large national cohort. Methods Participants from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study were classified as having IA (without diabetes or hypertension); diabetes (but no IA); hypertension (but no diabetes or IA); or no IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the odds of medical treatment among those with hyperlipidemia. Results Thirty-nine participants had IA, 5423 had diabetes, 7534 had hypertension, and 5288 had no diabetes, hypertension, or IA. The fully adjusted odds of treatment were similar between participants with IA and those without IA, hypertension, or diabetes. Participants with diabetes and no IA and participants with hypertension and no IA were twice as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Conclusion Despite their higher CVD risk, patients with IA were as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without diabetes, hypertension, or IA. Lipid guidelines should identify IA as a CVD risk factor to improve CVD risk optimization in IA.

  12. [Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome during ulcerative colitis: A rare extra-intestinal sign of inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aounallah, A; Zerriaa, S; Ksiaa, M; Jaziri, H; Boussofara, L; Ghariani, N; Mokni, S; Saidi, W; Sriha, B; Belajouza, C; Denguezli, M; Nouira, R

    2016-05-01

    Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome (BADAS) is characterized by combined pustular skin eruption and arthralgia. It may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease or bowel bypass surgery. We report a case of BADAS in a patient with ulcerative colitis. A 39-year-old woman was being treated for a severe flare-up of ulcerative colitis present over the preceding 2 months and treated with prednisone, azathioprine and cyclosporine. She was also presenting a cutaneous eruption and arthralgia that had begun three days earlier. Dermatological examination revealed profuse vesicular and pustular lesions. Biopsy specimens showed mature neutrophilic infiltrate within the dermis. A diagnosis of BADAS was made and the same treatment was maintained. Systemic symptoms were resolved but the vesicular lesions were superseded by hypertrophic scars. Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome consists of a vesiculopustular eruption associated with arthralgia and/or arthritis and fever, as was the case in our patient. The histological picture is characterized by abundant neutrophilic infiltrate in the superficial dermis. The clinical and histological features and the course of BADAS allow this entity to be classified within the spectrum of neutrophilic dermatoses. Treatment chiefly involves systemic corticosteroids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Silje Vermedal; Lindegaard, Hanne Merete; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    2008-01-01

    Innate immune system abnormalities, e.g., mannan-binding lectin (MBL) genotype variants, have been demonstrated to modify the disease course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) shares important structural and functional properties with MBL suggesting that SP-D may...... be an additional RA disease modifier. The Met11Thr polymorphism in the N-terminal part of SP-D is an important determinant for the SP-D serum level, but this polymorphism is also essential to the function and assembly into oligomers. We aimed to compare the serum levels of SP-D in a cohort of newly diagnosed...... untreated RA patients with healthy matched controls, and to investigate if there was an association to core measures of disease activity within the first year after disease onset. Secondly, we aimed to investigate whether the Met11Thr polymorphism was associated with RA. Serum SP-D was significantly lower...

  14. Modern methods of early diagnostics of juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Y.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory diseases of joints is one of the most important issues in the pediatrics. Nowadays the significant attention in this sphere is paid to the search of new accurate criteria of diagnostics. It will help estimate the severity of disease, determine the prognosis, choose the method of treatment and monitoring and evaluate the efficacy of the therapy.

  15. Monocarboxylate transporter 4, associated with the acidification of synovial fluid, is a novel therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Wataru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Nagahara, Hidetake; Kukida, Yuji; Seno, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Kohno, Masataka; Oda, Ryo; Taniguchi, Daigo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Ejima, Akika; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Ashihara, Eishi

    2015-11-01

    Synovial fluid pH is decreased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We undertook this study to examine the mechanism by which synovial fluid pH is regulated and to explore the possibility of a therapeutic strategy by manipulating this mechanism. We determined the pH and lactate concentration in synovial fluid from 16 RA patients. Cultured synovial fibroblasts (SFs) from the inflamed joints of 9 RA patients (RASFs) were examined for the expression of ion transporters that regulate intracellular and extracellular pH. The ion transporter up-regulated in RASF lines was then suppressed in RASFs by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the effect of transfection on viability and proliferation was investigated. Finally, we examined the therapeutic effect of electrotransfer of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4)-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Synovial fluid pH correlated inversely with both the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the C-reactive protein level and the synovial fluid lactate levels. RASFs exhibited up-regulated transcription of MCT4 messenger RNA. MCT4 exported intracellular lactate into the extracellular space. RASFs had significantly higher MCT4 protein levels than did SFs from patients with osteoarthritis. Knockdown of MCT4 induced intrinsic apoptosis of RASFs, thereby inhibiting their proliferation. Moreover, electrotransfer of MCT4-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with CIA significantly reduced the severity of arthritis. RA activity correlated with decreased synovial fluid pH. This may be due to increased MCT4 expression in RASFs. Silencing MCT4 induced apoptosis in RASFs and reduced the severity of CIA, suggesting that MCT4 is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Gratitude uniquely predicts lower depression in chronic illness populations: A longitudinal study of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Wood, Alex M

    2017-02-01

    Although gratitude has been identified as a key clinically relevant trait for improving well-being, it is understudied within medical populations. The current study addressed this gap and extended previous and limited cross-sectional research by examining the longitudinal associations of gratitude to depression in 2 chronic illness samples, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two chronic illness samples, arthritis (N = 423) and IBD (N = 427), completed online surveys at Time 1 (T1). One hundred sixty-three people with arthritis and 144 people with IBD completed the 6-month follow-up survey (T2). Depression, gratitude, illness cognitions, perceived stress, social support, and disease-related variables were assessed at T1 and T2. At T2, 57.2% of the arthritis sample and 53.4% of the IBD sample met the cut off scores for significant depression. T1 gratitude was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at T1 and T2 in both samples (rs from -.43 to -.50). Regression analyses revealed that T1 gratitude remained a significant and unique predictor of lower T2 depression after controlling for T1 depression, relevant demographic variables, illness cognitions, changes in illness-relevant variables, and another positive psychological construct, thriving, in both samples. As the first investigation of the longitudinal associations of gratitude to psychological well-being in the context of chronic illness, the current study provides important evidence for the relevance of gratitude for health-related clinical populations. Further intervention-based research is warranted to more fully understand the potential benefits of gratitude for adjustment to chronic illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Long-term safety and efficacy of biosimilar infliximab among patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abuelmagd Abdalla, Niamh Byrne, Richard Conway, Thomas Walsh, Geraldine Mannion, Michael Hanly, Miriam O’Sullivan, Ann Maria Curran, John J Carey Department of Rheumatology, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar infliximab in adult patients with inflammatory arthritis switched from reference product in our center. Patients and methods: In April 2014, patients attending our rheumatology service for infliximab infusions were switched from reference product to the biosimilar infliximab following consent and hospital approval. Results: Around 34 patients with inflammatory arthritis were switched from reference product to biosimilar infliximab in 2014: 50% female, mean age 55 years (standard deviation=12.9, mean disease duration 14.79 years (9.7, median duration on infliximab 57 months, and two-thirds on oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. There was no difference in efficacy or safety in the first 6 months of therapy. By the end of 2015, the mean follow-up on biosimilar infliximab was 15.8 (standard deviation=6.3 months. Our results showed no significant difference in Health Assessment Questionnaire score, patient global assessment of disease activity, number of disease flares, or the medication dose between the originator and the biosimilar infliximab. However, reported pain and C-reactive protein values were significantly higher during the longer follow-up period (p=0.043, 0.001 respectively. There was no significant difference in the number of adverse events or infusion reactions during follow-up periods. Only five (14.7% patients discontinued the biosimilar infliximab. Conclusion: Our patients experienced similar efficacy and safety for managing their arthritis with the biosimilar infliximab as the reference product infliximab, but at a much lower cost. Keywords: biologic therapy, rheumatic diseases, biosimilar exchange, infliximab, adult

  18. Early inflammatory response in rat brain after peripheral thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Raul; Wu, Yimin; Lai, Qin; Mrizek, Michael; Berger, Jamie; Jimenez, David F; Barone, Constance M; Ding, Yuchuan

    2006-10-16

    Previous studies have shown that the cerebral complications associated with skin burn victims are correlated with brain damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether systemic thermal injury induces inflammatory responses in the brain. Sprague Dawley rats (n=28) were studied in thermal injury and control groups. Animals from the thermal injury (n=14) and control (n=14) group were anesthetized and submerged to the neck vertically in 85 degrees C water for 6 s producing a third degree burn affecting 60-70% of the animal body surface area. The controls were submerged in 37 degrees C water for 6 s. Early expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), and intracellular cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) protein levels in serum were determined at 3 (n=7) and 7 h (n=7) by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). mRNA of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and ICAM-1 in the brain was measured at the same time points with a real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). An equal animal number was used for controls. Systemic inflammatory responses were demonstrated by dramatic up-regulations (5-50 fold) of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and ICAM-1 protein level in serum at 7 h after the thermal injury. However, as early as 3 h after peripheral thermal injury, a significant increase (3-15 fold) in mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and ICAM-1 was observed in brain homogenates, with increased levels remaining at 7 h after injury. This study demonstrated an early inflammatory response in the brain after severe peripheral thermal injury. The cerebral inflammatory reaction was associated with expression of systemic cytokines and an adhesion molecule.

  19. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF INFLIXIMAB IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY AND LATE JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of infliximab — monoclonal antibodies to the tumor necrotizing factor (TNF in treatment of 100 patients11 months — 17 years old with early and late articular types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The duration of treatment was 3 months — 2 years. Infliximap was delivered intravenously by scheme: infusion on 0, 2nd, 6th weeks and then every 8th week. The single dose of infliximab in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis was 6.7 (5.5; 9.0 mg/kg, with late type — 6.0 (5.0; 7.0 mg/kg of body weight. 102 weeks of treatment with anti-TNF-agent provided development of clinical remission, decrease and normalization of laboratory tests of disease’s activity, total restoration of joint’s function, increase of quality of life (on 97% in patients with early type, and 72% 0 in ones with late type. The drug was abolished in 39 (39% of patients, 23% — due to the development of secondary inefficiency, and 11% — due to the development of unfavorable effects.Key words: children, early and late rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, infliximab.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:30-42

  20. Differentiation between early rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy persons by conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Ejbjerg, B J; Hetland, M L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameter that best differentiates healthy persons and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigated responsiveness to treatment of various MRI parameters. METHOD: Conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE...

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi hydroalcoholic extract on neutrophil migration in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Elaine Cruz; Correa, Luana Barbosa; Pádua, Tatiana de Almeida; Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Mazzei, José Luiz; Heringer, Alan Patrick; Bizarro, Carlos Alberto; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora Coelho; Figueiredo, Maria Raquel; Henriques, Maria G

    2015-12-04

    Schinus terebinthifolius is a species of plant from the Anacardiaceae family, which can be found in different regions of Brazil. Schinus is popularly known as aroeirinha, aroeira-vermelha, or Brazilian pepper. In folk medicine, S. terebinthifolius is used for several disorders, including inflammatory conditions, skin wounds, mucosal membrane ulcers, respiratory problems, gout, tumors, diarrhea and arthritis. According to chemical analyses, gallic acid, methyl gallate and pentagalloylglucose are the main components of hydroalcoholic extracts from S. terebinthifolius leaves. In the present study, we demonstrated the ability of a hydroalcoholic extract to inhibit cell migration in arthritis and investigated the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The anti-inflammatory effect of S. terebinthifolius hydroalcoholic leaf extract (ST-70) was investigated in a zymosan-induced experimental model of inflammation. Male Swiss and C57Bl/6 mice received zymosan (100 µg/cavity) via intra-thoracic (i.t.) or intra-articular (i.a.) injection after oral pre-treatment with ST-70. The direct action of ST-70 on neutrophils was evaluated via chemotaxis. ST-70 exhibited a dose-dependent effect in the pleurisy model. The median effective dose (ED50) was 100mg/kg, which inhibited 70% of neutrophil accumulation when compared with the control group. ST-70 reduced joint diameter and neutrophil influx for synovial tissues at 6h and 24h in zymosan-induced arthritis. Additionally, ST-70 inhibited synovial interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (CXCL1/KC) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α production at 6h and CXCL1/KC and IL-1β production at 24h. The direct activity of ST-70 on neutrophils was observed via the impairment of CXCL1/KC-induced chemotaxis in neutrophils. Oral administration of ST-70 did not induce gastric damage. Daily administration for twenty days did not kill any animals. In contrast, similar administrations of diclofenac induced gastric damage and killed

  2. Successful tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy suppresses oxidative stress and hypoxia-induced mitochondrial mutagenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2011-07-25

    Abstract Introduction To examine the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy on the levels of early mitochondrial genome alterations and oxidative stress. Methods Eighteen inflammatory arthritis patients underwent synovial tissue oxygen (tpO2) measurements and clinical assessment of disease activity (DAS28-CRP) at baseline (T0) and three months (T3) after starting biologic therapy. Synovial tissue lipid peroxidation (4-HNE), T and B cell specific markers and synovial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Synovial levels of random mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were assessed using Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay. Results 4-HNE levels pre\\/post anti TNF-α therapy were inversely correlated with in vivo tpO2 (P < 0.008; r = -0.60). Biologic therapy responders showed a significantly reduced 4-HNE expression (P < 0.05). High 4-HNE expression correlated with high DAS28-CRP (P = 0.02; r = 0.53), tender joint count for 28 joints (TJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.49), swollen joint count for 28 joints (SJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.50) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (P = 0.04; r = 0.48). Strong positive association was found between the number of 4-HNE positive cells and CD4+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.60), CD8+ cells (P = 0.001; r = 0.70), CD20+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.68), CD68+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.47) and synovial VEGF expression (P = 0.01; r = 063). In patients whose in vivo tpO2 levels improved post treatment, significant reduction in mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP was observed (P < 0.05). In contrast in those patients whose tpO2 levels remained the same or reduced at T3, no significant changes for mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP were found. Conclusions High levels of synovial oxidative stress and mitochondrial mutation burden are strongly associated with low in vivo oxygen tension and synovial inflammation. Furthermore these significant mitochondrial genome alterations are rescued following successful anti TNF

  3. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2011-01-01

    of this score will require more PsA imaging datasets. As well, due to improved image resolution since the development of the original rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), the Task Force has worked on semiquantitative assessment of joint space narrowing, and developed a reliable method......The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, N.R.; Crabbe, J.P.; McQueen, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmington K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kelly Warmington,1 Carol Flewelling,2 Carol A Kennedy,3,4 Rachel Shupak,5 Angelo Papachristos,5 Caroline Jones,5 Denise Linton,3 Dorcas E Beaton,3,4,6–8 Sydney Lineker9 1Learning Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, 2Telemedicine Program, 3Musculoskeletal Health & Outcomes Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, 4Institute for Work & Health, 5Martin Family Centre for Arthritis Care & Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, 6Graduate Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, 7Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, 8Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, 9The Arthritis Society (Ontario Division, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities.Materials and methods: Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented.Results: In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the videoconference (% agree/strongly agree: could hear the presenter (92.9% and discussion

  6. Periarticular and generalised bone loss in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T W; Hansen, M S; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    )). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A hundred and sixty patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) received methotrexate, intra-articular betamethasone and ciclosporin /placebo-ciclosporin. Patients with Z-score ≤0 also started alendronate 10 mg/day. BMD of the hand (digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR...... in hand, lumbar spine and femoral neck was negatively associated with the dose of intra-articular betamethasone (p...

  7. Efficacy of tofacitinib monotherapy in methotrexate-naive patients with early or established rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Roy M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kavanaugh, Arthur F; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Kwok, Kenneth; DeMasi, Ryan; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib monotherapy was previously shown to inhibit structural damage, reduce clinical signs and symptoms of RA, and improve physical functioning over 24?months in methotrexate (MTX)-naive adult patients with RA. In this post hoc analysis, we compared efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in patients with early (disease duration

  8. AUTOANTIBODIES TO CIRTULLINATED ANTIGENS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF CLINICAL COURSE IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Belyaeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. To study the value of antibodies to cirtullinated antigens in diagnosis and their significance in prediction of erosion formation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, we examined serological status in 129 patients with early RA (ERA and 55 cases of undifferentiated arthritis, lasting less than 12 months. Another group consisted of 39 patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis, in whom the disease persisted for > 2 years. Control group included 39 patients with osteoarthrosis and 29 patients with reactive arthritis. The titers of rheumatoid factor (RF, antikeratin antibodies (AKA, antiperinuclear factor (APF and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP were studied during initial examination and 12 months later. Serial cryosections of rat esophagus and normal human buccal epithelial cells served as substrates for AKA and APF detection. AntiCCPs were revealed by means of DIASTAT technique (Axis Shield, UK.Upon initial observation of the patients with ERA, sensitivity and specificity of anti-CCP was, resp., 63.5% and 97,8%, thus exceeding both parameters for RF (48,8% и 86,7%. Sensitivity of AKA and APF for the same group was 17% and 24 %, with specificity of 97.7%. In RF-seronegative cases of early RA, anti-CCP were detected in 37% with ERA and 42% long-standing RA. In patients with non-differentiated arthritis who developed RA within one year, RF and anti-CCP were found in 12,2% and 45,5%. Following a one-year observation, a statistically significant increase was found in incidence of RF and anti-CCP in ERA patients.Positivity for anti-citrulline antibodies (AKA, APF and anti-CCP in ERA patients were associated with higher levels of CRP, increased HAQ, DAS4, Sharp scores, as compared to the patients who were seronegative. In ERA patients positive for anti-citrulline antibodies, higher frequencies of synovitis and erosive arthritis were detected by means of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. In the patients with ERA

  9. A randomized controlled cross-over trial investigating the effect of anti-inflammatory diet on disease activity and quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis: the Anti-inflammatory Diet In Rheumatoid Arthritis (ADIRA) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkvist, Anna; Bärebring, Linnea; Gjertsson, Inger; Ellegård, Lars; Lindqvist, Helen M

    2018-04-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects 0.5-1.0% of the population, and where many patients in spite of modern pharmacological treatment fail to reach remission. This affects physical as well as mental wellbeing and leads to severely reduced quality of life and reduced work capacity, thus yielding high individual as well as societal costs. As a complement to modern pharmacological treatment, lifestyle intervention should be evaluated as a treatment option. Scientific evidence exists for anti-inflammatory effects by single foods on RA, but no study exists where these foods have been combined to obtain maximum effect and thus offer a substantial improvement in patient life quality. The main goal of the randomized cross-over trial ADIRA (Anti-inflammatory Diet In Rheumatoid Arthritis) is to test the hypothesis that an anti-inflammatory diet intervention, compared to a regular diet, will decrease disease activity and improve quality of life in patients with stable established RA. In total, 50 RA patients with moderate disease activity are randomized to receive initially either a portfolio diet based on several food items with suggested anti-inflammatory effects or a control diet during 2 × 10 weeks with 3 months wash-out between diets. Food bags are delivered weekly by a home food delivery chain and referred to as the fiber bag and the protein bag, respectively, to partially blind participants. Both groups continue with regular pharmacological treatment. Known food biomarkers will be analyzed to measure intervention compliance. Impact on disease severity (measured by DAS28, a composite score which predicts disability and progression of RA), risk markers for cardiovascular disease and quality of life are evaluated after each diet regimen. Metabolomics will be used to evaluate the potential to predict responders to dietary treatment. A health economic evaluation is also included. The nutritional status of patients with RA often is

  10. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  11. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den; Dolman, Koert M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  12. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Seong Tae; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study

  13. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Seong Tae; Hahm, Chang Kok [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study.

  14. Early and late synovectomy of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C M; Poulsen, S; Ostergren, M

    1991-01-01

    was reduced and range of motion was unchanged. Total knee alloplasty (TKA) was performed in one knee among the patients who underwent early synovectomy, while reoperation with TKA had been performed in 12 out of 28 knees after late synovectomy. It is concluded that early synovectomy is indicated when medical...... treatment has failed. Late synovectomy must be regarded as a palliative procedure in order to postpone TKA....

  15. Neutrophil Microvesicles from Healthy Control and Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Prevent the Inflammatory Activation of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hefin I. Rhys

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles (MVs are emerging as a novel means to enact cell-to-cell communication in inflammation. Here, we aimed to ascertain the ability of neutrophil-derived MVs to modulate target cell behaviour, the focus being the macrophage.MVs were generated in response to tumour necrosis factor-α, from healthy control neutrophils or those from rheumatoid arthritis patients. MVs were used to stimulate human monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro, or administered intra-articularly in the K/BxN mouse model of arthritis. A macrophage/fibroblast-like synoviocyte co-culture system was used to study the effects of vesicles on the crosstalk between these cells.We demonstrate a direct role for phosphatidylserine and annexin-A1 exposed by the MVs to counteract classical activation of the macrophages, and promote the release of transforming growth factor-β, respectively. Classically-activated macrophages exposed to neutrophil MVs no longer activated fibroblast-like synoviocytes in subsequent co-culture settings. Finally, intra-articular administration of neutrophil MVs from rheumatoid arthritis patients in arthritic mice affected the phenotype of joint macrophages.Altogether these data, with the identification of specific MV determinants, open new opportunities to modulate on-going inflammation in the synovia – mainly by affecting macrophage polarization and potentially also fibroblast-like synoviocytes - through the delivery of autologous or heterologous MVs produced from neutrophils. Keywords: Neutrophils, Macrophages, Vesicles, Rheumatoid arthritis

  16. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  17. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH A VERY EARLY ONSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kornienko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has a tendency to manifest at earlier age. In childhood (< 6 years of age it has an especially severe course and is characterized by high grade inflammation, predominantly in the colon, by complication and extra-intestinal autoimmune injury. At younger age, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis require more aggressive treatment with frequently poor results. From genetic point of view, monogenic mutations controlling the immune response are characteristic for these diseases with an early onset; therefore, they are frequently associated with primary immunodeficiency. This implies various immunologic deficits, such as breakdown of the epithelial barrier, phagocytic dysfunction and dysfunction of Т and В lymphocytes and regulatory Т cells. Depending on this, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are identified associated with monogenic mutations of more than 50 genes. There some age-related specific features at manifestation. Thus, defects in interleukin 10 and FOXP3 manifest in the first months of life, whereas severe combined immunodeficiencies and phagocytosis defects become evident somewhat later. Virtually all 24 children with very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease, whom we examined, had immunologic defects and one child had a XIAP gene mutation. After identification of a specific immunologic defect, one can understand the mechanism of the disease and suspect one or another genetic defect with subsequent reasonable assessment of mutations in candidate genes. Detection of immunologic and genetic defects in children with a very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease allows for choosing an adequate strategy of non-conventional treatment that may differ depending on the mechanism of the disease.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  19. A randomized, double-blind, controlled study of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection into the joint of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cunnington, Joanna

    2010-07-01

    Most corticosteroid injections into the joint are guided by the clinical examination (CE), but up to 70% are inaccurately placed, which may contribute to an inadequate response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasound (US) guidance improves the accuracy and clinical outcome of joint injections as compared with CE guidance in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

  20. Identification of NR4A2 as a transcriptional activator of IL-8 expression in human inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, Carol M

    2009-10-01

    Expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 is controlled by pro-inflammatory mediators, suggesting that NR4A2 may contribute to pathological processes in the inflammatory lesion. This study identifies the chemoattractant protein, interleukin 8 (IL-8\\/CXCL8), as a molecular target of NR4A2 in human inflammatory arthritis and examines the mechanism through which NR4A2 modulates IL-8 expression. In TNF-alpha-activated human synoviocyte cells, enhanced expression of IL-8 mRNA and protein correspond to temporal changes in NR4A2 transcription and nuclear distribution. Ectopic expression of NR4A2 leads to robust changes in endogenous IL-8 mRNA levels and co-treatment with TNF-alpha results in significant (p<0.001) secretion of IL-8 protein. Transcriptional effects of NR4A2 on the human IL-8 promoter are enhanced in the presence of TNF-alpha, suggesting molecular crosstalk between TNF-alpha signalling and NR4A2. A dominant negative IkappaB kinase antagonizes the combined effects of NR4A2 and TNF-alpha on IL-8 promoter activity. Co-expression of NR4A2 and the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB enhances IL-8 transcription and functional studies indicate that transactivation occurs independently of NR4A2 binding to DNA or heterodimerization with additional nuclear receptors. The IL-8 minimal promoter region is sufficient to support NR4A2 and NF-kappaB\\/p65 co-operative activity and NR4A2 can interact with NF-kappaB\\/p65 on a 39bp sequence within this region. In patients treated with methotrexate for active inflammatory arthritis, a reduction in NR4A2 synovial tissue levels correlate significantly (n=10, r=0.73, p=0.002) with changes in IL-8 expression. Collectively, these data delineate an important role for NR4A2 in modulating IL-8 expression and reveal novel transcriptional responses to TNF-alpha in human inflammatory joint disease.

  1. The initial ultrasonographic examination of hands and feet joints in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ponikowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim was to assess of the morphology, intensity, and activity of changes in the first ultrasonographic (US examination of hands and feet in patients with early arthritis (lasting up to 12 months who were ultimately diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. An attempt was made to demonstrate a correlation between the intensity of lesions in US and selected laboratory parameters. Material and methods : Ultrasonographic examination was performed using a LOGIC GE 500 device on a group of 60 patients with arthritis (46 women, 14 men aged 18–80, previously untreated. In total, 3120 hand and feet joints were examined. The assessment focused on the presence of joint effusion, synovial proliferation and power Doppler signals (assessed on a semi-quantitative scale. Each patient underwent laboratory tests, necessary for making a diagnosis. In order to analyze the correlations between changes in US and laboratory parameters, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, reactive protein test (CRP, rheumatoid factor (RF, and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs were used. Results : In the study group, the average duration of arthritis symptoms until the first US examination was 5.6 months. Among the 3120 examined hand and foot joints, deviations from the norm appeared in 1093 joints, synovial hypertrophy was found in 471 joints (grade 1 synovial hypertrophy was reported most frequently, while presence of signal in Power Doppler was revealed in 261 joints (grade 1 was observed most frequently. A statistically significant correlation was found between the intensity of changes in Power Doppler and CRP concentration. Conclusions : In patients with increased concentrations of CRP, we may expect arthritis of higher intensity, therefore, in order to prevent the progression of destructive changes, it is necessary to quickly implement effective disease-modifying antirheumatic treatment. The conducted research showed that the activity of joint

  2. Management of Early- and Late-Stage Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Physiotherapy Students' Intended Behaviours Consistent with Canadian Best Practice Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineker, Sydney C.; Hallett, Christina; Tumber, Jake; Fernando, Nalin; Hul, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: This study examined whether physiotherapy students in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum intend to implement best practices for management of clients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Method: Physiotherapy students (n=49) completed a subsection of the ACREU Primary Care Survey to evaluate the concordance between intended behaviours and Canadian best practices for early- and late-stage RA, before and after completing the relevant PBL content. Changes in scores were assessed using McNemar's test for dependent proportions. Results: Most students indicated that they would recommend treatments or referrals for physiotherapy/exercise, education, and occupational therapy or joint protection pre- and post-PBL (>83% and >95%, respectively). Post-PBL, more students recommended referral to a rheumatologist and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for both early and late RA; however, the increase was significant only for early RA (p=0.013 and 0.031 for referral to rheumatologist and DMARDs, respectively). More students recommended psychosocial support at both stages of RA post-PBL (early RA: pstudents recommended DMARDs post-PBL, only 8 students in total made this recommendation (16%), and fewer students considered use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Most students (94%) did not recommend referral to a surgeon for early or late RA. Conclusion: Intended behaviour of physiotherapy students was more consistent with Canadian best practice guidelines for managing clients with early- and late-stage RA following the PBL curriculum. Further study is required to determine whether the students were less aware of best practices related to pharmacologic interventions and timely referral to appropriate specialists, or whether they considered these issues to be outside their scope of practice. PMID:23729962

  3. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Oestergaard, Mikkel [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spinal Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  4. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique; Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der; Oestergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  5. A commentary on TREAT: The trial of early aggressive drug therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baildam Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a category of JIA where multiple joints are affected by chronic inflammation, and where serious and lasting damage to joints is the expected natural history in untreated disease. There is evidence of response to disease-modifying antirheumatic and biologic drugs, but little evidence of permanent remission from any of the existing therapeutic trials. The TREAT trial by Wallace et al., recently published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, used a collaborative multicenter approach to studying early aggressive treatment of polyarticular JIA in an attempt to achieve full clinical inactive disease after 6 months of treatment. The study's main finding that the earlier in the disease course that treatment is started, the better the chance of disease control, has provided evidence that there is a 'window of opportunity' for treating JIA as there is in adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The study provides both a platform and an impetus for concentrating future treatment trials on early rather than established disease and investigating a standard of starting treatment within 10 to 12 weeks.

  6. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  7. Effect of Adalimumab on Refractory Arthritis in Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy with Anti-MDA5 Autoantibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Miyamae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old girl manifested persistent fever, skin rash, leg pain, fatigue, and joint pain. Based on muscle weakness, elevated muscle-derived enzymes, magnetic resonance imaging, and skin biopsy results, the diagnosis was juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM. Chest CT was normal; the anti-melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (anti-MDA5 autoantibody was positive. Initial manifestations subsided after prednisolone (PSL and methotrexate treatment. After the PSL dosage was decreased, the patient presented with metacarpophalangeal (MCP joint pain and swelling in both index fingers, synovial fluid, and signals on power Doppler ultrasound. The arthritis was refractory to cyclosporine and tacrolimus. Radiography showed progressive MCP joint space narrowing and joint erosion. Adalimumab was initiated 14 months after disease onset. There was a mildly increased matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3 level, an erythrocyte sedimentation ratio (ESR, and a normal CRP level. Adalimumab resulted in decreased MCP joint pain and swelling. PSL was discontinued 10 months after adalimumab initiation; after 9 more months of adalimumab, there were no significant ultrasonography findings. MMP3 and ESR levels normalized during treatment. Radiography after 2 years of adalimumab showed further progressive MCP joint space narrowing restricting dorsiflexion. This report clarified that anti-MDA5-positive JIIM joint manifestations were due to active synovitis and that adalimumab is required for severe cases. Further experience is needed to determine the pathology, severity, and prognosis of this type of arthritis.

  8. Extra-virgin olive oil and its phenolic extract prevent inflammatory response and joint damage in murine experimental arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosillo, M.A.; Sanchez-Hidalgo, M.; AlarcOn-de-la-Lastra, C.

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of EVOO in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that the phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of dietary EVOO and treatment with its phenolic extract (PE) in a model of RA, the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine collagen type II (CII). On day 21, the mice received a booster injection. We have demonstrated that EVOO and its PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. Our data indicate that dietary EVOO and PE treatment inhibit JNK, p38 and signal transducer and STAT-3. In addition, both EVOO and PE decrease NF-κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions. [es

  9. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S

    2017-01-01

    and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing...... was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist...... is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which...

  10. Understanding the relationship between the EQ-5D, SF-6D, HAQ and disease activity in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The growth of economic analyses and in particular cost-utility analyses (CUA), which use the QALY as a measure of outcome, has heightened the interest in the methodologies used to calculate the QALY. The EQ-5D has produced quite different utility values from that of the SF-6D. This article seeks to understand these differences using a cohort of patients with inflammatory arthritis. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the disease-specific measure, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) disability index (DI) and the preference-based measures, SF-6D, EQ-5D and European League Against Arthritis (EULAR) Disease Activity Score (DAS) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Patients with RA and PsA (n = 504) attending a tertiary rheumatology referral centre completed the HAQ, SF-6D and the EQ-5D before starting biological therapy and again 12 months later. The SF-36 was converted into a utility using the preference-based SF-6D. Clinical outcomes such as the DAS, joint counts and laboratory measures were also recorded. We calculated single index utility scores from the preference-based instruments using UK population norms. We used regression analysis to derive a mapping function and calculated utility scores from the HAQDI and the DAS 28. RESULTS: The mean utility observed at baseline for RA was 0.43 for the EQ-5D and 0.54 for the SF-6D and for PsA was 0.49 for the EQ-5D and 0.57 for the SF-6D. The utility gain demonstrated by the EQ-5D was over twice that of the SF-6D. The EQ-5D scored 17% of the RA group as less than 0 (state defined as worse than death); 7% of this group remained less than 0 at follow-up. The distribution of the utility estimates was similar for both RA and PsA. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings draw attention to the impact of states worse than death on the overall distribution for the EQ-5D derived utilities and how these impact on its use in practice. EQ-5D-derived QALY changes are over twice

  11. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS WITHIN THE REMARCA STUDY: PRELIMINARY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Novikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA have a high or very high cardiovascular risk (CVR before therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Objective: to evaluate the impact of antirheumatic therapy performed in accordance with the Treat-to-Target strategy on the progression of atherosclerosis and CVR in patients with early RA. Subjects and methods. This investigation enrolled 74 patients (72% women; median age, 56 years with early RA having moderate to high activity (median DAS28, 5.6 who had not previously received DMARDs and glucocorticoids (GCs. All patients were anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive and 87% of the patients were rheumatoid factor-positive. All patients received methotrexate (MT subcutaneously with dose escalation up to 25–30 mg/week, in case of its inefficiency at 3 months a biological agent (BA was added. After 6 months, 39% of the patients achieved remission; 19% had low; 35 and 7% had moderate and high disease activity, respectively. The majority (n = 20 (69% who achieved remission received MT monotherapy; 9 (31% – MT + BA whereas among the patients who did not achieve remission 15 (33% and 30 (67% respectively. At baseline and after 6 months of treatment, traditional CVR factors were assessed in all patients, by determining the total coronary risk by the SCORE scale, including that modified by EULAR (mSCORE, carotid artery atherosclerosis (CAA by duplex scanning data, coronary calcification (CC by multislice spiral computed tomography and by estimating the degree of CVR.Results and discussion. The rates of hypertension, overweight, abdominal obesity, low activity, smoking, and type 2 diabetes mellitus did not change significantly after 6 months. There were increases in the levels of total cholesterol by 7% (p < 0.05, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 9% (p<0.01, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 26% (p < 0.005, and body mass index (BMI by 1% (p < 0.01 and a decrease

  12. The impact of a revised EQ-5D population scoring on preference-based utility scores in an inflammatory arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is well established that there are problems with the EQ-5D. This is due to the original scoring methods used and how negative time trade-off (TTO) values were treated. A revised scoring method has been published. This article applies this to an inflammatory arthritis cohort. The objective is to examine the impact of a revised scoring system for the EQ-5D (UK) TTO on the utility estimates and in the case of rheumatoid arthritis, to explore the impact of using different utility metrics on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) results of an economic model. METHODS: A total of 504 patients with inflammatory arthritis were rescored using revised EQ-5D scoring, which uses an episodic random utility model to deal with negative TTO values. Differences in utility scores were compared and the new mapping coefficients were obtained. These were then used in an economic model to examine the impact on the ICER. RESULTS: In rheumatoid arthritis, the overall change is less for the revised EQ-5D scoring than with the original EQ-5D (TTO) but greater than the SF-6D: EQ-5D UK -0.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.30 to -0.15), revised EQ-5D UK -0.16 (95% CI -0.21 to -0.10) and SF-6D -0.08 (95% CI -0.11 to -0.05). A similar trend is seen in the psoriatic arthritis group. The economic model produced different ICERs, when different utility measures were used; EQ-5D (TTO) euro42,402, SF-6D euro111,788, and revised EQ-5D (TTO) euro57,747. CONCLUSION: In the context of inflammatory arthritis, this article demonstrates that a revised scoring for EQ-5D may have a significant impact on utility estimates and on the output of the economic model.

  13. Sleep and physical activity: a survey of people with inflammatory arthritis and their engagement by health professionals in rheumatology in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Sean; Donnelly, Alan; Fraser, Alexander; Kennedy, Norelee

    2017-06-02

    Sleep is important in maintaining the body's circadian rhythm and in maintaining health. Aim was to investigate sleep and physical activity among people who have inflammatory arthritis and their engagement with Health Professionals. Members from a national charitable organisation for patients with arthritis and a national rheumatology health professionals society were invited to participate in separate cross-sectional surveys hosted on SurveyMonkey (R)TM . Ninety people responded and report an average of 5.7 (SD 1.46) hours sleep per night. A majority (61%) report their sleep quality as bad, with 31% taking medications at least once a week to help sleep. There was a statistically significant association between longer years with symptoms, taking medication at least once a week and limited in their activities, when rating their sleep quality as bad. Twenty eight (65%) health professional's responded with 53% discussing sleep with their patients. People with inflammatory arthritis report low sleep with those having symptoms longer, taking medications regularly and having limitations with their activities, reporting poorer sleep quality. Only half of health professionals discuss sleep. More research is needed in investigating poor sleep quality, disturbances, and physical activity in order to promote health and well-being in this population. Implications for Rehabilitation People with inflammatory arthritis fall far below the National Sleep Foundations' "sleep needs spectrum", which is concerning as those who have reduced levels of sleep have been associated with decreased quality of life and physical function. Due to the importance of receiving sufficient sleep, there is a need to develop education and training for health professionals in the importance of engaging their patients in their sleep quality and disturbances. The effects of physical activity interventions on poor sleep need to be examined to show if it is a positive non-pharmacological treatment approach

  14. Rosuvastatin-Induced Carotid Plaque Regression in Patients With Inflammatory Joint Diseases: The Rosuvastatin in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis and Other Inflammatory Joint Diseases Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollefstad, S; Ikdahl, E; Hisdal, J; Olsen, I C; Holme, I; Hammer, H B; Smerud, K T; Kitas, G D; Pedersen, T R; Kvien, T K; Semb, A G

    2015-07-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and carotid artery plaques have an increased risk of acute coronary syndromes. Statin treatment with the goal of achieving a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level of ≤1.8 mmoles/liter (≤70 mg/dl) is recommended for individuals in the general population who have carotid plaques. The aim of the ROsuvastatin in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis and other inflammatory joint diseases (RORA-AS) study was to evaluate the effect of 18 months of intensive lipid-lowering treatment with rosuvastatin with regard to change in carotid plaque height. Eighty-six patients (60.5% of whom were female) with carotid plaques and inflammatory joint disease (55 with RA, 21 with AS, and 10 with psoriatic arthritis) were treated with rosuvastatin to obtain the LDL cholesterol goal. Carotid plaque height was evaluated by B-mode ultrasonography. The mean ± SD age of the patients was 60.8 ± 8.5 years, and the median compliance with rosuvastatin treatment was 97.9% (interquartile range [IQR] 96.0-99.4). At baseline, the median number and height of the carotid plaques were 1.0 (range 1-8) and 1.80 mm (IQR 1.60-2.10), respectively. The mean ± SD change in carotid plaque height after 18 months of treatment with rosuvastatin was -0.19 ± 0.35 mm (P < 0.0001). The mean ± SD baseline LDL cholesterol level was 4.0 ± 0.9 mmoles/liter (154.7 ± 34.8 mg/dl), and the mean reduction in the LDL cholesterol level was -2.3 mmoles/liter (95% confidence interval [95% CI] -2.48, -2.15) (-88.9 mg/dl [95% CI -95.9, -83.1]). The mean ± SD LDL cholesterol level during the 18 months of rosuvastatin treatment was 1.7 ± 0.4 mmoles/liter (area under the curve). After adjustment for age/sex/blood pressure, no linear relationship between a reduction in carotid plaque height and the level of LDL cholesterol exposure during the study period was observed. Attainment of the LDL cholesterol goal of ≤1.8 mmoles/liter (≤70

  15. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maijer, Karen I; Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP...

  16. DNA Methylome Signature in Synoviocytes From Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Compared to Synoviocytes From Patients With Longstanding Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ai, Rizi; Whitaker, John W.; Boyle, David L.; Tak, Paul Peter; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Wang, Wei; Firestein, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics can contribute to pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity. We recently identified an imprinted DNA methylation pattern in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) involving multiple genes in pathways implicated in cell migration, matrix regulation and immune

  17. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  18. Methotrexate for uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: value and requirement for additional anti-inflammatory medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenhaus, A; Mingels, A; Heinz, C; Ganser, G

    2007-01-01

    To study the value of methotrexate (MTX) and the requirement for additional anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of severe chronic iridocyclitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Institutional study of 35 consecutive patients with JIA started on MTX as the single systemic immunosuppressive drug for the treatment of associated iridocyclitis. The clinical epidemiologic data, course of visual acuity (VA), development of complications, and the need for additional anti-inflammatory drugs were analyzed. Mean follow-up with MTX treatment was 27.6 months. Uveitic complications were present in 31 patients before MTX treatment. With MTX, quiescence of uveitis was obtained with (n=21) or without (n=4) additional topical steroids. Additional systemic immunosuppressive drugs were required in another 7 patients: cyclosporine A (n=4), azathioprine (n=1), infliximab (n=1), or etanercept (n=1). Three patients had active uveitis at the end of the follow-up period. During MTX therapy, uveitis first developed in the unaffected fellow eyes in 2 patients, and secondary glaucoma or ocular hypertension occurred in 7 patients. The VA deteriorated in 6, improved in 13, and was stable in the remaining eyes. The data suggest that MTX is very effective in controlling inflammation of uveitis in patients with JIA. However, additional topical steroids or systemic immunosuppressive drugs are often required.

  19. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  20. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Su, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Fang; Chu, Jing-Xue; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  1. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...... in macrophage activity as evidenced by increasing levels following anti-TNF withdrawal, despite maintenance of a stable clinical condition achieved by conventional remedies. It remains to be determined whether sCD163 is an early predictor of disease flare....

  2. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, potentiates the inflammatory response in a rat model of peptidoglycan polysaccharide-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Analia E; Mada, Sripal R; Rico, Mario C; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2011-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation by several agonists, which is irreversibly antagonized by the active metabolite of clopidogrel, a widely used anti-thrombotic drug. In this study, we investigated whether reduction of platelet reactivity leads to reduced inflammatory responses using a rat model of erosive arthritis. We evaluated the effect of clopidogrel on inflammation in Lewis rats in a peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS)-induced arthritis model with four groups of rats: 1) untreated, 2) clopidogrel-treated, 3) PG-PS-induced, and 4) PG-PS-induced and clopidogrel-treated. There were significant differences between the PG-PS+clopidogrel group when compared to the PG-PS group including: increased joint diameter and clinical manifestations of inflammation, elevated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, interferon (IFN) gamma, and IL-6), an elevated neutrophil blood count and an increased circulating platelet count. Plasma levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the PG-PS+clopidogrel group compared to the PG-PS group. Plasma levels of platelet factor 4 (PF4) were elevated in both the PG-PS and the PG-PS+clopidogrel groups, however PF4 levels showed no difference upon clopidogrel treatment, suggesting that the pro- inflammatory effect of clopidogrel may be due to its action on cells other than platelets. Histology indicated an increase in leukocyte infiltration at the inflammatory area of the joint, increased pannus formation, blood vessel proliferation, subsynovial fibrosis and cartilage erosion upon treatment with clopidogrel in PG-PS-induced arthritis animals. In summary, animals treated with clopidogrel showed a pro-inflammatory effect in the PG-PS-induced arthritis animal model, which might not be mediated by platelets. Elucidation of the mechanism of clopidogrel-induced cell responses is important to understand the role of the P2Y12 receptor in inflammation.

  3. MiR-338-5p Promotes Inflammatory Response of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Targeting SPRY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Wang, Yanfeng; Liang, Qingwei; Yao, Lutian; Gu, Shizhong; Bai, Xizhuang

    2017-08-01

    Our purpose is to study the roles of microRNA-338-5p (miR-338-5p) on the proliferation, invasion, and inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (SFs) in rheumatoid arthritis patients by regulating SPRY1. The target relationship between miR-338-5p and SPRY1 was validated through luciferase reporter system. The expression of miR-338-5p and SPRY1 in synovial tissues and synovial cells were detected using RT-PCR and western blot. The mimics and inhibitors of miR-338-5p were transfected into SFs. MTT, Transwell, and ELISA assays were used to analyze cell proliferation, invasiveness, and the secreted extracellular pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1a, IL-6, COX2) levels of SFs. MiR-338-5p was highly expressed in rheumatoid arthritis tissues and cells, and directly down-regulated the expression of SPRY1 in the SFs of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Cell proliferation, invasiveness and the expression level of pro-inflammatory cytokines in synovial cells increased after the transfection of miR-338-5p mimics, while the proliferation, invasion and expression level of pro-inflammatory cytokines decreased after the transfection of miR-338-5p inhibitors. In conclusion,miR-338-5p promoted the proliferation, invasion and inflammatory reaction in SFs of rheumatoid arthritis by directly down-regulating SPRY1 expression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2295-2301, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, potentiates the inflammatory response in a rat model of peptidoglycan polysaccharide-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia E Garcia

    Full Text Available The P2Y12 receptor plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation by several agonists, which is irreversibly antagonized by the active metabolite of clopidogrel, a widely used anti-thrombotic drug. In this study, we investigated whether reduction of platelet reactivity leads to reduced inflammatory responses using a rat model of erosive arthritis. We evaluated the effect of clopidogrel on inflammation in Lewis rats in a peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS-induced arthritis model with four groups of rats: 1 untreated, 2 clopidogrel-treated, 3 PG-PS-induced, and 4 PG-PS-induced and clopidogrel-treated. There were significant differences between the PG-PS+clopidogrel group when compared to the PG-PS group including: increased joint diameter and clinical manifestations of inflammation, elevated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, interferon (IFN gamma, and IL-6, an elevated neutrophil blood count and an increased circulating platelet count. Plasma levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the PG-PS+clopidogrel group compared to the PG-PS group. Plasma levels of platelet factor 4 (PF4 were elevated in both the PG-PS and the PG-PS+clopidogrel groups, however PF4 levels showed no difference upon clopidogrel treatment, suggesting that the pro- inflammatory effect of clopidogrel may be due to its action on cells other than platelets. Histology indicated an increase in leukocyte infiltration at the inflammatory area of the joint, increased pannus formation, blood vessel proliferation, subsynovial fibrosis and cartilage erosion upon treatment with clopidogrel in PG-PS-induced arthritis animals. In summary, animals treated with clopidogrel showed a pro-inflammatory effect in the PG-PS-induced arthritis animal model, which might not be mediated by platelets. Elucidation of the mechanism of clopidogrel-induced cell responses is important to understand the role of the P2Y12 receptor in inflammation.

  5. Circadian rhythm and the influence of physical activity on circulating surfactant protein D in early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A F; Hoegh, S V; Lottenburger, T

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the collectin family and has pro-and anti-inflammatory capacities depending on its oligomerization. Previously, circulating SP-D was shown to be decreased in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and negatively correlated to disease activity. This study aimed...... at assessing the diurnal rhythmicity and the influence of physical activity on circulating SP-D in patients with RA at different stages compared with healthy individuals. Patients with early RA (ERA) with disease duration ... in two sub-studies. Healthy individuals served as controls. Diurnal variation: blood samples were collected every 3 h from 7 a.m to 10 p.m and the following morning. Physical activity: blood sampling was done before and after standardized physical challenge. SP-D was measured by ELISA. SP-D exhibited...

  6. The TT Genotype of the STAT4 rs7574865 Polymorphism Is Associated with High Disease Activity and Disability in Patients with Early Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lamana, Amalia; Balsa, Alejandro; Rueda, Blanca; Ortiz, Ana M.; Nuño, Laura; Miranda-Carus, Maria Eugenia; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel A.; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Martin, Javier; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of copies of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, and the minor alleles of the STAT4 rs7574865 and the PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphisms have all been linked with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these genetic variants on disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis. Methodology and Results: We studied 640 patients with early arthritis (76% women; median age, 52 years), recording disease-...

  7. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  8. Experience of Parenteral Administration of Methotrexate in a Female Patient Suffering from Early Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. V. Sleptsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Represented here is a case of early juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated with uveitis diagnosed in a three-year-old female patient subject to treatment with the standard methotrexate dosage. At the initial stage of treatment, the child demonstrated severe articular syndrome, inflammatory reactions affecting eyeball surfaces, increased laboratory indicators of the illness and functional insufficiency. Successful overcoming of methotrexate resistance through dosage increased up to 20 mg/m2 of body surface per week was described. Over three months of subcutaneous methotrexate treatment with a 15 mg/m2-per-week dose, the child showed milder joint exudation an, arthralgia, less lengthy morning stiffness, although there was no 50% improvement based on ACRpedi criteria, and uveitis was first recognized in the subactive phase. The dose was increased up to 20 mg/m2 per week. By the eighth week of methotrexate treatment, uveal inflammation reversed. Non-active phase and remission were detected in 6 and 12 months respectively. The remission has persisted for 6 years. No side effects have been observed throughout methotrexate treatment. 

  9. Psoriatic arthritis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ferrer, A; Laiz-Alonso, A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and clinical aspects of the disease justify the present review. Studies have identified common inflammatory pathways related to the innate immune response, such as the IL-12/IL-23 axis, along with numerous genes that affect susceptibility to both diseases and influence phenotypic development. Interest has grown in biomarkers that can be used for early diagnosis or prognosis or to predict joint destruction and the response to treatment. Recent reports describe important differences between the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics on the process of new bone formation. Other issues that have been discussed include the need for reliable screening methods, particularly for early detection of oligoarticular arthritis, and for protocols to guide referral to specialists, especially in newly created multidisciplinary practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. MRI appearances of inflammatory vertebral osteitis in early ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurugoglu, Sebuh; Kanberoglu, Kaya; Mihmanli, Ismail; Cokyuksel, Oktay [Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University (Turkey); Kanberoglu, Ayfer [Department of Physical Medicine, SSK Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2002-03-01

    Background: Undiagnosed and early ankylosing spondylitis (AS), especially in adolescent patients suffering from back pain, may present with the finding of vertebral osteitis on MRI. Aims: To identify the early MRI changes of vertebral osteitis in AS. Patients and methods: Five patients (three boys, two girls) aged 11-20 years (mean 15.4 years) suffering from back pain underwent MRI of the thoracolumbar spine. There was no initial diagnosis of AS. After clinical and radiological suspicion of AS, MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints was performed. Results: During the course of AS, destructive and reactive changes affect the discovertebral junctions that are initially seen in the thoracolumbar area. At this stage plain radiography of the spinal column may be normal. On MR images, inflammatory osteitis of the vertebrae is seen as hypointense areas on T1-weighted images and hyperintense areas on T2-W images. The lesions enhance homogenously with contrast material. Conclusions: Awareness of the MRI appearances of vertebral osteitis is helpful in suspecting AS. Radiological examination of the SI facilitates the diagnosis and unnecessary further imaging can be avoided. (orig.)

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Licorice and Roasted Licorice Extracts on TPA-Induced Acute Inflammation and Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Rim Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory activity of licorice (LE and roated licorice (rLE extracts determined in the murine phorbol ester-induced acute inflammation model and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of human rheumatoid arthritis. rLE possessed greater activity than LE in inhibiting phorbol ester-induced ear edema. Oral administration of LE or rLE reduced clinical arthritis score, paw swelling, and histopathological changes in a murine CIA. LE and rLE decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in serum and matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression in the joints. Cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to type II collagen or lipopolysaccharide stimulation were suppressed in spleen cells from LE or rLE-treated CIA mice. Furthermore, LE and rLE treatment prevented oxidative damages in liver and kidney tissues of CIA mice. Taken together, LE and rLE have benefits in protecting against both acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis. rLE may inhibit the acute inflammation more potently than LE.

  12. ASAS modification of the Berlin algorithm for diagnosing axial spondyloarthritis: results from the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE)-cohort and from the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS)-cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Rosaline; de Hooge, Manouk; Rudwaleit, Martin; Sieper, Joachim; van Gaalen, Floris; Reijnierse, Monique; Landewé, Robert; Huizinga, Tom; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the original Berlin algorithm for diagnosing axial Spondyloarthritis (axSpA) with two modifications in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE)-cohort and the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) axSpA criteria validation (ASAS)-cohort. Methods Patients

  13. Disease activity decrease is associated with improvement in work productivity over 1 year in early axial spondyloarthritis (SPondyloArthritis Caught Early cohort)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lunteren, Miranda; Ez-Zaitouni, Zineb; Fongen, Camilla; Landewé, Robert; Ramonda, Roberta; van der Heijde, Désirée; van Gaalen, Floris A.

    2017-01-01

    To assess if a change in disease activity is associated with a change in work productivity loss (WPL) over 1 year in early axial SpA (axSpA) patients. Baseline and 1 year data of axSpA patients in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early cohort were analysed. Linear regression models were built explaining

  14. Microanatomic studies to define predictive factors for the topography of periarticular erosion formation in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGonagle, Dennis; Tan, Ai Lyn; Møller Døhn, Uffe

    2009-01-01

    -prone regions, especially in the distal MCP joints and both distal and proximal PIP joints. Nevertheless, these sites exhibited soft-tissue pathologic features and bony microdamage/cyst formation. Other significant findings included the presence of pannus without inflammatory changes in the regions in which...

  15. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors

  16. Job retention vocational rehabilitation for\\ud employed people with inflammatory\\ud arthritis (WORK-IA) : a feasibility randomized\\ud controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, A; O'Brien, R; Woodbridge, S; Bradshaw, L; Prior, Y; Radford, K; Culley, J; Whitham, D; Pulikottil-Jacob, R

    2017-01-01

    Background Inflammatory arthritis leads to work disability, absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e. at-work productivity loss) at high cost to individuals, employers and society. A trial of job retention vocational rehabilitation (VR) in the United States identified this helped people keep working. The effectiveness of this VR in countries with different socioeconomic policies and conditions, and its impact on absenteeism, presenteeism and health, are unknown. This feasibility study tested the acc...

  17. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the ...

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects and hepatotoxicity of Tripterygium-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mei; Jiang, Zhen-zhou; Wu, Tao; Li, Ji; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Xue-jun; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yang, Shu-yu

    2012-08-15

    Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. (TWHF) has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive effects and its clinical use was restricted to some extent due to some toxic effects on the digestive, urogenital, and blood circulatory systems, especially the male reproductive system. In the previous study, we had confirmed that TWHF-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have protective effects on male reproductive toxicity in rats. Anti-inflammatory effects and hepatotoxicity of TWHF-SLN remain to be unidentified. The present study was focused on the anti-inflammatory effect of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats treated with TWHF-SLN as well as the effects of SLN delivery system on decreasing the hepatotoxicity induced by tripterygium. Sixty-four healthy male rats were randomly divided into eight groups with eight rats each. From day 18 after FCA injection, TWHF-SLN group (120, 60, 30 mg/kg) and TWHF group (120, 60, 30 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage for 24 consecutive days. The control group was with saline and model control group was without any treatment. The volume of the right hind paws was evaluated at 0, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 days post-injection of FCA by a home-made connected device. The serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin (TBIL) and albumin (ALB) levels were evaluated by an autoanalyzer. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) malondialdehyde (MDA) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) levels were determined using commercial kits. The PG level in sera was examined by double antibody sandwich method. Tissue histopathology was evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The results show that TWHF-SLN can significantly reduce rat paw volume at 60 mg/kg (psystem can enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of TWHF, and meanwhile has a protective effect against TWHF

  20. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Boesen, Mikael; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    was to compare site-specific release of inflammatory mediators and evaluate the corresponding anatomical sites by examining colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and MRI scans. METHODS: RA patients were evaluated on the basis of CDUS and 3-T MRI scans and subsequently underwent synovectomy using a needle arthroscopic.......02, approximate Spearman's ρ = 0.63). IL-8 associations with imaging outcome measures did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The association between imaging activity and synovial inflammatory mediators underscores the high sensitivity of CDUS and MRI in the evaluation of RA disease activity....... The associations found in our present study have different implications for synovial mediator releases and corresponding imaging signs. For example, MCP-1 and IL-6 were associated with both general inflammation and bone destruction, in contrast to MIP-1β, which was involved solely in general synovitis. The lack...

  1. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  2. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.; Mur, Erich; Schirmer, Michael; Klauser, Andrea S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  3. DNA damage, metabolism and aging in pro-inflammatory T cells: Rheumatoid arthritis as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinyin; Goronzy, Jörg J; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2018-05-01

    The aging process is the major driver of morbidity and mortality, steeply increasing the risk to succumb to cancer, cardiovascular disease, infection and neurodegeneration. Inflammation is a common denominator in age-related pathologies, identifying the immune system as a gatekeeper in aging overall. Among immune cells, T cells are long-lived and exposed to intense replication pressure, making them sensitive to aging-related abnormalities. In successful T cell aging, numbers of naïve cells, repertoire diversity and activation thresholds are preserved as long as possible; in maladaptive T cell aging, protective T cell functions decline and pro-inflammatory effector cells are enriched. Here, we review in the model system of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) how maladaptive T cell aging renders the host susceptible to chronic, tissue-damaging inflammation. In T cells from RA patients, known to be about 20years pre-aged, three interconnected functional domains are altered: DNA damage repair, metabolic activity generating energy and biosynthetic precursor molecules, and shaping of plasma membranes to promote T cell motility. In each of these domains, key molecules and pathways have now been identified, including the glycolytic enzymes PFKFB3 and G6PD; the DNA repair molecules ATM, DNA-PKcs and MRE11A; and the podosome marker protein TKS5. Some of these molecules may help in defining targetable pathways to slow the T cell aging process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extra-virgin olive oil and its phenolic extract prevent inflammatory response and joint damage in murine experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rosillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of EVOO in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that the phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of dietary EVOO and treatment with its phenolic extract (PE in a model of RA, the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine collagen type II (CII. On day 21, the mice received a booster injection. We have demonstrated that EVOO and its PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. Our data indicate that dietary EVOO and PE treatment inhibit JNK, p38 and signal transducer and STAT-3. In addition, both EVOO and PE decrease NF-κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions.

  5. Prevalence of Coxitis and its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet H. Bajraktari

    2018-02-01

    CONCLUSION: Coxitis has high economic cost because it ends up with a mandatory need for a total hip joint prosthesis. Thus the results of this study can serve to plan and initiate early preventive measures.

  6. Altered Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Seropositive Arthralgia and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Are Associated with Autoantibody Status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalan, Paulina; Bijzet, Johan; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    Objective. The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unclear. Therefore, numerical and functional alterations of CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cells in the early stages of RA development were studied. Methods. Whole blood samples from newly

  7. Adherence to a treat-to-target strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis : results of the DREAM remission induction cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Marloes; Kuper, Hillechiena H.; Moens, Hein J. Bernelot; Hoekstra, Monique; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment-to-target (T2T) is effective in achieving remission in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the concept of T2T has not been fully implemented yet and the question is whether a T2T strategy is feasible in daily clinical practice. The

  8. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Boekhorst, Bernard C M; Jensen, Linda B; Colombo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 cells in vitro. The severity of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice was assessed by paw scoring and compared to the degree of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-quantified joint effusion and bone marrow edema. Two intra-articular treatments per joint...... and femoral head remained unchanged. When the siRNA dose was 5 or 10µg, there was no difference between the specific and the non-specific siRNA treatment groups. These findings suggest that MRI is a promising method for evaluation of early disease progression and treatment in murine arthritis models...

  9. Effect of radiosynovectomy in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis; Wirksamkeit der Radiosynoviorthese bei degenerativ-entzuendlichen und chronisch-entzuendlichen Gelenkerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, S.; Klutmann, S.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Clausen, M. [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Sawula, J.A.; Brenner, W.; Henze, E. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1999-07-01

    Aim: Effect of radiosynovectomy (RS) should be evaluated both by subjective and objective parameters in patients with osteoarthritis and in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A total of 98 joints in 61 patients were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group included 35 patients with therapy-resistant effusions caused by severe osteoarthritis (46 joints). The second group consisted of 26 patients (52 joints) with ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis, and recurrent synovitis following surgery. Effect of RS was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire and quantified by T/B-ratios derived from blood pool images prior to and after RS. Results: Within the first patient group suffering from osteoarthritis, 40% showed a good or excellent improvement of clinical symptoms, 51% were unchanged, and in 9% symptoms worsened. Similar results were found in the second patient group. The majority of unchanged results were small finger joints. In contrast, wrist and knee joints showed a better improvement. Good correlation between results of bone scan and patients subjective impression was found in 38% and 67% in the first and the second patient group, respectively. Conclusion: Radiosynovectomy might be an effective treatment in osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Der Therapieerfolg der Radiosynoviorthese (RSO) sollte bei aktivierter Arthrose und anderen chronisch-entzuendlichen Gelenkerkrankungen anhand der subjektiven Befindlichkeit und objektiver Parameter evaluiert werden. Methoden: Es wurden insgesamt 98 Gelenke bei 61 Patienten behandelt. Entsprechend der Grunderkrankung umfasste die erste Gruppe 35 Patienten mit einer therapieresistenten, aktivierten Arthrose (46 Gelenke). Die zweite Patientengruppe beinhaltete 26 Patienten (52

  10. Paradoxical arthritis occurring during anti-TNF in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: histological and immunological features of a complex synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivernini, Stefano; Pugliese, Daniela; Tolusso, Barbara; Bui, Laura; Petricca, Luca; Guidi, Luisa; Mirone, Luisa; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Federico, Francesco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Gremese, Elisa

    2018-01-01

    Paradoxical arthritis under tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNF-i) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been described. This study aims to evaluate the histological features of paired synovial tissue (ST) and colonic mucosa (CM) tissue in patients with IBD developing paradoxical arthritis under TNF-i. Patients with IBD without history of coexisting joint involvement who developed arthritis under TNF-i were enrolled. Each patient underwent ST biopsy and ileocolonoscopy with CM biopsies. ST and CM paired samples were stained through immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68, CD21, CD20, CD3 and CD117. Clinical and immunological parameters (anticitrullinated peptides antibodies (ACPA)-immunoglobulin (Ig)M/IgA rheumatoid factor (RF)) were collected. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ACPA/IgM-RF/IgA-RF negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled as comparison. 10 patients with IBD (age 46.0±9.7 years, 13.2±9.9 years of disease duration, 2.5±1.6 years of TNF-i exposure, six with Crohn's disease and four with ulcerative colitis, respectively) were studied. At ST level, IHC revealed that patients with IBD with paradoxical arthritis showed more similar histological findings in terms of synovial CD68 + , CD21 + , CD20 + , CD3 + and CD117 + cells compared with PsA than ACPA/IgM-RF/IgA-RF negative RA. Analysing the CM specimens, patients with IBD showed the presence of CD68 + , CD3 + , CD117 + and CD20 + cells in 100%, 70%, 60% and 50% of cases, respectively, despite endoscopic remission. Finally, addition of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and switch to ustekinumab were more effective than swapping into different TNF-i in patients with IBD with paradoxical arthritis. Patients with IBD may develop histologically proven synovitis during TNF-i, comparable to PsA. The inhibition of inflammatory pathways alternative to TNF (IL12/1L23) may be an effective therapeutic option for severe paradoxical articular manifestations.

  11. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  12. Exploring the Inflammatory Metabolomic Profile to Predict Response to TNF-α Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart V J Cuppen

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, approximately one-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA respond insufficiently to TNF-α inhibitors (TNFis. The aim of the study was to explore the use of a metabolomics to identify predictors for the outcome of TNFi therapy, and study the metabolomic fingerprint in active RA irrespective of patients' response. In the metabolomic profiling, lipids, oxylipins, and amines were measured in serum samples of RA patients from the observational BiOCURA cohort, before start of biological treatment. Multivariable logistic regression models were established to identify predictors for good- and non-response in patients receiving TNFi (n = 124. The added value of metabolites over prediction using clinical parameters only was determined by comparing the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative predictive value and by the net reclassification index (NRI. The models were further validated by 10-fold cross validation and tested on the complete TNFi treatment cohort including moderate responders. Additionally, metabolites were identified that cross-sectionally associated with the RA disease activity score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or C-reactive protein (CRP. Out of 139 metabolites, the best-performing predictors were sn1-LPC(18:3-ω3/ω6, sn1-LPC(15:0, ethanolamine, and lysine. The model that combined the selected metabolites with clinical parameters showed a significant larger AUC-ROC than that of the model containing only clinical parameters (p = 0.01. The combined model was able to discriminate good- and non-responders with good accuracy and to reclassify non-responders with an improvement of 30% (total NRI = 0.23 and showed a prediction error of 0.27. For the complete TNFi cohort, the NRI was 0.22. In addition, 88 metabolites were associated with DAS28, ESR or CRP (p<0.05. Our study established an accurate

  13. Arthroscintigraphy in diagnosis of relapses after early synovectomy of the knee joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubovski, G.A.; Abasov, Eh.Sh.; Smirnov, Yu.N.

    1980-01-01

    The authors studied differential diagnostic possibilities of scintigraphy with the use of sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate to reveal relapses after early synovectomy of the knee joints in 40 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. High informativeness of the method was established. The authors succeded in diagnosing the subclinical variant of rheumatoid synovitis in the operated joints by means of scintigraphy. The computer-arthroscintigraphy method with sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate is recommended for a wide use in arthrological practice to ensure an objective assessment of the condition of the operated joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to conduct timely adequate therapy for the prevention of the relapses

  14. Hepcidin plasma levels are not associated with changes in haemoglobin in early rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, R D; Glerup, H; Jurik, A G

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A reduction in haemoglobin level is a frequent complication among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Hepcidin has been linked to disturbed erythropoiesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in hepcidin in patients with early RA. Method: Hepcidin...... with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and with additional adalimumab (ADA, n = 42) or placebo (PLA, n = 38) during 52 weeks, using a treat-to-target strategy, aiming for a 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) levels [median (interquartile range)] were 9...... = 0.48, p levels of haemoglobin and hepcidin at baseline or during the 52 week follow-up. No change in haemoglobin levels was seen as a function of hepcidin changes. In a mixed statistical model, no single factor was connected with the regulation...

  15. Transillumination optical sensing for biomedicine and diagnostics: feasibility of early diagnosis for rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao; Tanosaki, Shinji; Takagi, Michiaki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Optical computed tomography of thick biological tissues remains an elusive but fascinating area of research with potential applications in biomedicine. Our measurement use the optical heterodyne detection method wherein CW and single frequency lasers are used to exploit the maximum advantages of heterodyne detection such as high directionality, selectivity and sensitivity. We have demonstrated the advantages and capabilities of the measurement technique for transillumination optical computed tomography in biomedicine. Biological tissues by nature are heterogeneous, complex and forward scattering media. The optical heterodyne detection method enables selective filtering of the directional coherence retaining emergent photons for image reconstruction similar to those as in X-ray CT. Here, we report our recent results on transillumination in vivo imaging for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, we demonstrate the feasibility of early diagnosis for RA by comparing the laser tomographic images of fingers of an RA patient and a healthy volunteer. (author)

  16. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. An evaluation of seasonal variations in footwear worn by adults with inflammatory arthritis: a cross-sectional observational study using a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton-Rule, Angela; Hendry, Gordon J; Barr, Georgina; Rome, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Foot problems are common in adults with inflammatory arthritis and therapeutic footwear can be effective in managing arthritic foot problems. Accessing appropriate footwear has been identified as a major barrier, resulting in poor adherence to treatment plans involving footwear. Indeed, previous New Zealand based studies found that many people with rheumatoid arthritis and gout wore inappropriate footwear. However, these studies were conducted in a single teaching hospital during the New Zealand summer therefore the findings may not be representative of footwear styles worn elsewhere in New Zealand, or reflect the potential influence of seasonal climate changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate seasonal variations in footwear habits of people with inflammatory arthritic conditions in New Zealand. A cross-sectional study design using a web-based survey. The survey questions were designed to elicit demographic and clinical information, features of importance when choosing footwear and seasonal footwear habits, including questions related to the provision of therapeutic footwear/orthoses and footwear experiences. One-hundred and ninety-seven participants responded who were predominantly women of European descent, aged between 46-65 years old, from the North Island of New Zealand. The majority of participants identified with having either rheumatoid arthritis (35%) and/or osteoarthritis (57%) and 68% reported established disease (>5 years duration). 18% of participants had been issued with therapeutic footwear. Walking and athletic shoes were the most frequently reported footwear type worn regardless of the time of year. In the summer, 42% reported wearing sandals most often. Comfort, fit and support were reported most frequently as the footwear features of greatest importance. Many participants reported difficulties with footwear (63%), getting hot feet in the summer (63%) and the need for a sandal which could accommodate a supportive insole (73%). Athletic and

  18. Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hadi Mohd

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The aim of present research was to develop matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam filled in capsule for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods:Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam were prepared by direct compression method using microsomal enzyme dependent and pH-sensitive polymers which were further filled into an empty HPMC capsule. To assess the compatibility, FT-IR and DSC studies for pure drug, polymers and their physical mixture were performed. The formulated batches were subjected to physicochemical studies, estimation of drug content, in vitro drug release, drug release kinetics, and stability studies. Results:  When FTIR and DSC studies were performed it was found that there was no interaction between lornoxicam and polymers which used. All the physicochemical properties of prepared matrix-mini-tablets were found to be in normal limits. The percentage of drug content was found to be 99.60±0.07%. Our optimized matrix mini-tablets-filled-capsule formulation F30 released lornoxicam after a lag time of 5.02±0.92 hr, 95.48±0.65 % at the end of 8 hr and 99.90±0.83 % at the end of 12 hr. Stability was also found for this formulation as per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Conclusion: A novel colon targeted delivery system of lornoxicam was successfully developed by filling matrix-mini-tablets into an empty HPMC capsule shell for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Systematic protocol for assessment of the validity of BOLD MRI in a rabbit model of inflammatory arthritis at 1.5 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Kis, Antonella; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Zhong, Anguo; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Gahunia, Harpal [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI has the potential to identify regions of early hypoxic and vascular joint changes in inflammatory arthritis. There is no standard protocol for analysis of BOLD MRI measurements in musculoskeletal disorders. To optimize the following BOLD MRI reading parameters: (1) statistical threshold values (low, r > 0.01 versus high, r > 0.2); (2) summary measures of BOLD contrast (percentage of activated voxels [PT%] versus percentage signal difference between on-and-off signal intensities [diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff]); and (3) direction of BOLD response (positive, negative and positive + negative). Using BOLD MRI protocols at 1.5 T, arthritic (n = 21) and contralateral (n = 21) knees of 21 juvenile rabbits were imaged at baseline and on days 1, 14 and 28 after a unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenan. Nine non-injected rabbits served as external control knees (n = 18). By comparing arthritic to contralateral knees, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine diagnostic accuracy. Using diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff and positive + negative responses, a threshold of r > 0.01 was more accurate than r > 0.2 (P = 0.03 at day 28). Comparison of summary measures yielded no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Although positive + negative (AUC = 0.86 at day 28) and negative responses (AUC = 0.90 at day 28) for PT% were the most diagnostically accurate, positive + negative responses for diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff (AUC = 0.78 at day 28) also had acceptable accuracy. The most clinically relevant reading parameters included a lower threshold of r > 0.01 and a positive + negative BOLD response. We propose that diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff is a more clinically relevant summary measure of BOLD MRI, while PT% can be used as an ancillary measure. (orig.)

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of copper-protein complexes with reference to rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Sajjad, I.; Akram, W.; Karim, H.M.A.; Iqbal, M.Z.

    1996-01-01

    Work was carried out on the serum of 100 healthy subjects and hundred Rheumatoid Arthritus patients by electrophoresis and atomic absorption model Hitachi-180-80. The different proteins fractions separated by electrophoresis were subjected for estimation of Cu-Concentration. It was found that only 5% copper is present in albumin which remains constant in normal and Rheumatoid Arthritus patients. The other important group of proteins were a2-globulins, in which Cu concentration was found high in Rheumatoid Arthritus patients as compared to normal subject. There was no copper detected in beta and gamma globulins. The study can be used for diagnostic purposes. Copper complexes of alpha 2-Globulins were found anti inflammatory in nature and this quality of self defense can bring revolution in the history of all infectious diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritus simply by separating the copper complexes of alpha 2-globulins (most probably ceruloplasmin) from the blood of donors and injecting into the body of patients. It is possible by this method that the disease-Rheumatoid Arthritus may be eradicated completely. These complexes have also shown antibiotic activity in gynae patients. (author)

  1. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... tendons of the fingers were assessed for the presence of insertional changes and tenosynovitis. One hand was assessed by means of MRI for the aforementioned changes. X-rays of both hands and feet were assessed for bone erosions and proliferations. US was repeated in 8 persons by another ultrasonographer...

  2. Insight into the Endocrine System and the Immune System: A Review of the Inflammatory Role of Prolactin in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Man W.; Garcia, Samuel; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects females three times more frequently than males. A potential role for hormones, such as prolactin (PRL), may in part explain this phenomenon. The risk of developing RA is increased in women who are lactating after the first

  3. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  4. Adenosine A2A Receptors Mediate Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Electroacupuncture on Synovitis in Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the role of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA on synovitis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, C57BL/6 mice were divided into five treatment groups: Sham-control, CIA-control, CIA-EA, CIA-SCH58261 (A2AR antagonist, and CIA-EA-SCH58261. All mice except those in the Sham-control group were immunized with collagen II for arthritis induction. EA treatment was administered using the stomach 36 and spleen 6 points, and stimulated with a continuous rectangular wave for 30 min daily. EA treatment and SCH58261 were administered daily from days 35 to 49 (n=10. After treatment, X-ray radiography of joint bone morphology was established at day 60 and mouse blood was collected for ELISA determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α levels. Mice were sacrificed and processed for histological examination of pathological changes of joint tissue, including hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry of A2AR expression. EA treatment resulted in significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α concentrations, and bone damage X-ray scores. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effect of EA treatment was reversed by coadministration of SCH58261. Thus, EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect resulting in significant protection of cartilage by activation of A2AR in the synovial tissue of CIA.

  5. Radiological imaging in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; Radiologische Fruehdiagnostik der rheumatoiden Arthritis. Stellenwert von Ultraschall und Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzgummer, H.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [AKH, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    For optimal therapy management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) specific and sensitive diagnostic methods are essential for assessment of disease activity. In addition to projection radiography, imaging techniques, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) are becoming increasingly more important for the early diagnosis of RA. The MRI and US techniques play a key role in the early imaging diagnostics of RA. Measurement of inflammation activity represents the basis of therapeutic decision-making and can be quantitatively and qualitatively determined with MRI and US. Synovitis and bone marrow edema are predictors of erosion. (orig.) [German] Fuer das optimale Therapiemanagement bei Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis (RA) sind spezifische und sensible diagnostische Methoden zur Beurteilung der Krankheitsaktivitaet unerlaesslich. Neben der Projektionsradiographie gewinnen die bildgebenden Methoden zur Fruehdiagnostik der RA, insbesondere die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und der Ultraschall (US), zunehmend an Bedeutung. MRT und US spielen eine Schluesselrolle in der bildgebenden Fruehdiagnostik der RA. Die Messung der Entzuendungsaktivitaet stellt die Basis fuer die Therapieentscheidung dar. Sie kann mit dem US und der MRT quantitativ und semiquantitativ bestimmt werden. Synovialitis und Knochenmarkoedem sind Praediktoren fuer Erosionen. (orig.)

  6. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-07-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Chronic Inflammatory Disease, Lifestyle and Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Autoimmune Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Crohn Disease (CD); Colitis, Ulcerative (UC); Arthritis, Rheumatoid (RA); Spondylarthropathies; Arthritis, Psoriatic (PsA); Psoriasis; Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS); Uveitis

  8. High frequency of early colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Schipper, M. E. I.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Dijkstra, G.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Oldenburg, B.; Samsom, M.

    Background and aim: To detect precancerous dysplasia or asymptomatic cancer, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease often undergo colonoscopic surveillance based on American or British guidelines. It is recommended that surveillance is initiated after 8-10 years of extensive colitis, or

  9. High frequency of early colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Schipper, M. E. I.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Dijkstra, G.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Oldenburg, B.; Samsom, M.

    2008-01-01

    To detect precancerous dysplasia or asymptomatic cancer, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease often undergo colonoscopic surveillance based on American or British guidelines. It is recommended that surveillance is initiated after 8-10 years of extensive colitis, or after 15-20 years

  10. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  11. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of early inflammatory sacroiliitis according to ASAS criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Fatma Nur, E-mail: nursoylu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Kayhan, Arda, E-mail: arda_kayhan@yahoo.com [Health Services Vocational School, Esenyurt University, Dogan Arasli Bulvari No 120, Esenyurt, Istanbul (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer, E-mail: hakki.karakas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza, E-mail: feyzamd@yahoo.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Silte, Duygu, E-mail: drduygusilte@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktas, İlknur, E-mail: iaktas@hotmail.com [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, E-5 Karayolu Uzeri, 34752 Atasehir, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of multi-parametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including fat saturated (FS) T2-weighted, short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), diffusion-weighted (DW-MR), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging techniques in the diagnosis of early inflammatory sacroiliitis and determine the additional value of DW-MR and DCE-MR images according to recently defined ‘Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society’ criteria. Materials and methods: The study included 45 patients with back pain. Two radiologists estimated the likelihood of osteitis in 4 independent viewing sessions including FS T2-weighted, STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Of the 45 patients, 31 had inflammatory back pain. Of 31, 28 (90.3%) patients had inflammatory sacroiliitis diagnosed by clinical and laboratory analysis. FS T2-weighted MR images had the highest sensitivity (42.8% for both radiologists) for detecting osteitis in patients with inflammaory sacroiliitis when compared to other imaging sequences. For specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, and AUC levels there were no statistically significant difference between image viewing settings. However, adding STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images to the FS T2-weighted MR images did not improve the above stated indices. Conclusion: FS T2-weighted MR imaging had the highest sensitivity when compared to other imaging sequences. The addition of DW-MR and DCE-MR images did not significantly improve the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of osteitis for both experienced and less experienced radiologists.

  12. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of early inflammatory sacroiliitis according to ASAS criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Fatma Nur; Kayhan, Arda; Karakas, Hakki Muammer; Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza; Silte, Duygu; Aktas, İlknur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of multi-parametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including fat saturated (FS) T2-weighted, short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), diffusion-weighted (DW-MR), and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MR (DCE-MR) imaging techniques in the diagnosis of early inflammatory sacroiliitis and determine the additional value of DW-MR and DCE-MR images according to recently defined ‘Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society’ criteria. Materials and methods: The study included 45 patients with back pain. Two radiologists estimated the likelihood of osteitis in 4 independent viewing sessions including FS T2-weighted, STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Of the 45 patients, 31 had inflammatory back pain. Of 31, 28 (90.3%) patients had inflammatory sacroiliitis diagnosed by clinical and laboratory analysis. FS T2-weighted MR images had the highest sensitivity (42.8% for both radiologists) for detecting osteitis in patients with inflammaory sacroiliitis when compared to other imaging sequences. For specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, and AUC levels there were no statistically significant difference between image viewing settings. However, adding STIR, DW-MR and DCE-MR images to the FS T2-weighted MR images did not improve the above stated indices. Conclusion: FS T2-weighted MR imaging had the highest sensitivity when compared to other imaging sequences. The addition of DW-MR and DCE-MR images did not significantly improve the diagnostic value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of osteitis for both experienced and less experienced radiologists

  13. Up-regulated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (CD26) on monocytes was unaffected by effective DMARD treatment in early steroid and DMARD-naive rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, Torkell Juulsgaad; Hansen, I; Thorsen, J

    2012-01-01

    To study the CD26 density on monocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes in steroid and DMARD-naïve, early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to analyse for correlations with disease activity, including long-term radiographic progression.......To study the CD26 density on monocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes in steroid and DMARD-naïve, early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to analyse for correlations with disease activity, including long-term radiographic progression....

  14. Location and incidence of localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions at the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1988-01-01

    In early rheumatoid arthritis the location and incidence of localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions were investigated at 53 points of the wrist. On the level of the metacarpal bases, the distal and proximal row of the carpal bones more changes are seen in the oblique vd. and the lateral view than in the dv. view. At the distal bones of the forearm more changes are seen at the radius than at the ulnar styloid. The most often changes at all occur at the volar middle third of the triquetrum in the oblique view and at the distal volar articular facet of the scaphoid in the lateral view. Close relations between localized juxta-articular demineralizations and erosions do not exist. If the early bone changes at the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis are to be detected additional oblique and lateral view are prerequisite. (orig.) [de

  15. Variability in depression prevalence in early rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the CES-D and HAD-D Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Emery Paul; Cox Sally; Tennant Alan; Pallant Julie F; Covic Tanya; Conaghan Philip G

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however reported prevalence varies considerably. Two frequently used instruments to identify depression are the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The objectives of this study were to test if the CES-D and HADS-D (a) satisfy current modern psychometric standards for unidimensional measurement in an early RA sample; (b) measure the same construc...

  16. Atopic dermatitis is associated with an increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease, and a decreased risk for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Schwarz, Kristin; Baurecht, Hansjörg

    2016-01-01

    rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC]) and is inversely related to type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to investigate established RA, IBD, and T1D susceptibility loci in AD. METHODS: This cohort study used data from German National Health Insurance......BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal barrier failure and immune-mediated inflammation. Evidence on AD as a potential risk factor for inflammatory comorbidities is scarce. OBJECTIVES: We sought to test the hypothesis that prevalent AD is a risk factor for incident...... beneficiaries aged 40 years or younger (n = 655,815) from 2005 through 2011. Prevalent AD in the period 2005 to 2006 was defined as primary exposure, and incident RA, IBD, and T1D in the period 2007 to 2011 were defined as primary outcomes. Risk ratios were calculated with generalized linear models. Established...

  17. Is there subclinical enthesitis in early psoriatic arthritis? A clinical comparison with power doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeston, J E; Coates, L C; Helliwell, P S; Hensor, E M A; Wakefield, R J; Emery, P; Conaghan, P G

    2012-10-01

    Enthesitis is a recognized feature of spondylarthritides (SpA), including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Previously, ultrasound imaging has highlighted the presence of subclinical enthesitis in established SpA, but there are little data on ultrasound findings in early PsA. The aim of our study was to compare ultrasound and clinical examination (CE) for the detection of entheseal abnormalities in an early PsA cohort. Forty-two patients with new-onset PsA and 10 control subjects underwent CE of entheses for tenderness and swelling, as well as gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound of a standard set of entheses. Bilateral elbow lateral epicondyles, Achilles tendons, and plantar fascia were assessed by both CE and ultrasound, the latter scored using a semiquantitative (SQ) scale. Inferior patellar tendons were assessed by ultrasound alone. A GS SQ score of >1 and/or a PD score of >0 was used to describe significant ultrasound entheseal abnormality. A total of 24 (57.1%) of 42 patients in the PsA group and 0 (0%) of 10 controls had clinical evidence of at least 1 tender enthesis. In the PsA group, for sites assessed by both CE and ultrasound, 4% (7 of 177) of nontender entheses had a GS score >1 and/or a PD score >0 compared to 24% (9 of 37) of tender entheses. CE overestimated activity in 28 (13%) of 214 of entheses. All the nontender ultrasound-abnormal entheses were in the lower extremity. The prevalence of subclinical enthesitis in this early PsA cohort was low. CE may overestimate active enthesitis. The few subclinically inflamed entheses were in the lower extremity, where mechanical stress is likely to be more significant. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Aggressive treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis: recognizing the window of opportunity and treating to target goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resman-Targoff, Beth H; Cicero, Marco P

    2010-11-01

    Evidence supports the use of aggressive therapy for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical outcomes in patients with early RA can improve with a treat-to-target approach that sets the goal at disease remission. The current selection of antirheumatic therapies, including conventional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), has made disease remission a realistic target for patients with early RA. The challenge is selecting the optimal antirheumatic drug or combination of drugs for initial and subsequent therapy to balance the clinical benefits, risks, and economic considerations. In some cases, the use of biologic agents as part of the treatment regimen has shown superior results compared with conventional DMARDs alone in halting the progression of disease, especially in reducing radiographic damage. However, the use of biologic agents as initial therapy is challenged by cost-effectiveness analyses, which favor the use of conventional DMARDs. The use of biologic agents may be justified in certain patients with poor prognostic factors or those who experience an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs as a means to slow or halt disease progression and its associated disability. In these cases, the higher cost of treatment with biologic agents may be offset by decreased societal costs, such as lost work productivity, and increased health-related quality of life. Further research is needed to understand optimal strategies for balancing costs, benefits, and risks of antirheumatic drugs. Some key questions are (1) when biologic agents are appropriate for initial therapy, and (2) when to conclude that response to conventional DMARDs is inadequate and biologic agents should be initiated.

  19. A five-year model to assess the early cost-effectiveness of new diagnostic tests in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisman, Leander R; Luime, Jolanda J; Oppe, Mark; Hazes, Johanna M W; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2016-06-10

    There is a lack of information about the sensitivity, specificity and costs new diagnostic tests should have to improve early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the early cost-effectiveness of various new diagnostic test strategies in the workup of patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) at risk of having RA. A decision tree followed by a patient-level state transition model, using data from published literature, cohorts and trials, was used to evaluate diagnostic test strategies. Alternative tests were assessed as add-on to or replacement of the ACR/EULAR 2010 RA classification criteria for all patients and for intermediate-risk patients. Tests included B-cell gene expression (sensitivity 0.60, specificity 0.90, costs €150), MRI (sensitivity 0.90, specificity 0.60, costs €756), IL-6 serum level (sensitivity 0.70, specificity 0.53, costs €50) and genetic assay (sensitivity 0.40, specificity 0.85, costs €750). Patients with IA at risk of RA were followed for 5 years using a societal perspective. Guideline treatment was assumed using tight controlled treatment based on DAS28; if patients had a DAS28 >3.2 at 12 months or later patients could be eligible for starting biological drugs. The outcome was expressed in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (€2014 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained) and headroom. The B-cell test was the least expensive strategy when used as an add-on and as replacement in intermediate-risk patients, making it the dominant strategy, as it has better health outcomes and lower costs. As add-on for all patients, the B-cell test was also the most cost-effective test strategy. When using a willingness-to-pay threshold of €20,000 per QALY gained, the IL-6 and MRI strategies were not cost-effective, except as replacement. A genetic assay was not cost-effective in any strategy. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that the B-cell test was consistently superior in all strategies. When

  20. The Impact of Low-Dose Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatics Drugs (DMARDs) on Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan; Boshnjaku, Shkumbin

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis and multisystemic involvement. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low dose of methotrexate on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This paper follows a retrospective study, which involves 60 female patients with early onset RA diagnosed according to the American Rheumatism Association Criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010). The patients were divided into two groups group I was composed of thirty patients treated with dose of 7.5 mg/weekly methotrexate (MTX), while group II included thirty patients treated with dose of 2 g/daily sulfasalazine (SSZ). The Disease Activity was measured by a combination of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Disease Activity Score (DAS-28). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (L2-4), and femoral neck, was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (Stratos 800). Laboratory findings included: In this study, we found no negative effect on BMD in RA patients treated with low dose MTX in comparison to patients treated with SSZ. There was not observed significant difference in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck or trochanter, of MTX and SSZ patients in the pretreatment phase, nor after 12 months of treatment. No significant change in the biochemical parameters of the both groups. Based on the results of our study, low dose of methotrexate has no negative effect on BMD in premenopausal RA patients. We believe that these results might provide new insights and that further longitudinal studies with larger groups of premenopausal RA patients are required.

  1. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... of rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  2. A Polytropic Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Promoter Isolated from Multiple Tissues from a Sheep with Multisystemic Lentivirus-Associated Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Murphy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV is a lentivirus that infects both goats and sheep and is closely related to maedi-visna virus that infects sheep; collectively, these viruses are known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV. Infection of goats and sheep with SRLV typically results in discrete inflammatory diseases which include arthritis, mastitis, pneumonia or encephalomyelitis. SRLV-infected animals concurrently demonstrating lentivirus-associated lesions in tissues of lung, mammary gland, joint synovium and the central nervous system are either very rare or have not been reported. Here we describe a novel CAEV promoter isolated from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease including interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, polyarthritis and leukomyelitis. A single, novel SRLV promoter was cloned and sequenced from five different anatomical locations (brain stem, spinal cord, lung, mammary gland and carpal joint synovium, all of which demonstrated lesions characteristic of lentivirus associated inflammation. This SRLV promoter isolate was found to be closely related to CAEV promoters isolated from goats in northern California and other parts of the world. The promoter was denoted CAEV-ovine-MS (multisystemic disease; the stability of the transcription factor binding sites within the U3 promoter sequence are discussed.

  3. PhosphoLipid transfer protein (PLTP) exerts a direct pro-inflammatory effect on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblasts-like-synoviocytes (FLS) independently of its lipid transfer activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, Valérie; Daien, Claire I.; Che, Hélène; Elhmioui, Jamila; Lemaire, Stéphanie; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Desrumaux, Catherine; Combe, Bernard; Hahne, Michael; Lagrost, Laurent; Morel, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease with modification of lipids profile and an increased risk of cardiovascular events related to inflammation. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) exerts a lipid transfer activity through its active form. PLTP can also bind to receptors such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). In addition to its role in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, the latest advances came in support of a complex role of PLTP in the regulation of the inflammatory response, both with pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to decipher the role of PLTP in joint inflammation and to assess its relevance in the context of RA. PLTP expression was examined by western-blot and by immunochemistry. ABCA1 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Lipid transfer activity of PLTP and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in sera and synovial fluid (SF) from RA patients and controls (healthy subjects or osteoarthritis patients [OA]). FLS were treated with both lipid-transfer active form and inactive form of recombinant human PLTP. IL-8, IL-6, VEGF and MMP3 produced by FLS were assessed by ELISA, and proliferation by measuring 3H-Thymidine incorporation. RA synovial tissues showed higher PLTP staining than OA and PLTP protein levels were also significantly higher in RA-FLS. In addition, RA, unlike OA patients, displayed elevated levels of PLTP activity in SF, which correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both lipid-transfer active and inactive forms of PLTP significantly increased the production of cytokines and proliferation of FLS. ABCA1 was expressed on RAFLS and PLTP activated STAT3 pathway. To conclude, PLTP is highly expressed in the joints of RA patients and may directly trigger inflammation and FLS proliferation, independently of its lipid transfer activity. These results suggest a pro-inflammatory role for PLTP in RA. PMID:29565987

  4. Women's accounts of help-seeking in early rheumatoid arthritis from symptom onset to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Anne; Backman, Catherine L; Adam, Paul; Li, Linda C

    2014-12-01

    As interest in gender and health grows, the notion that women are more likely than men to consult doctors is increasingly undermined as more complex understandings of help seeking and gender emerge. While men's reluctance to seek help is associated with practices of masculinities, there has been less consideration of women's help-seeking practices. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that predominantly affects women and requires prompt treatment but considerable patient-based delays persist along the care pathway. This paper examines women's accounts of help seeking in early RA from symptom onset to diagnosis. We conducted in-depth interviews with 37 women with RA masculine practices associated with men's help-seeking. The women presented such behaviours as relational, e.g. rooted in family socialisation and a determination to maintain roles and 'normal' life. Our findings raise questions about how far notions of gender operate to differentiate men and women's help seeking and may indicate more similarities than differences. Recognising this has implications for policy and practice initiatives for both men and women. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Plass, Anne Marie C; Lems, Willem F; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Background The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, 5 years of follow‐up proved that COBRA therapy results in sustained reduction of the rate of radiological progression. Despite this evidence, Dutch rheumatologists seem reluctant to prescribe COBRA therapy. Objective To explore the reasons for the reluctance in Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe COBRA therapy. Methods A short structured questionnaire based on social–psychological theories of behaviour was sent to all Dutch rheumatologists (n = 230). Results The response rate was 50%. COBRA therapy was perceived as both effective and safe, but complex to administer. Furthermore, rheumatologists expressed their concern about the large number of pills that had to be taken, the side effects of high‐dose prednisolone and the low dose of methotrexate. Although the average attitude towards the COBRA therapy was slightly positive (above the neutral point), the majority of responding rheumatologists had a negative intention (below the neutral point) to prescribe COBRA therapy in the near future. Conclusion The reluctance of Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe effective COBRA therapy may be due to perceptions of complexity of the treatment schedule and negative patient‐related consequences of the therapy. PMID:17392349

  6. Violation of reserve filtration capacity of kidneys in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

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    G. V. Prytkova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the reserve filtration capacity of the kidneys in patients with rheumatoid arthritis onset as a potential marker of subclinical renal dysfunction. Materials and methods. 47 patients over the age of 18 years with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA were included into this study (duration of symptoms of the disease is no more than 12 months. The average age of patients was 50.71 ± 2.25 years (from 18 to 76 years, 80% of them were women, the average duration of the disease at the time of the initial study was 9.21 ± 0.43 months. Results. When we were determining the functional renal reserve (FRR by evaluating the increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR after the oral loading test, a statistically significant change was noted in the group of patients with eRA in FRR in comparison with the control group – 34,6% in comparison with practically healthy persons, while basal GFR Cockroft-Gault in these groups did not differ significantly. Among the general population of patients with eRA, the preserved FRR was noted in a third of cases (32%, in other cases, a certain degree of its decrease was recorded. A similar dynamics, differing only in the magnitude of differences, was observed for albumin-creatinine ratio – A / C urine: overall, in eRA patients, it was 6.3 times higher in comparison with practically healthy persons. The prevalence of patients with microalbuminuria for the group with the eRA was about 38%. Conclusion. In patients with eRA, already in the onset of the disease, there is a disruption of the functional status of the kidneys, which manifests itself in the worsening of reserve glomerular filtration: EDF in eRA was 34.6% lower than in practically healthy individuals, and the number of patients with impaired FPR was significantly higher than in the control group (χ2 = 13.79, p <0.01. The Pearson correlation analysis (r = -0.57, p <0.05 also confirms the presence of negative association between the

  7. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis of the craniocervical region: assessment and characterization of inflammatory soft tissue proliferations with unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, C.; Grampp, S.; Henk, C.B. [University Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Neuhold, A. [Institute for Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital Rudolfinerhaus, Vienna (Austria); Stiskal, M. [Institute for Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital Lainz, Vienna (Austria); Smolen, J. [Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital Vienna (Austria)

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to depict and characterize inflammatory soft tissue proliferations caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the craniocervical region by unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT. Computed tomography of the craniocervical region was performed in 35 patients in the axial plane before and after the i. v. administration of contrast material. According to the densities and contrast enhancement of the inflammatory soft tissue proliferations, four groups were classified. Ancillary findings, such as a compression of the dural sac or spinal cord, erosions of the bony structures, and atlantoaxial subluxation, were also evaluated. Inflammatory soft tissue proliferations were depicted in 28 of 35 patients and could be differentiated by unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT according to the above defined criteria: effusion in 6 patients (17 %); hypervascular pannus in 8 (23 %); hypovascular pannus in 5 (14 %); and fibrous tissue in 9 patients (26 %). A compression of the dural sac was seen in 11 (31 %) patients; 3 of these had neurological symptoms. Erosions of the odontoid process were found in 20 (57 %) patients; 16 (80 %) of these also showed erosions of the atlas. Atlantoaxial subluxation was seen in 11 (31 %) patients. Inflammatory soft tissue proliferations in the craniocervical region caused by RA can be reliably demonstrated and classified by unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT, which can differentiate between joint effusion and various forms of pannus and depict ancillary findings. Computed tomography is an alternative method for patients unable to undergo an MRI examination. (orig.)

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis of the craniocervical region: assessment and characterization of inflammatory soft tissue proliferations with unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerny, C.; Grampp, S.; Henk, C.B.; Stiskal, M.; Smolen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to depict and characterize inflammatory soft tissue proliferations caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the craniocervical region by unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT. Computed tomography of the craniocervical region was performed in 35 patients in the axial plane before and after the i. v. administration of contrast material. According to the densities and contrast enhancement of the inflammatory soft tissue proliferations, four groups were classified. Ancillary findings, such as a compression of the dural sac or spinal cord, erosions of the bony structures, and atlantoaxial subluxation, were also evaluated. Inflammatory soft tissue proliferations were depicted in 28 of 35 patients and could be differentiated by unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT according to the above defined criteria: effusion in 6 patients (17 %); hypervascular pannus in 8 (23 %); hypovascular pannus in 5 (14 %); and fibrous tissue in 9 patients (26 %). A compression of the dural sac was seen in 11 (31 %) patients; 3 of these had neurological symptoms. Erosions of the odontoid process were found in 20 (57 %) patients; 16 (80 %) of these also showed erosions of the atlas. Atlantoaxial subluxation was seen in 11 (31 %) patients. Inflammatory soft tissue proliferations in the craniocervical region caused by RA can be reliably demonstrated and classified by unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT, which can differentiate between joint effusion and various forms of pannus and depict ancillary findings. Computed tomography is an alternative method for patients unable to undergo an MRI examination. (orig.)

  10. Molecular insights into the differences in anti-inflammatory activities of green tea catechins on IL-1β signaling in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechtner, Sabrina; Singh, Anil; Chourasia, Mukesh; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2017-08-15

    In this study, we found that catechins found in green tea (EGCG, EGC, and EC) differentially interfere with the IL-1β signaling pathway which regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-6 and IL-8) and Cox-2 in primary human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs). EGCG and EGC inhibited IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-2 production and selectively inhibited Cox-2 expression. EC did not exhibit any inhibitory effects. When we looked at the expression of key signaling proteins in the IL-1β signaling pathway, we found all the tested catechins could inhibit TAK-1 activity. Therefore, the consumption of green tea offers an overall anti-inflammatory effect. Molecular docking analysis confirms that EGCG, EGC, and EC all occupy the active site of the TAK1 kinase domain. However, EGCG occupies the majority of the TAK1 active site. In addition to TAK1 inhibition, EGCG can also inhibit P38 and nuclear NF-κB expression whereas EC and EGC were not effective inhibitors. Our findings suggest one of the main health benefits associated with the consumption of green tea are due to the activity of EGCG and EGC which are both present at higher amounts. Although EGCG is the most effective catechin at inhibiting downstream inflammatory signaling, its effectiveness could be hindered by the presence of EC. Therefore, varying EC content in green tea may reduce the anti-inflammatory effects of other potential catechins in green tea. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Expression and Functions of Immediate Early Response Gene X-1 (IEX-1 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts.

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    Akio Morinobu

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA, synovial fibroblasts (RA-SFs accumulate in affected joints, where they play roles in inflammation and joint destruction. RA-SFs exhibit tumor-like proliferation and are resistant to apoptosis. Although RA-SF activation is well described, negative regulators of RA-SF activation are unknown. We previously reported that histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors facilitate apoptosis in RA-SFs. Here we found that RA-SFs treated with the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA exhibited an upregulation of the immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1. IEX-1 has roles in apoptosis sensitivity, cell-cycle progression, and proliferation, and is reported to be involved in immune responses, inflammation, and tumorigenesis, and to have anti-arthritic properties. To investigate IEX-1's role in RA-SFs, we used in vitro-cultured synovial fibroblasts from RA and osteoarthritis (OA patients. We confirmed that TSA upregulated the IEX-1 protein and mRNA expressions in RA-SFs by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Inhibiting HDAC1, 2, and 3 (but not 6 or 8 also upregulated IEX-1. The IEX-1 mRNA levels were higher in RA-SFs than in OA-SFs, and were further upregulated in RA-SFs by the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β. The staining of surgical specimens showed that IEX-1 was present in the pannus from affected RA joints. Si-RNA-mediated IEX-1 knockdown upregulated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced expression of TNFα and various chemokine mRNAs, indicating that IEX-1 downregulates TNFα and chemokines. Furthermore, apoptosis analysis showed that IEX-1 knockdown protected RA-SFs from apoptosis induced by TSA or by an anti-Fas mAb, indicating that IEX-1 is pro-apoptotic in RA-SFs. Collectively, our results showed that IEX-1 is induced by TNFα and IL-1β in RA-SFs, in which it suppresses TNFα and chemokine production and induces apoptosis; thus, IEX-1 negatively regulates RA-SF activation. Further investigation of IEX1's functions

  12. ACR/EULAR Definitions of Remission Are Associated with Lower Residual Inflammatory Activity Compared with DAS28 Remission on Hand MRI in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Solano, Albert; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Salman-Monte, Tarek Carlos; Maymó, Joan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the level of residual inflammation [synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), tenosynovitis, and total inflammation] quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (h-MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission according to 3 different definitions of clinical remission, and to compare these remission definitions. A cross-sectional study. To assess the level of residual MRI inflammation in remission, cutoff levels associated to remission and median scores of MRI residual inflammatory lesions were calculated. Data from an MRI register of patients with RA who have various levels of disease activity were used. These were used for the analyses: synovitis, BME according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring system, tenosynovitis, total inflammation, and disease activity composite measures recorded at the time of MRI. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best cutoffs associated with remission for each inflammatory lesion on h-MRI. Median values of each inflammatory lesion for each definition of remission were also calculated. A total of 388 h-MRI sets of patients with RA with different levels of disease activity, 130 in remission, were included. Cutoff values associated with remission according to the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤ 3.3 and the Boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) definitions for BME and tenosynovitis (1 and 3, respectively) were lower than BME and tenosynovitis (2 and 5, respectively) for the Disease Activity Score on 28 joints (DAS28) ≤ 2.6. Median scores for synovitis, BME, and total inflammation were also lower for the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR remission criteria compared with DAS28. Patients with RA in remission according to the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR definitions showed lower levels of MRI-detected residual inflammation compared with DAS28.

  13. Effect of bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)F4/80 (+) immature dendritic cells on the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingling; Song, Shanshan; Sheng, Kangliang; Li, Ying; Li, Peipei; Song, Shasha; Wang, Qingtong; Chu, Jianhong; Wei, Wei

    2014-05-01

    To explore the effect of bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)F4/80(+) immature dendritic cells (BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC) on the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC were induced with rmGM-CSF and rmIL-4, and were identified by the expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO), interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). CIA was established in DBA/1 mice by immunization with type II collagen. CIA mice were injected intravenously with BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC three times after immunization. The effect of BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC on CIA was evaluated by the arthritis index, joint histopathology, body weight, thymus index, thymocytes proliferation, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17, IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels. BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC induced with rmGM-CSF and rmIL-4 expressed high levels of TLR-2, IDO, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Infusion of BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC in CIA mice significantly reduced the arthritis index and pathological scores of joints, recovered the weight, decreased the thymus index and inhibited thymocyte proliferation. Levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-17 were decreased in BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC-treated mice. BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC can be induced successfully with rmGM-CSF and rmIL-4. BM CD11b(+)F4/80(+)iDC treatment can ameliorate the development and severity of CIA by regulating the balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  14. AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors contribute to inflammation, degeneration and pain related behaviour in inflammatory stages of arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Cleo S; Williams, Anwen S; Gilbert, Sophie J; Harvey, Ann K; Evans, Bronwen A; Mason, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Synovial fluid glutamate concentrations increase in arthritis. Activation of kainate (KA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors (GluRs) increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) release and cause arthritic pain, respectively. We hypothesised that AMPA and KA GluRs are expressed in human arthritis, and that intra-articular NBQX (AMPA/KA GluR antagonist) prevents pain and pathology in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Methods GluR immunohistochemistry was related to synovial inflammation and degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A single intra-articular NBQX injection was given at induction, and knee swelling and gait of AIA and AIA+NBQX rats compared over 21 days, before imaging, RT-qPCR, histology and immunohistochemistry of joints. Effects of NBQX on human primary osteoblast (HOB) activity were determined. Results AMPAR2 and KA1 immunolocalised to remodelling bone, cartilage and synovial cells in human OA and RA, and rat AIA. All arthritic tissues showed degradation and synovial inflammation. NBQX reduced GluR abundance, knee swelling (parthritis. PMID:24130267

  15. An intense and short-lasting burst of neutrophil activation differentiates early acute myocardial infarction from systemic inflammatory syndromes.

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    Norma Maugeri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils are involved in thrombus formation. We investigated whether specific features of neutrophil activation characterize patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS compared to stable angina and to systemic inflammatory diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The myeloperoxidase (MPO content of circulating neutrophils was determined by flow cytometry in 330 subjects: 69 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS, 69 with chronic stable angina (CSA, 50 with inflammation due to either non-infectious (acute bone fracture, infectious (sepsis or autoimmune diseases (small and large vessel systemic vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis. Four patients have also been studied before and after sterile acute injury of the myocardium (septal alcoholization. One hundred thirty-eight healthy donors were studied in parallel. Neutrophils with normal MPO content were 96% in controls, >92% in patients undergoing septal alcoholization, 91% in CSA patients, but only 35 and 30% in unstable angina and AMI (STEMI and NSTEMI patients, compared to 80%, 75% and 2% of patients with giant cell arteritis, acute bone fracture and severe sepsis. In addition, in 32/33 STEMI and 9/21 NSTEMI patients respectively, 20% and 12% of neutrophils had complete MPO depletion during the first 4 hours after the onset of symptoms, a feature not observed in any other group of patients. MPO depletion was associated with platelet activation, indicated by P-selectin expression, activation and transactivation of leukocyte β2-integrins and formation of platelet neutrophil and -monocyte aggregates. The injection of activated platelets in mice produced transient, P-selectin dependent, complete MPO depletion in about 50% of neutrophils. CONCLUSIONS: ACS are characterized by intense neutrophil activation, like other systemic inflammatory syndromes. In the very early phase of acute myocardial infarction only a subpopulation of neutrophils is massively activated, possibly via

  16. Nociception contributes to the formation of myogenic contracture in the early phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis in a rat knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneguchi, Akinori; Ozawa, Junya; Moriyama, Hideki; Yamaoka, Kaoru

    2017-07-01

    It is unknown how joint contracture is generated in inflamed joints. This study aimed to clarify the role of nociception on the formation of joint contracture secondary to arthritis. Monoarthritis was induced by intra-articular injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into rat knees. On day 5 after CFA injection, the passive extension range of motion (ROM) of knee joints were measured, both before and after myotomy of knee flexors, to evaluate the extent of muscular contribution to CFA-induced joint contracture. The steroidal anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone could prevent ROM restrictions completely, both before and after myotomy. On the other hand, the opioid analgesic drug morphine did not prevent the development of restricted ROM observed after myotomy, while it did before myotomy. This indicates that nociception contributes to joint contracture through alterations in muscular structure (myogenic factors). Next, we tested the hypothesis that nociception-induced reflexive flexor muscle contractions cause myogenic contracture in arthritic joints. To do this, chemical denervation was performed by Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections into knee flexor muscles, simultaneously with CFA injections into the knee. As expected, BTX-A could alleviate ROM restrictions observed before myotomy. These findings suggest that nociceptive-related muscle contractions play an essential role in the formation of joint contracture. Thus, our study indicates that analgesic management during an early stage of joint arthritis is an essential mean to prevent the formation of joint contracture. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1404-1413, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Expression of the dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin DC-SIGN by inflammatory matrix metalloproteinase-producing macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis synovium and interaction with intercellular adhesion molecule 3-positive T cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, P.L.E.M. van; Figdor, C.G.; Barrera Rico, P.; Ginkel, K. van; Sloetjes, A.W.; Berg, W.B. van den; Torensma, R.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-producing inflammatory macrophages in the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients express the novel dendritic cell (DC)-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN and whether this expression is associated with the presence of naive T cells

  18. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis: integrating systematic literature research and expert opinion of a broad panel of rheumatologists in the 3e Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittle, Samuel L.; Colebatch, Alexandra N.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Edwards, Christopher J.; Adams, Karen; Englbrecht, Matthias; Hazlewood, Glen; Marks, Jonathan L.; Radner, Helga; Ramiro, Sofia; Richards, Bethan L.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Aletaha, Daniel; Bombardier, Claire; Landewé, Robert B.; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; Branco, Jaime C.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; Catrina, Anca I.; Hannonen, Pekka; Kiely, Patrick; Leeb, Burkhard; Lie, Elisabeth; Martinez-Osuna, Píndaro; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Westhovens, Rene; Zochling, Jane; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2012-01-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process, 89 rheumatologists

  19. [Inflammasome and its role in immunological and inflammatory response at early stage of burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Jiahui; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-06-01

    Inflammasomes are large multi-protein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase-1 activation, and this process induces subsequent maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, as well as pyroptosis. As an important component of the innate immune system, early activation of inflammasomes in a variety of immune cell subsets can mediate inflammatory response and immunological conditions after burn injury. Here, we review the current knowledge of inflammasomes and its role in immunological and inflammatory response at the early stage of burn injury.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Mechanism of a Lipid Extract from Hard-Shelled Mussel (Mytilus Coruscus on Chronic Arthritis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guipu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity and mechanism of a lipid extract from hard-shelled mussel (Mytilus coruscus on adjuvant-induced (AIA and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in rats. AIA and CIA rats that received hard-shelled mussel lipid extract (HMLE group at a dose of 100 mg/kg demonstrated significantly lower paw swelling and arthritic index, but higher body weight gain than those which received olive oil (control group. Similar results were found in arthritic rats that received New Zealand green-lipped mussel lipid extract (GMLE at the same dosage. The levels of leukotriene B4 (LTB4, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, thromboxane B2 (TXB2 in the serum, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, interferon-γ (INF-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in the ankle joint synovial fluids of HMLE group rats were significantly lower than those of control group. However, the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in HMLE group rats were significantly higher than those in the control group. Decreased mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1 and MMP13, but increased tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1 were observed in the knee joint synovium tissues of HMLE group rats when compared with the control group. No hepatotoxicity was observed in both HMLE and GMLE group rats. The present results indicated that HMLE had a similarly strong anti-inflammatory activity as GMLE. Such a strong efficacy could result from the suppression of inflammatory mediators (LTB4, PGE2, TXB2, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, INF-γ, TNF-α and MMPs (MMP1, MMP13, and the promotion of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 and TIMPs (TIMP1 productions.

  1. Topical Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206-211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Topical Anti‐Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)−1 and COX‐2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti‐inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206–211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241582

  3. Comparison of several alternative uses of targeted antirheumatic drugs in monotherapy for early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Shatalova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ versus tofacitinib (TOFA in patients with severe and moderate rheumatoid arthritis (RA who have not previously received methotrexate (MTX. Material and methods. A systematic search for studies dealing with the evaluation of the efficacy of TCZ and TOFA was made in accordance with the provisions of the instruction «Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA». Indirect comparison of two Function and ORAL Start randomized clinical trials was done, as described by Н.C. Buchera. The trials were comparable in their design and in the baseline characteristics of patients. The efficiency of pharmacotherapy for early RA was evaluated based on the ACR20/50/70 response rates in MTX-naive patients from three endpoints. Results. The indirect comparison of TOFA and TCZ (A MTX general control after 52 weeks of treatment in MT-naive patients with severe and moderate RA indicated that the use of TOFA 5 mg twice daily and TCZ 8 mg/kg showed no difference in ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 response rates. Nevertheless, there was a tendency to the greater efficiency of TOFA (5 mg twice daily than that of TCZ (8 mg/kg. The indirect comparison of TOFA (10 mg twice daily and TCZ (8 mg/kg established that TCZ therapy was associated with the lower response rate for ACR50 (by 37%: the relative risk (RR was 0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.44–0.90 and for ACR70 (by 51%: RR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.29–0.83 as compared with TOFA therapy. Conclusion. The indirect comparisons confirmed that monotherapy with TOFA (10 mg twice daily produced a more pronounced antiinflammatory effect than that with TCZ in MTX-naive patients with early severe and moderate RA of less than one year's duration. There were no statistically significant differences in ACR response rates between the TOFA (5 mg twice daily and TCZ (8 mg/kg groups. 

  4. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-31

    To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem to affect the results. Moderate periodontitis was more frequent in

  5. Salmonella enteridis Septic Arthritis: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Uygur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nontyphoidal salmonellosis causes significant morbidity, is transmitted via fecal-oral route, and is a worldwide cause of gastroenteritis, bacteremia, and local infections. Salmonella is a less common etiologic factor for septic arthritis compared with other gram-negative bacteria. Cases. We present two septic arthritis cases with Salmonella enteridis as a confirmed pathogen and also discuss the predisposing factors and treatment. Discussion. Septic arthritis is an orthopedic emergency. The gold standard treatment of septic arthritis is joint debridement, antibiotic therapy according to the culture results, and physiotherapy, which should start in the early postoperative period to prevent limitation of motion. Salmonella is an atypical agent for septic arthritis. It must be particularly kept in mind as an etiologic factor for the acute arthritis of a patient with sickle cell anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should be cautious that the white blood cell count in synovial fluid can be under 50.000/mm3 in immune compromised individuals with septic arthritis. The inflammatory response can be deficient, or the microorganism may be atypical. Conclusion. Atypical bacteria such as Salmonella species in immune compromised patients can cause joint infections. Therefore, Salmonella species must always be kept in mind for the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in a clinically relevant setting.

  6. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  7. The CIMESTRA study: intra-articular glucocorticosteroids and synthetic DMARDs in a treat-to-target strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Horslev-Petersen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include aiming at disease control with early use of methotrexate (MTX) in monotherapy or in combination with glucocorticoids or other disease-modifying drugs (DMARDs). The CIMESTRA study applied an aggressive treatment with DMARD and intra-a...

  8. Comparison of Photo Optical Imaging with Musculoskeletal Ultrasound and Clinical Examination in the Assessment of Inflammatory Activity in Proximal Interphalangeal Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Isabella; Werner, Stephanie; Schicke, Bernd; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Minet, Olaf; Zabaryło, Urszula; Backhaus, Marina; Ohrndorf, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Lightscan is a novel, rapid, low-cost, easily operated and noninvasive imaging technology used to assess inflammatory activity in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. The results are calculated automatically. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative study of photo optical imaging (POI), with clinical examination (CE), disease activity score at 28 joints (DAS28)-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis (OA). There were 688 PIP joints of both hands examined in 87 subjects (38 RA, 21 OA, 28 healthy) by Lightscan and compared with CE for clinically swollen and tender joints, DAS28-ESR (only RA), and US. With US as reference, POI had a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 93%. In the receiver-operating curve (ROC) analysis, the Lightscan showed a higher sensitivity and specificity [area under the curve (AUC) 0.879] for the distinction of healthy subjects versus patients (OA, RA) than US in greyscale (GSUS; AUC 0.797) and power Doppler (PDUS; AUC 0.67). POI correlated significantly with GSUS (r 0.473, p POI and GSUS were up to 79%, between POI and PDUS up to 92%, and between POI and CE up to 66%. POI did not correlate with DAS28-ESR. The Lightscan is a new technology offering sensitive imaging detection of inflammatory changes in subjects with RA and OA with PIP arthritis. POI was more sensitive than CE and correlated significantly to GSUS and PDUS, while presenting a higher sensitivity and specificity for the detection of healthy subjects versus patients (RA, OA) based on the ROC analysis.

  9. Soluble Dietary Fibers Can Protect the Small Intestinal Mucosa Without Affecting the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Indomethacin in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Wada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    How to prevent the small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs is an urgent issue to be resolved. In the present study, we examined the effects of soluble dietary fibers on both anti-inflammatory and ulcerogenic effects of indomethacin in arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g were used. Arthritis was induced by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant (killed M. tuberculosis) into the plantar region of the right hindpaw. The animals were fed a regular powder diet for rats or a diet supplemented with soluble dietary fibers such as pectin or guar gum. Indomethacin was administered once a day for 3 days starting 14 days after the adjuvant injection, when marked arthritis was observed. The volumes of the hindpaw were measured before and after indomethacin treatment to evaluate the effect of indomethacin on edema. The lesions in the small intestine were examined 24 h after the final dosing of indomethacin. Hindpaw volume was increased about 3 times 14 days after injection of the adjuvant. Indomethacin (3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) decreased hindpaw volume dose-dependently, but caused severe lesions in the small intestine at doses of 6 and 10 mg/kg. The addition of pectin (1-10 %) or guar gum (10 %) to the diet markedly decreased the lesion formation without affecting the anti-edema action of indomethacin. The same effects of pectin were observed when indomethacin was administered subcutaneously. It is suggested that soluble dietary fibers can prevent intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs without affecting the anti-inflammatory effect of these agents.

  10. Comparison of interferon {gamma} release assays and conventional screening tests before tumour necrosis factor {alpha} blockade in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) and conventional screening tests in patients with inflammatory arthritis undergoing screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) before treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) compounds. METHODS: Successive patients were subjected to conventional LTBI screening, including a tuberculin skin test (TST). The T-SPOT.TB test was performed on all patients and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test was performed on a large subset. The results of the IGRAs were compared with the results of conventional screening tests. RESULTS: A total 150 patients were evaluated. The majority (57.9%) had rheumatoid arthritis. Previous vaccination with Bacille Calmette-Guerin was confirmed in 82% of patients. No patient had received prior anti-TB treatment. A total of 57 patients (38.0%) had at least one positive conventional risk factor. In contrast, an unequivocally positive T-SPOT.TB test was seen in only 14\\/143 (9.8%). There was 98.2% agreement between the two IGRAs. Statistically significant associations were found between each of the IGRAs and both TST and risk history, but not chest x-ray (CXR). A positive IGRA result was significantly associated with increased age. TB was not reactivated in any patient during the follow-up period. Interpretation: This study suggests that IGRAs may be useful when screening for LTBI before anti-TNFalpha therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The observations reported here also highlight the inadequate performance of CXR as a marker of LTBI.

  11. Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: Investigation of the IL-10 signaling pathway in Iranian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemati, Shahram; Teimourian, Shahram; Tabrizi, Mina; Najafi, Mehri; Dara, Naghi; Imanzadeh, Farid; Ahmadi, Mitra; Aghdam, Maryam Kazemi; Tavassoli, Mohmoud; Rohani, Pejman; Madani, Seyyed Ramin; de Boer, Martin; Kuijpers, T. W.; Roos, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background & aim: Comparing to adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), those with early onset manifestations have different features in terms of the underlying molecular pathology, the course of disease and the response to therapy. We investigated the IL-10 signaling pathway previously reported as

  12. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarka E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Eszter Szarka1*, Zsuzsa Neer1*, Péter Balogh2, Monika Ádori1, Adrienn Angyal1, József Prechl3, Endre Kiss1,3, Dorottya Kövesdi1, Gabriella Sármay11Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, 2Department of Immunology and Biotechnology, University of Pécs, Pécs, 3Immunology Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Science at Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2. These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro-inflammatory

  13. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect of Kerabala: a value-added ayurvedic formulation from virgin coconut oil inhibits pathogenesis in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratheesh, M; Sandya, S; Pramod, C; Asha, S; Svenia, Jose P; Premlal, S; GrishKumar, B

    2017-02-01

    Kerabala (CB) is a novel ayurvedic formulation used for treating various inflammatory diseases. This formulation was made from virgin coconut oil and it comprises extracts of Sida cordifolia, coconut milk and sesame oil. The current study was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of CB on carrageenan-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic experimental models. 5 mg/kg bwt was found to be potent dose from carrageenan model and evaluated its effect in adjuvant-induced chronic arthritic model. The antioxidant assays like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation product, nitrate level and GSH were measured in paw tissue. Hematological parameters like hemoglobin (HB) count, ESR, WBC count, plasma CRP levels were analyzed. By RT-PCR, the inflammatory markers like cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expressions were evaluated. The extracellular matrix proteins like MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by zymography and its expression by western blotting. Histopathology and cytology of paw tissue and synovium were analyzed. The result indicated that there was a significant increment in the levels of antioxidant enzymes on CB administration. The hematological markers such as ESR, WBC and plasma CRP levels were reduced by CB treatment and it also increases the HB level. The upregulated gene level expressions of inflammatory markers like COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 were down regulated by administration of CB. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression significantly reduced by CB administration. Massive influx of inflammatory cell infiltration, proliferative collagen in histological analysis of paw tissue of arthritic rat was decreased by CB administration. Synovial cytology of CB administrated group shows reduced number of reactive mesothelial cells and synovial inflammatory cells. This current study shows that ayurvedic drug CB has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and

  14. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNF-α therapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNF-α therapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNF-α therapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  15. Serum Biomarkers for Discrimination between Hepatitis C-Related Arthropathy and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Lidia; Biciuşcă, Viorel; Bogdan, Maria; Avramescu, Carmen; Taisescu, Citto; Padureanu, Vlad; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Dricu, Anica; Siloşi, Cristian Adrian

    2017-06-19

    In the present study, we aimed to estimate the concentrations of cytokines (interleukin 6, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, TNF-α) and auto-antibodies (rheumatoid factor IgM isotype, IgM-RF, antinuclear auto-antibodies, ANA, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies IgG isotype, IgG anti-CCP3.1, anti-cardiolipin IgG isotype, IgG anti-aCL) in serum of patients with eRA (early rheumatoid arthritis) and HCVrA (hepatitis C virus-related arthropathy) and to assess the utility of IL-6, TNF-α together with IgG anti-CCP and IgM-RF in distinguishing between patients with true eRA and HCVrA, in the idea of using them as differential immunomarkers. Serum samples were collected from 54 patients (30 diagnosed with eRA-subgroup 1 and 24 with HCVrA-subgroup 2) and from 28 healthy control persons. For the evaluation of serum concentrations of studied cytokines and auto-antibodies, we used immunoenzimatique techniques. The serum concentrations of both proinflammatory cytokines were statistically significantly higher in patients of subgroup 1 and subgroup 2, compared to the control group ( p < 0.0001). Our study showed statistically significant differences of the mean concentrations only for ANA and IgG anti-CCP between subgroup 1 and subgroup 2. We also observed that IL-6 and TNF-α better correlated with auto-antibodies in subgroup 1 than in subgroup 2. In both subgroups of patients, ROC curves indicated that IL-6 and TNF-α have a higher diagnostic utility as markers of disease. In conclusion, we can say that, due to high sensitivity for diagnostic accuracy, determination of serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, possibly in combination with auto-antibodies, could be useful in the diagnosis and distinguishing between patients with true eRA and HCV patients with articular manifestation and may prove useful in the monitoring of the disease course.

  16. MRI assessment of early response to certolizumab pegol in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Jacobsson, L T H; Schaufelberger, C

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the first time point of an MRI-verified response to certolizumab pegol (CZP) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Forty-one patients with active RA despite disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy were randomised 2:1 to CZP (CZP loading dose 400...

  17. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activati...

  18. Social Participation and Health Related Quality of Life in Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benka, Jozef; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Macejova, Zelmira; Lazurova, Ivica; van der Klink, Jac L. L.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    Social participation has been recognized as one of the key variables to be addressed in disability research yet few studies addressed the association between restriction in participation and quality of life in the context of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to explore the associations

  19. Macrophage activity assessed by soluble CD163 in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Møller, Holger Jon; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease where TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation, and is cleaved from the cell surface by TACE/ADAM17. This metalloproteinase is also responsible for the release of soluble (s) CD163. Soluble CD163 reflects macrophage activation...

  20. Work and health in early arthritis [werk en gerzondheid bij vroege inflammatoire gewrichtsklachten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints, which may result in joint damage. Any joint may be affected, but most commonly small joints in the hands and feet, wrists, elbows, and knees are involved. The onset of RA increases with age, and

  1. Efficacy of tofacitinib monotherapy in methotrexate-naive patients with early or established rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleischmann, Roy M.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kavanaugh, Arthur F.; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Kwok, Kenneth; DeMasi, Ryan; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.

    2016-01-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib monotherapy was previously shown to inhibit structural damage, reduce clinical signs and symptoms of RA, and improve physical functioning over 24 months in methotrexate (MTX)-naive adult

  2. Chronic comorbidity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a descriptive study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroot, E.J.A.; Gestel, A.M. van; Swinkels, H.L.; Albers, M.; Putte, L.B.A. van de; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the presence of chronic coexisting diseases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its effect on RA treatment, disease course, and outcome during the first years of the disease. METHODS: From January 1985 to December 1990, 186 patients with recent onset RA were enrolled

  3. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolen, Josef S.; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J.; Kvien, Tore K.; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Abadie, Eric C.; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for

  4. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.

  5. Quantification of synovitis in the cranio-cervical region: Dynamic contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis-A feasibility follow up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeromel, M., E-mail: miran.jeromel@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, Department for Neuroradiology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, V., E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si [Medical Faculty Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, I., E-mail: igor.sersa@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ambrozic, A., E-mail: ales.ambrozic@mf.uni-lj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, M., E-mail: matija.tomsic@kclj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To test the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCEI) and diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying synovitis of the cranio-cervical (C-C) region in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and neck pain at the beginning and at a six month follow up. Methods: 27 patients with duration of RA of less than 24 months and neck pain were studied with standard qualitative MRI evaluation and two quantitative MRI methods (DCEI and DWI) at the level of atlantoaxial joints. Rate of early enhancement (REE), enhancement gradient (Genh) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were extracted from DCEI and DWI data. MRI was coupled with clinical assessment and radiographic imaging. Results: Using standard qualitative MRI evaluation, unequivocal active synovitis (grade 2 or 3 contrast enhancement) was proved in 16 (59%) patients at baseline and 14 (54%) at follow up. DCEI and DWI measurements confirmed active synovitis in 25 (93%) patients at baseline and 24 (92%) at follow up. Average REE, Genh and ADC values decreased during follow up, however the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both qualitative and quantitative MRI methods confirmed active inflammatory disease in the C-C region following therapy although all clinical criteria showed signs of improvement of the peripheral disease. Conclusions: The study proved the feasibility of DCEI and DWI MRI for quantifying synovitis of the C-C region in patients with early RA and neck pain. Both techniques can be used as additional method for evaluation of synovitis of the C-C region in RA.

  6. Early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis: distinct molecular signatures identified by gene-expression profiling in synovia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequerré, Thierry; Bansard, Carine; Vittecoq, Olivier; Derambure, Céline; Hiron, Martine; Daveau, Maryvonne; Tron, François; Ayral, Xavier; Biga, Norman; Auquit-Auckbur, Isabelle; Chiocchia, Gilles; Le Loët, Xavier; Salier, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous disease and its underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Because previous microarray studies have only focused on long-standing (LS) RA compared to osteoarthritis, we aimed to compare the molecular profiles of early and LS RA versus control synovia. Methods Synovial biopsies were obtained by arthroscopy from 15 patients (4 early untreated RA, 4 treated LS RA and 7 controls, who had traumatic or mechanical lesions). Extracted mRNAs were used for large-scale gene-expression profiling. The different gene-expression combinations identified by comparison of profiles of early, LS RA and healthy synovia were linked to the biological processes involved in each situation. Results Three combinations of 719, 116 and 52 transcripts discriminated, respectively, early from LS RA, and early or LS RA from healthy synovia. We identified several gene clusters and distinct molecular signatures specifically expressed during early or LS RA, thereby suggesting the involvement of different pathophysiological mechanisms during the course of RA. Conclusions Early and LS RA have distinct molecular signatures with different biological processes participating at different times during the course of the disease. These results suggest that better knowledge of the main biological processes involved at a given RA stage might help to choose the most appropriate treatment. PMID:19563633

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  8. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis – impact of the severity of the inflammatory process and disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dąbrowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are much more common among rheumatoid arthritis (RA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients than in the general population. Chronic inflammation related to insulin resistance underlies the pathogenic mechanism of both rheumatoid disorders and diabetes. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α as well as substances produced by adipose tissue, including free fatty acids, leptin, resistin, visfatin and adiponectin, play a crucial role in the development of insulin resistance. The data show that there is a strong relationship between high level of inflammatory markers and insulin resistance and higher risk of diabetes in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. However, still other markers of disease activity are being sought, which could help to identify the patients with highest risk of impaired glucose tolerance. In the paper a literature overview has been presented concerning the assessment of risk of carbohydrate disorders among RA and AS patients and the disorders’ relationship with the intensity of non-specific inflammation and the disease activity.

  9. Plasma MicroRNA Profiles in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to Adalimumab plus Methotrexate vs Methotrexate Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Krintel, Sophine B; Carlsen, Anting Liu

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to identify plasma (i.e., cell-free) microRNA (miRNA) predicting antitumor necrosis and/or methotrexate (MTX) treatment response in patients enrolled in an investigator-initiated, prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial (The OPERA study, NCT00660647). METHODS......: We included 180 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) randomized to adalimumab (ADA; n = 89) or placebo (n = 91) in combination with MTX. Plasma samples before and 3 months after treatment initiation were analyzed for 91 specific mi...... multivariate miRNA models were able to predict response to ADA treatment after 3 and 12 months, with 63% and 82% area under the ROC curves, respectively. CONCLUSION: We identified miR-27a-3p as a potential predictive biomarker of ACR/EULAR remission in patients with early RA treated with ADA in combination...

  10. Early signs of degenerative arthritis of the hip by MRI. Fruehe Zeichen der Hueftgelenkarthrose in der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongartz, G.; Mueller-Miny, H.; Peters, P.E. (Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie)

    1989-10-01

    The hips of 8 young volunteers were investigated with high resolution MRI. The purpose of this study was to establish an imaging protocol to visualize hyaline cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone with optimized contrast. Spin Echo (SE) and Gradient Echo (GE) sequences were compared. FISP with a flip angle of 70{sup 0} was superior to the other techniques. The same sequences were applied on 45 volunteers aged 65-93 years. Early signs of degenerative arthritis of the hip were demonstrated as thinning, variable signal intensities within the cartilage layer, and cartilage loss. MRI of the hip may be a useful tool for the detection of early degenerative cartilage damage which cannot be documented with conventional X-rays. (orig.).

  11. Reduced butyrylcholinesterase activity is an early indicator of trauma-induced acute systemic inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivkovic AR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandar R Zivkovic, Jochen Bender, Thorsten Brenner, Stefan Hofer,* Karsten Schmidt* Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Early diagnosis of systemic inflammatory response syndrome is fundamentally important for an effective and a goal-directed therapy. Various inflammation biomarkers have been used in clinical and experimental practice. However, a definitive diagnostic tool for an early detection of systemic inflammation remains to be identified. Acetylcholine (Ach has been shown to play an important role in the inflammatory response. Serum cholinesterase (butyrylcholinesterase [BChE] is the major Ach hydrolyzing enzyme in blood. The role of this enzyme during inflammation has not yet been fully understood. This study tests whether a reduction in the BChE activity could indicate the onset of the systemic inflammatory response upon traumatic injury. Patients and methods: This observational study measured BChE activity in patients with traumatic injury admitted to the emergency room by using point-of-care-test system (POCT. In addition, the levels of routine inflammation biomarkers during the initial treatment period were measured. Injury Severity Score was used to assess the trauma severity. Results: Altered BChE activity was correlated with trauma severity, resulting in systemic inflammation. Reduction in the BChE activity was detected significantly earlier compared to those of routinely measured inflammatory biomarkers. Conclusion: This study suggests that the BChE activity reduction might serve as an early indicator of acute systemic inflammation. Furthermore, BChE activity, measured using a POCT system, might play an important role in the early diagnosis of the trauma-induced systemic inflammation. Keywords: trauma, injury, early diagnostics, cholinergic, pseudocholinesterase, SIRS

  12. Epidemiology of comorbidities in early rheumatoid arthritis: with emphasis on cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kerola, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a substantially increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Along with their CV burden, RA patients are at increased risk for other comorbidities such as hypothyroidism and depressive symptoms. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of CV comorbidities and hypothyroidism among RA patients in comparison to those of the general population at the time of RA diagnosis. We also aimed to determine, among patients wit...

  13. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of steroids and arthritis-related biotherapies in an in vitro co-culture model with immune cells and synoviocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Noack

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: During rheumatoid arthritis (RA, steroids and biotherapies are used alone and combined. Efficacy has been established in clinical trials but their differential effects at the cellular level are less documented. The aim was to study these cellular effects using an in vitro model with synoviocytes interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to reproduce the interactions in the RA synovium.Methods: Activated-PBMC were co-cultured with RA synoviocytes during 48h. A dose-response of methylprednisolone (MP was tested and different biotherapies (Infliximab, Etanercept, Adalimumab, Tocilizumab, Abatacept and Rituximab were added alone or in combination with MP. Cytokine production (IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-10 was measured by ELISA.Results: Addition of MP to co-cultures inhibited the production of all cytokines. The response to the biotherapies alone was treatment-dependent. IL-17 production was inhibited only by Tocilizumab (p=0.004 while IL-6 was decreased only by Infliximab (p≤0.002. IL-1β level was affected in all conditions (p≤0.03. IFN-γ production was mainly decreased by Infliximab (p=0.004, and IL-10 by Infliximab and Tocilizumab (p≤0.004. The combination MP and biotherapy did not induce an additional effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibition. The combination MP and biotherapies induced a higher IL-10 secretion than MP alone, mainly with Rituximab.Conclusion: Steroids inhibited the secretion of all cytokines, and low doses were as potent. The anti-inflammatory effect of biotherapies was dependent on their mechanism of action. MP and biotherapy combination did not enhance the inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines but could have a beneficial effect by increasing IL-10 production.

  14. Could early rheumatoid arthritis resolve after periodontitis treatment only?: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Simonetta; Biondo, Michela I; Fiorentino, Chiara; Argento, Giuseppe; Paolantonio, Michele; Di Murro, Carlo; Malagnino, Vito A; Canzoni, Marco; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated polyarthritis; currently no pathogenic agent has been identified as a disease trigger. A patient with RA, presumably caused by periodontal infection, whose remission has been observed after periodontitis treatment in absence of specific RA therapy, is reported here for the first time, to our knowledge. A 61-year-old male patient presented migrant arthritis associated with antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens positivity. The clinical features allowed to make RA diagnosis according to the 2010 European League against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology RA classification criteria. X-ray of the second upper molar showed chronic apical periodontitis. After its treatment, arthritis remission has been observed in the absence of specific RA therapy. It has been suggested that periodontitis may have a trigger role in RA pathogenesis. This could be explained by the enzymatic action of Porphyromonas gingivalis, probably leading to break tolerance to collagen. The identification and subsequent treatment of periodontitis should therefore be considered pivotal in RA prophylaxis and management.

  15. Arthritis severity locus Cia4 is an early regulator of IL-6, IL-1β, and NF-κB activators' expression in pristane-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Max; Laragione, Teresina; Gulko, Pércio S.

    2013-01-01

    Cia4 is a locus on rat chromosome 7 that regulates disease severity and joint damage in models of rheumatoid arthritis, including pristane-induced arthritis (PIA). To identify molecular processes regulated by Cia4, synovial tissues from MHC-identical DA (severe erosive) and DA.F344(Cia4) congenics (mild nonerosive) rats were collected at preclinical and recent onset stages following the induction of PIA and analyzed for gene expression levels. Il6 levels were significantly higher in DA compar...

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Lyakhov, Sergey A; Firestein, Gary S; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-06-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S-treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II-specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II-specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38–0.97, p=0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14–0.92, p=0.034, CC versus GG, dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36–0.87, p=0.011, GC + CC versus GG, and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41–0.84, p=0.004, C versus G inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population.

  18. A rare case of pulmonary toxoplasmosis in a patient with undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis on chronic methotrexate and corticosteroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Abdullateef; D'Souza, Ryan Steven; Patel, Nitin; Donato, Anthony A

    2017-08-23

    Pulmonary toxoplasmosis is a serious pulmonary condition caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii It typically affects immunocompromised patients presenting acutely with cough, fever, myalgias, arthralgias and lymphadenopathy, and chronically with persistent cough and dyspnoea. Because of its protean features, it can mimic many more common lung conditions in the immunocompromised patient, including atypical pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia and interstitial lung disease. In this article, we present the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with persistent dyspnoea and cough, initially suspected to have an arthritis-related interstitial lung disease. She received a final diagnosis of pulmonary toxoplasmosis after lung biopsy demonstrated Toxoplasma cysts, later confirmed by serology. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resulted in significant improvement of her respiratory symptoms after 3 months. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Obesity is the main determinant of insulin resistance more than the circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Hernandez, Jesus; Maldonado-Cervantes, Martha Imelda; Reyes, Juan Pablo; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Maldonado-Cervantes, Enrique; Solorzano-Rodriguez, Claudia; de la Cruz Mendoza, Esperanza; Alvarado-Sanchez, Brenda

    Systemic blockade of TNF-α in Rheumatoid arthritis with insulin resistance seems to produce more improvement in insulin sensitivity in normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis than in obese patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that systemic-inflammation and obesity are independent risk factors for insulin resistance in Rheumatoid arthritis patients. To evaluate the insulin resistance in: normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, overweight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, obese Rheumatoid arthritis patients, and matched control subjects with normal weight and obesity; and its association with major cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Assessments included: body mass index, insulin resistance by Homeostasis Model Assessment, ELISA method, and enzymatic colorimetric assay. Outstanding results from these studies include: (1) In Rheumatoid arthritis patients, insulin resistance was well correlated with body mass index, but not with levels of serum cytokines. In fact, levels of cytokines were similar in all Rheumatoid arthritis patients, regardless of being obese, overweight or normal weight (2) Insulin resistance was significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis with normal weight than in normal weight (3) No significant difference was observed between insulin resistances of Rheumatoid arthritis with obesity and obesity (4) As expected, levels of circulating cytokines were significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis patients than in obesity. Obesity appears to be a dominant condition above inflammation to produce IR in RA patients. The dissociation of the inflammation and obesity components to produce IR suggests the need of an independent therapeutic strategy in obese patients with RA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  1. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  2. Dilemmas of participation in everyday life in early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (The Swedish TIRA Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverker, Annette; Östlund, Gunnel; Thyberg, Mikael; Thyberg, Ingrid; Valtersson, Eva; Björk, Mathilda

    2015-01-01

    To explore the experiences of today's patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to dilemmas of everyday life, especially regarding patterns of participation restrictions in valued life activities. A total of 48 patients, aged 20-63, three years post-RA diagnosis were interviewed using the Critical Incident Technique. Transcribed interviews were condensed into meaningful units describing actions/situations. These descriptions were linked to ICF participation codes according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) linking rules. Dilemmas in everyday life were experienced in domestic life, interpersonal interactions and relationships, community, social and civic life. Most dilemmas were experienced in domestic life, including participation restrictions in, e.g. gardening, repairing houses, shovelling snow, watering pot plants, sewing or walking the dog. Also many dilemmas were experienced related to recreation and leisure within the domain community, social and civic life. The different dilemmas were often related to each other. For instance, dilemmas related to community life were combined with dilemmas within mobility, such as lifting and carrying objects. Participation restrictions in today's RA patients are complex. Our results underline that the health care needs to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to support the early multi-professional interventions in clinical practice. Implications of Rehabilitation Today's rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients experience participation restrictions in activities not included in International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core set for RA or in traditionally questionnaires with predefined activities. The health care need to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to meet the individual needs and optimize the rehabilitation in early RA in clinical practice.

  3. Nanomedicines for inflammatory arthritis : head-to-head comparison of glucocorticoid-containing polymers, micelles, and liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quan, Lingdong; Zhang, Yijia; Crielaard, Bart J; Dusad, Anand; Lele, Subodh M; Rijcken, Cristianne J F; Metselaar, Josbert M; Kostková, Hana; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Kiessling, Fabian; Mikuls, Ted R; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    As an emerging research direction, nanomedicine has been increasingly utilized to treat inflammatory diseases. In this head-to-head comparison study, four established nanomedicine formulations of dexamethasone, including liposomes (L-Dex), core-cross-linked micelles (M-Dex), slow releasing polymeric

  4. Selective, autoantibody-immune complex mediated proportional and functional changes of specific NK-cell subsets in early seropositive but not seronegative rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalan, P.; Brouwer, Liesbeth; Bijzet, J.; Kroesen, B.-J.; Boots, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite substantial data demonstrating NK-cell impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the exact role of NK-cells in RA immunopathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives: We studied the involvement of CD56dim and CD56bright NK-cells in the early stages of RA development to elucidate their

  5. Obesity is a strong predictor of worse clinical outcomes and treatment responses in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levitsky, Adrian; Brismar, Kerstin; Hafström, Ingiäld; Hambardzumyan, Karen; Lourdudoss, Cecilia; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Saevarsdottir, Saedis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyse the impact of obesity, in addition to known predictors, on disease outcome in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Body mass index (BMI) was available in 260 patients from the Swedish pharmacotherapy trial (SWEFOT). Differences in disease activity (DAS28), functional

  6. EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis: report of a task force of the European Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Combe, B.; Landewe, R.; Lukas, C.; Bolosiu, H. D.; Breedveld, F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Ferraccioli, G.; Hazes, J. M. W.; Klareskog, L.; Machold, K.; Martin-Mola, E.; Nielsen, H.; Silman, A.; Smolen, J.; Yazici, H.

    2007-01-01

    To formulate EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis. In accordance with EULAR's "standardised operating procedures", the task force pursued an evidence based approach and an approach based on expert opinion. A steering group comprised of 14 rheumatologists representing 10

  7. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Wee, Marieke M.; Coupé, Veerle M. H.; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S.; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit J. S. M.; Nurmohamed, Mike T.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164

  8. Social Support as a Moderator of Functional Disability's Effect on Depressive Feelings in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis : A Four-Year Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benka, Jozef; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Calfova, Anna; Macejova, Zelmira; Lazurova, Ivica; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    Objective: To examine associations of depressive feelings with disease-related variables and explore the moderating effect of social support on depressive feelings in individuals with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) prospectively over 4 years. Method: Data were collected annually over 4 years. The

  9. Targeting beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptors differentially shifts Th1, Th2, and inflammatory cytokine profiles in immune organs to attenuate adjuvant arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne eLorton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system (SNS regulates host defense responses and restores homeostasis. SNS-immune regulation is altered in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and rodent models of RA, characterized by nerve remodeling in immune organs and defective adrenergic receptor (AR signaling to immune cell targets that typically promotes or suppresses inflammation via α- and β2-AR activation, respectively, and indirectly drives humoral immunity by blocking Th1 cytokine secretion. Here, we investigate how β2-AR stimulation and/or α-AR blockade at disease onset affects disease pathology and cytokine profiles in relevant immune organs from male Lewis rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA. Rats challenged to induce AA were treated with terbutaline (TERB, a β2-AR agonist (600 μg/kg/day and/or phentolamine (PHEN, an α-AR antagonist (5.0 mg/kg/day or vehicle from disease onset through severe disease. We report that in spleen, mesenteric (MLN and draining lymph node (DLN cells, TERB reduces proliferation, an effect independent of IL-2. TERB also fails to shift Th cytokines from a Th1 to Th2 profile in spleen and MLN (no effect on IFN-γ and DLN (greater IFN-γ cells. In splenocytes, TERB, PHEN and co-treatment (PT promotes an anti-inflammatory profile (greater IL-10 and lowers TNF-α (PT only. In DLN cells, drug treatments do not affect inflammatory profiles, except PT, which raised IL-10. In MLN cells, TERB or PHEN lowers MLN cell secretion of TNF-α or IL-10, respectively. Collectively, our findings indicate disrupted β2-AR, but not α-AR signaling in AA. Aberrant β2-AR signaling consequently derails the sympathetic regulation of lymphocyte expansion, Th cell differentiation, and inflammation in the spleen, DLNs and MLNs that is required for immune system homeostasis. Importantly, this study provides potential mechanisms through which reestablished balance between α- and β2-AR function in the immune system ameliorates inflammation and joint

  10. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  11. Evaluation of a novel photo optical imaging (Lightscan) with musculoskeletal ultrasound and clinical examination in the assessment of inflammatory activity in PIP joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Amitai, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lightscan is a novel rapid, low cost and non-invasive imaging technology to assess inflammatory activity in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints, which can easily be performed. The results are calculated automatically. This is the first comparative study of photo optical imaging (POI), ‘Lightscan’, with musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US), clinical examination (CE) and DAS28 (only RA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and in healthy subjects. Me...

  12. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  13. Predictors of satisfactory improvements in pain for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis in a treat-to-target study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Siemons, Liseth; van Riel, Piet L C M; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify baseline predictors of achieving patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI) in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. Baseline and 6 month data were used from patients included in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring remission induction cohort study. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify significant predictors of achieving an absolute improvement of 30 mm or a relative improvement of 50% on a visual analogue scale for pain. At 6 months, 125 of 209 patients (59.8%) achieved an absolute PPSI and 130 patients (62.2%) achieved a relative PPSI in pain. Controlling for baseline pain, having symmetrical arthritis was the strongest independent predictor of achieving an absolute [odds ratio (OR) 3.17, P = 0.03] or relative (OR 3.44, P = 0.01) PPSI. Additionally, anti-CCP positivity (OR 2.04, P = 0.04) and having ≤12 tender joints (OR 0.29, P = 0.01) were predictive of achieving a relative PPSI. The total explained variance of baseline predictors was 30% for absolute and 18% for relative improvements, respectively. Symmetrical joint involvement, anti-CCP positivity and fewer tender joints at baseline are prognostic signs for achieving satisfactory improvement in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Power and color Doppler ultrasound settings for inflammatory flow: impact on scoring of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Christensen, Robin; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Ellegaard, Karen; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Balint, Peter; Wakefield, Richard J; Torp-Pedersen, Arendse; Terslev, Lene

    2015-02-01

    To determine how settings for power and color Doppler ultrasound sensitivity vary on different high- and intermediate-range ultrasound machines and to evaluate the impact of these changes on Doppler scoring of inflamed joints. Six different types of ultrasound machines were used. On each machine, the factory setting for superficial musculoskeletal scanning was used unchanged for both color and power Doppler modalities. The settings were then adjusted for increased Doppler sensitivity, and these settings were designated study settings. Eleven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with wrist involvement were scanned on the 6 machines, each with 4 settings, generating 264 Doppler images for scoring and color quantification. Doppler sensitivity was measured with a quantitative assessment of Doppler activity: color fraction. Higher color fraction indicated higher sensitivity. Power Doppler was more sensitive on half of the machines, whereas color Doppler was more sensitive on the other half, using both factory settings and study settings. There was an average increase in Doppler sensitivity, despite modality, of 78% when study settings were applied. Over the 6 machines, 2 Doppler modalities, and 2 settings, the grades for each of 7 of the patients varied between 0 and 3, while the grades for each of the other 4 patients varied between 0 and 2. The effect of using different machines, Doppler modalities, and settings has a considerable influence on the quantification of inflammation by ultrasound in RA patients, and this must be taken into account in multicenter studies. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, C; Krüger, K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the destruction of joints in the course of the disease it leads to significant morbidity in affected patients. The quality of life and even life expectancy can be severely impaired. Early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment is a decisive step towards a more benign course of the disease. New classification criteria have been published in order to help in early diagnosis. Methods of imaging, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging help in the detection of synovitis, which is the major pathomorphological manifestation of arthritis and should be identified without any doubt. Treatment follows the rule of treat to target with the aim of achieving remission or if this is not realistic, at least the lowest possible level of disease activity. The first and perhaps most important step in therapy is the initiation of methotrexate or if contraindications are present, another disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) as soon as the diagnosis is made. Initial addition of glucocorticoids is recommended, which should be reduced in dose and terminated as soon as possible. Furthermore, either the combination of different DMARDs or the start of biologic DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors or second generation biologic DMARDs is possible as a treatment option. The treatment follows the rule of shared decision-making and is the standard to treat comorbidities, the use an interdisciplinary approach and to treat functional deficits by rehabilitation measures, such as physiotherapy.

  16. A New Experimental Polytrauma Model in Rats: Molecular Characterization of the Early Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weckbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The molecular mechanisms of the immune response after polytrauma are highly complex and far from fully understood. In this paper, we characterize a new standardized polytrauma model in rats based on the early molecular inflammatory and apoptotic response. Methods. Male Wistar rats (250 g, 6–10/group were anesthetized and exposed to chest trauma (ChT, closed head injury (CHI, or Tib/Fib fracture including a soft tissue trauma (Fx + STT or to the following combination of injuries: (1 ChT; (2 ChT + Fx + STT; (3 ChT + CHI; (4 CHI; (5 polytrauma (PT = ChT + CHI + Fx + STT. Sham-operated rats served as negative controls. The inflammatory response was quantified at 2 hours and 4 hours after trauma by analysis of “key” inflammatory mediators, including selected cytokines and complement components, in serum and bronchoalveolar (BAL fluid samples. Results. Polytraumatized (PT rats showed a significant systemic and intrapulmonary release of cytokines, chemokines, and complement anaphylatoxins, compared to rats with isolated injuries or selected combinations of injuries. Conclusion. This new rat model appears to closely mimic the early immunological response of polytrauma observed in humans and may provide a valid basis for evaluation of the complex pathophysiology and future therapeutic immune modulatory approaches in experimental polytrauma.

  17. A New Experimental Polytrauma Model in Rats: Molecular Characterization of the Early Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckbach, Sebastian; Perl, Mario; Heiland, Tim; Braumüller, Sonja; Stahel, Philip F.; Flierl, Michael A.; Ignatius, Anita; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Background. The molecular mechanisms of the immune response after polytrauma are highly complex and far from fully understood. In this paper, we characterize a new standardized polytrauma model in rats based on the early molecular inflammatory and apoptotic response. Methods. Male Wistar rats (250 g, 6–10/group) were anesthetized and exposed to chest trauma (ChT), closed head injury (CHI), or Tib/Fib fracture including a soft tissue trauma (Fx + STT) or to the following combination of injuries: (1) ChT; (2) ChT + Fx + STT; (3) ChT + CHI; (4) CHI; (5) polytrauma (PT = ChT + CHI + Fx + STT). Sham-operated rats served as negative controls. The inflammatory response was quantified at 2 hours and 4 hours after trauma by analysis of “key” inflammatory mediators, including selected cytokines and complement components, in serum and bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid samples. Results. Polytraumatized (PT) rats showed a significant systemic and intrapulmonary release of cytokines, chemokines, and complement anaphylatoxins, compared to rats with isolated injuries or selected combinations of injuries. Conclusion. This new rat model appears to closely mimic the early immunological response of polytrauma observed in humans and may provide a valid basis for evaluation of the complex pathophysiology and future therapeutic immune modulatory approaches in experimental polytrauma. PMID:22481866

  18. Maintaining Intestinal Health: The Genetics and Immunology of Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R. Kelsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD younger than 5 years of age represent a unique form of disease, termed very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD, which is phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression, and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal inflammation and promote tissue repair. Here, we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. Keywords: Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Whole Exome Sequencing, Mucosal Immunology

  19. Early inflammatory changes in radiation-induced oral mucositis. Effect of pentoxifylline in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva; Roitinger, Eva; Schwarz, Karoline [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Applied and Translational Radiobiology, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Applied and Translational Radiobiology, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Early inflammation is a major factor of mucosal reactions to radiotherapy. Pentoxifylline administration resulted in a significant amelioration of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the mouse tongue model. The underlying mechanisms may be related to the immunomodulatory properties of the drug. The present study hence focuses on the manifestation of early inflammatory changes in mouse tongue during daily fractionated irradiation and their potential modulation by pentoxifylline. Daily fractionated irradiation with 5 fractions of 3 Gy/week (days 0-4, 7-11) was given to the snouts of mice. Groups of 3 animals per day were euthanized every second day between day 0 and 14. Pentoxifylline (15 mg/kg, s. c.) was administered daily from day 5 to the day before sacrifice. The expression of the inflammatory proteins TNFα, NF-κB, and IL-1β were analysed. Fractionated irradiation increased the expression of all inflammatory markers. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced the expression of TNFα and IL-1β, but not NF-κB. Early inflammation, as indicated by the expression of the inflammatory markers TNFα, NF-κB, and IL-1β, is an essential component of early radiogenic oral mucositis. Pentoxifylline differentially modulated the expression of different inflammatory markers. The mucoprotective effect of pentoxifylline does not appear to be based on modulation of NF-κB-associated inflammation. (orig.) [German] Fruehe entzuendliche Veraenderungen sind ein bedeutender Faktor waehrend der Strahlenreaktion der Schleimhaut. Die Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin erzielte eine signifikante Minderung strahleninduzierter oraler Mukositis im Mauszungenmodel. Die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen sind potenziell auf die immunomodulatorischen Eigenschaften des Wirkstoffs zurueckzufuehren. Die vorliegenden Untersuchungen fokussieren daher auf die Manifestation frueher entzuendlicher Veraenderungen in der Mauszunge waehrend taeglich fraktionierter Bestrahlung und deren potenzieller Modifikation

  20. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods.

  1. A qualitative evaluation of occupational therapy-led work rehabilitation for people with inflammatory arthritis: Perspectives of therapists and their line managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Yeliz; Amanna, Evangeline A; Bodell, Sarah J; Hammond, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Occupational therapy-led work rehabilitation for employed people with inflammatory arthritis and work problems was piloted in five hospitals in the United Kingdom. This qualitative study explored the views of participating occupational therapists and their line managers about the work rehabilitation training received and conducting the intervention, with particular focus on the structured interview used, the Work Experience Survey - Rheumatic Conditions. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with occupational therapists ( n  = 9), followed by telephone interviews with their line managers ( n  = 2). Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed by three researchers to maximize validity. The main themes emerging from the occupational therapists' interviews were: varying levels of prior knowledge and experience of work rehabilitation, initial concerns about the feasibility of a lengthy work assessment in practice and increased confidence in delivering work rehabilitation as the study progressed. The line managers' interviews generated themes around the positive impact of the work rehabilitation training the occupational therapists received, and changes in their practice. The Work Experience Survey - Rheumatic Conditions was considered a good choice of work assessment which can be implemented in practice. Once therapists had provided the work intervention several times, their confidence and skills increased.

  2. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.

    2000-01-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  3. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. Normally, the body stops the inflammatory response after healing is complete to prevent damage to its own cells and tissues. In people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis , the inflammatory ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  5. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...

  6. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare the effect of biannual peripheral magnetic resonance imaging, radiography and standard of care disease progression monitoring on pharmacotherapeutic escalation in rheumatoid and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Permanent joint damage is a major consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common and destructive form of inflammatory arthritis. In aggressive disease, joint damage can occur within 6 months from symptom onset. Early, intensive treatment with conventional and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can delay the onset and progression of joint damage. The primary objective of the study is to investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or radiography (X-ray) over standard of care as tools to guide DMARD treatment decision-making by rheumatologists for the care of RA. Methods A double-blind, randomized controlled trial has been designed. Rheumatoid and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis patients will undergo an MRI and X-ray assessment every 6 months. Baseline adaptive randomization will be used to allocate participants to MRI, X-ray, or sham-intervention groups on a background of standard of care. Prognostic markers, treating physician, and baseline DMARD therapy will be used as intervention allocation parameters. The outcome measures in rheumatology RA MRI score and the van der Heijde-modified Sharp score will be used to evaluate the MRI and X-ray images, respectively. Radiologists will score anonymized images for all patients regardless of intervention allocation. Disease progression will be determined based on the study-specific, inter-rater smallest detectable difference. Allocation-dependent, intervention-concealed reports of positive or negative disease progression will be reported to the treating rheumatologist. Negative reports will be delivered for the sham-intervention group. Study-based radiology clinical reports will be provided to the treating rheumatologists for extra-study X-ray requisitions to limit patient radiation exposure as part of diagnostic imaging standard of care. DMARD treatment dose escalation and therapy changes will be measured to evaluate the primary objective. A sample size of

  7. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  8. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  9. Inflammatory Gene Expression in Whole Peripheral Blood at Early Stages of Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol Andrés-Benito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveCharacterization of altered expression of selected transcripts linked to inflammation in the peripheral blood of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS patients at early stage of disease to increase knowledge about peripheral inflammatory response in sALS.MethodsRNA expression levels of 45 genes were assessed by RT-qPCR in 22 sALS cases in parallel with 13 age-matched controls. Clinical and serum parameters were assessed at the same time.ResultsUpregulation of genes coding for factors involved in leukocyte extravasation (ITGB2, INPP5D, SELL, and ICAM1 and extracellular matrix remodeling (MMP9 and TIMP2, as well as downregulation of certain chemokines (CCL5 and CXC5R, anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL10, TGFB2, and IL10RA, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, and T-cell regulators (CD2 and TRBC1 was found in sALS cases independently of gender, clinical symptoms at onset (spinal, respiratory, or bulbar, progression, peripheral leukocyte number, and integrity of RNA. MMP9 levels positively correlated with age, whereas CCR5, CCL5, and TRBC1 negatively correlated with age in sALS but not in controls. Relatively higher TNFA expression levels correlate with higher creatinine kinase protein levels in plasma.ConclusionPresent findings show early inflammatory responses characterized by upregulation of factors enabling extravasation of leukocytes and extracellular matrix remodeling in blood in sALS cases, in addition to increased TNFA levels paralleling skeletal muscle damage.

  10. Biomarkers, imaging and disease activity indices in patients with early axial spondyloarthritis: the Italian arm of the SpondyloArthritis-Caught-Early (SPACE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lorenzin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate biomarkers facilitating early diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA and correlations between them and disease activity parameters and imaging indexes. Patients with low back pain (LBP (≥3 months, ≤2 years, onset ≤45 years participating in the Italian arm of the SpondyloArthritis-Caught-Early SPACE study underwent a physical examination, questionnaires, laboratory tests, X-rays and MRI of the spine and sacroiliac joints (SIJ. An expert rheumatologist formulated axSpA diagnosis in accordance with Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS criteria. Disease activity and physical functioning were assessed using imaging, clinical and serological indices. Spine and SIJ MRI and X-rays were scored independently by 2 readers using the SPARCC, mSASSS and NY-criteria. Patients were classified as: subjects with signs of radiographic sacroiliitis (r-axSpA, subjects with signs of sacroiliitis on SIJ-MRI but not on X-rays (nr-axSpA MRI SIJ+ or subjects with no signs of sacroiliitis on MRI/X-rays but with >2 SpA features and signs of bone oedema on MRI spine (nr-axSpA MRI SIJ-/undifferentiated SpA. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis, active sacroiliitis on MRI and SPARCC SIJ scores. Biomarker levels were not significantly increased in any of the patient groups. The correlations between IL-17 and IL-23 and other indices were not significant; correlations were found between IL-22 and BASFI, BASG1, HAQ, VAS pain, between mSASSS and MMP3, and between the latter and hsCRP. Although not significantly higher in any of the three groups, IL-22, MMP3 and hsCRP values were correlated with some disease activity indexes and with mSASSS. Large observational studies are required to confirm these preliminary findings.

  11. Effects of Portabella mushrooms on collagen-induced arthritis, inflammatory cytokines, and body composition in dilute brown non-agouti (DBA1 mice

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    Stanley A. Lightfoot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Exotic mushrooms have long been used in Asia for treatment and/or prevention of chronic diseases due to their immunomodulatory properties. However, the health benefits of portabella mushrooms (PM (brown Agaricus bisporous, on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and associated complications, (i.e. loss of lean mass, increased fat mass and inflammatory cytokines, have not been previously investigated.Methods:We investigated CIA pathogenesis, body composition and plasma levels of IL- 6, TNF-α and sICAM1 in DBA1 female mice fed either the AIN76 diet or the same diet fortified with 5% lyophilized PM (n=19-20/group. Ten mice/group were immunized with 100 μg bovine collagen type II on day 42 of the protocol, followed by 50 μg lipopolysaccharides on day 62, and euthanized on day 73-74. Cytokines were measured by ELISA.Results:Compared to baseline diet, PM had: no protective effect from CIA since all collagen-immunized mice developed severe edema, bone erosion, and mononuclear cell infiltration in paws. In mice with and those without CIA, feeding a PM-fortified diet resulted in higher percent of body fat than feeding the baseline diet (p<0.05. After CIA induction, PM provided the followingFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2011; 9:279-296beneficial effects: (a a smaller reduction in lean mass and absolute thymus weight; (b a higher fat mass loss; and (c lower plasma TNF-α levels (p <0.05. PM-fortification did not alter plasma IL-6 and sICAM1 regardless of CIA status; but it increased in vitro IL-6 secretion by mitogen-treated spleen cells.Conclusion:Our data suggest that PM may reduce plasma TNF-α, attenuate lean mass loss and thymus atrophy associated with arthritis, and protect spleen cell function assessed by IL-6 secretion. However, PM-fortification did not attenuate overall CIA pathogenesis which may be due to lack of effect on plasma IL-6. Decreased TNF-α without alterations in IL-6 may reduce the risk of other conditions

  12. The foot as a barrier in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis - an interview study among Swedish women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Valtersson, Eva; Östlund, Gunnel; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

    2017-12-01

    Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA. The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee. Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease. There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu; Rull-Gabayet, Marina; Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with ≤12 months of disease duration, ≥3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 ± 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  14. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu, E-mail: uzari02@hotmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rull-Gabayet, Marina, E-mail: rull.marina@gmail.com [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge, E-mail: docjvlradiologo@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pascual-Ramos, Virginia, E-mail: virtichu@gmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with {<=}12 months of disease duration, {>=}3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 {+-} 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  15. Measures and time points relevant for post-surgical follow-up in patients with inflammatory arthritis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tägil Magnus

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatic diseases commonly affect joints and other structures in the hand. Surgery is a traditional way to treat hand problems in inflammatory rheumatic diseases with the purposes of pain relief, restore function and prevent progression. There are numerous measures to choose from, and a combination of outcome measures is recommended. This study evaluated if instruments commonly used in rheumatologic clinical practice are suitable to measure outcome of hand surgery and to identify time points relevant for follow-up. Methods Thirty-one patients (median age 56 years, median disease duration 15 years with inflammatory rheumatic disease and need for post-surgical occupational therapy intervention formed this pilot study group. Hand function was assessed regarding grip strength (Grippit, pain (VAS, range of motion (ROM (Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI and grip ability (Grip Ability Test (GAT. Activities of daily life (ADL were assessed by means of Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Outcome (DASH and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. The instruments were evaluated by responsiveness and feasibility; follow-up points were 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Results All instruments showed significant change at one or more follow-up points. Satisfaction with activities (COPM showed the best responsiveness (SMR>0.8, while ROM measured with SOFI had low responsiveness at most follow-up time points. The responsiveness of the instruments was stable between 6 and 12 month follow-up which imply that 6 month is an appropriate time for evaluating short-term effect of hand surgery in rheumatic diseases. Conclusion We suggest a core set of instruments measuring pain, grip strength, grip ability, perceived symptoms and self-defined daily activities. This study has shown that VAS pain, the Grippit instrument, GAT, DASH symptom scale and COPM are suitable outcome instruments for hand surgery, while SOFI may be a more insensitive

  16. Analysis of SF and plasma cytokines provides insights into the mechanisms of inflammatory arthritis and may predict response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Helen L; Bucknall, Roger C; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2012-03-01

    Biologic drugs have revolutionized the care of RA, but are expensive and not universally effective. To further understand the inflammatory mechanisms underlying RA and identify potential biomarkers predicting response to therapy, we measured multiple cytokine concentrations in SF of patients with inflammatory arthritides (IAs) and, in a subset of patients with RA, correlated this with response to TNF-α inhibition. SF from 42 RA patients and 19 non-RA IA patients were analysed for 12 cytokines using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokines were also measured in the plasma of 16 RA patients before and following treatment with anti-TNF-α. Data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman's rank correlation and cluster analysis with the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's post-test analysis. RA SF contained significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, G-CSF, GM-CSF and TNF-α compared with other IA SF. RA patients who did not respond to anti-TNF therapy had elevated IL-6 in their SF pre-therapy (P < 0.05), whereas responders had elevated IL-2 and G-CSF (P < 0.05). Plasma cytokine concentrations were not significantly modulated by TNF inhibitors, with the exception of IL-6, which decreased after 12 weeks (P < 0.05). Cytokine profiles in RA SF vary with treatment and response to therapy. Cytokine concentrations are significantly lower in plasma than in SF and relatively unchanged by TNF inhibitor therapy. Concentrations of IL-6, IL-2 and G-CSF in SF may predict response to TNF inhibitors.

  17. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  18. Triple DMARD treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis modulates synovial T cell activation and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Alice M; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Guo, Yanxia; Yin, Xuefeng; Weedon, Helen; Proudman, Susanna M; Smith, Malcolm D; Nagpal, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the genome-wide transcriptional effects of a combination of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (tDMARD; methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine) in synovial tissues obtained from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. While combination DMARD strategies have been investigated for clinical efficacy, very little data exists on the potential molecular mechanism of action. We hypothesized that tDMARD would impact multiple biological pathways, but the specific pathways were unknown. Paired synovial biopsy samples from early RA patients before and after 6 months of tDMARD therapy were collected by arthroscopy (n = 19). These biopsies as well as those from subjects with normal synovium (n = 28) were profiled by total RNA sequencing. Large differences in gene expression between RA and control biopsies (over 5000 genes) were identified. Despite clinical efficacy, the expression of a restricted set of less than 300 genes was reversed after 6 months of treatment. Many genes remained elevated, even in patients who achieved low disease activity. Interestingly, tDMARD downregulated genes included those involved in T cell activation and signaling and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation and function. We have identified transcriptomic signatures that characterize synovial tissue from RA patients with early disease. Analysis after 6 months of tDMARD treatment highlight consistent alterations in expression of genes related to T cell activation and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation. These results provide novel insight into the biology of early RA and the mechanism of tDMARD action and may help identify novel drug targets to improve rates of treatment-induced disease remission.

  19. Possible relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis in rat skin after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    The possible mechanistic relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis seen after radiation exposure was studied in rats were given single x ray doses of either 2000 or 5000 rads to standardized fields of the inner thigh. The results suggest that two mechanisms are responsible for the radiation-induced increase in extravasation rate and vascular injury seen early after irradiation. First, direct cytocidal damage of the endothelium; and second, chemically mediated, possibly complement dependent mechanisms. Indirect histological evidence suggests a correlation between the PMN infiltrate and the indirect vascular damage. In addition, one may conclude from these data that both direct and indirect damage to the vasculature play a role in influencing the subsequent late radiation-induced fibrosis; and a decrease in the indirect damage may allow the maintenance of a supportive vasculature at lower doses or allow the reestablishment of a vascular bed in the case of higher doses. (U.S.)

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with early phase acute inflammatory protein on serum protein electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ET Tuladhar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The onset of Type 2 diabetes has been associated with low grade systemic inflammation. The inflammatory status has been studied by measuring acute phase reactant proteins like hsCRP, α1- antitrypsin, α1-acid glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen. Most of these acute phase reactants form α1 and α2 bands on electropherogram of serum proteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate inflammatory status in controlled and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes using cellulose acetate electrophoresis and to find the impact of glycemic status as indicated by HbA1c on inflammation process. Materials and Methods: Serum protein electrophoresis was done on serum samples of 60 cases of Diabetes [controlled and uncontrolled] using cellulose acetate paper technique. The electropherogram obtained was stained with Ponseu S and then quantitated using densitometer. Glycemic status was studied by HbA1c analysis. The density of α1and α2 bands in electropherogram were correlated with HbA1c level. Result: A significant increase in the percentage of α1 and α2 band proteins (0.765 and 0.716, p<0.001 were found with the increasing level of HbA1c. With cutoff of HbA1c 7% (American Diabetic Association recommended, the α1 and α2 serum proteins concentration are significantly higher (p<0.001 in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus compared to controlled diabetes mellitus Conclusion: Cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins show early phase acute inflammatory status in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. The process of systemic inflammation worsens with uncontrolled glycemia as indicated by HbA1c. Inflammatory status should be studied adjunct to glycemic status. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6024 JPN 2012; 2(3: 211-214

  1. A treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone with or without adalimumab effectively reduces MRI synovitis, osteitis and tenosynovitis and halts structural damage progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Eshed, Iris; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular glucocorticosteroid injections suppresses MRI inflammation and halts structural damage progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA), and whether adalimumab provides an additional effect....

  2. A nationwide non-medical switch from originator infliximab to biosimilar CT-P13 in 802 patients with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2017-01-01

    Objectives According to guidelines, a nationwide non-medical switch from originator (INX, Remicade) to biosimilar infliximab (Remsima, CT-P13) was conducted in Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (AxSpA). We investigated disease...

  3. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  4. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  5. Cost-effectiveness of drug monitoring of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Laura; Olivera, Pablo; Roblin, Xavier; Attar, Alain; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of anti-TNF is increasingly used to manage inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The cost-effectiveness of this strategy is debated. All studies comparing the cost-effectiveness of a TDM-based strategy and an empirical dose management of anti-TNF in IBD or RA were screened. Studies were identified through the MEDLINE electronic database (up to July 2016), and annual international meeting abstracts were also manually reviewed. Seven studies were included: two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) enrolling 332 patients [247 Crohn's disease (CD) and 85 ulcerative colitis (UC)] and five modeling approaches. Four studies included only CD patients, one included both CD and UC patients, and two included only RA patients. Three studies compared the cost-effectiveness of the two strategies in patients with secondary infliximab (IFX) failure (dose-escalation strategy), one in patients in remission on optimized IFX (de-escalation strategy), one in patients starting adalimumab, and two in patients with clinical response to maintenance anti-TNF therapy. The two RCTs demonstrated that a TDM strategy led to major cost savings, ranging from 28 to 34 %. The three modeling approaches with regard to CD patients demonstrated cost savings ranging from $5396 over a 1-year period to €13,130 per patient at 5 years of follow-up. A TDM strategy also led to major cost savings in the two modeling approaches in RA patients. Available evidence indicates that a TDM strategy leads to major cost savings related to anti-TNF therapy in both IBD and RA patients, with no negative impact on efficacy.

  6. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)‐flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX‐1 (IC50 = 8.97 nM) and COX‐2 (IC50 = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. Drug Dev Res 76 : 20–28, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26763139

  8. [Effects of grain-sized moxibustion from 7 am to 9 am on circadian rhythm of inflammatory factor IL-6 in rats with rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenbin; Liu, Xuguang; Qin, Yong; Zhou, Haiyan; Yang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    To explore the rhythm regulatory mechanism of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the process of moxibustion for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 144 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a blank group, a model group, a moxibustion group, a sham operation group, an operation group, an operation+moxibustion group, 24 rats in each one. Each group was divided into 4 time points (0:00 am, 6:00' am, 12:00 am, 6:00 pm), 6 rats in each time point. The Light-Dark 12 : 12 was given in all rats for light-dark cycle. Except the blank group, rats in the remaining groups were treated with intracutaneous injection of freund's complete adjuvant at right-side foot to establish the model of RA. After the model establishment, bilateral adrenal, glands were removed in the operation group and operation + moxibustion group, while those in the sham operation group were not removed with identical operation procedure. Rats in the moxibustion group and operation + moxibustion group were treated with grain-sized moxibustion from 7:00 am to 9:00 am at "Shenshu" (BL 23) and "Zusanli" (ST 36) once everyday, 6 times were taken as one session and 3 sessions were required tatclly, while rats in the remaining groups received identical fixation without moxibustion. The general health state and foot volume of rats were measured before model establishment, after establishment and after treatment. After treatment, rats were sacrificed at each time point to collect the blood sample and measure the content of IL-6 by using enzymne-immunoassay method. Compared with the blank group, the foot swelling in the model group was obviously increased (Pcircadian rhythm (Pcircadian. rhythm (Pcircadian rhythm (P circadian rhythm in RA rats; with the complete hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, moxibustion is likely to regulate the circadian rhythm of IL-6 to play an important role of anti-inflammatory effect in RA rats.

  9. Common variants at five new loci associated with early-onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imielinski, Marcin; Baldassano, Robert N; Griffiths, Anne; Russell, Richard K; Annese, Vito; Dubinsky, Marla; Kugathasan, Subra; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Walters, Thomas D; Sleiman, Patrick; Kim, Cecilia E; Muise, Aleixo; Wang, Kai; Glessner, Joseph T; Saeed, Shehzad; Zhang, Haitao; Frackelton, Edward C; Hou, Cuiping; Flory, James H; Otieno, George; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Grundmeier, Robert; Castro, Massimo; Latiano, Anna; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Stempak, Joanne; Abrams, Debra J; Taylor, Kent; McGovern, Dermot; Silber, Gary; Wrobel, Iwona; Quiros, Antonio; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Hansoul, Sarah; Nicolae, Dan L; Cho, Judy H; Duerr, Richard H; Rioux, John D; Brant, Steven R; Silverberg, Mark S; Taylor, Kent D; Barmuda, M Michael; Bitton, Alain; Dassopoulos, Themistocles; Datta, Lisa Wu; Green, Todd; Griffiths, Anne M; Kistner, Emily O; Murtha, Michael T; Regueiro, Miguel D; Rotter, Jerome I; Schumm, L Philip; Steinhart, A Hillary; Targan, Stephen R; Xavier, Ramnik J; Libioulle, Cécile; Sandor, Cynthia; Lathrop, Mark; Belaiche, Jacques; Dewit, Olivier; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon; Laukens, Debby; Mni, Myriam; Rutgeerts, Paul; Van Gossum, André; Zelenika, Diana; Franchimont, Denis; Hugot, J P; de Vos, Martine; Vermeire, Severine; Louis, Edouard; Cardon, Lon R; Anderson, Carl A; Drummond, Hazel; Nimmo, Elaine; Ahmad, Tariq; Prescott, Natalie J; Onnie, Clive M; Fisher, Sheila A; Marchini, Jonathan; Ghori, Jilur; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Gwillam, Rhian; Tremelling, Mark; Delukas, Panos; Mansfield, John; Jewell, Derek; Satsangi, Jack; Mathew, Christopher G; Parkes, Miles; Georges, Michel; Daly, Mark J; Heyman, Melvin B; Ferry, George D; Kirschner, Barbara; Lee, Jessica; Essers, Jonah; Grand, Richard; Stephens, Michael; Levine, Arie; Piccoli, David; Van Limbergen, John; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Monos, Dimitri S; Guthery, Stephen L; Denson, Lee; Wilson, David C; Grant, Straun F A; Daly, Mark; Silverberg, Mark S; Satsangi, Jack; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-12-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are common causes of morbidity in children and young adults in the western world. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study in early-onset IBD involving 3,426 affected individuals and 11,963 genetically matched controls recruited through international collaborations in Europe and North America, thereby extending the results from a previous study of 1,011 individuals with early-onset IBD. We have identified five new regions associated with early-onset IBD susceptibility, including 16p11 near the cytokine gene IL27 (rs8049439, P = 2.41 x 10(-9)), 22q12 (rs2412973, P = 1.55 x 10(-9)), 10q22 (rs1250550, P = 5.63 x 10(-9)), 2q37 (rs4676410, P = 3.64 x 10(-8)) and 19q13.11 (rs10500264, P = 4.26 x 10(-10)). Our scan also detected associations at 23 of 32 loci previously implicated in adult-onset Crohn's disease and at 8 of 17 loci implicated in adult-onset ulcerative colitis, highlighting the close pathogenetic relationship between early- and adult-onset IBD.

  10. Disease activity decrease is associated with improvement in work productivity over 1 year in early axial spondyloarthritis (SPondyloArthritis Caught Early cohort).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lunteren, Miranda; Ez-Zaitouni, Zineb; Fongen, Camilla; Landewé, Robert; Ramonda, Roberta; van der Heijde, Désirée; van Gaalen, Floris A

    2017-12-01

    To assess if a change in disease activity is associated with a change in work productivity loss (WPL) over 1 year in early axial SpA (axSpA) patients. Baseline and 1 year data of axSpA patients in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early cohort were analysed. Linear regression models were built explaining the change in the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) over time by the change in absenteeism, presenteeism, WPL and activity impairment over time. Effect modification and confounding were tested for age, gender, arm of Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society classification criteria, HLA-B27, duration of chronic back pain, profession and medication. At baseline, in 105 axSpA patients (48% female, mean age 30.8 years, mean symptom duration 13.6 months, 92% HLA-B27 positive, 24% radiographic sacroiliitis), the mean ASDAS was 2.4 (s.d. 1.0), absenteeism 9% (s.d. 23), presenteeism 33% (s.d. 28), WPL 36% (s.d. 30) and activity impairment 37% (s.d. 25). After 1 year, the mean ASDAS decreased to 2.0 (s.d. 0.8) and absenteeism, presenteeism, WPL and activity impairment improved to 6% (s.d. 22), 26% (s.d. 26), 27% (s.d. 29) and 27% (s.d. 26), respectively. Models showed that if ASDAS decreased 1 unit, absenteeism, presenteeism, WPL and activity impairment improved by 5, 17, 16 and 18%, respectively. The impact of disease activity on work productivity was higher in patients with shorter symptom duration and the impact on absenteeism was higher in patients starting pharmacological treatment. In early axSpA patients, work productivity and daily activities are seriously impacted at baseline and 1 year. However, decreasing disease activity is associated with marked improvements in work productivity and daily activities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Near-infrared Fluorescence Optical Imaging in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparison to Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Michaela; Ohrndorf, Sarah; Werner, Stephanie G; Schicke, Bernd; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Hamm, Bernd; Backhaus, Marina; Hermann, Kay-Geert A

    2015-07-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) is a novel imaging technology in the detection and evaluation of different arthritides. FOI was validated in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), greyscale ultrasonography (GSUS), and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Hands of 31 patients with early RA were examined by FOI, MRI, and US. In each modality, synovitis of the wrist, metacarpophalangeal joints (MCP) 2-5, and proximal interphalangeal joints (PIP) 2-5 were scored on a 4-point scale (0-3). Sensitivity and specificity of FOI were analyzed in comparison to MRI and US as reference methods, differentiating between 3 phases of FOI enhancement (P1-3). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to evaluate the agreement of FOI with MRI and US. A total of 279 joints (31 wrists, 124 MCP and 124 PIP joints) were evaluated. With MRI as the reference method, overall sensitivity/specificity of FOI was 0.81/0.00, 0.49/0.84, and 0.86/0.38 for wrist, MCP, and PIP joints, respectively. Under application of PDUS as reference, sensitivity was even higher, while specificity turned out to be low, except for MCP joints (0.88/0.15, 0.81/0.76, and 1.00/0.27, respectively). P2 appears to be the most sensitive FOI phase, while P1 showed the highest specificity. The best agreement of FOI was shown for PDUS, especially with regard to MCP and PIP joints (ICC of 0.57 and 0.53, respectively), while correlation with MRI was slightly lower. FOI remains an interesting diagnostic tool for patients with early RA, although this study revealed limitations concerning the detection of synovitis. Further research is needed to evaluate its full diagnostic potential in rheumatic diseases.

  12. Chronic comorbidity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroot, E J; van Gestel, A M; Swinkels, H L; Albers, M M; van de Putte, L B; van Riel, P L

    2001-07-01

    To study the presence of chronic coexisting diseases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its effect on RA treatment, disease course, and outcome during the first years of the disease. From January 1985 to December 1990, 186 patients with recent onset RA were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal study. Between January 1991 and November 1992 patients were interviewed on the basis of a comorbidity questionnaire. For analysis the diseases were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) medical diagnoses. Disease activity during the period of followup was measured by the Disease Activity Score. Outcome in terms of physical disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire) and radiological damage (Sharp's modified version) over 3 and 6 year periods was determined. In the group of 186 patients, with mean disease duration of 4.3 years at January 1991, 50 patients (27%) reported at least one chronic coexisting disease. The most frequently reported coexisting diseases were of cardiovascular (29%), respiratory (18%), or dermatological (11%) origin. For the major part (66%) chronic coexisting diseases were already present before onset of RA. No statistically significant differences in use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs or corticosteroids were observed between RA patients with and without chronic coexisting diseases. No statistically significant differences were found in disease activity or in outcome in terms of physical disability and radiological damage over 3 and 6 year periods between the 2 groups with RA. The results showed that about 27% of patients with RA in this inception cohort had at least one chronic coexisting disease. Treatment, disease course, and outcome did not differ between patients with and without chronic coexisting diseases during the first years of the disease.

  13. PER2 is downregulated by the LPS-induced inflammatory response in synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis and is implicated in disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwayoung; Nah, Seong-Su; Chang, Sung-Hae; Kim, Hyung-Ki; Kwon, Jun-Tack; Lee, Sanghyun; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Young Ock; Hong, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hak-Jae

    2017-07-01

    The clinical symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) present with circadian variation, with joint stiffness and pain more prominent in the early morning. The mammalian clock genes, which include circadian locomotor output cycles kaput, brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1, period and cryptochrome, regulate circadian rhythms. In order to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms in the circadian clock gene period 2 (PER2) and RA, the present study genotyped three PER2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs934945, rs6754875, and rs2304674, using genetic information from 256 RA patients and 499 control subjects. Primary cultured rheumatoid synovial cells were stimulated with 10 µM lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Total protein was then extracted from the synovial cells following 12 and 24 h, and PER2 protein expression was assayed by immunoblotting. The rs2304674 SNP demonstrated a significant association with susceptibility to RA following Bonferroni correction. However, statistical analysis indicated that the SNPs were not associated with any clinical features of patients with RA. Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that PER2 protein expression was decreased by LPS‑induced inflammation in RA synovial cells; however, this was not observed in normal synovial cells. The results suggest that the PER2 gene may be a risk factor for RA, and expression of the PER2 protein may be affected by inflammation. Therefore, PER2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA.

  14. Incorporation of n-3 PUFA and γ-linolenic acid in blood lipids and red blood cell lipids together with their influence on disease activity in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis - a randomized controlled human intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer Monika

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Marine n-3 fatty acids and γ-linolenic acid both have anti-inflammatory effects and may be useful to help treat inflammatory diseases. The effects of these alone or combined were examined in patients with arthritis in a randomized controlled trial. Design Patients with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis were randomized into four groups in a double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel designed study. Patients received the respective capsules (1: 3.0 g n-3 LC-PUFA/d; 2: 3.2 g γ-linolenic acid/d; 3: 1.6 g n-3 LC-PUFA + 1.8 g γ-linolenic acid/d; 4: 3.0 g olive oil for a twelve week period. Clinical status was evaluated and blood samples were taken at the beginning and at the end of the period. Differences before and after intervention were tested with paired t-test or with Wilcoxon test for non-normal data distribution. Results 60 patients (54 rheumatoid arthritis, 6 psoriatic arthritis were randomised, 47 finished per protocol. In group 1, the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA/eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA decreased from 6.5 ± 3.7 to 2.7 ± 2.1 in plasma lipids and from 25.1 ± 10.1 to 7.2 ± 4.7 in erythrocyte membranes (p ≤ 0.001. There was no significant influence on AA/EPA ratio due to interventions in group 2-4. In group 2, the intake of γ-linolenic acid resulted in a strong rise of γ-linolenic acid and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid concentrations in plasma lipids, cholesteryl esters, and erythrocyte membranes. The combination of n-3 LC-PUFA and γ-linolenic acid (group 3 led to an increase of γ-linolenic acid and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid concentrations in plasma lipids, cholesteryl esters, and erythrocyte mem-branes. This increase was only half of that in group 2. Conclusions Incorporation of eicosanoid precursor FAs was influenced by an intake of n-3 LC-PUFA and γ-linolenic acid suggesting a possible benefit for therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT01179971

  15. Early, middle, or late administration of zoledronate alleviates spontaneous nociceptive behavior and restores functional outcomes in a mouse model of CFA-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morado-Urbina, Carlos Eduardo; Alvarado-Vázquez, Perla Abigail; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Acosta-González, Rosa Issel; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate whether early, middle, or late treatment of zoledronate, an approved bisphosphonate that blocks bone resorption, can reduce nociceptive behaviors in a mouse arthritis model. Arthritis was produced by repeated intra-articular knee injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). A dose-response curve with zoledronate (3, 30, 100, and 300 μg/kg, i.p., day 4 to day 25, twice weekly for 3 weeks) was performed, and the most effective dose of zoledronate (100 μg/kg, i.p.) was initially administered at different times of disease progression: day 4 (early), day 15 (middle), or day 21 (late) and continued until day 25 after the first CFA injection. Flinching of the injected extremity (spontaneous nociceptive behavior), vertical rearings and horizontal activity (functional outcomes), and knee edema were assessed. Zoledronate improved both functional outcomes and reduced flinching behavior. At day 25, the effect of zoledronate on flinching behavior and vertical rearings was greater in magnitude when it was given early or middle rather than late in the treatment regimen. Chronic zoledronate did not reduce knee edema in CFA-injected mice nor functional outcomes in naïve mice by itself. These results suggest that zoledronate may have a positive effect on arthritis-induced nociception and functional disabilities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease.......Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  17. Comparison of Two Assays to Determine Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis in relation to Other Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases: Assaying Anti-Modified Citrullinated Vimentin Antibodies Adds Value to Second-Generation Anti-Citrullinated Cyclic Peptides Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Lizette Díaz-Toscano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA plays a relevant role in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. To date, it is still unclear if the use of several tests for these autoantibodies in the same patient offers additional value as compared to performing only one test. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of using two assays for ACPA: second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides antibodies (anti-CCP2 and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV antibodies for the diagnosis of RA. We compared three groups: RA (n=142, chronic inflammatory disease (CIRD, n=86, and clinically healthy subjects (CHS, n=56 to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios (LR of these two assays for the presence of RA. A lower frequency of positivity for anti-CCP2 was found in RA (66.2% as compared with anti-MCV (81.0%. When comparing RA versus other CIRD, sensitivity increased when both assays were performed. This strategy of testing both assays had high specificity and LR+. We conclude that adding the assay of anti-MCV antibodies to the determination of anti-CCP2 increases the sensitivity for detecting seropositive RA. Therefore, we propose the use of both assays in the initial screening of RA in longitudinal studies, including early onset of undifferentiated arthritis.

  18. Efficacy of drainage blood reinfusion in early postoperative period after total hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Shelokova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study effect of drainage blood reinfusion in early postoperative period (EPP after total hip arthroplasty (THA in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods. Primary THA was performed in 51 RA pts with hip damage (49 female, 2 male aged from 26 to 68 years. 42 THA were performed with “Endosystems and Implants” (ESI endoprosthesis, and 21 — with “Mathys” endoprosthesis. The pts were divided into two groups. Standard infusion-transfusion therapy with donor blood components was performed in group 1 pts (n=26 to compensate blood loss in EPP. In group 2 pts (n=25 drainage blood reinfusion was done with active aspiration system Handy Vac TM ATS (Unomedical. Group 1 pts had more prominent circulatory and neurologic disturbances in EPP: hypodynamic variant of circulation with elevation of peripheral vascular resistance till 5-7 day of postoperative period, prominent hypersympathicotonia and a large number of posttransfusion reactions. Evaluation of hemodynamic and vegetative disturbances showed advantage of blood loss compensation and vegetative disturbances normalization with drainage blood reinfusion in EPP after THA in comparison with standard pts management.

  19. CXCL13 predicts disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis and could be an indicator of the therapeutic 'window of opportunity'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Schelde, Karen Kræmmer; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse

    2014-01-01

    placebo (DMARD) (n¿=¿37) or methotrexate plus adalimumab (DMARD¿+¿ADA) (n¿=¿39). Treatment outcome was evaluated after 1 and 2 years. CXCL13 plasma levels in healthy volunteers (n¿=¿38) were also examined.ResultsBaseline CXCL13 plasma levels were increased in early rheumatoid arthritis patients...... in comparison with healthy volunteers. Also, plasma CXCL13 correlated positively with disease activity parameters; swollen joint count 28 (rho¿=¿0.34) and 40 (rho¿=¿0.39), visual analogue score (rho¿=¿0.38) and simplified disease activity index (rho¿=¿0.25) (all P¿... a significantly 2-fold more in the DMARD¿+¿ADA group than in the DMARD group. Baseline CXCL13 plasma levels in the DMARD group correlated inversely with disease activity parameters; disease activity score in 28 joints, four variables, C-reactive protein based (DAS28CRP) (rho¿=¿0.58, p¿

  20. Variability in depression prevalence in early rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the CES-D and HAD-D Scales

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    Emery Paul

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, however reported prevalence varies considerably. Two frequently used instruments to identify depression are the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The objectives of this study were to test if the CES-D and HADS-D (a satisfy current modern psychometric standards for unidimensional measurement in an early RA sample; (b measure the same construct (i.e. depression; and (c identify similar levels of depression. Methods Data from the two scales completed by patients with early RA were fitted to the Rasch measurement model to show that (a each scale satisfies the criteria of fit to the model, including strict unidimensionality; (b that the scales can be co-calibrated onto a single underlying continuum of depression and to (c examine the location of the cut points on the underlying continuum as indication of the prevalence of depression. Results Ninety-two patients with early RA (62% female; mean age = 56.3, SD = 13.7 gave 141 sets of paired CES-D and HAD-D data. Fit of the data from the CES-D was found to be poor, and the scale had to be reduced to 13 items to satisfy Rasch measurement criteria whereas the HADS-D met model expectations from the outset. The 20 items combined (CES-D13 and HADS-D satisfied Rasch model expectations. The CES-D gave a much higher prevalence of depression than the HADS-D. Conclusion The CES-D in its present form is unsuitable for use in patients with early RA, and needs to be reduced to a 13-item scale. The HADS-D is valid for early RA and the two scales measure the same underlying construct but their cut points lead to different estimates of the level of depression. Revised cut points on the CES-D13 provide comparative prevalence rates.

  1. Variability in depression prevalence in early rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the CES-D and HAD-D Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covic, Tanya; Pallant, Julie F; Tennant, Alan; Cox, Sally; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G

    2009-01-01

    Background Depression is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however reported prevalence varies considerably. Two frequently used instruments to identify depression are the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The objectives of this study were to test if the CES-D and HADS-D (a) satisfy current modern psychometric standards for unidimensional measurement in an early RA sample; (b) measure the same construct (i.e. depression); and (c) identify similar levels of depression. Methods Data from the two scales completed by patients with early RA were fitted to the Rasch measurement model to show that (a) each scale satisfies the criteria of fit to the model, including strict unidimensionality; (b) that the scales can be co-calibrated onto a single underlying continuum of depression and to (c) examine the location of the cut points on the underlying continuum as indication of the prevalence of depression. Results Ninety-two patients with early RA (62% female; mean age = 56.3, SD = 13.7) gave 141 sets of paired CES-D and HAD-D data. Fit of the data from the CES-D was found to be poor, and the scale had to be reduced to 13 items to satisfy Rasch measurement criteria whereas the HADS-D met model expectations from the outset. The 20 items combined (CES-D13 and HADS-D) satisfied Rasch model expectations. The CES-D gave a much higher prevalence of depression than the HADS-D. Conclusion The CES-D in its present form is unsuitable for use in patients with early RA, and needs to be reduced to a 13-item scale. The HADS-D is valid for early RA and the two scales measure the same underlying construct but their cut points lead to different estimates of the level of depression. Revised cut points on the CES-D13 provide comparative prevalence rates. PMID:19200388

  2. The TT genotype of the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism is associated with high disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis.

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    Amalia Lamana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of copies of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, and the minor alleles of the STAT4 rs7574865 and the PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphisms have all been linked with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these genetic variants on disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We studied 640 patients with early arthritis (76% women; median age, 52 years, recording disease-related variables every 6 months during a 2-year follow-up. HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by PCR-SSO, while rs7574865 and rs2476601 were genotyped with the Taqman 5' allelic discrimination assay. Multivariate analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. After adjusting for confounding variables such as gender, age and ACPA, the TT genotype of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with increased disease activity (DAS28 as compared with the GG genotype (β coefficient [95% confidence interval] = 0.42 [0.01-0.83], p = 0.044. Conversely, the presence of the T allele of rs2476601 in PTPN22 was associated with diminished disease activity during follow-up in a dose-dependent manner (CT genotype = -0.27 [-0.56- -0.01], p = 0.042; TT genotype = -0.68 [-1.64- -0.27], p = 0.162. After adjustment for gender, age and disease activity, homozygosity for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with greater disability as compared with the GG genotype. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that patients with early arthritis who are homozygous for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 may develop a more severe form of the disease with increased disease activity and disability.

  3. The TT genotype of the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism is associated with high disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamana, Amalia; Balsa, Alejandro; Rueda, Blanca; Ortiz, Ana M; Nuño, Laura; Miranda-Carus, Maria Eugenia; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel A; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Martin, Javier; González-Álvaro, Isidoro

    2012-01-01

    The number of copies of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope, and the minor alleles of the STAT4 rs7574865 and the PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphisms have all been linked with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these genetic variants on disease activity and disability in patients with early arthritis. We studied 640 patients with early arthritis (76% women; median age, 52 years), recording disease-related variables every 6 months during a 2-year follow-up. HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by PCR-SSO, while rs7574865 and rs2476601 were genotyped with the Taqman 5' allelic discrimination assay. Multivariate analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. After adjusting for confounding variables such as gender, age and ACPA, the TT genotype of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with increased disease activity (DAS28) as compared with the GG genotype (β coefficient [95% confidence interval] = 0.42 [0.01-0.83], p = 0.044). Conversely, the presence of the T allele of rs2476601 in PTPN22 was associated with diminished disease activity during follow-up in a dose-dependent manner (CT genotype = -0.27 [-0.56- -0.01], p = 0.042; TT genotype = -0.68 [-1.64- -0.27], p = 0.162). After adjustment for gender, age and disease activity, homozygosity for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 was associated with greater disability as compared with the GG genotype. Our data suggest that patients with early arthritis who are homozygous for the T allele of rs7574865 in STAT4 may develop a more severe form of the disease with increased disease activity and disability.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. T-Helper 17 Cell Cytokine Responses in Lyme Disease Correlate With Borrelia burgdorferi Antibodies During Early Infection and With Autoantibodies Late in the Illness in Patients With Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strle, Klemen; Sulka, Katherine B; Pianta, Annalisa; Crowley, Jameson T; Arvikar, Sheila L; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Steere, Allen C

    2017-04-01

    Control of Lyme disease is attributed predominantly to innate and adaptive T-helper 1 cell (TH1) immune responses, whereas the role of T-helper 17 cell (TH17) responses is less clear. Here we characterized these inflammatory responses in patients with erythema migrans (EM) or Lyme arthritis (LA) to elucidate their role early and late in the infection. Levels of 21 cytokines and chemokines, representative of innate, TH1, and TH17 immune responses, were assessed by Luminex in acute and convalescent sera from 91 EM patients, in serum and synovial fluid from 141 LA patients, and in serum from 57 healthy subjects. Antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi or autoantigens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with healthy subjects, EM patients had significantly higher levels of innate, TH1, and TH17-associated mediators (P ≤ .05) in serum. In these patients, the levels of inflammatory mediators, particularly TH17-associated cytokines, correlated directly with B. burgdorferi immunoglobulin G antibodies (P ≤ .02), suggesting a beneficial role for these responses in control of early infection. Late in the disease, in patients with LA, innate and TH1-associated mediators were often >10-fold higher in synovial fluid than serum. In contrast, the levels of TH17-associated mediators were more variable, but correlated strongly with autoantibodies to endothelial cell growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 10, and apolipoprotein B-100 in joints of patients with antibiotic-refractory LA, implying a shift in TH17 responses toward an autoimmune phenotype. Patients with Lyme disease often develop pronounced TH17 immune responses that may help control early infection. However, late in the disease, excessive TH17 responses may be disadvantageous by contributing to autoimmune responses associated with antibiotic-refractory LA. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions

  6. Spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission in correlation to inflammatory metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, M.; Wijk, E. van; Wietmarschen, H. van; Wang, M.; Sun, M.; Koval, S.; Wijk, R. van; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis has driven the development of new approaches and technologies for investigating the pathophysiology of this devastating, chronic disease. From the perspective of systems biology, combining comprehensive personal data such as metabolomics profiling

  7. Noninvasive ultrasound molecular imaging of the effect of statins on endothelial inflammatory phenotype in early atherosclerosis.

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    Elham Khanicheh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory changes on the endothelium are responsible for leukocyte recruitment to plaques in atherosclerosis. Noninvasive assessment of treatment-effects on endothelial inflammation may be of use for managing medical therapy and developing novel therapies. We hypothesized that molecular imaging of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU could assess treatment effects on endothelial phenotype in early atherosclerosis. METHODS: Mice with atherosclerosis produced by gene deletion of the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1-editing protein were studied. At 12 weeks of age, mice received 8 weeks of regular chow or atorvastatin-enriched chow (10 mg/kg/day. At 20 weeks, CEU molecular imaging for aortic endothelial VCAM-1 expression was performed with VCAM-1-targeted (MB(VCAM and control microbubbles (MB(Ctr. Aortic wall thickness was assessed with high frequency ultrasound. Histology, immunohistology and Western blot were used to assess plaque burden and VCAM-1 expression. RESULTS: Plaque burden was reduced on histology, and VCAM-1 was reduced on Western blot by atorvastatin, which corresponded to less endothelial expression of VCAM-1 on immunohistology. High frequency ultrasound did not detect differences in aortic wall thickness between groups. In contrast, CEU molecular imaging demonstrated selective signal enhancement for MB(VCAM in non-treated animals (MB(VCAM 2±0.3 vs MB(Ctr 0.7±0.2, p<0.01, but not in statin-treated animals (MB(VCAM 0.8±0.2 vs MB(Ctr 1.0±0.2, p = ns; p<0.01 for the effect of statin on MB(VCAM signal. CONCLUSIONS: Non-invasive CEU molecular imaging detects the effects of anti-inflammatory treatment on endothelial inflammation in early atherosclerosis. This easily accessible, low-cost technique may be useful in assessing treatment effects in preclinical research and in patients.

  8. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  9. Lethal influenza virus infection in macaques is associated with early dysregulation of inflammatory related genes.

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    Cristian Cillóniz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The enormous toll on human life during the 1918-1919 Spanish influenza pandemic is a constant reminder of the potential lethality of influenza viruses. With the declaration by the World Health Organization of a new H1N1 influenza virus pandemic, and with continued human cases of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus infection, a better understanding of the host response to highly pathogenic influenza viruses is essential. To this end, we compared pathology and global gene expression profiles in bronchial tissue from macaques infected with either the reconstructed 1918 pandemic virus or the highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/04. Severe pathology was observed in respiratory tissues from 1918 virus-infected animals as early as 12 hours after infection, and pathology steadily increased at later time points. Although tissues from animals infected with A/Vietnam/1203/04 also showed clear signs of pathology early on, less pathology was observed at later time points, and there was evidence of tissue repair. Global transcriptional profiles revealed that specific groups of genes associated with inflammation and cell death were up-regulated in bronchial tissues from animals infected with the 1918 virus but down-regulated in animals infected with A/Vietnam/1203/04. Importantly, the 1918 virus up-regulated key components of the inflammasome, NLRP3 and IL-1beta, whereas these genes were down-regulated by A/Vietnam/1203/04 early after infection. TUNEL assays revealed that both viruses elicited an apoptotic response in lungs and bronchi, although the response occurred earlier during 1918 virus infection. Our findings suggest that the severity of disease in 1918 virus-infected macaques is a consequence of the early up-regulation of cell death and inflammatory related genes, in which additive or synergistic effects likely dictate the severity of tissue damage.

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  11. Effect of exposure to radiation on the inflammatory process and its influence by diclofenac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Kenawy, S.; Khayyal, M.T.; Roushdy, H.; Saleh, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of radiation exposure on the inflammatory process was studied in rats using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and adjuvant-induced arthritis tests. Irradiation (0.5,1 and 2 Grays) resulted in a significant augmentation of the tissue response to carrageenan and the early phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis, but suppressed the late phase. Diclofenac(1-5 mg kg -1 ) effectively reduced the exaggerated inflammatory response in irradiated animals in both the carrageenan paw oedema and adjuvant-induced arthritis tests. The drug also had a prophylactic value in guarding against the induction of radiation damage. The inflammatory responses produced by irradiation and the benefits obtained by drug treatment may be related to changes in tissue prostaglandin levels and/or changes in the immune system. (author)

  12. Possible relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis in rat skin after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to examine possible mechanistic relationships between the early inflammatory response and the subsequent fibrosis seen after radiation exposure. Anesthetized Rochester ex-Wistar rats were given single x-ray doses of either 2000 or 5000 rads to standardized fields of the inner thigh. The data suggest that two mechanisms are responsible for the radiation-induced increase in extravasation rate and vascular injury seen early after irradiation. First, direct cytocidal damage of the endothelium; and second, chemically mediated, possibly complement dependent mechanisms. Indirect histological evidence suggests a correlation between the PMN infiltrate and the indirect vascular damage. In addition, one may conclude from these data that (1) both direct and indirect damage to the vasculature play a role in influencing the subsequent late radiation-induced fibrosis; and (2) a decrease in the indirect damage may allow the maintenance of a supportive vasculature at lower doses or allow the reestablishment of a vascular bed in the case of higher doses

  13. The Additive Inflammatory In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of IL-7 and TSLP in Arthritis Underscore the Therapeutic Rationale for Dual Blockade.

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    Maarten R Hillen

    Full Text Available The cytokines interleukin (IL-7 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP signal through the IL-7R subunit and play proinflammatory roles in experimental arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We evaluated the effect of inhibition of IL-7R- and TSLPR-signalling as well as simultaneous inhibition of IL-7R- and TSLPR-signalling in murine experimental arthritis. In addition, the effects of IL-7 and TSLP in human RA dendritic cell (DC/T-cell co-cultures were studied.Arthritis was induced with proteoglycan in wildtype mice (WT and in mice deficient for the TSLP receptor subunit (TSLPR-/-. Both mice genotypes were treated with anti-IL-7R or phosphate buffered saline. Arthritis severity was assessed and local and circulating cytokines were measured. Autologous CD1c-positive DCs and CD4 T-cells were isolated from peripheral blood of RA patients and were co-cultured in the presence of IL-7, TSLP or both and proliferation and cytokine production were assessed.Arthritis severity and immunopathology were decreased in WT mice treated with anti-IL-7R, in TSLPR-/- mice, and the most robustly in TSLPR-/- mice treated with anti-IL-7R. This was associated with strongly decreased levels of IL-17, IL-6 and CD40L. In human DC/T-cell co-cultures, TSLP and IL-7 additively increased T-cell proliferation and production of Th17-associated cytokines, chemokines and tissue destruction factors.TSLP and IL-7 have an additive effect on the production of Th17-cytokines in a human in vitro model, and enhance arthritis in mice linked with enhanced inflammation and immunopathology. As both cytokines signal via the IL-7R, these data urge for IL-7R-targeting to prevent the activity of both cytokines in RA.

  14. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  15. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Code of Ethics Financials Annual Report Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms & Conditions Donate Press Store Blog Community Local Offices Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  16. Prevalence of vertebral fractures in a disease activity steered cohort of patients with early active rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirven Linda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the prevalence of vertebral fractures (VFs after 5 years of disease activity score (DAS-steered treatment in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to investigate the association of VFs with disease activity, functional ability and bone mineral density (BMD over time. Methods Five-year radiographs of the spine of 275 patients in the BeSt study, a randomized trial comparing four treatment strategies, were used. Treatment was DAS-steered (DAS ≤ 2.4. A height reduction >20% in one vertebra was defined a vertebral fracture. With linear mixed models, DAS and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ scores over 5 years were compared for patients with and without VFs. With generalized estimating equations the association between BMD and VFs was determined. Results VFs were observed in 41/275 patients (15%. No difference in prevalence was found when stratified for gender, prednisone use and menopausal status. Disease activity over time was higher in patients with VFs, mean difference 0.20 (95% CI: 0.05-0.36, and also HAQ scores were higher, independent of disease activity, with a mean difference of 0.12 (95% CI: 0.02-0.2. Age was associated with VFs (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.09, mean BMD in spine and hip over time were not (OR 95% CI, 0.99: 0.78-1.25 and 0.94: 0.65-1.36, respectively. Conclusion After 5 years of DAS-steered treatment, 15% of these RA patients had VFs. Higher age was associated with the presence of VFs, mean BMD in hip and spine were not. Patients with VFs have greater functional disability over time and a higher disease activity, suggesting that VFs may be prevented by optimal disease activity suppression.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints: one year follow up of patients with early arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarlund, M; Ostergaard, M; Jensen, K; Madsen, J; Skjodt, H; Lorenzen, I; the, T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one year. Additionally, to compare the results with radiography, bone scintigraphy, and clinical findings.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Fifty five patients were examined at baseline, of whom 34 were followed up for one year. Twenty one patients already fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA at baseline, five fulfilled the criteria only after one year's follow up, whereas eight maintained the original diagnosis of early unclassified polyarthritis. The following MRI variables were assessed at baseline and one year: synovial membrane hypertrophy score, number of erosions, and tenosynovitis score.
RESULTS—MRI detected progression of erosions earlier and more often than did radiography of the same joints; at baseline the MRI to radiography ratio was 28:4. Erosions were exclusively found in patients with RA at baseline or fulfilling the ACR criteria at one year. At one year follow up, scores of MR synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and scintigraphic tracer accumulation had not changed significantly from baseline; in contrast, swollen and tender joint counts had declined significantly (pthe changes seen over time in clinically assessed swollen and tender joint counts. Although joint disease activity may be assessed as quiescent by conventional clinical methods, a more detailed evaluation by MRI may show that a pathological condition is still present within the synovium.

 PMID:10873961

  18. The type I interferon signature in leukocyte subsets from peripheral blood of patients with early arthritis: a major contribution by granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Tamarah D; Lübbers, Joyce; Turk, Samina; Vosslamber, Saskia; Mantel, Elise; Bontkes, Hetty J; van der Laken, Conny J; Bijlsma, Johannes W; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Verweij, Cornelis L

    2016-07-13

    The type I interferon (IFN) signature in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has shown clinical relevance in relation to disease onset and therapeutic response. Identification of the cell type(s) contributing to this IFN signature could provide insight into the signature's functional consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of peripheral leukocyte subsets to the IFN signature in early arthritis. Blood was collected from 26 patients with early arthritis and lysed directly or separated into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs). PBMCs were sorted into CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells, and CD14(+) monocytes by flow cytometry. Messenger RNA expression of three interferon response genes (IRGs RSAD2, IFI44L, and MX1) and type I interferon receptors (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2) was determined in whole blood and blood cell subsets by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. IRG expression was averaged to calculate an IFN score for each sample. Patients were designated "IFN(high)" (n = 8) or "IFN(low)" (n = 18) on the basis of an IFN score cutoff in whole peripheral blood from healthy control subjects. The difference in IFN score between IFN(high) and IFN(low) patients was remarkably large for the PMN fraction (mean 25-fold) compared with the other subsets (mean 6- to 9-fold), indicating that PMNs are the main inducers of IRGs. Moreover, the relative contribution of the PMN fraction to the whole-blood IFN score was threefold higher than expected from its abundance in blood (p = 0.008), whereas it was three- to sixfold lower for the other subsets (p ≤ 0.063), implying that the PMNs are most sensitive to IFN signaling. Concordantly, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 were upregulated compared with healthy controls selectively in patient PMNs (p ≤ 0.0077) but not in PBMCs. PMNs are the main contributors to the whole-blood type I IFN signature in patients with early arthritis, which seems due to

  19. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

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    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  20. The anti-inflammatory effect of kaempferol on early atherosclerosis in high cholesterol fed rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis has been widely accepted as an inflammatory disease of vascular, adhesion molecules play an important role in the early progression of it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of kaempferol on the inflammatory molecules such as E-selectin (E-sel), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesionmolecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in high cholesterol induced atherosclerosis rabbit models. Methods Thirty male New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were randomly divided into five groups, control group, model group, fenofibrate (12mg/kg) group and kaempferol groups (150 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). The rabbits were fed with a normal diet or a high cholesterol diet for 10 weeks. Levels of blood lipids, serum tumour-necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and serum interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) were detected at the end of the sixth and tenth week. Malonaldehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum were also determined. Lesion areas of the aorta were measured with morphometry analysis after ten weeks. Gene expression of E-sel, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in aortas was determined by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction). Immunohistochemical staining was employed to measure protein expression of E-sel, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1. Results Model rabbits fed with ten weeks of high-cholesterol diet developed significant progression of atherosclerosis. Compared with the control, levels of blood lipids, TNF-α, IL-1β and MDA increased markedly in serum of model rabbits, while SOD levels decreased. Gene and protein expressions of E-sel, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in atherosclerotic aortas increased remarkably in model group. However, comparing to the model rabbits, levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and MDA decreased significantly and serum SOD activity increased, gene and protein expressions of E-sel, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in aortas decreased significantly with the treatment of

  1. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raciborski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%. According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems: M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  2. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Wenzel Kragstrup

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18 in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1 plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort, 2 plasma from chronic RA patients, 3 serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4 supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab.Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab.The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice

  3. Organising pneumonia as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Chisho; Satoh, Noriyuki; Narita, Masashi; Kikuchi, Akio; Inoue, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is an inflammatory lung disease with distinctive clinicopathological features. OP can be evident during the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with increased disease activity. The authors report an OP associated with RA case in which pulmonary symptoms preceded the onset of joint symptoms. An OP patient with elevated serum anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody is likely to manifest RA in the near future, reflecting its high disease activity. Thus, an early rheumatologic consultation should be taken into consideration to make an early decision to initiate disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. PMID:22699479

  4. Adiposity moderates links from early adversity and depressive symptoms to inflammatory reactivity to acute stress during late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jessica J; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Taylor, Shelley E; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2017-11-01

    Both early adversity and depression are associated with heightened inflammation. However, few studies have focused on inflammatory reactivity to psychosocial stress and examined adiposity as a potential moderator. Yet, repeated heightened inflammatory reactivity over time is thought to contribute to low-grade chronic inflammation and adipose tissue is a key source of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether early adversity and depressive symptoms were related to stress-induced inflammation and whether these associations varied by total body and abdominal adiposity as measured by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in a sample of late adolescents. Participants reported on their early family environment and current depressive symptoms, had their height, weight, and WC assessed for adiposity markers, and provided blood samples for IL-6 assessment before and after a standardized laboratory stress task. No main effect of early adversity on IL-6 reactivity to acute stress was observed. However, significant interactions between early adversity and BMI and WC emerged. Greater exposure to early adversity was associated with greater IL-6 responses only among adolescents with higher BMI or WC. The same pattern of findings was observed for depressive symptoms. Additionally, moderated mediation analyses indicated that among adolescents with greater adiposity, early adversity indirectly influenced IL-6 reactivity via current depressive symptoms. These findings contribute to our understanding of vulnerability factors that may amplify the associations between early adversity and depressive symptoms and inflammation during relatively early stages of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hideto To Department of Medical Pharmaceutics, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Morning stiffness, a characteristic feature of RA, shows a 24-hour rhythm. Cytokines, which are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA, also exhibit a 24-hour rhythm, with a peak in the early morning. These rhythms have been attributed to the endogenous hormone balance and changes in expression levels of clock-related genes. Chronotherapy based on the 24-hour rhythm of RA has been performed using glucocorticoids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In a previous study, it was reported that modified-release prednisone tablets were administered to patients with RA at night, which demonstrated that the severity of morning stiffness was markedly less than that in patients receiving the standard treatment. Methotrexate (MTX is the most frequently used RA drug worldwide. In a basic study, cytokines and inflammatory responses in RA model animals showed 24-hour rhythms, based on which MTX was administered and exerted dosing time-dependent antirheumatic effects. Plasma C-reactive protein and cytokine levels also exhibit 24-hour rhythms in patients with RA, with peaks occurring in the early morning. MTX has been shown to markedly inhibit the exacerbation of arthritis in patients with RA when it is administered as inflammatory responses and tumor necrosis factor-α levels begin to increase. Tacrolimus (TAC is an immunosuppressive agent that is administered to patients who undergo organ transplants. Since one of the mechanisms of action of TAC is the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, it is used as an RA therapeutic drug. When TAC was previously administered in the early light or early dark phase to RA model animals, the group treated in the early light phase had notably inhibited

  6. Early diagnosis of the Spondyloarthropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Naranjo, Luis Alonso; Londono, John D; Valle, Rafael Raul

    2005-01-01

    Spondyloarthropathies are a cluster of chronic inflammatory diseases that primarily include ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis; arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathies. The most common subgroups of spondyloarthropathies are ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. The diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is mainly based on unequivocal radiographic sacroiliitis of at least grade 2 bilaterally or grade 3 unilaterally. How ever, in the early phase of disease, conventional radiographs are often too insensitive to show sacroiliitis and it usually takes several years for definite radiographic sacroiliitis to evolve. Thus, the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is a commonly delayed by 8 to 11 years after the onset of symptoms. As a result, diagnosing axial spondyloarthropathy in the absence of radiographic sacroiliitis is very difficult to rheumatologists. In the early phase of disease, HLA B27 test and magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliac joints may be helpful to the early diagnosis. In the presence of chronic low back pain the probability of axial spondyloarthropathy is about 5% and is about 14% if the back pain is inflammatory. The presence of = 3 features of spondyloarthropathy (heel pain, uveitis, dactylitis, positive family history, alternating buttock pain, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, asymmetrical arthritis, positive response to anti-inflammatory drugs) increase the probability of axial spondyloarthropathy to 90%. Both, the positive HLA B27 and magnetic resonance imaging with signs of sacroiliitis increase the probability of spondyloarthropathy, particularly in patients without spondyloarthropathies features or with only 1 or 2 features. Since ankylosing spondylitis in association with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease is often HLA B27 negative, this test is of limited value under theses circumstances. Is important to consider that

  7. Early Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Patients Infected With Leishmania braziliensis Express Increased Inflammatory Responses After Antimony Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rúbia S; Carvalho, Lucas P; Campos, Taís M; Magalhães, Andréa S; Passos, Sara T; Schriefer, Albert; Silva, Juliana A; Lago, Ednaldo; Paixão, Camilla S; Machado, Paulo; Scott, Phillip; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2018-02-14

    Early cutaneous leishmaniasis (ECL) is characterized by a nonulcerated papular lesion and illness duration less than 30 days. Approximately 4 weeks later, the cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) ulcers appear. We were surprised to find that failure after antimony therapy (Sb5) is higher in ECL than CL. We hypothesize that the inflammatory response in ECL patients may increase during Sb5 therapy, which leads to treatment failure. A cohort of 44 ECL patients infected by Leishmania braziliensis was established to evaluate the response to Sb5 and to compare immunologic responses in ECL patients with CL and healthy subjects. A hierarchical clustering based on cytokine levels showed a weak positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and those patients that failed Sb5 treatment. Although Sb5 therapy decreased interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor levels in CL patients, we were surprised to find that an increase in these cytokines was observed in ECL patients. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-10 was less able to down-modulate immune responses in ECL. The enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, due in part to the decreased ability of IL-10 to down-modulate immune response during therapy in ECL, promotes the development and persistence of leishmania ulcer despite antimony therapy. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Maintaining intestinal health: the genetics and immunology of very early onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD occurring before the age of 5 represent a unique form of disease, termed Very Early Onset (VEO)-IBD, which is phenotypically- and genetically-distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies, and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal disease. Here we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation.

  9. The role of monogenic disease in children with very early onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N

    2017-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic intestinal microbes, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. Patients diagnosed with IBD occurring before the age of 5 are a unique population, known as very early onset (VEO)-IBD and can be phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. We aim to review the clinical presentation of children with VEO-IBD and recent discoveries that point to genomic drivers of disease that may impact our therapeutic decisions. VEO-IBD is increasing in incidence and is associated with more severe disease, aggressive progression and poor response to most conventional therapies. This article will review the advances in sequencing technology that have led to identification of novel gene variants associated with disease and potentially new targeted therapeutic options. Children with VEO-IBD may present with a different phenotype and more severe disease than older children and adults. Identification of the causal gene or pathways, these children may allow for true precision medicine with targeted therapy and improved disease course.

  10. Looking through the 'window of opportunity': is there a new paradigm of podiatry care on the horizon in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes Iain B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the clinical understanding and care of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Major paradigm changes include earlier disease detection and introduction of therapy, and 'tight control' of follow-up driven by regular measurement of disease activity parameters. The advent of tumour necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors and other biologic therapies have further revolutionised care. Low disease state and remission with prevention of joint damage and irreversible disability are achievable therapeutic goals. Consequently new opportunities exist for all health professionals to contribute towards these advances. For podiatrists relevant issues range from greater awareness of current concepts including early referral guidelines through to the application of specialist skills to manage localised, residual disease activity and associated functional impairments. Here we describe a new paradigm of podiatry care in early RA. This is driven by current evidence that indicates that even in low disease activity states destruction of foot joints may be progressive and associated with accumulating disability. The paradigm parallels the medical model comprising early detection, targeted therapy, a new concept of tight control of foot arthritis, and disease monitoring. 'Podiatrists are experts on foot disorders: both patients and rheumatologists can profit from the involvement of a podiatrist' - Korda and Balint, 2004 1.

  11. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  12. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP OF FoxP3+ T REGULATORY CELLS TO DISEASE ACTIVITY AND ANTIBODY LEVELS IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the relationship of the count of FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs to the clinical and laboratory parameters of disease activity and the levels of antibodies in a group of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 45 patients with early RA (2010 ACR/EULAR criteria who had not previously received treatment with methotrexate, including 39 women; median age was 52.0 [32.5; 57.5] years; disease duration, 5 [4; 6] months, DAS28 5.01 [4.18; 5.8]; 71.1% of the patients were rheumatoid factor (RF positive and 88.9% were anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide positive. The relative and absolute counts of Treg (FoxP3+CD25+; CD152+surface; CD152+intracellular; FoxP3+CD127-; CD25+CD127-; FoxP3+ICOS+; FoxP3+CD154+; FoxP3+CD274+ were measured by immunofluorescence staining and multicolor flow cytometry. A control group consisted of 20 healthy donors who were matched for sex and age with the examined patients.Results and discussion. DАS28 was high, moderate, and low in 22 (48.9%, 20 (44.4%, and 3 (6.7% patients, respectively. As compared with the healthy donors, the patients with early RA were observed to have lower values in the percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ cells, in the percentage and absolute count of FoxP3+ICOS+ cells, in the percentage and absolute count of FoxP3+CD154+ and FoxP3+ CD274+ T cells; p<0.05 in all cases. Negative correlation was recorded between the percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ and C-reactive protein (CRP (r=-0.4; that of CD152+intracellular and DAS28 (r=-0.35, ESR (r=-0.46, CRP (r=-0.54; that of FoxP3+CD127 and CRP (r=-0.42; that of CD25+CD127 and DAS28 (r=-0.38, SDAI (r=-0.41, CDAI (r=-0.36, ESR (r=-0.39, CRP (r=-0.47; p<0.05 in all cases.The patients who were seronegative for RF were found to have higher values in the percentage of CD25+CD127, in the percentage and absolute count of Foxp3+CD154+ and Foxp3+CD274+ T lymphocytes.Conclusion. The given data may indicate that the

  14. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Boekhorst, B.C.; Jensen, L.B.; Colombo, S.; Varkouhi, A.K.; Schiffelers, R.M.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Storm, Gerrit; Nielsen, H.M.; Strijkers, G.J.; Foged, C.; Nicolay, K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by systemic inflammation of synovial joints leading to erosion and cartilage destruction. Although efficacious anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) biologic therapies exist, there is an unmet medical need for safe and more efficient treatment regimens

  15. Changes in synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes after intraarticular methylprednisolone. Quantitative assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in arthritis by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate synovial membrane volumes, effusion volumes, and cartilage and bone erosion scores determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as markers of disease activity and severity in arthritis. METHODS: Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1...

  16. Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, van der D.; Lagraauw, H.M.; Wezel, A.; Launay, P.; Kuiper, J.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.M.; Bot, I.; Stoop, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease

  17. Inflammatory spine disease as a cause of back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossbauer, T.; Panteleon, A.; Becker-Gaab, C.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the role of inflammatory spine disease in patients with chronic back pain. The contribution of imaging modalities for the diagnostic evaluation of back pain is discussed. A systematic literature search based on the classification of seronegative spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis was performed. The results of this search and the experiences in a large collective of rheumatological patients are analyzed. The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (1-2%) is comparable to that of spondyloarthropathies (1.9%). The etiology of these entities is not fully elucidated. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used for early detection and surveillance of therapy with TNF-α antagonists. Bone marrow edema, which is only detectable with MRI, represents an early sign of inflammation. Therapy with TNF-α antagonists is based on clinical and laboratory criteria, and signs of inflammation in MRI. MRI is useful for assessment of the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory therapy. (orig.) [de

  18. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  19. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  20. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  1. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  2. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  3. Radiographic assessment of disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing early disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, M.C.

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic disease predominantly involving the joints. Since the pathogenesis, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of RA have only been partially elucidated, a definitive therapy has not been established. Precise diagnosis and follow-up therapy requires objective quantification, and radiological analyses are considered to be the most appropriate method. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the time-dependent progression of joint damage in patients with pharmacologically-treated RA, and to determine which therapeutic agents demonstrate the highest efficacy. Outpatient records, laboratory values, therapy schemes and radiographs from hands and feet of 150 RA patients were collected, analyzed and statistically evaluated. Radiographs were quantified using the Larsen score and supportively using the 'RheumaCoach-Rheumatology' computer software. Our observations reveal that radiologically-detectable damage is most pronounced during the first year of disease, while mitigated and generally progressing linearly thereafter. Overall Larsen scores linearly increased from year 0 to 10 (r=0.853), during which the mean Larsen score increased 7.93 ± 0.76 per year. During the first year, RA progression was similar regardless of the medication administered (gold-compounds, AU; chloroquine, CQ; methotrexate, MTX; sulfasalazine SSZ). While MTX and CQ treatment showed no difference when examined as mean 5-year increment of Larsen score, AU and SSZ showed up to 3 fold higher RA progression compared with MTX. The Larsen score in year 1 did not correlate with that of years 2 to 5. In contrast, Larsen scores in year 2 were linearly related to each of the subsequent 3 years. Despite similar ESR values in various medication groups, cumulative ESR correlated with RA progression, and its reduction with therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, this study found that, (i) early DMARD-treated RA progressed more rapidly during the first than

  4. Effects of β-D-mannuronic acid, as a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication within immunosuppressive properties, on IL17, RORγt, IL4 and GATA3 gene expressions in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barati A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Anis Barati,1 Ahmad Reza Jamshidi,2,* Hossein Ahmadi,1 Zahra Aghazadeh,1 Abbas Mirshafiey1,* 1Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, 2Iranian Institute for Health Sciences Research, Rheumatology Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common form of chronic inflammatory arthritis characterized by pain, swelling and destruction of joints, with a resultant disability. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and biological drugs can interfere with the disease process. In this study, the effect of β-D-mannuronic acid (M2000 as a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects together with antioxidant effects was evaluated on IL17, RORγt, IL4 and GATA3 gene expression in 12 RA patients. Previously, M2000 driven from sodium alginate (natural product; patented, DEU: 102016113018.4 has shown a notable efficacy in experimental models of multiple sclerosis, RA and nephrotic syndrome. This study was performed on 12 patients with RA who had an inadequate response to conventional treatments. During this trial, patients were permitted to continue the conventional therapy excluding NSAIDs. M2000 was administered orally at a dose of 500 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were collected before and after treatment to evaluate the expression levels of IL4, GATA3, IL17 and RORγt. The gene expression results showed that M2000 has a potent efficacy, so that it could not only significantly decrease IL17 and RORγt levels but also increase IL4 and GATA3 levels after 12 weeks of treatment. Moreover, the gene expression results were in accordance with the clinical and preclinical assessments. In conclusion, M2000 as a natural novel agent has therapeutic and immunosuppressive properties on RA patients (identifier

  5. A comparison of magnetic resonance imaging, sonography, and radiography of the hand in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Hall, Stephen; Lawler, Gary; Coombs, Peter; McNealy, Stephen; Bird, Paul; Connell, David

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) becomes more effective, more sensitive imaging methods are required to assess disease activity and joint damage. We compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), sonography, and radiography for assessment of disease activity for the detection of bony

  6. AN ASSOCIATION OF CYTOKINE LEVELS WITH DISEASE ACTIVITY, AUTOANTIBODY LEVELS, AND JOINT DESTRUCTIVE CHANGES IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the association of cytokine profile measures with disease activity, autoantibody levels, and joint destructive changes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Subjects and methods. Forty-five patients, including 35 women, with early RA were examined. Their median age was 53.5 [46; 59.5] years; the duration of the disease – 7.0 [4.0; 11.5] months; DAS28 – 5.8 [4.9; 6.4]; 91 and 96% of the patents were positive for rheumatoid factor (RF and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, respectively. Serum cytokine concentrations were estimated using the xMAP multiplex technology. The modified Sharp method was employed to quantify radiographic changes.Results and discussion. A group of 30 patients with high disease activity (DAS28 >5.1 had higher levels of interleukin (IL-6 (62.3 [36.1; 127.5] pg/ml and IP-10 (6367.8 [3682.7; 10691.3] pg/ml than 15 patients with moderate/low disease activity (DAS28 ≤5.1 (35.8 [13.4; 64.2] and 3222.6 [1881.0; 5671.9] pg/ml, respectively, p < 0.05. The patients highly positive for IgM RF had higher levels (pg/ml of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α; the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and the growth factors IL-7 and vascular endothelial growth factor (4.8 [2.8; 19.3], 23.0 [7.1; 55.8], 64.2 [41.6; 170.5], 52.2 [30.9; 126.9], 2.4 [0.2; 11.2], 210.8 [119.9; 584.2], 90.7 [42.7; 307/9], 57.5 [26.1; 93.8], 54.9 [37.1; 123.7], and 143.3 [70.6; 249.6] pg/ml than those who were negative/lowly positive for IgM RF (2.3 [1.9; 3.1], 4.9 [2.9; 16.8], 24.9 [20.4; 45.4], 25.6 [19.9; 57.1], 0.2 [0.01; 1.65], 94.4 [86.3; 138.9], 37.3 [23.6; 47.7], 20.9 [12.3; 33.9], 32.6 [28.1; 37.8], 74.2 [53.5; 147.6], respectively (p < 0.05.Conclusion. There are significant differences in cytokine profile measures in patients with early RA in relation to disease activity and serum autoantibody levels.

  7. Contributions of early adversity to pro-inflammatory phenotype in infancy: the buffer provided by attachment security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measelle, Jeffrey R; Ablow, Jennifer C

    2018-02-01

    Adversity early in life is associated with systemic inflammation by adolescence and beyond. At present, few studies have investigated the associations between different forms of adversity and inflammation during infancy, making it difficult to specify the origins of disease vulnerability. This study examined the association between multiple forms of early adversity - socioeconomic status disadvantage, familial stress, maternal depression, and security of attachment - and individual differences in a composite measure of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and the inflammatory protein C-reactive protein that were collected via saliva when (n = 49) children were 17 months old. In addition to gauging the direct effects of adversity, we also tested the hypothesis that infants' attachment relationship with their mother might buffer infants against the immunologic effects of early adversity. Results show that familial stress, maternal depression, and security of attachment were directly associated with infant salivary inflammation and that attachment status moderated the effect of maternal depression. The findings suggest that exposure to certain forms of adversity very early in life may engender a pro-inflammatory phenotype with possible life-long implications for health.

  8. Study for synovial lesions by MRI using gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) in patients with early phase of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Keiyu (Saint Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonanse imaging (MRI) enhanced with gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) for the detection of the inflamed synovium and for the evaluation of the responce to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis, we studied 49 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 1987 revised criteria of American Rheumatism Association (ARA), 6 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) complicated by arthritis, 3 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), 2 patients with Sjoegren syndrome, 2 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 10 healthy volunteers as an age matched control. The 49 patients with RA were divided into three groups: (1) early phase of RA, (2) non progressing RA and (3) slowly progressing RA, and the stage classification of plain X-ray film and enhancement pattern of MR imaging were classified into three groups. Synovial enhancement showed a linear, band-like or diffuse pattern. Almost all cases in early phase of RA group and non progressing RA group showed a linear pattern, a band-like pattern or even no enhancement, while slowly progressing group of stage II or higher showed the diffuse pattern of enhancement in all except 2 cases. Moreover, the linear pattern, the band-like pattern or even no contrast enhancement were seen in all except 1 stage I patient, whereas 26 out of 29 patients with stage II or higher change showed diffuse contrast enhancement. Furthermore, a comparison of MR images before and after administration of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in 10 patients showed that the improvement of clinical symptomes correlated fairly well with reduction of contrast enhancement. The present study suggested that MRI of the wrist using Gd-DTPA enhancement may be useful for the diagnosis of RA, the prediction of articular damage, and judgement of the response to therapy. (author).

  9. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  10. Gut-Sourced Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Induced by the Activation of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Substantially Contributes to the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Sinomenine in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MengFan Yue

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Sinomenine has long been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in China. However, its anti-inflammatory mechanism is still debatable because the in vitro minimal effective concentration (≥250 μM is hardly reached in either synovium or serum after oral administration at a therapeutic dose. Recent findings suggest that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR might mediate the inhibitory effect of sinomenine on macrophage activation, which attracts us to explore the anti-arthritis mechanism of sinomenine by taking neuroendocrine-inflammation axis into consideration. Here, we showed that orally administered sinomenine ameliorated the systemic inflammation of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA rats, which was significantly diminished by either vagotomy or the antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (especially the antagonist of α7nAChR, but not by the antagonists of muscarinic receptor. Sinomenine might bind to α7nAChR through interacting with the residues Tyr184 and Tyr191 in the pocket. In addition, the generation of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP from the gut of CIA rats and cultured neuron-like cells was selectively enhanced by sinomenine through the activation of α7nAChR-PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. The elevated levels of VIP in the serum and small intestine of rats were negatively correlated with the scores of joint destruction. The crucial role of VIP in the anti-arthritic effect of sinomenine was confirmed by using VIP hybrid, a non-specific antagonist of VIP receptor. Taken together, intestine-sourced VIP mediates the anti-arthritic effect of sinomenine, which is generated by the activation of α7nAChR.

  11. Inhaled corticosteroids do not influence the early inflammatory response and clinical presentation of hospitalized subjects with COPD exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafulli, Ernesto; Guerrero, Mónica; Menéndez, Rosario; Huerta, Arturo; Martinez, Raquel; Gimeno, Alexandra; Soler, Néstor; Torres, Antoni

    2014-10-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory medications that can down-regulate the immunologic response in patients with COPD; however, their role at onset of COPD exacerbation is still not understood. The aim of this study was to assess the early inflammatory response and clinical presentation of patients with COPD exacerbation mediated by inhaled corticosteroids. Prospective data were collected on 123 hospitalized subjects with COPD exacerbation over a 30-month period at 2 Spanish university hospitals. Based on domiciliary use, comparative analyses were performed between subjects who did not use inhaled corticosteroids (n = 58) and subjects who did (n = 65). Measurements of serum biomarkers were recorded on admission to the hospital (day 1) and on day 3; clinical, physiological, microbiological, and severity data and mortality/readmission rates were also recorded. At days 1 and 3, both groups showed a similar inflammatory response; fluticasone produced lower levels of interleukin-8 compared with budesonide (P clinical features considered were similar in the 2 groups; multivariate analysis predicting clinical complications on hospitalization showed air-flow obstruction severity as the only predictive factor (odds ratio 3.13, 95% CI 1.13-8.63, P = .02). Our study demonstrates a lack of inhaled corticosteroid influence in the early systemic inflammatory response to and clinical presentation of COPD exacerbation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  12. Harnessing Apoptotic Cell Clearance to Treat Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Saas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early-stage apoptotic cells possess immunomodulatory properties. Proper apoptotic cell clearance during homeostasis has been shown to limit subsequent immune responses. Based on these observations, early-stage apoptotic cell infusion has been used to prevent unwanted inflammatory responses in different experimental models of autoimmune diseases or transplantation. Moreover, this approach has been shown to be feasible without any toxicity in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to prevent graft-versus-host disease. However, whether early-stage apoptotic cell infusion can be used to treat ongoing inflammatory disorders has not been reported extensively. Recently, we have provided evidence that early-stage apoptotic cell infusion is able to control, at least transiently, ongoing collagen-induced arthritis. This beneficial therapeutic effect is associated with the modulation of antigen-presenting cell functions mainly of macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, as well as the induction of collagen-specific regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg. Furthermore, the efficacy of this approach is not altered by the association with two standard treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibition. Here, in the light of these observations and recent data of the literature, we discuss the mechanisms of early-stage apoptotic cell infusion and how this therapeutic approach can be transposed to patients with RA.

  13. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniko Nagy

    Full Text Available Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC, using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 ("T/I" mice. Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 ("T/I-het" dams that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and

  14. Reducing invasiveness, duration, and cost of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis by omitting intravenous contrast injection -- Does it change the assessment of inflammatory and destructive joint changes by the OMERACT RAMRIS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G; O'Connor, Philip

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides highly sensitive assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints, but intravenous (IV) Gd injection prolongs examination time and increases cost, invasiveness, and patient discomfort...... images, whereas complete image sets were available for the second reading. RESULTS: Gd contrast injection appeared unimportant to MRI scores of bone erosions and bone edema in RA wrist and MCP joints. However, when post-Gd MRI was considered the standard reference, MRI without Gd provided only moderate......: Omitting IV contrast injection did not change scores of bone erosions and bone edema, but decreased the reliability of synovitis scores. However, this disadvantage may for some purposes be outweighed by the possibility to assess more joints and/or greater feasibility....

  15. Associations of prenatal and early life dietary inflammatory potential with childhood adiposity and cardiometabolic risk in Project Viva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S; Rifas-Shiman, S L; Shivappa, N; Wirth, M D; Hebert, J R; Gold, D R; Gillman, M W; Oken, E

    2018-05-01

    Limited information exists regarding the association between early-life diet and cardiometabolic risk. Examine associations of dietary inflammatory index (DII) in pregnancy and early childhood (3-5 years) with adiposity, blood pressure and metabolic markers in mid-childhood (6-10 years). Among 992 mother-child pairs from Project Viva, a pre-birth cohort, we examined associations of DII scores with outcomes using multivariable linear regression adjusted for child age and sex and maternal age, BMI, education, parity, smoking, race and income. Mean (SD) maternal DII in pregnancy was -2.6(1.4) units and in child DII in early childhood was 0.3(0.7). Mean mid-childhood BMI z-score was 0.40(0.98) units. In boys only, DII in early childhood was associated with higher BMIz (adjusted β = 0.16 units per unit DII, 95%CI 0.02, 0.29), waist circumference (0.93 cm; -0.07, 1.92) and skin fold thicknesses (1.12 mm; 0.01, 2.23). Dietary inflammatory index in the highest quartiles during both pregnancy and in early childhood, compared to the lowest quartiles, was associated with higher waist circumference (2.4 cm; 0.14, 4.6) in all children, and BMIz in boys (0.78 units; 0.34, 1.22). Associations with BP and metabolic markers were null. A pro-inflammatory diet in pregnancy and early childhood may promote the development of adiposity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  16. Aggressive combination therapy with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections and conventional DMARDs in early rheumatoid arthritis Two Year Clinical and Radiographic Results From The CIMESTRA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Junker, Peter

    2008-01-01

    of the 2nd year of the randomized, controlled double-blind CIMESTRA study. METHODS: 160 patients with early RA (any swollen joint in combination with step-up treatment with either methotrexate and placebo...... years, and the radiographic erosive progression was minimal. Addition of cyclosporine during the first 76 weeks resulted in significantly better ACR20 and ACR50 responses, but did not have any additional effect on remission rate and radiographic outcome.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether clinical and radiographic disease control can be achieved and maintained in patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the 2nd year of aggressive treatment with conventional DMARD and intraarticular corticosteroid. This paper presents the results...

  17. Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann, J P; Enzenauer, R J

    1995-05-01

    A pediatric case of Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis is described. A 12-year-old black boy was admitted to the pediatric service for presumed right knee septic arthritis. Symptoms included acute pain and swelling with decreased range-of-motion. Although the patient's right knee symptoms and positive Lyme serology were consistent with a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, the presence of sensorineural hearing loss and interstitial keratitis with inflammatory arthritis suggested a diagnosis of Cogan's syndrome. Subsequent Western blot analysis was negative for Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. The patient had dramatic clinical improvement of musculoskeletal and ophthalmologic complaints shortly after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, although residual sensorineural hearing loss persisted.

  18. Reductions in Radiographic Progression in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Over Twenty-Five Years: Changing Contribution From Rheumatoid Factor in Two Multicenter UK Inception Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Lewis; Norton, Sam; Nikiphorou, Elena; Jayakumar, Keeranur; McWilliams, Daniel F; Rennie, Kirsten L; Dixey, Josh; Kiely, Patrick; Walsh, David Andrew; Young, Adam

    2017-12-01

    To assess the 5-year progression of erosions and joint space narrowing (JSN) and their associations with rheumatoid factor (RF) status in 2 large, multicenter, early rheumatoid arthritis cohorts, spanning 25 years. Radiographic joint damage was recorded using the Sharp/van der Heijde (SHS) method in the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study (ERAS), 1986-2001, and the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network (ERAN), 2002-2013. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression estimated changes in radiographic damage over 5 years, including erosions and JSN, separately. RF, along with age, sex, and baseline markers of disease activity were controlled for. A total of 1,216 patients from ERAS and 446 from ERAN had radiographic data. Compared to ERAS, ERAN patients had a lower mean total SHS score at baseline (ERAN 6.2 versus ERAS 10.5; P < 0.001) and mean annual rate of change (ERAN 2.5 per year versus ERAS 6.9 per year; P < 0.001). Seventy-four percent of ERAS and 27% of ERAN patients progressed ≥5 units. Lower scores at baseline in ERAN were largely driven by reductions in JSN (ERAS 3.9 versus ERAN 1.2; P < 0.001), along with erosions (ERAS 1.9 versus ERAN 0.8; P < 0.001). RF was associated with greater progression in each cohort, but the absolute difference in mean annual rate of change for RF-positive patients was substantially higher for ERAS (RF positive 8.6 versus RF negative 5.1; P < 0.001), relative to ERAN (RF positive 2.0 versus RF negative 1.9; P = 0.855). Radiographic progression was shown to be significantly reduced between the 2 cohorts, and was associated with lower baseline damage and other factors, including changes in early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug use. The impact of RF status as a prognostic marker of clinically meaningful change in radiographic progression has markedly diminished in the context of more modern treatment. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Ruffilli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis (PsO is a chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune skin disease, associated with an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthritis occurring approximately in 30% of PsO patients. Sporadic cases of association between PsO and autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs have been reported. However, two different recent studies did not find any association between them. In patients with PsO and PsA, an association with AITD has been shown by most of the studies in adults, but not in the juvenile form. In PsA women and men, thyroid autoimmunity [positive antithyroid peroxidase (AbTPO antibodies, hypoechoic thyroid pattern] and subclinical hypothyroidism were more prevalent than in the general population. An association has been shown also in patients with PsO, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease, who have more frequently AITD. A Th1 immune predominance has been shown in early PsO, and PsA, with high serum CXCL10 (Th1 prototype chemokine, overall in the presence of autoimmune thyroiditis. This Th1 immune predominance might be the immunopathogenetic base of the association of these disorders. A raised incidence of new cases of hypothyroidism, thyroid dysfunction, positive AbTPO, and appearance of a hypoechoic thyroid pattern in PsA patients, especially in women, has been shown recently, suggesting to evaluate AbTPO levels, thyroid function, and thyroid ultrasound, especially in PsA women. Thyroid function follow-up and suitable treatments should be performed regularly in PsA female patients at high risk (thyroid-stimulating hormone within the normal range but at the higher limit, positive AbTPO, hypoechoic, and small thyroid.

  20. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  1. Balancing the autonomic nervous system to reduce inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F. A.; van Maanen, M. A.; Vervoordeldonk, M. J.; Tak, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    Imbalance in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been observed in many established chronic autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is a prototypic immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID). We recently discovered that autonomic dysfunction precedes and predicts arthritis

  2. Nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis mimicking orbital inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch MC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Chen Lynch,1 Andrew B Mick21Optometry Clinic, Ocala West Veterans Affairs Specialty Clinic, Ocala, FL, USA; 2Eye Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Anterior scleritis is an uncommon form of ocular inflammation, often associated with coexisting autoimmune disease. With early recognition and aggressive systemic therapy, prognosis for resolution is good. The diagnosis of underlying autoimmune disease involves a multidisciplinary approach.Case report: A 42-year-old African American female presented to the Eye Clinic at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, with a tremendously painful left eye, worse on eye movement, with marked injection of conjunctiva. There was mild swelling of the upper eyelid. Visual acuity was unaffected, but there was a mild red cap desaturation. The posterior segment was unremarkable. The initial differential diagnoses included anterior scleritis and orbital inflammatory disease. Oral steroid treatment was initiated with rapid resolution over a few days. Orbital imaging was unremarkable, and extensive laboratory work-up was positive only for antinuclear antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with idiopathic diffuse, nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis and has been followed for over 5 years without recurrence. The rheumatology clinic monitors the patient closely, as suspicion remains for potential arthralgias including human leukocyte antigen-B27-associated arthritis, lupus-associated arthritis, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and scleroderma, based on her constitutional symptoms and clinical presentation, along with a positive anti-nuclear antibody lab result.Conclusion: Untreated anterior scleritis can progress to formation of cataracts, glaucoma, uveitis, corneal melting, and posterior segment disease with significant risk of vision loss. Patients with anterior scleritis must be aggressively treated with systemic anti-inflammatories

  3. Clear associations between demographic and psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in patients with early inflammatory joint complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, G.A.; Burdorf, A.; Evers, A.W.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Objective. To identify demographic and psychosocial characteristics associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with early inflammatory joint complaints. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients had inflammatory joint complaints for less than 12 months. Data

  4. Clear associations between demographic and psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in patients with early inflammatory joint complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Geuskens (Goedele); A. Burdorf (Alex); A.W.M. Evers (Arne); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective. To identify demographic and psychosocial characteristics associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with early inflammatory joint complaints. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, patients had inflammatory joint complaints for less than 12 months.

  5. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis – impact of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dąbrowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation – the crucial pathogenic mechanism of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis – is the main cause of accelerated atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and well-known consequences related to it. The conservative treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis may provide a significant influence on glucose metabolism. The paper is a literature overview concerning insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism during treatment with disease-modifying drugs including biologic DMARDs (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, corticosteroids and commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID. It has been found that the risk of carbohydrate disorders among those patients is much lower after therapy with hydroxychloroquine, methotrexate and TNF blockers – particularly with infliximab. The NSAID may play an important protective role in reducing risk of diabetes. The recent data show, contrary to general opinion, the advantageous outcome for glucose metabolism after treatment with corticosteroids, especially in the early active stage of rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Effects of timing of prednisolone on the duration of early morning stiffness, pain and disease activity score (das-28) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, H.; Nasim, A.; Salim, B.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effects of timing of prednisolone on duration of early morning stiffness, pain score, number of swollen and tender joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and disease activity score 28 (DAS-28) in joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Study Design: It was quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in the department of rheumatology Fauji Foundation Hospital Rawalpindi over a period of 3 months, from Dec 2015 to Feb 2016. Material and Methods: Total sample size of 85 was calculated by using non probability consecutive sampling technique. Patients with established rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed on the basis of ACR 1987 criteria were included in the study. All these patients had a disease duration of minimum 6 months and were on disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs and were taking =7.5mg of prednisolone and these patients were treated with the same dose of prednisolone given in morning at 8:00 A.M. for the first 15 days followed by treatment with same single daily dose of prednisolone given at the night 10:00 P.M. for next 15 days. This study compared duration of early morning stiffness, pain scores, number of swollen and tender joints, DAS-28 and ESR on day 15th and day 30th. Results: A total of 85 patients of established rheumatoid arthritis were included in the study. All patients were female with a mean duration of disease of 7.87 +- 6.41 years. The mean age of patients was 49.39 +- 10.24 years. Mean of pain score, duration of morning stiffness, DAS-28, number of tender and swollen joint count, and ESR was decreased in patients who took prednisolone at 10:00 pm and had significant statistical difference (p-value<0.001). Conclusions: Administration of low dose of prednisolone at night has good effects on duration of early morning stiffness, pain scores, number of swollen and tender joints, ESR and DAS-28. (author)

  7. Managing Arthritis (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. As the population ages, the number of people with this condition is expected to increase dramatically. In this podcast, Dr. Jennifer Hootman discusses the importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.

  8. Are there more than cross-sectional relationships of social support and support networks with functional limitations and psychological distress in early rheumatoid arthritis? the European Research on Incapacitating Diseases and Social Support Longitudinal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demange, V.; Guillemin, F.; Suurmeijer, T.P.; Moum, T.; Doeglas, D.; Briancon, S.; van den Heuvel, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether greater social support and support network are cross-sectionally associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA); whether this association is constant over time; and whether increases in social

  9. Circulating serum interleukin-6, serum chitinase-3-like protein-1, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor are not predictive for remission and radiographic progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, C H; Dehlendorff, C; Østergaard, M

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), serum chitinase-3-like protein-1 (YKL-40), and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as measures of disease activity and predictors of clinical remission and radiographic progression in two early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) randomized...

  10. Long-Term Outcomes in Puerto Ricans with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Receiving Early Treatment with Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs using the American College of Rheumatology Definition of Early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Rosario, Noemí; Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Díaz-Correa, Leyda M; Pérez-Ríos, Naydi; Rodríguez, Noelia; Ríos, Grissel; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) results in better long-term outcomes. However, the optimal therapeutic window has not been clearly established. To determine the clinical outcome of Puerto Ricans with RA receiving early treatment with conventional and/or biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition of early RA. A cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of Puerto Ricans with RA. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, functional status, and pharmacotherapy were determined. Early treatment was defined as the initiation of DMARDs (conventional and/or biologic) in less than 6 months from the onset of symptoms attributable to RA. Patients who received early (disease duration was 14.9 years and 337 (87.0%) patients were women. One hundred and twenty one (31.3%) patients received early treatment. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex, early treatment was associated with better functional status, lower probability of joint deformities, intra-articular injections and joint replacement surgeries, and lower scores in the physician's assessments of global health, functional impairment and physical damage of patients. Using the ACR definition of early RA, this group of patients treated with DMARDs within 6 months of disease had better long-term outcomes with less physical damage and functional impairment.

  11. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Protective effects of methanolic extract of Adhatoda vasica Nees leaf in collagen-induced arthritis by modulation of synovial toll-like receptor-2 expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Adhikary

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RA associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation has been a major health problem among the population worldwide. In this study protective effect of methanolic extract of Adhatoda vasica leaf (AVE was evaluated on Collagen-induced arthritis in male Swiss albino mice. Post oral administration of AVE at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight doses decreased the arthritic index and footpad swelling. AVE administration diminished pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum and synovial tissues. Reduced chemokines and neutrophil infiltration in synovial tissues after AVE administration dictated its protective effect against RA. Decreased LPO content and SOD activity along with concomitant rise in GSH and CAT activities from liver, spleen and synovial tissues indicated regulation of oxidative stress by AVE. In addition decreased CRP in serum along with suppressed TLR-2 expression in CIA mice after AVE treatment was also observed. Protective effect of AVE in RA is further supported from histopathological studies which showed improvement during bone damage. In conclusion this study demonstrated A. vasica is capable of regulating oxidative stress during CIA and therefore down regulated local and systemic release of pro-inflammatory mediators, which might be linked to mechanism of decreasing synovial TLR-2 expression via downregulating release of its regular endogenous ligands like CRP.

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of two varieties of pumpkin seed oil in an adjuvant arthritis model in rats; Actividad antiinflamatoria de dos variedades de aceite de semillas de calabaza en un modelo de artritis adyuvante en ratas.

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    Al-Okbi, S.Y.; Mohamed, D.A.; Kandil, E.; Abo-Zeid, M.A.; Mohammed, S.E.; Ahmed, E.K.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of pumpkin seed oils (PSOs) of an Egyptian and European variety, in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. Edema thickness, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined as inflammatory biomarkers while malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were assessed as indicative of oxidative stress. Chromosomal aberration, sperm shape abnormalities, and DNA fragmentations are cytogenetic parameters which aid in tracing inflammatory and oxidative activity. Phenolic contents and β-carotene were determined in PSOs. The results showed elevated ESR, plasma TNF-α, plasma MDA, liver cellular DNA fragmentation, bone marrow chromosomal aberration, sperm shape abnormalities with a reduction in plasma TAC and body weight gain in an adjuvant arthritis control compared to a healthy control. Administration of low and high doses of either Egyptian or European PSO improved all the aforementioned parameters with variable degrees. [Spanish] El objetivo de la presente investigación fue evaluar la actividad antiinflamatoria de aceites de calabaza (PSOs) de variedades egipcia y europea, en un modelo de rata con artritis adyuvante. El espesor del edema, el factor de necrosis tumoral (TNF-α) y la velocidad de sedimentación eritrocitaria (ESR) se determinaron como biomarcadores inflamatorios, mientras que el malondialdehído (MDA) y la capacidad antioxidante total (TAC) fueron evaluados como indicativos de estrés oxidativo. La aberración cromosómica, las anomalías de la forma del esperma y las fragmentaciones del ADN son parámetros citogenéticos que ayudan a localizar la actividad inflamatoria y oxidativa. Se determinaron contenidos fenólicos y β-caroteno en PSOs. Los resultados mostraron elevado ESR, TNF-α plasmático, MDA plasmática, fragmentación del ADN del hígado, aberración cromosómica de la médula ósea, anomalías de la forma

  14. Application of nanophotosensitizers (aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles) for early diagnosis and prevention of inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, J. O.; Makarov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with a possibility of new types of photosensitizers application - Aluminum Phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in clinical practice for diagnosis, prevention and therapy of inflammatory diseases in dentistry and traumatology. It was detected that the aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) fluoresces in the nanoparticle form in the presence of pathologic microflora or inflammation process. It will make possible to detect the local accumulation of pathological microflora on the enamel surface and also for diagnostics and treatment of inflammatory diseases. Experimental studies of interaction of NP-AlPc with tooth enamel and with biological joint tissue at arthrosis are presented.

  15. Application of nanophotosensitizers (aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles) for early diagnosis and prevention of inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, J O; Makarov, V I

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a possibility of new types of photosensitizers application - Aluminum Phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in clinical practice for diagnosis, prevention and therapy of inflammatory diseases in dentistry and traumatology. It was detected that the aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) fluoresces in the nanoparticle form in the presence of pathologic microflora or inflammation process. It will make possible to detect the local accumulation of pathological microflora on the enamel surface and also for diagnostics and treatment of inflammatory diseases. Experimental studies of interaction of NP-AlPc with tooth enamel and with biological joint tissue at arthrosis are presented. (paper)

  16. Relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and the early postpartum period: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William; Steiner, Meir; Coote, Marg; Frey, Benicio N

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal depressive symptoms often co-occur with other inflammatory morbidities of pregnancy. The goals of our study were 1) to examine whether changes in inflammatory markers from the third trimester of pregnancy to 12 weeks postpartum were associated with changes in depressive symptoms; 2) to examine whether third trimester inflammatory markers alone were predictive of postpartum depressive symptoms; and 3) to examine the relationship between inflammatory markers and depressive symptoms during the third trimester of pregnancy and at 12 weeks postpartum. Thirty-three healthy pregnant women were recruited from the Women's Health Concerns Clinic at St. Joseph's Healthcare in Hamilton, Canada. The impact of depressive symptoms on the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) at the third trimester of pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, and across time was assessed using linear and mixed-model regression. Regression analysis revealed no significant association between depressive symptoms and any of the candidate biomarkers during pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, or over time. Pregnancy depressive symptoms (p > 0.001), IL-6 (p = 0.025), and IL-10 (p = 0.006) were significant predictors of postpartum Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score. Our study supports previous reports from the literature showing no rela